Sample records for cardiovascular society guidelines

  1. 2014 focused update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Atul; Cairns, John A; Mitchell, L Brent; Macle, Laurent; Stiell, Ian G; Gladstone, David; McMurtry, Michael Sean; Connolly, Stuart; Cox, Jafna L; Dorian, Paul; Ivers, Noah; Leblanc, Kori; Nattel, Stanley; Healey, Jeff S

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common clinical problem with an important population morbidity and mortality burden. The management of AF is complex and fraught with many uncertain and contentious issues, which are being addressed by extensive ongoing basic and clinical research. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF Guidelines Committee produced an extensive set of evidence-based AF management guidelines in 2010 and updated them in the areas of anticoagulation and rate/rhythm control in 2012. In late 2013, the committee judged that sufficient new information regarding AF management had become available since 2012 to warrant an update to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF Guidelines. After extensive evaluation of the new evidence, the committee has updated the guidelines for: (1) stroke prevention principles; (2) anticoagulation of AF patients with chronic kidney disease; (3) detection of AF in patients with stroke; (4) investigation and management of subclinical AF; (5) left atrial appendage closure in stroke prevention; (6) emergency department management of AF; (7) periprocedural anticoagulation management; and (8) rate and rhythm control including catheter ablation. This report presents the details of the updated recommendations, along with their background and rationale. In addition, a complete set of presently applicable recommendations, those that have been updated and those that remain in force from previous guideline versions, is provided in the Supplementary Material. PMID:25262857

  2. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Jeong A; Na, Jin Oh; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology. PMID:25469078

  3. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Jeong A; Na, Jin Oh; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology. PMID:25469139

  4. The use of antiplatelet therapy in the outpatient setting: Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alan D; Roussin, André; Cartier, Raymond; Chan, Wee Shian; Douketis, James D; Gupta, Anil; Kraw, Maria E; Lindsay, Thomas F; Love, Michael P; Pannu, Neesh; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Teal, Philip; Théroux, Pierre; Turpie, A Graham; Welsh, Robert C; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Antiplatelet agents are a cornerstone of therapy for patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease. There is presently a lack of comprehensive guidelines focusing on the use of antiplatelet drugs in patients currently manifesting or at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. The Canadian Antiplatelet Therapy Guidelines Committee reviewed existing disease-based guidelines and subsequently published literature and used expert opinion and review to develop guidelines on the use of antiplatelet therapy in the outpatient setting. This Executive Summary provides an abbreviated version of the principal recommendations. Antiplatelet therapy appears to be generally underused, perhaps in part because of a lack of clear, evidence-based guidance. Here, we provide specific guidelines for secondary prevention in patients discharged from hospital after acute coronary syndromes, percutaneous coronary intervention, or coronary artery bypass grafting; patients with a history of transient cerebral ischemic events or strokes; and patients with peripheral arterial disease. Issues related to primary prevention are also addressed, in addition to special clinical contexts such as diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, pregnancy or lactation, and perioperative management. Recommendations are provided regarding pharmacologic interactions that may occur during combination therapy with warfarin, clopidogrel, and proton-pump inhibitors, or aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as well as for the management of bleeding complications. The complete guidelines document is published as a supplementary issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology and is available at http://www.ccs.ca/. PMID:21459270

  5. The use of antiplatelet therapy in the outpatient setting: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alan D; Roussin, André; Cartier, Raymond; Chan, Wee Shian; Douketis, James D; Gupta, Anil; Kraw, Maria E; Lindsay, Thomas F; Love, Michael P; Pannu, Neesh; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Teal, Philip; Théroux, Pierre; Turpie, Alexander G G; Welsh, Robert C; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Antiplatelet agents are a cornerstone of therapy for patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease. There is presently a lack of comprehensive guidelines focusing on the use of antiplatelet drugs in patients currently manifesting or at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. The Canadian Antiplatelet Therapy Guidelines Committee reviewed existing disease-based guidelines and subsequently published literature and used expert opinion and review to develop guidelines on the use of antiplatelet therapy in the outpatient setting. This full document has been summarized in an Executive Summary published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology and may be found at http://www.ccs.ca/. Antiplatelet therapy appears to be generally underused, perhaps in part because of a lack of clear, evidence-based guidance. Here, we provide specific guidelines for secondary prevention in patients discharged from hospital following acute coronary syndromes, post-percutaneous coronary intervention, post-coronary artery bypass grafting, patients with a history of transient cerebral ischemic events or strokes, and patients with peripheral arterial disease. Issues related to primary prevention are also addressed, in addition to special clinical contexts such as diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, pregnancy/lactation, and perioperative management. Recommendations are provided regarding pharmacologic interactions that may occur during combination therapy with warfarin, clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors, or acetylsalicylic acid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as well as for the management of bleeding complications. PMID:21640290

  6. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-01-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging. PMID:20931289

  7. The 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Focus Update: anemia, biomarkers, and recent therapeutic trial implications.

    PubMed

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Lepage, Serge; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Koshman, Sheri L; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Chan, Michael; De, Sabe; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides discussion on the management recommendations on 3 focused areas: (1) anemia; (2) biomarkers, especially natriuretic peptides; and (3) clinical trials that might change practice in the management of patients with heart failure. First, all patients with heart failure and anemia should be investigated for reversible causes of anemia. Second, patients with chronic stable heart failure should undergo natriuretic peptide testing. Third, considerations should be given to treat selected patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist and to treat patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction with an angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor, when the drug is approved. As with updates in previous years, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2014 Update includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers to best manage patients with heart failure. PMID:25532421

  8. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management. Differences Between the European and American Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-08-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en. PMID:25091935

  9. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en. PMID:25444651

  10. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management. Differences Between the European and American Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-14

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. PMID:25450438

  11. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. PMID:25443815

  12. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Paul F; Lougheed, Jane; Dancea, Adrian; McGillion, Michael; Barbosa, Nicole; Chan, Carol; Dillenburg, Rejane; Atallah, Joseph; Buchholz, Holger; Chant-Gambacort, Catherine; Conway, Jennifer; Gardin, Letizia; George, Kristen; Greenway, Steven; Human, Derek G; Jeewa, Aamir; Price, Jack F; Ross, Robert D; Roche, S Lucy; Ryerson, Lindsay; Soni, Reeni; Wilson, Judith; Wong, Kenny

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric heart failure (HF) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. This article presents guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis, and early medical management of HF in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The guidelines are intended to assist practitioners in office-based or emergency room practice, who encounter children with undiagnosed heart disease and symptoms of possible HF, rather than those who have already received surgical palliation. The guidelines have been developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and are accompanied by practical Recommendations for their application in the clinical setting, supplemented by online material. This work does not include Recommendations for advanced management involving ventricular assist devices, or other device therapies. PMID:24267800

  13. Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes in Patients at Metabolic Risk: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Rosenzweig; Ele Ferrannini; Scott M. Grundy; Steven M. Haffner; Robert J. Heine; Edward S. Horton; Ryuzo Kawamori

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to develop clinical practice guidelines for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients at metabolic risk. Conclusions: Healthcare providers should incorporate into their practice concrete measures to reduce the risk of developing CVD and T2DM. These include the regular screening and identifi- cation of patients at metabolic risk

  14. I guideline for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care -- Brazilian Society of Cardiology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria Margarita; Timerman, Sergio; de Oliveira, Renan Gianotto; Polastri, Thatiane Facholi; Dallan, Luis Augusto Palma; Araújo, Sebastião; Lage, Silvia Gelás; Schmidt, André; de Bernoche, Claudia San Martín; Canesin, Manoel Fernandes; Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Favarato, Maria Helena

    2013-02-01

    Despite advances related to the prevention and treatment in the past few years, many lives are lost to cardiac arrest and cardiovascular events in general in Brazil every year. Basic Life Support involves cardiovascular emergency treatment mainly in the pre-hospital environment, with emphasis on the early recognition and delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers focused on high-quality thoracic compressions and rapid defibrillation by means of the implementation of public access-to-defibrillation programs. These aspects are of the utmost importance and may make the difference on the patient's outcomes, such as on hospital survival with no permanent neurological damage. Early initiation of the Advanced Cardiology Life Support also plays an essential role by keeping the quality of thoracic compressions; adequate airway management; specific treatment for the different arrest rhythms; defibrillation; and assessment and treatment of the possible causes during all the assistance. More recently, emphasis has been given to post-resuscitation care, with the purpose of reducing mortality by means of early recognition and treatment of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Therapeutic hypothermia has provided significant improvement of neurological damage and should be performed in comatose individuals post-cardiac arrest. For physicians working in the emergency department or intensive care unit, it is extremely important to improve the treatment given to these patients by means of specific training, thus giving them the chance of higher success and of better survival rates. PMID:23503818

  15. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele, E-mail: michele.rossi@uniroma1.it [Sant’Andrea University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Iezzi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.iezzi.md@gmail.com [“Sacro Cuore” Catholic University, Radiology Department (Italy)

    2013-11-06

    PurposeThese guidelines are intended for use in assessing the standard for technical success and safety in aorto-iliac percutaneous endovascular interventions.MethodsAny recommendation contained in the text comes from the highest level and extension of literature review available to date.ResultsThe success of endovascular procedures is strictly related to an accurate planning based mainly on CT- or MR-angiography. TASC II A through C lesions have an endovascular-first option Pre-procedure ASA antiplatelet therapy is advisable in all cases. The application of stents improves the immediate hemodynamic and most likely long-term clinical results. Cumulative mean complication rate is 7.51 % according to the most relevant literature. Most of the complications can be managed by means of percutaneous techniques.ConclusionThe design and quality of devices, as well as the easy and accuracy of performing these procedures, have improved over the last decades, leading to the preferential treatment of aorto-iliac steno-obstructive disease via endovascular means, often as first-line therapy, with high technical success rate and low morbidity. This is mirrored by the decreasing number of patients undergoing surgical grafts over the last years with patency, limb salvage, and survival rates equivalent to open reconstruction.

  16. ASCI 2010 standardized practice protocol for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    These practice guidelines are recommended by the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI), the sole society in Asia designated for cardiovascular imaging, to provide a framework to healthcare providers for suggested essential elements in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations of different disease spectra. The guideline is composed of recommendations on the general technique, acquisition of some basic modules, and protocols on stress tests. The protocols for specific diseases are provided in a table format for quick reference to be easily utilized for everyday clinical CMR. PMID:20924794

  17. ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing need for standard Asian population guidelines for cardiac CT and cardiac MR due to differences in culture, healthcare system, ethnicity and disease prevalence. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, as the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a cardiac CT and cardiac MR guideline working group in order to help Asian practitioners to establish cardiac CT and cardiac MR services. In this ASCI cardiac MR appropriateness criteria report, 23 Technical Panel members representing various Asian countries were invited to rate 50 indications that can frequently be encountered in clinical practice in Asia. Indications were rated on a scale of 1–9 to be categorized into ‘appropriate’ (7–9), ‘uncertain’ (4–6), or ‘inappropriate’ (1–3). According to median scores of the 23 members, the final ratings for indications were 24 appropriate, 18 uncertain and 8 inappropriate with 22 ‘highly-agreed’ (19 appropriate and 3 inappropriate) indications. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the cardiac MR practices in many Asian countries by promoting the appropriate use of cardiac MR. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10554-010-9687-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20734234

  18. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

  19. National osteoporosis society vitamin D guideline summary.

    PubMed

    Aspray, Terry J; Bowring, Claire; Fraser, William; Gittoes, Neil; Javaid, M Kassim; Macdonald, Helen; Patel, Sanjeev; Selby, Peter; Tanna, Nuttan; Francis, Roger M

    2014-09-01

    The National Osteoporosis Society (NOS) published its document, Vitamin D and Bone Health: A Practical Clinical Guideline for Patient Management, in 2013 as a practical clinical guideline on the management of vitamin D deficiency in adult patients with, or at risk of developing, bone disease. There has been no clear consensus in the UK on vitamin D deficiency its assessment and treatment, and clinical practice is inconsistent. This guideline is aimed at clinicians, including doctors, nurses and dieticians. It recommends the measurement of serum 25 (OH) vitamin D (25OHD) to estimate vitamin D status in the following clinical scenarios: bone diseases that may be improved with vitamin D treatment; bone diseases, prior to specific treatment where correcting vitamin D deficiency is appropriate; musculoskeletal symptoms that could be attributed to vitamin D deficiency. The guideline also states that routine vitamin D testing is unnecessary where vitamin D supplementation with an oral antiresorptive treatment is already planned and sets the following serum 25OHD thresholds: <30 nmol/l is deficient; 30-50 nmol/l may be inadequate in some people; >50 nmol/l is sufficient for almost the whole population. For treatment, oral vitamin D3 is recommended with fixed loading doses of oral vitamin D3 followed by regular maintenance therapy when rapid correction of vitamin D deficiency is required, although loading doses are not necessary where correction of deficiency is less urgent or when co-prescribing with an oral antiresorptive agent. For monitoring, serum calcium (adjusted for albumin) should be checked 1 month after completing a loading regimen, or after starting vitamin D supplementation, in case primary hyperparathyroidism has been unmasked. However, routine monitoring of serum 25OHD is generally unnecessary but may be appropriate in patients with symptomatic vitamin D deficiency or malabsorption and where poor compliance with medication is suspected. The guideline focuses on bone health as, although there are numerous putative effects of vitamin D on immunity modulation, cancer prevention and the risks of cardiovascular disease and multiple sclerosis, there remains considerable debate about the evaluation of extraskeletal factors and optimal vitamin D status in these circumstances. PMID:25074538

  20. Revised ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management. Implications for preoperative clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, F; Baldassarri, R; Priebe, H J

    2015-02-01

    Each year, an increasing number of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery require careful perioperative management to minimize the perioperative risk. Perioperative cardiovascular complications are the strongest predictors of morbidity and mortality after major non-cardiac surgery. A Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) has recently published revised Guidelines on the perioperative cardiovascular management of patients scheduled to undergo non-cardiac surgery, which represent the official position of the ESC and ESA on various aspects of perioperative cardiac care. According to the Guidelines effective perioperative cardiac management includes preoperative risk stratification based on preoperative assessment of functional capacity, type of surgery, cardiac risk factors, and cardiovascular function. The ESC/ESA Guidelines discourage indiscriminate routine preoperative cardiac testing, because it is time- and cost-consuming, resource-limiting, and does not improve perioperative outcome. They rather emphasize the importance of individualized preoperative cardiac evaluation and the cooperation between anesthesiologists and cardiologists. We summarize the relevant changes of the 2014 Guidelines as compared to the previous ones, with particular emphasis on preoperative cardiac testing. PMID:25384693

  1. [Civilization stress, cardiovascular risk, evidence-based medicine, guidelines].

    PubMed

    Simon, Kornél

    2009-05-10

    Cardiovascular diseases have the pole-position on the list of morbidity and mortality statistics. Despite the great advances have been made in management of cardiovascular diseases, prevalence of these disorders increases worldwide, and even younger and younger ages are threatened. This phenomenon is strongly related to obesity and type 2 diabetes pandemic, which shows an unequivocal association with expansion of modernized life-style. The pathomechanism proposed to have central role is the chronic stress induced by civilized life-conduct. The authors criticizes the everyday practice suggested for management of cardiovascular diseases, focusing on normalization of cardiovascular risk factors, instead of fighting against the primary cause ie. chronic stress. There is growing evidence, that achieving the target values defined in guide-lines will not necessarily result in improvement of patient related clinical outcomes. The statistical approach generally practiced in randomized clinical trials is primarily striving for the drug-sale, instead of discovering novel pathophysiological relations. Pharmaceutical industry having decisive role in research and patient-care is mainly interested in profit-sharing, therefore patients' interest can not be optimally realized, and costs are unnecessarily augmented. Separation of patient-, and business-oriented medical care is an ethical question of fundamental importance. PMID:19403433

  2. European Oncology Nursing Society extravasation guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wengström, Y; Margulies, A

    2008-09-01

    An infrequent, but potential complication of chemotherapy is vesicant chemotherapy extravasation. Vesicants have the potential to cause blistering and ulceration when they extravasate from the vein or are inadvertently administered into the tissue. In 2007, the European Oncology Nursing Society published guidelines for extravasation prevention, detection, and management. Recommended management includes topical heating for plant alkaloid extravasations and topical cooling for anthracycline and other antitumor antibiotic vesicants. For treatment of antracycline extravasations topical dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sodium thiosulfate, and hyaluronidase have been described in the literature but due to lack of evidence to support their use as vesicant extravasation antidotes, it is recommended that these agents are studied further. Furthermore, Savene (dexrazoxane) is the only registered drug for the treatment of antracycline extravasation. Nurses need to be aware of current evidence-based guidelines for detecting and managing vesicant extravasations and need to be prepared to administer evidence-based treatment. PMID:18765210

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure – 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:18209766

  4. NHLBI integrated pediatric guidelines: battle for a future free of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Justin P; de Ferranti, Sarah D

    2013-01-01

    The report of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents collects into one document atherosclerotic disease prevention in pediatric age groups. The guidelines summarize the evidence base and make recommendations that encourage universal adoption of healthier lifestyles, identification of children with cardiovascular disease risk factors, and treatment of those risk factors using targeted lifestyle modification and rarely pharmacotherapy. These recommendations highlight childhood as a frontier for cardiovascular disease prevention. The guideline recommendations are controversial and not universally embraced, but at the very least, they suggest directions for important research. This article explores key facets of the guidelines, controversies and future directions in preventive cardiology for children. PMID:23259472

  5. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  6. Hartford Medical Society Historical Library Guidelines for Readers

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    1 Hartford Medical Society Historical Library Guidelines for Readers to the UCHC online catalog (set limit to "HMS Historical Library"). We have a card file which you of the original will not permit it or when the originals were received with gift, purchase or legal restrictions

  7. IOM committee members respond to Endocrine Society vitamin D guideline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In early 2011, a committee convened by the Institute of Medicine issued a report on the Dietary Reference Intakes for calcium and vitamin D. The Endocrine Society Task Force in July 2011 published a guideline for the evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency. Although these repor...

  8. The U.S. prevention of cardiovascular disease guidelines and implications for implementation in LMIC.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nathan D; Moran, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease released by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association included guidelines of assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, lifestyle management, management of overweight and obesity, and treatment of blood cholesterol. In addition, there were also 2014 guidelines on hypertension management released by members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee. Taken together, these guidelines, though extensively discussed and disseminated in the United States, have not been widely recognized beyond the United States, nor have their implications been considered for lower- and middle-income developing countries. With an estimated 80% of the global burden in CVD occurring in developing countries, it is important to develop strategies to adequately detect those at increased CVD risk and to manage their risk through lifestyle and where appropriate, pharmacologic means. Though certain aspects of each guideline may be suitable for implementation globally, including in developing countries, other recommendations would be unrealistic for many countries based on local epidemiology and resources. CVD prevention priorities can be set using guidance from recently published CVD prevention guidelines if appropriately modified to the context of lower- and middle-income developing countries. Establishment of global CVD prevention standards and rapid adaptation and dissemination of clinical guidelines are of paramount importance if we are to make significant progress into achieving World Health Organization 2025 goals to reduce the burden from CVD and other noncommunicable diseases. PMID:25592799

  9. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. PMID:24602600

  10. British Thoracic Society guidelines for home oxygen use in adults.

    PubMed

    Hardinge, Maxine; Annandale, Joe; Bourne, Simon; Cooper, Brendan; Evans, Angela; Freeman, Daryl; Green, Angela; Hippolyte, Sabrine; Knowles, Vikki; MacNee, William; McDonnell, Lynn; Pye, Kathy; Suntharalingam, Jay; Vora, Vandana; Wilkinson, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) Home Oxygen Guideline provides detailed evidence-based guidance for the use of home oxygen for patients out of hospital. Although the majority of evidence comes from the use of oxygen in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the scope of the guidance includes patients with a variety of long-term respiratory illnesses and other groups in whom oxygen is currently ordered, such as those with cardiac failure, cancer and end-stage cardiorespiratory disease, terminal illness or cluster headache. It explores the evidence base for the use of different modalities of oxygen therapy and patient-related outcomes such as mortality, symptoms and quality of life. The guideline also makes recommendations for assessment and follow-up protocols, and risk assessments, particularly in the clinically challenging area of home oxygen users who smoke. The guideline development group is aware of the potential for confusion sometimes caused by the current nomenclature for different types of home oxygen, and rather than renaming them, has adopted the approach of clarifying those definitions, and in particular emphasising what is meant by long-term oxygen therapy and palliative oxygen therapy. The home oxygen guideline provides expert consensus opinion in areas where clinical evidence is lacking, and seeks to deliver improved prescribing practice, leading to improved compliance and improved patient outcomes, with consequent increased value to the health service. PMID:25870317

  11. Secondary prevention in the clinical management of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Core components, standards and outcome measures for referral and delivery: A Policy Statement from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation. Endorsed by the Committee for Practice Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Corrà, Ugo; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Benzer, Werner; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Cupples, Margaret; Dendale, Paul; Doherty, Patrick; Gaita, Dan; Höfer, Stefan; McGee, Hannah; Mendes, Miguel; Niebauer, Josef; Pogosova, Nana; Garcia-Porrero, Esteban; Rauch, Bernhard; Schmid, Jean Paul; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2014-06-01

    Despite major improvements in diagnostics and interventional therapies, cardiovascular diseases remain a major health care and socio-economic burden both in western and developing countries, in which this burden is increasing in close correlation to economic growth. Health authorities and the general population have started to recognize that the fight against these diseases can only be won if their burden is faced by increasing our investment on interventions in lifestyle changes and prevention. There is an overwhelming evidence of the efficacy of secondary prevention initiatives including cardiac rehabilitation in terms of reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, secondary prevention is still too poorly implemented in clinical practice, often only on selected populations and over a limited period of time. The development of systematic and full comprehensive preventive programmes is warranted, integrated in the organization of national health systems. Furthermore, systematic monitoring of the process of delivery and outcomes is a necessity. Cardiology and secondary prevention, including cardiac rehabilitation, have evolved almost independently of each other and although each makes a unique contribution it is now time to join forces under the banner of preventive cardiology and create a comprehensive model that optimizes long term outcomes for patients and reduces the future burden on health care services. These are the aims that the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation has foreseen to promote secondary preventive cardiology in clinical practice. PMID:22718797

  12. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future. PMID:20529367

  13. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

  14. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker; Douglas, Pamela S; Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Altus, Philip; Barnard, Denise D; Blankenship, James C; Casey, Donald E; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Gilchrist, Ian C; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lakoski, Susan G; Le, D Elizabeth; Lesser, John R; Levine, Glenn N; Mehran, Roxana; Russo, Andrea M; Sorrentino, Matthew J; Williams, Mathew R; Wong, John B; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22678595

  15. Degree of Concordance with DASH Diet Guidelines and Incidence of Hypertension and Fatal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Parker, Emily D.; Harnack, Lisa J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension advocate the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. Methods We studied whether a greater concordance with the DASH diet is associated with reduced incidence of hypertension (self-reported) and mortality from cardiovascular disease in 20,993 women initially aged 55–69. We created a DASH diet concordance score using food frequency data in 1986 and followed the women for events through 2002. Results No woman had perfect concordance with the DASH diet. Adjusted for age and energy intake, incidence of hypertension was inversely associated with the degree of concordance with the DASH diet, with hazard ratios across quintiles of 1.0, 0.91, 0.95, 0.99, and 0.87 (p trend = 0.02). There also were inverse, but not monotonic, associations between better DASH diet concordance and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, and all CVD. However, after adjustment for other risk factors, there was little evidence that any endpoint was associated with the DASH diet score. Conclusions Our results suggest that greater concordance with DASH guidelines did not have an independent long-term association with hypertension or cardiovascular mortality in this cohort. This implies that very high concordance, as achieved in the DASH trials, may be necessary to achieve the benefits of the DASH diet. PMID:17324731

  16. Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

    2013-01-01

    In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

  17. Breast MRI: guidelines from the European Society of Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, C. K.; Kinkel, K.; Boetes, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of breast MRI is to obtain a reliable evaluation of any lesion within the breast. It is currently always used as an adjunct to the standard diagnostic procedures of the breast, i.e., clinical examination, mammography and ultrasound. Whereas the sensitivity of breast MRI is usually very high, specificity—as in all breast imaging modalities—depends on many factors such as reader expertise, use of adequate techniques and composition of the patient cohorts. Since breast MRI will always yield MR-only visible questionable lesions that require an MR-guided intervention for clarification, MRI should only be offered by institutions that can also offer a MRI-guided breast biopsy or that are in close contact with a site that can perform this type of biopsy for them. Radiologists involved in breast imaging should ensure that they have a thorough knowledge of the MRI techniques that are necessary for breast imaging, that they know how to evaluate a breast MRI using the ACR BI-RADS MRI lexicon, and most important, when to perform breast MRI. This manuscript provides guidelines on the current best practice for the use of breast MRI, and the methods to be used, from the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI). PMID:18389253

  18. Difficult Airway Society guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult intubation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Henderson; M. T. Popat; I. P. Latto; A. C. Pearce

    2004-01-01

    Summary Problems with tracheal intubation are infrequent but are the most common cause of anaesthetic death or brain damage. The clinical situation is not always managed well. The Difficult Airway Society (DAS) has developed guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in the non-obstetric adult patient without upper airway obstruction. These guidelines have been developed by consensus and

  19. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debbie Saslow; Carla Boetes; Wylie Burke; Steven Harms; Martin O. Leach; Constance D. Lehman; Elizabeth Morris; Etta Pisano; Mitchell Schnall; Stephen Sener; Robert A. Smith; Ellen Warner; Martin Yaffe; Kimberly S. Andrews; Christy A. Russell

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at different defined levels of risk. Screening MRI is recommended for women with an approximately 20-25% or

  20. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: from evidence to clinical practice – position statement 2014 of Brazilian Diabetes Society

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a very well known correlation between diabetes and cardiovascular disease but many health care professionals are just concerned with glycemic control, ignoring the paramount importance of controlling other risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of serious cardiovascular diseases. This Position Statement from the Brazilian Diabetes Society was developed to promote increased awareness in relation to six crucial topics dealing with diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Glicemic Control, Cardiovascular Risk Stratification and Screening Coronary Artery Disease, Treatment of Dyslipidemia, Hypertension, Antiplatelet Therapy and Myocardial Revascularization. The issue of what would be the best algorithm for the use of statins in diabetic patients received a special attention and a new Brazilian algorithm was developed by our editorial committee. This document contains 38 recommendations which were classified by their levels of evidence (A, B, C and D). The Editorial Committee included 22 specialists with recognized expertise in diabetes and cardiology. PMID:24855495

  1. Guideline-driven telemonitoring and follow-up of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices using IEEE 11073, HL7 & IHE profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maohua Yang; Catherine E. Chronaki; Christian Lupkes; Andreas Thiel; Manuela Plosnig; Lynne Hinterbuchner; Elena Arbelo; Gokce Banu Laleci; Yildiray Kabak; Fernandez Duarte; Alejandra Guillen; Xavier Navarro; Asuman Dogac; Marco Eichelberg; Andreas Hein

    2011-01-01

    For patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs), telemonitoring promises improved quality of life and safety, since events recorded by the device or observed by the patient can alert a health professional. Taking into account the latest clinical guidelines when responding to such alerts, is a topic of active research addressed by the iCARDEA project. A key technical challenge is

  2. British Thoracic Society guideline for non-CFbronchiectasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Pasteur; D. Bilton; A. T. Hill

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis, investigation and particularly management of bronchiectasis has been largely empirical and the subject of relatively few controlled clinical trials. There are no clear guidelines, although an Australian position statement has been published concerning bronchiectasis in children. The purposes of these guidelines were therefore threefold: (1) to identify relevant studies in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis; (2) to provide guidelines

  3. FOCUS: the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists' initiative to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room.

    PubMed

    Barbeito, Atilio; Lau, William Travis; Weitzel, Nathaen; Abernathy, James H; Wahr, Joyce; Mark, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) introduced the FOCUS initiative (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) in 2005 in response to the need for a rigorous scientific approach to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR). The goal of the project, which is supported by the SCA Foundation, is to identify hazards and develop evidence-based protocols to improve cardiac surgery safety. A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse event. Specifically, the strategic plan of FOCUS includes 3 goals: (1) identifying hazards in the CVOR, (2) prioritizing hazards and developing risk-reduction interventions, and (3) disseminating these interventions. Collectively, the FOCUS initiative, through the work of several groups composed of members from different disciplines such as clinical medicine, human factors engineering, industrial psychology, and organizational sociology, has identified and documented significant hazards occurring daily in our CVORs. Some examples of frequent occurrences that contribute to reduce the safety and quality of care provided to cardiac surgery patients include deficiencies in teamwork, poor OR design, incompatible technologies, and failure to adhere to best practices. Several projects are currently under way that are aimed at better understanding these hazards and developing interventions to mitigate them. The SCA, through the FOCUS initiative, has begun this journey of science-driven improvement in quality and safety. There is a long and arduous road ahead, but one we need to continue to travel. PMID:25232690

  4. Report of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's consensus conference on the Management of the Postmyocardial Infarction Patient.

    PubMed Central

    Fallen, E L; Armstrong, P; Cairns, J; Dafoe, W; Frasure-Smith, N; Langer, A; Massel, D; Oldridge, N; Peretz, D; Tremblay, G J

    1991-01-01

    In October 1989, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society announced a program to achieve consensus on important issues in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease. This report on the management of the postmyocardial infarction patient represents the first in a series of these consensus conferences. The process for establishing consensus recommendations involved several steps. A primary panel of 11 experts from various fields was selected to review the available clinical evidence and to make a list of recommendations about management decisions in the postmyocardial infarction period. The initial report was distributed to a secondary panel of 16 reviewers* representing allied health care constituencies from across Canada. On the basis of the critical reviews and feedback from these reviewers, a revised report was distributed to all members (over 800) of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society for further review and feedback. This iterative approach resulted in a penultimate report that was presented at a plenary session of the annual scientific meeting of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society on Oct. 18, 1990, in Halifax, NS. On the basis of discussion and feedback from this symposium, the consensus review was completed. PMID:2009463

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Genest, Jacques; Hegele, Robert A; Bergeron, Jean; Brophy, James; Carpentier, Andre; Couture, Patrick; Davignon, Jean; Dufour, Robert; Frohlich, Jiri; Gaudet, Daniel; Gupta, Milan; Krisnamoorthy, Preetha; Mancini, John; McCrindle, Brian; Raggi, Paolo; Ruel, Isabelle; St-Pierre, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common genetic disorder causing premature cardiovascular disease and death. Heterozygous FH conservatively affects approximately 1:500 Canadians, and the more serious homozygous form affects approximately 1:1,000,000 Canadians, although these numbers might be underestimated. Of approximately 83,500 Canadians estimated to have FH, most are undiagnosed, which represents a simultaneous public health deficit and opportunity, because early treatment of heterozygous FH can normalize life expectancy. Diagnostic algorithms for FH incorporate increased plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, pathognomonic clinical features, and family history of early cardiovascular disease and hyperlipidemia. DNA-based detection of causative mutations in FH-related genes can help with diagnosis. Maximizing diagnosis and treatment of FH in Canada will involve a multipronged approach, including: (1) increasing awareness of FH among health care providers and patients; (2) creating a national registry for FH individuals; (3) setting standards for screening, including cascade screening in affected families; (4) ensuring availability of standard-of-care therapies, in particular optimization of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and timely access to future validated therapies; (5) promoting patient-based support and advocacy groups; and (6) forming alliances with international colleagues, resources, and initiatives that focus on FH. This document aims to raise awareness of FH nationally, and to mobilize knowledge translation, patient support, and availability of treatment and health care resources for this underrecognized, but important medical condition. PMID:25448461

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352134

  7. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352139

  8. [Opinion of the Czech Atherosclerosis Society's committee (CSAT) on the ESC/EAS guidelines related to the diagnostics and treatment of dyslipidemias issued in 2011].

    PubMed

    Soška, V; Vaverková, H; Vráblík, M; Bláha, V; Cífková, R; Freiberger, T; Kraml, P; Pi?ha, J; Rosolová, H; Stulc, T; Urbanová, Z

    2013-02-01

    This position statement of the Executive Committee of the Czech Society for Atherosclerosis (CSAT) summarizes the most important aspects and novelties of the latest European guidelines for the management of dyslipidemia. In particular the position statement comments on: cardiovascular risk stratification, indications for plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels assessment as well as target lipid values, evaluation of current options for both lifestyle and pharmacological treatment of lipid metabolism disorders and, also, recommendation for laboratory monitoring of patients treated with lipid lowering agents. The statement deals with actual concepts of management of dyslipiemia in everyday practice, e.g. therapy of dyslipidemia in special patients´ groups. This statement does not replace the latest guidelines but focuses on the changes from the former guidelines for dyslipidemia management, published by CSAT in 2007. PMID:23461401

  9. Guidelines in the Register of the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany – A Quality Improvement Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Nothacker, M. J.; Muche-Borowski, C.; Kopp, I. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) is the umbrella organization of medical scientific societies in Germany. The development of guidelines goes back to an initiative of the medical scientific societies and is coordinated by the AWMF. Rules for the inclusion of guidelines in the AWMF Guideline Register have been defined including how guidelines are classified. S1 guidelines are based only on recommendations by experts, whereas S2 guidelines require a structured consensus process or a systematic literature review. S3 guidelines include both elements. In addition to compulsory disclosure of any potential conflict of interest, transparent handling of potential conflicts of interest is an important confidence-building measure. For years, the trend has been to develop higher order (S2/S3) guidelines, and the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG) has been no exception to the trend. In addition to its responsibility for specific S2 and S3 guidelines, the DGGG is also involved in numerous other interdisciplinary guidelines. When developing a guideline, it is essential to define the guideline?s scope, identify aspects which require improvement and agree on the goals. Target groups affected by the guidelines should be involved if they are interested. Different formats (long and short versions, practical instructions, conventional or electronic decision aids, patient versions) are useful to disseminate the guideline. The guideline can be adapted to local circumstances to encourage implementation of its recommendations. Implementation can be measured using quality indicators. Feedback from practitioners is important as this highlights areas which require improvement. The medical scientific societies in Germany can look back on almost two decades of work spent on developing guidelines, most of it done by unpaid voluntary contributors, making this a very successful quality initiative. PMID:25061235

  10. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur; McCord, Seth

    2013-09-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several factors related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each factor according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. PMID:23827829

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. PMID:25498265

  12. [Auditory processing disorders--differential diagnosis. Guidelines of the German Society for Phoniatry and Pedaudiology].

    PubMed

    Nickisch, A; Schönweiler, R

    2011-04-01

    One prerequisite of diagnosing an auditory processing disorder (APD) is the differential diagnostic exclusion of language comprehension disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, cognitive impairment, as well as autistic-type diseases. This issue is discussed in detail in the updated guidelines for APD, as well as the logical consequences resulting thereof in terms of interpreting individual test results. This update is based in terms of content on the preceding guidelines of the German Society for Phoniatry and Pedaudiology (DGPP) and aligns itself closely with the Californian Speech-Language-Hearing Association, as well as guidelines of the American Academy of Audiology. PMID:21647834

  13. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-03-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:24462332

  14. Management guidelines in essential hypertension: report of the second working party of the British Hypertension Society

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Sever; G Beevers; C Bulpitt; A Lever; L Ramsay; J Reid; J Swales

    1993-01-01

    Several important new issues have arisen in the management of patients with hypertension. A working party of the British Hypertension Society has therefore reviewed available intervention studies on anti-hypertensive treatment and made recommendations on blood pressure thresholds for intervention, on non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments, and on treatment goals. This report also provides guidelines on blood pressure measurement, essential investigations, referrals

  15. Saudi Oncology Society clinical management guidelines for urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Othman, Khaled; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Balaraj, Khalid; Al Otaibi, Mohamed; Kamal, Baher; Al Oraifi, Ibraheem; Al Saeed, Eyad; Al Gamdi, Khalid; Jubran, Ali; Salah, Ahmad; Al Shareef, Jalal; Zekri, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    In this report guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder is presented. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7(th) edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence. PMID:21673850

  16. Saudi Oncology Society clinical management guidelines for urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al Othman, Khaled; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Balaraj, Khalid; Al Otaibi, Mohamed; Kamal, Baher; Al Oraifi, Ibraheem; Al Saeed, Eyad; Al Gamdi, Khalid; Jubran, Ali; Salah, Ahmad; Al Shareef, Jalal; Zekri, Jamal

    2011-01-01

    In this report guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder is presented. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence. PMID:21673850

  17. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155. PMID:25498261

  18. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

  19. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

  20. Clinical competency guidelines for pulmonary rehabilitation professionals: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Eileen G; Bauldoff, Gerene; Carlin, Brian; Crouch, Rebecca; Emery, Charles F; Garvey, Chris; Hilling, Lana; Limberg, Trina; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that interdisciplinary health care professionals providing pulmonary rehabilitation services need to have certain core competencies. This statement updates the previous clinical competency guidelines for pulmonary rehabilitation professionals, and it complements the AACVPR's Guidelines for Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programs. These competencies provide a common core of 13 professional and clinical competencies inclusive of multiple academic and clinical disciplines. The core competencies include patient assessment and management; dyspnea assessment and management; oxygen assessment, management, and titration; collaborative self-management; adherence; medication and therapeutics; non-chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases; exercise testing; exercise training; psychosocial management; tobacco cessation; emergency responses for patient and program personnel; and universal standard precautions. PMID:25098438

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Sampling in Gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Technical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, C.

    2013-01-01

    At present, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines on endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling are almost complete and express state of the art developments. However, future developments are anticipated. This editorial focuses on a few recently published papers with some additional information and on two important additional techniques, elastography and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), which are mentioned, but not explained in detail in the current ESGE guidelines. Elastography and CEUS might be of importance in the near future to improve the biopsy techniques. PMID:24949378

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling in gastroenterology: European society of gastrointestinal endoscopy technical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Jenssen, C

    2013-07-01

    At present, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines on endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling are almost complete and express state of the art developments. However, future developments are anticipated. This editorial focuses on a few recently published papers with some additional information and on two important additional techniques, elastography and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), which are mentioned, but not explained in detail in the current ESGE guidelines. Elastography and CEUS might be of importance in the near future to improve the biopsy techniques. PMID:24949378

  3. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for basic wound management in the austere environment.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Wedmore, Ian; Johnson, Eric; Islas, Arthur; Anglim, Anne; Zafren, Ken; Bitter, Cindy; Mazzorana, Vicki

    2014-09-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for wound management in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for the management of wounds sustained in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made about several parameters related to wound management. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:24931588

  4. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Opacic, Matthew; Freer, Luanne; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Cochran, Amalia; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; McDevitt, Marion; Imray, Christopher H; Johnson, Eric L; Dow, Jennifer; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite. We present a review of pertinent pathophysiology. We then discuss primary and secondary prevention measures and therapeutic management. Recommendations are made regarding each treatment and its role in management. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality according to methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2011;22(2):156-166. PMID:25498262

  5. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Eifling, Kurt P; Ellis, Mark A; Gaudio, Flavio G; Otten, Edward M; Grissom, Colin K

    2013-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the recognition, prevention, and treatment of heat-related illness. We present a review of the classifications, pathophysiology, and evidence-based guidelines for planning and preventive measures as well as best-practice recommendations for both field- and hospital-based therapeutic management of heat-related illness. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality. PMID:24140191

  6. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22578925

  7. Staging of endometrial cancer with MRI: Guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kinkel; R. Forstner; F. M. Danza; L. Oleaga; T. M. Cunha; A. Bergman; J. O. Barentsz; C. Balleyguier; B. Brkljacic; J. A. Spencer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define guidelines for endometrial cancer staging with MRI. The technique included critical\\u000a review and expert consensus of MRI protocols by the female imaging subcommittee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology,\\u000a from ten European institutions, and published literature between 1999 and 2008. The results indicated that high field MRI\\u000a should include at least

  8. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.; Azziz, Ricardo; Baskin, Laurence S.; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Hensle, Terry W.; Merke, Deborah P.; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; Miller, Walter L.; Montori, Victor M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Ritzen, Martin; White, Perrin C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We developed clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), ten additional clinicians experienced in treating CAH, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Additional experts were also consulted. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society’s CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend universal newborn screening for severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency followed by confirmatory tests. We recommend that prenatal treatment of CAH continue to be regarded as experimental. The diagnosis rests on clinical and hormonal data; genotyping is reserved for equivocal cases and genetic counseling. Glucocorticoid dosage should be minimized to avoid iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. Mineralocorticoids and, in infants, supplemental sodium are recommended in classic CAH patients. We recommend against the routine use of experimental therapies to promote growth and delay puberty; we suggest patients avoid adrenalectomy. Surgical guidelines emphasize early single-stage genital repair for severely virilized girls, performed by experienced surgeons. Clinicians should consider patients’ quality of life, consulting mental health professionals as appropriate. At the transition to adulthood, we recommend monitoring for potential complications of CAH. Finally, we recommend judicious use of medication during pregnancy and in symptomatic patients with nonclassic CAH. PMID:20823466

  9. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for basic wound management in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Wedmore, Ian; Johnson, Eric L; Islas, Arthur A; Anglim, Anne; Zafren, Ken; Bitter, Cindy; Mazzorana, Vicki

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for wound management in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for the management of wounds sustained in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made about several parameters related to wound management. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(3):295-310. PMID:25498257

  10. Guideline-driven telemonitoring and follow-up of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices using IEEE 11073, HL7 & IHE profiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maohua; Chronaki, Catherine E; Lüpkes, Christian; Thiel, Andreas; Plössnig, Manuela; Hinterbuchner, Lynne; Arbelo, Elena; Laleci, Gokce Banu; Kabak, Yildiray; Duarte, Fernandez; Guillén, Alejandra; Navarro, Xavier; Dogac, Asuman; Eichelberg, Marco; Hein, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    For patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs), telemonitoring promises improved quality of life and safety, since events recorded by the device or observed by the patient can alert a health professional. Taking into account the latest clinical guidelines when responding to such alerts, is a topic of active research addressed by the iCARDEA project. A key technical challenge is correlating telemonitoring CIED report data in a vendor-independent format with Electronic Health Record (EHR) data collected in the hospital and Personal Health Record (PHR) data entered by the patient, in guideline-driven care processes. The iCARDEA CIED exposure service component presented in this paper employs standards specifications from ISO/IEEE 11073 (Health Informatics, Point-of-care Medical Device Communication) and HL7v2.x in the context of Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profiles to deliver telemonitoring CIED report data from two different CIED vendors to the adaptive care planner that implements guideline-driven care plans. Experience gained with implementation and initial component testing is discussed, while challenges and expectations for future health information standards to effectively support EHR-integrated guide-line-driven telemonitoring services are highlighted. PMID:22255018

  11. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Lougheed, M Diane; Lemiere, Catherine; Ducharme, Francine M; Licskai, Chris; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H; FitzGerald, Mark; Leigh, Richard; Watson, Wade; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines. METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus for the updated guideline: the role of noninvasive measurements of airway inflammation for the adjustment of anti-inflammatory therapy; the initiation of adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for uncontrolled asthma; the role of a single inhaler of an ICS/long-acting beta2-agonist combination as a reliever, and as a reliever and a controller; and the escalation of controller medication for acute loss of asthma control as part of a self-management action plan. The expert panel followed an adaptation process to identify and appraise existing guidelines on the specified topics. In addition, literature searches were performed to identify relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. The panel formally assessed and graded the evidence, and made 34 recommendations. RESULTS: The updated guideline recommendations outline a role for inclusion of assessment of sputum eosinophils, in addition to standard measures of asthma control, to guide adjustment of controller therapy in adults with moderate to severe asthma. Appraisal of the evidence regarding which adjunct controller therapy to add to ICS and at what ICS dose to begin adjunct therapy in children and adults with poor asthma control supported the 2010 CTS Consensus Summary recommendations. New recommendations for the adjustment of controller medication within written action plans are provided. Finally, priority areas for future research were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The present clinical practice guideline is the first update of the CTS Asthma Guidelines following the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee’s new guideline development process. Tools and strategies to support guideline implementation will be developed and the CTS will continue to regularly provide updates reflecting new evidence. PMID:22536582

  12. Study report on guidelines and test procedures for investigating stability of nonlinear cardiovascular control system models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A general study of the stability of nonlinear as compared to linear control systems is presented. The analysis is general and, therefore, applies to other types of nonlinear biological control systems as well as the cardiovascular control system models. Both inherent and numerical stability are discussed for corresponding analytical and graphic methods and numerical methods.

  13. Microvolt T-wave alternans physiological basis, methods of measurement, and clinical utility--consensus guideline by International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Richard L; Klingenheben, Thomas; Malik, Marek; El-Sherif, Nabil; Exner, Derek V; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Ikeda, Takanori; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Nieminen, Tuomo; Rosenbaum, David S

    2011-09-20

    This consensus guideline was prepared on behalf of the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology and is cosponsored by the Japanese Circulation Society, the Computers in Cardiology Working Group on e-Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology, and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society. It discusses the electrocardiographic phenomenon of T-wave alternans (TWA) (i.e., a beat-to-beat alternation in the morphology and amplitude of the ST-segment or T-wave). This statement focuses on its physiological basis and measurement technologies and its clinical utility in stratifying risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Signal processing techniques including the frequency-domain Spectral Method and the time-domain Modified Moving Average method have demonstrated the utility of TWA in arrhythmia risk stratification in prospective studies in >12,000 patients. The majority of exercise-based studies using both methods have reported high relative risks for cardiovascular mortality and for sudden cardiac death in patients with preserved as well as depressed left ventricular ejection fraction. Studies with ambulatory electrocardiogram-based TWA analysis with Modified Moving Average method have yielded significant predictive capacity. However, negative studies with the Spectral Method have also appeared, including 2 interventional studies in patients with implantable defibrillators. Meta-analyses have been performed to gain insights into this issue. Frontiers of TWA research include use in arrhythmia risk stratification of individuals with preserved ejection fraction, improvements in predictivity with quantitative analysis, and utility in guiding medical as well as device-based therapy. Overall, although TWA appears to be a useful marker of risk for arrhythmic and cardiovascular death, there is as yet no definitive evidence that it can guide therapy. PMID:21920259

  14. Updated Society for Vascular Surgery guidelines for management of extracranial carotid disease: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Ricotta, John J; Aburahma, Ali; Ascher, Enrico; Eskandari, Mark; Faries, Peter; Lal, Brajesh K

    2011-09-01

    In 2008, the Society for Vascular Surgery published guidelines for the treatment of carotid bifurcation stenosis. Since that time, a number of prospective randomized trials have been completed and have shed additional light on the best treatment of extracranial carotid disease. This has prompted the Society for Vascular Surgery to form a committee to update and expand guidelines in this area. The review was done using the GRADE methodology.[corrected] The perioperative risk of stroke and death in asymptomatic patients must be below 3% to ensure benefit for the patient. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) should be reserved for symptomatic patients with stenosis 50% to 99% at high risk for CEA for anatomic or medical reasons. CAS is not recommended for asymptomatic patients at this time. Asymptomatic patients at high risk for intervention or with <3 years life expectancy should be considered for medical management as first line therapy. In this Executive Summary, we only outline the specifics of the recommendations made in the six areas evaluated. The full text of these guidelines can be found on the on-line version of the Journal of Vascular Surgery at http://journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/ymva. PMID:21889705

  15. Standardized image interpretation and post processing in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Post Processing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With mounting data on its accuracy and prognostic value, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming an increasingly important diagnostic tool with growing utility in clinical routine. Given its versatility and wide range of quantitative parameters, however, agreement on specific standards for the interpretation and post-processing of CMR studies is required to ensure consistent quality and reproducibility of CMR reports. This document addresses this need by providing consensus recommendations developed by the Task Force for Post Processing of the Society for Cardiovascular MR (SCMR). The aim of the task force is to recommend requirements and standards for image interpretation and post processing enabling qualitative and quantitative evaluation of CMR images. Furthermore, pitfalls of CMR image analysis are discussed where appropriate. PMID:23634753

  16. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  17. Performance of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines for dyspepsia in Saudi population: Prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Nahla A; Almadi, Majid A; Alamar, Hessah Hamad; Almalki, Lamis Atyah; Alrashedi, Rehab Nawaf; Alghamdi, Rawabi Saleh; Al-hamoudi, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate adherence of primary care physicians (PCPs) to international guidelines when referring patients for upper-gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE), evaluate the importance of alarm symptoms and the performance of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines in a Saudi population. METHODS: A prospective, observational cross-sectional study on dyspeptic patients undergoing UGE who were referred by PCPs over a 4 mo period. Referrals were classified as appropriate or inappropriate according to adherence to ASGE guidelines. RESULTS: Total of 221 dyspeptic patients was enrolled; 161 patients met our inclusion criteria. Mean age was 40.3 years (SD ± 18.1). Females comprised 70.1%. Alarm symptoms included low hemoglobin level (39%), weight loss (18%), vomiting (16%), loss of appetite (16%), difficulty swallowing (3%), and gastrointestinal bleeding (3%). Abnormal endoscopy findings included gastritis (52%), duodenitis (10%), hiatus hernia (7.8%), features suggestive of celiac disease (6.5%), ulcers (3.9%), malignancy (2.6%) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: 17%). Among patients who underwent UGE, 63% met ASGE guidelines, and 50% had abnormal endoscopic findings. Endoscopy was not indicated in remaining 37% of patients. Among the latter group, endoscopy was normal in 54% of patients. There was no difference in proportion of abnormal endoscopic findings between two groups (P = 0.639). CONCLUSION: Dyspeptic patients had a low prevalence of important endoscopic lesions, and none of the alarm symptoms could significantly predict abnormal endoscopic findings. PMID:25605988

  18. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, William R.; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B.; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:25191516

  19. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. This is an updated version of the original Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for the Out-of-Hospital Evaluation and Treatment of Accidental Hypothermia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(4):425-445. PMID:25498264

  20. Cardiovascular risk assessment in low-resource settings: a consensus document of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk in Low Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Modesti, Pietro A.; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Agyemang, Charles; Basu, Sanjay; Benetos, Athanase; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Ceriello, Antonio; Del Prato, Stefano; Kalyesubula, Robert; O’Brien, Eoin; Kilama, Michael O.; Perlini, Stefano; Picano, Eugenio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Stuckler, David; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Van Bortel, Luc M.; Watfa, Ghassan; Zhao, Dong; Parati, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 confirms ischemic heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death and that hypertension is the main associated risk factor worldwide. How best to respond to the rising prevalence of hypertension in resource-deprived settings is a topic of ongoing public-health debate and discussion. In low-income and middle-income countries, socioeconomic inequality and cultural factors play a role both in the development of risk factors and in the access to care. In Europe, cultural barriers and poor communication between health systems and migrants may limit migrants from receiving appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To use more efficiently resources available and to make treatment cost-effective at the patient level, cardiovascular risk approach is now recommended. In 2011, The European Society of Hypertension established a Working Group on ‘Hypertension and Cardiovascular risk in low resource settings’, which brought together cardiologists, diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical trialists, epidemiologists, economists, and other stakeholders to review current strategies for cardiovascular risk assessment in population studies in low-income and middle-income countries, their limitations, possible improvements, and future interests in screening programs. This report summarizes current evidence and presents highlights of unmet needs. PMID:24577410

  1. Cardiovascular risk assessment in low-resource settings: a consensus document of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk in Low Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Modesti, Pietro A; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Agyemang, Charles; Basu, Sanjay; Benetos, Athanase; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Ceriello, Antonio; Del Prato, Stefano; Kalyesubula, Robert; O'Brien, Eoin; Kilama, Michael O; Perlini, Stefano; Picano, Eugenio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Stuckler, David; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Van Bortel, Luc M; Watfa, Ghassan; Zhao, Dong; Parati, Gianfranco

    2014-05-01

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 confirms ischemic heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death and that hypertension is the main associated risk factor worldwide. How best to respond to the rising prevalence of hypertension in resource-deprived settings is a topic of ongoing public-health debate and discussion. In low-income and middle-income countries, socioeconomic inequality and cultural factors play a role both in the development of risk factors and in the access to care. In Europe, cultural barriers and poor communication between health systems and migrants may limit migrants from receiving appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To use more efficiently resources available and to make treatment cost-effective at the patient level, cardiovascular risk approach is now recommended. In 2011, The European Society of Hypertension established a Working Group on 'Hypertension and Cardiovascular risk in low resource settings', which brought together cardiologists, diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical trialists, epidemiologists, economists, and other stakeholders to review current strategies for cardiovascular risk assessment in population studies in low-income and middle-income countries, their limitations, possible improvements, and future interests in screening programs. This report summarizes current evidence and presents highlights of unmet needs. PMID:24577410

  2. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  3. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. PMID:25443771

  4. [Development and implementation of the dementia guideline of the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine].

    PubMed

    Vollmar, Horst Christian; Abholz, Heinz-Harald; Egidi, Günther; Mand, Peter; Butzlaff, Martin E; Wilm, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The evidence-based guidelines of the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine (DEGAM) are developed according to an established ten-stage plan. The twelfth guideline addresses the health care problem of dementia. The main focus is the sensitive handling of patients and their relatives, e.g., although the goal is an early diagnosis, patients should also be protected against overdiagnosis. The treatment of Alzheimer's disease consists of three components: optimal care and supervision, the use of nondrug therapy, and a critically weighed administration of medications. The successful implementation of the guideline should be achieved by a multimodal strategy. This includes not only the direct integration of general practitioners (GPs) in developing the guideline, but also a comprehensive publication offensive, a wide use in training sessions including new media, the testing of complex implementation approaches in trials, and the use of the guideline in the context of GP contracts. PMID:20127438

  5. 2015 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology and the Taiwan Hypertension Society for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Chung-Yin; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chao, Chia-Lun; Liu, Ping-Yen; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Li, Yi-Heng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Chen, Wen-Jone; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2015-01-01

    It has been almost 5 years since the publication of the 2010 hypertension guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology (TSOC). There is new evidence regarding the management of hypertension, including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized trials, post-hoc analyses, subgroup analyses, retrospective studies, cohort studies, and registries. More recently, the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published joint hypertension guidelines in 2013. The panel members who were appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC) also published the 2014 JNC report. Blood pressure (BP) targets have been changed; in particular, such targets have been loosened in high risk patients. The Executive Board members of TSOC and the Taiwan Hypertension Society (THS) aimed to review updated information about the management of hypertension to publish an updated hypertension guideline in Taiwan. We recognized that hypertension is the most important risk factor for global disease burden. Management of hypertension is especially important in Asia where the prevalence rate grows faster than other parts of the world. In most countries in East Asia, stroke surpassed coronary heart disease (CHD) in causing premature death. A diagnostic algorithm was proposed, emphasizing the importance of home BP monitoring and ambulatory BP monitoring for better detection of night time hypertension, early morning hypertension, white-coat hypertension, and masked hypertension. We disagreed with the ESH/ESH joint hypertension guidelines suggestion to loosen BP targets to <140/90 mmHg for all patients. We strongly disagree with the suggestion by the 2014 JNC report to raise the BP target to <150/90 mmHg for patients between 60-80 years of age. For patients with diabetes, CHD, chronic kidney disease who have proteinuria, and those who are receiving antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention, we propose BP targets of <130/80 mmHg in our guidelines. BP targets are <140/90 mmHg for all other patient groups, except for patients ?80 years of age in whom a BP target of <150/90 mmHg would be optimal. For the management of hypertension, we proposed a treatment algorithm, starting with life style modification (LSM) including S-ABCDE (Sodium restriction, Alcohol limitation, Body weight reduction, Cigarette smoke cessation, Diet adaptation, and Exercise adoption). We emphasized a low-salt strategy instead of a no-salt strategy, and that excessively aggressive sodium restriction to <2.0 gram/day may be harmful. When drug therapy is considered, a strategy called "PROCEED" was suggested (Previous experience, Risk factors, Organ damage, Contraindications or unfavorable conditions, Expert's or doctor's judgment, Expenses or cost, and Delivery and compliance issue). To predict drug effects in lowering BP, we proposed the "Rule of 10" and "Rule of 5". With a standard dose of any one of the 5 major classes of anti-hypertensive agents, one can anticipate approximately a 10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (Rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (DBP) (Rule of 5). When doses of the same drug are doubled, there is only a 2-mmHg incremental decrease in SBP and a 1-mmHg incremental decrease in DBP. Preferably, when 2 drugs with different mechanisms are to be taken together, the decrease in BP is the sum of the decrease of the individual agents (approximately 20 mmHg in SBP and 10 mmHg in DBP). Early combination therapy, especially single-pill combination (SPC), is recommended. When patient's initial treatment cannot get BP to targeted goals, we have proposed an adjustment algorithm, "AT GOALs" (Adherence, Timing of administration, Greater doses, Other classes of drugs, Alternative combination or SPC, and LSM + Laboratory tests). Treatment of hypertension in special conditions, including treatment of resistant hypertension, hypertension in women, and perioperative management of hypertension, were also mentioned. The TSOC/THS hypertension guidelines pro

  6. Primary Care Guidelines for the Management of Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Recommendations of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Anderson; Patricia Emmanuel; Judith S. Currier; Valerie E. Stone; Jonathan E. Kaplan

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were prepared by an expert panel of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those published in 2004. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for HIV-infected patients or patients who may be at

  7. European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Consensus Guidelines on Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Juliane; Olivieri, Antonella; Donaldson, Malcolm; Torresani, Toni; Krude, Heiko; van Vliet, Guy; Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Evidence: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify key articles relating to the screening, diagnosis, and management of CH. The evidence-based guidelines were developed with the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, describing both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. In the absence of sufficient evidence, conclusions were based on expert opinion. Consensus Process: Thirty-two participants drawn from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and five other major scientific societies in the field of pediatric endocrinology were allocated to working groups with assigned topics and specific questions. Each group searched the literature, evaluated the evidence, and developed a draft document. These papers were debated and finalized by each group before presentation to the full assembly for further discussion and agreement. Recommendations: The recommendations include: worldwide neonatal screening, approaches to assess the cause (including genotyping) and the severity of the disorder, the immediate initiation of appropriate L-T4 supplementation and frequent monitoring to ensure dose adjustments to keep thyroid hormone levels in the target ranges, a trial of treatment in patients suspected of transient CH, regular assessments of developmental and neurosensory functions, consulting health professionals as appropriate, and education about CH. The harmonization of diagnosis, management, and routine health surveillance would not only optimize patient outcomes, but should also facilitate epidemiological studies of the disorder. Individuals with CH require monitoring throughout their lives, particularly during early childhood and pregnancy. PMID:24446653

  8. The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care and European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Fulbrook; Jos Latour; John Albarran; Wouter de Graaf; Fiona Lynch; Denis Devictor; Tone Norekvål

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, and the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

  9. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-09-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:23590928

  10. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, J. A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [AMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, M. J. [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology (Ireland); Belli, A. M. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Barkhof, F. [MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a putative new theory that has been suggested by some to have a direct causative relation with the symptomatology associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). The core foundation of this theory is that there is abnormal venous drainage from the brain due to outflow obstruction in the draining jugular vein and/or azygos veins. This abnormal venous drainage, which is characterised by special ultrasound criteria, called the 'venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score' (VHISS), is said to cause intracerebral flow disturbance or outflow problems that lead to periventricular deposits. In the CCSVI theory, these deposits have a great similarity to the iron deposits seen around the veins in the legs in patients with chronic deep vein thrombosis. Zamboni, who first described this new theory, has promoted balloon dilatation to treat the outflow problems, thereby curing CCSVI and by the same token alleviating MS complaints. However, this theory does not fit into the existing bulk of scientific data concerning the pathophysiology of MS. In contrast, there is increasing worldwide acceptance of CCSVI and the associated balloon dilatation treatment, even though there is no supporting scientific evidence. Furthermore, most of the information we have comes from one source only. The treatment is called 'liberation treatment,' and the results of the treatment can be watched on YouTube. There are well-documented testimonies by MS patients who have gained improvement in their personal quality of life (QOL) after treatment. However, there are no data available from patients who underwent unsuccessful treatments with which to obtain a more balanced view. The current forum for the reporting of success in treating CCSVI and thus MS seems to be the Internet. At the CIRCE office and the MS Centre in Amsterdam, we receive approximately 10 to 20 inquiries a month about this treatment. In addition, many interventional radiologists, who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  11. Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines for atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities: Management of asymptomatic disease and claudication.

    PubMed

    Conte, Michael S; Pomposelli, Frank B; Clair, Daniel G; Geraghty, Patrick J; McKinsey, James F; Mills, Joseph L; Moneta, Gregory L; Murad, M Hassan; Powell, Richard J; Reed, Amy B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) continues to grow in global prevalence and consumes an increasing amount of resources in the United States health care system. Overall rates of intervention for PAD have been rising steadily in recent years. Changing demographics, evolution of technologies, and an expanding database of outcomes studies are primary forces influencing clinical decision making in PAD. The management of PAD is multidisciplinary, involving primary care physicians and vascular specialists with varying expertise in diagnostic and treatment modalities. PAD represents a broad spectrum of disease from asymptomatic through severe limb ischemia. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Practice Guidelines committee reviewed the evidence supporting clinical care in the treatment of asymptomatic PAD and intermittent claudication (IC). The committee made specific practice recommendations using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. There are limited Level I data available for many of the critical questions in the field, demonstrating the urgent need for comparative effectiveness research in PAD. Emphasis is placed on risk factor modification, medical therapies, and broader use of exercise programs to improve cardiovascular health and functional performance. Screening for PAD appears of unproven benefit at present. Revascularization for IC is an appropriate therapy for selected patients with disabling symptoms, after a careful risk-benefit analysis. Treatment should be individualized based on comorbid conditions, degree of functional impairment, and anatomic factors. Invasive treatments for IC should provide predictable functional improvements with reasonable durability. A minimum threshold of a >50% likelihood of sustained efficacy for at least 2 years is suggested as a benchmark. Anatomic patency (freedom from restenosis) is considered a prerequisite for sustained efficacy of revascularization in IC. Endovascular approaches are favored for most candidates with aortoiliac disease and for selected patients with femoropopliteal disease in whom anatomic durability is expected to meet this minimum threshold. Conversely, caution is warranted in the use of interventions for IC in anatomic settings where durability is limited (extensive calcification, small-caliber arteries, diffuse infrainguinal disease, poor runoff). Surgical bypass may be a preferred strategy in good-risk patients with these disease patterns or in those with prior endovascular failures. Common femoral artery disease should be treated surgically, and saphenous vein is the preferred conduit for infrainguinal bypass grafting. Patients who undergo invasive treatments for IC should be monitored regularly in a surveillance program to record subjective improvements, assess risk factors, optimize compliance with cardioprotective medications, and monitor hemodynamic and patency status. PMID:25638515

  12. The use of imaging for electrophysiological and devices procedures: a report from the first European Heart Rhythm Association Policy Conference, jointly organized with the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), the Council of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology.

    PubMed

    Blomström Lundqvist, Carina; Auricchio, Angelo; Brugada, Josep; Boriani, Giuseppe; Bremerich, Jens; Cabrera, Jose Angel; Frank, Herbert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Heidbuchel, Hein; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Rademakers, Frank; Winkels, Gerard; Wolpert, Christian; Vardas, Panos E

    2013-07-01

    Implantations of cardiac devices therapies and ablation procedures frequently depend on accurate and reliable imaging modalities for pre-procedural assessments, intra-procedural guidance, detection of complications, and the follow-up of patients. An understanding of echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear cardiology, X-ray computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and vascular ultrasound is indispensable for cardiologists, electrophysiologists as well as radiologists, and it is currently recommended that physicians should be trained in several imaging modalities. There are, however, no current guidelines or recommendations by electrophysiologists, cardiac imaging specialists, and radiologists, on the appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging for selected patient indications, which needs to be addressed. A Policy Conference on the use of imaging in electrophysiology and device management, with representatives from different expert areas of radiology and electrophysiology and commercial developers of imaging and device technologies, was therefore jointly organized by European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), the Council of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR). The objectives were to assess the state of the level of evidence and a first step towards a consensus document for currently employed imaging techniques to guide future clinical use, to elucidate the issue of reimbursement structures and health economy, and finally to define the need for appropriate educational programmes to ensure clinical competence for electrophysiologists, imaging specialists, and radiologists. PMID:23729412

  13. ACCF/ASE/ACEP/AHA/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR 2008 appropriateness criteria for stress echocardiography: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Khandheria, Bijoy; Stainback, Raymond F; Weissman, Neil J; Peterson, Eric D; Hendel, Robert C; Stainback, Raymond F; Blaivas, Michael; Des Prez, Roger D; Gillam, Linda D; Golash, Terry; Hiratzka, Loren F; Kussmaul, William G; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Masoudi, Frederick A; Mayo, Paul H; Porembka, David; Spertus, John A; Wann, L Samuel; Wiegers, Susan E; Brindis, Ralph G; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Patel, Manesh R; Peterson, Eric D; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2008-03-18

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) together with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review for stress echocardiography. The review assessed the risks and benefits of stress echocardiography for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them on a scale of 1 to 9 (based upon methodology developed by the ACCF to assess imaging appropriateness). The upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The midrange (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the indication for a stress echocardiogram is uncertain. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Use of stress echocardiography for risk assessment in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while routine repeat testing and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:18342240

  14. ACCF/ASE/ACEP/AHA/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR 2008 Appropriateness Criteria for Stress Echocardiography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Khandheria, Bijoy; Stainback, Raymond F; Weissman, Neil J; Peterson, Eric D; Hendel, Robert C; Stainback, Raymond F; Blaivas, Michael; Des Prez, Roger D; Gillam, Linda D; Golash, Terry; Hiratzka, Loren F; Kussmaul, William G; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lindenfeld, Joann; Masoudi, Frederick A; Mayo, Paul H; Porembka, David; Spertus, John A; Wann, L Samuel; Wiegers, Susan E; Brindis, Ralph G; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Patel, Manesh R; Peterson, Eric D; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) together with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review for stress echocardiography. The review assessed the risks and benefits of stress echocardiography for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them on a scale of 1 to 9 (based upon methodology developed by the ACCF to assess imaging appropriateness). The upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The midrange (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the indication for a stress echocardiogram is uncertain. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Use of stress echocardiography for risk assessment in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while routine repeat testing and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:18314889

  15. ACCF/ASE/ACEP/AHA/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR 2008 appropriateness criteria for stress echocardiography: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Khandheria, Bijoy; Stainback, Raymond F; Weissman, Neil J; Peterson, Eric D; Hendel, Robert C; Stainback, Raymond F; Blaivas, Michael; Des Prez, Roger D; Gillam, Linda D; Golash, Terry; Hiratzka, Loren F; Kussmaul, William G; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Masoudi, Frederick A; Mayo, Paul H; Porembka, David; Spertus, John A; Wann, L Samuel; Wiegers, Susan E; Brindis, Ralph G; Douglas, Pamela S; Patel, Manesh R; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2008-03-18

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) together with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review for stress echocardiography. The review assessed the risks and benefits of stress echocardiography for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them on a scale of 1 to 9 (based upon methodology developed by the ACCF to assess imaging appropriateness). The upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The midrange (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the indication for a stress echocardiogram is uncertain. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Use of stress echocardiography for risk assessment in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while routine repeat testing and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:18316491

  16. Standardized terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Martha B.; Centeno, Barbara A.; Ali, Syed Z.; Genevay, Muriel; Stelow, Ed; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Schmidt, C. Max; Brugge, William R.; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing and post-biopsy treatment and management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussion of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology web site [www.papsociety.org]. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on a proposed standardized terminology scheme for pancreatobiliary specimens that correlate cytological diagnosis with biological behavior and increasingly conservative patient management of surveillance only. The proposed terminology scheme recommends a six-tiered system: Non-diagnostic, negative, atypical, neoplastic [benign or other], suspicious and positive. Unique to this scheme is the “neoplastic” category separated into “benign” (serous cystadenoma) or “other” (premalignant mucinous cysts, neuroendocrine tumors and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs)). The positive or malignant category is reserved for high-grade, aggressive malignancies including ductal adenocarcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, pancreatoblastoma, lymphoma and metastases. Interpretation categories do not have to be used. Some pathology laboratory information systems require an interpretation category, which places the cytological diagnosis into a general category. This proposed scheme provides terminology that standardizes the category of the various diseases of the pancreas, some of which are difficult to diagnose specifically by cytology. In addition, this terminology scheme attempts to provide maximum flexibility for patient management, which has become increasingly conservative for some neoplasms. PMID:25191517

  17. [Laparotomy closure - do we know how?(Guideline of the European Hernia Society)].

    PubMed

    East, B; Muysoms, F E

    2015-02-01

    The recurrence rate of surgical treatment of incisional hernia is high. The material and surgical technique used to close the abdominal wall following every surgery contribute as important risk factors in incisional hernia formation. However, by optimising abdominal wall closure, many patients can be spared from developing this type of complication. The European Hernia Society has established a Guidelines Development Group with a goal to research the literature and write a series of recommendations of how to close the abdomen and minimize the risk of incisional hernia in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine. To decrease the incidence of incisional hernias, the following is recommended: To utilise a non-midline approach to a laparotomy whenever possible. To perform a continuous suturing technique using a slowly absorbable monofilament suture in a single layer aponeurotic closure technique. To perform the small bites technique with a suture to wound length (SL/WL) ratio at least 4/1. Not to close the peritoneum separately. To avoid rapidly resorbable materials. To consider using a prophylactic mesh in high-risk patients. To use the smallest trocar size adequate for the procedure and closing the fascial defect if trocars larger or equal to 10 mm are used in laparoscopic surgery. Key words: incisional hernia laparotomy laparotomy closure suturing material. PMID:25659254

  18. Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has taken on an increasingly important role in the diagnostic evaluation and pre-procedural planning for patients with congenital heart disease. This article provides guidelines for the performance of CMR in children and adults with congenital heart disease. The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols. Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided. Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed. PMID:23763839

  19. The continuum of personalized cardiovascular medicine: a position paper of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Sipido, Karin R; Cowie, Martin R; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Fox, Keith A A; Katus, Hugo; Schroeder, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Priori, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    There is strong need to develop the current stratified practice of CVD management into a better personalized cardiovascular medicine, within a broad framework of global patient care. Clinical information obtained from history and physical examination, functional and imaging studies, biochemical biomarkers, genetic/epigenetic data, and pathophysiological insights into disease-driving processes need to be integrated into a new taxonomy of CVDs to allow personalized disease management. This has the potential for major health benefits for the population suffering from cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25148837

  20. Management of sepsis in neutropenia: guidelines of the infectious diseases working party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olaf Penack; Thomas Beinert; Dieter Buchheidt; Hermann Einsele; Holger Hebart; Michael G. Kiehl; Gero Massenkeil; Xaver Schiel; Jan Schleicher; Philipp B. Staber; Stefan Wilhelm; Hans-Heinrich Wolf; Helmut Ostermann

    2006-01-01

    These guidelines from the infectious diseases working party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO) give recommendations for the management of adults with neutropenia and the diagnosis of sepsis. The guidelines are written for clinicians and focus on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of sepsis. The manuscript contains evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the quality and strength

  1. Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Criteria and Society of Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) 2008 Guidelines in Non-Operative Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Krzysztof; Kozinoga, Mateusz; Stoli?ski, ?ukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    According to the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a curvature of more than 10° Cobb angle, affecting 2-3% of pediatric population. Idiopathic scoliosis accounts for 80% of all scoliosis cases. Non-operative principles in the therapy of idiopathic scoliosis, including Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) criteria and guidelines proposed by the experts of the Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORTS) were presented. The possibility to carry out quality of life assessments in a conservative procedure was also demonstrated. Based on the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis, SRS criteria, SOSORT 2008 experts' opinion and the knowledge of the possibilities of psychological assessment of conservative IS treatment, rules were proposed regarding nonsurgical IS therapy procedures, with special consideration being paid to the proper treatment start time (age, Risser test, biological maturity, Cobb angle), possibility of curvature progression, the importance of physiotherapy and psychological assessment. The knowledge of SRS criteria and SOSORT guidelines regarding the conservative treatment of IS are essential for proper treatment (the right time to start treatment), and supports establishment of interdisciplinary treatment teams, consisting of a physician, a physiotherapist, an orthopedic technician and a psychologist. PMID:25066033

  2. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Correa, Candace R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hardenbergh, Patricia H. [Shaw Regional Cancer Center, Vail, CO (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McQueen, Julie R. [Oncology Patient Navigator, Duke Raleigh Cancer Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, MI (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within {+-}7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  3. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for CKD Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a nephrologist when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2) (and for many other scenarios), but suggest urine albumin-creatinine ratio > 60mg/mmol or proteinuria with protein excretion > 1g/d as the referral threshold for proteinuria. PMID:25511161

  4. Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Søren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ? III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:25325682

  5. An Update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation (PE)

    PubMed Central

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Shindel, Alan W; Adaikan, P Ganesan; Becher, Edgardo; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne JG; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and partner, assessment, and pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments. It concluded by recognizing the continually evolving nature of clinical research and recommended a subsequent guideline review and revision every fourth year. Consistent with that recommendation, the ISSM organized a second multidisciplinary panel of experts in April 2013, which met for 2 days in Bangalore, India. This manuscript updates the previous guidelines and reports on the recommendations of the panel of experts. Aim The aim of this study was to develop clearly worded, practical, evidenced-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of PE for family practice clinicians as well as sexual medicine experts. Method A comprehensive literature review was performed. Results This article contains the report of the second ISSM PE Guidelines Committee. It offers a new unified definition of PE and updates the previous treatment recommendations. Brief assessment procedures are delineated, and validated diagnostic and treatment questionnaires are reviewed. Finally, the best practices treatment recommendations are presented to guide clinicians, both familiar and unfamiliar with PE, in facilitating treatment of their patients. Conclusion Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. We again recommend that these guidelines be reevaluated and updated by the ISSM in 4 years. Althof SE, McMahon CG, Waldinger MD, Serefoglu EC, Shindel AW, Adaikan PG, Becher E, Dean J, Giuliano F, Hellstrom WJG, Giraldi A, Glina S, Incrocci L, Jannini E, McCabe M, Parish S, Rowland D, Segraves RT, Sharlip I, and Torres LO. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE). Sex Med 2014;2:60–90. PMID:25356302

  6. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  7. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part II of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and bicuspid aortic valve disease, coarctation of the aorta, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352138

  8. Vitamin D dose response is underestimated by Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Malachi J; Murray, Barbara F

    2013-01-01

    Objective The recommended daily intakes of vitamin D according to the recent Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) of the Endocrine Society are three- to fivefold higher than the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report. We speculated that these differences could be explained by different mathematical approaches to the vitamin D dose response. Methods Studies were selected if the daily dose was ?2000?IU/day, the duration exceeded 3 months, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were measured at baseline and post-therapy. The rate constant was estimated according to the CPG approach. The achieved 25OHD result was estimated according to the following: i) the regression equation approach of the IOM; ii) the regression approach of the Vitamin D Supplementation in Older Subjects (ViDOS) study; and iii) the CPG approach using a rate constant of 2.5 (CPG2.5) and a rate constant of 5.0 (CPG5.0). The difference between the expected and the observed 25OHD result was expressed as a percentage of observed and analyzed for significance against a value of 0% for the four groups. Results Forty-one studies were analyzed. The mean (95% CI) rate constant was 5.3 (4.4–6.2) nmol/l per 100?IU per day, on average twofold higher than the CPG rate constant. The mean (95% CI) for the difference between the expected and observed expressed as a percentage of observed was as follows: i) IOM, ?7 (?16,+2)% (t=1.64, P=0.110); ii) ViDOS, +2 (?8,+12)% (t=0.40, P=0.69); iii) CPG2.5, ?21 (?27,?15)% (t=7.2, P<0.0001); and iv) CPG5.0+3 (?4,+10)% (t=0.91, P=0.366). Conclusion The CPG ‘rule of thumb’ should be doubled to 5.0?nmol/l (2.0?ng/ml) per 100?IU per day, adopting a more risk-averse position. PMID:23781324

  9. AHA Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: 2002 Update Consensus Panel Guide to Comprehensive Risk Reduction for Adult Patients Without Coronary or Other Atherosclerotic Vascular Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Pearson; Steven N. Blair; Stephen R. Daniels; Robert H. Eckel; Joan M. Fair; Stephen P. Fortmann; Barry A. Franklin; Larry B. Goldstein; Philip Greenland; Scott M. Grundy; Yuling Hong; Nancy Houston Miller; Ronald M. Lauer; Ira S. Ockene; Ralph L. Sacco; James F. Sallis; Sidney C. Smith; Neil J. Stone; Kathryn A. Taubert

    he initial Guide to the Primary Prevention of Cardiovas- cular Diseases was published in 1997 as an aid to healthcare professionals and their patients without established coronary artery disease or other atherosclerotic diseases. 1 It was intended to complement the American Heart Association (AHA)\\/American College of Cardiology (ACC) Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular

  10. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients. PMID:24355759

  11. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients. PMID:24374980

  12. Meeting Highlights of the 11th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Los Angeles, February 1–3, 2008

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper features the most interesting presentations and discussions of the 2008 Annual Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, which were held in Los Angeles from February 1 to 3, 2008. With more than 1100 attendees, this was the largest of the SCMR meetings ever. Among this year's highlights were scientific reports on CMR-based risk assessment, non-contrast tissue characterization, 3 T data, and interventional CMR. PMID:19128420

  13. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3-6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided. PMID:25043945

  14. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3,4,5,6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided. PMID:25070057

  15. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; -6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided. PMID:25003300

  16. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the infectious diseases society of America.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

    2014-07-15

    A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24947530

  17. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

    2014-07-15

    A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24973422

  18. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of eye injuries and illnesses in the wilderness.

    PubMed

    Drake, Brandy; Paterson, Ryan; Tabin, Geoffrey; Butler, Frank K; Cushing, Tracy

    2012-12-01

    A panel convened to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for the recognition and treatment of eye injuries and illnesses that may occur in the wilderness. These guidelines are meant to serve as a tool to help wilderness providers accurately identify and subsequently treat or evacuate for a variety of ophthalmologic complaints. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of their supporting evidence and the balance between risks and benefits according to criteria developed by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:23158204

  19. European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction: How to use existing assays clinically and for clinical trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred S. Apple; Alan H. B. Wu; Allan S. Jaffe

    2002-01-01

    Background The European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction suggest that the cutoff value for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) be the 99th percentile of the reference population at a level measured with imprecision (coefficient of variation) ?10%. No current commercially available troponin assay meets this requirement. Accordingly, questions have been

  20. Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care

    E-print Network

    Eklund, Patrik

    Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management Patrik Eklund Umeå University, Sweden 27 June 2008 Patrik Eklund IPMU 2008 Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management #12;Cognitive

  1. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Alghamdi, Khalid; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alghamdi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of germ cell tumor of testes are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence. PMID:25371603

  2. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Alolayan, Ashwaq; Ahmad, Imran; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of renal cell carcinoma are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level. PMID:25371602

  3. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG) and European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) 2013 joint guidelines on diagnosis and management of rare and emerging fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornely, O A; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Meis, J F; Ullmann, A J

    2014-04-01

    This guideline is the second in the line of three for fungal diseases by ESCMID and other societies. The guideline tried to follow the AGREE criteria for the development of clinical guidelines. This guideline serves as a European and potentially world-wide recommendation for the diagnosis and management of rare and emerging fungi. They include mucormycosis, hyalohyphomycosis (Fusarium, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium, etc.), phaeohyphomycosis (Alternaria, Bipolaris, Cladosporium, Rhinocladiella, etc.), and emerging yeasts (Saccharomyces, Trichosporon, Rhodotorula, etc.). PMID:24606200

  4. Meeting physical activity guidelines is associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease in black South African women; a 5.5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity (PA) have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies have examined whether meeting international PA guidelines is associated with reduced risk in a black South African (SA) population. The aims of this study were to compare body composition and cardio-metabolic risk factors for CVD and T2D between active and inactive groups (part 1, cross-sectional analysis) and, to determine whether PA level predicts changes in body composition and cardio-metabolic risk factors for CVD and T2D at follow-up after 5.5-years (part 2, longitudinal analysis). Methods Part 1 included a sample of 240 apparently healthy black SA women (26?±?7 years) who underwent the following measurements at baseline: PA (Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ)), body composition and regional fat distribution (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and computerised tomography), blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations. For part 2, a sub-sample of women (n?=?57) underwent the same measurements after a 5.5-year period. Results At baseline, 61% of women were classified as meeting the guidelines for moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) according to GPAQ. Women who were active had significantly lower body weight (p?guidelines was associated with decreased risk for CVD and T2D in black SA women, but did not prevent the increase in body fat over time. Interventions promoting physical activity to specifically address obesity in this high-risk group are recommended. PMID:24886324

  5. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kalpana; Hooton, Thomas M; Naber, Kurt G; Wullt, Björn; Colgan, Richard; Miller, Loren G; Moran, Gregory J; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Raz, Raul; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Soper, David E

    2011-03-01

    A Panel of International Experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) to update the 1999 Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection Guidelines by the IDSA. Co-sponsoring organizations include the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Urological Association, Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases-Canada, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The focus of this work is treatment of women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis, diagnoses limited in these guidelines to premenopausal, non-pregnant women with no known urological abnormalities or co-morbidities. The issues of in vitro resistance prevalence and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial therapy (collateral damage) were considered as important factors in making optimal treatment choices and thus are reflected in the rankings of recommendations. PMID:21292654

  6. [Practice Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology for the management of cardiac disease in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    González Maqueda, I; Armada Romero, E; Díaz Recasens, J; García De Vinuesa, P G; García Moll, M; González García, A; Fernández Burgos, C; Iñiguez Romo, A; Rayo Llerena, I

    2000-11-01

    Maternal adaptation to pregnancy includes reproductive hormone interaction plasma, volume changes with an increase in total body water, vascular alterations with a decrease in systemic resistance and modifications associated with hypercoagulability. These explain, in part, the appearance of signs and symptoms, even in a normal pregnant woman, that are difficult to distinguish from those occurring in heart disease and why some cardiac abnormalities are not well tolerated during pregnancy. Cardiovascular abnormalities are considered the first non-obstetric cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Rheumatic and congenital heart diseases are currently the most frequent cardiopathy found in women of childbearing age, followed by hypertension, coronary artery disease and arrhythmia. Although pregnancy is well tolerated by most women with heart disease, there are some cardiovascular abnormalities which place the mother and the infant at extremely high risk: patients with congestive heart failure and severe cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, cyanotic congenital heart disease, Marfan's syndrome, severe obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart, patients with prosthetic cardiac valves and antecedents of peripartum cardiomyopathy should be encouraged to avoid pregnancy and the interruption of pregnancy may be advisable in cases with great risk of disability or death. The most severe cardiopathies significantly increase the risk of fetal loss and the presence of a congenital cardiac abnormality in either parent increases the risk of congenital cardiac disease in the fetus. Medical care must be initiated early, prior to conception and women with cardiopathy should be informed of the possible risks of pregnancy to both the mother and fetus. PMID:11084006

  7. Cancer screening in the United States, 2015: a review of current American cancer society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brooks, Durado; Doroshenk, Mary; Fedewa, Stacey; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection along with a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines. The latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) also is described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Affordable Care Act, including the expansion of the Medicaid program. PMID:25581023

  8. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD. PMID:24917550

  9. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches. PMID:25117402

  10. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for the management of blood pressure in CKD.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Marcel; Quinn, Robert R; McFarlane, Phil; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ramesh Prasad, G V; Feber, Janusz; Nesrallah, Gihad; MacKinnon, Martin; Tangri, Navdeep; McCormick, Brendan; Tobe, Sheldon; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2014-06-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) 2012 clinical practice guideline for the management of blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides the structural and evidence base for the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN) commentary on this guideline's relevancy and application to the Canadian health care system. While in general agreement, we provide commentary on 13 of the 21 KDIGO guideline statements. Specifically, we agreed that nonpharmacological interventions should play a significant role in the management of hypertension in patients with CKD. We also agreed that the approach to the management of hypertension in elderly patients with CKD should be individualized and take into account comorbid conditions to avoid adverse outcomes from excessive BP lowering. In contrast to KDIGO, the CSN Work Group believes there is insufficient evidence to target a lower BP for nondiabetic CKD patients based on the presence and severity of albuminuria. The CSN Work Group concurs with the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendation of a target BP for all non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients without diabetes of ?140 mm Hg systolic and ?90 mm Hg diastolic. Similarly, it is our position that in diabetic patients with CKD and normal urinary albumin excretion, raising the threshold for treatment from <130 mm?Hg systolic BP to <140 mm Hg systolic BP could increase stroke risk and the risk of worsening kidney disease. The CSN Work Group concurs with the CHEP and the Canadian Diabetic Association recommendation for diabetic patients with CKD with or without albuminuria to continue to be treated to a BP target similar to that of the overall diabetes population, aiming for BP levels < 130/80 mm Hg. Consistent with this, the CSN Work Group endorses a BP target of <130/80 mm Hg for diabetic patients with a kidney transplant. Finally, in the absence of evidence for a lower BP target, the CSN Work Group concurs with the CHEP recommendation to target BP<140/90 mm Hg for nondiabetic patients with a kidney transplant. PMID:24725980

  11. Normal values of blood pressure self-measurement in view of the 1999 World Health Organization-International Society of Hypertension guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Weisser; T. Mengden; R. Düsing; H. Vetter; W. Vetter

    2000-01-01

    New guidelines for the management of hypertension have been published in 1999 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Society of Hypertension (ISH). The WHO\\/ISH Committee has adopted in principle the definition and classification of hypertension provided by the JNC VI (1997). The new classification defines a blood pressure of 120\\/80 mm Hg as optimal and of 130\\/85

  12. Implementation of the NHLBI Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents: Rationale and Study Design for Young Hearts, Strong Starts, a Cluster-Randomized Trial Targeting Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lazorick, Suzanne; Ariza, Adolfo J.; Furberg, Robert D.; Whetstone, Lauren; Hobbs, Connie; de Jesus, Janet; Bender, Randall H.; Salinas, Ilse G.; Binns, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the underlying atherosclerosis begin in childhood, and their presence and intensity are related to known cardiovascular disease risk factors. Attention to risk factor control in childhood has the potential to reduce subsequent risk of CVD. Objective The Young Hearts Strong Starts Study was designed to test strategies facilitating adoption of the National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute supported Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents. This study compares guideline-based quality measures for body mass index, blood pressure, and tobacco using two strategies: a multifaceted, practice-directed intervention versus standard dissemination. Study Design Two primary care research networks recruited practices and provided support for the intervention and outcome evaluations. Individual practices were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups using a cluster randomized design based on network affiliation, number of clinicians per practice, urban versus nonurban location, and practice type. The units of observation are individual children because measure adherence is abstracted from individual patient’s medical records. The units of randomization are physician practices. This results in a multilevel design in which patients are nested within practices. The intervention practices received toolkits and supported guideline implementation including academic detailing, an ongoing e-learning group. This project is aligned with the American Board of Pediatrics Maintenance of Certification requirements including monthly physician self-abstraction, webinars, and other elements of the trial. Significance This trial will provide an opportunity to demonstrate tools and strategies to enhance CV prevention in children by guideline-based interventions. PMID:24295879

  13. Heart Rhythm Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of arrhythmias using the Heart Rhythm Society’s searchable directory. Learn More Common Heart Problems Although people can ... advanced cardiovascular practice. We also provide a searchable directory consisting of Heart Rhythm Society members ( e.g. , ...

  14. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  15. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  16. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the use of epinephrine in outdoor education and wilderness settings: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Flavio G; Lemery, Jay; Johnson, David E

    2014-12-01

    The Epinephrine Roundtable took place on July 27, 2008, during the 25th Annual Meeting of the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) in Snowmass, CO. The WMS convened this roundtable to explore areas of consensus and uncertainty in the field treatment of anaphylaxis. Panelists were selected on the basis of their relevant academic or professional experience. There is a paucity of data that address the treatment of anaphylaxis in the wilderness. Anaphylaxis is a rare disease, with a sudden onset and drastic course that does not lend itself to study in randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, the panel endorsed the following position based on the limited available evidence and review of published articles, as well as expert consensus. The position represents the consensus of the panelists and is endorsed by the WMS. In 2014, the authors reviewed relevant articles published since the Epinephrine Roundtable. The following is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(4):185-187. PMID:25498258

  17. Swedish guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults--Swedish Society of Infectious Diseases 2012.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Carl; Strålin, Kristoffer; Eriksson, Lars; Hjerdt-Goscinski, Gunilla; Holmberg, Hans; Lidman, Christer; Nilsson, Anna; Ortqvist, Ake; Hedlund, Jonas

    2012-12-01

    This document presents the 2012 evidence based guidelines of the Swedish Society of Infectious Diseases for the in- hospital management of adult immunocompetent patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The prognostic score 'CRB-65' is recommended for the initial assessment of all CAP patients, and should be regarded as an aid for decision-making concerning the level of care required, microbiological investigation, and antibiotic treatment. Due to the favourable antibiotic resistance situation in Sweden, an initial narrow-spectrum antibiotic treatment primarily directed at Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in most situations. The recommended treatment for patients with severe CAP (CRB-65 score 2) is penicillin G in most situations. In critically ill patients (CRB-65 score 3-4), combination therapy with cefotaxime/macrolide or penicillin G/fluoroquinolone is recommended. A thorough microbiological investigation should be undertaken in all patients, including blood cultures, respiratory tract sampling, and urine antigens, with the addition of extensive sampling for more uncommon respiratory pathogens in the case of severe disease. Recommended measures for the prevention of CAP include vaccination for influenza and pneumococci, as well as smoking cessation. PMID:22830356

  18. Utilization of ancillary studies in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Layfield, Lester J.; Ehya, Hormoz; Filie, Armando C.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Jhala, Nirag; Joseph, Loren; Vielh, Philippe; Pitman, Martha B.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing and post-biopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussion of the draft document at several national and international meetings and synthesis of selected online comments of the draft document. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. Currently, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) appears to be the most clinically relevant ancillary technique for cytology of bile duct strictures. The addition of FISH analysis to routine cytologic evaluation appears to yield the highest sensitivity without loss in specificity. Loss of immunohistochemical staining for the protein product of the SMAD4 gene and positive staining for mesothelin support a diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical markers for endocrine and exocrine differentiation are sufficient for a diagnosis of endocrine and acinar tumors. Nuclear staining for beta-catenin supports a diagnosis of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm. Cyst fluid analysis for amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen aids in the pre-operative classification of pancreatic cysts. A number of gene mutations (KRAS, GNAS, von Hippel-Lindau, RNF43 and CTNNB1) may be of aid in the diagnosis of cystic neoplasms. Other ancillary techniques do not appear to improve diagnostic sensitivity sufficiently to justify their increased costs. PMID:25191518

  19. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)

    PubMed Central

    Seung, Steven K.; Larson, David A.; Galvin, James M.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J.; Yajnik, Santosh V.; Hartford, Alan C.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2014-01-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program. PMID:23681017

  20. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Seung, Steven K; Larson, David A; Galvin, James M; Mehta, Minesh P; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J; Yajnik, Santosh V; Hartford, Alan C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2013-06-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program. PMID:23681017

  1. Consideration of Consulting Psychology\\/Organizational Educational Principles as They Relate to the Practice of Industrial–Organizational Psychology and The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology's Education and Training Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wanda J. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    This article is written on behalf of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) to present its reactions to the Consulting Psychology\\/Organizational Educational Principles (Consulting Principles; Education & Training Committee, 2002). An overview of the history and practice of I-O psychology is provided. The Consulting Principles are then compared with SIOP Education and Training Guidelines (SIOP Guidelines), and recommendations

  2. [Diagnosis and conservative treatment of low back pain: review and guidelines of the Croatian Vertebrologic Society].

    PubMed

    Grazio, Simeon; Curkovi?, Bozidar; Vlak, Tonko; Kes, Vanja Basi?; Jeli?, Miroslav; Buljan, Danijel; Gnjidi?, Zoja; Nemci?, Tomislav; Grubisi?, Frane; Bori?, Igor; Kauzlari?, Neven; Mustapi?, Matej; Demarin, Vida

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very common condition with high costs of patient care. Medical doctors of various specialties from Croatia have brought an up-to-date review and guidelines for diagnosis and conservative treatment of low back pain, which should result in the application of evidence-based care and eventually better outcomes. As LBP is a multifactorial disease, it is often not possible to identify which factors may be responsible for the onset of LBP and to what extent they aggravate the patient's symptoms. In the diagnostic algorithm, patient's history and clinical examination have the key role. Furthermore, most important is to classify patients into those with nonspecific back pain, LBP associated with radiculopathy (radicular syndrome) and LBP potentially associated with suspected or confirmed severe pathology. Not solely a physical problem, LBP should be considered through psychosocial factors too. In that case, early identification of patients who will develop chronic back pain will be helpful because it determines the choice of treatment. In order to make proper assessment of a patient with LBP (i.e. pain, function), we should use validated questionnaires. Useful approach to a patient with LBP is to apply the principles of content management. Generally, acute and chronic LBP cases are treated differently. Besides providing education, in patients with acute back pain, advice seems to be crucial (especially to remain active), along with the use of drugs (primarily in terms of pain control), while in some patients spinal manipulation (performed by educated professional) or/and short-term use of lumbosacral orthotic devices can also be considered. The main goal of treating patients with chronic LBP is renewal of function, even in case of persistent pain. For chronic LBP, along with education and medical treatment, therapeutic exercise, physical therapy and massage are recommended, while in patients with a high level of disability intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach has proved to be effective. PMID:23814971

  3. Pan-Canadian cardiovascular data definitions and quality indicators: a status update.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, David E; Buller, Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    After the 2009 publication of Building a Heart Healthy Canada, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society was commissioned to address a long-standing information gap related to the compatibility and comparability of data on the quality of cardiovascular care in Canada. Through collaboration between the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and 5 regional cardiovascular registries, 2 committees were tasked with developing standardized cardiovascular data definitions and quality indicators. The work culminated in national consensus on the definitions of 55 patient, disease, and therapeutic variables (core and optional) to facilitate cardiovascular care comparisons within and across Canada. Supplemental data definition chapters were then developed on acute coronary syndrome and coronary angiography/revascularization, with chapters on heart failure and atrial fibrillation electrophysiology to follow. This foundational work led to a critical appraisal of cardiac quality indicator development initiatives via the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) Quality Indicator tool, followed by the development of quality indicator catalogues on heart failure and atrial fibrillation. These indicators will be embedded within the clinical practice guidelines of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, facilitating national comparisons across Canada on cardiovascular disease incidence, prevalence, patterns and quality of care, and clinical outcomes. This methodology-achieving national stakeholder consensus on a standardized process for the development and selection of cardiovascular quality indicators-illustrates the capacity to reach agreement by drawing on expertise and research across diverse organizational mandates and agendas, potentially contributing to improved cardiovascular care and outcomes for patients. PMID:22552173

  4. Feeding & Risering Guidelines for

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Feeding & Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings Steel Founders' Society of America 2001 #12;Index Castings [1], a foundry handbook intended to provide risering guidelines for use in steel foundries. The guidelines contained in Risering Steel Castings were developed based on experimental casting work

  5. Social-Strata-Related Cardiovascular Health Disparity and Comorbidity in an Aging Society: Implications for Professional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Amy L.; Carrigan, Lynn T.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise in the aging population of the United States. Heart disease is the leading cause of death, hospital bed use, and social security disability. Enhancing knowledge about CVD may improve social work's professional role in the health care system. This article focuses on a pressing CVD-related issue that needs…

  6. Vascular lasers and IPLS: guidelines for care from the European Society for Laser Dermatology (ESLD).

    PubMed

    Adamic, Metka; Troilius, Agneta; Adatto, Maurice; Drosner, Michael; Dahmane, Raja

    2007-06-01

    Dermatology and dermatologic surgery have rapidly evolved during the last two decades thanks to the numerous technological and scientific acquisitions focused on improved precision in the diagnosis and treatment of skin alterations. Given the proliferation of new devices for the treatment of vascular lesions, we have considerably changed our treatment approach. Lasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has recently been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. The list is a long one and includes pulsed dye (FPDL, APDL) lasers (577 nm, 585 nm and 595 nm), KTP lasers (532 nm), long pulsed alexandrite lasers (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (in the range of 800 to 900 nm), long pulsed 1064 Nd:YAG lasers and intense pulsed light sources (IPLS, also called flash-lights or pulsed light sources). Several vascular lasers (such as argon, tunable dye, copper vapour, krypton lasers) which were used in the past are no longer useful as they pose a higher risk of complications such as dyschromia (hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation) and scarring. By properly selecting the wavelength which is maximally absorbed by the target--also called the chromophore (haemoglobin in the red blood cells within the vessels)--and a corresponding pulse duration which is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of that target, the target can be preferentially injured without transferring significant amounts of energy to surrounding tissues (epidermis and surrounding dermal tissue). Larger structures require more time for sufficient heat absorption. Therefore, a longer laser-pulse duration has to be used. In addition, more deeply situated vessels require the use of longer laser wavelengths (in the infrared range) which can penetrate deeper into the skin. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invading nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side effects. These guidelines focus on patient selection and treatment protocol in order to provide safe and effective treatment. Physicians should always make the indication for the treatment and are responsible for setting the machine for each individual patient and each individual treatment. The type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters must be adapted to the indication (such as the vessel's characteristics, e.g. diameter, colour and depth, the Fitzpatrick skin type). Treatments should start on a test patch and a treatment grid can improve accuracy. Cooling as well as a reduction of the fluence will prevent adverse effects such as pigment alteration and scar formation. A different number of repeated treatments should be done to achieve complete results of different vascular conditions. Sunscreen use before and after treatment will produce and maintain untanned skin. Individuals with dark skin, and especially tanned patients, are at higher risk for pigmentary changes and scars after the laser or IPLS treatment. PMID:17558762

  7. Rationale and design of the Kanyini guidelines adherence with the polypill (Kanyini-GAP) study: a randomised controlled trial of a polypill-based strategy amongst Indigenous and non Indigenous people at high cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Kanyini Guidelines Adherence with the Polypill (Kanyini-GAP) Study aims to examine whether a polypill-based strategy (using a single capsule containing aspirin, a statin and two blood pressure-lowering agents) amongst Indigenous and non-Indigenous people at high risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event will improve adherence to guideline-indicated therapies, and lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Methods/Design The study is an open, randomised, controlled, multi-centre trial involving 1000 participants at high risk of cardiovascular events recruited from mainstream general practices and Aboriginal Medical Services, followed for an average of 18 months. The participants will be randomised to one of two versions of the polypill, the version chosen by the treating health professional according to clinical features of the patient, or to usual care. The primary study outcomes will be changes, from baseline measures, in serum cholesterol and systolic blood pressure and self-reported current use of aspirin, a statin and at least two blood pressure lowering agents. Secondary study outcomes include cardiovascular events, renal outcomes, self-reported barriers to indicated therapy, prescription of indicated therapy, occurrence of serious adverse events and changes in quality-of-life. The trial will be supplemented by formal economic and process evaluations. Discussion The Kanyini-GAP trial will provide new evidence as to whether or not a polypill-based strategy improves adherence to effective cardiovascular medications amongst individuals in whom these treatments are indicated. Trial Registration This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN126080005833347. PMID:20687931

  8. Recommendations for the use of genetic testing in the clinical evaluation of inherited cardiac arrhythmias associated with sudden cardiac death: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position paper.

    PubMed

    Gollob, Michael H; Blier, Louis; Brugada, Ramon; Champagne, Jean; Chauhan, Vijay; Connors, Sean; Gardner, Martin; Green, Martin S; Gow, Robert; Hamilton, Robert; Harris, Louise; Healey, Jeff S; Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Honeywell, Christina; Kantoch, Michael; Kirsh, Joel; Krahn, Andrew; Mullen, Michelle; Parkash, Ratika; Redfearn, Damian; Rutberg, Julie; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Woo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The era of gene discovery and molecular medicine has had a significant impact on clinical practice. Knowledge of specific genetic findings causative for or associated with human disease may enhance diagnostic accuracy and influence treatment decisions. In cardiovascular disease, gene discovery for inherited arrhythmia syndromes has advanced most rapidly. The arrhythmia specialist is often confronted with the challenge of diagnosing and managing genetic arrhythmia syndromes. There is now a clear need for guidelines on the appropriate use of genetic testing for the most common genetic conditions associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death. This document represents the first ever published recommendations outlining the role of genetic testing in various clinical scenarios, the specific genes to be considered for testing, and the utility of test results in the management of patients and their families. PMID:21459272

  9. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: joint recommendations of Indian Chest Society and National College of Chest Physicians (India).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Maturu, V N; Dhooria, Sahajal; Prasad, K T; Sehgal, Inderpaul S; Yenge, Lakshmikant B; Jindal, Aditya; Singh, Navneet; Ghoshal, A G; Khilnani, G C; Samaria, J K; Gaur, S N; Behera, D; Jindal, S K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem in India. Although several International guidelines for diagnosis and management of COPD are available, yet there are lot of gaps in recognition and management of COPD in India due to vast differences in availability and affordability of healthcare facilities across the country. The Indian Chest Society and the National College of Chest Physicians (India) have joined hands to come out with these evidence-based guidelines to help the physicians at all levels of healthcare to diagnose and manage COPD in a scientific manner. Besides the International literature, the Indian studies were specifically analysed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (a) definition, epidemiology and disease burden, (b) disease assessment and diagnosis, (c) pharmacologic management of stable COPD, (d) management of acute exacerbations; and (e) non-pharmacologic and preventive measures. PMID:24974625

  10. The 2013 ACC/AHA cardiovascular prevention guidelines improve alignment of statin therapy with coronary atherosclerosis as detected by coronary computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Amit; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Hoffmann, Udo

    2014-11-01

    The recently released 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for management of blood cholesterol have substantially increased the number of adults who are eligible for preventive statin therapy. We sought to determine whether eligibility for statin therapy as determined by the 2013 ACC/AHA guideline recommendation is better aligned with the actual presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as detected by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) when compared to prior guidelines including the 2004 NCEP ATP III and 2011 ESC/EAS guidelines. In this secondary analysis of the prospective observational ROMICAT I (Rule Out Myocardial Infarction with Computer Assisted Tomography) cohort study, we included all men and women aged 40-79 years presenting with acute chest pain but not diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome nor on admission statin. Based on risk factor assessment and lipid data, we determined guideline-based eligibility for statin therapy by the 2013 ACC/AHA, the 2004 NCEP ATP III, and the 2011 ESC/EAS guidelines. We determined the presence and severity of CAD as detected by CCTA. The 2013 ACC/AHA algorithm identified nearly twice as many individuals as eligible for statins (n = 77/189; 41%) as compared to the 2004 ATP III criteria: (n = 41/189; 22%), (p < .0001) In addition, the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines were more sensitive for treatment of CCTA-detected CAD than the 2004 ATP III guidelines [53.4% (42.5-64.1) vs 27.3% (18.3-37.8), p < .001] and the 2011 ESC/EAE guidelines [53.4% (42.5-64.1) vs 34.1% (24.3-45.0), p < .001]. However, the specificity of these guidelines was modestly reduced compared to the 2004 ATP III guidelines [70.3 (60.4-79.0) vs 83.2 (74.4-89.9), p < .001] and the 2011 ESC/EAE guidelines [70.3 (60.4-79.0) vs 86.1 (77.8-92.2), p < .001], suggesting increased treatment of subjects without CCTA-detected CAD. Overall, the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines are more sensitive to identify patients who have CAD detected by CCTA eligible for statin therapy as compared with prior guidelines, with an acceptable trade-off in specificity for recommending statin therapy in those without CAD. PMID:25299966

  11. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This guideline is based on the Full Panel Report which is provided as a data supplement to the guideline. The Full Panel Report contains background and additional material related to content, methodology, evidence synthesis, rationale and references and is supported by the NHLBI Systematic Evidence ...

  12. Treatment planning methodology for the Miami Multichannel Applicator following the American Brachytherapy Society recently published guidelines: the Lahey Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Mower, Herbert W; McKee, Andrea B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a standardized procedure from simulation to treatment delivery for the multichannel Miami applicator, in order to increase planning consistency and reduce errors. A plan is generated prior to the 1st treatment using the CT images acquired with the applicator in place, and used for all 3 fractions. To confirm the application placement before each treatment fraction, an AP image is acquired and compared with the AP baseline image taken at simulation. A preplanning table is generated using the EBRT doses and is used to compute the maximum allowable D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and the mean allowable dose for the upper vaginal wall per HDR brachytherapy fraction. These data are used to establish the criteria for treatment planning dose optimization. A step-by-step treatment planning approach was developed to ensure appropriate coverage for the tumor (D90 > 100% prescribed dose of 700 cGy/fraction) and the uninvolved vaginal surface (dose for the entire treatment length > 600 cGy/fraction), while keeping the organs at risk below the tolerance doses. The equivalent dose 2 Gy (EQD2) tolerances for the critical structures are based on the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recently published guidelines. An independent second check is performed before the 1st treatment using an in-house Excel spreadsheet. This methodology was successfully applied for our first few cases. For these patients: the cumulative tumor dose was 74-79 EQD2 Gy10 (ABS recommended range 70-85); tumor D90 was >100% of prescribed dose (range 101%-105%); cumulative D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower than the tolerances of 90, 75, and 75 EQD2 Gy3, respectively; cumulative upper vaginal wall mean dose was below the tolerance of 120 EQD2 Gy3; the second check agreement was within 5%. By using a standardized procedure the planning consistency was increased and all dosimetric criteria were met. PMID:23318396

  13. Cardiovascular risk in Mozambique: who should be treated for hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Albertino; Padrão, Patricia; Silva-Matos, Carla; Prista, António; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    Aim To estimate the proportion of Mozambicans eligible for pharmacological treatment for hypertension, according to single risk factor and total cardiovascular risk approaches. Methods A representative sample of Mozambicans aged 40–64 years (n = 1116) was evaluated according to the WHO STEPwise Approach to Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance (STEPS). We measured blood pressure (BP) and 12-h fasting blood glucose levels and collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, and use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. We estimated the 10-year risk of a fatal or nonfatal major cardiovascular event (WHO/lnternational Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts), and computed the proportion of untreated participants eligible for pharmacological treatment for hypertension, according to BP values alone and accounting also for the total cardiovascular risk (WHO guidelines for assessment and management of cardiovascular diseases). Results Among the Mozambicans aged 40–64 years and not taking antihypertensive drugs, less than 4% were classified as having cardiovascular risk at least 20% whereas the prevalence of SBP/DBP at least 140/90 mmHg was nearly 40%. A total of 19.8% of 40–64-year-olds would be eligible for pharmacological treatment of hypertension according to the WHO guidelines, all of whom had SBP/DBP at least 160/100 mmHg. Conclusion Among the Mozambicans aged 40–64 years not taking antihypertensive drugs and having SBP/DBP at least 140/90 mmHg, only half were eligible for pharmacological treatment according to the WHO guidelines. Taking the latter into account, when defining strategies to control hypertension at a population level, may allow a more efficient use of the scarce resources available in developing settings. PMID:24220589

  14. Summary of the Dutch S3-guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis 2011. Dutch Society of Dermatology and Venereology.

    PubMed

    Zweegers, J; de Jong, E M G J; Nijsten, T E C; de Bes, J; te Booij, M; Bogonjen, R J; van Cranenburgh, O D; van Deutekom, H; van Everdingen, J J E; de Groot, M; Van Hees, C L M; Hulshuizen, H; Koek, M B G; de Korte, W J A; de Korte, J; Lecluse, L L A; Pasch, M C; Poblete-Gutiérrez, P A; Prens, E P; Seyger, M M B; Thio, H B; Torcque, L A; de Vries, A C Q; van de Kerkhof, P C M; Spuls, Ph I

    2014-03-01

    This document provides a summary of the Dutch S3-guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis. These guidelines were finalized in December 2011 and contain unique chapters on the treatment of psoriasis of the face and flexures, childhood psoriasis as well as the patient's perspective on treatment. They also cover the topical treatment of psoriasis, photo(chemo)therapy, conventional systemic therapy and biological therapy. PMID:24656281

  15. Guidelines for laparoscopic treatment of ventral and incisional abdominal wall hernias (International Endohernia Society (IEHS)-part 1.

    PubMed

    Bittner, R; Bingener-Casey, J; Dietz, U; Fabian, M; Ferzli, G S; Fortelny, R H; Köckerling, F; Kukleta, J; Leblanc, K; Lomanto, D; Misra, M C; Bansal, V K; Morales-Conde, S; Ramshaw, B; Reinpold, W; Rim, S; Rohr, M; Schrittwieser, R; Simon, Th; Smietanski, M; Stechemesser, B; Timoney, M; Chowbey, P

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines are increasingly determining the decision process in day-to-day clinical work. Guidelines describe the current best possible standard in diagnostics and therapy. They should be developed by an international panel of experts, whereby alongside individual experience, above all, the results of comparative studies are decisive. According to the results of high-ranking scientific studies published in peer-reviewed journals, statements and recommendations are formulated, and these are graded strictly according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Guidelines can therefore be valuable in helping particularly the young surgeon in his or her day-to-day work to find the best decision for the patient when confronted with a wide and confusing range of options. However, even experienced surgeons benefit because by virtue of a heavy workload and commitment, they often find it difficult to keep up with the ever-increasing published literature. All guidelines require regular updating, usually every 3 years, in line with progress in the field. The current Guidelines focus on technique and perioperative management of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and constitute the first comprehensive guidelines on this topic. In this issue of Surgical Endoscopy, the first part of the Guidelines is published including sections on basics, indication for surgery, perioperative management, and key points of technique. The next part (Part 2) of the Guidelines will address complications and comparisons between open and laparoscopic techniques. Part 3 will cover mesh technology, hernia prophylaxis, technique-related issues, new technologic developments, lumbar and other unusual hernias, and training/education. PMID:24114513

  16. Treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: Synopsis of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading U.S. cause of death, lost quality of life and medical costs. Nearly one in three Americans die from heart disease and stroke. Most ASCVD is preventable through a healthy lifestyle and effective treatment of cholesterol and blood pressure...

  17. Implementing ethics in the professions: preparing guidelines on scientific communication for the Society for Neuroscience. Commentary on 'Implementing ethics in the professions: examples from environmental epidemiology' (Soskolne and Sieswerda).

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Michael J

    2003-04-01

    In 1994, the governing council of the Society for Neuroscience was asked to make a brief statement on an issue regarding responsible conduct in publishing. The present article reviews how that initial request grew over the next four years into a lengthy document. Drawing on that experience, which was presided over by the author, comments are made about the potential impact of such guidelines, the lessons learned, and the proper role of professional societies in promoting responsible conduct in research. PMID:12774651

  18. [Clinical guidelines for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Many international guidelines for epilepsy from the countries in Europe, USA and Asia have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the clinical guidelines for epilepsy management were published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002 and 2010. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 primarily targets general practitioners treating epilepsy patients. The Japan Epilepsy Society has been publishing 16 guidelines for several topics since 2005. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 recommends that carbamazepine can be regarded for new onset partial epilepsy and sodium valproate is for new onset generalized epilepsy as anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy. The new AEDs received approval by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, mainly in the add-on treatment of adults with partial epilepsy. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 will contribute to improvement in the management of epilepsy in Japan. PMID:24912279

  19. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  20. Post-brushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kurtycz, Daniel F. I.; Field, Andrew; Tabatabai, Laura; Michaels, Claire; Young, Nancy; Schmidt, C. Max; Farrell, James; Gopal, Deepak; Simeone, Diane; Merchant, Nipun B.; Pitman, Martha Bishop

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing and post-procedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature and discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site (www.papsociety.org). This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by committee III. PMID:25191519

  1. Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas; Schmidt, C. Max; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Barthel, James S.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Merchant, Nipun B.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shaaban, Akram M.; Simeone, Diane; Pitman, Martha Bishop; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed. PMID:25191515

  2. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP). PMID:23749327

  3. Updated guidelines for biomarker testing in colorectal carcinoma: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, P; García-Foncillas, J; Salazar, R; Pérez-Segura, P; García-Carbonero, R; Musulén-Palet, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Landolfi, S; Ramón Y Cajal, S; Navarro, S

    2015-04-01

    Publication of this consensus statement is a joint initiative of the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), intended to revise and update the diagnostic and treatment recommendations published 2 years ago on biomarker use and the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC), thereby providing an opportunity to improve healthcare efficiency and resource use in these patients. This expert group recommends testing for KRAS and NRAS status in all patients with metastatic CRC being considered for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy, as this type of treatment should only be used in patients not harbouring mutations in these genes. In contrast, testing for BRAF, EGFR, PI3K and PTEN mutation status is not necessary for therapeutic decision making, so does not need to be done routinely. PMID:25373533

  4. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Yoshino, Takayuki; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Baba, Eishi; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2015-03-01

    The Japanese guidelines for the testing of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer have been used for the past 5 years. However, new findings of RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutations that can further predict the therapeutic effects of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy necessitated a revision of the guidelines. The revised guidelines included the following five basic requirements for RAS mutation testing to highlight a patient group in which anti-EGFR antibody therapy may be ineffective: First, anti-EGFR antibody therapy may not offer survival benefit and/or tumor shrinkage to patients with expanded RAS mutations. Thus, current methods to detect KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13) mutations are insufficient for selecting appropriate candidates for this therapy. Additional testing of extended KRAS/NRAS mutations is recommended. Second, repeated tests are not required for the detection; tissue materials of either primary or metastatic lesions are applicable for RAS mutation testing. Evaluating RAS mutations prior to anti-EGFR antibody therapy is recommended. Third, direct sequencing with manual dissection or allele-specific PCR-based methods is currently applicable for RAS mutation testing. Fourth, thinly sliced sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks are applicable for RAS mutation testing. One section stained with H&E should be provided to histologically determine whether the tissue contains sufficient amount of tumor cells for testing. Finally, RAS mutation testing must be performed in laboratories with appropriate testing procedures and specimen management practices. PMID:25800101

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infection: 2009 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaa

    PubMed Central

    Mermel, Leonard A.; Allon, Michael; Bouza, Emilio; Craven, Donald E.; Flynn, Patricia; O’Grady, Naomi P.; Raad, Issam I.; Rijnders, Bart J. A.; Sherertz, Robert J.; Warren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. PMID:19489710

  6. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of adults suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:23216388

  7. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, part 1: update 2012 on the acute treatment of schizophrenia and the management of treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful and these guidelines are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia. PMID:22834451

  8. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25822804

  9. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

  10. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    PubMed

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping of the saphenous vein to the level of the knee (GRADE 1B). We recommend phlebectomy or sclerotherapy to treat varicose tributaries (GRADE 1B) and suggest foam sclerotherapy as an option for the treatment of the incompetent saphenous vein (GRADE 2C). We recommend against selective treatment of perforating vein incompetence in patients with simple varicose veins (CEAP class C(2); GRADE 1B), but we suggest treatment of pathologic perforating veins (outward flow duration ?500 ms, vein diameter ?3.5 mm) located underneath healed or active ulcers (CEAP class C(5)-C(6); GRADE 2B). We suggest treatment of pelvic congestion syndrome and pelvic varices with coil embolization, plugs, or transcatheter sclerotherapy, used alone or together (GRADE 2B). PMID:21536172

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with an MR compatible pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within FDA guidelines for the MRI-conditional pacemaker precludes placing the heart at the center of the magnet’s bore. This in effect appears to preclude cardiovascular MR. In this manuscript, we describe a protocol for cardiovascular MR of patients with a Revo pacemaker system while operating within FDA guidelines, and the first US case of cardiovascular MR in a patient with a Revo MRI-conditional pacing system despite position constraints. PMID:23409835

  12. [Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Skov, Lone; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2012-05-21

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease that affects 2-3% of the population and shares pathophysiologic mechanisms and risk factors with cardiovascular diseases. Studies have suggested psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and Danish guidelines on cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have recently been published. We provide a short review of the current evidence and the Danish guidelines. PMID:22640784

  13. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat; Larsen, Michael; Souied, Eric; Schlingemann, Reinier; Eldem, Bora; Monés, Jordi; Richard, Gisbert; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has led to an overwhelming improvement in the prognosis of patients affected by neovascular AMD, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of patients. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by significant economic investments, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations in diagnostic technologies, such as optical coherence tomography, allows unprecedented high-resolution visualisation of disease morphology and provides a promising horizon for early disease detection and efficient therapeutic follow-up. However, definite conclusions from morphologic parameters are still lacking, and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state-of-the-art care to their patients. Trial registration number NCT01318941. PMID:25136079

  14. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  15. SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune ‘resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for ‘good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies. PMID:25387090

  16. Utilization of ancillary studies in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology.

    PubMed

    Layfield, Lester J; Ehya, Hormoz; Filie, Armando C; Hruban, Ralph H; Jhala, Nirag; Joseph, Loren; Vielh, Philippe; Pitman, Martha B

    2014-04-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and post-biopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings, and synthesis of selected online comments of the draft document. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions.?Currently, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) appears to be the most clinically relevant ancillary technique for cytology of bile duct strictures. The addition of FISH analysis to routine cytologic evaluation appears to yield the highest sensitivity without loss in specificity. Loss of immunohistochemical staining for the protein product of the SMAD4 gene and positive staining for mesothelin support a diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical markers for endocrine and exocrine differentiation are sufficient for a diagnosis of endocrine and acinar tumors. Nuclear staining for beta-catenin supports a diagnosis of solid-pseudopapilary neoplasm. Cyst fluid analysis for amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen aids in the preoperative classification of pancreatic cysts. Many gene mutations (KRAS, GNAS, VHL, RNF43, and CTNNB1) may be of aid in the diagnosis of cystic neoplasms. Other ancillary techniques do not appear to improve diagnostic sensitivity sufficiently to justify their increased costs. PMID:24639398

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy. PMID:19917871

  18. Growth Hormone Research Society Workshop Summary: Consensus Guidelines for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Therapy in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B.; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Battista, Renaldo; Beauloye, Véronique; Berall, Glenn; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Chihara, Kazuo; Cohen, Pinchas; Craig, Maria; Farholt, Stense; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Greggi, Tiziana; Grugni, Graziano; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C.; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Johnson, Keegan; Kemper, Alex; Kopchick, John J.; Malozowski, Saul; Miller, Jennifer; Mogul, Harriette R.; Muscatelli, Françoise; Nergårdh, Ricard; Nicholls, Robert D.; Radovick, Sally; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sipilä, Ilkka; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Vogels, Annick; Waters, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. Objective: The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. Evidence: We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ? 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Methodology: Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Conclusions: Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as long as demonstrated benefits outweigh the risks. PMID:23543664

  19. Cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fatty acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clemens von Schacky; William S. Harris

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac societies recommend the intake of 1 g\\/day of the two omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for cardiovascular disease prevention, treatment after a myocardial infarction, prevention of sudden death, and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. These recommendations are based on a body of scientific evidence that encompasses literally thousands of publications. Of four large scale

  20. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule prior to capsule endoscopy in these patients (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In the presence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis, ESGE recommends that dedicated small bowel cross-sectional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis or computed tomography enterography/enteroclysis should be used first (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 In patients with established Crohn's disease, based on ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends dedicated cross-sectional imaging for small-bowel evaluation since this has the potential to assess extent and location of any Crohn's disease lesions, to identify strictures, and to assess for extraluminal disease (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In patients with unremarkable or nondiagnostic findings from such cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as a subsequent investigation, if deemed to influence patient management (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). When capsule endoscopy is indicated, ESGE recommends use of the PillCam patency capsule to confirm functional patency of the small bowel (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 7 ESGE strongly recommends against the use of small-bowel capsule endoscopy for suspected coeliac disease but suggests that capsule endoscopy could be used in patients unwilling or unable to undergo conventional endoscopy (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:25826168

  1. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, other cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiovascular disease in Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in North West Europe: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. M. Uitewaal; D. R. Manna; M. A. Bruijnzeels; A. W. Hoes; S. Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of diabetes, other cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality varies between immigrant groups in Western societies, but epidemiological data on these topics are scarce for Turks and Moroccan immigrant living in North West Europe.Methods. Medline and Embase were systematically searched for studies containing data on the prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiovascular morbidity

  2. Prevalence and concordance of high cardiovascular disease scores in HIV/AIDS patients from Croatia and Serbia with four international algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Begovac, Josip; Dragovic, Gordana; Viskovic, Klaudija; Kusic, Jovana; Perovic Mihanovic, Marta; Lukas, Davorka; Jevtovic, Djordje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated cardiovascular risks in HIV-infected patients from Croatia and Serbia and the eligibility for statin therapy as recommended by the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines, European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines and European Society of Cardiology and the European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention [1–3]. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional analysis of consecutive patients between 40 and 79 years old who had received antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months was performed. Results Of 254 (132 from Croatia and 122 from Serbia) persons included in the study, 76% were male; median age was 49 years. Up to 51.6% of persons had a high CVD risk. The prevalence of current smoking was 42.9%, hypertension 31.5% and hypercholesterolaemia (>6.2 mmol/L) 35.4%. Statins would be recommended to 21.3% (95% CI, 16.3% to 27.4%) of persons by the EACS, 25.6% (95% CI, 20.2% to 31.9%) by ESC/EAS and 37.9% (95% CI, 31.6 to 44.6%) by the ACC/AHA guidelines. A high 5-year data collection on adverse effects of anti-HIV drugs study risk score (>5%) had a moderate agreement with the high (?20%) 10-year CVD Framingham risk score (kappa=0.47) and high (?5%) 10-year European systematic coronary risk evaluation score algorithm (kappa=0.47), and substantial agreement with the elevated (?7.5%) 10-year Pooled Cohort Atherosclerotic CVD risk equation score (kappa=0.63). Conclusion We found a high prevalence of CVD risks in patients from Croatia and Serbia. The ACC/AHA guideline would recommend statins more often than ESC/EAS and EACS guidelines. PMID:25394056

  3. Cardiovascular system

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    The cardiovascular system is composed of the heart and the network of arteries, veins, and capillaries that transport blood throughout the ... carries waste products from the tissues to the systems of the body through which they are eliminated. ...

  4. Recommendations for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in adults with congenital heart disease from the respective working groups of the European Society of Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, Philip J.; Geva, Tal; Kaemmerer, Harald; Trindade, Pedro T.; Schwitter, Juerg; Webb, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to provide information and explanations regarding the clinically relevant options, strengths, and limitations of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in relation to adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance can provide assessments of anatomical connections, biventricular function, myocardial viability, measurements of flow, angiography, and more, without ionizing radiation. It should be regarded as a necessary facility in a centre specializing in the care of adults with CHD. Also, those using CMR to investigate acquired heart disease should be able to recognize and evaluate previously unsuspected CHD such as septal defects, anomalously connected pulmonary veins, or double-chambered right ventricle. To realize its full potential and to avoid pitfalls, however, CMR of CHD requires training and experience. Appropriate pathophysiological understanding is needed to evaluate cardiovascular function after surgery for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and after Fontan operations. For these and other complex CHD, CMR should be undertaken by specialists committed to long-term collaboration with the clinicians and surgeons managing the patients. We provide a table of CMR acquisition protocols in relation to CHD categories as a guide towards appropriate use of this uniquely versatile imaging modality. PMID:20067914

  5. Optimal use of left ventriculography at the time of cardiac catheterization: a consensus statement from the society for cardiovascular angiography and interventions.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Osvaldo S; Babb, Joseph D; Dieter, Robert S; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Islam, Ashequl M; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Moore, Phillip; Sorajja, Paul; Blankenship, James C

    2015-02-01

    The rationale to perform left ventriculography at the time of cardiac catheterization has been little studied. The technique and frequency of use of left ventriculography vary by geographic regions, institutions, and individuals. Despite the recent publication of guidelines and appropriate use criteria for coronary angiography, revascularization, and noninvasive imaging, to date there have been no specific guidelines on the performance of left ventriculography. When left ventriculography is performed, proper technique must be used to generate high quality data which can direct patient management. The decision to perform left ventriculography in place of, or in addition to, other forms of ventricular assessment should be made taking into account the clinical context and the type of information each study provides. This paper attempts to show the role of left ventriculography at the time of coronary angiography or left heart catheterization. The recommendations in this document are not formal guidelines but are based on the consensus of this writing group. These recommendations should be tested through clinical research studies. Until such studies are performed, the writing group believes that adoption of these recommendations will lead to a more standardized application of ventriculography and improve the quality of care provided to cardiac patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25370476

  6. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  7. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011. PMID:21572115

  8. [Practice guideline 'Influenza prevention in nursing homes and care homes', issued by the Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists; division of tasks between nursing home specialist, general practitioner and company doctor].

    PubMed

    Cools, H J M; van Essen, G A

    2005-01-15

    The Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists has formulated a guideline for the prevention of influenza in nursing homes and care homes in The Netherlands. The guideline recommends the realisation of the highest possible degree of vaccination of both patients and health care workers. At the start of the flu season, the manager of the chronic care institute should organize a scheme for vaccination against influenza and a plan in case of an outbreak of influenza. The division of tasks between the nursing home specialist, the general practitioner and the company doctor should be recorded in both the vaccination scheme and the outbreak plan. In order to decrease the incidence of non-response to the vaccine a double dose of influenza vaccine for nursing home patients should be considered. The outbreak plan should raise the state of alertness for influenza and ensure that virological confirmation of clinical influenza is obtained quickly. Immediately after virological confirmation of clinical influenza, patients with influenza should be treated with oseltamivir and both patients and health care workers in the unit should receive prophylaxis with oseltamivir. Non-vaccinated patients should also be offered vaccination to restrict re-introduction of the virus. During an influenza outbreak, only patients with influenza or those who have had prophylactic treatment may be admitted to the facility. In the case of an influenza pandemic, national guidelines should be followed. PMID:15693586

  9. Management of cardiovascular disease risk in chronic inflammatory disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariana J. Kaplan

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic inflammatory disorders are at increased risk of developing premature cardiovascular disease. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the effects of inflammatory pathways on the vasculature, clear guidelines on the management of traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors in patients with systemic autoimmunity are lacking. Thus, rigorous studies assessing the individual contributions of the various treatments used

  10. Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children: Recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M.; Brady, Michael T.; Danner, Susie P.; Dominguez, Kenneth L.; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S.; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Summary This report updates and combines into one document earlier versions of guidelines for preventing and treating opportunistic infections (OIs) among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, last published in 2002 and 2004, respectively. These guidelines are intended for use by clinicians and other health-care workers providing medical care for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in the United States. The guidelines discuss opportunistic pathogens that occur in the United States and one that might be acquired during international travel (i.e., malaria). Topic areas covered for each OI include a brief description of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the OI in children; prevention of exposure; prevention of disease by chemoprophylaxis and/or vaccination; discontinuation of primary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution; treatment of disease; monitoring for adverse effects during treatment; management of treatment failure; prevention of disease recurrence; and discontinuation of secondary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution. A separate document about preventing and treating of OIs among HIV-infected adults and postpubertal adolescents (Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents) was prepared by a working group of adult HIV and infectious disease specialists. The guidelines were developed by a panel of specialists in pediatric HIV infection and infectious diseases (the Pediatric Opportunistic Infections Working Group) from the U.S. government and academic institutions. For each OI, a pediatric specialist with content-matter expertise reviewed the literature for new information since the last guidelines were published; they then proposed revised recommendations at a meeting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in June 2007. After these presentations and discussions, the guidelines underwent further revision, with review and approval by the Working Group, and final endorsement by NIH, CDC, the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (PIDS), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of the evidence supporting the recommendation so readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. An important mode of acquisition of OIs, as well as HIV infection among children, is from their infected mother; HIV-infected women coinfected with opportunistic pathogens might be more likely than women without HIV infection to transmit these infections to their infants. In addition, HIV-infected women or HIV-infected family members coinfected with certain opportunistic pathogens might be more likely to transmit these infections horizontally to their children, resulting in increased likelihood of primary acquisition of such infections in the young child. Therefore, infections with opportunistic pathogens might affect not just HIV-infected infants but also HIV-exposed but uninfected infants who become infected by the pathogen because of transmission from HIV-infected mothers or family members with coinfections. These guidelines for treating OIs in children therefore consider treatment of infections among all children, both HIV-infected and uninfected, born to HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV infection is increasingly seen among adolescents with perinatal infection now surviving into their teens and among youth with behaviorally acquired HIV infection. Although guidelines for postpubertal adolescents can be found in the adult OI guidelines, drug pharmacokinetics and response to treatment may differ for younger prepubertal or pubertal adolescents. Therefore, these guidelines also apply to treatment of HIV-infected youth who have not yet completed pubertal development. Major changes in the guidelines include 1) greater emphasis on the importance of antiretroviral therapy for p

  11. Pulmonary rehabilitation exercise prescription in chronic obstructive lung disease: US survey and review of guidelines and clinical practices.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Chris; Fullwood, M Dot; Rigler, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, progressive disorder associated with disabling symptoms, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and substantial morbidity and mortality. Current national guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Many PR exercise programs are based on guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine. Recommendations have also been published by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the American Thoracic Society. Translating exercise science into effective training and clinical care requires interpretation and the use of diverse national PR guidelines and recommendations. Pulmonary rehabilitation clinicians often vary in their education and background, with most nurses and respiratory care practitioners lacking formal training in exercise physiology. Patients often have comorbidities that may further complicate exercise provision and prescription. This article describes the results of an informal, nonscientific survey of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation members exploring current PR exercise prescription practices as a basis for discussion and reviews current national exercise recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further, it describes areas of uncertainty regarding exercise prescription in PR and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines, clinician preparedness, and patient complexity. PMID:23846840

  12. Forms & Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    2003 DCP Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials 2003 Step 1: Developing a Cancer Prevention Clinical Trial Forms & Guidelines General Guidelines for Consortia Lead Organization to add Participating to Consortium (doc, 63kb) NCI Request for Proposals,

  13. [Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics].

    PubMed

    Scibona, Paula; Angriman, Federico; Simonovich, Ventura; Heller, Martina M; Belloso, Waldo H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current medical practice takes into account information based on population studies and benefits observed in large populations or cohorts. However, individual patients present great differences in both toxicity and clinical efficacy that can be explained by variations in adherence, unknown drug to drug interactions and genetic variability. The latter seems to explain from 20% up to 95% of patient to patient variability. Treating patients with cardiovascular disorders faces the clinician with the challenge to include genomic analysis into daily practice. There are several examples within cardiovascular disease of treatments that can vary in toxicity or clinical usefulness based on genetic changes. One of the main factors affecting the efficacy of Clopidogrel is the phenotype associated with polymorphisms in the gene CYP 2C9. Furthermore, regarding oral anticoagulants, changes in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 play an important role in changing the clinical response to anticoagulation. When analyzing statin treatment, one of their main toxicities (myopathy) can be predicted by the SLCO1B1 polymorphism. The potential for prediction of toxicity and clinical efficacy from the use of genetic analysis warrants further studies aiming towards its inclusion in daily clinical practice. PMID:24636047

  14. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ? 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into perspective with new insights in terms of safety issues. PMID:24613429

  15. Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

    2014-11-01

    Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. PMID:25354948

  16. Cardiovascular risk assessment in diabetes mellitus: comparison of the general Framingham risk profile versus the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts in Arabs--clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Barakat, Mohammed N; Al-Lawati, Najla A; Al-Maskari, Masoud Y; Elsayed, Medhat K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim S

    2013-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and its clinical implications among 1 110 Omani patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) using 2 different CVD risk tools: the general Framingham risk profile (GFRP) and the joint World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) risk prediction charts. The GFRP tool identified higher proportion of patients compared with joint WHO/ISH tool at 10-year CVD risk 10% to <20% and at 20% to <30%. At CVD risk ?30%, both assessment tools identified similar proportions of patients (22% vs 24%; P=.120). Compared with WHO/ISH charts, the GFRP identified almost double the number of men eligible for aspirin treatment at CVD risk thresholds of ?10% (86% vs 43%). In women, the proportions were, 66% and 45%, respectively. For statins, the figures were, 60% and 37%, for men and 28% and 36%, for women. In conclusion, the GFRP overestimates the number of patients eligible for primary prevention of CVD compared with the joint WHO/ISH method. PMID:22942129

  17. Tobacco and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Prajeena; Pant, Sadip; Rodriguez, Alexis Phillip; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-04-01

    Tobacco consumption has been inextricably intertwined with society and its evolution. At one time, centuries ago, thought to be a sign of refinement and nobility, fortunately, this perception has been changing worldwide. Currently, this change in perception has been so dramatic that laws are enacted to limit tobacco exposure through second-hand smokers. Countless studies continue to emerge on tobacco's healthcare toll to the point that we now consider indisputable facts that smokers have a higher incidence of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, among many others. However, there are other less well-known emerging facts that still require close attention such as the effect on the immune and hematopoietic systems. Tobacco smoke is injurious to all major organs in our bodies. With over 30 known carcinogens, it should not be surprising that it affects all aspects of human health. In this chapter, we will focus on the effects of tobacco on cardiovascular health. PMID:25225032

  18. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI))

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, K.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Bone, H.-G.; Bardutzky, J.; Dempfle, C.-E.; Forst, H.; Gastmeier, P.; Gerlach, H.; Gründling, M.; John, S.; Kern, W.; Kreymann, G.; Krüger, W.; Kujath, P.; Marggraf, G.; Martin, J.; Mayer, K.; Meier-Hellmann, A.; Oppert, M.; Putensen, C.; Quintel, M.; Ragaller, M.; Rossaint, R.; Seifert, H.; Spies, C.; Stüber, F.; Weiler, N.; Weimann, A.; Werdan, K.; Welte, T.

    2010-01-01

    Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources. PMID:20628653

  19. Safety guideline: reducing the risk from cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture 2015: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland British Orthopaedic Association British Geriatric Society.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R; White, S M; Moppett, I K; Parker, M J; Chesser, T J S; Costa, M L; Johansen, A; Wilson, H; Timperley, A J

    2015-05-01

    Concise guidelines are presented for the preparation and conduct of anaesthesia and surgery in patients undergoing cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture. The Working Party specifically considered recent publications highlighting complications occurring during the peri-operative period . The advice presented is based on previously published advice and clinical studies. PMID:25866041

  20. Cardiovascular risk profile and lifestyle habits in a cohort of Italian cardiologists (from the SOCRATES Survey).

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Zito, Giovanni; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2013-07-15

    Cardiologists' cardiovascular profile and lifestyle habits are poorly known worldwide. To offer a snapshot of the personal health habits of Italian cardiologists, the Survey on Cardiac Risk Profile and Lifestyle Habits in a Cohort of Italian Cardiologists (SOCRATES) was undertaken. A Web-based electronic self-reported survey, accessible through a dedicated Web site, was used for data entry, and data were transferred through the Web to a central database. The survey was divided into 4 sections: baseline characteristics, medical illnesses and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, lifestyle habits, and selected medication use. The e-mail databases of 3 national scientific societies were used to survey a large and representative sample of Italian cardiologists. During the 3-month period of the survey, 1,770 of the 5,240 cardiologists contacted (33.7%) completed and returned ?1 sections of the questionnaire. More than 49% of the participants had 1 of the 5 classic risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, active smoking, diabetes, and previous vascular events). More than 28% of respondents had 2 to 5 risk factors, and only 22.1% had none and therefore, according to age and gender, could be considered at low to intermediate risk. Despite the reported risk factors, >90% of cardiologists had a self-reported risk perception quantified as mild, such as low or intermediate. Furthermore, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, and stress at work or at home were commonly reported, as well as limited use of cardiovascular drugs, such as statins or aspirin. In conclusion, the average cardiovascular profile of Italian cardiologist is unlikely to be considered ideal or even favorable according to recent statements and guidelines regarding cardiovascular risk. PMID:23587277

  1. Prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in women: the obstetric-gynecologist's point of view.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Giuseppina; Brunelli, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    It has been confirmed that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality not only in men but also in women. The most recent American Heart Association (AHA) and European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) recommendations specifically address women. This is in response to the majority of studies that primarily involved men. Ideal cardiovascular health has been defined for women, and new factors were added to the traditional risk factors. As stated by the American and European Menopause Societies (NAMS and EMAS), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is no longer believed to be protective for CVD; on the contrary, women benefit just as much as men from statins to lower their risk of heart disease. At the onset of menopause, women exhibit an increase in cholesterol and an increased risk of CVD. Unfortunately, hyperlipidemia is largely undertreated in women, although the rate of hypercholesterolemia among women is similar to that of men. More aggressive intervention is recommended for persons with multiple risk factors and/or monogenic dyslipidemias. In women affected by familial hypercholesterolemia in the homozygous and compound forms, treatment such as lipoprotein apheresis is also suggested. There is evidence for the use of these techniques even in pregnancy. An update on the most recent guidelines issued by AHA, EAS, NAMS and EMAS for the prevention of CVD in women along with a brief overview on the use of lipoprotein apheresis in women during pregnancy is reported. PMID:23551672

  2. Cardiovascular adaptation and cardiac disease in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Del Río-santiago, Valentín; Santiago Trinidad, Ricardo; Vicenty Rivera, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are uncommon among trained athletes. Their occurrences mostly depend on the individual's age and fitness levels. Adequate understanding of the cardiovascular adaptations undergone by the competitive athletes' heart is of paramount importance in order to differentiate them from serious cardiovascular conditions. Diagnosing these abnormalities early may prevent rare but devastating potential complications associated with athletic activities and defines appropriate activity restrictions to minimize the risk of sudden cardiac death. This article will review concerns related to competitive athlete's cardiovascular adaptations and diseases, in light of specific recommendations presented in the 36th Bethesda Conference guidelines. PMID:23882976

  3. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  4. ESC\\/EAS Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias: the Task Force for the management of dyslipidaemias of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Reiner; A. L. Catapano; G. de Backer; I. Graham; M. R. Taskinen; O. Wiklund; S. Agewall; E. Alegria; M. J. Chapman; P. Durrington; S. Erdine; J. Halcox; R. Hobbs; J. Kjekshus; P. P. Filardi; G. Riccardi; R. F. Storey; D. Wood; J. Bax; A. Vahanian; A. Auricchio; H. Baumgartner; C. Ceconi; V. Dean; C. Deaton; R. Fagard; G. Filippatos; C. Funck-Brentano; D. Hasdai; A. Hoes; P. Kearney; J. Knuuti; P. Kolh; T. McDonagh; C. Moulin; D. Poldermans; B. A. Popescu; U. Sechtem; P. A. Sirnes; M. Tendera; A. Torbicki; P. Vardas; P. Widimsky; S. Windecker; G. Berkenboom; J. de Graaf; O. Descamps; N. Gotcheva; K. Griffith; G. F. Guida; S. Gulec; Y. Henkin; K. Huber; Y. A. Kesaniemi; J. Lekakis; A. J. Manolis; P. Marques-Vidal; L. Masana; J. McMurray; M. Mendes; Z. Pagava; T. Pedersen; E. Prescott; Q. Rato; G. Rosano; S. Sans; A. F. H. Stalenhoef; L. Tokgozoglu; M. Viigimaa; M. E. Wittekoek; J. L. Zamorano

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to atherosclerosis of the arterial vessel wall and to thrombosis is the foremost cause of premature mortality and of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in Europe, and is also increasingly common in developing countries.1 In the European Union, the economic cost of CVD represents annually E192 billion1 in direct and indirect healthcare costs. The main clinical entities

  5. Update on Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kay M. Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in adults in the United States and based on recent data from the World Health Organization (WHO), it will soon be a major cause of death even in so-called developing societies. CVD is very complex and includes coronary heart disease (CHD), systemic and pulmonary hypertension, stroke, valvular heart disease, congenital heart

  6. Cardiovascular prevention in the cancer survivor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Carol L

    2015-03-01

    Cancer survivorship should be defined starting not from completion of treatment, but from the time of diagnosis. Assessing and controlling the cancer patient's cardiovascular risk before, during, and after treatment is crucial to improving their overall outcome. There are many cancer therapies, including but not limited to anthracyclines, radiation, and vascular signaling pathway inhibitors which should be considered nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors with significant morbidity. Monitoring novel populations, such as a younger age group, for ischemic coronary disease or congestive heart failure (CHF) is not intuitive to many clinicians. Symptoms of CHF and coronary artery disease overlap with common side effects of cancer and cancer treatment. Cancer survivors may also have fewer typical symptoms of cardiovascular disease. Increased surveillance and aggressive control of cardiovascular disease is important in cancer patients both while undergoing active treatment and in the long term. Despite the increasing interest in cardio-oncology, data-driven guidelines are lacking due to small study sizes and low event rates over a short period of time. Most practice guidelines have been based on clinical practice and expert opinion. The list of cardiotoxic cancer therapies continues to grow each year. This review is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all cancer therapy toxicity, but will focus on recent literature regarding prevention of CHF and coronary artery disease (CAD) during active cancer therapy as well as current screening guidelines for long-term survivors. PMID:25637040

  7. Hypertension, concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and mortality: the Singapore Cardiovascular Cohort Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Lee; S Ma; D Heng; S K Chew; K Hughes; E S Tai

    2008-01-01

    The current hypertension (HTN) guidelines recommend the assessment of other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in individuals with HTN for further management. Few studies in Asian populations have been published to identify the outcome of individuals with HTN and other CVD risk factors. This study aims to assess the effect of HTN alone, and in combination with other CVD risk

  8. Barriers to physician adherence to a subfertility guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. C. Haagen; W. L. D. M. Nelen; R. P. M. G. Hermens; D. D. M. Braat; R. P. T. M. Grol; J. A. M. Kremer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines aim to improve clinical practice but are not self-implementing. Insight into barriers to physician guideline adherence is crucial for development of effective implementation strategies. The study aim was to identify barriers to physician adherence to an intrauterine insemination (IUI) guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among all Dutch gynaecologists,

  9. Guidelines for Two-Year College Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan,, William P., Ed.; Davies, Chad L., Ed.; O'Kuma, Thomas L., Ed.; Plumb, Marie , Ed.; Waggoner, William, Ed.; Warren, William R., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The guidelines are meant to help two-year institutions provide physics students with the best possible education in the fundamental areas of physics and its relation to other disciplines and to society. General curricular guidelines, rather than specific curricular content, are defined. Implementing these guidelines can help ensure that the…

  10. AHA\\/ACC Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sidney C. Smith; Steven N. Blair; Robert O. Bonow; Lawrence M. Brass; Manuel D. Cerqueira; Kathleen Dracup; Valentin Fuster; Antonio Gotto; Scott M. Grundy; Nancy Houston Miller; Alice Jacobs; Daniel Jones; Ronald M. Krauss; Lori Mosca; Ira Ockene; Richard C. Pasternak; Thomas Pearson; Marc A. Pfeffer; Rodman D. Starke; Kathryn A. Taubert

    improves patient survival, reduces recurrent events and the need for interventional procedures, and improves the quality of life for these patients. The compelling evidence from recent clinical trials was the impetus to revise the 1995 guidelines. As examples, the many lipid reduction trials have generated significant changes in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Adult Treatment Panel III report.

  11. Sodium intake and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-03-13

    Sodium is an essential nutrient. Increasing sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure, whereas low sodium intake results in increased renin and aldosterone levels. Randomized controlled trials have reported reductions in blood pressure with reductions in sodium intake, to levels of sodium intake <1.5 g/d, and form the evidentiary basis for current population-wide guidelines recommending low sodium intake. Although low sodium intake (<2.0 g/d) has been achieved in short-term feeding clinical trials, sustained low sodium intake has not been achieved by any of the longer term clinical trials (>6-month duration). It is assumed that the blood pressure-lowering effects of reducing sodium intake to low levels will result in large reductions in cardiovascular disease globally. However, current evidence from prospective cohort studies suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and cardiovascular events, based on studies from >300 000 people, and suggests that the lowest risk of cardiovascular events and death occurs in populations consuming an average sodium intake range (3-5 g/d). The increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with higher sodium intake (>5 g/d) is most prominent in those with hypertension. A major deficit in the field is the absence of large randomized controlled trials to provide definitive evidence on optimal sodium intake for preventing cardiovascular events. Pending such trials, current evidence would suggest a recommendation for moderate sodium intake in the general population (3-5 g/d), with targeting the lower end of the moderate range among those with hypertension. PMID:25767289

  12. Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline From the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Levin; David A. Lieberman; Beth McFarland; Kimberly S. Andrews; Durado Brooks; John Bond; Chiranjeev Dash; Francis M. Giardiello; Seth Glick; David Johnson; C. Daniel Johnson; Theodore R. Levin; Perry J. Pickhardt; Douglas K. Rex; Robert A. Smith; Alan Thorson; Sidney J. Winawer

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society,

  13. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Huang, Bin [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States) [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Divison of Cancer Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Tucker, Thomas C. [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  15. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY?

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  16. Cardiovascular risk and psoriasis: beyond the traditional risk factors.

    PubMed

    Coumbe, Ann G; Pritzker, Marc R; Duprez, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease resulting in plaques of the skin. Similar to atherosclerosis, inflammation is integral to the initiation and propagation of plaque development. Mounting evidence has emerged demonstrating that psoriasis not only is associated with increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, but also is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Systemic therapies for moderate to severe psoriasis can increase the cardiovascular risk. Despite the evidence that psoriasis is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, current guidelines only address managing traditional risk factors. An interdisciplinary approach is needed to find the necessary steps beyond classic risk reduction and detection of early cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriasis, as well as to develop a cardiovascular disease preventive regimen. PMID:24161194

  17. Guidelines 2.0: systematic development of a comprehensive checklist for a successful guideline enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Schünemann, Holger J.; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Etxeandia, Itziar; Falavigna, Maicon; Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem; Ventresca, Matthew; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Kowalski, Sérgio; Baldeh, Tejan; Zhang, Yuan; Raid, Ulla; Neumann, Ignacio; Norris, Susan L.; Thornton, Judith; Harbour, Robin; Treweek, Shaun; Guyatt, Gordon; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Reinap, Marge; Brožek, Jan; Oxman, Andrew; Akl, Elie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although several tools to evaluate the credibility of health care guidelines exist, guidance on practical steps for developing guidelines is lacking. We systematically compiled a comprehensive checklist of items linked to relevant resources and tools that guideline developers could consider, without the expectation that every guideline would address each item. Methods: We searched data sources, including manuals of international guideline developers, literature on guidelines for guidelines (with a focus on methodology reports from international and national agencies, and professional societies) and recent articles providing systematic guidance. We reviewed these sources in duplicate, extracted items for the checklist using a sensitive approach and developed overarching topics relevant to guidelines. In an iterative process, we reviewed items for duplication and omissions and involved experts in guideline development for revisions and suggestions for items to be added. Results: We developed a checklist with 18 topics and 146 items and a webpage to facilitate its use by guideline developers. The topics and included items cover all stages of the guideline enterprise, from the planning and formulation of guidelines, to their implementation and evaluation. The final checklist includes links to training materials as well as resources with suggested methodology for applying the items. Interpretation: The checklist will serve as a resource for guideline developers. Consideration of items on the checklist will support the development, implementation and evaluation of guidelines. We will use crowdsourcing to revise the checklist and keep it up to date. PMID:24344144

  18. COASTAL GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the coastal subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential regulatory limits, and the cost of regulation. Legislation/Enabling Authority: ...

  19. Real-life evaluation of European and American high-risk strategies for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with first myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin B; Falk, Erling

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the detection rate (sensitivity) of the high-risk strategy recommended in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE/UK) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In particular, to evaluate the ability to ensure statin therapy to contemporary Europeans destined for a first myocardial infarction (MI). Design 393 consecutive statin-naïve, CVD-free patients without diabetes hospitalised for a first MI, 247 of whom were 40–75?years of age. We assumed they had undergone a health check the day before their MI and estimated the predicted risk. Primary outcome Sensitivity of the risk-based eligibility for primary prevention with statins recommended by the guidelines. Results All recommended risk scores rank-ordered patients similarly, but the sensitivity of the cut point above which statin therapy should be considered differed substantially. In younger patients (age 40–60), 62% of men and 13% of women qualified for statin therapy by ACC/AHA criteria, compared with only 2% of men and no women using the ESC criteria recommended for most non-Eastern European countries. In those 60–75?years of age, the ACC/AHA guidelines captured all men and 85% of women, compared with 12% and 2%, respectively, using the new ESC guideline. This guideline restricted the eligibility for primary prevention with statins substantially by reclassifying many European countries from ‘high-risk’ to ‘low-risk’, whereas the eligibility was expanded in the ACC/AHA and the new NICE/UK guidelines by lowering the decision threshold. Conclusions The 2012 ESC guidelines differ substantially from the 2013 ACC/AHA and 2014 NICE/UK guidelines in ability to secure statin therapy to those destined for a first MI. A great opportunity for primary prevention with statins remains unexploited in Europe. PMID:25326211

  20. [Residual cardiovascular risk markers].

    PubMed

    Rosolová, Hana; Nussbaumerová, Barbora

    2014-11-01

    The European definition of biomarker is presented; it is a measurable factor, which reflects a physiological or pathological process in human body. There are also mentioned transferred meanings of the term marker used in different fields of medicine. The importance, categorization and calculation of global cardiovascular (CV) risk are explained in patients in primary prevention of CV disease (SCORE risk chart). Residual CV risk persists in patients in primary or secondary prevention of CV diseases treated according to current guidelines, even if their risk factors (blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol, glucose level) have achieved the recommended values. This residual risk was done by non-LDL dyslipidemia especially, so called atherogenic dyslipidemia (Residual Risk Reduction Initiative definition). Investigators of preventive EUROASPIRE studies assessed, that 5-year mortality from CV diseases was in a positive association with glucose level, smoking and total cholesterol. In our recent analysis, we have described among the Czech samples of EUROASPIRE studies I-IV, that BMI and prevalence of diabetes increase during the last 16 years very steeply. Patients with stable coronary heart diseases in combination with diabetes have had higher prevalence of residual risk markers (atherogenic dyslipidemia, atherogenic index of plasma described by M. Dobiasova and hypertriglyceridemic waist) than patients without diabetes. Except of prescription of statins, ACE inhibitors, antiaggregative or anticoagulative drugs was increasing, the residual CV risk was not changing during the followed period of 16 years. PMID:25600039

  1. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  2. The role of aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ittaman, Sunitha V; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-12-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  3. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT-scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric edema, small-bowel feces sign, devascularization) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water-Soluble-Contrast-Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The radiologic appearance of WSCM in the colon within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM maybe administered either orally or via NGT both immediately at admission or after failed conservative treatment for 48 hours. The use of WSCM is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution, surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not decrease recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery. Open surgery is often used for strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach is advisable using open access technique. Access in left upper quadrant or left flank is the safest and only completely obstructing adhesions should be identified and lysed with cold scissors. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably if first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band. A low threshold for open conversion should be maintained. Peritoneal adhesions should be prevented. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin decrease incidence of adhesions. Icodextrin may reduce the risk of re-obstruction. HA cannot reduce need of surgery. Adhesions quantification and scoring maybe useful for achieving standardized assessment of adhesions severity and for further research in diagnosis and treatment of ASBO. PMID:24112637

  4. Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Student Research Fellowships Scientists of Tomorrow #12 medical Provides medical Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research

  5. 1997 Guidelines for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Unexplained Fever

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter T. Hughes; Donald Armstrong; Gerald P. Bodey; Arthur E. Brown; John E. Edwards; Ronald Feld; Philip Pizzo; Kenneth V. I. Rolston; Jerry L. Shenep; Lowell S. Young

    1997-01-01

    This is the first in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners. The targeted patients and setting for

  6. Cardiovascular fitness and type 2 diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cathy Mullooly

    2002-01-01

    Exercise has long been recognized as a cornerstone in diabetes care. Even so, modern science is just beginning to understand\\u000a the physiologic impact cardiovascular fitness has on long-term diabetes management, and the prevention or delay, of type 2\\u000a diabetes. Recent advances in research are defining the metabolic pathways involved in insulin signaling and in reducing insulin\\u000a resistance. Tools and guidelines

  7. Exosome and its roles in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Zhao, Shui-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles secreted by cells, which are capable of carrying signaling molecules in the forms of protein, mRNA and miRNA to serve as the platforms for complex intercellular communications. During the past few years, increasing efforts have been devoted to exosome research, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of identifying the molecular composition, elucidating the mechanisms and regulations of biogenesis and characterizing the functions in a variety of physiological and pathological settings including cardiovascular diseases, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern society. This review provides an update on exosome research and summarizes the roles of exosomes in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25549884

  8. Endocrine Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Us Leadership and Staff Strategic Plan Society History Conflicts of Interest Advertising Disclaimer Employment at the Society Sister Societies ... Us Leadership and Staff Strategic Plan Society History Conflicts of Interest Advertising Disclaimer Employment at the Society Sister Societies ...

  9. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. Heart diseases and stroke are ...

  10. Ethical and Clinical Aspects of Intensive Care Unit Admission in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Guidelines of the Ethics Commission of the French Society of Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Malak, Sandra; Sotto, Jean-Jacques; Ceccaldi, Joël; Colombat, Philippe; Casassus, Philippe; Jaulmes, Dominique; Rochant, Henri; Cheminant, Morgane; Beaussant, Yvan; Zittoun, Robert; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Admission of patients with hematological malignancies to intensive care unit (ICU) raises recurrent ethical issues for both hematological and intensivist teams. The decision of transfer to ICU has major consequences for end of life care for patients and their relatives. It also impacts organizational human and economic aspects for the ICU and global health policy. In light of the recent advances in hematology and critical care medicine, a wide multidisciplinary debate has been conducted resulting in guidelines approved by consensus by both disciplines. The main aspects developed were (i) clarification of the clinical situations that could lead to a transfer to ICU taking into account the severity criteria of both hematological malignancy and clinical distress, (ii) understanding the process of decision-making in a context of regular interdisciplinary concertation involving the patient and his relatives, (iii) organization of a collegial concertation at the time of the initial decision of transfer to ICU and throughout and beyond the stay in ICU. The aim of this work is to propose suggestions to strengthen the collaboration between the different teams involved, to facilitate the daily decision-making process, and to allow improvement of clinical practice. PMID:25349612

  11. Antiviral prophylaxis in patients with haematological malignancies and solid tumours: Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Hematology and Oncology (DGHO).

    PubMed

    Sandherr, M; Einsele, H; Hebart, H; Kahl, C; Kern, W; Kiehl, M; Massenkeil, G; Penack, O; Schiel, X; Schuettrumpf, S; Ullmann, A J; Cornely, O A

    2006-07-01

    Morbidity and mortality in patients with malignancies are increased by viral infections. These mostly are reactivations of asymptomatic latent infections. They primarily concern clinical entities associated with the reactivation of herpes viruses, such as varicella zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Respiratory tract infections caused by influenza, parainfluenza or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are less common. Since reactivation of latent infections has major clinical impact, antiviral prophylaxis is an attractive approach for patients expecting immunosuppression. The main risk factor for clinically relevant reactivation is profound disruption of cellular immune response. Duration and severity of chemotherapy induced neutropenia are of lesser importance. The risk of viral complications rises significantly in the presence of sustained suppression of T-cell function, e.g. in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants or of alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) antibody therapy. The objective of this guideline is to review the basis of prophylactic strategies and to provide recommendations for clinicians treating patients with haematological malignancies and solid tumors. PMID:16410361

  12. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  13. New Insights into the Management of Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk with Angiotensin Receptor Blockers: Observational Studies Help Us?

    PubMed Central

    Goudev, Assen

    2014-01-01

    Post-marketing observational studies are valuable for establishing the real-world effectiveness of treatment regimens in routine clinical practice as they typically monitor a diverse population of patients over many months. This article reviews recent observational studies of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for the management of hypertension: the 6-month eprosartan POWER study (n~29,400), the 3-month valsartan translational research programme (n~19,500), the 9-month irbesartan Treat to Target study (n=14,200), the 6-month irbesartan DO-IT survey (n~3300) and the 12-week candesartan CHILI survey programme (n=4600). Reduction in blood pressure with ARBs reported across these studies appears to be comparable for the different agents, although direct comparisons between studies cannot be made owing to different treatment durations and baseline patient demographics. Of these studies, the eprosartan POWER study, 2 of the 7 studies in the valsartan translational research programme, and the candesartan CHILI Triple T study measured total cardiovascular risk, as recommended in the 2013 European Society of Cardiology-European Society of Hypertension guidelines. The POWER study confirmed the value of the Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) to accurately assess total cardiovascular risk. With the advent of new healthcare practices, such as the use of electronic health records (EHRs), observational studies in larger patient populations will become possible. In the future, algorithms embedded in EHR systems could evolve as decision support tools to inform on patient care. PMID:24847388

  14. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Contact us SCAI.org Home | SecondsCount.org | eLearning Library | Contribute to SCAI PAC My SCAI My ... Interventional Program (TRIP) - Atlanta Maintenance of Certification (MOC) eLearning Library Co-Sponsored Programs Industry Support Documents & Quality ...

  15. Guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis in clinical practice-evidence-based approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis: the sixth special issue.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joseph; Winters, Jeffrey L; Padmanabhan, Anand; Balogun, Rasheed A; Delaney, Meghan; Linenberger, Michael L; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Williams, Mark E; Wu, Yanyun; Shaz, Beth H

    2013-07-01

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) JCA Special Issue Writing Committee is charged with reviewing, updating and categorizating indications for therapeutic apheresis. Beginning with the 2007 ASFA Special Issue (Fourth Edition), the committee has incorporated systematic review and evidence-based approach in the grading and categorization of indications. This Sixth Edition of the ASFA Special Issue has further improved the process of using evidence-based medicine in the recommendations by consistently applying the category and GRADE system definitions, but eliminating the "level of evidence" criteria (from the University HealthCare Consortium) utilized in prior editions given redundancy between GRADE and University HealthCare Consortium systems. The general layout and concept of a fact sheet that was utilized in the Fourth and Fifth Editions, has been largely maintained in this edition. Each fact sheet succinctly summarizes the evidence for the use of therapeutic apheresis in a specific disease entity. This article consists of 78 fact sheets (increased from 2010) for therapeutic indications in ASFA categories I through IV, with many diseases categorized having multiple clinical presentations/situations which are individually graded and categorized. PMID:23868759

  16. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25710019

  17. SBF GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the use of synthetic based drilling fluids in the offshore and coastal subcategories of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential reg limits, and the cost o...

  18. Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The Mountain-Plains curriculum guidelines are outlined to provide guidance in fulfilling the requirements of the Career Education Model Four project as they relate to curriculum design, implementation, and evaluation. The curriculum is devised for the sole purpose of supporting the mission of Model Four and is based on the criteria for family…

  19. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients. Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a frequent death cause among people who sustain blunt trauma. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference. PMID:24606950

  20. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Response to Shallow Water Exercise in Young and Older Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jennifer A.; D'Acquisto, Leo J.; D'Acquisto, Debra M.; Cline, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Compared the metabolic and cardiovascular responses of young and older women while performing shallow water exercise (SWE). Overall, SWE elicited metabolic and cardiovascular responses that met American College of Sports Medicine's guidelines for establishing health benefits. Older females self-selected a greater relative exercise intensity during…

  1. The Lebanese Society of Cardiology: Plans and Perspectives, Navigating Against Contrary Winds and Progressing Against All Odds

    PubMed Central

    Kossaify, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Scientific societies in medicine theoretically aim to improve a medical field as a science; however, this role is expanding nowadays to seeking also the improved practice of a certain medical field. In this regard, the current Lebanese Society of Cardiology (2013–2015) has laid many plans and considered many perspectives. These concern mainly, but not exclusively, the increase of public awareness regarding prevention, investment in research, implementation of guidelines, support of continuous medical education, organization of cardiology symposia and congresses, and achievement of national registries regarding main cardiac conditions, as well as the society’s main objective of decreasing the burden of cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Nonetheless, the implementation of such plans and perspectives is facing contrary winds related to a multifaceted phenomenon: the dominance of private medicine with a subsequent lack of teamwork, the dominance of private media, the social and political unrest in Lebanon, significant discrepancies in the scientific background of cardiologists, and the absence of a standardized national cardiology licensing exam. Importantly, the implementation of such plans and perspectives requires individual commitment, along with the cooperation of the Order of Physicians, the Syndicate of Hospitals in Lebanon (representing private hospitals) and the Ministry of Health. Moreover, industry must be more committed to medical scientific societies; the support of cardiology events organized without the auspices of the Lebanese Society of Cardiology is not encouraged because of the presence of significant conflict of interest. PMID:25452697

  2. [2013 Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recommendations for the diagnosis of adult hypertension, assessment of cardiovascular and other hypertension-associated risk, and attainment of therapeutic goals (summary). Joint recommendations from the International Society for Chronobiology (ISC), American Association of Medical Chronobiology and Chronotherapeutics (AAMCC), Spanish Society of Applied Chronobiology, Chronotherapy, and Vascular Risk (SECAC), Spanish Society of Atherosclerosis (SEA), and Romanian Society of Internal Medicine (RSIM)].

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco; Crespo, Juan J; Fabbian, Fabio; Haus, Erhard; Manfredini, Roberto; Mojón, Artemio; Moyá, Ana; Piñeiro, Luis; Ríos, María T; Otero, Alfonso; Balan, Horia; Fernández, José R

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is much greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime office measurements. The 2013 ABPM guidelines specified herein are based on ABPM patient outcomes studies and constitute a substantial revision of current knowledge. The asleep SBP mean and sleep-time relative SBP decline are the most significant predictors of CVD events, both individually as well as jointly when combined with other ABPM-derived prognostic markers. Thus, they should be preferably used to diagnose hypertension and assess CVD and other associated risks. Progressive decrease by therapeutic intervention in the asleep BP mean is the most significant predictor of CVD event-free interval. The 24 h BP mean is not recommended to diagnose hypertension because it disregards the more valuable clinical information pertaining to the features of the 24 h BP pattern. Persons with the same 24 h BP mean may display radically different 24 h BP patterns, ranging from extreme-dipper to riser types, representative of markedly different risk states. Classification of individuals by comparing office with either the 24 h or awake BP mean as "masked normotensives" (elevated clinic BP but normal ABPM), which should replace the terms of "isolated office" or "white-coat hypertension", and "masked hypertensives" (normal clinic BP but elevated ABPM) is misleading and should be avoided because it disregards the clinical significance of the asleep BP mean. Outcome-based ABPM reference thresholds for men, which in the absence of compelling clinical conditions are 135/85 mmHg for the awake and 120/70 mmHg for the asleep SBP/DBP means, are lower by 10/5 mmHg for SBP/DBP in uncomplicated, low-CVD risk, women and lower by 15/10 mmHg for SBP/DBP in male and female high-risk patients, e.g., with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and/or past CVD events. In the adult population, the combined prevalence of masked normotension and masked hypertension is >35%. Moreover, >20% of "normotensive" adults have a non-dipper BP profile and, thus, are at relatively high CVD risk. Clinic BP measurements, even if supplemented with home self-measurements, are unable to quantify 24 h BP patterning and asleep BP level, resulting in potential misclassification of up to 50% of all evaluated adults. ABPM should be viewed as the new gold standard to diagnose true hypertension, accurately assess consequent tissue/organ, maternal/fetal, and CVD risk, and individualize hypertension chronotherapy. ABPM should be a priority for persons likely to have a blunted nighttime BP decline and elevated CVD risk, i.e., those who are elderly and obese, those with secondary or resistant hypertension, and those diagnosed with diabetes, CKD, metabolic syndrome, and sleep disorders. PMID:23849214

  3. ESC-CHF: guidelines for the aspirational and the practical

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A J B Brady; P A Poole-Wilson

    2006-01-01

    The recently published guidelines by the European Society of Cardiology on the diagnosis and treatment of chronic heart failure are well worth reading, include important new recommendations and are reviewed here

  4. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was…

  5. Is Low-Impact Aerobic Dance an Effective Cardiovascular Workout?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williford, Henry N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents results of an investigation comparing energy cost and cardiovascular responses of aerobic dance routines performed at different intensity levels in varying amounts of energy expenditure. For low-impact dance to meet minimum guidelines suggested by the American College of Sports Medicine, it should be performed at high intensity. (SM)

  6. Update on cardiovascular disease in post-menopausal women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George I. Gorodeski

    2002-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), and in particular coronary artery heart disease (CAHD), is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women. Until recently, most of our knowledge about the pathophysiology of CVD in women – and, subsequently, management guidelines – were based on studies conducted mostly in men. While similar mechanisms operate to induce CVD in women and men, gender-related

  7. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations. PMID:12658506

  8. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

  9. Guideline clinical nutrition in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is regularly accompanied by dysphagia and other factors associated with decreased nutritional intake. Dysphagia with aspiration pneumonia and insufficient nutritional intake lead to worse outcome after stroke. This guideline is the first chapter of the guideline “Clinical Nutrition in Neurology” of the German Society for Clinical Nutrition (DGEM) which itself is one part of a comprehensive guideline about all areas of Clinical Nutrition. The thirty-one recommendations of the guideline are based on a systematic literature search and review, last updated December 31, 2011. All recommendations were discussed and consented at several consensus conferences with the entire DGEM guideline group. The recommendations underline the importance of an early screening and assessment of dysphagia and give advice for an evidence based and comprehensive nutritional management to avoid aspiration, malnutrition and dehydration. PMID:24289189

  10. Imaging in Cardiovascular Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Schäfers; Klaus Tiemann; Michael Kuhlmann; Lars Stegger; Klaus Schäfers; Sven Hermann

    \\u000a Despite enormous investment into cardiovascular research on all levels worldwide, cardiovascular events such as myocardial\\u000a infarction, heart failure, tachyarrhythmia or stroke remain the major causes for death and inability in all developed countries.\\u000a Conventional clinical cardiovascular imaging nowadays provides high-resolution visualization of the morphology of vessels\\u000a and the myocardium. To translate the available patient imaging technologies into animals, especially mice

  11. Canadian guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) that includes recommendations relevant for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of CRS is based on type and duration of symptoms and an objective finding of inflammation of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses. Chronic rhinosinusitis is categorized based on presence or absence of nasal polyps, and this distinction leads to differences in treatment. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is treated with intranasal corticosteroids. Antibiotics are recommended when symptoms indicate infection (pain or purulence). For CRS without nasal polyps, intranasal corticosteroids and second-line antibiotics (ie, amoxicillin– clavulanic acid combinations or fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity) are recommended. Saline irrigation, oral steroids, and allergy testing might be appropriate. Failure of response should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses and referral to an otolaryngologist. Patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery require postoperative treatment and follow-up. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide diagnosis and treatment approaches based on the current understanding of the disease and available evidence. Additionally, the guidelines provide the expert opinion of a diverse group of practice and academic experts to help guide clinicians where evidence is sparse. PMID:24336538

  12. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. De Hert; J. M. Dekker; D. Wood; K. G. Kahl; R. I. G. Holt; H.-J. Möller

    2009-01-01

    People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed in part to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors; obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and

  13. Process description and evaluation of Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark S Tremblay; Michelle E Kho; Andrea C Tricco; Mary Duggan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper describes the process used to arrive at recommended physical activity guidelines for Canadian school-aged children and youth (5-17 years), adults (18-64 years) and older adults (?65 years). METHODS: The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) Physical Activity Measurement and Guidelines (PAMG) Steering Committee used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument to inform the

  14. FRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    of Heart Failure: Sex Differences Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, MD, PhD Center for Cardiovascular Research, CharitéFRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCE SPON S ORED BY LOCATION/TIME Li Ka Shing Center for Learning at 11:45 a.m. TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2012 Learning the Health System and CV Disease: a Possibility

  15. Applied cardiovascular physiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Hainsworth

    2004-01-01

    Physical exercise involves complex coordinated responses involving the locomotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The first cardiovascular changes are initiated by a central drive, which starts either in anticipation of, or at the start of, exercise and leads to a decrease in cardiac vagal activity and an increase in sympathetic activity. Though an increase in heart rate may be the first

  16. Applied cardiovascular physiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emrys Kirkman

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular responses to exercise, haemorrhage, a Valsalva manoeuvre, postural changes and exposure to microgravity are complex patterns made up of a number of common physiological ‘building blocks’. The main cardiovascular response to isotonic exercise is an increase in cardiac output to elevate oxygen delivery to exercising muscle. This is largely mediated via an increase in heart rate and facilitated

  17. Applied cardiovascular physiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emrys Kirkman

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular responses to exercise, haemorrhage, Valsalva manoeuvre, postural changes and exposure to microgravity are complex patterns made up of a number of common physiological ‘building blocks’. The main cardiovascular response to isotonic exercise is an increase in cardiac output to elevate oxygen delivery to exercising muscle. This is largely mediated via an increase in heart rate and facilitated by

  18. Ghrelin and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaigai; Yin, Xinhua; Qi, Yongfen; Pendyala, Lakshmana; Chen, Jack; Hou, Dongming; Tang, Chaoshu

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin, a newly discovered bioactive peptide, is a natural endogenous ligand of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor and initially identified as a strong stimulant for the release of GH. Subsequent research has shown that ghrelin and its various receptors are ubiquitous in many other organs and tissues. Moreover, they participate in the regulation of appetite, energy, bodyweight, metabolism of glucose and fat, as well as modulation of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, immune functions and cell proliferation/apoptosis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that ghrelin has a close relationship with cardiovascular system. Ghrelin and its receptors are widely distributed in cardiovascular tissues, and there is no doubt that the effects of ghrelin in the cardiovascular system are mediated not only via its growth-hormone-releasing effect but also by its direct effects on the heart. Exogenous administration of ghrelin can dilate peripheral blood vessels, constrict coronary artery, improve endothelial function, as well as inhibit myocardial cell apoptosis. So, ghrelin may have cardiovascular protective effect, including lowering of blood pressure, regulation of atherosclerosis, and protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury as well as improving the prognosis of myocardial infarction and heart failure. Some of these new functions of ghrelin may provide new potential therapeutic opportunities for ghrelin in cardiovascular medicine. In this paper, we will review the existing evidence for cardiovascular effects of ghrelin, including the cardiovascular function, the variations in ghrelin plasma levels in pathophysiologicalogical conditions, the possible protective mechanisms of ghrelin, as well as its future potential therapeutic roles. PMID:21286280

  19. Guidelines for the management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Gloviczki, P; Gloviczki, M L

    2012-03-01

    Recently published evidence-based guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) include recommendations for evaluation, classification, outcome assessment and therapy of patients with varicose veins and more advanced chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The need for such guidelines has been evident since imaging techniques and minimally invasive technologies have progressed by leaps and bounds and radiofrequency ablation, laser and sclerotherapy have largely replaced classical open surgery of saphenous stripping. This report reviews the most important guidelines recommended by the SVS/AVF Venous Guideline Committee. It is obvious, however, that some of the technology that is recommended in North America is either not available or not affordable in some parts of the world for patients with varicose veins and CVI. The readers are urged therefore to also consult the guidelines of their national societies, recent publications of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence and the Venous Forum of the Royal Society of Medicine. Venous specialists should also keep in mind that scientific evidence should always be combined with the physician's clinical experience and the patient's preference when the best treatment is selected for an individual patient. PMID:22312060

  20. ISMuLT Guidelines for muscle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Nanni, Gianni; Barazzuol, Michele; Via, Alessio Giai; Ramponi, Carlo; Brancaccio, Paola; Lisitano, Gianfranco; Rizzo, Diego; Freschi, Marco; Galletti, Stefano; Melegati, Gianluca; Pasta, Giulio; Testa, Vittorino; Valent, Alessandro; Del Buono, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Muscle injuries are frequent in high demand sports. No guidelines are available in the scientific literature. ISMuLT, the “Italian Society of Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons”, in line with its multidisciplinary mission, is proud to cover this gap. PMID:24596685

  1. ISMuLT Guidelines for muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Nanni, Gianni; Barazzuol, Michele; Via, Alessio Giai; Ramponi, Carlo; Brancaccio, Paola; Lisitano, Gianfranco; Rizzo, Diego; Freschi, Marco; Galletti, Stefano; Melegati, Gianluca; Pasta, Giulio; Testa, Vittorino; Valent, Alessandro; Del Buono, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Muscle injuries are frequent in high demand sports. No guidelines are available in the scientific literature. ISMuLT, the "Italian Society of Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons", in line with its multidisciplinary mission, is proud to cover this gap. PMID:24596685

  2. Cardiovascular Diseases (and Oral Health)

    MedlinePLUS

    Cardiovascular Diseases Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Conditions Heart Disease and Dental Treatment Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack) High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) Angina High ...

  3. DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF CASES CARDIOVASCULAR

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF CASES CARDIOVASCULAR Cardiovascular disease .........................................................36 Crop Disorder.....................................................12 Digestive Disease/Plant/worms...........................14 Liver disease ......................................................14 Liver tumor

  4. Effects of acute and chronic sleep deprivation on cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Tobaldini, E; Pecis, M; Montano, N

    2014-09-01

    Sleep is a fundamental physiological process, characterized by the activation of several cortical and subcortical neural networks. The relation between sleep and cardiovascular system is complex and bidirectional: sleep disor- ders may alter cardiovascular system, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk, while, on the contrary, cardio- vascular diseases are characterized by an alteration of physiological sleep. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular functions during different sleep stages, with sympatho-vagal balance dynamically shifting towards sympathetic or vagal predominance across different sleep stages. Sleep deprivation (SD) has becoming one of the most relevant health problem in modern societies. SD can be related to aging, which is associated with increased sleep fragmentation, and to sleep disorders, such as sleep disordered breathing and neurological disorders. Experimental studies in animals showed that SD significantly affects cardiovascular functions, altering heart rate and blood pressure responses, and increasing sympathetic activity and neuroendocrine response to stressor stimu- li. Clinical studies in humans have shown that SD, either due to experimental sleep loss and to sleep disorders, can affect different biological pathways, such as cardiovascular autonomic control, inflammation, immunity responses and metabolism. All these alterations may predispose subjects with SD to an increased cardiovascular risk. Hence, it is fundamental to identify the presence of a sleep disorder, which could be per se responsible for sleep loss, or the presence of sleep deprivation due to other factors, such as social life, habits etc., in order to identify subjects at high risk for cardiovascular events. PMID:25828682

  5. Development of evidence-based remote telemetry policy guidelines for a multifacility hospital system.

    PubMed

    George, Karen J; Walsh-Irwin, Colleen; Queen, Caleb; Heuvel, Kimberly Vander; Hawkins, Carrie; Roberts, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Over 10 years ago, the standards for cardiac monitoring were set forth by the Councils on Cardiovascular Nursing, Clinical Cardiology, and Cardiovascular Disease in the Young. The standards were endorsed by the International Society of Computerized Electrocardiology and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The American Heart Association printed the standards as an American Heart Association Scientific Statement. The standards provided direction related to remote telemetry monitoring to acute care hospitals. Since the standards were published, remote monitoring of cardiac patients has increased dramatically prompting research and literature related to appropriate utilization. Appropriate and safe telemetry monitoring requires clearly written evidence-based facility policies. This article describes the process whereby a team of Veterans Hospital Administration nurses from across the country reviewed 70 remote telemetry policies representing 75 Veterans Hospital Administration hospitals for clarity, consistency, and congruency to existing levels of evidence found in the literature. This article describes the processes, successes, and challenges of compiling an evidence-based remote telemetry policy guideline. PMID:25470261

  6. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California. The Senate Bill 1 and commercial structures where solar energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1California Energy Commission GUIDELINES GUIDELINES FOR CALIFORNIA'S SOLAR

  7. Comparison of four international cardiovascular disease prediction models and the prevalence of eligibility for lipid lowering therapy in HIV infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Begovac, Josip; Dragovi?, Gordana; Viškovi?, Klaudija; Kuši?, Jovana; Perovi? Mihanovi?, Marta; Lukas, Davorka; Jevtovi?, ?or?e

    2015-02-28

    Aim. To compare four cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk models and to assess the prevalence of eligibility for lipid lowering therapy according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines, European AIDS Clinical Society Guidelines (EACS), and European Society of Cardiology and the European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines for CVD prevention in HIV infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 254 consecutive HIV infected patients aged 40 to 79 years who received antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months. The patients were examined at the HIV-treatment centers in Belgrade and Zagreb in the period February-April 2011. We compared the following four CVD risk models: the Framingham risk score (FRS), European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Score (SCORE), the Data Collection on Adverse Effects of Anti-HIV Drugs study (DAD), and the Pooled Cohort Atherosclerotic CVD risk (ASCVD) equations. Results. The prevalence of current smoking was 42.9%, hypertension 31.5%, and hypercholesterolemia (>6.2 mmol/L) 35.4%; 33.1% persons were overweight, 11.8% were obese, and 30.3% had metabolic syndrome. A high 5-year DAD CVD risk score (>5%) had substantial agreement with the elevated (?7.5%) 10-year ASCVD risk equation score (kappa=0.63). 21.3% persons were eligible for statin therapy according to EACS (95% confidence intervals [CI], 16.3% to 27.4%), 25.6% according to ESC/EAS (95% CI, 20.2% to 31.9%), and 37.9% according to ACC/AHA guidelines (95% CI, 31.6 to 44.6%). Conclusion. In our sample, agreement between the high DAD CVD risk score and other CVD high risk scores was not very good. The ACC/AHA guidelines would recommend statins more often than ESC/EAS and EACS guidelines. Current recommendations on treatment of dyslipidemia should be applied with caution in the HIV infected population. PMID:25727038

  8. Comparison of four international cardiovascular disease prediction models and the prevalence of eligibility for lipid lowering therapy in HIV infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Begovac, Josip; Dragovi?, Gordana; Viškovi?, Klaudija; Kuši?, Jovana; Perovi? Mihanovi?, Marta; Lukas, Davorka; Jevtovi?, ?or?e

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare four cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk models and to assess the prevalence of eligibility for lipid lowering therapy according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines, European AIDS Clinical Society Guidelines (EACS), and European Society of Cardiology and the European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines for CVD prevention in HIV infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 254 consecutive HIV infected patients aged 40 to 79 years who received antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months. The patients were examined at the HIV-treatment centers in Belgrade and Zagreb in the period February-April 2011. We compared the following four CVD risk models: the Framingham risk score (FRS), European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Score (SCORE), the Data Collection on Adverse Effects of Anti-HIV Drugs study (DAD), and the Pooled Cohort Atherosclerotic CVD risk (ASCVD) equations. Results The prevalence of current smoking was 42.9%, hypertension 31.5%, and hypercholesterolemia (>6.2 mmol/L) 35.4%; 33.1% persons were overweight, 11.8% were obese, and 30.3% had metabolic syndrome. A high 5-year DAD CVD risk score (>5%) had substantial agreement with the elevated (?7.5%) 10-year ASCVD risk equation score (kappa?=?0.63). 21.3% persons were eligible for statin therapy according to EACS (95% confidence intervals [CI], 16.3% to 27.4%), 25.6% according to ESC/EAS (95% CI, 20.2% to 31.9%), and 37.9% according to ACC/AHA guidelines (95% CI, 31.6 to 44.6%). Conclusion In our sample, agreement between the high DAD CVD risk score and other CVD high risk scores was not very good. The ACC/AHA guidelines would recommend statins more often than ESC/EAS and EACS guidelines. Current recommendations on treatment of dyslipidemia should be applied with caution in the HIV infected population. PMID:25727038

  9. ICF linked Dutch physiotherapy guidelines concerning initial assessment, treatment and evaluation in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Peter; M. J. Jansen; E. J. Hurkmans; H. Bloo; L. M. M. C. J. Dekker-Bakker; R. G. Dilling; W. K. H. A. Hilberdink; C. Kersten-Smit; M. de Rooij; C. Veenhof; E. M. Vermeulen; I. de Vos; J. W. Schoones; T. P. Vliet Vlieland

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In 2001 the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) Guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis (HKOA) was developed. Since then, many scientific papers on physical therapy interventions as well as national and international guidelines were published. Relevance: An update of the physical therapy guideline was needed to support the physical therapy practice in performing the best clinical practice

  10. New cholesterol guidelines and primary prevention in women.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Martha; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death for women in the United States. The role of primary prevention of CVD is a necessary focus of healthcare, given the overall prevalence of CVD and its risk factors in women. In 2013, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association released new guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk (ASCVD) in adults that were based on results of randomized controlled trials. These guidelines apply to both men and women. Achievement of a target cholesterol level is no longer part of the guidelines. Rather, the guidelines recommend an appropriate and fixed intensity of a statin based on calculation of an individual?s risk of ASCVD or in diabetics or those with severely elevated LDL-C for primary prevention. The new guidelines emphasize statin therapy over other lipid-lowering therapy. The new guidelines are evidence-based, coming from randomized control trials that have clearly demonstrated improved outcomes using statin therapy in those with ASCVD and those at high risk of ASCVD, not based on LDL targets but rather LDL lowering. This evidence-based approach to ASCVD prevention should be used in women. There were no specific sex differences in the new guidelines, and the focus of this article is to provide the evidence to support the use of these guidelines in women. PMID:25442733

  11. Assistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    in Cardiovascular Disease (or eligible), and advanced certification or training in cardiovascular imaging is highlyAssistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Medicine The Cardiovascular Medicine Division and the Cardiovascular Institute at Stanford

  12. Psoriasis and cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C; Menter, A

    2012-04-01

    There is considerable evidence to show that patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome and smoking compared to the general population. The mechanistic link between psoriasis and this observed increase in cardiovascular co-morbidities has not been fully defined. It is clear, however, that common inflammatory pathways are at play in the pathophysiology of psoriasis, obesity and coronary artery disease. It had been proposed that the control of systemic inflammation in psoriasis could help reduce cardiovascular morbidity, and retrospective studies of methotrexate and anti-TNF-a agents have suggested a cardio-protective effect with use of these agents. More recently, however, there have been concerns regarding a potential excess of cardiovascular events with the newer generation of anti-interleukin-12p40 antibodies. In this article we review the association of psoriasis with cardiovascular disorders and the effects of current psoriasis therapies on cardiovascular risk. PMID:22481581

  13. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  14. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 1 Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 2

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    a world-class education, and conduct cutting- edge cardiovascular research. As heart disease remains into improved tools for cardiovascular disease detection, prevention and treatment. In late 2012, Dr. Robert CStanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 1 2013­2014 #12;Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 2

  15. Professional Guideline Series: Guidelines for Professional Employment

    E-print Network

    Professional Guideline Series: Guidelines for Professional Employment A Framework For Communication Prepared by IEEE-USA's Career and Employment Services Committee #12;IEEE-USA Professional Guideline Series TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 3 I. CAREER OUTLOOK 4 II. RECRUITMENT 6 III. PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT 8

  16. [Updated Dementia guideline: reflections from primary care].

    PubMed

    Perry, M; Moll van Charante, E P

    2015-01-01

    The updated Dementia guideline of the Dutch Geriatrics Society (NVKG) recommends additional testing (e.g. EEG, cerebrospinal fluid, CT/MRI or SPECT scans) only in cases of persisting significant diagnostic uncertainty. This more parsimonious use of tests appears to contrast with the current trend for specialist memory assessment services to favour full test batteries for all patients, and may be more efficient and less burdensome for patients. However, unlike the benchmark Dementia guideline of the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG), the NVKG guideline recommends treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients with cholinesterase inhibitors or memantine. Although meta-analyses yield significant beneficial treatment effects, in our opinion these are not clinically relevant and are mostly short-lived and counterbalanced by the burden of adverse effects. Nevertheless, the NVKG guideline also devotes considerable attention to psychosocial interventions that are valuable for the quality of life of both patients and their carers. PMID:25873226

  17. Cardiovascular Interactions CVI Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Carl F. Rothe (Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology)

    2005-06-22

    The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses.

  18. Silicon Baroreceptors: Modeling Cardiovascular

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, John

    Silicon Baroreceptors: Modeling Cardiovascular Pressure Transduction in Analog VLSI John Lazzaro of the baroreceptors in the carotid vessel. Inspired by re- cent work in silicon models of the cochlea [3

  19. Radiology Lab 2: Cardiovascular

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shaffer, Kitt

    Introduction to concepts important in cardiovascular imaging of normal anatomy, including angiographic techniques and cross-sectional methods.Annotated: trueDisease diagnosis: NormalRadiograph type: angiogram

  20. Obesity and cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Poirier; Robert H. Eckel

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a major contributor to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the developed world, and yet has only recently\\u000a been afforded the same level of attention as other risk factors of coronary artery disease. Obesity is a chronic metabolic\\u000a disorder associated with cardiovascular disease and increased morbidity and mortality. It is apparent that a variety of adaptations\\/alterations\\u000a in cardiac

  1. Interventional Cardiovascular MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milind Y. Desai; Albert C. Lardo; Joao A. C. Lima

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the Western world and the incidence is projected to increase\\u000a in the future (1). Traditionally, X-ray techniques have been the mainstay in terms of imaging modality for diagnostic and therapeutic cardiovascular\\u000a procedures. However, there are inherent limitations to this technology including inability to perform three-dimensional imaging,\\u000a poor soft tissue

  2. Cardiovascular complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis - Assessment, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Morbidity and mortality rates are higher in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than in the general population. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure now represent one of the most common causes of death in RA. Indeed, RA appears to represent an independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease, similar to diabetes mellitus. However, no clear guidelines with regards to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and prevention in RA have been developed. This review highlights recent investigations on the assessment, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in RA. PMID:20510241

  3. [Perioperative cardiovascular evaluation and management for noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yuko; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2014-03-01

    As a population ages, an increase in the number of patients with cardiac complications who undergo non-cardiac surgeries is observed. The perioperative mortality for noncardiac surgery is approximately 1-5%; approximately 20-35% of these cases are due to cardiovascular complications. Among them, perioperative myocardiac infarction/ischemia is a factor that leads to poor prognosis, and the ACC/AHA guidelines emphasize this aspect. An important task of the anesthesiologist is to accurately assess risks in patients undergoing noncardiac surgeries and avoid adverse cardiovascular events. PMID:24724438

  4. Childhood cardiovascular risk factors in South Asians: A cause of concern for adult cardiovascular disease epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Duggirala Sivaram; Kabir, Zubair; Dash, Ashok Kumar; Das, Bhagabati Charan

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in children are increasing at an alarming rate in the western world. However, there is limited information regarding these in the South Asian children. This review attempts at summarizing such evidence. South Asians are remarkable for the earlier onset of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) by almost a decade compared to the Caucasians. We identified published literature, mainly on PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library using specific search terms such as lipid abnormalities, high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, and unhealthy dietary practices. Atherosclerotic CVD processes begin early in childhood and are influenced over the life course by genetic and potentially modifiable risk factors and environmental exposure. 80% of adult CVD burden will fall on the developing nations by 2020. The concept of primordial prevention is fast emerging as a necessary prevention tool to curb adult CVD epidemic. Established guidelines and proven preventive strategies on cardiovascular health exist; however, are always implemented half-heartedly. Composite screening and prediction tools for adults can be adapted and validated in children tailored to South Asian population. South Asian children could be at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors at an earlier stage, thus, timely interventions are imperative. PMID:21976880

  5. Nutrition and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Berciano, Silvia; Ordovás, José M

    2014-09-01

    A multitude of studies have been published on the relationship between cardiovascular disease risk and a variety of nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns. Despite the well-accepted notion that diet has a significant influence on the development and prevention of cardiovascular disease, the foods considered healthy and harmful have varied over the years. This review aims to summarize the current scientific evidence on the cardioprotective effect of those foods and nutrients that have been considered healthy as well as those that have been deemed unhealthy at any given time in history. For this purpose, we reviewed the most recent literature using as keywords foods and nutrients (ie, meat, omega-3) and cardiovascular disease-related terms (ie, cardiovascular diseases, stroke). Emphasis has been placed on meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. In general, there is a paucity of intervention studies with a high level of evidence supporting the benefits of healthy foods (ie, fruits and vegetables), whereas the evidence supporting the case against those foods considered less healthy (ie, saturated fat) seems to be weakened by most recent evidence. In summary, most of the evidence supporting the benefits and harms of specific foods and nutrients is based on observational epidemiological studies. The outcome of randomized clinical trials reveals a more confusing picture with most studies providing very small effects in one direction or another; the strongest evidence comes from dietary patterns. The current status of the relationship between diet and cardiovascular disease risk calls for more tailored recommendations based on genomic technologies. PMID:25172070

  6. Pharmacogenomics: Application to the Management of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JA; Cavallari, LH; Beitelshees, AL; Lewis, JP; Shuldiner, AR; Roden, DM

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen substantial advances in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics. Genetic determinants of response to clopidogrel and warfarin have been defined, resulting in changes to the product labels for these drugs that suggest the use of genetic information as a guide for therapy. Genetic tests are available, as are guidelines for incorporation of genetic information into patient-care decisions. These guidelines and the literature supporting them are reviewed herein. Significant advances have also been made in the pharmacogenomics of statin-induced myopathy and the response to ?-blockers in heart failure, although the clinical applications of these findings are less clear. Other areas hold promise, including the pharmacogenomics of antihypertensive drugs, aspirin, and drug-induced long-QT syndrome (diLQTS). The potential value of pharmacogenomics in the discovery and development of new drugs is also described. In summary, pharmacogenomics has current applications in the management of cardiovascular disease, with clinically relevant data continuing to mount. PMID:21918509

  7. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    Operated by the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Association of Health Plans (AAHP), The National Guideline Clearinghouse provides information about hundreds of "evidence-based clinical practice guidelines" for health care professionals. Guidelines from over 100 different medical organizations can be searched or browsed by disease or condition; treatment or intervention method; or issuing organization. Each record includes the date of release and current status of the guideline, major recommendations for interventions and practices, organization(s) and committee members responsible for the guideline, and methods used to collect evidence and rate the quality of evidence. A link to the full text of the guideline is provided if available. When more than one guideline has been released on a topic, users can compare selected guidelines in chart format. A News section tells developers how to submit guidelines to the Clearinghouse.

  8. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, N.; Kirkels, J.H.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A.P.W.M.; Brügemann, J.; Erasmus, M.E.; Klautz, R.J.M.; Verwey, H.F.; Oomen, A.; Peels, C.H.; Golüke, A.E.J.; Nicastia, D.; Koole, M.A.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic surgery (NVVC and NVT). The indication for heart transplantation is defined as: ‘End-stage heart disease not remediable by more conservative measures’. Contraindications are: irreversible pulmonary hypertension/elevated pulmonary vascular resistance; active systemic infection; active malignancy or history of malignancy with probability of recurrence; inability to comply with complex medical regimen; severe peripheral or cerebrovascular disease and irreversible dysfunction of another organ, including diseases that may limit prognosis after heart transplantation. Considering the difficulties in defining end-stage heart failure, estimating prognosis in the individual patient and the continuing evolution of available therapies, the present criteria are broadly defined. The final acceptance is done by the transplant team which has extensive knowledge of the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure on the one hand and thorough experience with heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support on the other hand. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:79-87.) PMID:18345330

  9. Interactive Cardiovascular System Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The cardiovascular portion of the InnerBody website is a road map to the human cardiovascular system. It displays all of the main veins and arteries of the human body allowing the user to click on various parts of body and dozens of links to the many different systems appear. Users can hover over the links to discover what each part is named, or click on the link to be brought to a thorough definition and description of the selected system. Users may also �zoom in� on certain parts to view more detail. In addition to the interactive �map,� InnerBody also has images and descriptions about common issues that arise within the cardiovascular system.

  10. Screening for Cardiovascular Disease in Survivors of Thoracic Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jacob Adams; Robert G. Prosnitz; Louis S. Constine; Lawrence B. Marks; Steven E. Lipshultz

    \\u000a \\u000a Background and purpose  A solid body of evidence demonstrates that therapeutic thoracic radiotherapy can injure the cardiovascular system. However,\\u000a there is little consensus on how to screen survivors who received this therapy. This review intends to assess recent evidence\\u000a on radiotherapy-related cardiac injury with the goal of formulating evidence-based guidelines.

  11. Cardiovascular Disease and Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Rupal; Bhatt, Nikita; Shah, Priyanki; Patell, Rushad

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to study the abnormalities in the cardiovascular profile in postmenopausal Indian women and to compare the same with the cardiovascular profile of pre menopausal Indian women belonging to the same age group; taken as controls. The goal was to throw some light on the cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women of the Indian population as this population is thought to be at higher risk than their western counterparts and significant studies of the same kind in this population have been few. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study on 100 women who were either postmenopausal or premenopausal and were between the age group of 40 to 55 years was carried out over a period of ten months at our hospital. The variations in the cardiovascular profile between both groups were studied. All the women were subjected to a detailed history, thorough examination, investigations and imaging studies. Results: The evaluation revealed that Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), hypertension, abnormal Body Mass Index (BMI) and abnormal Waist Hip Ratio (WHR) were significantly higher in the postmenopausal group as compared to the premenopausal group. The post menopausal women had significantly higher prevalence of abnormal lipid profiles as compared to their premenopausal counterparts. The postmenopausal women with a normal lipid profile also had increased prevalence of CAD and SAHT, which emphasizes the non-lipid cardiovascular benefits of estrogen. Conclusion: Thus, we can conclude that cardiovascular disease was more common in postmenopausal women of age group 40-55 years as compared to those not yet achieved menopause in a population of western Indian women. And this risk was significantly associated with central obesity, an abnormal lipid profile and the postmenopausal state in itself. PMID:24701484

  12. Having a Change of Heart: A Lesson on Cardiovascular Anatomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cynthia Pfirrmann (Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School)

    2006-08-01

    This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiologycal Society's 2006 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org. The purpose of this activity is to investigate and develop a model of the normal anatomy of the human heart/circulatory system and then to explore and model the effects of several cardiovascular disease processes. Students should understand basic cellular respiration. Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to: plan and design a model of a human heart with basic systemic circulation and evaluate impact of cardiovascular diseases on normal circulation.

  13. NCI Digital Media Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Digital Media Guidelines The NCI Digital Media Guidelines provide developers and content managers guidance on the visual and content standards, as well as policies and procedures, in effect for National Cancer Institute (NCI) digital media – including

  14. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  15. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl J. Lavie; Richard V. Milani; Hector O. Ventura

    2009-01-01

    Obesity has reached global epidemic proportions in both adults and children and is associated with numerous comorbidities, including hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing, certain cancers, and major cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Because of its maladaptive effects on various CV risk factors and its adverse effects on CV structure and function, obesity has a

  16. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caren E. Smith; José M. Ordovás

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only explain a small part of the variability in CVD risk, which is a major obstacle for its prevention and

  17. Cardiovascular Actions of Neurotrophins

    PubMed Central

    CAPORALI, ANDREA; EMANUELI, COSTANZA

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophins were christened in consideration of their actions on the nervous system and, for a long time, they were the exclusive interest of neuroscientists. However, more recently, this family of proteins has been shown to possess essential cardiovascular functions. During cardiovascular development, neurotrophins and their receptors are essential factors in the formation of the heart and critical regulator of vascular development. Postnatally, neurotrophins control the survival of endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes and regulate angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Recent studies suggest the capacity of neurotrophins, via their tropomyosin-kinase receptors, to promote therapeutic neovascularization in animal models of hindlimb ischemia. Conversely, the neurotrophin low-affinity p75NTR receptor induces apoptosis of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and impairs angiogenesis. Finally, nerve growth factor looks particularly promising in treating microvascular complications of diabetes or reducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the infarcted heart. These seminal discoveries have fuelled basic and translational research and thus opened a new field of investigation in cardiovascular medicine and therapeutics. Here, we review recent progress on the molecular signaling and roles played by neurotrophins in cardiovascular development, function, and pathology, and we discuss therapeutic potential of strategies based on neurotrophin manipulation. PMID:19126759

  18. Proteomics in cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Matt, Peter; Carrel, Thierry; White, Melanie; Lefkovits, Ivan; Van Eyk, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics describes, analogous to the term genomics, the study of the complete set of proteins present in a cell, organ, or organism at a given time. The genome tells us what could theoretically happen, whereas the proteome tells us what does happen. Therefore, a genomic-centered view of biologic processes is incomplete and does not describe what happens at the protein level. Proteomics is a relatively new methodology and is rapidly changing because of extensive advances in the underlying techniques. The core technologies of proteomics are 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Proteomic approaches might help to close the gap between traditional pathophysiologic and more recent genomic studies, assisting our basic understanding of cardiovascular disease. The application of proteomics in cardiovascular medicine holds great promise. The analysis of tissue and plasma/serum specimens has the potential to provide unique information on the patient. Proteomics might therefore influence daily clinical practice, providing tools for diagnosis, defining the disease state, assessing of individual risk profiles, examining and/or screening of healthy relatives of patients, monitoring the course of the disease, determining the outcome, and setting up individual therapeutic strategies. Currently available clinical applications of proteomics are limited and focus mainly on cardiovascular biomarkers of chronic heart failure and myocardial ischemia. Larger clinical studies are required to test whether proteomics may have promising applications for clinical medicine. Cardiovascular surgeons should be aware of this increasingly pertinent and challenging field of science. PMID:17198814

  19. ANALYSIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank H. Wilhelm; Paul Grossman; Walton T. Roth

    1999-01-01

    Adequate characterization of hemodynamic and autonomic responses to physical and mental stress can elucidate underlying mechanisms of cardiovascular disease or anxiety disorders. We developed a physiological signal processing system for analysis of continuously recorded ECG, arterial blood pres- sure (BP), and respiratory signals using the programming language Matlab. Data collection devices are a 16-channel digital, physiological recorder (Vitaport), a finger

  20. Advancing Cardiovascular Research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, we have seen dramatic changes in cardiovascular science and clinical care, accompanied by marked declines in the morbidity and mortality. Nonetheless, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death and disability in the world, and its nature is changing as Americans become older, fatter, and ethnically more diverse. Instead of young or middle-aged men with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, the “typical” cardiac patient now presents with acute coronary syndrome or with complications related to chronic hypertension or ischemic heart disease, including heart failure, sudden death, and atrial fibrillation. Analogously, structural heart disease is now dominated by degenerative valve or congenital disease, far more common than rheumatic disease. The changing clinical scene presents cardiovascular scientists with a number of opportunities and challenges, including taking advantage of high-throughput technologies to elucidate complex disease mechanisms, accelerating development and implementation of evidence-based strategies, assessing evolving technologies of unclear value, addressing a global epidemic of cardiovascular disease, and maintaining high levels of innovation in a time of budgetary constraint and economic turmoil. PMID:22315116

  1. Postdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Postdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology Job Description A postdoctoral position and physiological roles of new components of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of cardiovascular with a strong background in molecular biology and cardiovascular physiology. Expertise in sympathetic nerve

  2. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND PERIODONTAL TREATMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Sauvetre; C. V. Diji

    Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires knowledge and understanding of diseases specifically those affecting the cardiovascular system in order to institute necessary modifications to periodontal therapy accordingly. Considering the high incidence of periodontal diseases in elderly individuals, the periodontist must be prepared to provide periodontal therapeutic support for an increasing number of cardiovascular patients. In this review, common cardiovascular disorders

  3. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help clinicians discern viral from bacterial episodes, as well as optimally manage their patients with ABRS. PMID:24627376

  4. Prekindergarten Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Marilyn; Meyers, Margaret E.; Morris, Pam Bell; Gonzales, Peggy Freedson; Uphaus, Anita

    Following adoption of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in 1998, new prekindergarten curriculum guidelines were developed. These voluntary guidelines articulate what 3- and 4-year-olds should know and be able to do and provide a means to align prekindergarten programs with the TEKS curriculum. The guidelines are intended to assist…

  5. National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Library, Columbus.

    This publication is based on the work of The State Library of Ohio, the National Bookmobile Guidelines Committee, and staff of local Ohio bookmobile programs. Draft guidelines were approved by the 7th National Bookmobile Conference (May 31-June 2, 1992). The Guidelines provide brief statements of standards followed by specifics which indicate…

  6. Guidelines for Teaching Assistants

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    20130823 Guidelines for ECE Teaching Assistants Prepared by R.C. Maher Electrical & Computer students, but also avoiding damage to equipment and lab components. Our basic electrical laboratory safety Engineering 2013-2014 #12;ECE GTA Guidelines 2 20130823 Guidelines for ECE Teaching Assistants Welcome

  7. Consensus guidelines on sedation and analgesia in critically ill children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Playfor; Ian Jenkins; Carolyne Boyles; Imti Choonara; Gerald Davies; Tim Haywood; Gillian Hinson; Anton Mayer; Neil Morton; Tanya Ralph; Andrew Wolf

    2006-01-01

    Objective  The United Kingdom Paediatric Intensive Care Society Sedation, Analgesia and Neuromuscular Blockade Working Group is a multi-disciplinary expert panel created to produce consensus guidelines on sedation and analgesia in critically ill children and forward knowledge in these areas. Sedation and analgesia are recognised as important areas of critical care practice and adult clinical practice guidelines in these fields remain amongst the

  8. Development and implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines in physical therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Van der Wees

    Summary Quality assurance and cost-effectiveness are important issues in modern-day healthcare. They are of great concern to the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). One strategy for improving the quality of physical therapy (physiotherapy) is to minimize undesirable variability in clinical practice by developing and implementing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. However, even well- established guidelines will not contribute to

  9. Cardiovascular Prevention in a High Risk Sport, Ice Hockey: Applications in Wider Sports Physical Therapy Practice

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk – including history taking, chart review, physical examination – and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients. PMID:21522221

  10. Diabetes to cardiovascular disease: Is depression the potential missing link?

    PubMed

    Singh, Puneetpal; Khullar, Shallu; Singh, Monica; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mastana, Sarabjit

    2015-04-01

    The etiopathological consequences of diabetes and its imperative sequels have been explored extensively in the scientific arena of cardiovascular diabetology. Innumerable risk covariates and confounders have been delineated for the primary and secondary prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). However, an intricate interaction of depression on them has been largely overlooked. Depression influences and participates in each and every step that worsens the diabetic state for developing cardiovascular complications. The dilemma is that it coexists, remains silent and generally not considered as relevant clinical parameter amenable to intervention. In this review, it is highlighted that depression has strong association and linkages with both diabetes and CVD and it should be considered and diagnosed at every stage of the diabetes to CVD continuum. Careful attention to the diagnosis and management of these disease states would contribute in lessening the CVD burden of the society. PMID:25655224

  11. Cardiovascular Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew M.; Vinci, Lisa M.; Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Chase, Ayana R.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health care are well documented. Promising approaches to disparity reduction are increasingly described in literature published since 1995, but reports are fragmented by risk, condition, population, and setting. The authors conducted a systematic review of clinically oriented studies in communities of color that addressed hypertension, hyperlipidemia, physical inactivity, tobacco, and two major cardiovascular conditions, coronary artery disease and heart failure. Virtually no literature specifically addressed disparity reduction. The greatest focus has been African American populations, with relatively little work in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American populations. The authors found 62 interventions, 27 addressing hypertension, 9 lipids, 18 tobacco use, 8 physical inactivity, and 7 heart failure. Only 1 study specifically addressed postmyocardial infarction care. Data supporting the value of registries, multidisciplinary teams, and community outreach were found across several conditions. Interventions addressing care transitions, using telephonic outreach, and promoting medication access and adherence merit further exploration. PMID:17881625

  12. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  13. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Lathers, Claire M.

    1991-01-01

    Data are presented on the rate of adaptation of the human cardiovascular system to conditions of spaceflight, with particular attention given to data obtained during spaceflight in the U.S. Space Shuttle Program. It is pointed out that many of the cardiovascular changes that occurred during spaceflights that lasted from 2 to 11 days can be traced directly to changes in the body fluid volume. The beneficial effects of a fluid loading countermeasure (oral rehydration) and of the supine body position on the heart rate during the spaceflight are demonstrated. It is noted that, after hours or a few days of spaceflight, a state of adaptation is reached, in which the subject is well adapted and appropriately hydrated for the weightless environment. However, the return to the normal gravity of the earth leaves the individual especially sensitive to orthostatic stress.

  14. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara “Bobbi” Leeper; Dl Mcgee

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes has been shown to be increasing at a rapid rate in the United States. There estimates of 23.6 million individuals with diabetes with 1.6 million new cases being diagnosed annually. [1] Diabetes has long been known as a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Experts indicate 38% of patients admitted to the hospital are diabetic.[2] Therefore one

  15. Nanomedicine and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason R. McCarthy

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine has become an important tool in the imaging and therapy of numerous diseases. This is due, in large part, to\\u000a the ability to generate multifunctional nanoagents bearing combinations of targeting, diagnostic, and therapeutic moieties,\\u000a allowing for the tailoring of the properties of the synthesized nanomaterials. With respect to cardiovascular disease and\\u000a its sequelae, nanomedicine has the potential to detect

  16. Cardiovascular Risk and Statin Use in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Michael Edward; Green, Lee A.; Sen, Ananda; Kircher, Sheetal; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Statins reduce the risk of mortality and coronary artery disease in individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Using nationally representative data, we examined the relationships between statin use and cardiovascular risk, diagnosis of hyperlipidemia, and other risk factors. METHODS We analyzed data from the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of the US civilian noninstitutionalized population. The study sample had a total of 16,712 individuals aged 30 to 79 years. Those who reported filling at least 2 statin prescriptions were classified as statin users. We created multiple logistic regression models for statin use as the dependent variable, with cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Overall, 58.2% (95% CI, 54.6%–61.7%) of individuals with coronary artery disease and 52.0% (95% CI, 49.4%–54.6%) of individuals with diabetes aged older than 40 years were statin users. After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic factors, the probability of being on a statin was significantly higher among individuals with both hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease, at 0.44 (95% CI, 0.40–0.48), or hyperlipidemia only, at 0.32 (95% CI, 0.30–0.33), than among those with coronary artery disease only, at 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07–0.15). A similar pattern was seen in people with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS In this nationally representative sample, many people at high risk for cardiovascular events, including those with coronary artery disease, diabetes, or both, were not receiving statins despite evidence that these agents reduce adverse events. This undertreatment appears to be related to placing too much emphasis on hyperlipidemia and not enough on cardiovascular risk. Recently released guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association offer an opportunity to improve statin use by focusing on cardiovascular risk instead of lipid levels. PMID:24821892

  17. Time to detoxify medical literature from guideline overdose.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Dinesh; Vyas, Arpita K

    2012-07-14

    The current financial turmoil in the United States has been attributed to multiple reasons including healthcare expenditure. Health care spending has increased from 5.7 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP) in 1965 to 16 percent of the GDP in 2004. Healthcare is driven with a goal to provide best possible care available at that period of time. Guidelines are generally assumed to have the high level of certainty and security as conclusions generated by the conventional scientific method leading many clinicians to use guidelines as the final arbiters of care. To provide the standard of care, physicians follow guidelines, proposed by either groups of physicians or various medical societies or government organizations like National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This has lead to multiple tests for the patient and has not survived the test of time. This independence leads to lacunae in the standardization of guidelines, hence flooding of literature with multiple guidelines and confusion to patients and physicians and eventually overtreatment, inefficiency, and patient inconvenience. There is an urgent need to restrict articles with Guidelines and develop some strategy like have an intermediate stage of pre-guidelines and after 5-10 years of trials, a systematic launch of the Guidelines. There can be better ways than this for putting together guidelines as has been suggested by multiple authors and researchers. PMID:22807603

  18. National Space Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-02-01

    The National Space Society (NSS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of a spacefaring civilization. The NSS web site features information about the organization, its mission and vision, membership information, and a listing of NSS local chapters. The library features links to videos, books, and other publications on space settlements and bases, space policy, and technology. There is also information on the organization's magazine, "Ad Astra," including instructions for authors, publishing and advertising guidelines, and some archived content. Other materials include news articles, event announcements, and information on current space missions.

  19. Omega-3 Index and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    von Schacky, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Recent large trials with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the cardiovascular field did not demonstrate a beneficial effect in terms of reductions of clinical endpoints like total mortality, sudden cardiac arrest or other major adverse cardiac events. Pertinent guidelines do not uniformly recommend EPA + DHA for cardiac patients. In contrast, in epidemiologic findings, higher blood levels of EPA + DHA were consistently associated with a lower risk for the endpoints mentioned. Because of low biological and analytical variability, a standardized analytical procedure, a large database and for other reasons, blood levels of EPA + DHA are frequently assessed in erythrocytes, using the HS-Omega-3 Index® methodology. A low Omega-3 Index fulfills the current criteria for a novel cardiovascular risk factor. Neutral results of intervention trials can be explained by issues of bioavailability and trial design that surfaced after the trials were initiated. In the future, incorporating the Omega-3 Index into trial designs by recruiting participants with a low Omega-3 Index and treating them within a pre-specified target range (e.g., 8%–11%), will make more efficient trials possible and provide clearer answers to the questions asked than previously possible. PMID:24566438

  20. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with “normal” lipid profiles and high CRP values who benefited from statin therapy. The backdrop to JUPITER during this period was an increasing awareness of a rising cardiovascular risk burden and imperfect methods of risk evaluation, so that a significant number of individuals were being denied beneficial therapies. Other concerns have been a high level of residual risk in those who are treated, poor patient adherence, a need to follow guidelines more closely, a dual global epidemic of obesity and diabetes, and a progressively deteriorating level of physical activity in the population. Calls for new and more effective means of reducing risk for coronary heart disease are intensifying. In view of compelling evidence supporting earlier and aggressive therapy in people with high risk burdens, JUPITER simply offers another choice for stratification and earlier risk reduction in primary prevention patients. When indicated, and in individuals unwilling or unable to change their diet and lifestyles sufficiently, the benefits of statins greatly exceed the risks. Two side effects of interest are myotoxicity and an increase in the incidence of diabetes. PMID:21267417

  1. The Ability of Instructors to Organize Aerobic Dance Exercise Into Effective Cardiovascular Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claremont, Alan D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The ability of five aerobics instructors to combine music and exercise movements into effective low, medium, and high levels of cardiovascular intensity was evaluated by measuring respiratory gas exchange and heart rate for twelve subjects. Results underscore the need for instructor training guidelines. (Author/MT)

  2. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3375 Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular...

  3. Assistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    degree and are board certified (or eligible) in Cardiovascular Disease or Radiology. AdvancedAssistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Medicine The Cardiovascular Institute and the Departments of Medicine and Radiology at Stanford

  4. Guidelines for Children's Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Presents American's with Disabilities Act guidelines for building school toilet facilities that serve children with disabilities. Several dimension charts are provided showing min/max measurements. (GR)

  5. Water conservation plan guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-08-06

    These Water Conservation Plan Guidelines are addressed to water system planners but use of the Guidelines is not required by federal law or regulation. The first part of the document introduces the Guidelines and provides information to the States about their nature and possible use. The second part of the document, written for water systems, is an overview to the organization, content, and the use of the Guidelines. The next three parts contain the water conservation plan Guidelines: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced. The Basic Guidelines are designed for use by water systems serving populations of 10,000 or fewer; The Intermediate Guidelines are designed for water systems serving between 10,000 and 100,000 people; The Advanced Guidelines are designed for water systems serving more than 100,000 people. Six appendixes to the Guidelines provide supporting information: detailed descriptions of conservation measures (Appendix A), conservation benchmarks (Appendix B), acronyms and a glossary (Appendix C), information resources (Appendix D), funding sources (Appendix E), and state contacts (Appendix F).

  6. Guidelines for Faculty Organization

    E-print Network

    Guidelines for Faculty Organization International Programs Foy Hall, Room 301 Phone: 518 ......................................................................................................................... 7 Embedded versus "Stand-Alone" Courses...................................................................................................................... 10 Non

  7. Improving cardiovascular outcomes using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Roumia, Mazen; Steinhubl, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Improving quality of care through the enhanced use of digital technologies is becoming an increasingly primary focus of the health care industry in general and cardiovascular (CV) medicine in particular. The recent rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) has the potential to improve the management of CV disease by removing variability and assuring at least consideration of guideline-recommended care and appropriate use criteria. This can lead to improved cardiac outcomes at all phases of care; beginning with the automated identification of patients who are at increased risk, implementing evidence based medicine for primary CV prevention, using online decision support tools for acute management, and, possibly most importantly, by connecting the health care provider and the patient through open accessibility to their EHR. The widespread use of EHR is the dawn of a new era where evidence based guidelines can be seamlessly translated to patient care and where patients are actively involved in their own health. As transformative as this will be, it is important to recognize that we are currently experiencing only the very earliest potential of the EHR in improving CV outcomes. PMID:24408676

  8. Cardiovascular risk screening for women.

    PubMed

    Hamel, L; Oberle, K

    1996-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death of both men and women in Canada and the United States. The medical and societal emphasis on the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in men has resulted in an inclination to minimize its existence and severity in women. The purpose of this article is to assist clinical nurse specialists in cardiovascular risk-screening of women by providing a review of cardiovascular risk factors specific to women. Current knowledge about lipids, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, menopause, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, stress, and multiple roles are discussed. The clinical presentation for women and the clinical implications are presented. Lastly, implications for future research are described. PMID:9060255

  9. Cardiovascular Cine Film Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, Carl C.

    1983-12-01

    The detection of a cardiovascular stenosis involves the complex interaction of technique selection, system performance and anatomy. Technique selection for instance involves choosing the correct focal spot, pulse width, KVp, and frame rate for a given patient and projection angle. In order to provide guidance in this selection process, these variables were investigated in terms of their impact on image quality. Conclusions which were confirmed clinically are summarized in terms of recommended techniques for a range of patient sizes. The confirmation includes clinical films which demonstrates the effects of parameter changes.

  10. Selenoproteins and cardiovascular stress.

    PubMed

    Rose, A H; Hoffmann, P R

    2015-03-01

    Dietary selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that exerts its biological effects through its incorporation into selenoproteins. This family of proteins contains several antioxidant enzymes such as the glutathione peroxidases, redox-regulating enzymes such as thioredoxin reductases, a methionine sulfoxide reductase, and others. In this review, we summarise the current understanding of the roles these selenoproteins play in protecting the cardiovascular system from different types of stress including ischaemia-reperfusion, homocysteine dysregulation, myocardial hypertrophy, doxirubicin toxicity, Keshan disease, and others. PMID:25354851

  11. Design Patterns for Modelling Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radu Serban; Annette Ten Teije; Mar Marcos; Cristina Polo-conde; Kitty Rosenbrand; Jolanda Wittenberg; Joyce Van Croonenborg

    2005-01-01

    It is by now widely accepted that medical guidelines can help to significantly improve the quality of medical care. Unfortunately, constructing the required medical guidelines is a very labour intensive and costly process. The cost of guideline construction would decrease if guidelines could be built from a set of building blocks that can be reused across guidelines. Such reusable building

  12. The low-carbohydrate diet and cardiovascular risk factors: Evidence from epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, T.; Bazzano, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Obesity is an important public health issue because of its high prevalence and concomitant increase in risk of cardiovascular diseases. Low carbohydrate diets are popular for weight loss and weight management but are not recommended in leading guidelines due to the perception that increases in dietary fat intake may lead to an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. To clarify the effects of a low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss on cardiovascular disease risk factors as compared to a low fat diet for weight loss, we systematically reviewed data from randomized controlled clinical trials and large observational studies. Data synthesis We searched the MEDLINE database (Jan 1966–Nov 2013) to identify studies that examined a low-carbohydrate diet as compared to a low-fat diet for weight loss or the improvement of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Conclusions Recent randomized controlled trials document that low-carbohydrate diets not only decrease body weight but also improve cardiovascular risk factors. In light of this evidence from randomized controlled trials, dietary guidelines should be re-visited advocating a healthy low carbohydrate dietary pattern as an alternative dietary strategy for the prevention of obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:24613757

  13. METHODOLOGY Open Access Revised French guidelines for the diagnosis and

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    METHODOLOGY Open Access Revised French guidelines for the diagnosis and management of migraine Française d'Etude des Migraines et des Céphalées (SFEMC; French Society for the Study of Migraine Headache). They are a revision of the professional guidance on the "Diagnosis and therapeutic management of migraine in adults

  14. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  15. Guidelines for the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Mowat; Andrew Cole; Al Windsor; Tariq Ahmad; Ian Arnott; Sally Mitton; Tim Orchard; Matt Rutter; Lisa Younge; Charlie Lees; Gwo-tzer Ho; Jack Satsangi; Stuart Bloom; Richard Driscoll

    2011-01-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease represents a key component of clinical practice for members of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). There has been considerable progress in management strategies affecting all aspects of clinical care since the publication of previous BSG guidelines in 2004, necessitating the present revision.Key components of the present document worthy of attention as having been

  16. Guidelines for sedation in gastroenterological endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Obara, Katsutoshi; Haruma, Ken; Irisawa, Atsushi; Kaise, Mitsuru; Gotoda, Takuji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Tanabe, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Akira; Fujita, Naotaka; Ozaki, Makoto; Yoshida, Masahiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Kaminishi, Michio

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the need for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy has been increasing. However, the National Health Insurance Drug Price list in Japan does not include any drug specifically used for the sedation. Although benzodiazepines are the main medication, their use in cases of gastrointestinal endoscopy has not been approved. This has led the Japan Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Society to develop the first set of guidelines for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy on the basis of evidence-based medicine in collaboration with the Japanese Society for Anesthesiologists. The present guidelines comprise 14 statements, five of which were judged to be valid on the highest evidence level and three on the second highest level. The guidelines are not intended to strongly recommend the use of sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy, but rather to indicate the policy as to the choice of appropriate procedures when such sedation is deemed necessary. In clinical practice, the final decision as to the use of sedation should be made by physicians considering patient willingness and physical condition. PMID:25677012

  17. Optimization in Cardiovascular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid mechanics plays a key role in the development, progression, and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Advances in imaging methods and patient-specific modeling now reveal increasingly detailed information about blood flow patterns in health and disease. Building on these tools, there is now an opportunity to couple blood flow simulation with optimization algorithms to improve the design of surgeries and devices, incorporating more information about the flow physics in the design process to augment current medical knowledge. In doing so, a major challenge is the need for efficient optimization tools that are appropriate for unsteady fluid mechanics problems, particularly for the optimization of complex patient-specific models in the presence of uncertainty. This article reviews the state of the art in optimization tools for virtual surgery, device design, and model parameter identification in cardiovascular flow and mechanobiology applications. In particular, it reviews trade-offs between traditional gradient-based methods and derivative-free approaches, as well as the need to incorporate uncertainties. Key future challenges are outlined, which extend to the incorporation of biological response and the customization of surgeries and devices for individual patients.

  18. PHYSIOLAB: A cardiovascular laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquil, D.; Laffaye, C.; Camus, A. L.; Weerts, G.; Gratchev, V.; Alferova, I.; Kotovskaya, A.

    PHYSIOLAB is a cardio-vascular laboratory designed by CNES in cooperation with IMBP, with double scientific and medical goals: • a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in blood pressure and heart rate regulation, in order to predict and control the phenomenon of cardio-vascular deconditionning. • a real-time monitoring of cosmonauts during functionnal tests. Launched to the MIR station in 1996, this laboratory was set up and used for the first time by Claudie André-Deshays during the French mission ? Cassiopeia ?. The scientific program is performed pre, post and in-flight to study phenomena related to the transition to microgravity as well as the return to the earth conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on the development of the real-time telemetry to monitor LBNP test. This function was successfull during the Cassiopeia mission, providing the medical team at TSOUP (MIR Control Center in Moscow) with efficient means to control the physiological state of the cosmonaut. Based on the results of this first mission, IMBP and CNES will go on using Physiolab with Russian crews. CNES will take advantage of the upcoming French missions on MIR to improve the system, and intends to develop a new laboratory for the International Space Station.

  19. Arsenic and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    States, J. Christopher; Srivastava, Sanjay; Chen, Yu; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a worldwide health problem. Although arsenic-induced cancer has been widely studied, comparatively little attention has been paid to arsenic-induced vascular disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. In addition, studies suggest that susceptibility to arsenic-induced vascular disease may be modified by nutritional factors in addition to genetic factors. Recently, animal models for arsenic-induced atherosclerosis and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell dysfunction have been developed. Initial studies in these models show that arsenic exposure accelerates and exacerbates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E–knockout mice. Microarray studies of liver mRNA and micro-RNA abundance in mice exposed in utero suggest that a permanent state of stress is induced by the arsenic exposure. Furthermore, the livers of the arsenic-exposed mice have activated pathways involved in immune responses suggesting a pro-hyperinflammatory state. Arsenic exposure of mice after weaning shows a clear dose-response in the extent of disease exacerbation. In addition, increased inflammation in arterial wall is evident. In response to arsenic-stimulated oxidative signaling, liver sinusoidal endothelium differentiates into a continuous endothelium that limits nutrient exchange and waste elimination. Data suggest that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase–derived superoxide or its derivatives are essential second messengers in the signaling pathway for arsenic-stimulated vessel remodeling. The recent findings provide future directions for research into the cardiovascular effects of arsenic exposure. PMID:19015167

  20. Emerging clinical applications in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Damani, Samir B; Topol, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    Over one-fourth of the 36 million annual outpatient prescriptions filled in the United States are known to have human genomic biomarker information available that predicts drug safety and efficacy, or both. However, to date, we have not systematically implemented strategies to effectively use this data in clinical practice to improve patient outcomes. Part of the difficulty has stemmed from the only modest predictive capacity of previously identified gene variants, lack of replication of data in multiple studies, and the hesitancy of the clinical community to translate data gleaned from basic and translational research to routine clinical practice. Now, additional key variants that strongly impact drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion are rapidly surfacing through the use of genome-wide association technology. Most importantly, these variants are being validated in independent cohorts of thousands of cases and controls. In the near future, the dramatic reduction in the cost of DNA sequencing will lead to further insight into the common and rare genetic variants that strongly predict our individual response to commonly used medications. The clinical community will need to be prepared to utilize this vital data in aiding their selection of the right drug for the right patient if we expect to significantly reduce the ever increasing burden of societies' most common diseases. Herein, we detail the most clinically compelling and robust examples of pharmacogenomics emerging in the field of cardiovascular disease and hopefully foretell how cardiovascular disease might be treated in the era of genomic medicine. PMID:20730785

  1. Maintenance Trades Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, APPA published "Maintenance Staffing Guidelines for Educational Facilities," the first building maintenance trades staffing guideline designed to assist educational facilities professionals with their staffing needs. addresses how facilities professionals can determine the appropriate size and mix of their organization. Contents include…

  2. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  3. Towards European urinalysis guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timo T Kouri; Vanya A Gant; Giovanni B Fogazzi; Walter Hofmann; Hans O Hallander; Walter G Guder

    2000-01-01

    Improved standardized performance is needed because urinalysis continues to be one of the most frequently requested laboratory tests. Since 1997, the European Confederation of Laboratory Medicine (ECLM) has been supporting an interdisciplinary project aiming to produce European urinalysis guidelines. More than seventy clinical chemists, microbiologists and ward-based clinicians, as well as representatives of manufacturers are taking part. These guidelines aim

  4. Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines

    E-print Network

    mortality from insect epidemics and wildfire. To start the process of defining management guidelines, weLodgepole Pine Management Guidelines for Land Managers in the Wildland -Urban Interface #12;Authors.491.6303 http://csfs.colostate.edu/ All photos CSFS unless otherwise noted. #12;1 Lodgepole Pine Management

  5. Business Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    These business education curriculum guidelines are designed as a guide for teachers, counselors, and administrators involved with business education in Montana. Introductory materials include the goals of business education and suggested curriculum patterns for different business and office education programs. Guidelines are provided for 17…

  6. Guidelines for OPAC Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Martha M.

    This paper describes the IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) guidelines for librarians charged with customizing OPAC (online public access catalog) software and vendors and producers of this software. The guidelines are intended to apply to all types of catalog, including World Wide Web-based catalogs, GUI…

  7. Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

  8. RECREATIONAL FISHERIES GUIDELINES FOR

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Steven J.

    RECREATIONAL FISHERIES FAO TECHNICAL GUIDELINES FOR RESPONSIBLE FISHERIES 13 ISSN 1020-5292 RECREATIONAL FISHERIES #12;Cover illustration: Emanuela D'Antoni #12;RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 13 RECREATIONAL FISHERIES FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Rome, 2012 FAO TECHNICAL GUIDELINES

  9. Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001 Revised February 2004 Revised March 15, 2007 Page 1 of 5 INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES College of Business Louisiana Tech University The University supports an experiential an internship course(s) that students may apply as credit toward their academic degrees. The internship must

  10. Guidelines to Console Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuma, Jean R.

    This brochure contains guidelines concerning the use of the master control panel of the language laboratory at the University of Hawaii. Three sections of guidelines are provided: (1) master control panel including teacher headset functions and student booth functions, (2) "things to know"--including the switch functions, instant communication…

  11. University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    1 University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine in collaboration with the Oxford the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, which study molecular mechanisms in the early development The Medical Sciences Division, within which the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine is located, includes

  12. Assessment of total cardiovascular risk using WHO/ISH risk prediction charts in three low and middle income countries in Asia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research has used cardiovascular risk scores intended to estimate “total cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk” in individuals to assess the distribution of risk within populations. The research suggested that the adoption of the total risk approach, in comparison to treatment decisions being based on the level of a single risk factor, could lead to reductions in expenditure on preventive cardiovascular drug treatment in low- and middle-income countries. So that the patient benefit associated with savings is highlighted. Methods This study used data from national STEPS surveys (STEPwise Approach to Surveillance) conducted between 2005 and 2010 in Cambodia, Malaysia and Mongolia of men and women aged 40–64 years. The study compared the differences and implications of various approaches to risk estimation at a population level using the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) risk score charts. To aid interpretation and adjustment of scores and inform treatment in individuals, the charts are accompanied by practice notes about risk factors not included in the risk score calculations. Total risk was calculated amongst the populations using the charts alone and also adjusted according to these notes. Prevalence of traditional single risk factors was also calculated. Results The prevalence of WHO/ISH “high CVD risk” (?20% chance of developing a cardiovascular event over 10 years) of 6%, 2.3% and 1.3% in Mongolia, Malaysia and Cambodia, respectively, is in line with recent research when charts alone are used. However, these proportions rise to 33.3%, 20.8% and 10.4%, respectively when individuals with blood pressure > = 160/100 mm/Hg and/or hypertension medication are attributed to “high risk”. Of those at “moderate risk” (10- < 20% chance of developing a cardio vascular event over 10 years), 100%, 94.3% and 30.1%, respectively are affected by at least one risk-increasing factor. Of all individuals, 44.6%, 29.0% and 15.0% are affected by hypertension as a single risk factor (systolic ? 140 mmHg or diastolic ? 90 mmHg or medication). Conclusions Used on a population level, cardiovascular risk scores may offer useful insights that can assist health service delivery planning. An approach based on overall risk without adjustment of specific risk factors however, may underestimate treatment needs. At the individual level, the total risk approach offers important clinical benefits. However, countries need to develop appropriate clinical guidelines and operational guidance for detection and management of CVD risk using total CVD-risk approach at different levels of health system. Operational research is needed to assess implementation issues. PMID:23734670

  13. European Society of Intensive Care Medicine statement: intensive care medicine in Europe--structure, organisation and training guidelines of the Multidisciplinary Joint Committee of Intensive Care Medicine (MJCICM) of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS).

    PubMed

    De Lange, Simon; Van Aken, Hugo; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2002-11-01

    This article describes the structures and institutions in the European Union by which professional training and qualification in medical specialities will be harmonised. All main medical specialities are represented in the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) by speciality sections. For intensive care medicine, as a multidisciplinary speciality, a new structure of a Multidisciplinary Joint Committee of Intensive Care Medicine (MJCICM) within the UEMS was established in 1999. In this MJCICM the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care are represented by delegates without voting capacity in a Standing Advisory Board. Statements and recommendations which the MJCICM has worked out until now are presented: Definitions of intensive care medicine, structural conditions for education and training, continuing medical education, criteria for accreditation of intensive care medicine training centres, common core curriculum for optional specialist training in intensive care medicine, as well as an intensive care units accreditation visiting programme and standards for medical treatment and nursing care. PMID:12583367

  14. A critical appraisal of the use of Internet for calculating cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed Central

    Gillois, P.; Colombet, I.; Dréau, H.; Degoulet, P.; Chatellier, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper aims to retrieve and evaluate the quality of the Internet sites providing information on cardiovascular risk. We searched web pages related to risk prediction using six search engines. Sites proposing a cardiovascular risk prediction were selected for evaluation. The quality of each site was checked against criteria testing the validity, type and potential usefulness of information for physicians or patients. Search engines retrieved about 50 10(6) web pages. Eight sites were included. Only 2 of them provided calculation of cardiovascular risk based on Framingham equation. The others proposed algorithms, guidelines, or general information on cardiovascular health. Most sites lacked details to ensure quality of information. Present search engines are inefficient to retrieve precise and valid information. Facing the inflation of medical information, a systematic approach to validate the quality of a site is mandatory. Application of Evidence Based Medicine concepts gives a solution for evaluation of internet-based medical information. PMID:10566465

  15. Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    .....................................................................................13 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................13Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community Formative Research from Lowell, Massachusetts U ...........................................................14 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

  16. Cardiovascular Risk in the Filipino Community

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    .....................................................................................12 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................12Cardiovascular Risk in the Filipino Community Formative Research from Daly City and San Francisco ...........................................................13 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

  17. Cardiovascular Risk in the Vietnamese Community

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    .....................................................................................15 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................16Cardiovascular Risk in the Vietnamese Community Formative Research from Houston, Texas U ...........................................................17 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

  18. Integrating guidelines, CKD, multimorbidity, and older adults.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Paul E; Lamb, Edmund J; Levin, Adeera

    2015-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines provide guidance in decision making relating to diagnosis, management, and treatment in specific areas of health care. They play an essential role in the evaluation and synthesis of an ever-expanding evidence base and are of increasing importance in aging societies with a high prevalence of overlapping disease comorbid conditions. Integration of chronic disease guidance is essential, particularly in older people, in order to understand critical disease interactions and the potential adverse effects that individual guideline statements may engender in different disease areas. This requires a need for flexibility that not only recognizes the differences in patients' characteristics, but also their preferences for medical interventions and health outcomes. The question is how this can be achieved. In this article, we look at the standardization of clinical practice guidelines from the chronic kidney disease standpoint and consider how tools for integrating guidelines, such as the ADAPTE process and the knowledge-to-action cycle, can be used to guide appropriate decision making and take account of patient choice in older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:25483849

  19. Does Integrated Practice Guideline Testing in Gastroenterology Fellowship Training Improve Fellows' Education?

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Michael A.; Occhipinti, Kaitlin; Connolly, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple professional societies have issued practice guidelines that provide up-to-date evidence-based recommendations and expert opinions on patient care in the field of gastroenterology (GI). While most physicians are aware that formal guidelines exist, these GI guidelines have not been integrated into academic training curricula in most of the top-ranked GI fellowship programs. Methods Two fellows in the Ochsner GI fellowship program (the control group) reviewed 14 current American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines deemed essential for GI fellowship training and wrote 200 questions based on these guidelines. Four additional fellows (the experimental group) had no knowledge of which articles would be tested. A 14-week curriculum focused on reviewing the guidelines. All 6 fellows took a pretest before the guideline review and then took a postreview test. All of the participating GI fellows completed a survey evaluating the perceived effectiveness of the formal guideline testing. Results The experimental group had a 33% improvement in test scores between the pre- and posttest, while the control group had a 7% improvement. The survey showed that 100% of the fellows felt more secure in their knowledge of the guidelines and would recommend that this learning format be implemented into the annual academic curriculum. All also agreed that this format provided evidence-based knowledge to improve patient safety and provide optimal patient care. Conclusion We plan to continue formal practice guideline reviews in our fellowship and believe this format would benefit other medical training programs as well. PMID:24052769

  20. Cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, D P; Sanidas, E A; Viniou, N A; Gennimata, V; Chantziara, V; Barbetseas, I; Makris, T K

    2015-02-01

    Inevitably, a small proportion of patients with systematic hypertension will develop hypertensive crisis at some point. Hypertensive crises can be divided into hypertensive emergency or hypertensive urgency according to the presence or lack of acute target organ damage. In this review, we discuss cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, congestive heart failure, and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises, including those caused by cocaine use. Each presents in a unique fashion, although some hypertensive emergency patients report nonspecific symptoms. Treatment includes several effective and rapid-acting medications to safely reduce the blood pressure, protect remaining end-organ function, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications, and thereby improve patient outcomes. PMID:25620633

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance artefacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The multitude of applications offered by CMR make it an increasing popular modality to study the heart and the surrounding vessels. Nevertheless the anatomical complexity of the chest, together with cardiac and respiratory motion, and the fast flowing blood, present many challenges which can possibly translate into imaging artefacts. The literature is wide in terms of papers describing specific MR artefacts in great technical detail. In this review we attempt to summarise, in a language accessible to a clinical readership, some of the most common artefacts found in CMR applications. It begins with an introduction of the most common pulse sequences, and imaging techniques, followed by a brief section on typical cardiovascular applications. This leads to the main section on common CMR artefacts with examples, a short description of the mechanisms behind them, and possible solutions. PMID:23697969

  2. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  3. A guideline management system.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

  4. The future of simulation technologies for complex cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Cates, Christopher U; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    Changing work practices and the evolution of more complex interventions in cardiovascular medicine are forcing a paradigm shift in the way doctors are trained. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), carotid artery stenting (CAS), and acute stroke intervention procedures are forcing these changes at a faster pace than in other disciplines. As a consequence, cardiovascular medicine has had to develop a sophisticated understanding of precisely what is meant by 'training' and 'skill'. An evolving conclusion is that procedure training on a virtual reality (VR) simulator presents a viable current solution. These simulations should characterize the important performance characteristics of procedural skill that have metrics derived and defined from, and then benchmarked to experienced operators (i.e. level of proficiency). Simulation training is optimal with metric-based feedback, particularly formative trainee error assessments, proximate to their performance. In prospective, randomized studies, learners who trained to a benchmarked proficiency level on the simulator performed significantly better than learners who were traditionally trained. In addition, cardiovascular medicine now has available the most sophisticated virtual reality simulators in medicine and these have been used for the roll-out of interventions such as CAS in the USA and globally with cardiovascular society and industry partnered training programmes. The Food and Drug Administration has advocated the use of VR simulation as part of the approval of new devices and the American Board of Internal Medicine has adopted simulation as part of its maintenance of certification. Simulation is rapidly becoming a mainstay of cardiovascular education, training, certification, and the safe adoption of new technology. If cardiovascular medicine is to continue to lead in the adoption and integration of simulation, then, it must take a proactive position in the development of metric-based simulation curriculum, adoption of proficiency benchmarking definitions, and then resolve to commit resources so as to continue to lead this revolution in physician training. PMID:22733836

  5. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for anemia in chronic kidney disease: problems and solutions. A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Locatelli; Allen R. Nissenson; Brendan J. Barrett; Rowan G. Walker; David C. Wheeler; Kai U. Eckardt; Norbert H. Lameire; Garabed Eknoyan; Tom Manley

    2008-01-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease has been instrumental in identifying and reducing variations in the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron replacement. Challenges to the effectiveness and safety of recommendations made in these guidelines were magnified when recent clinical trials showed no benefit or harm with respect to cardiovascular outcomes

  7. The Poetry Society of America

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With a lyre serving as their organization's totem, the Poetry Society of America has served the poetry community of the United States for over seventy years. The Society may be best known for its annual awards, which include the prestigious Frost Award, the Cecil Hemly Memorial Award, and the Shelley Memorial Award. Aspiring poets can read about the entry guidelines for these awards, along with being able to peruse a list of previous recipients of both the Frost Award and Shelley Memorial Award, including such literary luminaries as Conrad Aiken, Kenneth Rexroth, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks and Wallace Stevens. Even more compelling is the inclusion of works by the most recent recipients, whose august number includes Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Also on the website are lists of helpful outside poetry-related websites, a calendar of upcoming events sponsored by the Society, and a direct link to the Favorite Poem Project, which was begun by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky.

  8. Subclinical cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: To screen or not to screen

    PubMed Central

    Chillarón, Juan J; Roux, Juana A Flores-Le; Benaiges, David; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen in recent decades, and cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in this population. Several clinical trials have demonstrated the benefit of tight control of risk factors on the incidence and mortality of cardiovascular disease. However, in clinical practice, few patients achieve the therapeutic goals. The current diagnostic procedures for subclinical cardiovascular disease in T2DM patients have not been shown to improve prognosis or mortality, probably because they do not categorize cardiovascular risk. Thus, clinical practice guidelines do not systematically recommend screening for subclinical atherosclerosis in these patients, although it is known that patients with extra-coronary atherosclerosis, microangiopathy and poorly-controlled cardiovascular risk factors are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Improvements in the reliability of diagnostic tests, with fewer side effects and better cost efficiency, may better help to stratify cardiovascular risk in this group of patients, and further evaluation on this topic should be considered. PMID:25232543

  9. A multifaceted strategy using mobile technology to assist rural primary healthcare doctors and frontline health workers in cardiovascular disease risk management: protocol for the SMARTHealth India cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood Pressure related disease affected 118 million people in India in the year 2000; this figure will double by 2025. Around one in four adults in rural India have hypertension, and of those, only a minority are accessing appropriate care. Health systems in India face substantial challenges to meet these gaps in care, and innovative solutions are needed. Methods We hypothesise that a multifaceted intervention involving capacity strengthening of primary healthcare doctors and non-physician healthcare workers through use of a mobile device-based clinical decision support system will result in improved blood pressure control for individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular disease event when compared with usual healthcare. This intervention will be implemented as a stepped wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial in 18 primary health centres and 54 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh involving adults aged ?40 years at high cardiovascular disease event risk (approximately 15,000 people). Cardiovascular disease event risk will be calculated based on World Health Organisation/International Society of Hypertension’s region-specific risk charts. Cluster randomisation will occur at the level of the primary health centres. Outcome analyses will be conducted blinded to intervention allocation. Expected outcomes The primary study outcome is the difference in the proportion of people meeting guideline-recommended blood pressure targets in the intervention period vs. the control period. Secondary outcomes include mean reduction in blood pressure levels; change in other cardiovascular disease risk factors, including body mass index, current smoking, reported healthy eating habits, and reported physical activity levels; self-reported use of blood pressure and other cardiovascular medicines; quality of life (using the EQ-5D); and cardiovascular disease events (using hospitalisation data). Trial outcomes will be accompanied by detailed process and economic evaluations. Significance The findings are likely to inform policy on a scalable strategy to overcome entrenched inequities in access to effective healthcare for under-served populations in low and middle income country settings. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registry India CTRI/2013/06/003753. PMID:24274431

  10. Lymphoma Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    Coding Guidelines LYMPHOMA M9590/3-M9738/3 See the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (DB) for more information and coding instructions. First Course of Therapy Do not code

  11. Guidelines for the prevention and management of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease in adult patients with chronic kidney disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Milburn; Neil Ashman; Peter Davies; Sarah Doffman; Francis Drobniewski; Saye Khoo; Peter Ormerod; Marlies Ostermann; Catherine Snelson

    2010-01-01

    Guidelines have been compiled by the Joint Tuberculosis Committee of the British Thoracic Society for the prevention and management of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease in patients with all grades of renal impairment.

  12. Support Guidelines.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource, created by Laura Wish Morgan, a prominent family law and child support attorney, is offered primarily as an aid to other attorneys "who wish to research the law of child support in general and child support guidelines in particular." The site features links to child support guidelines for each state and the District of Columbia, weekly overviews of current notable child support cases, monthly articles on current legal issues concerning child support, and a collection of related links.

  13. Dietary guidelines in singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin Lc

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Dietary Guidelines were developed with the aim of providing guidance on what dietary strategies can best address increasing rates of obesity and non-communicable chronic disease in Singapore. This set of dietary guidelines was developed with a local expert committee based on a review of scientific literature and data on current dietary patterns from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. Projected nutrient intakes from a diet adhering to the 2011 Dietary Guidelines were calculated using a local food composition database (FOCOS) and validated against nutrient recommendations. Acknowledging that dietary requirements differ between age groups, different sets of dietary guidelines have been developed and customised for different segments of the population. To date, Singapore has produced dietary guidelines for children and adolescents (focusing on establishing healthy lifelong eating patterns), adults (focusing on preventing obesity and reinforcing healthy eating patterns), and most recently, guidelines for older adults (>50 years of age) that address the issue of potential dietary insufficiency caused by age-related increases in nutrient requirements combined with a reduction in energy requirements. In Singapore, dietary guidelines have been used to inform and direct public policy and promote dietary patterns that meet nutrient requirements while reducing the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. Examples of public policy include: national guidelines on food advertising and standards for food served in nursing homes; examples of public health promotion programmes include: the Healthier Choice Symbol Programme for packaged food products and programmes encouraging provision of healthier meals in hawker centres, restaurants, and school or workplace canteens. PMID:21859669

  14. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  15. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  16. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Evidence-based Management of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Satyajeet

    2014-01-01

    An elevated level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is directly associated with development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which may present as coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. The new cholesterol management guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association aim to address a comprehensive approach to prevent and reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The new guidelines recommend initiation of heart healthy lifestyle modifications and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor (“statin”) therapy in individuals who are at a high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It is estimated that these guidelines could result in “statin” therapy for one in every three adults in the United States. This article presents a review of the current cholesterol management guidelines, recommendations from relevant randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses obtained from the searches in Medline/PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and publications from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service, and the United States Preventive Services Task Force. PMID:24926443

  17. A Critique of Clinical Guidelines for Detection of Individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John O. Connolly; Robin G. Woolfson

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its association with cardiovascular mortality is increasingly regarded as a global public health problem. International efforts to combat this ‘epidemic’ have led to fundamental changes not only in the way we measure renal function but also how we classify and manage CKD. Clinical guidelines have established the use of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and

  18. Developing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines to Promote Healthy Diets and Lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Janice L.; Samuda, Pauline M.; Molina, Veronika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the…

  19. Guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Pryse-Phillips, W E; Dodick, D W; Edmeads, J G; Gawel, M J; Nelson, R F; Purdy, R A; Robinson, G; Stirling, D; Worthington, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide physicians and allied health care professionals with guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice. OPTIONS: The full range and quality of nonpharmacologic therapies available for the management of migraine. OUTCOMES: Improvement in the nonpharmacologic management of migraine. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The creation of the guidelines followed a needs assessment by members of the Canadian Headache Society and included a statement of objectives; development of guidelines by multidisciplinary working groups using information from literature reviews and other resources; comparison of alternative clinical pathways and description of how published data were analysed; definition of the level of evidence for data in each case; evaluation and revision of the guidelines at a consensus conference held in Ottawa on Oct. 27-29, 1995; redrafting and insertion of tables showing key variables and data from various studies and tables of data with recommendations; and reassessment by all conference participants. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Augmentation of the use of nonpharmacologic therapies for the acute and prophylactic management of migraine is likely to lead to substantial benefits in both human and economic terms. RECOMMENDATIONS: Both the avoidance of migraine trigger factors and the use of nonpharmacologic therapies have a part to play in overall migraine management. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of Canadian experts in neurology, emergency medicine, psychiatry, psychology and family medicine, and consumers. Previous guidelines did not exist. Field testing of the guidelines is in progress. PMID:9679487

  20. Improving patient adherence to lifestyle advice (IMPALA): a cluster-randomised controlled trial on the implementation of a nurse-led intervention for cardiovascular risk management in primary care (protocol)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marije S Koelewijn-van Loon; Ben van Steenkiste; Gaby Ronda; Michel Wensing; Henri E Stoffers; Glyn Elwyn; Richard Grol; Trudy van der Weijden

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients at high risk of cardiovascular diseases are managed and monitored in general practice. Recommendations for cardiovascular risk management, including lifestyle change, are clearly described in the Dutch national guideline. Although lifestyle interventions, such as advice on diet, physical exercise, smoking and alcohol, have moderate, but potentially relevant effects in these patients, adherence to lifestyle advice in general

  1. Residential environments and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Diez Roux, Ana V

    2003-12-01

    The article begins with a discussion of the rationale for studying the relationship between residential environments and cardiovascular health. Existing empirical research relating residential environments to cardiovascular outcomes and risk factors is summarized. The research areas discussed include neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics and cardiovascular disease, the effects of residential environments on physical activity, and the effects of residential environments on diet. Other mechanisms through which residential environments may affect cardiovascular health are also briefly noted. Key challenges in investigating the relationship between residential environments and health are discussed. These challenges include characterizing environments (including definition and geographic scale as well as conceptualization and measurement of relevant features), the limitations of observational studies, and the need to evaluate the health impact of interventions or "naturally" occurring changes in local environments. The need for interdisciplinary work is emphasized. PMID:14709706

  2. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Gösta; Eriksson, Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, as in many other European countries, traffic noise is an important environmental health issue. At present, almost two million people are exposed to average noise levels exceeding the outdoor national guideline value (55 dB(A)). Despite efforts to reduce the noise burden, noise-related health effects, such as annoyance and sleep disturbances, are increasing. The scientific interest regarding more serious health effects related to the cardiovascular system is growing, and several experimental and epidemiological studies have been performed or are ongoing. Most of the studies on cardiovascular outcomes have been related to noise from road or aircraft traffic. Few studies have included railway noise. The outcomes under study include morning saliva cortisol, treatment for hypertension, self-reported hypertension, and myocardial infarction. The Swedish studies on road traffic noise support the hypothesis of an association between long-term noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. However, the magnitude of effect varies between the studies and has been shown to depend on factors such as sex, number of years at residence, and noise annoyance. Two national studies have been performed on the cardiovascular effects of aircraft noise exposure. The first one, a cross-sectional study assessing self-reported hypertension, has shown a 30% risk increase per 5 dB(A) noise increase. The second one, which to our knowledge is the first longitudinal study assessing the cumulative incidence of hypertension, found a relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.19) per 5 dB(A) noise increase. No associations have been found between railway noise and cardiovascular diseases. The findings regarding noise-related health effects and their economic consequences should be taken into account in future noise abatement policies and community planning. PMID:21537104

  3. Gaps between Global Guidelines and Local Practices in CKD-MBD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The term 'chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder' (CKD-MBD) is a new term that, in contrast to the old term 'renal osteodystrophy', implies a systemic syndrome associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This new terminology is in line with previous studies that show elevated serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. In order to improve outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD, many countries have developed clinical practice guidelines. Globally, the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines are the most commonly used. However, whether these global guidelines can be successfully implemented on a local level needs to be studied. Differences in medical care and social factors between countries may limit the generalizability of global guidelines. Reports from the Korean registry and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) suggest that many dialysis patients are not within the target ranges recommended by the KDOQI and KDIGO guidelines for serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH, suggesting gaps between global guidelines and local practices. Clinical studies with Korean CKD-MBD patients are necessary to compare Korean practices and outcomes to those suggested by global guidelines and to determine the target serum mineral levels associated with the best local outcomes. PMID:25606042

  4. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkatesh K.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides structural and functional cardiovascular information with excellent soft tissue contrast. Real-time MRI can guide transcatheter cardiovascular interventions in large animal models, and may prove superior to x-ray and adjunct modalities for peripheral vascular, structural heart and cardiac electrophysiology applications. We describe technical considerations, pre-clinical work and early clinical studies in this emerging field. PMID:17662914

  5. Cardiovascular physiology in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system have been studied since the first manned flights. In several instances, the results from these investigations have directly contradicted the predictions based on established models. Results suggest associations between space flight's effects on other organ systems and those on the cardiovascular system. Such findings provide new insights into normal human physiology. They must also be considered when planning for the safety and efficiency of space flight crewmembers.

  6. Forgotten cardiovascular diseases in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Sliwa; Ana Olga Mocumbi

    2010-01-01

    Much of the global burden of cardiovascular disease is now carried by low and middle income countries. Unfortunately, many\\u000a of these regions are still grappling with poverty and infection-related cardiovascular diseases, such as endomyocardial fibrosis,\\u000a tuberculous pericarditis and rheumatic heart disease. In addition, Africa has its unique diseases that occur more commonly\\u000a in Africans as peripartum cardiomyopathy or, almost uniquely

  7. Japan Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Japan Society was founded in New York City in 1907 by a group of businesspeople who were intimately interested in promoting relations between the United States and Japan. While the Society experienced a downturn in activities during World War II, the postwar period saw the Society come under the direction of John D. Rockefeller III, who was able to vastly expand its programs. Currently, the Society offers a number of programs, including programs for K-12 educators, a language center, a global affairs lecture and seminar series, and exhibitions in its gallery. One particularly nice resource is the mini-site, "Journey Through Japan", which may be found in the education section. This part of the site is designed specifically for educators, and includes background readings, lesson plans, maps, an interactive timeline and a photo gallery. Additionally, visitors can sign up to receive a number of specialized electronic newsletters sent out by the Society.

  8. Testosterone and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Gioia, Angelo; Giovannini, Lara; Boscaro, Marco; Corona, Giovanni; Carpi, Angelo; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-04-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is one of the most common causes of death in the western populations and, nowadays, its incidence is increasing even in the developing countries; although CV disease affects both sexes, it is more frequent in males in whom it shortens the average life expectancy. In this regard, this difference has been wrongly attributed for many years to the negative effects of testosterone (T); however, nowadays, a large amount of evidence suggests that this hormone may have protective effects on the CV system and that, indeed, the low levels of T could be associated with an increased CV risk and with an augmentation of morbidity and mortality in males. Such an aspect gains great relevance in light of the consideration that T decrease, besides occurring as a consequence of rare pathological conditions, can often take place with natural aging, causing a state of "male menopause", also called late-onset hypogonadism. In this review, we aimed to summarize the present state of the art concerning the association between T deficit and CV disease by analyzing the protective role of T on CV system and the relationship of this hormonal lack with metabolic syndrome, CV morbidity and mortality, and with the CV complications, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke, that frequently occur in T deficiency. PMID:23475207

  9. CONCEPTUALIZING INFORMATION SOCIETY AS RISK SOCIETY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Róbert PINTÉR

    2003-01-01

    The article try to find why does it seem that the recent human development will be fatal. It employ two, so called postmodern theories, the information society idea and the concept of risk society. The thesis is that the information society is itself the risk society, and risk society is itself the information society. On theoretical level, both of them

  10. Assessment of Patients with a DePuy ASR Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacement: Results of Applying the Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery in a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Ramiro, Sebastián Garcia; Combalía, Andrés; Riba, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis associated with the DePuy ASR hip cup is poor and varies according to the series. This implant was withdrawn from use in 2010 and all patients needed to be assessed. We present the results of the assessment of our patients treated with this device, according to the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery (SECCA) algorithm published in 2011. This retrospective study evaluates 83 consecutive ASR cups, followed up at a mean of 2.9 years. Serum levels of chromium and cobalt, as well as the acetabular abduction angle, were determined in order to assess their possible correlation with failure, defined as the need for revision surgery. The mean Harris Hip Score was 83.2 (range 42–97). Eight arthroplasties (13.3%) required revision due to persistent pain and/or elevated serum levels of chromium/cobalt. All the cups had a correct abduction angle, and there was no correlation between elevated serum levels of metal ions and implant failure. Since two previous ASR implants were exchanged previously to the recall, the revision rate for ASR cups in our centre is 18.2% at 2.9 years. PMID:25431677

  11. Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Science: Predicting Cardiovascular Illnesses for the 21st Century, and the Unpredictable …

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Changes in our society such as the increasing cost of retirement and age redistribution toward a larger elderly population will require humans to remain highly functional until an advanced age. As a consequence, chronic illnesses that are primarily responsible for reducing functionality and life expectancy will require improved prevention and therapeutic strategies. In a global way, cardiovascular disease and cancer represent the most challenging disorders to maintaining the functional integrity of our fellow humans. A new theory has been derived from recent progress in our understanding of atherosclerosis as a key mechanism for cardiovascular disease and of cancer. Instructively, this theory provides a bridge at the stem cell level, linking most chronic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 401–406. PMID:19035844

  12. Cardiovascular disease prevention: talking occurs at all levels--does understanding?

    PubMed

    Pipe, A

    1995-01-01

    The magnitude of the health problems posed by cardiovascular disease is well known and represents a major public health challenge. Traditionally programmes of prevention have had a 'lifestyle' orientation, focusing on individual behaviours. Ironically, it may well be that profound societal changes, notably the agricultural and industrial revolutions, have largely been responsible in the most fundamental sense for the modern epidemic of cardiovascular disease. Thus attempts to deal with individually expressed behaviours alone may not be the most effective way to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease in our society. Ultimately, it will be the creation of social environments in which healthy behaviours are the norm that will have the most profound effect on the community's cardiovascular health. Misunderstandings abound. Politicians, while speaking favourably about the importance of prevention, do not match their rhetoric with resources. Many health professionals mistake 'risk-factor identification' with 'prevention'. Private industry has often confused or distorted public understanding in the process of marketing products deemed to have cardiovascular benefits. The public's awareness of many of the basic epidemiological realities concerning the prevention of cardiovascular disease is often sadly lacking. In spite of the misunderstandings, preventive approaches have played a significant role in the reduction of cardiovascular disease, a role that should become more prominent in the future. PMID:7850671

  13. Heterogeneity in statin indications within the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Lima, João A C; Nallamothu, Brahmajee; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-01-01

    A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden. PMID:25456869

  14. Liver elastography, comments on EFSUMB elastography guidelines 2013.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; De Molo, Chiara; Ignee, Andre; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-10-14

    Recently the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Guidelines and Recommendations have been published assessing the clinical use of ultrasound elastography. The document is intended to form a reference and to guide clinical users in a practical way. They give practical advice for the use and interpretation. Liver disease forms the largest section, reflecting published experience to date including evidence from meta-analyses with shear wave and strain elastography. In this review comments and illustrations on the guidelines are given. PMID:24151351

  15. ESUR guidelines: ovarian cancer staging and follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosemarie Forstner; Evis Sala; Karen Kinkel; John A. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Objective  To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer, and to provide the radiologist with\\u000a a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Guidelines for ovarian cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European\\u000a Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 12 leading

  16. Liver elastography, comments on EFSUMB elastography guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Molo, Chiara De; Ignee, Andre; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-01-01

    Recently the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Guidelines and Recommendations have been published assessing the clinical use of ultrasound elastography. The document is intended to form a reference and to guide clinical users in a practical way. They give practical advice for the use and interpretation. Liver disease forms the largest section, reflecting published experience to date including evidence from meta-analyses with shear wave and strain elastography. In this review comments and illustrations on the guidelines are given. PMID:24151351

  17. Guidelines for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Injection Drug Users: Status Quo in the European Union Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Reimer; Bernd Schulte; Xavier Castells; Ingo Schafer; Susanne Polywka; Dagmar Hedrich; Lucas Wiessing; Christian Haasen; Markus Backmund; Michael Krausz

    2005-01-01

    Treatment guidelines are considered to be an important tool in steering patients to medical treatment. This study was conducted to analyze guidelines for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in injection drug users (IDUs) in the European Union (EU) countries as a component of treatment access. National and international databases, expert contacts, professional societies, and health administrations were

  18. [The HERACLES Cardiovascular Network].

    PubMed

    Marrugat, Jaume; López-López, José R; Heras, Magdalena; Tamargo, Juan; Valverde, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, a group of researchers in the fields of cell electrophysiology, cardiology, population genetics, epidemiology, proteomics, molecular biology, bioinformatics and statistics decided to take up the challenge of investigating the mechanisms and genetics of arterial hypertension (AH). Mechanisms related to ion channel regulation of arterial smooth muscle function were identified. The HERACLES (Hipertensión Esencial: Red de Análisis de Canales iónicos de la musculatura Lisa arterial y su Explotación terapéutica Sistemática) network was honored with a distinguished mention in the 2005 evaluation, and was strengthened by the incorporation of new research groups in 2007. The work of the HERACLES network is characterized as much by the transfer of knowledge "from bedside to bench" as by its converse: "from bench to bedside". The current objectives of the HERACLES network are: a) to study the Ca2+-dependent K+ channels, the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels, and the Ca2+-dependent Cl- channels that are involved in vascular physiology; b) to study protein expression maps in plasma and cardiovascular tissue and their significance for drug treatment; c) to study the effect of flavonoids on ion transport and responses to oxidative stress, and d) to identify biomarkers of risk, prognosis, and treatment responses in extreme AH phenotypes. Our project includes a number of lines of research coordinated within cross-sectional programs based on centralized facilities, which are used by them. The HERACLES network has published more than 60 articles (available from: http://www.redheracles.net), funding has been received for more than 90 projects in competitive submissions to Spanish and six international bodies, and there is a DNA Biobank. PMID:18221693

  19. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  20. Are guidelines on use of colony-stimulating factors in solid cancers flawed?

    PubMed

    Haines, I E; Olver, I

    2009-04-01

    In cancer care in Australia, we are very reliant on an array of expensive pharmaceuticals. Our use of these treatments is often based on multinational or foreign clinical studies. Oncologists are, to varying degrees, reliant on how the studies are interpreted by the writers of journal editorials, clinical guidelines and opinion pieces. Therefore it is important that these guidelines are balanced and evidence based. We have examined in detail one of the most influential and wide ranging clinical guidelines used in oncology, The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2006 Update of Recommendations for the use of White Blood Cell Factors: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline. We have discussed in detail some of the controversial recommendations in this guideline and have exposed what we believe are some flaws in these recommendations. We would urge that we continue to be rigorous in our oversight of international research agendas and international clinical guidelines in the future. PMID:19402867

  1. American Society for Microbiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Professional and academic scientific organizations have long had a strong web-based presence, and many of them have contributed mightily to online educational initiatives. The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has done their part by creating this set of resources for undergraduate educators working in the fields of bioterrorism, microbiology, and related topics. One of the strongest sections here includes the curriculum guidelines, which include basic recommendations for what an introductory course in microbiology should cover in terms of skills, safety, and laboratory content. Additionally, visitors can also learn what bioterrorism related topics should be covered in similar courses. The site is rounded out by a set of links to external resources, such as the Bioscience Education Network, the National Academy Press, and a collection of science videos from the Annenberg/CPB Learner website.

  2. Guidelines for use of fishes in research: revised and expanded

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bart, Henry L., Jr.; Bowker, James D.; Bowser, Paul R.; MacMillan, J. Randy; Nickum, John G.; Rachlin, Joseph W.; Rose, James D.; Sorensen, Peter W.; Warkentine, Barbara E.; Whitledge, Greg W.

    2014-01-01

    The Guidelines for the Use of Fishes in Research (2014; 2014 Guidelines), now available through the American fisheries Society (AFS) website and in print from the AFS bookstore, is a resource to aid researchers and regulatory authorities regarding responsible, scientifically valid research on fish and aquatic wildlife. The Guidelines for the Use of Fishes in Field Research (American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists [ASIH] et al. 1987, 1988) emphasized field research and was followed by the 2004 Guidelines including laboratory research topics. Each version of the Guidelines has been jointly endorsed and/or published by the ASIH, the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists (AIFRB), and AFS--each focusing on the scientific understanding, global conservation, and sustainability of aquatic animals, fisheries, and ecosystems. Changes with time necessitate revisions to make the Guidelines consistent with contemporary practices and scientific literature so to remain relevant as a technical resource. This document provides not only general principles relevant for field and laboratory research endeavors but includes specific requirements for researchers working within the United States and outside of the country. Within the scope of their expertise, the 2014 Uses of Fishers in Research (UFR) Committee members updated and revised sections, resulting in a 90-page 2014 Guidelines having undergone through peer review. As before, topical areas were addressed (see Table of Contents on page 416). Expanded coverage was provided on U.S. and international agencies and programs relevant to research with fishes. The Surgical Procedures and the Marking and Tagging section received special focus by a UFR Subcommittee. Feeds and Feeding and the Administration of Drugs, Biologics and Other Chemicals are just some of the newly added topics. The 2014 Guidelines is user-friendly by way of hyperlinks to external Internet sites, intradocument sections, and tables of acronyms with corresponding terms, low regulatory priority drugs, and Office of International des Epizooties notifiable disease agents. Again, the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) role is explained, expectations for research are provided, and a brief checklist for IACUC readiness is included. Overall, the ,i>2014 Guidelines is the taxon-specific resource for our professional societies and is a principal document for standards on the care and use of fish and aquatic vertebrates in research.

  3. Developing clinical practice guidelines: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and accounting for comorbid conditions in guideline development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this third paper we discuss the issues of: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the two emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and how guideline developers should approach dealing with the issue of patients who will be the subject of guidelines having co-morbid conditions. PMID:22762242

  4. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    PubMed

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most comprehensive federal legislation which includes a mandatory standard of 1 microg L-(1) for microcystins, and also recommendations for saxitoxins (3 microg L(-1)) and for cylindrospermopsin (15 microg L(-1)). Although guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacterial cell numbers for recreational waters are in place in a number of countries, it is consid ered that there is currently insufficient information to derive sound guidelines for the use of water contaminated by cyanobacteria or toxins for agricultural production, fisheries and ecosystem protection. In relation to the need for specific regulations for toxins for the US, the surveys that have been carried out to date would indicate that the priority compounds for regulation, based upon their incidence and distribution, are microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and Anatoxin-a. Additional research is required to support guideline development, including whole-of-life animal studies with each of the known cyanotoxins. In view of the animal studies that indicate that microcystins may act as tumor promoters, and also some evidence of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for cylindrospermopsin, it may be appropriate to carry out whole-of-life animal studies with both toxicity and carcinogenicity as end-points. In relation to microcystins, it is known that there a large number of congeners, and the toxico-dynamics and kinetics of these variants are not well understood. Further research is needed to consider the approach to take in formulating health advisories or regulations for toxin mixtures, i.e. multiple microcystins, or mixtures of toxin types. An important requirement for regulation is the availability of robust monitoring and analytical protocols for toxins. Currently rapid and economical screening or quantitative analytical methods are not available to the water industry or natural resource managers, and this is a priority before the release of guidelines and regulations. There is insufficient information available in a range of the categories usually required to satisfy comprehensive risk assessment process for the major tox

  5. Guidelines for Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arieh, David

    2001-01-01

    Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Self-Care Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Yoon, Hye-Won; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Chyun, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of increased morbidity and mortality globally. Clinical practice guidelines recommend that individuals with CVD are routinely instructed to engage in self-care including diet restrictions, medication adherence, and symptom monitoring. Objectives. To describe the nature of nurse-led CVD self-care interventions, identify limitations in current nurse-led CVD self-care interventions, and make recommendations for addressing them in future research. Design. Integrative review of nurse-led CVD self-care intervention studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and CINAHL. Primary studies (n = 34) that met the inclusion criteria of nurse-led RCT or quasiexperimental CVD self-care intervention studies (years 2000 to 2012) were retained and appraised. Quality of the review was assured by having at least two reviewers screen and extract all data. Results. A variety of self-care intervention strategies were studied among the male (57%) and Caucasian (67%) dominated samples. Combined interventions were common, and quality of life was the most frequent outcome evaluated. Effectiveness of interventions was inconclusive, and in general results were not sustained over time. Conclusions. Research is needed to develop and test tailored and inclusive CVD self-care interventions. Attention to rigorous study designs and methods including consistent outcomes and measurement is essential. PMID:24223305

  7. The P-glycoprotein transport system and cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Jeffrey D; Grip, Laura T; Mendell, Jeanne; Giugliano, Robert P

    2013-06-25

    Permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) mediates the export of drugs from cells located in the small intestine, blood-brain barrier, hepatocytes, and kidney proximal tubule, serving a protective function for the body against foreign substances. Intestinal absorption, biliary excretion, and urinary excretion of P-gp substrates can therefore be altered by either the inhibition or induction of P-gp. A wide spectrum of drugs, such as anticancer agents and steroids, are known P-gp substrates and/or inhibitors, and many cardiovascular drugs have recently been observed to have clinically relevant interactions as well. We review the interactions among commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs that are P-gp substrates and observe interactions involving P-gp that may be relevant to clinical practice. Cardiovascular drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes (e.g., antiarrhythmic agents, anticoagulant agents) have demonstrated large increases in concentrations when coadministered with potent P-gp inhibitors, thus increasing the risk for drug toxicity. Therefore, dose adjustment or use of alternative agents should be considered when strong P-gp-mediated drug-drug interactions are present. Finally, interactions between novel drugs and known P-gp inhibitors are now being systematically evaluated during drug development, and recommended guidelines for the administration of P-gp substrate drugs will be expanded. PMID:23563132

  8. Using ST2 in cardiovascular patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Lori B; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-07-01

    Biomarkers have emerged as indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognostication in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, and several are now standard of care. New markers are constantly being developed, but few are able to significantly improve upon already established markers. ST2 is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis, which provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients across a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. Based upon the totality of data, measurement of ST2 is now recommended for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or ambulatory heart failure in the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association joint guidelines. Looking forward, ST2 levels may be useful for tailoring medical therapy in those with or at risk for developing heart failure. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker, and provides insight into the application of ST2 now and in the future. PMID:25301315

  9. Pharmacogenetics and Cardiovascular Disease—Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Larisa H.

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetic factors influencing response to a variety of drugs, including those targeted at treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the case of clopidogrel, warfarin, and statins, the literature has become sufficiently strong that guidelines are now available describing the use of genetic information to guide treatment with these therapies, and some health centers are using this information in the care of their patients. There are many challenges in moving from research data to translation to practice; we discuss some of these barriers and the approaches some health systems are taking to overcome them. The body of literature that has led to the clinical implementation of CYP2C19 genotyping for clopidogrel, VKORC1, CYP2C9; and CYP4F2 for warfarin; and SLCO1B1 for statins is comprehensively described. We also provide clarity for other genes that have been extensively studied relative to these drugs, but for which the data are conflicting. Finally, we comment briefly on pharmacogenetics of other cardiovascular drugs and highlight ?-blockers as the drug class with strong data that has not yet seen clinical implementation. It is anticipated that genetic information will increasingly be available on patients, and it is important to identify those examples where the evidence is sufficiently robust and predictive to use genetic information to guide clinical decisions. The review herein provides several examples of the accumulation of evidence and eventual clinical translation in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics. PMID:23686351

  10. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Surgical Devices § 870.4500 Cardiovascular surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical...have special features for use in cardiovascular surgery. These devices include,...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Surgical Devices § 870.4500 Cardiovascular surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical...have special features for use in cardiovascular surgery. These devices include,...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Surgical Devices § 870.4500 Cardiovascular surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical...have special features for use in cardiovascular surgery. These devices include,...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Surgical Devices § 870.4500 Cardiovascular surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical...have special features for use in cardiovascular surgery. These devices include,...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Surgical Devices § 870.4500 Cardiovascular surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical...have special features for use in cardiovascular surgery. These devices include,...

  15. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  16. Exercise Guidelines For Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, J. Patricia; Vandorpe, David

    1980-01-01

    Fitness may be the latest fad or it may be a positive step towards refocusing on healthy lifestyles. Many individuals, before they jump into new activity, want reassurances from their physicians that they are in sound enough health to do so. The physician can rule out major risk factors, recommend further fitness assessment, and give general guidelines for a well rounded program and safe activity within the limits of the individual's health status. This paper discusses some guidelines that may be followed. PMID:21293617

  17. Accessible Digital Media Guidelines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Freed, Geoff

    The World Wide Web is a tool that has a myriad of uses for any type of person, so it should be accessible to everyone. In order to help Web designers and software authors accommodate people with disabilities, this site offers a series of guidelines that explains how to effectively serve these types of users. Following a discussion of different disabilities, assistive technologies, and general accessibility tips, ten main guideline topics are addressed in depth. Techniques for using images, multimedia applications, and mathematics illustrations, among others, are given to create a more universally useable online experience.

  18. Air pollution and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Barry A; Brook, Robert; Arden Pope, C

    2015-05-01

    An escalating body of epidemiologic and clinical research provides compelling evidence that exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease and the triggering of acute cardiac events. There are 3 potential mediating pathways that have been implicated, including "systemic spillover," autonomic imbalance, and circulating particulate matter constituents. Further support that the increased morbidity and mortality attributed to air pollution comes from studies demonstrating the adverse cardiovascular effects of even brief periods of exposure to secondhand smoke. Accordingly, persons with known or suspected cardiovascular disease, the elderly, diabetic patients, pregnant women, and those with pulmonary disease should be counseled to limit leisure-time outdoor activities when air pollution is high. Recognizing the insidious and pervasive nature of air pollution, and the associated odds ratios and population attributable fractions for this widely underappreciated chemical trigger of acute cardiovascular events, may serve to maximize the potential for cardiovascular risk reduction by addressing at least a portion of the 10%-25% incidence of coronary disease that is unexplained by traditional risk factors. PMID:25882781

  19. Cardiovascular system effects of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Jones, Reese T

    2002-11-01

    Marijuana and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) increase heart rate, slightly increase supine blood pressure, and on occasion produce marked orthostatic hypotension. Cardiovascular effects in animals are different, with bradycardia and hypotension the most typical response. Cardiac output increases, and peripheral vascular resistance and maximum exercise performance decrease. Tolerance to most of the initial cardiovascular effects appears rapidly. With repeated exposure, supine blood pressure decreases slightly, orthostatic hypotension disappears, blood volume increases, heart rate slows, and circulatory responses to exercise and Valsalva maneuver are diminished, consistent with centrally mediated, reduced sympathetic, and enhanced parasympathetic activity. Receptor-mediated and probably nonneuronal sites of action account for cannabinoid effects. The endocannabinoid system appears important in the modulation of many vascular functions. Marijuana's cardiovascular effects are not associated with serious health problems for most young, healthy users, although occasional myocardial infarction, stroke, and other adverse cardiovascular events are reported. Marijuana smoking by people with cardiovascular disease poses health risks because of the consequences of the resulting increased cardiac work, increased catecholamine levels, carboxyhemoglobin, and postural hypotension. PMID:12412837

  20. Tsunami Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site assists the international Tsunami Society in its mission to distribute "knowledge about tsunamis to scientists, officials, and the public." In the first section of the site, scientists can download articles from the 2002 and 2003 issues of the journal Science of Tsunami Hazards. Visitors can also view footage from tsunamis around the world. The second section of the site discusses the details of the society including its origin, award recipients, and symposiums.

  1. Guidelines International Network: toward international standards for clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Forland, Frode; Macbeth, Fergus; Ollenschläger, Günter; Phillips, Sue; van der Wees, Philip

    2012-04-01

    Guideline development processes vary substantially, and many guidelines do not meet basic quality criteria. Standards for guideline development can help organizations ensure that recommendations are evidence-based and can help users identify high-quality guidelines. Such organizations as the U.S. Institute of Medicine and the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have developed recommendations to define trustworthy guidelines within their locales. Many groups charged with guideline development find the lengthy list of standards developed by such organizations to be aspirational but infeasible to follow in entirety. Founded in 2002, the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) is a network of guideline developers that includes 93 organizations and 89 individual members representing 46 countries. The G-I-N board of trustees recognized the importance of guideline development processes that are both rigorous and feasible even for modestly funded groups to implement and initiated an effort toward consensus about minimum standards for high-quality guidelines. In contrast to other existing standards for guideline development at national or local levels, the key components proposed by G-I-N will represent the consensus of an international, multidisciplinary group of active guideline developers. This article presents G-I-N's proposed set of key components for guideline development. These key components address panel composition, decision-making process, conflicts of interest, guideline objective, development methods, evidence review, basis of recommendations, ratings of evidence and recommendations, guideline review, updating processes, and funding. It is hoped that this article promotes discussion and eventual agreement on a set of international standards for guideline development. PMID:22473437

  2. Managing diabetic foot infections: a review of the new guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gariani, K; Uçkay, I; Lipsky, B A

    2014-01-01

    Foot infections are amongst the most frequent and severe complications linked to diabetes mellitus and are the most common non-traumatic cause of lower limb amputation. Appropriate management of these infections, however, can improve their outcome. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) constituted a panel of multidisciplinary experts in 2004 to develop guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections, which have been widely used and validated. Because there have been many new publications in the field, and the IDSA updated the format for all guidelines, they asked the diabetic foot infection committee to revise the 2004 publication. The revised guidelines, based on a thorough and systematic review of the literature, were published in 2012. They are built around 10 key questions concerning diagnosis and treatment; these are answered, with a summary of the evidence provided, and given a GRADE rating for the strength of the recommendation and quality of the evidence. The updated guidelines also include advice on implementing these recommendations, suggestions for regulatory changes to enhance care for diabetic foot infections, recommendations on performance measures and suggested areas for future research. They also include 14 tables, 1 figure, and 345 references, most of which were published after the first guidelines in 2004. Implementing these guidelines should improve outcomes in patients with a DFI. PMID:24720132

  3. Guidelines for Video Capsule Endoscopy: Emphasis on Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Park, Cheol Hee; Lee, Wan-Sik; Jang, Byung Ik; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is an ingestible video camera that transmits high-quality images of the small intestinal mucosa. This makes the small intestine more readily accessible to physicians investigating the presence of small bowel disorders, such as Crohn's disease (CD). Although VCE is frequently performed in Korea, there are no evidence-based guidelines on the appropriate use of VCE in the diagnosis of CD. To provide accurate information and suggest correct testing approaches for small bowel diseases, the Korean Gut Image Study Group, part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, developed guidelines on VCE. Teams were set up to develop guidelines on VCE. Four areas were selected: diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel preparation for VCE, diagnosis of CD, and diagnosis of small bowel tumors. Three key questions were selected regarding the role of VCE in CD. In preparing these guidelines, a systematic literature search, evaluation, selection, and meta-analysis were performed. After writing a draft of the guidelines, the opinions of various experts were solicited before producing the final document. These guidelines are expected to play a role in the diagnosis of CD. They will need to be updated as new data and evidence become available.

  4. ASPS clinical practice guideline summary on reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Kalliainen, Loree K

    2012-10-01

    In May of 2011, the Executive Committee of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons approved an evidence-based guideline on reduction mammaplasty developed by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Health Policy Committee. The guideline addresses six clinical questions: procedural efficacy as noted by relief of symptoms, resection weight, the impact of body mass index on surgical complications, use of prophylactic antibiotics, use of drains, and effect on quality of life. The evidence indicates that resection volume is not correlated directly to the degree of postoperative symptom relief. Increased breast resection weight may increase the risks of complication. The evidence is inconclusive on whether increased body mass index is associated with increased risk of complications. Perioperative antibiotics may reduce the risk of infection associated with reduction mammaplasty, and in standard reduction mammaplasty procedures without liposuction, the use of drains is not beneficial. Reduction mammaplasty has been shown to improve quality of life. PMID:23018692

  5. Undergraduates Understanding of Cardiovascular Phenomena

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Joel A. Michael (Rush Medical College Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology)

    2002-06-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the studentsÂ? answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the studentsÂ? inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  6. Current Genomics in Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Vinit; Brouilette, Scott; Abrams, Dominic; Schilling, Richard; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a heterogeneous, complex trait that has a major impact on human morbidity and mortality. Common genetic variation may predispose to common forms of CVD in the community, and rare genetic conditions provide unique pathogenetic insights into these diseases. With the advent of the Human Genome Project and the genomic era, new tools and methodologies have revolutionised the field of genetic research in cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we describe the rationale for the current emphasis on large-scale genomic studies, elaborate on genome wide association studies and summarise the impact of genomics on clinical cardiovascular medicine and how this may eventually lead to new therapeutics and personalised medicine. PMID:23450299

  7. The cardiovascular action of hexarelin

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuanjie; Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Hexarelin, a synthetic growth hormone-releasing peptide, can bind to and activate the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) in the brain similar to its natural analog ghrelin. However, the peripheral distribution of GHSR in the heart and blood vessels suggests that hexarelin might have direct cardiovascular actions beyond growth hormone release and neuroendocrine effects. Furthermore, the non-GHSR CD36 had been demonstrated to be a specific cardiac receptor for hexarelin and to mediate its cardioprotective effects. When compared with ghrelin, hexarelin is chemically more stable and functionally more potent. Therefore, it may be a promising therapeutic agent for some cardiovascular conditions. In this concise review, we discuss the current evidence for the cardiovascular action of hexarelin. PMID:25278975

  8. Cardiovascular Consequences of Cortisol Excess

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Judith A; Williamson, Paula M; Mangos, George; Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a consequence of primary or, more commonly, secondary oversecretion of cortisol. Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Cushing's syndrome, and excess risk remains even in effectively treated patients. The cardiovascular consequences of cortisol excess are protean and include, inter alia, elevation of blood pressure, truncal obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. This review analyses the relationship of cortisol excess, both locally and at tissue level, to these cardiovascular risk factors, and to putative mechanisms for hypertension. Previous studies have examined correlations between cortisol, blood pressure, and other parameters in the general population and in Cushing's syndrome. This review also details changes induced by short-term cortisol administration in normotensive healthy men. PMID:17315601

  9. Global approach to cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: Reality and opportunities for intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L De Nicola; R Minutolo; P Chiodini; C Zoccali; P Castellino; C Donadio; M Strippoli; F Casino; M Giannattasio; F Petrarulo; M Virgilio; E Laraia; B R Di Iorio; V Savica; G Conte

    2006-01-01

    The current implementation into nephrology clinical practice of guidelines on treatment of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. We designed a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate the prevalence and treatment of eight modifiable CV risk factors in 1058 predialysis CKD patients (stage 3: n=486; stage 4: n=430, stage 5: n=142) followed for at least 1 year

  10. 2012 Guidelines for Water Reuse

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual is a revision of the "2004 Water Reuse Guidelines." This document is a summary of reuse guidelines, with supporting information, for the benefit of utilities of utilities and regulatory agencies, particularly EPA....

  11. Current Fat Guidelines and Recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current dietary guidelines, including those of the US government [Dietary Guidelines (USDA/DHHS, 2005), Dietary Reference Intakes [reference DRI macronutrient book], National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, 2001)], American Heart Association (AHA, 2206), American Diabetes Association (2006) and...

  12. PREVENTION GUIDELINES SYSTEM/DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Prevention Guidelines System gives public health practitioners quick access to the most current CDC recommendations and guidelines for the prevention, control, treatment and detection of infectious and chronic diseases, environmental hazards, natural or human-generated disast...

  13. EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents fifteen technical guidelines to evaluate the suitability of an ecological indicator for a particular monitoring program. The guidelines are organized within four evaluation phrases: conceptual relevance, feasibility of implementation, response variability...

  14. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  15. Peer Evaluation Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agatucci, Cora; Ahern, Gloria; Mays, Ken; McCown, Jack; Sequeira, Mike

    This document provides the peer evaluation guidelines for Central Oregon Community College (COCC). It begins by identifying the goals of the peer team: to maintain and strengthen the quality of instruction at COCC; establish strong collegial ties among faculty members; offer positive suggestions to them for improvement as teachers; and evaluate…

  16. Emergency Evacuation Guidelines For

    E-print Network

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Emergency Evacuation Guidelines For Persons With Disabilities Tips for establishing an evacuation plan. Tips for the person with a disability in preparing for and responding in an evacuation. Tips for assisting persons with disabilities in an evacuation. This document is available in alternate formats from

  17. Guidelines for Theatre Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    Prepared to help school administrators and theatre arts teachers establish and maintain a safe environment for the actors, technicians, and audience members who participate in educational theatre programs, this guide is divided into two major sections. The first section presents administrative guidelines covering recommended procedures, teacher…

  18. GUIDELINES FOR WATER REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified an immediate short-term objective of developing a wastewater-reuse guidelines document that will significantly increase interest in and assist implementation of wastewater reuse for nonpotable purposes. Irrigation and ...

  19. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  20. The University Advertising Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    The University Advertising Guidelines www.hw.ac.uk Distinctly Ambitious #12;Contents 2 www.hw.ac.uk Distinctly Ambitious Introduction 3 Print ­ staff recruitment advertising 5 Small space (5cms x 2cols) advertisements 6 Small space (5cms x 2cols) advertisements with image 8 A5 advertisements 9 A5 advertisements

  1. Lung Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    Co ding Guidelines LUNG C340–C349 Primary Site C340 Main bronchus Carina Hilum Bronchus intermedius C341 Upper lobe, lung Lingula Apex Pancoast tumor C342 Middle lobe, lung (Right lung only) C343 Lower lobe, lung Base C348

  2. GUIDELINES FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Guidelines for Exposure Assessment describe the general concepts of exposure assessment including definitions and associated units, and by providing guidance on the planning and conducting of an exposure assessment. Guidance is also provided on presenting the results of the e...

  3. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    PROGRAMS (SENATE BILL 1) Fourth Edition CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division #12;ABSTRACT As required by Senate Bill 1, this document presents guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California. Senate Bill 1

  4. BUCKLEY AMENDMENT GUIDELINES Confidentiality

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    BUCKLEY AMENDMENT GUIDELINES Confidentiality: Regardless of the function you are performing, non-academic, or medical, is confidential and cannot be given or made available to anyone other than confidentiality, and to ensure that only University officials with a legitimate educational interest have access

  5. Parking Procedures GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    10, 2014 PURPOSE: To establish guidelines for the regulation of parking on the Washington University outside of the Clayton Garage is regulated due to more high demand for the other facilities. Clayton and a report may be forwarded to the parker's department for disposition. All vehicles on the Medical Center

  6. Prenatal Testing Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miriam Kuppermann; Mary E. Norton

    2005-01-01

    Numerous advances over the past 15 years have led to a much wider array of prenatal testing options for pregnant women who are interested in obtaining information regarding the chromosomal status of their fetus. However, despite recent data calling into question the assumptions underlying current testing guidelines, including those inherent in the risk-based threshold for offering invasive testing, chorionic villus

  7. Rethinking Dietary Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Marantz

    2010-01-01

    Many public health recommendations are not truly evidence based (Brownson et al., 2003). Although some public health decisions can and should be made in the face of inconclusive data, many should not. The need for restraint may be especially salient when considering dietary guidelines. Dietary fat recommendations are a case in point, because they may have led to significant and

  8. Guidelines on Urolithiasis1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-G. Tiselius; D. Ackermann; P. Alken; C. Buck; P. Conort; M. Gallucci

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: A project was initiated by the Health Care Office of the European Association of Urology in order to formulate common recommendations and guidelines for the treatment of patients with urolithiasis. The basic task for the working group therefore was to extract and evaluate evidence from the literature in order to reach a consensus on how these patients could best

  9. Guidelines for National Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Guy

    This report is designed to provide practical assistance to government officials and librarians responsible for the planning, creation, and development of national library services. Based on a number of authoritative studies and a broad consensus among experts, including directors of national libraries, these guidelines give special attention to…

  10. Contributors to primary care guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Allan, G. Michael; Kraut, Roni; Crawshay, Aven; Korownyk, Christina; Vandermeer, Ben; Kolber, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the professions of those who contribute to guidelines, guideline variables associated with differing contributor participation, and whether conflict of interest statements are provided in primary care guidelines. Design Retrospective analysis of the primary care guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association website. Two independent data extractors reviewed the guidelines and extracted relevant data. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Sponsors of guidelines, jurisdiction (national or provincial) of guidelines, the professions of those who contribute to guidelines, and the reported conflict of interest statements within guidelines. Results Of the 296 guidelines in the family medicine section of the CMA Infobase, 65 were duplicates and 35 had limited relevance to family medicine. Twenty did not provide contributor information, leaving 176 guidelines for analysis. In total, there were 2495 contributors (authors and committee members): 1343 (53.8%) non–family physician specialists, 423 (17.0%) family physicians, 141 (5.7%) nurses, 75 (3.0%) pharmacists, 269 (10.8%) other clinicians, 203 (8.1%) nonclinician scientists, and 41 (1.6%) unknown professions. The proportion of contributors from the various professions differed significantly between provincial and national guidelines, as well as between industry-funded and non–industry-funded guidelines (both P < .001). For provincial guidelines, 30.8% of contributors were family physicians and 37.3% were other specialists compared with 13.9% and 57.4%, respectively, for national guidelines. Of industry-funded guidelines, 7.8% of contributors were family physicians and 68.6% were other specialists compared with 19.4% and 49.9%, respectively, for non–industry-funded guidelines. Conflicts of interest were not reported in 68.9% of guidelines. When reported, conflict of interest statements were present for 48.6% of non–family physician specialists, 30.0% of pharmacists, 27.7% of family physicians, and 10.0% or less of the remaining groups; differences were statistically significant (P < .001). Conclusion Non–family physician specialists outnumber all other health care providers combined and are more than 3 times more likely to contribute to primary care guidelines than family physicians are. Conflict of interest statements were provided in the minority of guidelines, and for guidelines in which conflict of interest statements were included, non–family physician specialists were most likely to report them. Guidelines targeted to primary care should have much more primary care and family medicine representation and include fewer contributors who have conflicts of interest. PMID:25609522

  11. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  12. Genetics of Human Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kathiresan, Sekar; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease encompasses a range of conditions extending from myocardial infarction to congenital heart disease most of which are heritable. Enormous effort has been invested in understanding the genes and specific DNA sequence variants responsible for this heritability. Here, we review the lessons learned for monogenic and common, complex forms of cardiovascular disease. We also discuss key challenges that remain for gene discovery and for moving from genomic localization to mechanistic insights with an emphasis on the impact of next generation sequencing and the use of pluripotent human cells to understand the mechanism by which genetic variation contributes to disease. PMID:22424232

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Papazafiropoulou, A; Tentolouris, N

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular enzymes that are important in many physiologic and pathologic processes. Their activity is regulated mainly by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs expression is related with the classical cardiovascular risk factors as well as with inflammation. They play a central role in atherosclerosis, plaque formation, platelet aggregation, acute coronary syndrome, restenosis, aortic aneurysms and peripheral vascular disease. Many studies have shown that commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications, glitazones and statins may influence MMPs activity. The aim of the review is to present literature data on the role of MMPs and their inhibitors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:19561775

  14. [Brazilian guidelines for the manegement of intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Pontes-Neto, Octávio M; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Valiente, Raul; Friedrich, Maurício; Pedreira, Bruno; Rodrigues, Bruno Castelo Branco; Liberato, Bernardo; Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez de

    2009-09-01

    Among the stroke subtypes, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has the worst prognosis and still lacks a specific treatment. The present manuscript contains the Brazilian guidelines for the management of ICH. It was elaborated by the executive committee of the Brazilian Cerebrovascular Diseases Society and was based on a broad review of articles about the theme. The text aims to provide a rational for the management of patients with an acute ICH, with the diagnostic and therapeutic resources that are available in Brazil. PMID:19838537

  15. Human factors guidelines for nuclear power plant applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ketchel

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, Waters et al. reported to the Human Factors Society on developing human factors criteria for a new reactor plant. They correctly indicated that much of the guidance documentation in human factors engineering has derived from MIL-STD-1472 and its antecedents. Guidelines for human-computer interface have sprung primarily from the Smith and Mosier compendium and its source documents. NUREG-0700, which

  16. The role of testosterone therapy in cardiovascular mortality: culprit or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Alukal, Joseph; Weintraub, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Testosterone therapy is recommended for men with symptomatic androgen deficiency and unequivocally low testosterone levels. Although the prevalence of hypogonadism seems relatively constant, studies of prescribing patterns in both the United States and the United Kingdom show a dramatic increase in testosterone prescription in recent years, possibly due to increased marketing and inappropriate therapy. Concurrent with this, there has been growing concern regarding the potential adverse effects of testosterone therapy, particularly its cardiovascular risks. In this review, we present our current understanding of the implications of testosterone deficiency, as well as the conflicting evidence surrounding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone replacement therapy. Although there is a lack of adequate data, based on the current evidence, we conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and increased cardiovascular risk after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline recommended safety monitoring. PMID:25687258

  17. Cardiovascular Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, Peter; Schneider, Sue

    1999-01-01

    It was apparent that the bed-rest and spaceflight data indicated that decreases in plasma volume and cardiac atrophy along with cardiac remodeling were fundamental changes which predisposed many astronauts to post flight orthostatic intolerance. Despite the recently acquired in-flight and post-flight muscle sympathetic nerve activity findings suggesting that the sympathetic nerve responses were appropriate there remains significant contrary data from bed-rest studies, post- flight stand tests and hind-limb unweighted rat studies that suggest that the vasoconstrictive responses were compromised at least insufficient in susceptible individuals. The key issues raised is whether a diminished increase in sympathetic activity from baseline without changes in 254 First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators'Workshop Cardiovascular peak response or receptor adaptations is an abnormal response or is an individual variance of response to the accentuated decrease in stroke volume. Data relating autonomic neural control of heart rate were presented to suggest that the vagal and sympathetic control of heart rate was attenuated. Also, bed-rest and space flight induced attenuated baroreflex control of heart rate was shown to be restored to pre-bedrest function by one bout of maximal dynamic exercise. However, these data were confounded by relying on the use of R-R interval as a measure of efferent responses of the baroreflex during a condition in which the baseline heart rate was changed. Clearly the idea that the autonomic control of heart rate may be changed by microgravity needs further investigation. This direction is suggested despite the fact that in the triple product (HR x SV x TPR = MAP) assessment of the regulation of arterial blood pressure during orthostasis the role of the HR reflex may be less influential than that associated. with cardiac atrophy (SV changes) and aberrant sympathetic vasoconstriction (resistance) changes. Although sympathetic nerve activity responses in-flight and post-flight on neurolab appeared appropriate, enough bed-rest and post-flight stand test data, along with animal model data suggest that vasoconstriction was compromised. The mechanism of this compromised vasoconstriction needs to be delineated. Other major findings concerning microgravity and physiological regulatory systems are that: I . Thermoregulatory adaptation appear to suggest some decrements in the control of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating; 2. Calcium resorption and dietary calcium need to be defined for differing durations of spaceflight, especially as the effects of excess calcium on vasomotor function appears to be detrimental; 3. Neurohumoral mechanisms of microgravity induced changes in neural function and the regulation of plasma volume and total body water, bone resorption and autonomic neural control of the circulation need further delineation; 4. As performance of work tasks become prolonged, the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation in microgravity needs to be used in the recovery period from prolonged work tasks.

  18. 10 CFR 960.5 - Preclosure guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...960.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines § 960.5 Preclosure guidelines. The guidelines in this subpart specify...

  19. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  20. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  1. 10 CFR 960.5 - Preclosure guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...960.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines § 960.5 Preclosure guidelines. The guidelines in this subpart specify...

  2. Flu Policy 20092010 Supervisory Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    1 Flu Policy 20092010 Supervisory Guidelines These HR guidelines will be implemented effective the reporting/notification guidelines outlined below. The employee should also be reminded to review the Flu. When Employees Exhibit FluLike Symptoms at Work Employees at work who have flulike symptoms (fever

  3. EAU Guidelines on Prostate Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Aus; C. C. Abbou; D. Pacik; H. van Poppel; J. M. Wolff; F. Zattoni

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To develop clinical guidelines for the management of patients with prostate cancer.Methods: Guidelines were compiled by a working panel based on current literature following a literature review using MEDLINE. Already published structured analysis from national and international guidelines was used, and panel consensus was employed when literature evidence was absent or of poor quality.Results: The full text of the

  4. Integration of textual guideline documents with formal guideline knowledge bases.

    PubMed

    Shankar, R D; Tu, S W; Martins, S B; Fagan, L M; Goldstein, M K; Musen, M A

    2001-01-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to integrate the text of guideline documents with guideline-based care systems. Current approaches range from serving marked up guideline text documents to generating advisories using complex guideline knowledge bases. These approaches have integration problems mainly because they tend to rigidly link the knowledge base with text. We are developing a bridge approach that uses an information retrieval technology. The new approach facilitates a versatile decision-support system by using flexible links between the formal structures of the knowledge base and the natural language style of the guideline text. PMID:11825260

  5. Introduction and methodology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 1

    PubMed Central

    Koletzko, B.; Celik, I.; Jauch, K. W.; Koller, M.; Kopp, J. B.; Verwied-Jorky, S.; Mittal, R.

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for Parenteral Nutrition were prepared by the German Society for Nutritional Medicine (http://www.dgem.de/), in collaboration with other medical associations to provide guidance for quality assurance for parenteral nutrition (PN) practice, and to promoting health and quality of life of patients concerned. A coordination team proposed topics, working group leaders who along with working group members performed systematic literatur searches and drafted recommendations in a nominal group process. Recommendations were discussed and agreed upon in a structured consensus conference process, followed by a Delphi consensus. The current English version of the guidelines was written and updated during the period between the last quarter of 2007 and the first quarter of 2009. The recommendations of the guidelines should be reviewed, and if necessary updated five years after publication. PMID:20049082

  6. Introduction and methodology - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 1.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, B; Celik, I; Jauch, K W; Koller, M; Kopp, J B; Verwied-Jorky, S; Mittal, R

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for Parenteral Nutrition were prepared by the German Society for Nutritional Medicine (http://www.dgem.de/), in collaboration with other medical associations to provide guidance for quality assurance for parenteral nutrition (PN) practice, and to promoting health and quality of life of patients concerned. A coordination team proposed topics, working group leaders who along with working group members performed systematic literatur searches and drafted recommendations in a nominal group process. Recommendations were discussed and agreed upon in a structured consensus conference process, followed by a Delphi consensus. The current English version of the guidelines was written and updated during the period between the last quarter of 2007 and the first quarter of 2009. The recommendations of the guidelines should be reviewed, and if necessary updated five years after publication. PMID:20049082

  7. [Are the guidelines the standards we have to follow].

    PubMed

    Petignat, Pierre-Auguste

    2009-11-11

    National or international medical societies yearly produce many recommendations i.e., guidelines about patient care, diagnostic or therapeutic procedures or preventive measures. These publications are established according to a level of evidence, based on randomised controlled trials or case studies. The strength of evidence reflects the presence of a good agreement or disagreement between the published trials. The clinician when confronted to these recommendations find them too rigid, poorly adapted to individual patients and depriving him from autonomy. However the use of well established guidelines plays a proven role in improvement of the quality and effectiveness of patient care. Primary care physicians should recognise the good guidelines and follow them to improve their daily practice. PMID:19999315

  8. BSACI guideline for the management of chronic urticaria and angioedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, R J; Leech, S C; Till, S; Huber, P A J; Nasser, S M; Clark, A T

    2015-03-01

    This guidance for the management of patients with chronic urticaria and angioedema has been prepared by the Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI). The guideline is based on evidence as well as on expert opinion and is aimed at both adult physicians and paediatricians practising in allergy. The recommendations are evidence graded. During the development of these guidelines, all BSACI members were included in the consultation process using a Web-based system. Their comments and suggestions were carefully considered by the Standards of Care Committee. Where evidence was lacking, a consensus was reached by the experts on the committee. Included in this management guideline are clinical classification, aetiology, diagnosis, investigations, treatment guidance with special sections on children with urticaria and the use of antihistamines in women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Finally, we have made recommendations for potential areas of future research. PMID:25711134

  9. Existing dietary guidelines for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Rampertab, S Devi; Mullin, Gerard E

    2011-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often question their doctors about diet. The objectives of this article are to provide clinicians with existing dietary advice by presenting the dietary information proposed by medical societies in the form of clinical practice guidelines as it relates to IBD; listing dietary guidelines from patient-centered IBD-related organizations; and creating a new 'global practice guideline' that attempts to consolidate the existing information regarding diet and IBD. The dietary suggestions derived from sources found in this article include nutritional deficiency screening, avoiding foods that worsen symptoms, eating smaller meals at more frequent intervals, drinking adequate fluids, avoiding caffeine and alcohol, taking vitamin/mineral supplementation, eliminating dairy if lactose intolerant, limiting excess fat, reducing carbohydrates and reducing high-fiber foods during flares. Mixed advice exists regarding probiotics. Enteral nutrition is recommended for Crohn's disease patients in Japan, which differs from practices in the USA. PMID:21651358

  10. Cardiovascular Fitness Levels among American Workers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John E.; Clark, John D.; LeBlanc, William G.; Fleming, Lora E.; Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Tannenbaum, Stacey L.; Ocasio, Manuel A.; Davila, Evelyn P.; Kachan, Diana; McCollister, Kathryn; Dietz, Noella; Bandiera, Frank C.; Clarke, Tainya C.; Lee, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore cardiovascular fitness in 40 occupations using a nationally-representative 3 sample of the U.S. population. Methods Respondents aged 18–49 (n=3,354) from the 1999–2004 NHANES were evaluated for 5 cardiovascular fitness and classified into low, moderate, and high levels. Comparisons were 6 made among occupations. Results Of all U.S. workers, 16% had low, 36% moderate, and 48% high cardiovascular 8 fitness. Administrators, Health occupations, Wait staff, Personal services, and Agricultural 9 occupations had a lesser percentage of workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared to all 10 others. Sales workers, Administrative support, and Food preparers had a higher percentage of 11 workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared to all others. Conclusions Cardiovascular fitness varies significantly across occupations, and those with limited physical activity have higher percentages of low cardiovascular fitness. Workplace strategies are needed to promote cardiovascular fitness among high-risk occupations. PMID:21915067

  11. Diagnosis Of Age-Related Cardiovascular Disorders

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging Cardiovascular Biology Unit-Vascular Group is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods for diagnosing age-related cardiovascular disorders.

  12. Cardiologists' awareness and perceptions of guidelines for chronic heart failure. The ADDress your Heart survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leif Erhardt; Michel Komajda; F. D. Richard Hobbs; Jordi Soler-Soler

    Background: Several surveys show that patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are sub-optimally managed and treatment guidelines are not implemented in clinical practice. Aims: To investigate awareness and perceptions of the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for CHF. Methods: 467 cardiologists from seven European countries completed an on-line interview using a validated, semi-structured questionnaire including questions about awareness

  13. Increased susceptibility to cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapcaicin in resuscitated rats. Cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapsaicin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keld Fosgerau; Giuseppe Ristagno; Magdalena Jayatissa; Mads Axelsen; Jacob W Gotfredsen; Uno J Weber; Lars Køber; Christian Torp-Pedersen; Charlotte Videbaek

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have persistent cardiovascular derangements following cardiopulmonary resuscitation including decreased cardiac output, arrhythmias and morphological myocardial damage. These cardiovascular derangements may lead to an increased susceptibility towards the external and internal environment of the cardiovascular system as compared to the healthy situation. METHODS: Here we tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular system in healthy

  14. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 132:11541165, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Steven J.

    Fisheries Society 2003 Cardiovascular Responses of Largemouth Bass to Exhaustive Exercise and Brief Air of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides at four water temperatures (13, 17, 21, and 25 C). We used Doppler flow to resting values despite 50% reductions in stroke volume, suggesting that largemouth bass are primarily

  15. JGES guidelines for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection/endoscopic mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinji; Kashida, Hiroshi; Saito, Yutaka; Yahagi, Naohisa; Yamano, Hiroo; Saito, Shoichi; Hisabe, Takashi; Yao, Takashi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sugihara, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Saitoh, Yusuke; Igarashi, Masahiro; Toyonaga, Takashi; Ajioka, Yoichi; Ichinose, Masao; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Akira; Sugano, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become common in recent years. Suitable lesions for endoscopic treatment include not only early colorectal carcinomas but also many types of precarcinomatous adenomas. It is important to establish practical guidelines in which the preoperative diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia and the selection of endoscopic treatment procedures are properly outlined, and to ensure that the actual endoscopic treatment is useful and safe in general hospitals when carried out in accordance with the guidelines. In cooperation with the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum, the Japanese Society of Coloproctology, and the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology, the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society has recently compiled a set of colorectal ESD/endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) guidelines using evidence-based methods. The guidelines focus on the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and caveat before, during, and after ESD/EMR and, in this regard, exclude the specific procedures, types and proper use of instruments, devices, and drugs. Although eight areas, ranging from indication to pathology, were originally planned for inclusion in these guidelines, evidence was scarce in each area. Therefore, grades of recommendation were determined largely through expert consensus in these areas. PMID:25652022

  16. 2008 white paper for implementing strategies and interventions for cardiovascular prevention in Italy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo

    2008-04-01

    The present article for improving strategies and interventions for cardiovascular prevention in Italy represents the collaborative work of several scientific societies that recognize their own role and mission in the field of prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It originates from the need, felt in many European and non-European countries, as well as at the level of the EU, to rapidly promote strategies and interventions to better prevent cardiovascular diseases.The main reason for producing this article is represented by the growing clinical and socioeconomic impact that cardiovascular diseases will have in Italy in the next few years. This, in fact, will bring serious problems regarding the ability to sustain the entire national healthcare system in Italy.This article reviews some of the major data available on projections of cardiovascular diseases and their social and economic burden. This article represents a White Paper, and it is conceived as a new starting point, proposing general specific interventions, addressed to decision-makers, stakeholders, institutions, citizens, physicians, healthcare workers, organizations and industries. These proposals are listed, and briefly discussed, leading to the development of a 'call-to-action', aimed at reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and their impact on the healthcare system, even in the short to medium term. PMID:23334874

  17. The heart and cardiovascular system

    SciTech Connect

    Fozzard, H.A. (Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (US)); Haber, E. (Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)); Jennings, R.B. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (US)); Katz, A.M. (Univ. of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT (US))

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 72 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Radionuclide Methods to Assess Cardiac Function, Perfusion Viability and Necrosis; NMR Imaging of the Cardiovascular System; Quantitative Angiographic Techniques; RNA Transcription in Heart Muscle; Reentry Rhythms; and Effect of Ischemia on Cardiac Electrophysiology.

  18. Cardiovascular physiology at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hooper, T; Mellor, A

    2011-03-01

    The role of the cardiovascular system is to deliver oxygenated blood to the tissues and remove metabolic effluent. It is clear that this complex system will have to adapt to maintain oxygen deliver in the profound hypoxia of high altitude. The literature on the adaptation of both the systemic and pulmonary circulations to high altitude is reviewed. PMID:21465906

  19. Laser therapy in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindge, David

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. It is broadly defined to include anything which adversely affects the heart or blood vessels. One-third of Americans have one or more forms of it. By one estimate, average human life expectancy would increase by seven years if it were eliminated. The mainstream medical model seeks mostly to "manage" cardiovascular disease with pharmaceuticals or to surgically bypass or reopen blocked vessels via angioplasty. These methods have proven highly useful and saved countless lives. Yet drug therapy may be costly and ongoing, and it carries the risk of side effects while often doing little or nothing to improve underlying health concerns. Similarly, angioplasty or surgery are invasive methods which entail risk. Laser therapy1 regenerates tissue, stimulates biological function, reduces inflammation and alleviates pain. Its efficacy and safety have been increasingly well documented in cardiovascular disease of many kinds. In this article we will explore the effects of laser therapy in angina, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and other conditions. The clinical application of various methods of laser therapy, including laserpuncture and transcutaneous, supravascular and intravenous irradiation of blood will be discussed. Implementing laser therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease offers the possibility of increasing the health and wellbeing of patients while reducing the costs and enhancing safety of medical care.

  20. Cardiovascular disease and environmental exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, K D

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the possible association between cardiovascular disease and occupational and environmental agents. The effects of carbon monoxide, fibrogenic dusts, carbon disulphide, heavy metals, noise, radiation, heat, cold, solvents and fluorocarbons are discussed. New directions for investigation are suggested. PMID:465378

  1. Cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    Childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity is an important and increasingly prevalent public health problem in Canada and worldwide. High adiposity in youth is indicated in clinical practice by plotting body mass index on appropriate percentile charts normed for age and sex, although waist measures might be a further tool. High adiposity can lead to adiposopathy in youth, with associated increases in inflammation and oxidative stress, changes in adipokines, and endocrinopathy. This is manifest as cardiometabolic risk factors in similar patterns to those in noted in obese adults. Obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors have been shown to be associated with vascular changes indicative of early atherosclerosis, and ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. These cardiovascular consequences are evident in youth, but childhood obesity is also predictive of similar consequences in adulthood. Childhood obesity and risk factors have been shown to track into adulthood and worsen in most individuals. The result is an exponential acceleration of atherosclerosis, which can be predicted to translate into an epidemic of premature cardiovascular disease and events. A change in paradigm is needed toward preventing and curing atherosclerosis and not just preventing cardiovascular disease. This would necessarily create an imperative for preventing and treating childhood obesity. Urgent attention, policy, and action are needed to avoid the enormous future social and health care costs associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obesity in youth. PMID:25661547

  2. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  3. Cardiovascular calcification: an inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    New, Sophie E P; Aikawa, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This disease of dysregulated metabolism is no longer viewed as a passive degenerative disease, but instead as an active process triggered by pro-inflammatory cues. Furthermore, a positive feedback loop of calcification and inflammation is hypothesized to drive disease progression in arterial calcification. Both calcific aortic valve disease and atherosclerotic arterial calcification may possess similar underlying mechanisms. Early histopathological studies first highlighted the contribution of inflammation to cardiovascular calcification by demonstrating the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in `early' lesions within the aortic valves and arteries. A series of in vitro work followed, which gave a mechanistic insight into the stimulation of smooth muscle cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation and mineralization. The emergence of novel technology, in the form of animal models and more recently molecular imaging, has enabled accelerated progression of this field, by providing strong evidence regarding the concept of this disorder as an inflammatory disease. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms behind this disorder, this review discusses the various studies that have helped form the concept of the inflammation-dependent cardiovascular calcification paradigm. PMID:21566338

  4. Protein Glutathionylation in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Anna; Piemonte, Fiorella

    2013-01-01

    The perturbation of thiol-disulfide homeostasis is an important consequence of many diseases, with redox signals implicated in several physio-pathological processes. A prevalent form of cysteine modification is the reversible formation of protein mixed disulfides with glutathione (S-glutathionylation). The abundance of glutathione in cells and the ready conversion of sulfenic acids to S-glutathione mixed disulfides supports the reversible protein S-glutathionylation as a common feature of redox signal transduction, able to regulate the activities of several redox sensitive proteins. In particular, protein S-glutathionylation is emerging as a critical signaling mechanism in cardiovascular diseases, because it regulates numerous physiological processes involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, including myocyte contraction, oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, vasodilation, glycolytic metabolism and response to insulin. Thus, perturbations in protein glutathionylation status may contribute to the etiology of many cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy and atherosclerosis. Various reports show the importance of oxidative cysteine modifications in modulating cardiovascular function. In this review, we illustrate tools and strategies to monitor protein S-glutathionylation and describe the proteins so far identified as glutathionylated in myocardial contraction, hypertrophy and inflammation. PMID:24141185

  5. An Integrated Cardiovascular Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Nils S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes computer strategies designed to emphasize teaching of an integrative view of cardiovascular physiology. They include: (1) a group of simulated laboratories which emphasize an explicit integration of ideas; (2) fault-finding exercises in which those ideas are put to use; and (3) a novel testing device for measuring student progress. (JN)

  6. Specificity of Cardiovascular Endurance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Calberth B., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

    This study determined the specificity of cardiovascular endurance training on a bicycle ergometer. Eighteen male subjects were tested on a heart rate response test of 150 beats per minute on a bicycle ergometer at the pace of 50 revolutions per minute (rpm) and at 160 beats per minute at 60 and 80 rpm, with the resistance equal to the force of…

  7. Bioengineering and the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    The development of the modern era of bioengineering and the advances in our understanding of the cardiovascular system have been intertwined over the past one-half century. This is true of bioengineering as an area for research in universities. Bioengineering is ultimately the beginning of a new engineering discipline, as well as a new discipline in the medical device industry. PMID:24688999

  8. Cardiovascular Fitness Education for Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David

    1978-01-01

    This cardiovascular fitness program for grades 1-6 (with emphasis on grades 5 and 6) consists of (1) discussion classes and exercise experiments, (2) discussion of exercise effects during regular activity sessions, (3) required cardiovascular warmup exercises, and (4) evaluation of cardiovascular fitness. (Author/MJB)

  9. Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Eastern Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emil Ginter

    1998-01-01

    During the last 30 y the region of highest premature cardiovascular mortality has shifted from the US and Finland to Central and Eastern Europe. Present male cardiovascular mortality in Latvia, Estonia, the Russian Federation, and Hungary has overtaken the maximum cardiovascular mortality reached in the US in the 1960s. This epidemic is only partially explainable by the high prevalence of

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of Marfan syndrome with an emphasis on cardiovascular complications and cardiovascular imaging. Both pre- and post-operative imaging is addressed with an explanation of surgical management. All relevant imaging modalities are discussed with a particular focus on cardiovascular MR. PMID:23587220

  11. Biomarkers of Obesity and Subsequent Cardiovascular Events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salma Musaad; Erin N. Haynes

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanisms for increased cardiovascular risk in obesity are still unclear. Inflammation and increased oxidative stress are two potential mechanisms proposed to play a major role in the morbidity associated with obesity. Studies that investigate these mechanisms rely on biomarkers, but validated biomarkers for obesity-related cardiovascular outcomes are lacking. By

  12. Evaluation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Basinski, A S

    1995-01-01

    Compared with the current focus on the development of clinical practice guidelines the effort devoted to their evaluation is meagre. Yet the ultimate success of guidelines depends on routine evaluation. Three types of evaluation are identified: evaluation of guidelines under development and before dissemination and implementation, evaluation of health care programs in which guidelines play a central role, and scientific evaluation, through studies that provide the scientific knowledge base for further evolution of guidelines. Identification of evaluation and program goals, evaluation design and a framework for evaluation planning are discussed. PMID:7489550

  13. Critical appraisal of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Netsch, Debra S; Kluesner, Jean A

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of clinical guidelines is gaining in popularity due to their significant impact on clinical practice. While a plethora of guidelines exist, many are lacking in quality, based on current critical appraisal standards. It then becomes necessary for the end users of the guidelines to adopt or develop those that are deemed adequate for implementation. This often requires that users possess critical appraisal skills as they become proficient in discerning between guidelines of varying quality. This article provides direction and tools to support the critical appraisal process in the adoption of clinical guidelines. PMID:20838314

  14. Dietary and lifestyle guidelines for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Bush, Ashley I; Ceccarelli, Antonia; Cooper, James; de Jager, Celeste A; Erickson, Kirk I; Fraser, Gary; Kesler, Shelli; Levin, Susan M; Lucey, Brendan; Morris, Martha Clare; Squitti, Rosanna

    2014-09-01

    Risk of developing Alzheimer's disease is increased by older age, genetic factors, and several medical risk factors. Studies have also suggested that dietary and lifestyle factors may influence risk, raising the possibility that preventive strategies may be effective. This body of research is incomplete. However, because the most scientifically supported lifestyle factors for Alzheimer's disease are known factors for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, it is reasonable to provide preliminary guidance to help individuals who wish to reduce their risk. At the International Conference on Nutrition and the Brain, Washington, DC, July 19-20, 2013, speakers were asked to comment on possible guidelines for Alzheimer's disease prevention, with an aim of developing a set of practical, albeit preliminary, steps to be recommended to members of the public. From this discussion, 7 guidelines emerged related to healthful diet and exercise habits. PMID:24913896

  15. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zittermann, Armin

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known from case series that vitamin D excess can lead to atherosclerosis and vascular calcification in humans. In the 1980s, ecological studies provided data that deficient human vitamin D status may also increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The assumption of a biphasic vitamin D effect on CVD is supported by experimental studies: Numerous studies have demonstrated positive effects of the vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyviramin D) on the cardiovascular system. However, the effects and mechanisms that lead to vascular calcification by vitamin D excess could also be confirmed. Large prospective observational studies support the hypothesis of a U-shaped association between vitamin D and CVD. These studies indicate that deficient circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (<30 nmol/l) are independently-associated with increased CVD morbidity and mortality. They also suggest that those circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, which have long been considered to be safe (100-150 nmol/l), are associated with an increased CVD risk. Meanwhile, numerous randomized controlled trials have investigated the effects of vitamin D supplements or ultraviolet B radiation on biochemical cardiovascular risk markers, cardiovascular physiology, and cardiovascular outcomes. Overall, results are mixed with the majority of studies reporting neither beneficial nor adverse vitamin D effects. Several limitations in the study design, which may have prevented beneficial vitamin D effects, are discussed. In conclusion, it must be stated that the role of vitamin D in the prevention and management of CVD as well as the dose-response relationship of potentially harmful effects still remain to be established. PMID:25202039

  16. Prevalence of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Risk Using Three Risk Equations in Nigerians Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Edward, Ayodele Olugbenga; Oladayo, Akinboro Adeolu; Omolola, Akinyemi Suliat; Adetiloye, Adepeju Akinlawon; Adedayo, Popoola Adetoun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reports from middle- and high-income countries suggest that the improved health outcome from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWHIV) is being mitigated by increase in deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Aims: This study was to determine the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and the 10-year cardiovascular risk using three risk equations in PLWHIV with no overt vascular disease. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 265 PLWHIV. We classified the subjects as having low, moderate or high cardiovascular risk using the Framingham, World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) equations. Results: The mean age of the cohort was 38.7 ± 8.7 years; 179 (67.5%) were females and 214 (80.8%) were on HAART. The prevalent traditional CVRFs in our cohort were low physical activity (66%), low HDL-C (49.1%), hypercholesterolaemia (33.6%), BMI ? 25 kg/m2 (32.8%) and elevated LDL-C (28.3%). The prevalence of smoking was very low (1.9%). The prevalence of moderate to high 10-year coronary risk was 11.7, 12.8, and 12.8% according to the Framingham, WHO/ISH and SCORE risk equations, respectively. Conclusion: Most of our patients had low overall cardiovascular risk according to the three risk equations. PMID:24404550

  17. UROTRAUMA: AUA GUIDELINE

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Allen F.; Brandes, Steve; Dugi, Daniel David; Armstrong, John H.; Breyer, Benjamin N.; Broghammer, Joshua A.; Erickson, Bradley A.; Holzbeierlein, Jeff; Hudak, Steven J.; Mirvis, Stuart; Pruitt, Jeffrey H.; Reston, James T.; Santucci, Richard A.; Smith, Thomas G.; Wessells, Hunter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The authors of this guideline reviewed the urologic trauma literature to guide clinicians in the appropriate methods of evaluation and management of genitourinary injuries. Methods A systematic review of the literature using the MEDLINE® and EMBASE databases (search dates 1/1/90-9/19/12) was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to urotrauma. The review yielded an evidence base of 372 studies after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. These publications were used to inform the statements presented in the guideline as Standards, Recommendations or Options. When sufficient evidence existed, the body of evidence for a particular treatment was assigned a strength rating of A (high), B (moderate) or C (low). In the absence of sufficient evidence, additional information is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions. PMID:24857651

  18. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Menter; Alice Gottlieb; Steven R. Feldman; Abby S. Van Voorhees; Craig L. Leonardi; Kenneth B. Gordon; Mark Lebwohl; John Y. M. Koo; Craig A. Elmets; Neil J. Korman; Karl R. Beutner; Reva Bhushan

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this first of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the classification of psoriasis; associated comorbidities including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular risk, psychiatric\\/psychologic issues, and cancer risk; along with assessment tools for skin disease and quality-of-life

  19. TORIS Data Preparation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, H.; Remson, D.

    1999-03-11

    The objective of this manual is to present guidelines and procedures for the preparation of new data for the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) data base. TORIS is an analytical system currently maintained by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bartlesville Project Office. It uses an extensive field- and reservoir-level data base to evaluate the technical and economic recovery potential of specific crude oil reservoirs.

  20. Test Analysis Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2007-01-01

    Development of analysis guidelines for Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology tests was completed. The guidelines were developed based on analysis experiences gained from supporting Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology development in air revitalization systems and water recovery systems. Analyses are vital during all three phases of the ELS technology test: pre-test, during test and post test. Pre-test analyses of a test system help define hardware components, predict system and component performances, required test duration, sampling frequencies of operation parameters, etc. Analyses conducted during tests could verify the consistency of all the measurements and the performance of the test system. Post test analyses are an essential part of the test task. Results of post test analyses are an important factor in judging whether the technology development is a successful one. In addition, development of a rigorous model for a test system is an important objective of any new technology development. Test data analyses, especially post test data analyses, serve to verify the model. Test analyses have supported development of many ECLSS technologies. Some test analysis tasks in ECLSS technology development are listed in the Appendix. To have effective analysis support for ECLSS technology tests, analysis guidelines would be a useful tool. These test guidelines were developed based on experiences gained through previous analysis support of various ECLSS technology tests. A comment on analysis from an experienced NASA ECLSS manager (1) follows: "Bad analysis was one that bent the test to prove that the analysis was right to begin with. Good analysis was one that directed where the testing should go and also bridged the gap between the reality of the test facility and what was expected on orbit."