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1

The 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on acute and chronic heart failure.  

PubMed

The 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Update provides management recommendations for acute and chronic HF. In 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF Guidelines committee first published an overview of HF management. Since then, significant additions to and changes in many of these recommendations have become apparent. With this in mind and in response to stakeholder feedback, the Guidelines Committee in 2012 has updated the overview of both acute and chronic heart failure diagnosis and management. The 2012 Update also includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the medical practitioner manage their patients with HF. PMID:23201056

McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Heckman, George A; Costigan, Jeannine; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Giannetti, Nadia; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Howlett, Jonathan G; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Kori; Mann, Elizabeth; Nigam, Anil; O'Meara, Eileen; Rajda, Miroslaw; Steinhart, Brian; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Le, Vy Van; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce

2012-11-30

2

ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group  

PubMed Central

The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging.

Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

2010-01-01

3

Cardiovascular Surgery. Guideline Series.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines adopted by the Health Systems Agency of Southwestern Pennsylvania to facilitate the development of a community-oriented system of quality cardiovascular surgery are presented. Using the guidelines, subarea planning councils, in collaboration wi...

1976-01-01

4

The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and management of heart failure update: Heart failure in ethnic minority populations, heart failure and pregnancy, disease management, and quality improvement/assurance programs  

PubMed Central

Since 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure (HF) guidelines have published annual focused updates for cardiovascular care providers. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF guidelines update focuses on an increasing issue in the western world – HF in ethnic minorities – and in an uncommon but important setting – the pregnant patient. Additionally, due to increasing attention recently given to the assessment of how care is delivered and measured, two critically important topics – disease management programs in HF and quality assurance – have been included. Both of these topics were written from a clinical perspective. It is hoped that the present update will become a useful tool for health care providers and planners in the ongoing evolution of care for HF patients in Canada.

Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Costigan, Jeannine; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Kori; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; O'Meara, Eileen; Rajda, Miroslav; Siu, Samuel; Stolee, Paul; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Zeiroth, Shelley

2010-01-01

5

The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.  

PubMed

The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS. PMID:21601772

McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Cheung, Anson; Costigan, Jeannine; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Floras, John; Giannetti, Nadia; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Howlett, Jonathan G; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Kori; Mann, Elizabeth; O'Meara, Eileen; Rajda, Miroslav; Rao, Vivek; Simon, Jessica; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Sussex, Bruce; Ross, Heather J

6

ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac computed tomography: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Cardiac Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guideline Working Group.  

PubMed

In Asia, the healthcare system, populations and patterns of disease differ from Western countries. The current reports on the criteria for cardiac CT scans, provided by Western professional societies, are not appropriate for Asian cultures. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and invited 23 Technical Panel members representing a variety of Asian countries to rate the 51 indications for cardiac CT in clinical practice in Asia. The indications were rated as 'appropriate' (7-9), 'uncertain' (4-6), or 'inappropriate' (1-3) on a scale of 1-9. The median score was used for the final result if there was no disagreement. The final ratings for indications were 33 appropriate, 14 uncertain and 4 inappropriate. And 20 of them are highly agreed (19 appropriate and 1 inappropriate). Specifically, the Asian representatives considered cardiac CT as an appropriate modality for Kawasaki disease and congenital heart diseases in follow up and in symptomatic patients. In addition, except for some specified conditions, cardiac CT was considered to be an appropriate modality for one-stop shop ischemic heart disease evaluation due to its general appropriateness in coronary, structure and function evaluation. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the clinical practice, research and reimbursement policy in Asia. PMID:20094917

Tsai, I-Chen; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

2010-01-22

7

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

2009-01-01

8

American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.  

PubMed

Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

2013-01-11

9

One more look at guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in women  

PubMed Central

The most common cause of death in menopausal women is due to complications from cardiovascular disease. However, many physicians feel that the prevention in women may be delayed, because women present the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease 10 years later than men. Another matter emerged following the results of the Women's Health Initiative study and of the Heart Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study. Thus the proper interpretation and implementation of science should be included in a strict procedure of appreciation and clear communication for both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of evidence, used for the clinical guidelines. Based on objective scientific collaboration among various specialities, guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease of adult women with a broad range of cardiovascular risk have been formed. In this review, the guidelines or recommendations which have been reported in the last 2 decades by various scientific societies for prevention of cardiovascular disease in women will be analysed.

Marvaki, Apostolia; Bilianou, Helen

2011-01-01

10

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure - 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies  

PubMed Central

Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O'Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

2008-01-01

11

Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent.

Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

2012-01-01

12

Developing the 2011 Integrated Pediatric Guidelines for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction.  

PubMed

This article reviews aspects of development of the recently released "Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents" for pediatric care providers that remain in the area of human judgment. Discussed will be the context in which the guidelines were developed, the formal evidence review process, a consideration of how quality grades were established, key social/ethical issues that the panel confronted, and a critique of the final work with recommendations for future guideline development. Lessons learned are that both a formal evidence review process is essential to developing a credible document, and human judgment is critical to producing a meaningful result. Guideline development is a dynamic process that must be continuously self-critical as new evidence is acquired and sociopolitical and environmental contexts evolve. PMID:22492765

Gidding, Samuel S; Daniels, Stephen R; Kavey, Rae Ellen W

2012-04-09

13

Adequacy of reporting monitoring regimens of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in clinical guidelines: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To assess the reporting of monitoring recommendations in guidelines on the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.Data sources Medline, Trip database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and databases containing guidelines published from January 2002 to February 2010.Data selection Three major risk factors for cardiovascular disease: cholesterol level, smoking, and hypertension. The primary outcome was the frequency with which the guidelines dealt

Ivan Moschetti; Daniel Brandt; Rafael Perera; M Clarke; Carl Heneghan

2011-01-01

14

Home mechanical ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline  

PubMed Central

Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Cote, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, Francois; Morrison, Debra L; O'Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

2011-01-01

15

British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community acquired pneumonia in children: update 2011.  

PubMed

The British Thoracic Society first published management guidelines for community acquired pneumonia in children in 2002 and covered available evidence to early 2000. These updated guidelines represent a review of new evidence since then and consensus clinical opinion where evidence was not found. This document incorporates material from the 2002 guidelines and supersedes the previous guideline document. PMID:21903691

Harris, Michael; Clark, Julia; Coote, Nicky; Fletcher, Penny; Harnden, Anthony; McKean, Michael; Thomson, Anne

2011-10-01

16

Effectiveness of guidelines implementation for the control of multiple cardiovascular risk factors in high-risk patients in practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the effective cardiovascular protection current guidelines recommend multifactorial intervention on cardiovascular risk factors. This study assessed the efficiency of the combined implementation of guidelines for the control of major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in high-risk patients.Study participants were consecutive patients attending an Outpatients Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clinic. Current guidelines were simultaneously implemented by trained physicians aiming to reach the

George Stergiou; Nikos Baibas; Irini Skeva; George Damianidis; P. Douitsis; I. Terzi; A. Sidiropoulos; N. Kakavas; N. Liakopoulos

2005-01-01

17

Provider Compliance With Guidelines for Management of Cardiovascular Risk in HIV-Infected Patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction Compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP) guidelines has been shown to significantly reduce incident cardiovascular events. We investigated physicians’ compliance with NCEP guidelines to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a population infected with HIV. Methods We analyzed HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) data, following eligible patients from January 1, 2002, or first HOPS visit thereafter to calculate 10-year cardiovascular risk (10yCVR), until September 30, 2009, death, or last office visit. We categorized participants into four 10yCVR strata, according to guidelines determined by NCEP, the Infectious Disease Society of America, and the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group. We calculated percentages of patients treated for dyslipidemia and hypertension, calculated percentages of patients who achieved recommended goals, and categorized them by 10yCVR stratum. Results Of 2,005 patients analyzed, 33.7% had fewer than 2 CVD risk factors. For patients who had 2 or more risk factors, 10yCVR was less than 10% for 28.2%, 10% to 20% for 18.2%, and higher than 20% for 20.0% of patients. Of patients eligible for treatment, 81% to 87% were treated for elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/non–HDL-C), 2% to 11% were treated for low HDL-C, 56% to 91% were treated for high triglycerides, and 46% to 69% were treated for hypertension. Patients in higher 10yCVR categories were less likely to meet treatment goals than patients in lower 10yCVR categories. Conclusion At least one-fifth of contemporary HOPS patients have a 10yCVR higher than 20%, yet a large percentage of at-risk patients who were eligible for pharmacologic treatment did not receive recommended interventions and did not reach recommended treatment goals. Opportunities exist for CVD prevention in the HIV-infected population.

Lichtenstein, Kenneth A.; Buchacz, Kate; Chmiel, Joan S.; Buckner, Kern; Tedaldi, Ellen; Wood, Kathleen; Holmberg, Scott D.; Brooks, John T.

2013-01-01

18

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement.  

PubMed

Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with medical management alone, and balloon aortic valvuloplasty has failed to provide durable clinical benefit. Open surgical replacement of the aortic valve can improve symptoms and survival. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to improve survival, quality of life, and functional status in nonoperable patients and to be a viable option for patients in whom the risk of open surgical morbidity or mortality is high. This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement represents the consensus of a representative group of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons as to the current, but evolving, role of this less-invasive new therapy. Specific recommendations are provided for selection of patients for TAVI vs surgical aortic valve replacement for native valves and for bioprostheses, approaches to patient evaluation for TAVI, appropriate constitution of multidisciplinary teams involved in performing TAVI, essential facilities that are needed to perform TAVI safely and effectively, and training/qualifications for TAVI operators. Cost considerations, complication rates, and the quality of the available evidence are also discussed. It is hoped that this consensus document will prove to be a useful resource for health professionals, institutions, departments, and decision-making bodies dealing with this important and rapidly evolving therapy. PMID:22703948

Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Fremes, Stephen; Pibarot, Philippe; Ruel, Marc; Ibrahim, Reda; Welsh, Robert; Feindel, Christopher; Lichtenstein, Samuel

2012-06-15

19

Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement - Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Since the last publication of the recommendations for the management and treatment of dyslipidemia, new clinical trial data have emerged that support a more vigorous approach to lipid lowering in specific patient groups. The decision was made to update the lipid guidelines in collaboration with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. A systematic electronic search of medical literature for original research consisting of blinded, randomized controlled trials was performed. Meta-analyses of studies of the efficacy and safety of lipid-lowering therapies, and of the predictive value of established and emerging risk factors were also reviewed. All recommendations are evidence-based, and have been reviewed in detail by primary and secondary review panels. Major changes include a lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment target (lower than 2.0 mmol/L) for high-risk patients, a slightly higher intervention point for the initiation of drug therapy in most low-risk individuals (LDL-C of 5.0 mmol/L or a total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio of 6.0) and recommendations regarding additional investigations of potential use in the further evaluation of coronary artery disease risk in subjects in the moderate-risk category.

McPherson, Ruth; Frohlich, Jiri; Fodor, George; Genest, Jacques

2006-01-01

20

ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22678595

Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker; Douglas, Pamela S; Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Altus, Philip; Barnard, Denise D; Blankenship, James C; Casey, Donald E; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Gilchrist, Ian C; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lakoski, Susan G; Le, D Elizabeth; Lesser, John R; Levine, Glenn N; Mehran, Roxana; Russo, Andrea M; Sorrentino, Matthew J; Williams, Mathew R; Wong, John B; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

2012-06-07

21

The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future.

2010-01-01

22

Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: new guidelines, technologies and therapies.  

PubMed

A trend in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been a move away from managing isolated risk factors, such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia, towards assessment and management of absolute CVD risk. In Australian guidelines, absolute CVD risk is calculated as the probability of a stroke, transient ischaemic attack, myocardial infarction, angina, peripheral arterial disease or heart failure occurring within the next 5 2013s. Absolute CVD risk should be regularly assessed in patients aged 45 2013s or older (35 2013s or older in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people) using the Australian absolute CVD risk calculator (http://www.cvdcheck.org.au). For patients currently taking a blood pressure (BP)-lowering or lipid-lowering agent, pretreatment values should be used to calculate risk. Patients at high absolute risk of CVD (> 15% over 5 2013s) should be treated with both BP-lowering and lipid-lowering agents, unless contraindicated or clinically inappropriate. For patients at moderate absolute risk of CVD (10%-15%) treatment with a BP-lowering and/or a lipid-lowering agent should be considered if the risk remains elevated after lifestyle interventions, BP is ? 160/100 mmHg, there is a family history of premature CVD, or the patient is of South Asian, Middle Eastern, Maori, Pacific Islander, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander ethnicity. BP measurements taken using an oscillometric device can be used to approximate mean daytime ambulatory BP. PMID:23919708

Nelson, Mark R; Doust, Jennifer A

2013-06-17

23

Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction  

PubMed Central

In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice.

Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

2013-01-01

24

Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction.  

PubMed

In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok; Kim, Soo Woong

2013-08-31

25

American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography  

Microsoft Academic Search

New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at different defined levels of risk. Screening MRI is recommended for women with an approximately 20-25% or

Debbie Saslow; Carla Boetes; Wylie Burke; Steven Harms; Martin O. Leach; Constance D. Lehman; Elizabeth Morris; Etta Pisano; Mitchell Schnall; Stephen Sener; Robert A. Smith; Ellen Warner; Martin Yaffe; Kimberly S. Andrews; Christy A. Russell

2007-01-01

26

British Thoracic Society guideline for non-CF bronchiectasis.  

PubMed

The diagnosis, investigation and particularly management of bronchiectasis has been largely empirical and the subject of relatively few controlled clinical trials. There are no clear guidelines, although an Australian position statement has been published concerning bronchiectasis in children. The purposes of these guidelines were therefore threefold: (1) to identify relevant studies in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis; (2) to provide guidelines on management based on published studies where possible or a consensus view; and (3) to identify gaps in our knowledge and identify areas for future study. PMID:20627931

Pasteur, M C; Bilton, D; Hill, A T

2010-07-01

27

Adherence to a guideline on cardiovascular prevention: A comparison between general practitioners and practice nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPatient non-compliance with prescribed treatment is an important factor in the lack of success in cardiovascular prevention. Another important cause is non-adherence of caregivers to the guidelines. It is not known how doctors and nurses differ in the application of guidelines. Patient compliance to treatment may vary according to the type of caregiver.

Helene R. Voogdt-Pruis; Jan W. Van Ree; Anton P. M. Gorgels; George H. M. I. Beusmans

2011-01-01

28

Development of the Champlain primary care cardiovascular disease prevention and management guideline  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed A well documented gap remains between evidence and practice for clinical practice guidelines in cardiovascular disease (CVD) care. Objective of program As part of the Champlain CVD Prevention Strategy, practitioners in the Champlain District of Ontario launched a large quality-improvement initiative that focused on increasing the uptake in primary care practice settings of clinical guidelines for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and CVD risk factors. Program description The Champlain Primary Care CVD Prevention and Management Guideline is a desktop resource for primary care clinicians working in the Champlain District. The guideline was developed by more than 45 local experts to summarize the latest evidence-based strategies for CVD prevention and management, as well as to increase awareness of local community-based programs and services. Conclusion Evidence suggests that tailored strategies are important when implementing specific practice guidelines. This article describes the process of creating an integrated clinical guideline for improvement in the delivery of cardiovascular care.

Montoya, Lorraine; Liddy, Clare; Hogg, William; Papadakis, Sophia; Dojeiji, Laurie; Russell, Grant; Akbari, Ayub; Pipe, Andrew; Higginson, Lyall

2011-01-01

29

Putting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines Into Practice to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2008, the federal government of the United States issued its first-ever physical activity guidelines for Americans. These\\u000a guidelines were based on a large body of scientific evidence, including evidence showing that physical activity can reduce\\u000a the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The guidelines encourage any amount of physical activity, and ideally encourage\\u000a 150 min\\/wk of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 min\\/wk

I-Min Lee

2010-01-01

30

2011 consensus statement on endomyocardial biopsy from the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology and the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology.  

PubMed

The Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology and the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology have produced this position paper concerning the current role of endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases and its contribution to patient management, focusing on pathological issues, with these aims: • Determining appropriate EMB use in the context of current diagnostic strategies for cardiac diseases and providing recommendations for its rational utilization • Providing standard criteria and guidance for appropriate tissue triage and pathological analysis • Promoting a team approach to EMB use, integrating the competences of pathologists, clinicians, and imagers. PMID:22137237

Leone, Ornella; Veinot, John P; Angelini, Annalisa; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Basso, Cristina; Berry, Gerald; Bruneval, Patrick; Burke, Margaret; Butany, Jagdish; Calabrese, Fiorella; d'Amati, Giulia; Edwards, William D; Fallon, John T; Fishbein, Michael C; Gallagher, Patrick J; Halushka, Marc K; McManus, Bruce; Pucci, Angela; Rodriguez, E René; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Sheppard, Mary N; Steenbergen, Charles; Stone, James R; Tan, Carmela; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard C; Winters, Gayle L

2011-12-03

31

The Age of Discontinuity; Guidelines to Our Changing Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Concentrating on the social dimension of human experience and existence, this book probes certain profound changes occurring in contemporary technology, economy, society, politics, and education. The author discusses four major discontinuities: (1) the impact of the new technology on the industrial structure; (2) the shift from an "international…

Drucker, Peter F.

32

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

2013-01-01

33

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

2012-03-14

34

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16/18 infections. PMID:22418039

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna M; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R; Chelmow, David; Herzig, Abbe; Kim, Jane J; Kinney, Walter; Herschel, W Lawson; Waldman, Jeffrey

2012-07-01

35

2010 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the management of hypertension.  

PubMed

Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerosis-related mortality and morbidity. In this document, the Hypertension Committee of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology provides new guidelines for hypertension management. The key messages are as follows. (1) The life-time risk for hypertension is 90%. (2) Both the increase in the prevalence rate and the relative risk of hypertension for causing cardiovascular events are higher in Asians than in Caucasians. (3) The control rate has been improved significantly in Taiwan from 2.4% to 21% in men, and from 5% to 29% in women in recent years (1995-2002). (4) Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) = 130/80 mmHg are thresholds of treatment for high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, stroke, established coronary heart disease, and coronary heart disease equivalents (carotid artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and abdominal aortic aneurysm). (5) Ambulatory and home BP monitoring correlate more closely with end-organ damage and have a stronger relationship with cardiovascular events than office BP monitoring, but the feasibility of home monitoring makes it a more attractive alternative. (6) Patients with masked hypertension have higher cardiovascular risk than those with white-coat hypertension. (7) Lifestyle changes should be encouraged in all patients, and include the following six items: S-ABCDE (Salt restriction; Alcohol limitation; Body weight reduction; Cessation of smoking; Diet adaptation; Exercise adoption). (8) When pharmacological therapy is needed, physicians should consider "PROCEED" (Previous experience of patient; Risk factors; Organ damage; Contraindication or unfavorable conditions; Expert or doctor judgment; Expense or cost; Delivery and compliance) to decide the optimal treatment. (9) The main benefits of antihypertensive agents are derived from lowering of BP per se, and are generally independent of the drugs being used, except that certain associated cardiovascular conditions might favor certain classes of drugs. (10) There are five major classes of drugs: thiazide diuretics; ?-blockers; calcium channel blockers; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs); and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Any one of these can be used as the initial treatment, except for ?-blockers, which are only indicated in patients with heart failure, a history of coronary heart disease, and hyperadrenergic state. (11) A standard dose of any one of the five major classes of antihypertensive drugs can produce an ?10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (rule of 5), after placebo subtraction. (11) Combination therapy is frequently needed for optimal control of BP, and the amount of the decrease in BP by a two-drug combination is approximately the same as the sum of the decrease by each individual drug (?20 mmHg in systolic BP and 10 mmHg in diastolic BP) if their mechanisms of action are independent, with the exception of the combination of ACEIs and ARBs. (13) An ACEI or ARB plus a calcium channel blocker or a diuretic (A + C or A + D) are reasonable two-drug combinations, and A+C + D is a reasonable three-drug combination, unless patients have special indications for ?-blockers. (14) Single-pill (fixed-dose) combinations that contain more than one drug in a single tablet are highly recommended because they reduce pill burden and cost, and improve compliance. (15) Very elderly patients (> 80 years) should be treated without delay, but BP should be reduced gradually and more cautiously. Finally, these guidelines are not mandatory; the responsible physician's decision remains most important in hypertension management. PMID:20970072

Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Li, Yi-Heng; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Yeh, Hung-I; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Tsai, Wei-Chuen; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong

2010-10-01

36

Diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the Swiss guidelines. Official guidelines of the Swiss Respiratory Society.  

PubMed

The new Swiss Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Guidelines are based on a previous version, which was published 10 years ago. The Swiss Respiratory Society felt the need to update the previous document due to new knowledge and novel therapeutic developments about this prevalent and important disease. The recommendations and statements are based on the available literature, on other national guidelines and, in particular, on the GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) report. Our aim is to advise pulmonary physicians, general practitioners and other health care workers on the early detection and diagnosis, prevention, best symptomatic control, and avoidance of COPD as well as its complications and deterioration. PMID:23406723

Russi, E W; Karrer, W; Brutsche, M; Eich, C; Fitting, J W; Frey, M; Geiser, T; Kuhn, M; Nicod, L; Quadri, F; Rochat, T; Steurer-Stey, C; Stolz, D

2013-02-11

37

[Cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. An anamnestic guideline].  

PubMed

Being overweight in childhood causes several cardiovascular risk factors which in turn contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis. Being overweight itself represents a risk factor, but also contributes to an increased prevalence of arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Thus, cardiovascular prevention should be included in the management of obese children. Most of all, therapy of adiposity should be performed, as weight reduction and increased fitness represent protective factors. Moreover, a detailed cardiovascular workup and therapy of secondary vascular disease must also be performed. Subclinical changes at the level of the endothelium may be diagnosed using modern imaging techniques such as the measurement of the intima-media thickness of the carotid artery. In general, the overweight child should be considered as a future patient with vascular disease! The following article focuses on the prevalence, diagnostics and therapeutic options in the cardiovascular management of overweight children. PMID:23529592

Dalla Pozza, R

2013-04-01

38

Evaluation and management of the atrial fibrillation patient: a report from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care.  

PubMed

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, and its prevalence is growing. The care of patients with AF is complex and involves multiple specialties and venues of care. Guideline recommendations are available for AF therapy; however, their implementation can be challenging. The Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care has developed an accreditation program, formulated by an expert committee on AF. Accreditation is based on specific criteria in 7 domains: (1) community outreach, (2) prehospital care, (3) early stabilization, (4) acute care, (5) transitions of care, (6) clinical quality measures, and (7) governance. This document presents the rationale, discussion, and supporting evidence for these criteria, in an effort to maximize effective and efficient AF care. PMID:23892939

Steinberg, Benjamin A; Beckley, Philip D; Deering, Thomas F; Clark, Carol L; Amin, Alpesh N; Bauer, Kenneth A; Cryer, Byron; Mansour, Moussa; Scheiman, James M; Zenati, Marco A; Newby, L Kristin; Peacock, W Frank; Bhatt, Deepak L

2013-09-01

39

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Personality Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

These practical guidelines for the biological treatment of personality disorders in primary care settings were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). They embody the results of a systematic review of all available clinical and scientific evidence pertaining to the biological treatment of three specific personality disorders, namely borderline, schizotypal and

Sabine C. Herpertz; Mary Zanarini; Charles S. Schulz; Larry Siever; Klaus Lieb; Hans-Jürgen Möller

2007-01-01

40

Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society framework for guideline dissemination and implementation, with concurrent evaluation.  

PubMed

The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT) methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research 'Knowledge-to-Action' process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel 'Clinical Assembly-KT Action Team', and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding. PMID:23936883

Gupta, Samir; Licskai, Christopher; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

41

Implementation of Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background The successful implementation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention guidelines relies heavily on primary care physicians (PCPs) providing risk factor evaluation, intervention and patient education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the degree of awareness and implementation of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention in clinical practice (CEIPC guidelines) among PCPs. Methods A cross-sectional survey of PCPs was conducted in Spain between January and June 2011. A random sample of 1,390 PCPs was obtained and stratified by region. Data were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Results More than half (58%) the physicians were aware of and knew the recommendations, and 62% of those claimed to use them in clinical practice, with general physicians (without any specialist accreditation) being less likely to so than family doctors. Most PCPs (60%) did not assess cardiovascular risk, with the limited time available in the surgery being cited as the greatest barrier by 81%. The main reason to be sceptical about recommendations, reported by 71% of physicians, was that there are too many guidelines. Almost half the doctors cited the lack of training and skills as the greatest barrier to the implementation of lifestyle and behavioural change recommendations. Conclusions Most PCPs were aware of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention (CEIPC guidelines) and knew their content. However, only one third of PCPs used the guidelines in clinical practice and less than half CVD risk assessment tools.

2013-01-01

42

Infection control guidelines for the cardiac catheterization laboratory: society guidelines revisited.  

PubMed

In the early years of diagnostic cardiac catheterization, strict sterile precautions were required for cutdown procedures. Thirteen years ago, when the original guidelines were written, the brachial arteriotomy was still frequently utilized, femoral closure devices were uncommon, "implantables," such as intracoronary stents and PFO/ASD closure devices, were in their infancy, and percutaneous valve replacement was not a consideration. In 2005, the cardiac catheterization laboratory is a complex interventional suite with percutaneous access routine and device implantation standard. Despite frequent device implantation, strict sterile precautions are often not observed. Reasons for this include a decline in brachial artery cutdown, limited postprocedure follow-up with few reported infections, limited use of hats and masks in televised cases, and lack of current guidelines. Proper sterile technique has the potential to decrease the patient infection rate. Hand washing remains the most important procedure for preventing infections. Caps, masks, gowns, and gloves help to protect the patient by maintaining a sterile field. Protection of personnel may be accomplished by proper gowning, gloving, and eye wear, disposal of contaminated equipment, and prevention and care of puncture wounds and lacerations. With the potential for acquired disease from blood-borne pathogens, the need for protective measures is as essential in the cardiac catheterization laboratory as is the standard Universal Precautions, which are applied throughout the hospital. All personnel should strongly consider vaccination for hepatitis B. Maintenance of the cardiac catheterization laboratory environment includes appropriate cleaning, limitation of traffic, and adequate ventilation. In an SCAI survey, members recommended an update on guidelines for infection control in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The following revision of the original 1992 guidelines is written specifically to address the increased utilization of the catheterization laboratory as an interventional suite with device implantation. In this update, infection protection is divided into sections on the patient, the laboratory personnel, and the laboratory environment. Additionally, specific CDC recommendation sections highlight recommendations from other published guidelines. PMID:16331649

Chambers, Charles E; Eisenhauer, Michael D; McNicol, Lynn B; Block, Peter C; Phillips, William J; Dehmer, Gregory J; Heupler, Frederick A; Blankenship, James C

2006-01-01

43

Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases and are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have or

David Andes; L. Ostrosky-Zeichner

2009-01-01

44

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Sporotrichosis: 2007 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000. The guidelines are intended for use by internists, pediatricians, family practitioners, and dermatologists. They include evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with lymphocutaneous, cutaneous, pulmonary, osteoarti- cular, meningeal, and disseminated sporotrichosis.

Carol A. Kauffman; Beatriz Bustamante; Stanley W. Chapman; Peter G. Pappas

2007-01-01

45

Management of severe perioperative bleeding: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.  

PubMed

The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia and stabilisation of the macro- and microcirculations in order to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Third, targeted procoagulant interventions to reduce the amount of bleeding, morbidity, mortality and costs. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists throughout Europe to integrate this knowledge into daily patient care wherever possible. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of scientific subcommittees and individual expert members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched without language restrictions from the year 2000 until 2012. These searches produced 20 664 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. At the suggestion of the ESA Guideline Committee, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was initially used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. During the process of guideline development, the official position of the ESA changed to favour the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This report includes general recommendations as well as specific recommendations in various fields of surgical interventions. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for four weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members. Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines. PMID:23656742

Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre; Santullano, Cesar Aldecoa Alvarez; De Robertis, Edoardo; Filipescu, Daniela C; Fries, Dietmar; Görlinger, Klaus; Haas, Thorsten; Imberger, Georgina; Jacob, Matthias; Lancé, Marcus; Llau, Juan; Mallett, Sue; Meier, Jens; Rahe-Meyer, Niels; Samama, Charles Marc; Smith, Andrew; Solomon, Cristina; Van der Linden, Philippe; Wikkelsø, Anne Juul; Wouters, Patrick; Wyffels, Piet

2013-06-01

46

Use of epoetin in patients with cancer: evidence-based clinical practice guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia resulting from cancer or its treat- ment is an important clinical problem increasingly treated with the recombinant hematopoietic growth factor erythropoi- etin. To address uncertainties regarding indications and efficacy, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology devel- oped an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the use of epoetin in pa- tients with cancer. The

J. Douglas Rizzo; Alan E. Lichtin; Steven H. Woolf; Jerome Seidenfeld; Charles L. Bennett; David Cella; Benjamin Djulbegovic; Matthew J. Goode; Ann A. Jakubowski; Stephanie J. Lee; Carole B. Miller; Mark U. Rarick; David H. Regan; George P. Browman; Michael S. Gordon

2010-01-01

47

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline  

PubMed Central

Objective: We developed clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), ten additional clinicians experienced in treating CAH, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Additional experts were also consulted. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society’s CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend universal newborn screening for severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency followed by confirmatory tests. We recommend that prenatal treatment of CAH continue to be regarded as experimental. The diagnosis rests on clinical and hormonal data; genotyping is reserved for equivocal cases and genetic counseling. Glucocorticoid dosage should be minimized to avoid iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. Mineralocorticoids and, in infants, supplemental sodium are recommended in classic CAH patients. We recommend against the routine use of experimental therapies to promote growth and delay puberty; we suggest patients avoid adrenalectomy. Surgical guidelines emphasize early single-stage genital repair for severely virilized girls, performed by experienced surgeons. Clinicians should consider patients’ quality of life, consulting mental health professionals as appropriate. At the transition to adulthood, we recommend monitoring for potential complications of CAH. Finally, we recommend judicious use of medication during pregnancy and in symptomatic patients with nonclassic CAH.

Speiser, Phyllis W.; Azziz, Ricardo; Baskin, Laurence S.; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Hensle, Terry W.; Merke, Deborah P.; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; Miller, Walter L.; Montori, Victor M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Ritzen, Martin; White, Perrin C.

2010-01-01

48

Principles and guidelines for surgeons--management of symptomatic breast cancer. European Society of Surgical Oncology.  

PubMed

The European Society of Surgical Oncology is actively involved in the promotion of a high standard of surgical oncology throughout Europe. Such an ambition involves recognition of Centres of Excellence in the management of cancer patients throughout Europe. These centres have a multi-disciplinary system involved in the total care of patients with cancer and are concerned with the delivery of care to the highest available standards. It is accepted that not all patients with cancer can, nor should, necessarily be treated in such highly specialized centres. Yet all cancer patients should be guaranteed a high standard of care. High surgical standards can be ensured if surgeons treating cancer are trained in specialist centres and, when in independent practice, follow established guidelines or protocols of treatment. In common with many national surgical oncology societies, the European Society of Surgical Oncology is in the process of establishing good practice guidelines in the treatment of solid tumours. This document on the management of symptomatic breast cancer is the first of a series of guidelines to be proposed by ESSO. It draws heavily on excellent documents already in existence from the British Association of Surgical Oncology and from the Danish Breast Cancer Co-Operative Group. It is hoped that this document will be sufficiently clear and purposeful to be of help to the individual surgeon and yet sufficiently flexible to allow it to be adopted in the different medical systems throughout Europe. PMID:9158182

Blichert-Toft, M; Smola, M G; Cataliotti, L; O'Higgins, N

1997-04-01

49

Degree of Concordance With DASH Diet Guidelines and Incidence of Hypertension and Fatal Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension advocate the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.Methods: We studied whether a greater concordance with the DASH diet is associated with reduced incidence of hypertension (self-reported) and mortality from cardiovascular disease in 20,993 women initially aged 55 to 69 years. We created a DASH diet concordance score using food frequency data in

Aaron R. Folsom; Emily D. Parker; Lisa J. Harnack; Aaron R. Folsom

2007-01-01

50

Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines. METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus for the updated guideline: the role of noninvasive measurements of airway inflammation for the adjustment of anti-inflammatory therapy; the initiation of adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for uncontrolled asthma; the role of a single inhaler of an ICS/long-acting beta2-agonist combination as a reliever, and as a reliever and a controller; and the escalation of controller medication for acute loss of asthma control as part of a self-management action plan. The expert panel followed an adaptation process to identify and appraise existing guidelines on the specified topics. In addition, literature searches were performed to identify relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. The panel formally assessed and graded the evidence, and made 34 recommendations. RESULTS: The updated guideline recommendations outline a role for inclusion of assessment of sputum eosinophils, in addition to standard measures of asthma control, to guide adjustment of controller therapy in adults with moderate to severe asthma. Appraisal of the evidence regarding which adjunct controller therapy to add to ICS and at what ICS dose to begin adjunct therapy in children and adults with poor asthma control supported the 2010 CTS Consensus Summary recommendations. New recommendations for the adjustment of controller medication within written action plans are provided. Finally, priority areas for future research were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The present clinical practice guideline is the first update of the CTS Asthma Guidelines following the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee’s new guideline development process. Tools and strategies to support guideline implementation will be developed and the CTS will continue to regularly provide updates reflecting new evidence.

Lougheed, M Diane; Lemiere, Catherine; Ducharme, Francine M; Licskai, Chris; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H; FitzGerald, Mark; Leigh, Richard; Watson, Wade; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

2012-01-01

51

ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22578925

Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

2012-05-09

52

Ethical issues for invasive cardiologists: Society for cardiovascular angiography and interventions.  

PubMed

In view of the major impact of medical economic forces, rapidly changing technology, and other pressures on invasive cardiologists, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions determined that a statement of the ethical issues confronting the modern invasive cardiologist was needed. The various conflicts presented to the cardiologist in his or her roles as practicing clinician, administrator of the catheterization laboratory, educator, or clinical researcher were reviewed. In all instances, the major concern was determined to be the welfare of the patient no matter how forceful the pressures from various outside force or concerns for personal advancement might be. PMID:14755804

Cameron, Airlie A C; Laskey, Warren K; Sheldon, William C

2004-02-01

53

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, Part 1: Acute treatment of schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

These guidelines for the biological treatment of schizophrenia were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The goal during the development of these guidelines was to review systematically all available evidence pertaining to the treatment of schizophrenia, and to reach a consensus on a series of practice recommendations that are clinically

Peter Falkai; Thomas Wobrock; Jeffrey Lieberman; Birte Glenthoj; Wagner F. Gattaz; Hans-Jürgen Möller

2005-01-01

54

Canadian Cardiovascular Society focused position statement update on assessment of the cardiac patient for fitness to drive: fitness following left ventricular assist device implantation.  

PubMed

There have been significant advances in mechanical circulatory support during the past several years. Older pulsatile models of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) (also known as VADs) have shown improved outcomes compared with medical therapy but have had limited durability and significant morbidity associated with their use. For this reason, Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2003 guidelines recommended permanent cessation of driving in these patients (for both private and commercial vehicle operation). However, recent advances with newer, continuous-flow devices have resulted in much lower rates of device-related complications and greater use of these devices for destination therapy. The majority of patients now are discharged home and lead active lives subsequently. Based on new evidence applied to the Society's "Risk of Harm" formula, it has been determined that patients with continuous-flow devices who are doing well 2 months post implantation are fit to hold noncommercial class drivers' licenses. PMID:22342270

Baskett, Roger; Crowell, Richard; Freed, Darren; Giannetti, Nadia; Simpson, Christopher S

2012-02-17

55

The Society for Vascular Surgery: Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical placement and maintenance of arteriovenous hemodialysis access  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recognizing the impact of the decision making by the dialysis access surgeon on the successful placement of autogenous arteriovenous hemodialysis access, the Society for Vascular Surgery assembled a multispecialty panel to develop practice guidelines in arteriovenous access placement and maintenance with the aim of maximizing the percentage and function- ality of autogenous arteriovenous accesses that are placed. The Society commissioned

Anton N. Sidawy; Lawrence M. Spergel; Anatole Besarab; Michael Allon; William C. Jennings; Frank T. Padberg Jr; M. Hassan Murad; Victor M. Montori; M. O'Hare; Keith D. Calligaro; Robyn A. Macsata; Alan B. Lumsden; Enrico Ascher

56

[Spanish Society of Anaesthesia (SEDAR) guidelines for pre-anaesthesia checking procedures].  

PubMed

We present this document as a guide to preparing a specific institutional pre-anaesthesia checklist, as recommended in the Helsinki declaration on patient safety in anaesthesiology. Also, the recently recommended WHO "safe surgery check-list" includes a check-list for anaesthesia. A working group was established in accordance with the charter of the Spanish Society of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitation (Sociedad Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación [SEDAR]). The new patient safety culture introduced into medicine, and the recommendations of European anaesthesia societies has led us to design and update protocols in order to improve results in this important part of our speciality. We have prepared these recommendations or guidelines using, as examples, updates of pre-anaesthesia check-lists by other American (ASA), British, or Canadian societies of anaesthesia. With that aim, we enlisted the help of anaesthesia ventilator experts and the participation and advice of experienced anaesthesiologists from all parts of Spain. After various corrections and modifications, the document was available at www.sedar.es, so that any anaesthesiologist could propose any correction, or give their opinion. Finally, these guidelines have been approved by the SEDAR Board of Directors, before it was sent for publication in this journal. The aims of this document are to provide: a guideline applicable to all anaesthesia machines, a descriptive pre-anaesthesia check-list that include everything necessary for the anaesthesia procedure, and a resumed check-list to be available in all the anaesthesia machines or other equivalent, but prepared for each institution, which should include anaesthetic equipment and drugs. So, in order to ensure the aims and requirements of the European Board of Anaesthesiology, the European Society of Anaesthesiology, and the WHO are met, each institution should have a protocol for checking equipment and drugs. These guidelines are applicable to any anaesthesia equipment, enabling every institution to develop their own checking protocols, adapted to their anaesthesia machines and their procedures. With the consent of the SEDAR, this group will collaborate with anaesthesia machines providers in order to develop specific checklists for each of their models that will be available at www.sedar.es. PMID:22542879

Cassinello, F; Ariño, J J; Bartolomé Ruibal, A; de la Pinta, J C; de la Quintana, F B; Espinosa, M E; Gilsanz, F; Gómez-Arnau, J; González Arévalo, A; López-Quero, L; López-Romero, J L; Moret, E; Mourelle, I; Pensado, A; Planas, A; Perez-Cerdá, F; Rincón, R

2012-04-28

57

Practice guidelines for perioperative transesophageal echocardiography: Recommendations of the Indian association of cardiovascular thoracic anesthesiologists.  

PubMed

Transoesophageal Echocardiography (TEE) is now an integral part of practice of cardiac anaesthesiology. Advances in instrumentation and the information that can be obtained from the TEE examination has proceeded at a breath-taking pace since the introduction of this technology in the early 1980s. Recognizing the importance of TEE in the management of surgical patients, the American Societies of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and the Society of Cardiac Anesthesiologists, USA (SCA) published practice guidelines for the clinical application of perioperative TEE in 1996. On a similar pattern, Indian Association of Cardiac Anaesthesiologists (IACTA) has taken the task of putting forth guidelines for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to standardize practice across the country. This review assesses the risks and benefits of TEE for several indications or clinical scenarios. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses as well as current clinical practice guidelines published by various society practicing Cardiac Anaesthesia and cardiology . Based on the input received, it was determined that the most important parts of the TEE examination could be displayed in a set of 20 cross sectional imaging planes. These 20 cross sections would provide also the format for digital acquisition and storage of a comprehensive TEE examination. Because variability exists in the precise anatomic orientation between the heart and the esophagus in individual patients, an attempt was made to provide specific criteria based on identifiable anatomic landmarks to improve the reproducibility and consistency of image acquisition for each of the standard cross sections. PMID:24107693

Muralidhar, Kanchi; Tempe, Deepak; Chakravarthy, Murali; Shastry, Naman; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Tewari, Prabhat; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas V; Mehta, Yatin

58

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and prognosis in heart failure due to systolic left ventricular dysfunction: a validation study of the European Society of Cardiology Guidelines and Recommendations (2008) and further developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The study aims were to validate the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) parameters recommended by the European Society of Cardiology 2008 Guidelines for risk assessment in heart failure (HF) (ESC-predictors) and to verify the predictive role of 11 supplementary CPET (S-predictors) parameters.Methods and results: We followed 749 HF patients for cardiovascular death and urgent heart transplantation for 3 years: 139

Ugo Corrà; Andrea Giordano; Alessandro Mezzani; Marco Gnemmi; Massimo Pistono; Roberto Caruso; Pantaleo Giannuzzi

2012-01-01

59

ESC/EAS Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias: the Task Force for the management of dyslipidaemias of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS).  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to atherosclerosis of the arterial vessel wall and to thrombosis is the foremost cause of premature mortality and of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in Europe, and is also increasingly common in developing countries.1 In the European Union, the economic cost of CVD represents annually E192 billion1 in direct and indirect healthcare costs. The main clinical entities are coronary artery disease (CAD), ischaemic stroke, and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The causes of these CVDs are multifactorial. Some of these factors relate to lifestyles, such as tobacco smoking, lack of physical activity, and dietary habits, and are thus modifiable. Other risk factors are also modifiable, such as elevated blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidaemias, or non-modifiable, such as age and male gender. These guidelines deal with the management of dyslipidaemias as an essential and integral part of CVD prevention. Prevention and treatment of dyslipidaemias should always be considered within the broader framework of CVD prevention, which is addressed in guidelines of the Joint European Societies’ Task forces on CVD prevention in clinical practice.2 – 5 The latest version of these guidelines was published in 20075; an update will become available in 2012. These Joint ESC/European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) guidelines on the management of dyslipidaemias are complementary to the guidelines on CVD prevention in clinical practice and address not only physicians [e.g. general practitioners (GPs) and cardiologists] interested in CVD prevention, but also specialists from lipid clinics or metabolic units who are dealing with dyslipidaemias that are more difficult to classify and treat. PMID:21712404

Reiner, Zeljko; Catapano, Alberico L; De Backer, Guy; Graham, Ian; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Wiklund, Olov; Agewall, Stefan; Alegria, Eduardo; Chapman, M John; Durrington, Paul; Erdine, Serap; Halcox, Julian; Hobbs, Richard; Kjekshus, John; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Riccardi, Gabriele; Storey, Robert F; Wood, David

2011-06-28

60

Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Anemia in CKD.  

PubMed

The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) 2012 clinical practice guideline for anemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease provides the structural and evidence base for the Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on this guideline's relevancy and application to the Canadian health care system. While in general agreement, we provide commentary on 11 of the 61 KDIGO guideline statements. Specifically, we agreed that a therapeutic trial of iron is appropriate in cases in which a reduction in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dosage or avoidance of ESA and transfusion is desired, transferrin saturations are >30%, and ferritin concentrations are >500 ?g/L. However, we concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support an upper target or threshold for ferritin and transferrin saturation levels. We agree with the initiation of ESA treatment when hemoglobin (Hb) level is 90-100 g/L; however, we specifically state that an acceptable range for Hb level is 95-115 g/L, with a target of 100-110 g/L, and add caution to individualization above this range due to concerns regarding the safety of ESAs. We agree that ESAs should be used with considerable caution in patients with active malignancy, history of stroke, or history of malignancy, and we suggest initiating ESA therapy at Hb level of 90 g/L and to aim for a Hb level in the range of 90-105 g/L. The reader is encouraged to note the level of evidence and review the entire KDIGO anemia guideline to interpret the guideline statements and commentary appropriately. PMID:24054466

Moist, Louise M; Troyanov, Stéphan; White, Colin T; Wazny, Lori D; Wilson, Jo-Anne; McFarlane, Phil; Harwood, Lori; Sood, Manish M; Soroka, Steven D; Bass, Adam; Manns, Braden J

2013-09-17

61

The relationship between introduction of American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and the use of colony-stimulating factors in clinical practice in a Paris University Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Clinical practice guidelines are issued periodically by professional medical societies or committees to assist practitioners in clinical decision making. However, it is unclear whether such guidelines have any lasting impact on clinical practice.Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines regarding use of hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSF)

Isabelle Debrix; Patrick Tilleul; Bernard Milleron; Nathalie Grené; Carole Bouleuc; Dominique Roux; Huguette Lioté; Isabelle Madelaine; Agnès Bellanger; Ornella Conort; Jean Eudes Fontan; Frank Le Mercier; Christophe Bardin; Annie Becker

2001-01-01

62

Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.  

PubMed

The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss, clarify, comment, or rebut any of the points made in this Commentary. It is our goal to elevate this debate in order to provide women who are afflicted with androgen insufficiency and sexual disorders with the highest quality health care and to relieve their distress and suffering, as well as to improve their quality of life. PMID:17727347

Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

2007-09-01

63

The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into

Lorraine Johnson; Raphael B Stricker

2010-01-01

64

From guidelines to clinical practice: cardiovascular risk management in inflammatory arthritis patients.  

PubMed

There exists significant evidence of increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in comparison with the general population. This finding has been supported by a number of guidelines recommending screening for CV disease risk in patients with the disease. However, the opportunity to identify and manage those patients at risk has been missed in both primary and secondary care. The success of CV risk management in diabetes patients provides a clear incentive to identify and actively manage CV risk in all RA patients as part of routine practice. This article provides an approach that shows how to assess for CV risk in standard clinical practice. PMID:24005485

Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

2013-09-01

65

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Access to Care Workshop proceedings and next steps.  

PubMed

On October 24, 2008, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Standing Committee on Access to Care invited clinical practitioners, researchers and administrators from across Canada to provide input on the CCS action plan for 2009/2010. The meeting provided an opportunity for stakeholders to identify initiatives under three CCS priority areas for action: collecting and reporting wait time data, improving systems to improve access, and establishing national networks. Building on the suggestions from this meeting, the Standing Committee drafted an action plan for 2009/2010. This plan includes a lead role for the CCS in facilitating consensus on pan-Canadian data standards and definitions, and using current resources and infrastructure. The CCS and its Standing Committee look forward to continuing to work with stakeholders to promote awareness and adoption of the benchmarks, and to undertake new initiatives that will provide insight into access to care issues along the continuum of care. PMID:20151051

O'Neill, Blair J; Simpson, Christopher S

2010-02-01

66

Degree of Concordance with DASH Diet Guidelines and Incidence of Hypertension and Fatal Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension advocate the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. Methods We studied whether a greater concordance with the DASH diet is associated with reduced incidence of hypertension (self-reported) and mortality from cardiovascular disease in 20,993 women initially aged 55–69. We created a DASH diet concordance score using food frequency data in 1986 and followed the women for events through 2002. Results No woman had perfect concordance with the DASH diet. Adjusted for age and energy intake, incidence of hypertension was inversely associated with the degree of concordance with the DASH diet, with hazard ratios across quintiles of 1.0, 0.91, 0.95, 0.99, and 0.87 (p trend = 0.02). There also were inverse, but not monotonic, associations between better DASH diet concordance and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, and all CVD. However, after adjustment for other risk factors, there was little evidence that any endpoint was associated with the DASH diet score. Conclusions Our results suggest that greater concordance with DASH guidelines did not have an independent long-term association with hypertension or cardiovascular mortality in this cohort. This implies that very high concordance, as achieved in the DASH trials, may be necessary to achieve the benefits of the DASH diet.

Folsom, Aaron R.; Parker, Emily D.; Harnack, Lisa J.

2007-01-01

67

American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2: Presurgical Functional Brain Mapping Using Magnetic Evoked Fields*  

PubMed Central

The following are “minimum standards” for the routine clinical recording of magnetic evoked fields (MEFs) in all age-groups. Practicing at minimum standards should not be the goal of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) center but rather a starting level for continued improvement. Minimum standards meet only the most basic responsibilities to the patient and the referring physician. These minimum standards have been put forth to improve standardization of procedures, to facilitate interchange of recordings and reports among laboratories in the United States, and to confirm the expectations of referring physicians. Recommendations regarding Laboratory (Center) Environment and Preparation for MEG Recordings are detailed in the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 1 : Recording and Analysis of Spontaneous Cerebral Activity, except for its EEG aspect that is not considered necessary (although may be helpful in trained hands) for MEFs (presurgical functional brain mapping).

Burgess, Richard C.; Funke, Michael E.; Bowyer, Susan M.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Bagic, Anto I.

2012-01-01

68

Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.  

PubMed

Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:23590928

Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

2013-04-13

69

Metabolic syndrome, adiponectin, and cardiovascular risk in Spain (the segovia study): impact of consensus societies criteria.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in rural and urban areas in the province of Segovia, Spain, and its relationship to lifestyle habits, cardiovascular risk, and serum adiponectin concentrations. Methods: The study had a cross-sectional design and included 888 individual residents in the province of Segovia, Autonomous Community of Castilla-León. Results: The age/sex standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was by: (1) American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute criteria (AHA/NHLBI), 17%; (2) International Diabetes Federation (IDF), 24.3%; and (3) Consensus Societies/Joint Interim Statement (CS), 27.8%. A high correlation was found between the different criteria. No formal education [odds ratio (OR) 6.9 (2.4-20.2)] and primary education [6.7 (2.8-15.9)] were independently associated with metabolic syndrome. An inverse association with metabolic syndrome was found for subjects doing a high level of exercise during work [0.4 (0.2-0.7)] as well as those who were mild drinkers [alcohol intake of less than 15 grams/daily, 0.4 (0.3-0.8)]. Among subjects with low estimated cardiovascular risk, adiponectin levels are higher in those who do not meet criteria of metabolic syndrome. A total of 29.7% of subjects meeting CS criteria had >20% 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by the Framingham risk score criteria [4.5 (2.4-8.5)]. Conclusions: Our results show: (1) A higher estimated prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to IDF and CS criteria. (2) Low educational level was independently associated with metabolic syndrome. A high level of physical activity and a daily alcohol intake of less than 15 grams/day were inversely associated with metabolic syndrome. (3) Metabolic syndrome increases the predicted CVD risk. (4) Adiponectin levels are not inversely related to insulin resistance in subjects with high cardiovascular risk and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23734759

Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; Vega-Quiroga, Saturio; Ibarra-Rueda, José María; Serrano-Ríos For The Segovia Insulin Resistance Study Group, Manuel

2013-06-04

70

ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR 2011 Appropriate Use Criteria for Echocardiography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance American College of Chest Physicians.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where echocardiography is frequently considered. This document combines and updates the original transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2007 (1) and the original stress echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2008 (2). This revision reflects new clinical data, reflects changes in test utilization patterns,and clarifies echocardiography use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria.The indications (clinical scenarios)were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC).The 202 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9,to designate appropriate use(median 7 to 9), uncertain use(median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Ninety-seven indications were rated as appropriate, 34 were rated as uncertain, and 71 were rated as inappropriate. In general,the use of echocardiography for initial diagnosis when there is a change in clinical status or when the results of the echocardiogram are anticipated to change patient management were rated appropriate. Routine testing when there was no change in clinical status or when results of testing were unlikely to modify management were more likely to be inappropriate than appropriate/uncertain.The AUC for echocardiography have the potential to impact physician decision making,healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore,recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:21338862

Douglas, Pamela S; Garcia, Mario J; Haines, David E; Lai, Wyman W; Manning, Warren J; Patel, Ayan R; Picard, Michael H; Polk, Donna M; Ragosta, Michael; Parker Ward, R; Weiner, Rory B

2011-03-01

71

Joint British Diabetes Societies guideline for the management of diabetic ketoacidosis.  

PubMed

The Joint British Diabetes Societies guidelines for the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (these do not cover Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic Syndrome) are available in full at: (i) http://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/Our_Views/Care_recommendations/The-Management-of-Diabetic-Ketoacidosis-in-Adults; (ii) ?http://www.diabetes.nhs.uk/publications_and_resources/reports_and_guidance; (iii) http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS_DKA_Management.pdf. This article summarizes the main changes from previous guidelines and discusses the rationale for the new recommendations. The key points are: Monitoring of the response to treatment (i) The method of choice for monitoring the response to treatment is bedside measurement of capillary blood ketones using a ketone meter. (ii) If blood ketone measurement is not available, venous pH and bicarbonate should be used in conjunction with bedside blood glucose monitoring to assess treatment response. (iii) Venous blood should be used rather than arterial (unless respiratory problems dictate otherwise) in blood gas analysers. (iv) Intermittent laboratory confirmation of pH, bicarbonate and electrolytes only. Insulin administration (i) Insulin should be infused intravenously at a weight-based fixed rate until the ketosis has resolved. (ii) When the blood glucose falls below 14 mmol/l, 10% glucose should be added to allow the fixed-rate insulin to be continued. (iii) If already taking, long-acting insulin analogues such as insulin glargine (Lantus(®), Sanofi Aventis, Guildford, Surry, UK) or insulin detemir (Levemir(®), Novo Nordisk, Crawley, West Sussex, UK.) should be continued in usual doses. Delivery of care (i) The diabetes specialist team should be involved as soon as possible. (ii) Patients should be nursed in areas where staff are experienced in the management of ketoacidosis. PMID:21255074

Savage, M W; Dhatariya, K K; Kilvert, A; Rayman, G; Rees, J A E; Courtney, C H; Hilton, L; Dyer, P H; Hamersley, M S

2011-05-01

72

Revised guidelines for cardiovascular risk management -- time to stop medication? A practice-based intervention study  

PubMed Central

Background According to the new Dutch guideline for cardiovascular risk management, patients with a low risk of cardiovascular mortality may have insufficient benefit to warrant medication. Therefore, numerous patients per general practice may be treated unnecessarily. Aim To explore the feasibility and consequences of a re-evaluation programme for patients without target organ damage who were treated for hypertension and/or hypercholesterolaemia. Design and setting Practice-based intervention study in six general practices. Method Patients treated for hypertension and/or hypercholesterolaemia without target organ damage (n = 833) were invited to re-evaluate their cardiovascular risk and were advised whether or not to stop medication. Patients who discontinued medication were followed for 6 months. To determine indicators for successful stopping, logistic regression analyses were performed, and differences between practices were analysed. Results About two-thirds of the patients were re-evaluated and 61% of them had a low calculated risk, especially younger patients, females, and non-smokers. Of these, 42% were advised to stop medication, especially younger patients and non-smokers. Of those who discontinued medication, 40% had restarted within 6 months. After 6 months, 80 of the 833 patients (9.6%) had not restarted medication. There were no important side effects related to stopping medication. Conclusion Over 50% of patients without target organ damage treated for hypertension and/or hypercholesterolaemia may have insufficient benefit to warrant medication. Younger patients, females, and non-smokers in particular are more likely to have an insufficient indication for medication. GPs’ and nurse practitioners’ views seem to play a role in advising to stop or to restart medication.

van Duijn, Huug J; Belo, Janneke N; Blom, Jeanet W; Velberg, Irvine D; Assendelft, Willem JJ

2011-01-01

73

Canadian Cardiovascular Society consensus conference recommendations on heart failure 2006: Diagnosis and management  

PubMed Central

Heart failure remains a common diagnosis, especially in older individuals. It continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, but major advances in both diagnosis and management have occurred and will continue to improve symptoms and other outcomes in patients. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published its first consensus conference recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in 1994, followed by two brief updates, and reconvened this consensus conference to provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and management strategies. New clinical trial evidence and meta-analyses were critically reviewed by a multidisciplinary primary panel who developed both recommendations and practical tips, which were reviewed by a secondary panel. The resulting document is intended to provide practical advice for specialists, family physicians, nurses, pharmacists and others who are involved in the care of heart failure patients. Management of heart failure begins with an accurate diagnosis, and requires rational combination drug therapy, individualization of care for each patient (based on their symptoms, clinical presentation and disease severity), appropriate mechanical interventions including revascularization and devices, collaborative efforts among health care professionals, and education and cooperation of the patient and their immediate caregivers. The goal is to translate best evidence-based therapies into clinical practice with a measureable impact on the health of heart failure patients in Canada.

Arnold, J Malcolm O; Liu, Peter; Demers, Catherine; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Johnstone, David E; Jong, Philip; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Parker, John D; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; Svendsen, Anna M; Teo, Koon; Tsuyuki, Ross T; White, Michel

2006-01-01

74

A review and critical analysis of professional societies' guidelines for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

The development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which are promulgated by various sponsoring organizations to provide direction to clinicians for management of complex problems, generally adhere to a set of key principles. To reassure the users of their scientific and ethical validity, these include the use of a system to rate the quality of evidence on which the guideline is based and the divulgence of any conflicts of interest (COI) among members of the panel developing the guidelines. I analyzed the CPGs for pharmacologic management of patients with type 2 diabetes written by the two US professional societies that developed such guidelines (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists [AACE] and the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes [ADA/EASD]) to assess their adherence to these principles of guideline development and to compare them with regard to simplicity, consideration of costs, and peer review status. To put the existence of COIs in these guidelines into context, I also reviewed the COIs from government-sponsored panels that developed diabetes CPGs. The results of this analysis suggest that both the AACE and ADA/EASD guidelines should be regarded as consensus documents rather than true CPGs, since neither guideline employed evidence grading. COI was extremely common among the members of both CPG panels from professional organizations, as well in the CPG panels with government sponsorship. In addition, the nature and extent of external peer review of these guidelines is unclear. Given these limitations, the AACE and ADA/EASD CPGs for diabetes management should be regarded as advisory at best, rather than prescriptive or authoritative, especially in view of their noncompliance with key principles of guideline development. PMID:22422437

Vigersky, Robert A

2012-06-01

75

European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the clinical management and treatment of HIV-infected adults.  

PubMed

A working group of the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) have developed these guidelines for European clinicians to help them in the treatment of adults with HIV infection. This third version of the guidelines includes, as new topics, the assessment of patients at initial and subsequent clinic visits as well as post-exposure prophylaxis. A revision of the 2005 guidelines based on current data includes changes in the sections on primary HIV infection, when to initiate therapy, which drug combinations are preferred as initial combination regimens for antiretroviral-naïve patients, how to manage virological failure and the treatment of HIV during pregnancy. In Europe, there is a wide range of clinical practices in antiretroviral therapy depending on various factors such as drug registration, national policies, local availability, reimbursement and access to treatment. These can vary greatly from one country to another, especially in Central and Eastern parts of Europe. These guidelines are intended to help clinicians achieve the best care for their patients. In some countries, particularly where the quality of and access to care are not optimal, these guidelines should help AIDS societies and physicians or patient group organizations to negotiate with their national health authorities with a view to implementing what should be the standard of care for HIV-infected patients all over Europe. PMID:18257769

Clumeck, N; Pozniak, A; Raffi, F

2008-02-01

76

Review of guidelines on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with aspirin: how much evidence is needed to turn a tanker?  

PubMed

AIMS: There are numerous national and international guidelines on the use of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Given the uncertainties about aspirin in primary prevention, our aim was to compare the recommendations and the reported evidence in guidelines for the treatment with aspirin of subjects free of cardiovascular disease with or without diabetes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Guidelines were retrieved through Medline and other electronic databases and through a web-based search for guideline development organizations. The content of the recommendations and the underlying evidence were analysed with qualitative and bibliometric methods. In addition, we searched for recent studies to assess whether they underscore the current recommendations. We included 12 guidelines: six European, three North American, and one each from New Zealand, Australia, and the World Health Organization. Recommendations differ with regard to outcome (morbidity, mortality), time span (years of risk), cut-off percentage between high and low risk, and the dose of aspirin. Most guidelines are not in line with recent evidence, which show that aspirin is of uncertain net value as the reduction in absolute risk for occlusive CV events needs to be weighed against an increase in the risk of major bleeds. CONCLUSION: We found conflicting recommendations in various guidelines about the use of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, which reflect differences in selection of the evidence and in the timing of publication. According to recent evidence, in general, the use of aspirin seems no longer justifiable in primary prevention in patients with or without diabetes. PMID:23610452

Matthys, Frederik; De Backer, Tine; De Backer, Guy; Stichele, Robert Vander

2012-12-20

77

Assessment of activity status and survival according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina classification  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Despite its widespread use, limited data on the validity of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina (CCSA) classification relative to other measures of functional status have been reported. OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity of the CCSA classification by comparing it with the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI) and evaluate its prognostic significance with respect to long-term mortality. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1407 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization between 1992 and 1996. The median follow-up period was 9.7 years (interquartile range 6.1 to 11.1 years) and the mortality status as of December 31, 2004 was available for all patients. RESULTS: The first three CCSA classes were inversely related to the DASI. The mean (± SD) scores were as follows: class I, 31.4±16.7; class II, 22.5±15.4; class III, 14.7±14.3; and class IV, 15.5±14.9 (P<0.01). Increasing CCSA class was associated with increased long-term mortality, even after adjusting for baseline characteristics. Chest pain course was also an important modulator of mortality among class III and IV patients; one-year mortality rates were 8.1% among unstable patients compared with 4.8% among patients with stable or progressing course. CONCLUSION: CCSA classes I to III were inversely related to DASI scores and linearly associated with mortality. The similarity in outcomes among class III and IV patients is probably explained by the confounding effect of the stability of the patients’ symptoms. The higher mortality risk among class III and IV patients with an unstable course provides impetus for a revised CCSA definition incorporating this information.

Kaul, Padma; Naylor, C David; Armstrong, Paul W; Mark, Daniel B; Theroux, Pierre; Dagenais, Gilles R

2009-01-01

78

Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.  

PubMed

The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the perioperative period may constitute an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, aside from the risks associated with the underlying disease. Second, this should help us to design perioperative strategies that aim to reduce additional perioperative risks. Very few well performed randomised studies on the topic are available and many recommendations rely heavily on expert opinion and are adapted specifically to the healthcare systems in individual countries. This report aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of subcommittees of scientific subcommittees and individual members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched from the year 2000 until July 2010 without language restrictions. These searches produced 15?425 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines. PMID:21885981

De Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

2011-10-01

79

Post-polypectomy colonoscopy surveillance: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.  

PubMed

This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.Main recommendations: The following recommendations for post-polypectomy endoscopic surveillance should be applied only after a high quality baseline colonoscopy with complete removal of all detected neoplastic lesions.1 In the low risk group (patients with 1 - 2 tubular adenomas < 10 mm with low grade dysplasia), the ESGE recommends participation in existing national screening programmes 10 years after the index colonoscopy. If no screening programme is available, repetition of colonoscopy 10 years after the index colonoscopy is recommended (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In the high risk group (patients with adenomas with villous histology or high grade dysplasia or ?10 mm in size, or ? 3 adenomas), the ESGE recommends surveillance colonoscopy 3 years after the index colonoscopy (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). Patients with 10 or more adenomas should be referred for genetic counselling (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 In the high risk group, if no high risk adenomas are detected at the first surveillance examination, the ESGE suggests a 5-year interval before a second surveillance colonoscopy (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). If high risk adenomas are detected at first or subsequent surveillance examinations, a 3-year repetition of surveillance colonoscopy is recommended (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).4 The ESGE recommends that patients with serrated polyps < 10 mm in size with no dysplasia should be classified as low risk (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). The ESGE suggests that patients with large serrated polyps (? 10 mm) or those with dysplasia should be classified as high risk (weak recommendation, low quality evidence).5 The ESGE recommends that the endoscopist is responsible for providing a written recommendation for the post-polypectomy surveillance schedule (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:24030244

Hassan, Cesare; Quintero, Enrique; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Regula, Jaroslaw; Brandão, Catarina; Chaussade, Stanislas; Dekker, Evelien; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Ferlitsch, Monika; Gimeno-García, Antonio; Hazewinkel, Yark; Jover, Rodrigo; Kalager, Mette; Loberg, Magnus; Pox, Christian; Rembacken, Bjorn; Lieberman, David

2013-09-12

80

Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within {+-}7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Correa, Candace R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hardenbergh, Patricia H. [Shaw Regional Cancer Center, Vail, CO (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McQueen, Julie R. [Oncology Patient Navigator, Duke Raleigh Cancer Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, MI (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

2011-09-01

81

Principles and guidelines for surgeons--management of symptomatic breast cancer. On behalf of the European Society of Surgical Oncology.  

PubMed

The European Society of Surgical Oncology is actively involved in the promotion of a high standard of surgical oncology throughout Europe. Such an ambition involves recognition of Centres of Excellence in the management of cancer patients throughout Europe. These centres have a multi-disciplinary system involved in the total care of patients with cancer and are concerned with the delivery of care to the highest available standards. It is accepted that not all patients with cancer can, nor should, necessarily be treated in such highly specialized centres. Yet all cancer patients should be guaranteed a high standard of care. High surgical standards can be ensured if surgeons treating cancer are trained in specialist centres and, when in independent practice, follow established guidelines or protocols of treatment. In common with many national surgical oncology societies, the European Society of Surgical Oncology is in the process of establishing good practice guidelines in the treatment of solid tumours. This document on the management of symptomatic breast cancer is the first of a series of guidelines to be proposed by ESSO. It draws heavily on excellent documents already in existence from the British Association of Surgical Oncology and from the Danish Breast Cancer Co-Operative Group. It is hoped that this document will be sufficiently clear and purposeful to be of help to the individual surgeon and yet sufficiently flexible to allow it to be adopted in the different medical systems throughout Europe. PMID:9598248

Blichert-Toft, M; Smola, M G; Cataliotti, L; O'Higgins, N

1998-01-01

82

Review of the American Heart Association's guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in women  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death of women in the United States and most of the developed world. The latest available data from the World Health Organization indicate that 16.6 million people around the globe die of CVD each year. World deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD) in 2002 totalled 7.2 million. One in seven women in Europe will die of CHD; in the United Kingdom >?1.2 million women are living with CHD. Despite advances in diagnosing and treating CHD, the disease accounts for the majority of CVD deaths in women in the United States, with more than 240?000 dying annually. Although coronary heart disease is the predominant cause of mortality for adult women in the United States, screening for coronary risk factors and coronary risk reduction interventions remains underused in women. In February of 2004, the American Heart Association published the first evidence?based guidelines for CVD prevention in women, consisting of a set of clinical recommendations tailored to a woman's individual level of risk.

Mieres, J H

2006-01-01

83

Noncompliance with FDA and society guidelines for endoscopic reprocessing: implications for patient care.  

PubMed

Flexible endoscopic instruments are very valuable in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Current guidelines for reprocessing these instruments between patient use are appropriate. Rigid adherence to these guidelines, however, will be necessary to reassure governmental authorities, other medical authorities, and the public that the risk of infection from these procedures is minimal. PMID:10683215

DiMarino, A J

2000-04-01

84

Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on processing and evaluation of nerve biopsies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nerve biopsy is often the final step in the diagnostic work-up of neuropathies of unknown origin. The aim of this guideline was to prepare an evidence-based guideline on the methods for performing and evaluating nerve biopsy. The panel performed a search of MEDLINE, hand search of bibliographies of the references retrieved, review of the evidence, and reached agreement by consensus.

C. L. Sommer; S. Brandner; P. J. Dyck; Y. Harati; C. LaCroix; M. M. Y. Lammens; L. Magy; S. I. Mellgren; M. Morbin; C. Navarro; H. C. Powell; A. E. Schenone; E. Tan; A. Urtizberea; J. Weis

2010-01-01

85

Overview: the 2nd Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.  

PubMed

Recent years have seen the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) focus its attention on improving outcomes for Indigenous people within Australia and New Zealand. The most visible of these activities has been the convening of conferences devoted specifically to understanding and overcoming the burden of cardiovascular disparities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders within Australia and Maori and Pacific Islander populations within New Zealand. Following from the success of the first meeting, the second was held in Alice Springs in 2011. Alongside plenary sessions discussing primary prevention, improved care, secondary prevention and the social and cultural determinants of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), targeted workshops outlined the issues and priority activities for the CSANZ into the future. These included discussion of Workforce, Improving Chronic Care, Reducing the burden of Rheumatic Heart Disease and Reducing Disparities in Hospital Care. PMID:22877731

Brown, Alex; Kritharides, Leonard

2012-08-09

86

[Annual Congress of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE-2009) September 18-21, 2009, Lisbon, Portugal].  

PubMed

Reviewed in the article are the proceedings of the Annual Congress of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) held on September 18-21, 2009 in Lisbon, Portugal. The Forum centred upon recent achievements in such currently important trends of interventional radiology as carotid stenting, transcatheterembolization, endovascular prosthetic reconstruction of the aorta and its branches, angioplasty of the crural arteries in diabetic foot, prevention of pulmonary artery thromboembolism, peripheral interventions on lower-limb arteries, as well as interventions on the hepatic bile ducts in mechanical jaundice, transjugular intrahepaticportosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedures, embolization ofuterine arteries in womb myoma, vertebroplasty, venous interventions, interventions in renal artery stenoses, etc. PMID:20635717

Shipovski?, V N

2010-01-01

87

European National Society Cardiovascular Journals: Background, rationale and mission statement of the 'Editors' Club' (Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology).  

PubMed

Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane k MD, Jørgen Videbaek MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations). PMID:18665206

Alfonso, F; Ambrosio, G; Pinto, F J; van der Wall, E E

2008-06-01

88

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, Part 2: Long-term treatment of schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

These guidelines for the biological treatment of schizophrenia were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The goal during the development of these guidelines was to review systematically all available evidence pertaining to the treatment of schizophrenia, and to reach a consensus on a series of practice recommendations that are clinically

Peter Falkai; Thomas Wobrock; Jeffrey Lieberman; Birte Glenthoj; Wagner F. Gattaz; Hans-Jürgen Möller

2006-01-01

89

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Substance Use and Related Disorders, Part 1: Alcoholism  

Microsoft Academic Search

These practice guidelines for the biological treatment of substance use disorders were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The goal during the development of these guidelines was to review systematically all available evidence pertaining to the treatment of substance use disorders, and to reach a consensus on a series of

Michael Soyka; Henry R. Kranzler; Mats Berglund; David Gorelick; Victor Hesselbrock; Bankole A. Johnson; Hans-Jürgen Möller

2008-01-01

90

Management of sepsis in neutropenia: guidelines of the infectious diseases working party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

These guidelines from the infectious diseases working party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO) give recommendations for the management of adults with neutropenia and the diagnosis of sepsis. The guidelines are written for clinicians and focus on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of sepsis. The manuscript contains evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the quality and strength

Olaf Penack; Thomas Beinert; Dieter Buchheidt; Hermann Einsele; Holger Hebart; Michael G. Kiehl; Gero Massenkeil; Xaver Schiel; Jan Schleicher; Philipp B. Staber; Stefan Wilhelm; Hans-Heinrich Wolf; Helmut Ostermann

2006-01-01

91

How well are European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines adhered to in patients with syncope?  

PubMed

The ESC guidelines on syncope were published in 2001 and updated in 2004. Adherence to the recommendations enables early stratification of low and high risk patients and prevents unnecessary investigations and admissions. Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is the commonest cause of syncope in all age groups and a low risk condition. The study objective was to determine whether the ESC guidelines were adhered to prior to referral to a syncope unit; 100 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope (52 +/- 23 (15-91) years); 53 female. Sixty-six patients had VVS. Forty nine (75%) of patients with VVS had undergone unnecessary investigations prior to diagnosis and 31 (47%) were admitted to hospital for investigation. Research from other countries confirms that adherence to the ESC guidelines expediates accurate diagnosis, improves resource utilization and reduces health care cost. Greater awareness amongst Irish practitioners of guidelines may improve syncope management and reduce costs. PMID:20222386

O'Dwyer, C; Hade, D; Fan, C W; Cunningham, C; Kenny, R A

2010-01-01

92

A comment on the International Society of Geriatric Oncology guidelines: evidence-based advice for the clinical setting.  

PubMed

Largely a disease of older men, prostate cancer is likely to become a growing burden in the developed world as the population ages and overall life expectancy increases. Furthermore, prostate cancer management in older men is not optimal, reflecting the lack of training dedicated to senior adults in fellowship programs and the lack of specific guidelines to manage senior adults. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) convened a multidisciplinary Prostate Cancer Working Group to review the evidence base and provide advice on the management of the disease in senior age groups. The Working Group reported that advancing age, by itself, is not a reliable guide to treatment decision making for men with either localized or advanced prostate cancer. Instead, the SIOG guidelines advise health care teams to assess the patient's underlying health status, which is largely dictated by associated comorbid conditions, but also by dependency in activities of daily living and nutritional status, and to use the findings to categorize the individual into one of four groups: healthy, vulnerable, frail, or terminally ill. The guidelines recommend that a patient categorized as healthy or vulnerable (i.e., with reversible problems following geriatric intervention) should receive the same approach to treatment as a younger patient. Frail patients should be managed using adapted treatment strategies, and the terminally ill should receive symptomatic/palliative care only. The guidelines may have ongoing relevance as the treatment options for prostate cancer expand. PMID:23015683

Fitzpatrick, John M; Graefen, Markus; Payne, Heather A; Scotté, Florian; Aapro, Matti S

2012-01-01

93

European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Background, Rationale and Mission Statement of the \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular scientific production in Europe is growing both in quantity and quality. Promoting high- quality research is a major goal of the European So- ciety of Cardiology (ESC) (1-3). The ESC has two highly respected official general journals, namely the \\

Ernst E. van der Wall; Anesti Kondili; Djamaleddine Nibouche; Karlen Adamyan; Kurt Huber; Hugo Ector; Izet Masic; Rumiana Tarnovska; Mario Ivanusa; Jørgen Videbæk; Mohamed Hamed; Alexandras Laucevicius; Pirjo Mustonen; Jean-Yves Artigou; Ariel Cohen; Mamanti Rogava; Michael Böhm; Eckart Fleck; Gerd Heusch; Rainer Klawki; Panos Vardas; Christodoulos Stefanadis; József Tenczer; Massimo Chiariello; Joseph Elias; Halima Benjelloun; Olaf Rødevand; Edvard Apetrei; Victor A. Lusov; Rafael G. Oganov; Velibor Obradovic; Gabriel Kamensky; Miran F. Kenda; Christer Höglund; Thomas F. Lüscher; René Lerch; Moufid Jokhadar; Habib Haouala; Vedat Sansoy; Valentin Shumakov; Adam Timmis

2008-01-01

94

Clinical practice guidelines for the management of cryptococcal disease: 2010 update by the infectious diseases society of america.  

PubMed

Cryptococcosis is a global invasive mycosis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. These guidelines for its management have been built on the previous Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines from 2000 and include new sections. There is a discussion of the management of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in 3 risk groups: (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, (2) organ transplant recipients, and (3) non-HIV-infected and nontransplant hosts. There are specific recommendations for other unique risk populations, such as children, pregnant women, persons in resource-limited environments, and those with Cryptococcus gattii infection. Recommendations for management also include other sites of infection, including strategies for pulmonary cryptococcosis. Emphasis has been placed on potential complications in management of cryptococcal infection, including increased intracranial pressure, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), drug resistance, and cryptococcomas. Three key management principles have been articulated: (1) induction therapy for meningoencephalitis using fungicidal regimens, such as a polyene and flucytosine, followed by suppressive regimens using fluconazole; (2) importance of early recognition and treatment of increased intracranial pressure and/or IRIS; and (3) the use of lipid formulations of amphotericin B regimens in patients with renal impairment. Cryptococcosis remains a challenging management issue, with little new drug development or recent definitive studies. However, if the diagnosis is made early, if clinicians adhere to the basic principles of these guidelines, and if the underlying disease is controlled, then cryptococcosis can be managed successfully in the vast majority of patients. PMID:20047480

Perfect, John R; Dismukes, William E; Dromer, Francoise; Goldman, David L; Graybill, John R; Hamill, Richard J; Harrison, Thomas S; Larsen, Robert A; Lortholary, Olivier; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Pappas, Peter G; Powderly, William G; Singh, Nina; Sobel, Jack D; Sorrell, Tania C

2010-02-01

95

Advanced Cardiovascular Sonographer: A Proposal of the American Society of Echocardiography Advanced Practice Sonographer Task Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

Echocardiographic examinations require a well-trained and competent sonographer to obtain proper ana- tomic and physiologic data to establish an accurate diagnosis for clinical decision-making and patient man- agement. Although the formal education and training of cardiovascular sonographers are evolving, many entry-level and staff sonographers may not have sufficient practical or clinical knowledge of the necessary components of the echocardiographic study

Carol Mitchell; Fletcher A. Miller Jr.; S. Michelle Bierig; Merri L. Bremer; Donna Ehler; Timothy Hanlon; Daren Keller; Claudia E. Korcarz; Judy R. Mangion; Jane E. Marshall; Marti L. McCulloch; Brad Mehl; Rick Rigling; Cassie Robbins; Liza Sanchez; Matt M. Umland

2009-01-01

96

Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide

Benjamin D. Smith; Soren M. Bentzen; Candace R. Correa; Carol A. Hahn; Patricia H. Hardenbergh; Geoffrey S. Ibbott; Beryl McCormick; Julie R. McQueen; Lori J. Pierce; Simon N. Powell; Abram Recht; Alphonse G. Taghian; Frank A. Vicini; Julia R. White; Bruce G. Haffty

2011-01-01

97

Guidelines for the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections Amoung HIV-Infected Persons, 2002. Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were ...

H. Masur J. E. Kaplan K. K. Holmes

2002-01-01

98

Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain - Consensus statement and guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society  

PubMed Central

Neuropathic pain (NeP), generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics) and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP.

Moulin, DE; Clark, AJ; Gilron, I; Ware, MA; Watson, CPN; Sessle, BJ; Coderre, T; Morley-Forster, PK; Stinson, J; Boulanger, A; Peng, P; Finley, GA; Taenzer, P; Squire, P; Dion, D; Cholkan, A; Gilani, A; Gordon, A; Henry, J; Jovey, R; Lynch, M; Mailis-Gagnon, A; Panju, A; Rollman, GB; Velly, A

2007-01-01

99

Perioperative fasting in adults and children: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.  

PubMed

This guideline aims to provide an overview of the present knowledge on aspects of perioperative fasting with assessment of the quality of the evidence. A systematic search was conducted in electronic databases to identify trials published between 1950 and late 2009 concerned with preoperative fasting, early resumption of oral intake and the effects of oral carbohydrate mixtures on gastric emptying and postoperative recovery. One study on preoperative fasting which had not been included in previous reviews and a further 13 studies published since the most recent review were identified. The searches also identified 20 potentially relevant studies of oral carbohydrates and 53 on early resumption of oral intake. Publications were classified in terms of their evidence level, scientific validity and clinical relevance. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network scoring system for assessing level of evidence and grade of recommendations was used. The key recommendations are that adults and children should be encouraged to drink clear fluids up to 2 h before elective surgery (including caesarean section) and all but one member of the guidelines group consider that tea or coffee with milk added (up to about one fifth of the total volume) are still clear fluids. Solid food should be prohibited for 6 h before elective surgery in adults and children, although patients should not have their operation cancelled or delayed just because they are chewing gum, sucking a boiled sweet or smoking immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia. These recommendations also apply to patients with obesity, gastro-oesophageal reflux and diabetes and pregnant women not in labour. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of antacids, metoclopramide or H2-receptor antagonists before elective surgery in non-obstetric patients, but an H2-receptor antagonist should be given before elective caesarean section, with an intravenous H2-receptor antagonist given prior to emergency caesarean section, supplemented with 30 ml of 0.3 mol l(-1) sodium citrate if general anaesthesia is planned. Infants should be fed before elective surgery. Breast milk is safe up to 4 h and other milks up to 6 h. Thereafter, clear fluids should be given as in adults. The guidelines also consider the safety and possible benefits of preoperative carbohydrates and offer advice on the postoperative resumption of oral intake. PMID:21712716

Smith, Ian; Kranke, Peter; Murat, Isabelle; Smith, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Geraldine; Søreide, Eldar; Spies, Claudia; in't Veld, Bas

2011-08-01

100

Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with Q fever by the Armed Forces Infectious Diseases Society.  

PubMed

This issue in the series Current Topics in Military Tropical Medicine focuses on Q Fever. Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Over 150 confirmed cases have occurred among U.S. military personnel deployed to Iraq since 2007. Acute Q fever is underdiagnosed because of a myriad of possible clinical presentations but typically presents as a flu-like illness. The most common chronic manifestation is endocarditis. Most providers are not familiar with the diagnosis, treatment, or appropriate follow-up of this disease. In order to facilitate the care of patients infected with C. burnetii, the Armed Forces Infectious Diseases Society convened a panel of experts in the field to develop practical guidelines for those caring for infected patients. The recommendations and rationale are reviewed in this article. PMID:22645872

Hartzell, Joshua D; Gleeson, Todd; Scoville, Stephanie; Massung, Robert F; Wortmann, Glenn; Martin, Gregory J

2012-05-01

101

Assessment of the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or invasive procedures: Guidelines of the Italian Society for Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis of recommendationsThe Italian Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SISET: Società Italiana per lo Studio dell’ Emostasi e della Trombosi) promoted the development of a series of guidelines which would adopt evidence-based medicine methodology on clinically relevant problems in the field of haemostasis and thrombosis.The objective of the present guidelines is to provide recommendations for the pre-operative and pre-procedural assessment

Benilde Cosmi; Adriano Alatri; Marco Cattaneo; Paolo Gresele; Marco Marietta; Francesco Rodeghiero; Armando Tripodi; Luca Ansaloni; Maurizio Fusari; Stefania Taddei

2009-01-01

102

Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.  

PubMed

The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites. PMID:23512728

Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

2013-03-19

103

Bethesda Conference #36 and the European Society of Cardiology Consensus Recommendations revisited a comparison of U.S. and European criteria for eligibility and disqualification of competitive athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities.  

PubMed

Aspiration to reduce the risks of athletic field deaths prompted the American Heart Association and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) to establish consensus guidelines for eligibility/disqualification decisions in competitive athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities. Since 2005, the Bethesda Conference #36 and the ESC consensus documents have been relied upon by physicians from different parts of the world. The 2 consensus documents emanate from largely different cultural, social, and legal backgrounds existing in the U.S. and Europe and, although several recommendations are similar, in some instances the Bethesda Conference #36 and the ESC consensus documents suggest different approaches to disqualification decisions and implications for clinical practice, raising the possibility that confusion and discrepancies will contaminate the management of competitive athletes with cardiovascular disease. In the present article, the differences between the 2 documents are critically viewed, with special attention to genetic cardiovascular diseases relevant to sudden death in young athletes, through the prism of different cultural backgrounds, societal attitudes, and also perceptions regarding exposure to legal liability in the U.S. and Europe. In conclusion, it seems appropriate at some time to consider assembling updated recommendations for sports eligibility/disqualification that assimilate both the U.S. and European perspectives, with the aspiration of creating a unique and authoritative document applicable to the global sports medicine community. PMID:19055990

Pelliccia, Antonio; Zipes, Douglas P; Maron, Barry J

2008-12-01

104

Cardiovascular Health, Part 2  

PubMed Central

Context: An athlete’s health may be endangered if he or she continues to compete after diagnosis of certain cardiovascular conditions. The most worrisome risk is sudden cardiac death; the annual rate in US athletes is 1 in 50 000 to 200 000. Evidence Acquisition: Part 2 of this review highlights the current guidelines and controversies surrounding compatibility of participation with a variety of cardiac conditions in competitive and recreational athletics. Data sources were limited to peer-reviewed publications from 1984 to the April 2009. Results: The guidelines published by the American College of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology provide a framework for safe competitive and recreational sports participation in athletes with a broad spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiovascular disorders. These guidelines are necessarily conservative because it is not currently possible to individualize risk prediction. Few data are available in many areas, particularly in the noncompetitive arena or in older athletes. Conclusions: Published national guidelines are currently the foundation governing return-to-play decisions in athletes with cardiovascular conditions. Further studies are needed to refine risk stratification algorithms to allow athletes with cardiovascular conditions to reap the health benefits of regular exercise and sports participation without undue risk.

Baman, Timir S.; Gupta, Sanjaya; Day, Sharlene M.

2010-01-01

105

[The guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities' of The Netherlands Surgical Society].  

PubMed

The guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities' describes the diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with peripheral artery disease of the legs. The text is the result of a cooperative effort of the Dutch Society of Vascular Surgery and the Section of nterventional Radiology of the Dutch Society of Radiology. A diagnosis of 'peripheral artery disease' can be made by measuring the ankle/brachial index. Additional investigations are only necessary ifa plan for invasive treatment must be drawn up. The first line of treatment in patients with intermittent claudication is walking exercise. If the results are unsatisfactory, percutaneus transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or surgery can be performed. In case of critical ischaemia, revascularisation is mandatory to prevent an amputation. In selected cases, percutaneous intentional endovascular revascularisation is a good alternative to bypass surgery. In patients with acute ischaemia in whom the vitality of the leg is not threatened, intra-arterial thrombolysis can be carried out as an alternative to surgery. An inhibitor of platelet aggregation such as acetylsalicylic acid and a statin should be prescribed to patients with peripheral artery disease. Only in case of venous bypass surgery should a coumarin derivative and a statin be prescribed for 2 years, while the bypass is controlled periodically for 6 months by duplex examination. PMID:16104112

Vahl, A C; Reekers, J A

2005-07-23

106

Clinical practice guidelines by the infectious diseases society of america for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in adults and children.  

PubMed

Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for adult and pediatric patients with MRSA infections. The guidelines discuss the management of a variety of clinical syndromes associated with MRSA disease, including skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia, bone and joint infections, and central nervous system (CNS) infections. Recommendations are provided regarding vancomycin dosing and monitoring, management of infections due to MRSA strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, and vancomycin treatment failures. PMID:21208910

Liu, Catherine; Bayer, Arnold; Cosgrove, Sara E; Daum, Robert S; Fridkin, Scott K; Gorwitz, Rachel J; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Karchmer, Adolf W; Levine, Donald P; Murray, Barbara E; J Rybak, Michael; Talan, David A; Chambers, Henry F

2011-01-04

107

Clinical practice guidelines by the infectious diseases society of america for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in adults and children: executive summary.  

PubMed

Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for adult and pediatric patients with MRSA infections. The guidelines discuss the management of a variety of clinical syndromes associated with MRSA disease, including skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia, bone and joint infections, and central nervous system (CNS) infections. Recommendations are provided regarding vancomycin dosing and monitoring, management of infections due to MRSA strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, and vancomycin treatment failures. PMID:21217178

Liu, Catherine; Bayer, Arnold; Cosgrove, Sara E; Daum, Robert S; Fridkin, Scott K; Gorwitz, Rachel J; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Karchmer, Adolf W; Levine, Donald P; Murray, Barbara E; J Rybak, Michael; Talan, David A; Chambers, Henry F

2011-02-01

108

Nicotine replacement therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease: guidelines for health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The causal relationship between cigarette smoking and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well known and it is of great importance that smokers with CVD are encouraged to stop. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is an effective aid to smoking cessation. However, its use in patients with CVD is often avoided because of warnings on product labelling. This is not justié ed, as

Hayden McRobbie; Peter Hajek

2001-01-01

109

Management of multiple myeloma and related-disorders: guidelines from the Italian Society of Hematology (SIE), Italian Society of Experimental Hematology (SIES) and Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation (GITMO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Perceiving the need for rigorous recommendations to facilitate decisions concerning the management of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), the Italian Soci- ety of Hematology (SIE) and the two affiliate societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned a project to develop guidelines for the therapy of MM using evidence-based knowledge and consensus formation techniques. Methods. After a comprehensive systematic review of 1,450

GIOVANNI BAROSI; MARIO BOCCADORO; MICHELE CAVO; PAOLO CORRADINI; MONIA MARCHETTI; MASSIMO MASSAIA; GIAMPAOLO MERLINI; PATRIZIA TOSI; SANTE TURA

2004-01-01

110

Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-acquired Pneumonia: An evidence-based update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society  

PubMed Central

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

Mandell, Lionel A; Marrie, Thomas J; Grossman, Ronald F; Chow, Anthony W; Hyland, Robert H

2000-01-01

111

Impact of obesity on female reproductive health: British Fertility Society, Policy and Practice Guidelines.  

PubMed

Obesity has a significant adverse impact on reproductive outcome. It influences not only the chance of conception but also the response to fertility treatment, and increases the risk of miscarriage, congenital anomalies and pregnancy complications in addition to potential adverse effects on long term health of both mother and infant. Women should aim for a normal BMI before starting any form of fertility treatment. Treatment should be deferred until the BMI is less than 35 kg/m2, although in those with more time (e.g., less than 37 years; normal serum FSH concentration) a weight reduction to a BMI of less than 30 kg/m2 is preferable. Clinicians should consider deferring treatment to women outside these guidelines. Women should be provided with assistance to lose weight, including psychological support, dietary advice, exercise classes and where appropriate, weight reducing agents or bariatric surgery. Even a moderate weight loss of 5-10% of body weight can be sufficient to restore fertility and improve metabolic markers. PMID:18049955

Balen, Adam H; Anderson, Richard A

2007-12-01

112

Fabry disease practice guidelines: recommendations of the national society of genetic counselors.  

PubMed

Identification and comprehensive care of individuals who have Fabry disease (FD) requires a multidisciplinary approach inclusive of genetic testing, test interpretation, genetic counseling, long term disease symptom monitoring, treatment recommendations, and coordination of therapy. The purpose of this document is to provide health care professionals with guidelines for testing, care coordination, identification of psychosocial issues, and to facilitate a better understanding of disease treatment expert recommendations for patients with Fabry disease. These recommendations are the opinions of a multicenter working group of genetic counselors, medical geneticists, and other health professionals with expertise in Fabry disease counseling, as well as representatives/founders of the two United States based Fabry disease patient advocacy groups who are themselves affected by Fabry disease. The recommendations are U.S. Preventive Task Force Class III, and they are based on clinical experience, a review of pertinent English-language articles, and reports of expert committees. This document reviews the genetics of Fabry disease, the indications for genetic testing, interpretation of results, psychosocial considerations, and references to professional and patient resources. PMID:23860966

Laney, Dawn A; Bennett, Robin L; Clarke, Virginia; Fox, Angela; Hopkin, Robert J; Johnson, Jack; O'Rourke, Erin; Sims, Katherine; Walter, Gerald

2013-07-17

113

Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Plaque in Apparently Healthy Japanese Individuals with an Estimated 10-Year Absolute Risk of CAD Death According to the Japan Atherosclerosis Society (JAS) Guidelines 2012: The Shiga Epidemiological Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis (SESSA).  

PubMed

Aim: To examine whether subclinical atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries is concordant with the categories in the 2012 atherosclerosis prevention guidelines proposed by the Japan Atherosclerosis Society (JAS guidelines 2012), which adopted the estimated 10-year absolute risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) death in the NIPPON DATA80 Risk Assessment Chart. Methods: Between 2006 and 2008, 868 Japanese men 40 to 74 years of age without a history of cardiovascular disease were randomly selected from Kusatsu City, Japan. The intima media thickness (IMT) and plaque number from the common to internal carotid arteries were investigated using ultrasonography. The absolute risk of CAD death was estimated based on the individual risk factor data, and the mean IMT and plaque number in Categories ?, ? and ? of the guidelines were examined. Results: The estimated 10-year absolute risk of CAD was directly related to the IMT (mean IMT (mean±SD) (mm) for a 10-year absolute risk of ?2.0% and ?5.0%: 0.88±0.18 and 0.95±0.19, respectively) and the plaque number. These results are compatible with the categories described by the guidelines (mean IMT (mean±SD) (mm) for Categories ?, ?, and ?: 0.70±0.11, 0.81±0.16 and 0.88±0.18, respectively; mean plaque number: 0.9, 2.1 and 3, respectively). These findings were similar for Category ? participants with or without DM and CKD. Conclusions: Subclinical atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries is concordant with the 10-year absolute risk of CAD and the categories in the JAS guidelines 2012. PMID:23831585

Kadota, Aya; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kadowaki, Takashi; Takashima, Naoyuki; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

2013-07-05

114

American Cancer Society Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention: Reducing the Risk of Cancer With Healthy Food Choices and Physical Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American Cancer Society (ACS) has set aggressive challenge goals for the nation to decrease cancer incidence and mortality—and to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors—by the year 2015. To address these critical goals, the ACS publishes the Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines to serve as a foundation for its communication, policy, and community strategies and ultimately, to

Lawrence H. Kushi; Tim Byers; Colleen Doyle; Elisa V. Bandera; Marji McCullough; Ted Gansler; Kimberly S. Andrews; Michael J. Thun

115

European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction: How to use existing assays clinically and for clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction suggest that the cutoff value for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) be the 99th percentile of the reference population at a level measured with imprecision (coefficient of variation) ?10%. No current commercially available troponin assay meets this requirement. Accordingly, questions have been

Fred S. Apple; Alan H. B. Wu; Allan S. Jaffe

2002-01-01

116

Swedish guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults--Swedish Society of Infectious Diseases 2012.  

PubMed

This document presents the 2012 evidence based guidelines of the Swedish Society of Infectious Diseases for the in- hospital management of adult immunocompetent patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The prognostic score 'CRB-65' is recommended for the initial assessment of all CAP patients, and should be regarded as an aid for decision-making concerning the level of care required, microbiological investigation, and antibiotic treatment. Due to the favourable antibiotic resistance situation in Sweden, an initial narrow-spectrum antibiotic treatment primarily directed at Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in most situations. The recommended treatment for patients with severe CAP (CRB-65 score 2) is penicillin G in most situations. In critically ill patients (CRB-65 score 3-4), combination therapy with cefotaxime/macrolide or penicillin G/fluoroquinolone is recommended. A thorough microbiological investigation should be undertaken in all patients, including blood cultures, respiratory tract sampling, and urine antigens, with the addition of extensive sampling for more uncommon respiratory pathogens in the case of severe disease. Recommended measures for the prevention of CAP include vaccination for influenza and pneumococci, as well as smoking cessation. PMID:22830356

Spindler, Carl; Strålin, Kristoffer; Eriksson, Lars; Hjerdt-Goscinski, Gunilla; Holmberg, Hans; Lidman, Christer; Nilsson, Anna; Ortqvist, Ake; Hedlund, Jonas

2012-07-25

117

ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally,percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research. PMID:22296741

Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

2012-01-30

118

ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally, percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research. PMID:22424518

Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

2012-04-01

119

Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan's syndrome  

PubMed Central

With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part II of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and bicuspid aortic valve disease, coarctation of the aorta, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

Silversides, Candice K; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

2010-01-01

120

Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. Scientific Advisory Board, Osteoporosis Society of Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To recommend clinical practice guidelines for the assessment of people at risk for osteoporosis, and for effective diagnosis and management of the condition. OPTIONS: Screening and diagnostic methods: risk-factor assessment, clinical evaluation, measurement of bone mineral density, laboratory investigations. Prophylactic and corrective therapies: calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation, physical activity and fall-avoidance techniques, ovarian hormone therapy, bisphosphonate drugs, other drug therapies. Pain-management medications and techniques. OUTCOMES: Prevention of loss of bone mineral density and fracture; increased bone mass; and improved quality of life. EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and clinical studies and reports were examined, with emphasis on recent randomized controlled trials. Clinical practice in Canada and elsewhere was surveyed. Availability of treatment products and diagnostic equipment in Canada was considered. VALUES: Cost-effective methods and products that can be adopted across Canada were considered. A high value was given to accurate assessment of fracture risk and osteoporosis, and to increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and fracture risk and minimizing side effects of diagnosis and treatment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Proper diagnosis and management of osteoporosis minimize injury and disability, improve quality of life for patients and reduce costs to society. Rationally targeted methods of screening and diagnosis are safe and cost effective. Harmful side effects and costs of recommended therapies are minimal compared with the harms and costs of untreated osteoporosis. Alternative therapies provide a range of choices for physicians and patients. RECOMMENDATIONS: Population sets at high risk should be identified and then the diagnosis confirmed through bone densitometry. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the preferred measurement technique. Radiography can be adjunct when indicated. Calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation should be at currently recommended levels. Patients should be counselled in fall-avoidance techniques and exercises. Immobilization should be avoided. Guidelines for management of acute pain are listed. Ovarian hormone therapy is the therapy of choice for osteoporosis prevention and treatment in postmenopausal women. Bisphosphonates are an alternative therapy for women with established osteoporosis who cannot or prefer not to take ovarian hormone therapy.

1996-01-01

121

Guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections among HIV-infected persons--2002. Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were updated in 1997 and 1999. This fourth edition of the guidelines, made available on the Internet in 2001, is intended for clinicians and other health-care providers who care for HIV-infected persons. The goal of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based guidelines for preventing OIs among HIV-infected adults and adolescents, including pregnant women, and HIV-exposed or infected children. Nineteen OIs, or groups of OIs, are addressed, and recommendations are included for preventing exposure to opportunistic pathogens, preventing first episodes of disease by chemoprophylaxis or vaccination (primary prophylaxis), and preventing disease recurrence (secondary prophylaxis). Major changes since the last edition of the guidelines include 1) updated recommendations for discontinuing primary and secondary OI prophylaxis among persons whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts have increased in response to antiretroviral therapy; 2) emphasis on screening all HIV-infected persons for infection with hepatitis C virus; 3) new information regarding transmission of human herpesvirus 8 infection; 4) new information regarding drug interactions, chiefly related to rifamycins and antiretroviral drugs; and 5) revised recommendations for immunizing HIV-infected adults and adolescents and HIV-exposed or infected children. PMID:12081007

Kaplan, Jonathan E; Masur, Henry; Holmes, King K

2002-06-14

122

Guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections among HIV-infected persons--2002. Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were updated in 1997 and 1999. This fourth edition of the guidelines, made available on the Internet in 2001, is intended for clinicians and other health-care providers who care for HIV-infected persons. The goal of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based guidelines for preventing OIs among HIV-infected adults and adolescents, including pregnant women, and HIV-exposed or infected children. Nineteen OIs, or groups of OIs, are addressed, and recommendations are included for preventing exposure to opportunistic pathogens, preventing first episodes of disease by chemoprophylaxis or vaccination (primary prophylaxis), and preventing disease recurrence (secondary prophylaxis). Major changes since the last edition of the guidelines include 1) updated recommendations for discontinuing primary and secondary OI prophylaxis among persons whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts have increased in response to antiretroviral therapy; 2) emphasis on screening all HIV-infected persons for infection with hepatitis C virus; 3) new information regarding transmission of human herpesvirus 8 infection; 4) new information regarding drug interactions, chiefly related to rifamycins and antiretroviral drugs; and 5) revised recommendations for immunizing HIV-infected adults and adolescents and HIV-exposed or infected children. PMID:12617574

Masur, Henry; Kaplan, Jonathan E; Holmes, King K

2002-09-01

123

Guidelines for a national policy model for early childhood education and care in Korea: Meeting the needs of knowledge-based societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The guidelines presented here are based on an investigation of strategies to promote life long learning and participation\\u000a in those knowledge-based societies which seek to integrate humane and democratic principles with knowledge-based economies.\\u000a Like many developing and developed countries, South Korea is seeking ways to insure a citizenry made up of individual human\\u000a resources who will contribute to and partake

Ok Seung Yang

2002-01-01

124

[Omega-3 fatty acids, fish, fish oil and cardiovascular disease--a review with implications to Israeli nutritional guidelines].  

PubMed

Evidence from epidemiological and randomized controlled trials shows beneficial effects of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids from fish and plant sources on cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially in patients with preexisting CVD. The optimal dose of n-3 is not yet determined, but prospective secondary prevention studies suggest that the addition of 0.5-1.8 grams/day of marine-derived eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, or plant derived alpha-linolenic acid at a dose of 1.5-3 grams/day significantly reduce subsequent cardiac events and mortality. These data have led the American Heart Association Dietary Guidelines committee to recommend to the general population the consumption of at least two servings of fatty fish per week, in addition to vegetable oils high in alpha-linolenic acid. The risk of adverse effects and toxicity from contaminants at this dose is low. The amount of daily n-3 fatty acids recommended for patients with coronary heart disease is 1 gram/day. In patients who cannot consume this dose of n-3 fatty acids through diet alone, addition of n-3 supplements should be considered. Higher doses of contaminant-free n-3 supplements, 2-4 grams/day, can be used in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. Data on the content of n-3 fatty acids and contaminants in Israeli bred fish is limited. Thus, caution should be exercised when applying these recommendations to the Israeli fish market. PMID:15523812

Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Lipovetzky, Nestor; Goldbourt, Uri; Henkin, Yaakov

2004-08-01

125

Guidelines for office gynecology in Japan: Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Japan Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2011 edition.  

PubMed

Gynecology in the office setting is developing worldwide. Clinical guidelines for office gynecology were first published by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Japan Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in 2011. These guidelines include a total of 72 clinical questions covering four areas (Infectious disease, Malignancies and benign tumors, Endocrinology and infertility, and Healthcare for women). These clinical questions were followed by several answers, backgrounds, explanations and references covering common problems and questions encountered in office gynecology. Each answer with a recommendation level of A, B or C has been prepared based principally on evidence or consensus among Japanese gynecologists.These guidelines would promote a better understanding of the current standard care practices for gynecologic outpatients in Japan. PMID:22414139

Takeda, Takashi; Wong, Tze Fang; Adachi, Tomoko; Ito, Kiyoshi; Uehara, Shigeki; Kanaoka, Yasushi; Kamada, Masaharu; Kitagawa, Hiroaki; Koseki, Satoshi; Gomibuchi, Hideto; Saito, Juichiro; Shirasu, Kazuhiro; Sueoka, Kou; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Mitsuaki; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Takeda, Satoru; Tasaka, Keiichi; Noguchi, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Shunsaku; Fujii, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Michihisa; Maeda, Tsugio; Matsumoto, Koji; Momoeda, Mikio; Morita, Mineto; Yoshimura, Kazuaki; Hirai, Yasuo; Kubota, Toshiro; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Kawabata, Masakiyo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

2012-03-13

126

American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) practice guideline for the performance of total body irradiation (TBI).  

PubMed

Total body irradiation (TBI) is a specialized radiotherapy technique. It is frequently used as a component of treatment plans involving hematopoietic stem cell transplant for a variety of disorders, most commonly hematologic malignancies. A variety of treatment delivery techniques, doses, and fractionation schemes can be utilized. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for delivery of TBI. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist. Review of the typical indications for TBI is presented, and the importance of integrating TBI into the multimodality treatment plan is discussed. Procedures and special considerations related to the simulation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and quality assurance for patients treated with TBI are reviewed. This practice guideline can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful TBI program. PMID:23334484

Wolden, Suzanne L; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Galvin, James M; Giap, Huan B; Schomberg, Paula J; Rosenthal, Seth A

2013-02-01

127

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-03-01

128

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

2011-02-01

129

American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).  

PubMed

American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program. PMID:23681017

Seung, Steven K; Larson, David A; Galvin, James M; Mehta, Minesh P; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J; Yajnik, Santosh V; Hartford, Alan C; Rosenthal, Seth A

2013-06-01

130

A guide to guidelines for professional societies and other developers of recommendations: introduction to integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.  

PubMed

Organizations around the world are recognizing that guidelines should be based on the best available evidence, that the development of recommendations needs to be transparent, and that appropriate processes should be followed. In June 2007, we convened an American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS)-sponsored workshop with over 60 representatives from 36 international organizations to provide advice to guideline developers about the required steps and processes for guideline development using the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an example. Following the workshop, participants completed a series of 14 review articles that underwent peer review and incorporated key new literature until June 2011 for most articles in this series. The review articles evaluate the guideline cycle including: priority setting, question formulation, managing conflict of interest, defining appropriate outcomes, stakeholder involvement, grading the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations, integration of values and preferences, considering resource use, reporting of guidelines, implementation, and adaptation. In this Introduction we frame the background and methods of these reviews and provide the key conclusions of the workshop. A summary of the workshop's conclusions and recommendations was published in The Lancet. Given the enormous resources that are spent on research and the importance of providing the best guidance to healthcare decision makers, attributing appropriate funds to research syntheses and transparent, independent guidance for the development of evidence-based guidelines is justified. Furthermore, given the immense amount of work that is required, individuals and organizations need to collaborate to achieve the best possible and cost-effective coordination of these efforts. PMID:23256161

Schünemann, Holger J; Woodhead, Mark; Anzueto, Antonio; Buist, A Sonia; Macnee, William; Rabe, Klaus F; Heffner, John

2012-12-01

131

[Annual Congress of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE - 2010) September 2nd-6th, 2010 Valencia, Spain].  

PubMed

The article reviews the materials presented at the Annual Congress of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe held on September 2"-6'", 2010 in Valencia, Spain. The participants discussed the basic results of research studies on such currently important trends of interventional radiology as carotid stenting, transcatheter embolization, endovascular prosthetic repair of the aorta and its branches, angioplasty of the crural arteries in diabetic foot syndrome, prevention of pulmonary artery thromboembolism, peripheral interventions on lower-limb arteries, interventions on biliary ducts in mechanical jaundice, transjugular intrahepatic stenting, embolization of uterine arteries in uterine myoma, venous interventions, etc. PMID:21780622

Shipovski?, V N

2010-01-01

132

Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.  

PubMed

The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP). PMID:23749327

García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

2013-06-01

133

[Management of hypertension (ESC Guideline 2007/DHL Guideline 2008)].  

PubMed

The 2007 ESH/ESC (European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension focus on the individual patient with his specific cardiovascular risk profile. The existing hypertension classification remains the same as in previous editions. However, specific patient characteristics and risk profiles require a more individualized approach. Recommended diagnostic procedures have been extended in order to detect existing subclinical organ damage and/or established cardiovascular or renal diseases at an early stage. Urgency and mode of therapeutic approach can directly be derived from the relevant risk stratification matrix which continues to be an integral component of the current guidelines. The primary goal of treatment of the hypertensive patient is to achieve a maximum reduction in the long-term total risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Since blood pressure lowering per se is thought to be of major importance to achieve these goals, a number of well-established pharmaceutical substances remain at hand of the practitioner. In addition, lifestyle changes are increasingly regarded to be of high importance. In patients with established comorbidities and in young subjects the choice of a specific pharmaceutical substance class is fundamental. The gap between guideline recommendations and poor blood pressure control in medical practice remains and needs to be closed. Therefore, a collective striving of all parties involved for early detection and effective treatment is needed to overcome the current and future burden of arterial hypertension. PMID:19214405

Krauss, Timothy; Schunkert, Heribert

2009-02-01

134

Persistent pain in the older adult: what should we do now in light of the 2009 American geriatrics society clinical practice guideline?  

PubMed

The recent publication of revised guidelines for the management of persistent pain in the older adult (American Geriatric Society, 2009) has posed a dilemma for clinicians. In essence, these revised guidelines now downplay the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) relative to prior year's recommendations. The strong recommendation for caution when employing NSAIDs is because of the numerous, well-documented, potential adverse effects including renal failure, stroke, hypertension, heart failure exacerbations, and gastrointestinal complications. Nevertheless, physicians still have a substantial arsenal for combating chronic pain due to such conditions as degenerative arthritis and back problems. Options for intervention include physical therapy, topical nonsteroidals, capsaicin, topical lidocaine, intra-articular therapies, and judicious use of narcotics. In the future, cyclooxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide-donating drugs may represent a technical improvement in the toxicity profile of traditional NSAIDs. PMID:20010465

Katz, James D; Shah, Tina

2009-12-01

135

Preventing opportunistic infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Infectious Diseases Society of America, and American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Practice Guidelines and beyond.  

PubMed

This review presents evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of infection after blood and marrow transplantation. Recommendations apply to all myeloablative transplants regardless of recipient (adult or child), type (allogeneic or autologous) or source (peripheral blood, marrow or cord blood) of transplant. In Section I, Dr. Dykewicz describes the methods used to rate the strength and quality of published evidence supporting these recommendations and details the two dozen scholarly societies and federal agencies involved in the genesis and review of the guidelines. In Section II, Dr. Longworth presents recommendations for hospital infection control. Hand hygiene, room ventilation, health care worker and visitor policies are detailed along with guidelines for control of specific nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. In Section III, Dr. Boeckh details effective practices to prevent viral diseases. Leukocyte-depleted blood is recommended for cytomegalovirus (CMV) seronegative allografts, while ganciclovir given as prophylaxis or preemptive therapy based on pp65 antigenemia or DNA assays is advised for individuals at risk for CMV. Guidelines for preventing varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and community respiratory virus infections are also presented. In Section IV, Drs. Baden and Rubin review means to prevent invasive fungal infections. Hospital design and policy can reduce exposure to air contaminated with fungal spores and fluconazole prophylaxis at 400 mg/day reduces invasive yeast infection. In Section V, Dr. Sepkowitz details effective clinical practices to reduce or prevent bacterial or protozoal disease after transplantation. In Section VI, Dr. Sullivan reviews vaccine-preventable infections and guidelines for active and passive immunizations for stem cell transplant recipients, family members and health care workers. PMID:11722995

Sullivan, K M; Dykewicz, C A; Longworth, D L; Boeckh, M; Baden, L R; Rubin, R H; Sepkowitz, K A

2001-01-01

136

Canadian guidelines for training in adult perioperative transesophageal echocardiography  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To establish Canadian guidelines for training in adult perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). METHODS Guidelines were established by the Canadian Perioperative Echocardiography Group with the support of the cardiovascular section of the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society in conjunction with the Canadian Society of Echocardiography. Guidelines for training in echocardiography by the American Society of Echocardiography, the American College of Cardiology and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists were reviewed, modified and expanded to produce the 2003 Quebec expert consensus for training in perioperative echocardiography. The Quebec expert consensus and the 2005 guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada formed the basis of the Canadian training guidelines in adult perioperative TEE. RESULTS Basic, advanced and director levels of expertise were identified. The total number of echocardiographic examinations to achieve each level of expertise remains unchanged from the 2002 American Society of Echocardiography and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines. The increased proportion of examinations personally performed at basic and advanced levels, as well as the level of autonomy at the basic level suggested by the Quebec expert consensus are retained. These examinations may be performed in a perioperative setting and are not limited to intraoperative TEE. Training ‘on-the-job’, the role of the perioperative TEE examination, the requirements for maintenance of competence and the duration of training are also discussed for each level of training. The components of a TEE report and comprehensive TEE examination are also outlined. CONCLUSION The Canadian guidelines for training in adult perioperative TEE reflect the unique Canadian practice profile in perioperative TEE and address the training requirements to obtain expertise in this field.

Beique, Francois; Ali, Mohamed; Hynes, Mark; MacKenzie, Scott; Denault, Andre; Martineau, Andre; MacAdams, Charles; Sawchuk, Corey; Hirsch, Kristine; Lampa, Martin; Murphy, Patricia; Honos, Georges; Munt, Bradley; Sanfilippo, Anthony; Duke, Peter

2006-01-01

137

Social-Strata-Related Cardiovascular Health Disparity and Comorbidity in an Aging Society: Implications for Professional Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise in the aging population of the United States. Heart disease is the leading cause of death, hospital bed use, and social security disability. Enhancing knowledge about CVD may improve social work's professional role in the health care system. This article focuses on a pressing CVD-related issue that…

Ai, Amy L.; Carrigan, Lynn T.

2007-01-01

138

Occupational Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology: A Joint Guideline of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe and the Society of Interventional Radiology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures are performed in large numbers in Europe and in the United States. The number of procedures performed annually throughout the world has increased over the past 20 years. The benefits of interventional radi...

D. L. Miller E. Vano G. Bartal R. Dixon S. Balter

2010-01-01

139

Recommendations for the use of genetic testing in the clinical evaluation of inherited cardiac arrhythmias associated with sudden cardiac death: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position paper.  

PubMed

The era of gene discovery and molecular medicine has had a significant impact on clinical practice. Knowledge of specific genetic findings causative for or associated with human disease may enhance diagnostic accuracy and influence treatment decisions. In cardiovascular disease, gene discovery for inherited arrhythmia syndromes has advanced most rapidly. The arrhythmia specialist is often confronted with the challenge of diagnosing and managing genetic arrhythmia syndromes. There is now a clear need for guidelines on the appropriate use of genetic testing for the most common genetic conditions associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death. This document represents the first ever published recommendations outlining the role of genetic testing in various clinical scenarios, the specific genes to be considered for testing, and the utility of test results in the management of patients and their families. PMID:21459272

Gollob, Michael H; Blier, Louis; Brugada, Ramon; Champagne, Jean; Chauhan, Vijay; Connors, Sean; Gardner, Martin; Green, Martin S; Gow, Robert; Hamilton, Robert; Harris, Louise; Healey, Jeff S; Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Honeywell, Christina; Kantoch, Michael; Kirsh, Joel; Krahn, Andrew; Mullen, Michelle; Parkash, Ratika; Redfearn, Damian; Rutberg, Julie; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Woo, Anna

140

Impact of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations on HER2 interpretation in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Accurate assessment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 is critical for the management of patients with breast cancer. We set out to study the impact of the 2007 American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines on the interpretation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 IHC results and its correlation with fluorescence in situ hybridization results. Invasive breast carcinomas with IHC HercepTest 3+ were retrieved from the archive of Mayo Clinic Rochester. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 slides were rereviewed, and results were recorded as percentage of invasive tumor cells with 3+, 2+, 1+, and 0 staining intensity. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on all tumors with 3+ staining in 70% or less of tumor cells. Of the 141 cases studied, 12 cases showed intense membrane staining in 11% to 30% of the invasive tumor cells and would have been scored as 2+ according to the new American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines. Of these 12 cases, 6 were positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (ratio >2.2), 4 cases were negative (HER2/CEP17 ratio of < 1.8), and 2 cases were equivocal (ratio of 1.8-2.2). One human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive case showed dramatic intratumoral heterogeneity with high-level amplification (ratio of 12.2) in the IHC 3+ area and no amplification (ratio of 1.0) in the IHC 1+/2+ areas. The 2007 American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines down-scored 2.8% of tumors from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (IHC 3+) to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (IHC 2+ equivocal and fluorescence in situ hybridization negative) in this study. Clinical studies are needed to determine whether the updated guidelines are better at predicting response to anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 therapy. PMID:19762065

Shah, Sejal S; Ketterling, Rhett P; Goetz, Matthew P; Ingle, James N; Reynolds, Carol A; Perez, Edith A; Chen, Beiyun

2009-09-16

141

Executive summary: diagnosis and management of prosthetic joint infection: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

These guidelines are intended for use by infectious disease specialists, orthopedists, and other healthcare professionals who care for patients with prosthetic joint infection (PJI). They include evidence-based and opinion-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with PJI treated with debridement and retention of the prosthesis, resection arthroplasty with or without subsequent staged reimplantation, 1-stage reimplantation, and amputation. PMID:23230301

Osmon, Douglas R; Berbari, Elie F; Berendt, Anthony R; Lew, Daniel; Zimmerli, Werner; Steckelberg, James M; Rao, Nalini; Hanssen, Arlen; Wilson, Walter R

2013-01-01

142

Diagnosis and management of prosthetic joint infection: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

These guidelines are intended for use by infectious disease specialists, orthopedists, and other healthcare professionals who care for patients with prosthetic joint infection (PJI). They include evidence-based and opinion-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with PJI treated with debridement and retention of the prosthesis, resection arthroplasty with or without subsequent staged reimplantation, 1-stage reimplantation, and amputation. PMID:23223583

Osmon, Douglas R; Berbari, Elie F; Berendt, Anthony R; Lew, Daniel; Zimmerli, Werner; Steckelberg, James M; Rao, Nalini; Hanssen, Arlen; Wilson, Walter R

2012-12-06

143

USPHS/IDSA Guidelines for the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, 1999. U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 48, No. RR-10, August 20, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) . These guidelines, writte...

J. E. Kaplan H. Masur K. K. Holmes

1999-01-01

144

Patient and physician related factors of adherence to evidence based guidelines in diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular disease and prevention: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Patients do not always receive guideline-adherent therapy, yet little is known about the underlying causes on the patients’ side. We quantified non-guideline-adherent treatment of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation) in primary care and analysed the causes from the physician’s as well as the patient’s view. Methods With the intention to analyze the frequency and causes of non-guideline-adherent treatment of patients with chronic diseases, we drew a random sample of 124 general practitioners (GP) in Salzburg, Austria, of which 58 (46.8%) participated. In the participating GP surgeries, we consecutively recruited 501 patients with at least one of the target-diseases and checked the guideline conformity of treatment using 9 quality indicators. We then interviewed the patients as well as the general practitioners regarding factors affecting deviation from guideline recommendations. Results Of the 501 patients, a total of 1224 quality indicators could be analysed. Non-adherence to guideline recommendations were present in 16.8% (n?=?205, 95% CI 14.7 to 18.8%) of all quality indicators. In 61.5% of these cases (n?=?126, 95% CI 53.0 to 70.0%) the treatment was wrongly judged as not recommended by the physicians. In 10.2% (n?=?21, 95% CI 0 to 23.2%) physicians attributed non-adherence to patient’s non-compliance, and in 10.7% (n?=?22, 95% CI 0 to 23.7%) to an adverse drug event, whereas only 5.4% (n?=?11, 95% CI 0 to 18.7%) of non-adherence was related to an adverse drug event reported by the patients. Patients were unaware regarding the reason for non-adherent therapy in 64.4% (n?=?132, 95% CI 56.2 to 72.6%) of the quality indicators. In 20.0% (n?=?41, 95% CI 7.8 to 32.2%) patients regarded a drug as not needed. Conclusions Guideline adherence in chronic care was relatively good in our study sample, but still leaving room for improvement. Physicians’ lack of knowledge and patients’ lack of awareness account for about 70% of non-adherence, indicating the necessity to improve physician education, and patient involvement. In about 30% of the quality indicators not fulfilled, non-adherence is due to other reasons like adverse drug events or patients not willing to take a recommended drug.

2013-01-01

145

Implementing ethics in the professions: preparing guidelines on scientific communication for the Society for Neuroscience. Commentary on 'Implementing ethics in the professions: examples from environmental epidemiology' (Soskolne and Sieswerda).  

PubMed

In 1994, the governing council of the Society for Neuroscience was asked to make a brief statement on an issue regarding responsible conduct in publishing. The present article reviews how that initial request grew over the next four years into a lengthy document. Drawing on that experience, which was presided over by the author, comments are made about the potential impact of such guidelines, the lessons learned, and the proper role of professional societies in promoting responsible conduct in research. PMID:12774651

Zigmond, Michael J

2003-04-01

146

American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT).  

PubMed

Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a complex technique for the delivery of radiation therapy preferentially to target structures while minimizing doses to adjacent normal critical structures. It is widely utilized in the treatment of a variety of clinical indications in radiation oncology, including tumors of the central nervous system, head and neck, breast, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and gynecologic organs, as well as in situations where previous radiation therapy has been delivered, and has allowed for significant therapeutic advances in many clinical areas. IMRT treatment planning and delivery is a complex process. Safe and reliable delivery of IMRT requires appropriate process design and adherence to quality assurance (QA) standards. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for IMRT. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist. Factors with respect to the QA of the treatment planning system, treatment-planning process, and treatment-delivery process are discussed, as are issues related to the utilization of volumetric modulated arc therapy. Patient-specific QA procedures are presented. Successful IMRT programs involve integration of many processes: patient selection, patient positioning/immobilization, target definition, treatment plan development, and accurate treatment delivery. Appropriate QA procedures, including patient-specific QA procedures, are essential to ensure quality in an IMRT program and to assure patient safety. PMID:23165357

Hartford, Alan C; Galvin, James M; Beyer, David C; Eichler, Thomas J; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kavanagh, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J; Rosenthal, Seth A

2012-12-01

147

Genetic counseling and testing for FMR1 gene mutations: practice guidelines of the national society of genetic counselors.  

PubMed

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of several clinical disorders associated with mutations in the X-linked Fragile X Mental Retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. With evolving knowledge about the phenotypic consequences of FMR1 transcription and translation, sharp clinical distinctions between pre- and full mutations have become more fluid. The complexity of the issues surrounding genetic testing and management of FMR1-associated disorders has increased; and several aspects of genetic counseling for FMR1 mutations remain challenging, including risk assessment for intermediate alleles and the widely variable clinical prognosis for females with full mutations. FMR1 mutation testing is increasingly being offered to women without known risk factors, and newborn screening for FXS is underway in research-based pilot studies. Each diagnosis of an FMR1 mutation has far-reaching clinical and reproductive implications for the extended family. The interest in large-scale population screening is likely to increase due to patient demand and awareness, and as targeted pharmaceutical treatments for FXS become available over the next decade. Given these developments and the likelihood of more widespread screening, genetic counselors across a variety of healthcare settings will increasingly be called upon to address complex diagnostic, psychosocial, and management issues related to FMR1 gene mutations. The following guidelines are intended to assist genetic counselors in providing accurate risk assessment and appropriate educational and supportive counseling for individuals with positive test results and families affected by FMR1-associated disorders. PMID:22797890

Finucane, Brenda; Abrams, Liane; Cronister, Amy; Archibald, Alison D; Bennett, Robin L; McConkie-Rosell, Allyn

2012-07-14

148

Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma in adults: guidelines of the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation on initial work-up, management, and follow-up  

PubMed Central

The Italian Society of Hematology (SIE), the Italian Society of Experimental Haematology (SIES) and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation (GITMO) commissioned a project to develop practice guidelines for the initial work-up, therapy and follow-up of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Key questions to the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease were formulated by an Advisory Committee, discussed and approved by an Expert Panel (EP) composed of senior hematologists and one radiotherapist. After a comprehensive and systematic literature review, the EP recommendations were graded according to their supporting evidence. An explicit approach to consensus methodologies was used for evidence interpretation and for producing recommendations in the absence of a strong evidence. The EP decided that the target domain of the guidelines should include only classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as defined by the WHO classification, and exclude lymphocyte predominant histology. Distinct recommendations were produced for initial work-up, first-line therapy of early and advanced stage disease, monitoring procedures and salvage therapy, including hemopoietic stem cell transplant. Separate recommendations were formulated for elderly patients. Pre-treatment volumetric CT scan of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis is mandatory, while FDG-PET is recommended. As to the therapy of early stage disease, a combined modality approach is still recommended with ABVD followed by involved-field radiotherapy; the number of courses of ABVD will depend on the patient risk category (favorable or unfavorable). Full-term chemotherapy with ABVD is recommended in advanced stage disease; adjuvant radiotherapy in patients without initial bulk who achieved a complete remission is not recommended. In the elderly, chemotherapy regimens more intensive than ABVD are not recommended. Early evaluation of response with FDG-PET scan is suggested. Relapsed or refractory patients should receive high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hemopoietic stem cells transplant. Allogeneic transplant is recommended in patients relapsing after autologous transplant. All fertile patients should be informed of the possible effects of therapy on gonadal function and fertility preservation measures should be taken before the initiation of therapy.

Brusamolino, Ercole; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Barosi, Giovanni; Biti, Giampaolo; Gobbi, Paolo G.; Levis, Alessandro; Marchetti, Monia; Santoro, Armando; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Tura, Sante

2009-01-01

149

Status of lipid-lowering therapy prescribedbased on recommendations in the 2002 report of the Japan Atherosclerosis Society Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperlipidemia in Japanese Adults: A study of the Japan Lipid Assessment Program (J-LAP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:In its 1997 Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperlipidemia in Japanese Adults and subsequent revisions, the Japan10 Atherosclerosis Society (JAS) recommends serum lipid management goals (SLMGs) based on a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk classification. A literature search revealed that the status of lipid-lowering therapy based on the current JAS recommendations in Japan has not been assessed.

Tamio Teramoto; Atsunori Kashiwagi; Hiroshi Mabuchi

2005-01-01

150

[Comparison between European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for initial management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)].  

PubMed

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) have recently updated guidelines for management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to compare the both recommendations. PMID:23916786

Puymirat, E; Ducrocq, G

2013-07-05

151

AHA Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: 2002 Update Consensus Panel Guide to Comprehensive Risk Reduction for Adult Patients Without Coronary or Other Atherosclerotic Vascular Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

he initial Guide to the Primary Prevention of Cardiovas- cular Diseases was published in 1997 as an aid to healthcare professionals and their patients without established coronary artery disease or other atherosclerotic diseases. 1 It was intended to complement the American Heart Association (AHA)\\/American College of Cardiology (ACC) Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular

Thomas A. Pearson; Steven N. Blair; Stephen R. Daniels; Robert H. Eckel; Joan M. Fair; Stephen P. Fortmann; Barry A. Franklin; Larry B. Goldstein; Philip Greenland; Scott M. Grundy; Yuling Hong; Nancy Houston Miller; Ronald M. Lauer; Ira S. Ockene; Ralph L. Sacco; James F. Sallis; Sidney C. Smith; Neil J. Stone; Kathryn A. Taubert

152

Growth Hormone Research Society Workshop Summary: Consensus Guidelines for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Therapy in Prader-Willi Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Context: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. Objective: The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. Evidence: We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ? 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Methodology: Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Conclusions: Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as long as demonstrated benefits outweigh the risks.

Tony, Michele; Hoybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B.; Tauber, Maithe; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Battista, Renaldo; Beauloye, Veronique; Berall, Glenn; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Chihara, Kazuo; Cohen, Pinchas; Craig, Maria; Farholt, Stense; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Greggi, Tiziana; Grugni, Graziano; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C.; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Johnson, Keegan; Kemper, Alex; Kopchick, John J.; Malozowski, Saul; Miller, Jennifer; Mogul, Harriette R.; Muscatelli, Francoise; Nergardh, Ricard; Nicholls, Robert D.; Radovick, Sally; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sipila, Ilkka; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Vogels, Annick; Waters, Michael J.

2013-01-01

153

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers  

PubMed Central

Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Parker, John D; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O'Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Rao, Vivek; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

2007-01-01

154

Update on aldosterone antagonists use in heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Heart Failure Society of America Guidelines Committee.  

PubMed

Aldosterone antagonists (or mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists [MRAs]) are guideline-recommended therapy for patients with moderate to severe heart failure (HF) symptoms and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and in postmyocardial infarction patients with HF. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) trial evaluated the MRA eplerenone in patients with mild HF symptoms. Eplerenone reduced the risk of the primary endpoint of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.74, P < .001) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.93, P < .008) after a median of 21 months. Based on EMPHASIS-HF, an MRA is recommended for patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-IV symptoms and reduced LVEF (<35%) on standard therapy (Strength of Evidence A). Patients with NYHA Class II symptoms should have another high-risk feature to be consistent with the EMPHASIS-HF population (age >55 years, QRS duration >130 msec [if LVEF between 31% and 35%], HF hospitalization within 6 months or elevated B-type natriuretic peptide level). Renal function and serum potassium should be closely monitored. Dose selection should consider renal function, baseline potassium, and concomitant drug interactions. The efficacy of eplerenone in patients with mild HF symptoms translates into a unique opportunity to reduce morbidity and mortality earlier in the course of the disease. PMID:22464767

Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Collins, Sean P; Givertz, Michael M; Teerlink, John R; Walsh, Mary N; Albert, Nancy M; Westlake Canary, Cheryl A; Carson, Peter E; Colvin-Adams, Monica; Fang, James C; Hernandez, Adrian F; Hershberger, Ray E; Katz, Stuart D; Rogers, Joseph G; Spertus, John A; Stevenson, William G; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Tang, W H Wilson; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Starling, Randall C

2012-04-01

155

[Risk and crisis management by anesthesiologists regarding 'Guidelines for Actions Against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage' published by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists and the Japan Society of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy].  

PubMed

According to a survey of anesthesia-related critical incidents by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists, hemorrhage was the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. To deal with critical hemorrhage swiftly, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also the linkage of operating rooms with transfusion management divisions and the blood center is important. It is desirable for the hospital transfusion committee to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these guidelines by simulated drills. When critical hemorrhage occurs, a person in charge is appointed, and an emergency is declared (call for manpower and notification of the emergency to the transfusion management divisions). A person in charge comprehensively assesses the hemostatic condition, hemodynamics, laboratory data, and blood product supply system, and consults the operator regarding the continuation of surgery or changing surgical procedures. When time is short, the cross-matching test is omitted, and the ABO-identical blood is used. When a supply of the identical ABO-type blood is not available, compatible blood type is used. The evolving concept of hemostatic resuscitation seems to be important to prevent coagulopathy, which easily develops during massive hemorrhage. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the risk of such an emergency transfusion and procedures to be taken to switch to transfusion of the ABO-identical blood. Establishment of a hospital emergency transfusion system depends on the overall capability of the critical and crisis management systems of the hospital. PMID:18807897

Irita, Kazuo; Yoshimura, Hayashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiro; Takamatsu, Chihiro; Tokuda, Kentaro

2008-09-01

156

Limitations of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel Guidelines on the Use of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We applied the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel (CP) guidelines for the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) to patients treated with this technique to determine the ability of the guidelines to differentiate patients with significantly different clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients treated with APBI and 199 with whole-breast irradiation (WBI) (matched for tumor size, nodal status, age, margins, receptor status, and tamoxifen use) were stratified into the three ASTRO CP levels of suitability ('suitable,' 'cautionary,' and 'unsuitable') to assess rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure, distant metastases, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival based on CP category. Median follow-up was 11.1 years. Results: Analysis of the APBI and WBI patient groups, either separately or together (n = 398), did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in 10-year actuarial rates of IBTR when stratified by the three ASTRO groups. Regional nodal failure and distant metastasis were generally progressively worse when comparing the suitable to cautionary to unsuitable CP groups. However, when analyzing multiple clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variables, only patient age was associated with IBTR using WBI (p = 0.002). Conclusions: The ASTRO CP suitable group predicted for a low risk of IBTR; however, the cautionary and unsuitable groups had an equally low risk of IBTR, supporting the need for continued refinement of patient selection criteria as additional outcome data become available and for the continued accrual of patients to Phase III trials.

Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Arthur, Douglas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Wazer, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Peter; Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle; Kestin, Larry; Ye, Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-03-15

157

Applicability of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines on management of acute coronary syndromes to people with haemophilia - an assessment by the ADVANCE Working Group.  

PubMed

There are no evidence-based guidelines for antithrombotic management in people with haemophilia (PWH) presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to review the current European Society of Cardiology guidelines, and to consider how best they should be adapted for PWH. Structured communication techniques based on a Delphi-like methodology were used to achieve expert consensus on key aspects of clinical management. The main final statements are as follows: (i) ACS and myocardial revascularization should be managed promptly by a multidisciplinary team that includes a haemophilia expert, (ii) each comprehensive care centre for adult PWH should have a formal clinical referral pathway with a cardiology centre with an emergency unit and 24 h availability of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), (iii) PCI should be performed as soon as possible under adequate clotting factor protection, (iv) bare metal stents are preferred to drug-eluting stents, (v) anticoagulants should only be used in PWH after replacement therapy, (vi) minimum trough levels should not fall below 5-15% in PWH on dual antiplatelet therapy, (vii) the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS and PCI should be limited to a minimum, (viii) the use of GPIIb-IIIa inhibitors is not recommended in PWH other than in exceptional circumstances, (ix) the use of fibrinolysis may be justified in PWH when primary PCI (within 90 min) is not available ideally under adequate clotting factor management. It is hoped that the results of this initiative will help to guide optimal management of ACS in PWH. PMID:23710576

Staritz, P; de Moerloose, P; Schutgens, R; Dolan, G

2013-05-28

158

2011 Focused Update of 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) focused update updates a single recommendation (or subset of recommendations) in advance of a regularly scheduled guideline update. This document updates one recommendation of the ASCO Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) regarding switch maintenance chemotherapy. Clinical Context Recent results from phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that in patients with stage IV NSCLC who have received four cycles of first-line chemotherapy and whose disease has not progressed, an immediate switch to alternative, single-agent chemotherapy can extend progression-free survival and, in some cases, overall survival. Because of limitations in the data, delayed treatment with a second-line agent after disease progression is also acceptable. Recent Data Seven randomized controlled trials of carboxyaminoimidazole, docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, gemcitabine, and pemetrexed have evaluated outcomes in patients who received an immediate, non–cross resistant alternative therapy (switch maintenance) after first-line therapy. Recommendation In patients with stage IV NSCLC, first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy should be stopped at disease progression or after four cycles in patients whose disease is stable but not responding to treatment. Two-drug cytotoxic combinations should be administered for no more than six cycles. For those with stable disease or response after four cycles, immediate treatment with an alternative, single-agent chemotherapy such as pemetrexed in patients with nonsquamous histology, docetaxel in unselected patients, or erlotinib in unselected patients may be considered. Limitations of this data are such that a break from cytotoxic chemotherapy after a fixed course is also acceptable, with initiation of second-line chemotherapy at disease progression.

Azzoli, Christopher G.; Temin, Sarah; Aliff, Timothy; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pao, William; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

2011-01-01

159

American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on the Use of Pharmacologic Interventions Including Tamoxifen, Raloxifene, and Aromatase Inhibition for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction  

PubMed Central

Purpose To update the 2002 American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on pharmacologic interventions for breast cancer (BC) risk reduction. Methods A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. Primary outcome of interest was BC incidence (invasive and noninvasive). Secondary outcomes included BC mortality, adverse events, and net health benefits. An expert panel reviewed the literature and developed updated consensus guidelines. Results Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria. In premenopausal women, tamoxifen for 5 years reduces the risk of BC for at least 10 years, particularly estrogen receptor (ER) –positive invasive tumors. Women ? 50 years of age experience fewer serious side effects. Vascular and vasomotor events do not persist post-treatment across all ages. In postmenopausal women, raloxifene and tamoxifen reduce the risk of ER-positive invasive BC with equal efficacy. Raloxifene is associated with a lower risk of thromboembolic disease, benign uterine conditions, and cataracts than tamoxifen in postmenopausal women. No evidence exists establishing whether a reduction in BC risk from either agent translates into reduced BC mortality. Recommendations In women at increased risk for BC, tamoxifen (20 mg/d for 5 years) may be offered to reduce the risk of invasive ER-positive BC, with benefits for at least 10 years. In postmenopausal women, raloxifene (60 mg/d for 5 years) may also be considered. Use of aromatase inhibitors, fenretinide, or other selective estrogen receptor modulators to lower BC risk is not recommended outside of a clinical trial. Discussion of risks and benefits of preventive agents by health providers is critical to patient decision making.

Visvanathan, Kala; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Hurley, Patricia; Col, Nananda F.; Ropka, Mary; Collyar, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Runowicz, Carolyn; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Hagerty, Karen; Arun, Banu; Garber, Judy; Vogel, Victor G.; Wade, James L.; Brown, Powel; Cuzick, Jack; Kramer, Barnett S.; Lippman, Scott M.

2009-01-01

160

Regional anesthesia in the patient receiving antithrombotic or thrombolytic therapy: American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Evidence-Based Guidelines (Third Edition).  

PubMed

The actual incidence of neurologic dysfunction resulting from hemorrhagic complications associated with neuraxial blockade is unknown. Although the incidence cited in the literature is estimated to be less than 1 in 150,000 epidural and less than 1 in 220,000 spinal anesthetics, recent epidemiologic surveys suggest that the frequency is increasing and may be as high as 1 in 3000 in some patient populations.Overall, the risk of clinically significant bleeding increase with age,associated abnormalities of the spinal cord or vertebral column, the presence of an underlying coagulopathy, difficulty during needle placement,and an indwelling neuraxial catheter during sustained anticoagulation( particularly with standard heparin or low-molecular weight heparin). The need for prompt diagnosis and intervention to optimize neurologic outcome is also consistently reported. In response to these patient safety issues, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) convened its Third Consensus Conference on Regional Anesthesia and Anticoagulation. Practice guidelines or recommendations summarize evidence-based reviews. However, the rarity of spinal hematoma defies a prospective randomized study, and there is no current laboratory model. As a result,the ASRA consensus statements represent the collective experience of recognized experts in the field of neuraxial anesthesia and anticoagulation. These are based on case reports, clinical series, pharmacology,hematology, and risk factors for surgical bleeding. An understanding of the complexity of this issue is essential to patient management. PMID:20052816

Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J; Rowlingson, John C; Enneking, F Kayser; Kopp, Sandra L; Benzon, Honorio T; Brown, David L; Heit, John A; Mulroy, Michael F; Rosenquist, Richard W; Tryba, Michael; Yuan, Chun-Su

161

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects.  

PubMed

Abstract These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of adults suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:23216388

Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

2012-12-06

162

[Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with nosocomial pneumonia. S-3 Guideline of the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society for Infectious Diseases, the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology, the German Respiratory Society and the Paul-Ehrlich-Society for Chemotherapy].  

PubMed

Nosocomial pneumonia (HAP) is a frequent complication of hospital care. Most data are available on ventilator-associated pneumonia. However infections on general wards are also increasing. A central issue are infections with multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens which are difficult to treat particularly in the empirical setting potentially leading to inappropriate use of antimicrobial therapy. This guideline was compiled by an interdisciplinary group on the basis of a systematic literature review. Recommendations are made according to GRADE giving guidance for the diagnosis and therapy of HAP on the basis of quality of evidence and benefit/risk ratio. The guideline has two parts. First an update on epidemiology, spectrum of pathogens and antiinfectives is provided. In the second part recommendations for the management of diagnosis and treatment are given. Proper microbiologic work up is emphasized for knowledge of the local patterns of microbiology and drug susceptibility. Moreover this is the optimal basis for deescalation in the individual patient. The intensity of antimicrobial therapy is guided by the risk of infections with MDR. Structured deescalation concepts and strict limitation of treatment duration should lead to reduced selection pressure. PMID:23225407

Dalhoff, K; Abele-Horn, M; Andreas, S; Bauer, T; von Baum, H; Deja, M; Ewig, S; Gastmeier, P; Gatermann, S; Gerlach, H; Grabein, B; Höffken, G; Kern, W V; Kramme, E; Lange, C; Lorenz, J; Mayer, K; Nachtigall, I; Pletz, M; Rohde, G; Rosseau, S; Schaaf, B; Schaumann, R; Schreiter, D; Schütte, H; Seifert, H; Sitter, H; Spies, C; Welte, T

2012-12-06

163

Osteoporosis: therapeutic guidelines. Guidelines for practice management of osteoporosis.  

PubMed

Therapeutic guidelines of osteoporosis are reviewed from North American Menopause Society, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the National Osteoporosis Foundation. The various guidelines are compared and discussed. PMID:24177062

Khan, Sana N; Craig, Latasha; Wild, Robert

2013-12-01

164

The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2009 on the Treatment of Acute Mania  

Microsoft Academic Search

These updated guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2003, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until end of 2008. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute mania in adults. The data used for these guidelines have been extracted from

Heinz Grunze; Eduard Vieta; Guy M. Goodwin; Charles Bowden; Rasmus W. Licht; Hans-Jürgen Möller; Siegfried Kasper

2009-01-01

165

The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2010 on the treatment of acute bipolar depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. These guidelines are based on a fi rst edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientifi c evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientifi c evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults. Methods. The data used for these guidelines

Heinz Grunze; Eduard Vieta; Guy M. Goodwin; Charles Bowden; Rasmus W. Licht; Hans-Jürgen Möller; Siegfried Kasper

2010-01-01

166

Recent Update of Guidelines for Neurointerventional Procedures  

PubMed Central

Treatment guidelines of the neurointerventional procedures are continuously updated. However, these guidelines differ between countries and even medical societies within the same country because of the differing interests and patient groups. The differences between guidelines are confusing to many neurointerventionalists. Recently "Clinical Research Center for Stroke" in Korea updated "Clinical Practice Guidelines for Stroke" for the patients in Korea. So we introduce those guidelines and compare several recent guidelines of international medical societies for neurointerventionalists.

Shin, Shang Hun; Kwon, Soon Chan

2013-01-01

167

Submission by the Cancer Society of New Zealand to the Ministry of Health on Proposed Changes to the 'Tobacco Display Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cancer Society of New Zealand is a non-profit organisation which aims to minimise the incidence and impact of cancer on all those living in New Zealand. The Society considers efforts to reduce smoking rates in this country to be one of the key strategic objectives of its cancer prevention programme and strongly supports efforts to reduce exposure to second-

Belinda Hughes

168

[Evidence-based management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Latest guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2010].  

PubMed

Acute myocardial infarction and its consequences (death, chronic ischemic coronary artery disease, heart failure) are still the number 1 causes of death and of cardiovascular diseases in Germany. In this context, patients with STEMI are at the highest risk. The first-line management of STEMI patients often determines if the outcome is life or death. This overview presents the current optimal evidence-based management of STEMI patients as a practice-oriented extract according to the latest ESC guidelines, fully published some weeks ago (http://www.escardio.org).All efforts must be made to keep the respective time intervals between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of reperfusion therapy as short as possible, i.e. best within a dedicated STEMI network. Two of the time intervals are particularly essential: the time delay between the onset of symptoms and the first medical contact (FMC) and the time delay between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion. The time delay between the onset of symptoms and FMC depends on the patient as well as on the organization of the emergency medical service (EMS). Unfortunately, too many patients/bystanders still hesitate to immediately call the EMS. More intense measures must therefore be taken to educate the public. The optimal FMC by medical doctors or paramedics reacts quickly and ideally arrives with ECG equipment for immediate diagnosis of STEMI (persistent ST-segment elevation or presumably new left bundle branch block) before hospital admission. Unfortunately in many cases, the FMC is the emergency room of a hospital. Further decisions can be made without laboratory findings. In Germany, the average time delay between onset of symptoms and FMC is 100 min and therefore longer than in some other European countries.The next critical time interval is that between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion: this interval depends solely on the EMS organization and the distance to the next catheter laboratory with 24 h PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention) availability. The key question for further decisions is whether a primary PCI can be performed within 120 min after FMC. If so, the primary PCI should definitively be preferred. In patients <75 years presenting with a large anterior infarction within 2 h after onset of symptoms, this time interval should not exceed 90 min. For primary PCI an often used measure of quality is the "door-to-balloon" time, which should of course be as short as possible. Therefore, patients with STEMI should be admitted directly to the catheterization laboratory bypassing the emergency room or intensive care unit. In Germany, the average time interval between FMC and start of primary PCI is approximately 120 min just at the upper limit of the guideline recommendations. Some other European countries report a significantly shorter corresponding time delay.If primary PCI is not possible within 120 min (or 90 min) after FMC, thrombolysis must be initiated within 30 min after FMC, either in the EMS ambulance or in a nearby non-PCI hospital. A thrombolytic therapy, however, even if "successful", is not the final therapy: within 24 h (but not before 3 h) cardiac catheterization has to be performed with PCI, if applicable. Analyzing the overall revascularization rates in Germany, 81% receive primary PCI, 7% thrombolysis and 12% no reperfusion therapy. Regarding any reperfusion in STEMI, Germany holds the third place after the Czech Republic and Belgium.Patients presenting at 12-24 h after onset of symptoms or later may possibly benefit from a PCI, even if already asymptomatic, if signs of ischemia/viability in the infarct artery-related area are demonstrable. If this cannot be shown, PCI in these patients is not indicated.The first-line medication aims at dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and anticoagulation. For DAPT, the combination of ASA with a thienopyridine is mandatory. If primary PCI is feasible, DAPT with prasugrel (loading dose of 60 mg, independent of age and weight) is preferred due to its faster onset of action and superior effectiven

Silber, S

2010-12-01

169

Executive Summary: The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America  

PubMed Central

Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and surgery. These guidelines are intended for use by primary care and subspecialty providers responsible for the management of otherwise healthy infants and children with CAP in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Site-of-care management, diagnosis, antimicrobial and adjunctive surgical therapy, and prevention are discussed. Areas that warrant future investigations are also highlighted.

Byington, Carrie L.; Shah, Samir S.; Alverson, Brian; Carter, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Mace, Sharon E.; McCracken, George H.; Moore, Matthew R.; St Peter, Shawn D.; Stockwell, Jana A.; Swanson, Jack T.

2011-01-01

170

[Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy. PMID:23965245

Heida, K Y; Franx, A; Bots, M L

2013-01-01

171

Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline From the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society,

Bernard Levin; David A. Lieberman; Beth McFarland; Kimberly S. Andrews; Durado Brooks; John Bond; Chiranjeev Dash; Francis M. Giardiello; Seth Glick; David Johnson; C. Daniel Johnson; Theodore R. Levin; Perry J. Pickhardt; Douglas K. Rex; Robert A. Smith; Alan Thorson; Sidney J. Winawer

2008-01-01

172

Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children: recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.  

PubMed

This report updates and combines into one document earlier versions of guidelines for preventing and treating opportunistic infections (OIs) among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, last published in 2002 and 2004, respectively. These guidelines are intended for use by clinicians and other health-care workers providing medical care for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in the United States. The guidelines discuss opportunistic pathogens that occur in the United States and one that might be acquired during international travel (i.e., malaria). Topic areas covered for each OI include a brief description of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the OI in children; prevention of exposure; prevention of disease by chemoprophylaxis and/or vaccination; discontinuation of primary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution; treatment of disease; monitoring for adverse effects during treatment; management of treatment failure; prevention of disease recurrence; and discontinuation of secondary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution. A separate document about preventing and treating of OIs among HIV-infected adults and postpubertal adolescents (Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents) was prepared by a working group of adult HIV and infectious disease specialists. The guidelines were developed by a panel of specialists in pediatric HIV infection and infectious diseases (the Pediatric Opportunistic Infections Working Group) from the U.S. government and academic institutions. For each OI, a pediatric specialist with content-matter expertise reviewed the literature for new information since the last guidelines were published; they then proposed revised recommendations at a meeting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in June 2007. After these presentations and discussions, the guidelines underwent further revision, with review and approval by the Working Group, and final endorsement by NIH, CDC, the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (PIDS), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of the evidence supporting the recommendation so readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. An important mode of acquisition of OIs, as well as HIV infection among children, is from their infected mother; HIV-infected women coinfected with opportunistic pathogens might be more likely than women without HIV infection to transmit these infections to their infants. In addition, HIV-infected women or HIV-infected family members coinfected with certain opportunistic pathogens might be more likely to transmit these infections horizontally to their children, resulting in increased likelihood of primary acquisition of such infections in the young child. Therefore, infections with opportunistic pathogens might affect not just HIV-infected infants but also HIV-exposed but uninfected infants who become infected by the pathogen because of transmission from HIV-infected mothers or family members with coinfections. These guidelines for treating OIs in children therefore consider treatment of infections among all children, both HIV-infected and uninfected, born to HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV infection is increasingly seen among adolescents with perinatal infection now surviving into their teens and among youth with behaviorally acquired HIV infection. Although guidelines for postpubertal adolescents can be found in the adult OI guidelines, drug pharmacokinetics and response to treatment may differ for younger prepubertal or pubertal adolescents. Therefore, these guidelines also apply to treatment of HIV-infected youth who have not yet completed pubertal development. Major changes in the guidelines include 1) greater emphasis on the importance of antiretroviral therapy for preventin

Mofenson, Lynne M; Brady, Michael T; Danner, Susie P; Dominguez, Kenneth L; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

2009-09-01

173

Guidelines for Mentors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document provides guidelines for mentors on how to establish a mentoring relationship with a mentee, how to interact with a mentee, and how to avoid potential pitfalls in the mentor/mentee relationship. These guidelines were developed by the American Physiological Society (APS).

2008-01-01

174

AACE\\/TOS\\/ASMBS Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice are systematically developed statements to assist health-care professionals in medical decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document

Jeffrey I. Mechanick; Robert F. Kushner; Harvey J. Sugerman; J. Michael Gonzalez-Campoy; Maria L. Collazo-Clavell; Adam F. Spitz; Caroline M. Apovian; Edward H. Livingston; Robert Brolin; David B. Sarwer; Wendy A. Anderson; John Dixon

2009-01-01

175

Instructional Guidelines. Welding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

176

Recommendations for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in adults with congenital heart disease from the respective working groups of the European Society of Cardiology  

PubMed Central

This paper aims to provide information and explanations regarding the clinically relevant options, strengths, and limitations of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in relation to adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance can provide assessments of anatomical connections, biventricular function, myocardial viability, measurements of flow, angiography, and more, without ionizing radiation. It should be regarded as a necessary facility in a centre specializing in the care of adults with CHD. Also, those using CMR to investigate acquired heart disease should be able to recognize and evaluate previously unsuspected CHD such as septal defects, anomalously connected pulmonary veins, or double-chambered right ventricle. To realize its full potential and to avoid pitfalls, however, CMR of CHD requires training and experience. Appropriate pathophysiological understanding is needed to evaluate cardiovascular function after surgery for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and after Fontan operations. For these and other complex CHD, CMR should be undertaken by specialists committed to long-term collaboration with the clinicians and surgeons managing the patients. We provide a table of CMR acquisition protocols in relation to CHD categories as a guide towards appropriate use of this uniquely versatile imaging modality.

Kilner, Philip J.; Geva, Tal; Kaemmerer, Harald; Trindade, Pedro T.; Schwitter, Juerg; Webb, Gary D.

2010-01-01

177

Guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis in clinical practice: evidence-based approach from the Apheresis Applications Committee of the American Society for Apheresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Apheresis Applications Committee is charged with a review and categorization of indications for therapeutic apheresis. This elaborate process had been undertaken every 7 years resulting in three prior publications in 1986, 1993, and 2000 of \\

Zbigniew M. Szczepiorkowski; Nicholas Bandarenko; Haewon C. Kim; Michael L. Linenberger; Marisa B. Marques; Ravindra Sarode; Joseph Schwartz; Beth H. Shaz; Robert Weinstein; Ashka Wirk; Jeffrey L. Winters

2007-01-01

178

Guidelines for evaluation of new fever in critically ill adult patients: 2008 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine and the Infectious Diseases Society of America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To update the practice parameters for the evaluation of adult patients who develop a new fever in the intensive care unit, for the purpose of guiding clinical practice. Participants: A task force of 11 experts in the disciplines related to critical care medicine and infectious diseases was convened from the membership of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and

Naomi P. O’Grady; Philip S. Barie; John G. Bartlett; Thomas Bleck; Karen Carroll; Andre C. Kalil; Peter Linden; Dennis G. Maki; David Nierman; William Pasculle; Henry Masur

2008-01-01

179

Efficacy of a strategy for implementing a guideline for the control of cardiovascular risk in a primary healthcare setting: the SIRVA2 study a controlled, blinded community intervention trial randomised by clusters  

PubMed Central

This work describes the methodology used to assess a strategy for implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for cardiovascular risk control in a health area of Madrid. Background The results on clinical practice of introducing CPGs have been little studied in Spain. The strategy used to implement a CPG is known to influence its final use. Strategies based on the involvement of opinion leaders and that are easily executed appear to be among the most successful. Aim The main aim of the present work was to compare the effectiveness of two strategies for implementing a CPG designed to reduce cardiovascular risk in the primary healthcare setting, measured in terms of improvements in the recording of calculated cardiovascular risk or specific risk factors in patients' medical records, the control of cardiovascular risk factors, and the incidence of cardiovascular events. Methods This study involved a controlled, blinded community intervention in which the 21 health centres of the Number 2 Health Area of Madrid were randomly assigned by clusters to be involved in either a proposed CPG implementation strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk, or the normal dissemination strategy. The study subjects were patients ? 45 years of age whose health cards showed them to belong to the studied health area. The main variable examined was the proportion of patients whose medical histories included the calculation of their cardiovascular risk or that explicitly mentioned the presence of variables necessary for its calculation. The sample size was calculated for a comparison of proportions with alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.20, and assuming that the intervention would lead to a 15% increase in the measured variables. Corrections were made for the design effect, assigning a sample size to each cluster proportional to the size of the population served by the corresponding health centre, and assuming losses of 20%. This demanded a final sample size of 620 patients. Data were analysed using summary measures for each cluster, both in making estimates and for hypothesis testing. Analysis of the variables was made on an intention-to-treat basis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01270022

2011-01-01

180

Osteoporosis guidelines.  

PubMed

The Position Statement from the International Menopause Society (IMS) in 2004 recommends the use of hormone therapy for the 'avoidance of bone-wasting and fractures'. It also states that 'prevention, not treatment, is the most feasible goal'. In updating the Statement, this paper considers the relevance of Osteoporosis Guidelines. Relevant documents will be of two broad types. These may be consensus statements/position statements that summarize the 'state of the art' for practitioners, based on the work of expert groups, or they may be formal Guidelines generated through formal 'evidence-based' methodology. The former approach is generally used by Societies and can be generated through relatively efficient consensus processes. The latter approach will normally involve extensive work and cost, necessarily becomes very detailed, involving systematic review and technology appraisal and can lead to highly specific recommendations on intervention thresholds. For the revision of the general IMS Position Statement, the specific IMS Paper on Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (2005) must be a key reference document. This provides a description of the international consensus on the management of osteoporosis up to late 2004 and which remains relevant today. Additionally, other consensus statements and systematic guidelines need to be considered. Across these documents providing guidance, the substantial influence of the International Osteoporosis Foundation/National Osteoporosis Foundation Position Paper, defining a 'New approach to the development of assessment guidelines for osteoporosis', can be seen. This flagged the importance of a shift from guidance, tying the diagnostic threshold to the intervention threshold, and instead advised linking the intervention threshold to estimated fracture risk probability. This moves the intervention decision away from a simple bone density threshold to a more complex, but more realistic, threshold estimate, taking into account a range of important clinical risk factors and bone mineral density. This thinking is reflected in the IMS Paper on Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (2005). PMID:17882679

Barlow, D H

2007-10-01

181

Practice guidelines in the addictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consensually established principles of clinical conduct, known variously as practice guidelines, standards, protocols, or algorithms, have proliferated throughout medicine over the past decade. Institutional and disciplinary efforts to develop and promulgate guidelines for the treatment of addictive disorders have recently been initiated. We review guideline development activities of the American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, American Society of Addiction Medicine,

R. Dale Walker; Matthew Owen Howard; Patricia Silk Walker; M. Dow Lambert; Richard Suchinsky

1995-01-01

182

Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

PubMed

These guidelines have been developed for practitioners who insert catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home health-care settings. This report was prepared by a working group comprising members from professional organizations representing the disciplines of critical care medicine, infectious diseases, health-care infection control, surgery anesthesiology interventional radiology pulmonary medicine, pediatric medicine, and nursing. The working group was led by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), Society for Healthcare Epidemiology ofAmerica (SHEA), Surgical Infection Society (SIS), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), American Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists (ASCCA), Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Infusion Nurses Society (INS), Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (SCVIR), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Device-Related Infections published in 1996 These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for preventing catheter-related infections. Major areas of emphasis include 1) educating and training health-care providers who insert and maintain catheters; 2) using maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion; 3) using a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis; 4) avoiding routine replacement of central venous catheters as a strategy to prevent infection; and 5) using antiseptic/antibiotic impregnated short-term central venous catheters if the rate of infection is high despite adherence to other strategies (i.e., education and training, maximal sterile barrier precautions, and 2% chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis). These guidelines also identify performance indicators that can be used locally by health-care institutions or organizations to monitor their success in implementing these evidence-based recommendations. PMID:12233868

O'Grady, Naomi P; Alexander, Mary; Dellinger, E Patchen; Gerberding, Julie L; Heard, Stephen O; Maki, Dennis G; Masur, Henry; McCormick, Rita D; Mermel, Leonard A; Pearson, Michele L; Raad, Issam I; Randolph, Adrienne; Weinstein, Robert A

2002-08-01

183

Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.  

PubMed

The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011. PMID:21572115

Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

2011-05-14

184

Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons  

MedlinePLUS

... Web Site minIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY WEEK 2014 ANNUAL MEETING & ENDO EXPO Presented by SLS & Affiliated Societies September 10-13, 2014 CAesar's Palace Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada, USA Call for Abstracts / Abstract Guidelines Online Abstract Submission Form The AsianAmerican ...

185

The role of ACE inhibitor therapy in treating cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

The first angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were introduced in 1981. They are used in the management of a variety of cardiovascular disorders and their role in hypertension, heart failure, managing asymptomatic and symptomatic left-ventricular dysfunction, post-myocardial infarction, stroke prevention, and diabetes is now well established. This is recognised in the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease (Department of Health, 2000) and the guidelines from the British Hypertension Society (Ramsay et al, 1999). Nurses have a responsibility as part of the multidisciplinary team to have knowledge of various aspects of these drugs. PMID:15067910

Flint, Laura

186

Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2009.  

PubMed

The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder in 2005, with a 2007 update. This second update, in conjunction with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD), reviews new evidence and is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous publications. The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain mostly unchanged. Lithium, valproate, and several atypical antipsychotics continue to be first-line treatments for acute mania. Tamoxifen is now suggested as a third-line augmentation option. The combination of olanzapine and carbamazepine is not recommended. For the management of bipolar depression, lithium, lamotrigine, and quetiapine monotherapy, olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion remain first-line options. New data support the use of adjunctive modafinil as a second-line option, but also indicate that aripiprazole should not be used as monotherapy for bipolar depression. Lithium, lamotrigine, valproate, and olanzapine continue to be first-line options for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. New data support the use of quetiapine monotherapy and adjunctive therapy for the prevention of manic and depressive events, aripiprazole monotherapy for the prevention of manic events, and risperidone long-acting injection monotherapy and adjunctive therapy, and adjunctive ziprasidone for the prevention of mood events. Bipolar II disorder is frequently overlooked in treatment guidelines, but has an important clinical impact on patients' lives. This update provides an expanded look at bipolar II disorder. PMID:19419382

Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Schaffer, Ayal; Parikh, Sagar V; Beaulieu, Serge; O'Donovan, Claire; MacQueen, Glenda; McIntyre, Roger S; Sharma, Verinder; Ravindran, Arun; Young, L Trevor; Young, Allan H; Alda, Martin; Milev, Roumen; Vieta, Eduard; Calabrese, Joseph R; Berk, Michael; Ha, Kyooseob; Kapczinski, Flávio

2009-05-01

187

Clinical practice guideline for the evaluation of fever and infection in older adult residents of long-term care facilities: 2008 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are at great risk for infection. Most residents are older and have multiple comorbidities that complicate recognition of infection; for example, typically defined fever is absent in more than one-half of LTCF residents with serious infection. Furthermore, LTCFs often do not have the on-site equipment or personnel to evaluate suspected infection in the fashion typically performed in acute care hospitals. In recognition of the differences between LTCFs and hospitals with regard to hosts and resources present, the Infectious Diseases Society of America first provided guidelines for evaluation of fever and infection in LTCF residents in 2000. The guideline presented here represents the second edition, updated by data generated over the intervening 8 years. It focuses on the typical elderly person institutionalized with multiple chronic comorbidities and functional disabilities (e.g., a nursing home resident). Specific topic reviews and recommendations are provided with regard to what resources are typically available to evaluate suspected infection, what symptoms and signs suggest infection in a resident of an LTCF, who should initially evaluate the resident with suspected infection, what clinical evaluation should be performed, how LTCF staff can effectively communicate about possible infection with clinicians, and what laboratory tests should be ordered. Finally, a general outline of how a suspected outbreak of a specific infectious disease should be investigated in an LTCF is provided. PMID:19278394

High, Kevin P; Bradley, Suzanne F; Gravenstein, Stefan; Mehr, David R; Quagliarello, Vincent J; Richards, Chesley; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

2009-03-01

188

[Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality in Croatia and in Europe. Primary prevention of CVD involves intervention before the onset of disease, and prevention of modifiable risk factors, i.e. cigarette smoking, hyperlipidemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inactivity, obesity. These risk factors are strongly associated and lead to impaired vascular endothelial function, chronic injury of endothelium, platelet activation and aggregation, atherosclerotic plaque formation, and in the end manifestation of CVD. The risk of any coronary event increases exponentially when two or more risk factors are present. Aside from conventional factors, it has been demonstrated that raised levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokines, homocysteine and fibrinogen are also important promotors of the disease, pointing to partially inflammatory nature of coronary atherosclerosis. The effects of risk factors such as smoking, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidemia on vascular endothelium are proven to be reversible. According to Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice of the European Society of Cardiology (2007), population is advised to follow the formula 0 3 5 140 5 3 0. It suggests that crucial measures in preserving cardiovascular health are as follows: no smoking (0), walking 3 km daily or 30 minutes of any moderate activity (3), blood pressure less than 140 mm Hg systolic (140), total blood cholesterol less than 5 mmol/L (5), LDL cholesterol less than 3 mmol/L (3), avoidance of overweight and diabetes (0). There are many studies proving the beneficial effects of statins and ACE inhibitors in improving endothelial function and endorsing primary prevention. PMID:19681467

Kati?, Tina; Saki?, Ivana; Bergovec, Mijo

2009-02-01

189

Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplin?re Vereinigung f?r Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI))  

PubMed Central

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources.

Reinhart, K.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Bone, H.-G.; Bardutzky, J.; Dempfle, C.-E.; Forst, H.; Gastmeier, P.; Gerlach, H.; Grundling, M.; John, S.; Kern, W.; Kreymann, G.; Kruger, W.; Kujath, P.; Marggraf, G.; Martin, J.; Mayer, K.; Meier-Hellmann, A.; Oppert, M.; Putensen, C.; Quintel, M.; Ragaller, M.; Rossaint, R.; Seifert, H.; Spies, C.; Stuber, F.; Weiler, N.; Weimann, A.; Werdan, K.; Welte, T.

2010-01-01

190

Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2013.  

PubMed

The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder in 2005, with updates in 2007 and 2009. This third update, in conjunction with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, reviews new evidence and is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous publications.The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain largely unchanged. Lithium, valproate, and several atypical antipsychotic agents continue to be first-line treatments for acute mania. Monotherapy with asenapine, paliperidone extended release (ER), and divalproex ER, as well as adjunctive asenapine, have been added as first-line options.For the management of bipolar depression, lithium, lamotrigine, and quetiapine monotherapy, as well as olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion remain first-line options. Lurasidone monotherapy and the combination of lurasidone or lamotrigine plus lithium or divalproex have been added as a second-line options. Ziprasidone alone or as adjunctive therapy, and adjunctive levetiracetam have been added as not-recommended options for the treatment of bipolar depression. Lithium, lamotrigine, valproate, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, risperidone long-acting injection, and adjunctive ziprasidone continue to be first-line options for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Asenapine alone or as adjunctive therapy have been added as third-line options. PMID:23237061

Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Parikh, Sagar V; Schaffer, Ayal; Beaulieu, Serge; Alda, Martin; O'Donovan, Claire; Macqueen, Glenda; McIntyre, Roger S; Sharma, Verinder; Ravindran, Arun; Young, L Trevor; Milev, Roumen; Bond, David J; Frey, Benicio N; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Lafer, Beny; Birmaher, Boris; Ha, Kyooseob; Nolen, Willem A; Berk, Michael

2012-12-12

191

Are current UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) obesity risk guidelines useful? Cross-sectional associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a large, representative english population.  

PubMed

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently released obesity guidelines for health risk. For the first time in the UK, we estimate the utility of these guidelines by relating them to the established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Health Survey for England (HSE) 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study in England was used with a sample size of 7225 men and women aged ?35 years (age range: 35-97 years). The following CVD risk factor outcomes were used: hypertension, diabetes, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and Framingham risk score. Four NICE categories of obesity were created based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC): no risk (up to normal BMI and low/high WC); increased risk (normal BMI & very high WC, or obese & low WC); high risk (overweight & very high WC, or obese & high WC); and very high risk (obese I & very high WC or obese II/III with any levels of WC. Men and women in the very high risk category had the highest odds ratios (OR) of having unfavourable CVD risk factors compared to those in the no risk category. For example, the OR of having hypertension for those in the very high risk category of the NICE obesity groupings was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 2.06 to 3.21) in men, and 2.15 (1.75 to 2.64) in women. Moreover, a dose-response association between the adiposity groups and most of the CVD risk factors was observed except total cholesterol in men and low HDL in women. Similar results were apparent when the Framingham risk score was the outcome of interest. In conclusion, the current NICE definitions of obesity show utility for a range of CVD risk factors and CVD risk in both men and women. PMID:23844088

Tabassum, Faiza; Batty, G David

2013-07-02

192

[Gender aspects in cardiovascular diseases].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in women and men worldwide, and, especially as far as coronary heart disorders are concerned, this is true of an increasing number of older and elderly persons. For decades, Gender Medicine research has shown gender differences in cardiology to the detriment of women, for example it takes longer for them to receive and they are less likely to have access to high-tech medicine, such as the ICU, heart catheters, bypass surgery, and they have a poorer outcome. Meanwhile, numerous scientific studies and awareness campaigns have been conducted. However, the more recent publications still show the same trends, albeit at a decreasing rate. Thanks to the emphasis placed on prevention and, thus, also the attention called to the leading heart risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure, blood lipids, diabetes mellitus and overweight, namely for women and men, heart death is no longer exclusively male. In order to promote equal opportunity, Gender Medicine must be further implemented in medical training and post-graduate training, and-above all-the scientific findings concerning Gender Medicine must be incorporated into the guidelines of our professional societies. PMID:23743882

Hochleitner, M

2013-08-01

193

Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy  

PubMed Central

This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the ‘treat-to-target’ paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and ‘real-world’ populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

Zannad, Faiez; Dallongeville, Jean; Macfadyen, Robert J; Ruilope, Luis M; Wilhelmsen, Lars; De Backer, Guy; Graham, Ian; Lorenz, Matthias; Mancia, Giuseppe; Morrow, David A; Reiner, Zeljko; Koenig, Wolfgang

2012-01-01

194

Complex societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of human societies of the past few thousand years rivals that of social insect societies. We hypothesize that\\u000a two sets of social “instincts” underpin and constrain the evolution of complex societies. One set is ancient and shared with\\u000a other social primate species, and one is derived and unique to our lineage. The latter evolved by the late Pleistocene,

Peter J. Richerson; Robert Boyd

1999-01-01

195

Planetary Society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

196

Statement of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography & ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... this technology continues to benefit the sickest ... proposed comprehensive training program for new ... experience level and management of vascular ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

197

Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions  

MedlinePLUS

... us SCAI.org Home | SecondsCount.org | eLearning Library | Women in Innovations | Contribute to SCAI PAC My SCAI My ... in-Training Radial Access Mentorship & Preceptorship (RAMP) Program Women in Innovations (WIN) Events Maintenance of Certification (MOC) eLearning ...

198

Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. The Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S.  

PubMed

These guidelines have been developed for practitioners who insert catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home health-care settings. This report was prepared by a working group comprising members from professional organizations representing the disciplines of critical care medicine, infectious diseases, health-care infection control, surgery, anesthesiology, interventional radiology, pulmonary medicine, pediatric medicine, and nursing. The working group was led by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), Surgical Infection Society (SIS), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), American Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists (ASCCA), Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Infusion Nurses Society (INS), Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (SCVIR), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Device-Related Infections published in 1996. These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for preventing catheter-related infections. Major areas of emphasis include 1) educating and training health-care providers who insert and maintain catheters; 2) using maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion; 3) using a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis; 4) avoiding routine replacement of central venous catheters as a strategy to prevent infection; and 5) using antiseptic/antibiotic impregnated short-term central venous catheters if the rate of infection is high despite adherence to other strategies (ie, education and training, maximal sterile barrier precautions, and 2% chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis). These guidelines also identify performance indicators that can be used locally by health-care institutions or organizations to monitor their success in implementing these evidence-based recommendations. PMID:12415057

O'Grady, Naomi P; Alexander, Mary; Dellinger, E Patchen; Gerberding, Julie L; Heard, Stephen O; Maki, Dennis G; Masur, Henry; McCormick, Rita D; Mermel, Leonard A; Pearson, Michele L; Raad, Issam I; Randolph, Adrienne; Weinstein, Robert A

2002-11-01

200

Guidelines for hospital privileges in vascular surgery.  

PubMed

This is a report by an ad hoc committee to the Joint Council of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery (North American Chapter) concerning guidelines that hospitals may use or modify when judging individual applicants for hospital and operating room privileges in vascular surgery. The committee recognizes that the completion of training and obtaining a board certificate is testimony to the qualification but not necessarily the competence of an individual to practice vascular surgery. This report identifies three categories of applicant for privileges in vascular surgery; the surgeon who just completed training, the surgeon who completed training after 1984, and the surgeon who completed training before 1984. In addition, the committee recognizes the importance of periodic vascular surgery privileges renewal for established surgeons. Several pathways are defined for use by hospital privilege committees to evaluate the competence of an individual to be granted privileges in general vascular surgery. The ad hoc committee also has outlined a program for evaluation of established surgeons for renewing privileges in vascular surgery using a mechanism of case outcome audit. Finally, a review mechanism, potential corrective actions, and an appeals mechanism are also suggested. This report represents optimal criteria that may require modification by individual hospitals to meet local community needs and standards. It is the hope of the ad hoc committee that this report will help hospitals and practicing physicians improve the quality of care and treatment outcome in patients with vascular disease. PMID:2585656

Moore, W S; Treiman, R L; Hertzer, N R; Veith, F J; Perry, M O; Ernst, C B

1989-12-01

201

National Space Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Space Society (NSS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of a spacefaring civilization. The NSS web site features information about the organization, its mission and vision, membership information, and a listing of NSS local chapters. The library features links to videos, books, and other publications on space settlements and bases, space policy, and technology. There is also information on the organization's magazine, "Ad Astra," including instructions for authors, publishing and advertising guidelines, and some archived content. Other materials include news articles, event announcements, and information on current space missions.

2005-02-01

202

Web Accessibility and Guidelines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

203

The Italian Society of Gastroenterology (SIGE) and the Italian Group for the study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) Clinical Practice Guidelines: The use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonist therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological therapies are an important step in the management of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. In consideration of high cost and safety issues there is the need to have clear recommendations for their use. Despite the American Gastroenterological Association and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation have published exhaustive Inflammatory Bowel Disease guidelines, national guidelines may be necessary as cultural values, economical

Ambrogio Orlando; Alessandro Armuzzi; Claudio Papi; Vito Annese; Sandro Ardizzone; Livia Biancone; Aurora Bortoli; Fabiana Castiglione; Renata D’Incà; Paolo Gionchetti; Anna Kohn; Gilberto Poggioli; Fernando Rizzello; Maurizio Vecchi; Mario Cottone

2011-01-01

204

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with an MR compatible pacemaker  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within FDA guidelines for the MRI-conditional pacemaker precludes placing the heart at the center of the magnet’s bore. This in effect appears to preclude cardiovascular MR. In this manuscript, we describe a protocol for cardiovascular MR of patients with a Revo pacemaker system while operating within FDA guidelines, and the first US case of cardiovascular MR in a patient with a Revo MRI-conditional pacing system despite position constraints.

2013-01-01

205

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.  

PubMed

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (Class IIa; Level of Evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >/=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed. PMID:18596492

Pickering, Thomas G; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R; Artinian, Nancy T; Goff, David

206

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: executive summary a joint scientific statement from the american heart association, american society of hypertension, and preventive cardiovascular nurses association.  

PubMed

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (class IIa; level of evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: 1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; 2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; 3) Two to three readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >/=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; 4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; 5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; 6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; 7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; 8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; 9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; 10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and 11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed. PMID:20409902

Pickering, Thomas G; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R; Artinian, Nancy T; Goff, David

207

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society Of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.  

PubMed

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (Class IIa; Level of Evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >or=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed. PMID:18497370

Pickering, Thomas G; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R; Artinian, Nancy T; Goff, David

2008-05-22

208

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: Executive Summary. A joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.  

PubMed

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (class IIa; level of evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of > or =12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed. PMID:18550937

Pickering, Thomas G; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R; Artinian, Nancy T; Goff, David

2008-06-01

209

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: executive summary: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society Of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.  

PubMed

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (class IIa; level of evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >or=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed. PMID:18497371

Pickering, Thomas G; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R; Artinian, Nancy T; Goff, David

2008-05-22

210

Cardiovascular risk in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

JIA is the most common chronic inflammatory arthritis in children and young people. More than one-third of individuals have persistent active disease into adulthood. In RA, there has been considerable interest in long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity have been observed and consensus guidelines recommend annual cardiovascular risk assessment for adults with RA. The increased risk is attributed to a higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and the role of systemic inflammation in the acceleration of atherosclerosis. The long-term risk of cardiovascular disease for individuals with JIA remains uncertain and guidance on risk assessment is not currently available. Given the potential for longer disease duration, it is possible that cardiovascular risk in this group surpasses that observed in adult-onset inflammatory arthritides. In this article, we consider the evidence for cardiovascular risk in JIA. PMID:23502074

Coulson, Elizabeth J; Ng, Wan-Fai; Goff, Iain; Foster, Helen E

2013-03-15

211

Deschooling Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author calls for a "cultural revolution" and urges a radical examination of the social myths and institutions by which we presently live our lives. He scores the present educational structure in America as a sacred cow which suits people for a life of consumption rather than action. In its stead he proposes a "deschooled" society; legal…

Illich, Ivan

212

Cryptozoology Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History

Barbara T. Richman

1982-01-01

213

Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established critical pathways and specific loci modulating therapeutic responses to commonly used drugs such as clopidogrel, warfarin, and statins. In addition, genomic approaches have defined mechanisms and genetic variants underlying important toxicities with these and other drugs. These findings have not only resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described to date might be deployed in clinical decision making. PMID:23689943

Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M

2013-07-01

214

Specialty guidelines for forensic psychology.  

PubMed

In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists, 1991). These Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology were developed by the American Psychology-Law Society (Division 41 of the American Psychological Association [APA]) and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. They were adopted by the APA Council of Representatives on August 3, 2011. PMID:23025747

2012-10-01

215

Review Tracheotomy: clinical review and guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Tracheotomy is a commonly performed procedure. The Belgian Society of Pneumology (BVP-SBP) and the Belgian Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery (BACTS) developed guidelines on tracheotomy for mechanical ventilation in adults. The levels of evidence as developed by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) were used. The members of the guideline committee reviewed peer-reviewed publications on this subject. After discussion,

Paul De Leyn; Lieven Bedert; Marion Delcroix; Pieter Depuydt; Geert Lauwers; Youri Sokolov; Alain Van Meerhaeghe; Paul Van Schil

216

Research Ethical Guidelines and Anonymity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

That researchers should give anonymity to research sites and to the individuals involved in research is usually taken as an ethical norm. Such a norm is embodied internationally in most of the ethical guidelines and codes of practice of the various educational, sociological and psychological research associations and societies. This paper…

Walford, Geoffrey

2005-01-01

217

Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed in part to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors; obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and

M. De Hert; J. M. Dekker; D. Wood; K. G. Kahl; R. I. G. Holt; H.-J. Möller

2009-01-01

218

Cryptozoology Society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

Richman, Barbara T.

219

Haemorrhagia post partum; an implementation study on the evidence-based guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the MOET (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma-course) instructions; the Fluxim study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: One of the most important causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity worldwide is post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Factors as substandard care are frequently reported in the international literature and there are similar reports in the Netherlands. The incidence of PPH in the Dutch population is 5% containing 10.000 women a year. The introduction of an evidence-based guideline on

Mallory D Woiski; Rosella PMG Hermens; Johanna M Middeldorp; Jan A Kremer; Marco A Marcus; Maurice GAJ Wouters; Richard P Grol; Fred K Lotgering; Hubertina CJ Scheepers

2010-01-01

220

American Society for Microbiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Professional and academic scientific organizations have long had a strong web-based presence, and many of them have contributed mightily to online educational initiatives. The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has done their part by creating this set of resources for undergraduate educators working in the fields of bioterrorism, microbiology, and related topics. One of the strongest sections here includes the curriculum guidelines, which include basic recommendations for what an introductory course in microbiology should cover in terms of skills, safety, and laboratory content. Additionally, visitors can also learn what bioterrorism related topics should be covered in similar courses. The site is rounded out by a set of links to external resources, such as the Bioscience Education Network, the National Academy Press, and a collection of science videos from the Annenberg/CPB Learner website.

221

Models, standards, guidelines.  

PubMed

This article reviews the current illness experience for elders, highlights key issues that cause suffering and affect the quality of life of elders in our society, and reviews the definition and the process for providing palliative care. A consensus-building process is described, which any hospice or palliative care organization can use to adapt existing consensus and evidence-based models, standards of practice, and preferred practice guidelines and engage all staff and stakeholders in the development of an organizational model to guide day-to-day practices and improve the quality of all its activities. PMID:15639035

Ferris, Frank D; Librach, S Lawrence

2005-02-01

222

Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: A position statement from the European Association of CardioThoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To critically review the available transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and their results, as well as propose recommendations for their use and development. Methods and results: A committee of experts including European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and European Society of Cardiology representatives met to reach a consensus based on the analysis of the available data obtained with transcatheter aortic

A. Vahanian; O. Alfieri; N. Al-Attar; M. Antunes; J. J. Bax; B. Cormier; A. Cribier; P. De Jaegere; G. Fournial; A. P. Kappetein; J. Kovac; S. Ludgate; F. Maisano; N. Moat; F. W. Mohr; P. Nataf; L. Piérard; J. L. Pomar; J. Schofer; P. Tornos; M. Tuzcu; Hout van B. A; Segesser von L. K; T. Walther

2008-01-01

223

COASTAL GUIDELINES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the coastal subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential regulatory limits, and the cost of regulation. Legislation/Enabling Authority: ...

224

Barriers to physician adherence to a subfertility guideline  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Guidelines aim to improve clinical practice but are not self-implementing. Insight into barriers to physician guideline adherence is crucial for development of effective implementation strategies. The study aim was to identify barriers to physician adherence to an intrauterine insemination (IUI) guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among all Dutch gynaecologists,

E. C. Haagen; W. L. D. M. Nelen; R. P. M. G. Hermens; D. D. M. Braat; R. P. T. M. Grol; J. A. M. Kremer

2005-01-01

225

Guidelines on the management of fibromyalgia syndrome – A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the methodology and the recommendations of evidence-based guidelines for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) to give an orientation within the continuously growing number of reviews on the therapy of FMS. Systematic searches up to April 2008 of the US-American National Guideline Clearing House, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany

Winfried Häuser; Kati Thieme; Dennis C. Turk

2010-01-01

226

Revision of ACS Guidelines for Undergraduate Chemistry Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is beginning a major revision of the guidelines it uses for approving programs to offer ACS-certified undergraduate degrees in chemistry. The guidelines include curriculum requirements as well as faculty, staff, and facilities requirements. Changes in both chemistry and education make a careful examination and revision of the guidelines particularly

F. Fleming Crim; William F. Polik

2004-01-01

227

Phase II study of the American Brachytherapy Society guidelines for the use of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical carcinoma: is 45-50.4 Gy radiochemotherapy plus 31.8 Gy in six fractions high-dose rate brachytherapy tolerable?  

PubMed

In 2000, the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) published incompletely evaluated guidelines for curative chemoradiation and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer: our aim was to assess guideline tolerability in an Asian population. From 2000, all stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma patients were treated following ABS guidelines. Early disease (FIGO stage I/II <4 cm) received 45 Gy whole-pelvis external-beam radiation (EBRT) at 1.8 Gy/fraction, while advanced-stage disease received 50.4 Gy: no central shielding was used. All patients were planned to receive chemotherapy during EBRT, cisplatin 40 mg/m(2) weekly. All patients received 31.8-Gy HDR brachytherapy (six fractions of 5.3 Gy/fraction) to point A via three-channel applicators. Radiotherapy was completed within 8 weeks. Toxicity scoring used Common Toxicity Criteria. Nineteen of 21 (90.4%) patients (8 early, 13 advanced stage) received planned radiation, and 85.7% received planned chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 9-50 months). Three-year overall survival (S) was 79.1% and disease-free survival (DFS) was 64.8%. S/DFS for early and advanced stage was 85.7%/85.7% and 73.3%/47.1%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved by 85.7% of patients, partial response 14.3%. For those in CR, there were no local failures. Acute cystitis occurred in 23.8%, proctitis 4.8%, and gastroenteritis 47.6%. Late cystitis occurred in 9.5%, gastroenteritis 4.8%, and genitourinary fistula (in the presence of progressive disease) 4.8%. No grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicity occurred. The ABS guidelines were well tolerated and efficacious in our study, although longer follow-up is required. Further studies are warranted to validate safety and efficacy of the recommendations. PMID:16445645

Shakespeare, T P; Lim, K H C; Lee, K M; Back, M F; Mukherjee, R; Lu, J D

228

Cardiovascular phantom  

SciTech Connect

A cardiovascular phantom is described for providing the proper indexing of a cine camera for X-Ray cineangiography consisting of: a plastic boardlike substrate; a metallic X-Ray absorptive material configured with the arborescent outline of a system of coronary arteries on the plastic boardlike substrate for absorbing X-Rays; and a covering material for the board.

Ridge, W.B.

1988-12-27

229

What is the evidence for cardiovascular disorders as a risk factor for non-syncopal falls? Scope for future research  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundGuidelines cite the importance of cardiovascular assessment in falls prevention, however there has been no systematic review of the role of cardiovascular disorders as risk factors for non-syncopal falls.

F. McCarthy; C. W. Fan; P. M. Kearney; C. Walsh; R. A. Kenny

2010-01-01

230

AHA\\/ACC Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

improves patient survival, reduces recurrent events and the need for interventional procedures, and improves the quality of life for these patients. The compelling evidence from recent clinical trials was the impetus to revise the 1995 guidelines. As examples, the many lipid reduction trials have generated significant changes in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Adult Treatment Panel III report.

Sidney C. Smith; Steven N. Blair; Robert O. Bonow; Lawrence M. Brass; Manuel D. Cerqueira; Kathleen Dracup; Valentin Fuster; Antonio Gotto; Scott M. Grundy; Nancy Houston Miller; Alice Jacobs; Daniel Jones; Ronald M. Krauss; Lori Mosca; Ira Ockene; Richard C. Pasternak; Thomas Pearson; Marc A. Pfeffer; Rodman D. Starke; Kathryn A. Taubert

231

Jogging Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Jogging guidelines are set forth under the following headings: a) What Is Jogging; c) Why One Should Jog; c) How To Begin; d) What To Wear (with the emphasis on proper shoes); e) When and Where To Jog; and f) How To Jog. A 16-week basic program, outlined for inactive adults, recommends for each week the number of days to exercise, the distance,…

President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

232

SBF GUIDELINES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the use of synthetic based drilling fluids in the offshore and coastal subcategories of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential reg limits, and the cost o...

233

Cardiac computed tomography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals without known cardiovascular disease: a position statement of the Working Group on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT of the European Society of Cardiology.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular events remain one of the most frequent causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The majority of cardiac events occur in individuals without known coronary artery disease (CAD) and in low- to intermediate-risk subjects. Thus, the development of improved preventive strategies may substantially benefit from the identification, among apparently intermediate-risk subjects, of those who have a high probability for developing future cardiac events. Cardiac computed tomography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) by single photon emission computed tomography may play a role in this setting. In fact, absence of coronary calcium in cardiac computed tomography and inducible ischaemia in MPS are associated with a very low rate of major cardiac events in the next 3-5 years. Based on current evidence, the evaluation of coronary calcium in primary prevention subjects should be considered in patients classified as intermediate-risk based on traditional risk factors, since high calcium scores identify subjects at high-risk who may benefit from aggressive secondary prevention strategies. In addition, calcium scoring should be considered for asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients without known CAD to select those in whom further functional testing by MPS or other stress imaging techniques may be considered to identify patients with significant inducible ischaemia. From available data, the use of MPS as first line testing modality for risk stratification is not recommended in any category of primary prevention subjects with the possible exception of first-degree relatives of patients with premature CAD in whom MPS may be considered. However, the Working Group recognizes that neither the use of computed tomography for calcium imaging nor of MPS have been proven to significantly improve clinical outcomes of primary prevention subjects in prospective controlled studies. This information would be crucial to adequately define the role of imaging approaches in cardiovascular preventive strategies. PMID:20630895

Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Achenbach, Stephan; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Reiner, Zeljko; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Schuijf, Joanne D; Van der Wall, Ernst; Kaufmann, Philip A; Knuuti, Juhani; Schroeder, Stephen; Zellweger, Michael J

2010-07-14

234

Management of cardiovascular disease risk in chronic inflammatory disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with chronic inflammatory disorders are at increased risk of developing premature cardiovascular disease. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the effects of inflammatory pathways on the vasculature, clear guidelines on the management of traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors in patients with systemic autoimmunity are lacking. Thus, rigorous studies assessing the individual contributions of the various treatments used

Mariana J. Kaplan

2009-01-01

235

Cardiovascular Proteomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional cardiovascular proteomics includes the comparative large-scale determination of protein profiles and the identification\\u000a of individual proteins of myocardial tissue from different species including humans. The goal of these studies consisted,\\u000a and still consists, in the establishment of comprehensive proteome databases. By comparison with protein profiles from diseased\\u000a tissues such databases will enable to an increasing degree the fast identification

Rainer Klocke; Sergiu Scobioala; Sigrid Nikol

236

Guidelines for the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Infected Persons 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were ...

H. Masur J. E. Kaplan K. K. Holmes

2002-01-01

237

Diagnosis and Management of Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A Practice Guideline  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the second in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are pediatricians, family practitioners, and internists. The targeted patients and setting for

Alan L. Bisno; Michael A. Gerber; Richard H. Schwartz

1997-01-01

238

1997 Guidelines for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Unexplained Fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the first in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners. The targeted patients and setting for

Walter T. Hughes; Donald Armstrong; Gerald P. Bodey; Arthur E. Brown; John E. Edwards; Ronald Feld; Philip Pizzo; Kenneth V. I. Rolston; Jerry L. Shenep; Lowell S. Young

1997-01-01

239

Citizenship in Civil Society?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by individualism that is sustained and protected by the civil values of autonomy and emancipation.

M. R. R. Ossewaarde

2006-01-01

240

Update of the guidelines for lupus anticoagulant detection. Subcommittee on Lupus Anticoagulant/Antiphospholipid Antibody of the Scientific and Standardisation Committee of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.  

PubMed

One of the conclusions of the subcommittee meeting on Lupus Anticoagulant/Phospholipid dependent antibodies, held in Geneva on 2007, was the need to update the guidelines on Lupus Anticoagulant (LA) detection. Particular emphasis was given to several aspects discussed in this official communication. A new paragraph is dedicated to the patient selection, and aims to minimize inappropriate requests for LA testing. Modalities for blood collection and processing are fully delineated and the choice of tests is limited to dRVVT and a sensitive aPTT. Calculation of cut-off values for each diagnostic step are clearly stated. A final paragraph reports the interpretation of the results in general and in particular situations. PMID:19624461

Pengo, V; Tripodi, A; Reber, G; Rand, J H; Ortel, T L; Galli, M; De Groot, P G

2009-07-17

241

Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade for cardiovascular diseases: current status  

PubMed Central

Activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) results in vasoconstriction, muscular (vascular and cardiac) hypertrophy and fibrosis. Established arterial stiffness and cardiac dysfunction are key factors contributing to subsequent cardiovascular and renal complications. Blockade of RAAS has been shown to be beneficial in patients with hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, chronic systolic heart failure, stroke and diabetic renal disease. An aggressive approach for more extensive RAAS blockade with combination of two commonly used RAAS blockers [ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs)] yielded conflicting results in different patient populations. Combination therapy is also associated with more side effects, in particular hypotension, hyperkalaemia and renal impairment. Recently published ONTARGET study showed ACEI/ARB combination therapy was associated with more adverse effects without any increase in benefit. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program responded with a new warning: ‘Do not use ACEI and ARB in combination’. However, the European Society of Cardiology in their updated heart failure treatment guidelines still recommended ACEI/ARB combo as a viable option. This apparent inconsistency among guidelines generates debate as to which approach of RAAS inhibition is the best. The current paper reviews the latest evidence of isolated ACEI or ARB use and their combination in cardiovascular diseases, and makes recommendations for their prescriptions in specific patient populations.

Ma, Terry KW; Kam, Kevin KH; Yan, Bryan P; Lam, Yat-Yin

2010-01-01

242

Making society's groups more therapeutic.  

PubMed

This paper represents the author's Presidential Address to the American Group Psychotherapy Association, delivered at the annual meeting on February 11, 1988, in New York. The author poses a challenge: What can we teach society about how to make our groups more healing and productive? He suggests certain guidelines relating to effective communication, empathic understanding, willingness to assume responsibility, and, most importantly, recognition that groups exist for the individuals who comprise them. For groups to function well, individuals must play their role and sacrifice themselves for the good of the whole; yet for groups to function well, the needs of the individual must never be lost. PMID:2912904

Rutan, J S; Groves, J E

1989-01-01

243

Policy and program evaluation, civil society, and democracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall aim of this article is to develop conceptual tools and practical guidelines for evaluating the effects of public policy and program on civil society and democracy, and to analyze three broad ways of taking evaluation to the people. The terms “civil society” and “democracy” are ambiguous, referring to different notions in various discourses. The article demonstrates how different

Anders Hanberger

2001-01-01

244

Establishing a successful coronary CT angiography program in the emergency department: official writing of the Fellow and Resident Leaders of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (FiRST).  

PubMed

Coronary CT angiography is an effective, evidence-based strategy for evaluating acute chest pain in the emergency department for patients at low-to-intermediate risk of acute coronary syndrome. Recent multicenter trials have reported that coronary CT angiography is safe, reduces time to diagnosis, facilitates discharge, and may lower overall cost compared with routine care. Herein, we provide a 10-step approach for establishing a successful coronary CT angiography program in the emergency department. The importance of strategic planning and multidisciplinary collaboration is emphasized. Patient selection and preparation guidelines for coronary CT angiography are reviewed with straightforward protocols that can be adapted and modified to clinical sites, depending on available cardiac imaging capabilities. Technical parameters and patient-specific modifications are also highlighted to maximize the likelihood of diagnostic quality examinations. Practical suggestions for quality control, process monitoring, and standardized reporting are reviewed. Finally, the role of a "triple rule-out" protocol is featured in the context of acute chest pain evaluation in the emergency department. PMID:23809428

Maroules, Christopher D; Blaha, Michael J; El-Haddad, Mohamed A; Ferencik, Maros; Cury, Ricardo C

2013-05-31

245

Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

Bialas, Brygida

2012-01-01

246

Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Health Issue Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in Canadian women and men. In general, women present with a wider range of symptoms, are more likely to delay seeking medial care and are less likely to be investigated and treated with evidence-based medications, angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft than men. Key Findings In 1998, 78,964 Canadians died from CVD, almost half (39,197) were women. Acute myocardial infarction, which increases significantly after menopause, was the leading cause of death among women. Cardiovascular disease accounted for 21% of all hospital admissions for Canadian women over age 50 in 1999. Admissions to hospital for ischemic heart disease were more frequent for men, but the mean length of hospital stay was longer for women. Mean blood pressure increases with age in both men and women. After age 65, however, high blood pressure is more common among Canadian women. More than one-third of postmenopausal Canadian women have hypertension. Diabetes increases the mortality and morbidity associated with CVD in women more than it does in men. Depression also contributes to the incidence and recovery from CVD, particularly for women who experience twice the rate of depression as men. Data Gaps and Recommendations CVD needs to be recognized as a woman's health issue given Canadian mortality projections (particularly heart failure). Health professionals should be trained to screen, track, and address CVD risk factors among women, including hypertension, elevated lipid levels, smoking, physical inactivity, depression, diabetes and low socio-economic status.

Grace, Sherry L; Fry, Rick; Cheung, Angela; Stewart, Donna E

2004-01-01

247

Primary prophylaxis of bacterial infections and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors : guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO).  

PubMed

Bacterial infections are the most common cause for treatment-related mortality in patients with neutropenia after chemotherapy. Here, we discuss the use of antibacterial prophylaxis against bacteria and Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in neutropenic cancer patients and offer guidance towards the choice of drug. A literature search was performed to screen all articles published between September 2000 and January 2012 on antibiotic prophylaxis in neutropenic cancer patients. The authors assembled original reports and meta-analysis from the literature and drew conclusions, which were discussed and approved in a consensus conference of the Infectious Disease Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (AGIHO). Antibacterial prophylaxis has led to a reduction of febrile events and infections. A significant reduction of overall mortality could only be shown in a meta-analysis. Fluoroquinolones are preferred for antibacterial and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for PCP prophylaxis. Due to serious concerns about an increase of resistant pathogens, only patients at high risk of severe infections should be considered for antibiotic prophylaxis. Risk factors of individual patients and local resistance patterns must be taken into account. Risk factors, choice of drug for antibacterial and PCP prophylaxis and concerns regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics are discussed in the review. PMID:23412562

Neumann, S; Krause, S W; Maschmeyer, G; Schiel, X; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M

2013-02-15

248

[Polytherapy in cardiovascular prevention: open issues].  

PubMed

Despite the considerable advances in preventive treatment achieved over the last two decades, the increasing burden of cardiovascular disease represents an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The current pandemic of obesity, hypertension and diabetes, as a result of unhealthy lifestyle and dietary habits together with predisposing genetic backgrounds, is the main cause of increased cardiovascular mortality and raised overall health expenditure. Despite the growing number of cardiovascular prevention campaigns, the control of cardiovascular risk factors remains largely unsatisfactory worldwide. Unhealthy lifestyles lead to an increased consumption of drugs to achieve target levels of cardiovascular risk factors, namely blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. This phenomenon results in a disproportionate increase in the number of cardiovascular drugs, already in the early stages of disease. Despite current guidelines encourage combination therapies in cardiovascular prevention, the adoption of polytherapy, commonly defined as the use of 5 or more drugs, is extremely frequent and is often paradoxically unsuccessful due to poor patient education and adherence, increased adverse effects and inappropriate drug prescribing. Moreover, increased life-expectancy resulting from early treatment of myocardial infarction and improved heart failure management has led to an older population characterized by an increased prevalence of comorbid conditions. This is a further reason for increased prescription of drugs leading to an impairment of patient adherence and increased adverse effects. In order to overcome the emerging problem of polytherapy, the use of a single "polypill" containing a combination of drugs for cardiovascular prevention has been postulated. Such an approach is providing promising results in the management of hypertension and dyslipidemia. However, available evidence is still preliminary and prospective data on cardiovascular outcomes are still lacking. This present article proposes a critical analysis of some open issues related to polytherapy in cardiovascular prevention. PMID:22781377

Volpe, Massimo; Pignatelli, Giulia; Paneni, Francesco

249

Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.  

PubMed

These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations. PMID:12658506

Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

2003-03-26

250

Younger age of escalation of cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indian subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk factors start early, track through the young age and manifest in middle age in most societies. We conducted epidemiological studies to determine prevalence and age-specific trends in cardiovascular risk factors among adolescent and young urban Asian Indians. METHODS: Population based epidemiological studies to identify cardiovascular risk factors were performed in North India in 1999–2002. We evaluated major

Rajeev Gupta; Anoop Misra; Naval K Vikram; Dimple Kondal; Shaon Sen Gupta; Aachu Agrawal; RM Pandey

2009-01-01

251

[S1 Clinical guideline"adenoids and adenoidectomy"].  

PubMed

On behalf of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, a clinical guideline for adenoids and adenoidectomy was developed in 5 consensus meetings after taking into consideration the current literature. This guideline was released by the presidium on 13 April 2011. Anatomy, pathology and pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis, therapy, and course are presented. PMID:22864901

Wilhelm, T; Hilger, G; Begall, K; Lautermann, J; Kaschke, O; Mir-Salim, P; Zahnert, T

2012-08-01

252

Process description and evaluation of Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines development  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper describes the process used to arrive at recommended physical activity guidelines for Canadian school-aged children and youth (5-17 years), adults (18-64 years) and older adults (?65 years). METHODS: The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) Physical Activity Measurement and Guidelines (PAMG) Steering Committee used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument to inform the

Mark S Tremblay; Michelle E Kho; Andrea C Tricco; Mary Duggan

2010-01-01

253

Thyroid nodule guidelines: agreement, disagreement and need for future research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews agreement, disagreement and need for future research of the thyroid nodule guidelines published by the British Thyroid Association, National Cancer Institute, American Thyroid Association and the joint, transatlantic effort of three large societies, the American Society of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi and the European Thyroid Association, published in 2010. Consensus exists for most topics in the

Laszlo Hegedüs; Erik Alexander; Roberto Valcavi; Enrico Papini; Hossein Gharib; Ralf Paschke

2011-01-01

254

Guidelines on the radical management of patients with lung cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A joint initiative by the British Thoracic Society and the Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland was undertaken to update the 2001 guidelines for the selection and assessment of patients with lung cancer who can potentially be managed by radical treatment.

Eric Lim; David Baldwin; Michael Beckles; John Duffy; James Entwisle; Corinne Faivre-Finn; Keith Kerr; Alistair Macfie; Jim McGuigan; Simon Padley; Sanjay Popat; Nicholas Screaton; Michael Snee; David Waller; Chris Warburton; Thida Win

2010-01-01

255

Executing Clinical Pratice Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A clinical practice guideline can be implemented using a guideline execution engine. The engine can interpret the clinical practice guideline, obtain medical data stored in a clinical information system (CIS), and implement an action in response to execut...

B. Wu C. Taunk D. R. Berg J. M. Thrun P. Ram R. M. Abarbanel

2004-01-01

256

National Multiple Sclerosis Society  

MedlinePLUS

... that JavaScript is enabled in your browser. National Multiple Sclerosis Society Accessibility Navigation: Skip to resource navigation Skip ... Primary Content: Programs & Services Events My Content National Multiple Sclerosis Society Latest News In The News Some of ...

257

Civil Society and Accountability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the question of whether trust in civil society groups is justified when it comes to giving voice to the poor. It addresses the issue of accountability as it relates to civil society, defining \\

Mary Kaldor

2003-01-01

258

COMPRESSED MEDICAL GASES GUIDELINE  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... COMPRESSED MEDICAL GASES GUIDELINE. (REVISED) FEBRUARY 1989. ... COMPRESSED MEDICAL GASES GUIDELINE. INTRODUCTION. ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/guidances

259

Japanese guideline for childhood asthma.  

PubMed

The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2010 (JAGL 2010) describes childhood asthma based on the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2008 (JPGL 2008) published by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. JAGL 2010 provides information on diagnosis by age groups from infancy to puberty, treatment for acute exacerbations, long-term management by medication, daily life guidance, and patient education to allow physicians, not specialized in childhood asthma, to refer to this guideline for routine medical treatment. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA) in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2-5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents. PMID:21636964

Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Morikawa, Akihiro; Nishima, Sankei

2011-03-01

260

Trends in cardiovascular diseases in Bosnia and Herzegovina and perspectives with heartscore programme.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases are still the major cause of death, morbidity, mortality and loss of quality of life in European countries and worldwide. In Bosnia and Herzegovina we have burden of cardiovascular diseases with higher rate of morbidity and mortality than in the countries of EU zone or broader Europe. The cause of mortality is in close relation to multiple risk factors but also with specific conditions in our country; post war situation, transition and overall economic position. The main mission of European Society of Cardiology is to improve quality of life in the European population by reducing the impact of cardiovascular diseases. HeartScore web based program and PS Standalone program are introduce to assesses the overall risk of cardiovascular death for a period of 10 years, based on variables such as age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure and cholesterol levels in the blood, or total cholesterol/HDL ratio. Standalone PS HeartScore is practical to use, requires no permanent internet connection, the system offers its own database for each patient and the print version of the guidelines to reduce risk factors, based on evidence based medicine Program is tailored to patients, the system provides a graphical representation of the absolute risk of CVD, a version for our country is developed on the principle of high-risk populations and is available in the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Program is available for all types of medical practice which is equipped with computers, the laptop, and suitable for community nursing service as well. PMID:21287948

Masic, Izet; Dilic, Mirza; Raljevic, Enver; Vulic, Dusko; Mott, Dario

2010-01-01

261

Teams in animal societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the existence of teams in animal societies. Teams have previously been dismissed in all but a tiny minority of insect societies. ''Team'' is a term not generally used in studies of vertebrates. We propose a new rigorous definition of a team that may be applied to both vertebrate and invertebrate societies. We reconsider what it means to work

Carl Anderson; Nigel R. Franks

262

Optical Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Optical Society of America (OSA) is a professional society of optical engineers and scientists devoted to advancing the fields of optics and photonics. The Optical Society of America goals are to increase and diffuse the knowledge of optics, pure and applied, to promote the common interests of investigators of optical problems, of designers, and of users of optical apparatus of all kinds.

2003-10-10

263

[Update on current care guideline: dyslipidaemias].  

PubMed

The updated guideline on the treatment of dyslipidaemias is in concordance with European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention. Treatment of dyslipidaemia aims to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Therapeutic targets for LDL cholesterol, determined by risk assessment, range from concentration < 1.8 mmol/l (very high risk), < 2.5 mmol/l (high risk) to < 3.0 mmol/l (moderate or low risk). Lifestyle (diet, including replacement of saturated with unsaturated fat, physical activity, nonsmoking, stress management) is the cornerstone of treatment. Drug therapy, mainly statins, is considered when risk-stratified LDL targets are not reached otherwise. PMID:23819207

2013-01-01

264

Dietary pattern analysis for the evaluation of dietary guidelines.  

PubMed

Dietary Guidelines for the promotion of overall good health and the prevention of disease often play an important role in setting nutritional policy and in the education of the public about healthy food choices. Although much has been written about adherence to such guidelines, until recently there was no evidence on whether adherence to specific dietary guidelines is associated with better health. As an outcome variable for such analyses, we have used the incidence of major chronic disease, which includes incidence of any major cardiovascular disease, cancer, or death from any cause excluding violence. We have evaluated the Dietary Guidelines for Americans using a scoring system called the Healthy Eating Index developed by the Department of Agriculture to quantify adherence to these guidelines. We found that adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid was associated with only a small reduction in major chronic disease risk in a population of over 100,000 US adult men and women. We also assessed whether an alternate index, which took into account the type of fat and quality of carbohydrate, would better predict risk. In contrast with the original Healthy Eating Index, adherence to the alternative index predicted lower rates of major chronic disease, and particularly cardiovascular disease, suggesting that the Dietary Guidelines were not offering optimal dietary guidance. These analyses suggest that dietary guidelines should be evaluated for their ability to predict the occurrence of major illness, and that such analyses can help refine these guidelines. PMID:18296306

Willett, Walter C; McCullough, Marjorie L

2008-01-01

265

ASCO-CAP guidelines for breast predictive factor testing: an update.  

PubMed

This brief report compares and contrasts the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines for breast cancer predictive factor testing including the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists human epidermal growth factor receptor, type 2, erbB2 Guideline published in 2007 and the recently published Guideline for Estrogen Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Testing by Immunohistochemistry, published in 2011. PMID:22089488

Hammond, M Elizabeth Hale

2011-12-01

266

Decreased mortality after implementation of a treatment guideline for community-acquired pneumonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We developed a pneumonia guideline at Intermountain Health Care that included admission decision support and recommendations for antibiotic timing and selection, based on the 1993 American Thoracic Society guideline. We hypothesized that guideline implementation would decrease mortality.Subjects and methods: We included all immunocompetent patients >65 years with community-acquired pneumonia from 1993 through 1997 in Utah; nursing home patients were

Nathan C Dean; Michael P Silver; Kim A Bateman; Brent James; Carol J Hadlock; David Hale

2001-01-01

267

Understanding knowledge translation through practice guidelines in the intensive care unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. (1) To determine the quality of critical care professional society guidelines and consensus conference statements (CCSs). (2) To understand the barriers and facilitators to guideline adherence for critically ill patients. (3) To develop a conceptual framework and integrated model to optimize guideline implementation and adherence in the ICU.^ Methods. I conducted 4 studies (1 systematic review, 1 survey, and

Tasnim Sinuff

2006-01-01

268

[The PreFord Study. A prospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of a cardiovascular event (overall-collective) as well as a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicentre clinical intervention study (high-risk-collective) on primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in the Ford Motor Company employees in Germany].  

PubMed

The PreFord Study is a multicenter prospective cohort study to evaluate guideline based risk management on primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore a randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be designed to analyse the effect of a special intervention program. 40,000 employees of the Ford Motor Company, Visteon Company and Deutz Company in Germany will be included, monitored for ten years and the following primary endpoints will be investigated: 1. evaluation and comparison of established and newly developed risk-scores, 2. the relative impact of single and combined cardiovascular risk factors on cardiovascular diseases, 3. the influence of a novel occupationally integrated ambulant rehabilitation program in combination with a guideline oriented optimal drug therapy within a high risk group on the primary endpoint: risk reduction by, 4. the influence of this intervention on secondary endpoints: death, myocardial infarction and stroke, combined appearance of angina pectoris and hospitalisation, occurrence of cerebral circulatory disorder and hospitalisation, occurrence of peripheral occlusive arterial disease and hospitalisation and single cardiovascular risk factors and cost-benefit-analysis. Beginning with an cross sectional study there will be a systemic screening of cardiovascular risk profiles, of anthropometric data and different lifestyle-factors. Based on these data participants will be differentiated into three risk-groups according to the risk score of the European Society of Cardiology (risk of a lethal primary acute cardiovascular event: I < or = 1%; II > 1-< 5% and III > or = 5%). In the following longitudinal study different strategies will be applied: Group I: low risk (< 0.5% per year): repetition of the investigation after five and ten years. Group II: middle risk, (0.6% to 1.4% per year), repetition of the investigation every two years, instruction of the patients general practitioner (GP) with respect to a risk factor oriented and evidence based treatment. Group III: high risk, (> 1.5% per year or >15% within the next 10 years) will be randomised into two interventional groups. The first one, the intervention-group "PreFord" will perform an occupational integrated rehabilitation program (2,5-3 hours twice a week, for 15 weeks according to the BAR guidelines) with a following engagement in heart-groups and an annual repetition of the check-ups. The second group, the "classic" intervention-group will be treated evidence based in cooperation with their GP. As a result of this long term interventional study efficient, area wide implementable and economically feasible prevention concepts with special regards to operational healthcare will be developed and evaluated. Core elements will be exercise- and lifestyle-oriented concepts as well as guideline-based pharmacotherapy. PMID:14963679

Gysan, D B; Latsch, J; Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Albus, C; Falkowski, G; Herold, G; Mey, E; Heinzler, R; Montiel, G; Schneider, C A; Stützer, H; Türk, S; Weisbrod, M; Predel, H G

2004-02-01

269

Society for Applied Spectroscopy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Society for Applied Spectroscopy is a nonprofit organization formed to advance and disseminate knowledge and information concerning the art and science of spectroscopy" as well as to advance the professional standing of the Society and foster a close bond among its members. The website provides the Society's latest news, meetings, and conferences. Visitors can learn about the winners of the Society's yearly awards. Everyone can download copies of current and archived issues of the Society's newsletter describing the accomplishments of its members, employment opportunities, official Governing Board minutes, and more. Interested scientists can also find out about membership opportunities.

2005-11-04

270

Society for Applied Spectroscopy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Society for Applied Spectroscopy is a nonprofit organization formed to advance and disseminate knowledge and information concerning the art and science of spectroscopy" as well as to advance the professional standing of the Society and foster a close bond among its members. The website provides the Society's latest news, meetings, and conferences. Visitors can learn about the winners of the Society's yearly awards. Everyone can download copies of current and archived issues of the Society's newsletter describing the accomplishments of its members, employment opportunities, official Governing Board minutes, and more. Interested scientists can also find out about membership opportunities.

271

Scholarly Societies Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Waterloo (Canada) Electronic Library provides this massive meta-index of over 1,100 scholarly societies, from the Abrasive Engineering Society to the Yuen Ren Society for the Promotion of Chinese Dialect Fieldwork. The list can be browsed alphabetically or by any of 39 subjects, and is also searchable. Features include a meeting/conference announcement list, full text archives of scholarly societies' serial publications when available, and pointers to other scholarly societies resources. There is also an essay on the stability of URLs for this meta-page that may interest maintainers of other large meta-pages.

1994-01-01

272

Cardiovascular screening of student athletes.  

PubMed

Each year, a number of children and adolescents die suddenly from cardiac problems that are associated with a small subgroup of disorders and high-risk behaviors. While sudden cardiac death in any child or adolescent is distressing, it can be particularly devastating when it occurs in a seemingly healthy young athlete. Although uncommon in competitive sports, sudden death is a catastrophe that physicians who care for athletes should attempt to prevent. To prevent the occurrence of sudden death or cardiovascular disease progression in young athletes, the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Cardiology, American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and American Osteopathic Academy of Sports Medicine have developed or endorsed recommendations for cardiovascular screening of student athletes as part of a comprehensive sports preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE). Knowledge and understanding of these recommendations can help physicians make informed decisions about the eligibility of an athlete to participate in a particular sport and encourage development of a more uniform PPE screening process. PMID:10969856

Lyznicki, J M; Nielsen, N H; Schneider, J F

2000-08-15

273

Cardiovascular disease in women: reducing cardiovascular comorbidity.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease is the leading etiology of mortality in women. The American Heart Association recommends classifying a woman's risk as 1 of 3 categories: ideal cardiovascular health, at risk, and high risk. Risk levels are based on traditional risk factors, such as lipid levels, blood pressure, body mass index, and smoking status. Risk can be assessed using the Framingham risk score, which estimates an individual's 10-year risk of myocardial infarction or stroke. Other risk factors for cardiovascular disease that should be considered include psychosocial disadvantage, marital status, depression, and anxiety. A multidisciplinary approach to managing these stressors may decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:23977826

Madrazo, Catinca

2013-08-01

274

Society for Ecological Restoration International  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Society for Ecological Restoration International (SER) is comprised of approximately 2,300 members working "to promote ecological restoration as a means of sustaining diversity of life on Earth and reestablishing an ecologically healthy relationship between nature and culture." The SER website links to information about membership; the upcoming 2005 Conference in Zaragoza, Spain; and Reading Resources including Journals, Guidelines for Developing and Managing Ecological Restoration Projects, and the SER Primer on Ecological Restoration. SER also hosts opportunity boards with listings for Professional Employment, Volunteer Opportunities; and Student/Intern Positions; an online marketplace with listings for vendors involved in ecological restoration; and the Plant Conservation Alliance's Directory of Restoration Expertise. The SER site posts boards for educational opportunities as well, including listings for University Programs, Continuing Education, Online Courses, and Children's Programs.

275

Cardiovascular Risk Reduction. The Problems Facing Our Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Continued and expanded efforts to educate people as to what factors contribute to coronary heart disease will help to decrease its occurrence. Risk factors include: cholesterol, smoking, hypertension, obesity, heredity, psychological influences, and the taking of oral contraceptives or alcohol. (CJ)|

Harrison, Donald C.; Winston, Mary

1982-01-01

276

Revision of ACS Guidelines for Undergraduate Chemistry Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is beginning a major revision of the guidelines it uses for approving programs to offer ACS-certified undergraduate degrees in chemistry. The guidelines include curriculum requirements as well as faculty, staff, and facilities requirements. Changes in both chemistry and education make a careful examination and revision of the guidelines particularly appropriate now. The Committee wants to draw on the opinions of the chemistry community as broadly as possible and seeks responses to a collection of specific questions about the undergraduate chemistry curriculum, as well as general comments about the guidelines.

Fleming Crim, F.; Polik, William F.

2004-12-01

277

Guideline for Capsule Endoscopy: Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding  

PubMed Central

Capsule endoscopy (CE) is considered as a noninvasive and reliable diagnostic tool of examining the entire small bowel. CE has been performed frequently at many medical centers in South Korea; however, there is no evidence-based CE guideline for adequate diagnostic approaches. To provide accurate information and suggest correct testing approaches for small bowel disease, the guideline on CE was developed by the Korean Gut Image Study Group, a part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Operation teams for developing the guideline were organized into four areas: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel preparation, Crohn's disease, and small bowel tumor. A total of 20 key questions were selected. In preparing this guideline, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, KMbase, KISS, and KoreaMed literature searches were performed. After writing a draft of the guideline, opinions from various experts were reflected before approving the final document. The guideline should be regarded as recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. These are not absolute rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care. Although further revision may be necessary as new data appear, this guideline is expected to play a role for adequate diagnostic approaches of various small bowel diseases.

Shim, Ki-Nam; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chang, Dong Kyung; Do, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Min, Byung Hoon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Choi, Myung-Gyu

2013-01-01

278

Finnish guidelines for workplace drug testing.  

PubMed

The Finnish guidelines for workplace drug testing outlined here represent what is considered the best practice for workplace drug testing to be followed in Finland. The guidelines are based on the act on the protection of privacy in working life (759/2004), the occupational health care act (1383/2001) and the decree on workplace drug testing (218/2005). They start by defining situations in which workplace testing is allowed and continue up to the point where the certificate is submitted to the employer. The role of the occupational health care system is crucial in the procedure. The guidelines include the best practice procedures to be followed by laboratories providing workplace drug testing services. The laboratory recommendations are based on general principles established internationally. In the Finnish guidelines, accreditation is an absolute prerequisite for a laboratory functioning as a workplace drug testing laboratory. The laboratory section of the guidelines includes specimen collection, laboratory organisation, analysis procedure, quality assurance and quality control measures. These largely conform to the European laboratory guidelines for legally defensible workplace drug testing published by the European workplace drug testing society (EWDTS), but there are differences. In addition to using urine as a specimen, the Finnish guidelines also encompass blood. PMID:17499950

Lillsunde, Pirjo; Haavanlammi, Katariina; Partinen, Ritva; Mukala, Kristiina; Lamberg, Matti

2007-05-17

279

Towards Higher Education in an Active Society: Three Policy Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is part of a report which was published earlier in toto as ED 040 695. The first section of the report discusses the perspective of the study; the strategy of cross-commitment, which consists of (1) a year of national service, (2) greater protection of teaching from research, and (3) new measures to advance equality of opportunities in…

Etzioni, Amitai

280

Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

McGrath, K-CY; McRobb, LS; Heather, AK

2008-01-01

281

The Meteoritical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Meteoritical Society is a non-profit scholarly organization founded in 1933 to promote the study of extraterrestrial materials and their history." The website provides the latest Society news and downloads to its annual newsletter and bulletins. Scientists can find out about upcoming meetings and workshops, Society publications, and membership opportunities. Students and educators can locate materials describing meteorites, tektites, dust, and lunar samples as well as links to outside educational resources.

282

Palivizumab use among children with congenital heart disease in Quebec: Impact of Canadian guidelines on clinical practice  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Palivizumab has been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization caused by respiratory syncytial virus in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Guidelines published in 2003 by the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) stated that children younger than 24 months with hemodynamically significant CHD should be considered for up to five monthly doses of palivizumab during the winter season. OBJECTIVE To assess the impact of CPS guidelines on the use of palivizumab in children with CHD. METHODS Clinical information was reviewed on all patients with CHD who were prescribed palivizumab in 2002–2003 and 2003–2004 and who were followed by one of four paediatric cardiovascular programs in the province of Quebec. RESULTS Palivizumab was prescribed to 45 children in 2002–2003 and to 146 children in 2003–2004. The number of children receiving more than five doses increased from 10 of 45 (22%) in 2002–2003 to 57 of 128 (45%) in 2003–2004 (P=0.008). One hundred seventeen of 146 children (80%) receiving palivizumab in 2003–2004 met the CPS guidelines versus 38 of 45 children (84%) in 2002–2003 (ie, before the guidelines were published) (P=0.66). Patients not meeting CPS criteria were older than 24 months at the time of the first dose, had hemodynamically insignificant CHD or had lesions adequately corrected by surgery. CONCLUSIONS The number of children with CHD receiving palivizumab prophylaxis increased significantly following the publication of CPS guidelines. The majority of children were eligible for palivizumab according to the current CPS criteria. More patients received more than five doses in 2003-2004 than in 2002–2003.

Bellavance, Marc; Rohlicek, Charles V; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Cote, Jean-Marc; Paquet, Marc; Lebel, Marc H; Mackie, Andrew S

2006-01-01

283

Cardiovascular Research in Times of Troubled Economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to the XXII Nordic-Baltic Congress of Cardiology. This year, for the first time, the National Societies of the five Nordic and the three Baltic countries have joined forces to create a new and stronger Nordic-Baltic forum for cardiovascular science. The stage is international and the participants are attracted not only from all corners of the Nordic-Baltic region, but also

David O Arnar; Karl Andersen

2009-01-01

284

Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

Cañedo, Luis

2008-08-01

285

National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Operated by the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Association of Health Plans (AAHP), The National Guideline Clearinghouse provides information about hundreds of "evidence-based clinical practice guidelines" for health care professionals. Guidelines from over 100 different medical organizations can be searched or browsed by disease or condition; treatment or intervention method; or issuing organization. Each record includes the date of release and current status of the guideline, major recommendations for interventions and practices, organization(s) and committee members responsible for the guideline, and methods used to collect evidence and rate the quality of evidence. A link to the full text of the guideline is provided if available. When more than one guideline has been released on a topic, users can compare selected guidelines in chart format. A News section tells developers how to submit guidelines to the Clearinghouse.

1999-01-01

286

British Thoracic Society national bronchiectasis audit 2010 and 2011.  

PubMed

There have been two national British Thoracic Society (BTS) bronchiectasis audits from 1 October to 30 November in 2010 and 2011 in patients with non-cystic fibrosis attending secondary care. The first audit was soon after the publication of the BTS guidelines in July 2010 and both audits were based on the BTS guideline recommendations. We had 1460 and 2404 records in the 2 years respectively. The national audits highlight that the majority of guideline recommendations were not currently being adhered to and demonstrate the need for national quality standards, which are currently in preparation. PMID:22807516

Hill, Adam T; Welham, Sally; Reid, Kerry; Bucknall, C E

2012-07-17

287

Cyber Physical Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural physical space provides material basis for the birth and evolution of human beings and civilization. The progress of human society has created the cyber space. With the rapid development of information technology, the cyber space is connecting physical space, social space and mental space to form a new world - Cyber Physical Society. The way to explore the cyber

Hai Zhuge

2010-01-01

288

Environment, energy, and society  

SciTech Connect

This book delineates the major ways in which human society and the environment affect each other. To study the structure of societies, it employs three conceptual models, or sociological paradigms, conservative, liberal, and radical. The book explains the courses in environmental sociology, international development, natural resources, agriculture, and urban or regional planning.

Humphrey, C.R.; Buttel, F.R.

1986-01-01

289

INTRODUCING GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY  

Microsoft Academic Search

he words 'global' and 'civil society' have become commonplace during the last decade. Yet what they mean and how they come together are subject to widely differing interpretations. For some, global civil society refers to the protestors in Seattle and Prague or Greenpeace's actions against trans- national corporations: in other words, a counter- weight to global capitalism. For others, the

Helmut Anheier; Marlies Glasius; Mary Kaldor

2001-01-01

290

Schools, Violence, and Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The seeming increase of violence in American society and its schools has become a pressing issue. Some researchers argue that the American education system mirrors the dynamics of society. The articles in this book address the following issues: the extent of violence in American schools; the forms that violence takes; its root causes; the effects…

Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.

291

Materials Research Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the web page for the Materials Research Society, an organization of materials researchers from academia, industry, and government that promotes communication for the advancement of interdisciplinary materials research to improve the quality of life. The Society recognizes professional and technical excellence, conducts symposium tutorials, and encourages technical interaction among college students through University Chapters. Membership is required to access articles.

2010-06-02

292

Geologists' Role in Society  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|At a meeting sponsored by the Geological Society of America, earth scientists examined their function in society. Participants concluded that earth scientists are not providing a rationale for value judgments concerning the use and limitations of the earth and a program aimed at understanding solid-Earth resource systems is needed. (BT)|

Bally, A. W.; And Others

1976-01-01

293

Metabolic and Cardiovascular Response to Shallow Water Exercise in Young and Older Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared the metabolic and cardiovascular responses of young and older women while performing shallow water exercise (SWE). Overall, SWE elicited metabolic and cardiovascular responses that met American College of Sports Medicine's guidelines for establishing health benefits. Older females self-selected a greater relative exercise intensity…

Campbell, Jennifer A.; D'Acquisto, Leo J.; D'Acquisto, Debra M.; Cline, Michael G.

2003-01-01

294

Intermediate Sanctions in Sentencing Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Foreword; Acknowledgments; Executive summary; Intermediate sanctions in sentencing guidelines; Intermediate sanctions; Sentencing guidelines; Incorporating intermediate sanctions in sentencing guidelines; Problems and prospects; and Lis...

M. Tonry

1997-01-01

295

[Prostate cancer: interpretation of management guidelines].  

PubMed

The guidelines of the urological and oncological societies reflect the different possible interpretations of evidence-based medicine, as well as the medical and economical, or even medico-legal constraints in the various countries. Essentially, the guidelines of the American Urological Association seem to be focused on the medico-legal aspects, and offer urologists a wide range of treatment options through each stage of the disease. The recommendations of the British National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) focus heavily on the medical and economic aspects and the risk-benefit ratio, whereas in those of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) overall survival is the main criteria. The French and European recommendations (Association française d'urologie [AFU] and European Association of Urology [EAU]) are almost equivalent, except for a few minor differences, and strongly reflect the recommendations of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). PMID:23682482

Ploussard, Guillaume; Desgrandchamps, François

2013-04-01

296

Candidaemia in the non-neutropenic patient: A critique of the guidelines.  

PubMed

Several guidelines have been published on the management of candidaemia. These guidelines vary in their recommendations, and the lack of consistency between the guidelines has implications for the management of candidaemia. We critiqued five guidelines, including the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Guidelines for the Management of Candidiasis, the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Invasive Candidiasis in Adults, the Joint Recommendations of the German Speaking Mycological Society and the Paul-Ehrlich-Society for Chemotherapy, the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Candida Diseases, and the Brazilian Guidelines for the Management of Candidiasis. The recommendations in these guidelines vary in all major areas of management, including choice of initial therapy, species-specific therapy (Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis), transition to oral therapy (3 days as per IDSA but 10 days as per ESCMID), catheter removal and specialty referrals. We found that too much emphasis has been placed on themes such as predicting the infecting species (and therefore fluconazole susceptibility) or the need for investigations such as echocardiography. We also stress that guidelines fail to provide adequate information (due to lack of evidence) on the most relevant issues that clinicians face when managing candidaemia, such as the place for fluconazole in the treatment of C. glabrata, the clinical relevance of dose-dependent susceptibility to fluconazole, and the timing of step-down therapy. PMID:24016797

Deshpande, A; Gaur, S; Bal, A M

2013-09-07

297

Recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents in Korea, the Korean Pediatric Society, 2013 (The Committee on Infectious Diseases, the Korean Pediatric Society)  

PubMed Central

This guideline contains the recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents in Korea by the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the Korean Pediatric Society, updated in March 2013. It also includes a catch-up immunization schedule for children and adolescents who are behind the recommended schedule. These schedules are a minor revision of the corresponding parts of immunization guideline, 7th edition, of the Korean Pediatric Society, released in 2012. Tables of this paper are published with quotation approval of immunization schedule English version of Committee on Infectious Diseases and Committee on Publication of the Korean Pediatric Society.

2013-01-01

298

Physical activity recommendations and cardiovascular disease risk factors in young Hispanic women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the benefits associated with regular physical activity, there is little epidemiological evidence to support positive health outcomes when meeting physical activity guidelines in high-risk ethnic groups, such as Hispanic women. We compared cardiovascular disease risk factors between young Hispanic women who meet and those who do not meet current physical activity guidelines. Height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure

Chantal A. Vella; Diana Ontiveros; Raul Y. Zubia; Lance Dalleck

2011-01-01

299

National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is based on the work of The State Library of Ohio, the National Bookmobile Guidelines Committee, and staff of local Ohio bookmobile programs. Draft guidelines were approved by the 7th National Bookmobile Conference (May 31-June 2, 1992). The Guidelines provide brief statements of standards followed by specifics which indicate…

Ohio State Library, Columbus.

300

National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication is based on the work of The State Library of Ohio, the National Bookmobile Guidelines Committee, and staff of local Ohio bookmobile programs. Draft guidelines were approved by the 7th National Bookmobile Conference (May 31-June 2, 1992). The Guidelines provide brief statements of standards followed by specifics which indicate…

Ohio State Library, Columbus.

301

Best practices for developing cardiovascular quality indicators.  

PubMed

The Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan recommended that the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) lead the development of pan-Canadian data definitions and quality indicators (QIs) for evaluating cardiovascular care in Canada. In response to this recommendation, the CCS developed and adopted a standardized QI development methodology. This report provides a brief overview of the CCS "Best Practices" for developing pan-Canadian cardiovascular QIs. A more detailed description is available in Supplemental Material. The CCS Best Practices QI development methodology consists of 3 phases: phase I, plan and organize the QI development initiative; phase II, develop and select QIs; and phase III, operationalize the QIs. Phase I includes identifying the cardiovascular focus or content area, determining the objective and/or purpose of the initiative, the target users of, and the target population for, the QIs, and selection of a QI working group. Phase II involves formulating the QIs including generating a preliminary set of QIs and draft definitions, followed by an indicator rating and ranking process based on the CCS QI rating criteria. Phase III involves finalizing technical specifications and pilot testing the QIs. It also describes the CCS QI approval process and addresses knowledge translation. Adoption of a standardized methodology for QI development will improve the quality, completeness, acceptability, and usability of pan-Canadian cardiovascular QIs developed by the CCS. Public release of the QI definitions and related performance data might help improve patient care quality and outcomes. PMID:23962730

Tu, Jack V; Abrahamyan, Lusine; Donovan, Linda R; Boom, Nicole

2013-08-17

302

Food Pyramid of the Swiss Society for Nutrition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swiss Society for Nutrition issued its Food Pyramid in 2005. It was updated according to the latest scientific evidence and is in principal agreement with food-based guidelines of other countries. It has also been officially endorsed by the Swiss government. The food pyramid stands for a balanced diet that guarantees the body a sufficient supply of energy, essential nutrients

Paul Walter; Esther Infanger; Pascale Mühlemann

2007-01-01

303

Adopting Moderate Alcohol Consumption in Middle Age: Subsequent Cardiovascular Events  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeModerate alcohol use is part of a healthy lifestyle, yet current guidelines caution nondrinkers against starting to drink alcohol in middle age. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adopting moderate alcohol consumption in middle age would result in subsequent lower cardiovascular risk.

Dana E. King; Arch G. Mainous; Mark E. Geesey

2008-01-01

304

Role of antiplatelet drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antiplatelet drugs have an established place in the prevention of vascular events in a variety of clinical conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. Both European and American guidelines recommend the use of antiplatelet drugs in patients with established coronary heart disease and other atherosclerotic disease. In high-risk patients, such as those with post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI), ischaemic

Micha Tendera; Wojciech Wojakowski

2003-01-01

305

Is Low-Impact Aerobic Dance an Effective Cardiovascular Workout?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents results of an investigation comparing energy cost and cardiovascular responses of aerobic dance routines performed at different intensity levels in varying amounts of energy expenditure. For low-impact dance to meet minimum guidelines suggested by the American College of Sports Medicine, it should be performed at high intensity. (SM)|

Williford, Henry N.; And Others

1989-01-01

306

Phycological Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Represented by 2,000 members world-wide, the Phycological Society of America (PSA) is a scientific organization dedicated to algae research and education. The PSA website contains information about Society meetings, membership, related conferences, and the _Journal of Phycology_. The site also posts information about graduate research opportunities and assistantships as well as a limited number of student grants, fellowships, and awards. In addition to downloadable copies of current and past newsletters, the PSA website provides an extensive list of phycological links under such categories as Societies & Journals, Web Publications & Catalogues, and Culture & Museum Collections.

307

The Meteoritical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Meteoritical Society, which provides this interesting Website, is an international scholarly society formed to promote the study of meteors and meteorites, interplanetary dust, lunar samples, and other extraterrestrial materials. The site acquaints visitors with such phenomena as tektites (impact glass), moon rocks, and space dust by featuring referenced overview articles, authored by scholars and researchers, which deal with the various objects and materials. Each summary includes one or more photographs or figures (.gif). News from the Society, meeting information, and links are also provided.

308

Photographic Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Photographic Society of America is the premiere organization of its kind in the world dedicated to the advancement of the art of photography. Most of its membership are amateur photographers from all walks of life but there are also a considerable number of members who are professional photographers. Announcements about upcoming events sponsored by the Society are posted on this page. Informational documents and other forms are available on this page for those who are interested in the Society and about what services are available for members.

1997-01-01

309

Consumption in the Information Society  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

2010-01-01

310

The place of guidelines in hospital-acquired pneumonia.  

PubMed

The recent increase in hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) has meant that hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) has come under the spotlight. HAP is the most common HAI contributing to death and affects about 0.5-1% of all patients admitted to hospital. HAP significantly increases health complications and extends the length of time patients stay in hospital by up to 13 days on average, thus impacting significantly on hospital resources. The British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia guidelines were published on the society's website last year and represent one of only two sets of evidence-based HAP guidelines in the world which deal with the trio of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. This paper reviews the evolution and status of HAP guidelines, drawing attention to recent developments, differences in approach and outcomes and further areas of work. There are clear indications that the implementation of evidence-based guidelines will reduce HAP and improve patient outcomes. PMID:17482718

Masterton, R

2007-05-07

311

The new hypertension guidelines.  

PubMed

The Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) has published guidelines annually since 2000. The CHEP guidelines are a model of concise, comprehensive, up-to-date, evidence-rated guidelines for physicians who diagnose and treat hypertension. The guidelines address measurement of blood pressure and the definition of hypertension, secondary hypertension evaluation and treatment, and blood pressure targets and medication choices in patients with and without compelling indications. This review describes CHEP's process for developing guidelines and provides an overview of the 2013 recommendations. PMID:24088284

H Stern, Ralph

2013-07-22

312

The american brachytherapy society recommendations for permanent prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetric analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this report is to establish guidelines for postimplant dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy.Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate dosimetry evaluation performed a literature review and supplemented with their clinical experience formulated guidelines for performing and analyzing postimplant dosimetry of permanent prostate brachytherapy.Results: The ABS recommends that postimplant dosimetry should

Subir Nag; William Bice; Keith DeWyngaert; Bradley Prestidge; Richard Stock; Yan Yu

2000-01-01

313

New England Rug Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Appreciation of antique rugs is widespread throughout the United States, and New England is no exception to this phenomenon. The New England Rug Society was formed in 1985 as the New Boston Rug Society, and now it has over 130 members who "share a common love of the traditional creative textile arts." On their website, visitors will find sections such as "Meetings", "Newsletter", "Gallery", "Literature", and "Blog". The "Gallery" area contains a selection of excellent online exhibits, including "Rare and Unusual Turkmen Pile Weavings" and "Small Weavings of the South Persian Nomads". Next up is the "Literature" section. Here visitors will find links to thoughtful pieces authored by Society members, and the offerings including "How Good is My Rug Collecting?" and "Some Thoughts on Islamic Prayer Rugs and Related Textiles". The site is rounded out by information on joining the Society and a link to their blog.

314

Iran Chamber Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 2001, the Iran Chamber Society was created in order to provide a non-partisan, non-commercial, comprehensive source of information on Iran. The website's "About Us" section states that their aim is to "create a global awareness about Iranian society and eradicate the misunderstandings and misconceptions about Iranian society, and to play an educational role as well." Visitors will find the website divided up into "Art and Culture", "History", "Society" and "Iran's Guide". The "Exhibitions and Conferences" link on the right side of the homepage leads visitors to a number of exhibitions, including the fascinating "Artistic Murals of Tehran's Metro Stations", which offers a dozen pictures of the beautifully handcrafted murals made of pottery, metal, cement and other materials. The "History" section offers pictures and documents, including some disturbing graphic photos from the Iran-Iraq War in 1980-1988 that appear at the end of the Historic Periods and Events section.

315

The Society of Rheology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Society of Rheology is composed of physicists, chemists, biologists, engineers, and mathematicians interested in the advancing and applications or rheology, the science of deformation and flow of matter.

2003-10-10

316

Society of Nuclear Medicine  

Cancer.gov

June 14, 2008 12:00 AM - June 18, 2008 12:00 AM Ernest N Morial Convention Center, Booth 419 New Orleans, LA + Add to Outlook Calendar 2008 Annual Meeting Print This Page Society of Nuclear Medicine News & Events

317

Society of Interventional Radiology  

Cancer.gov

March 15, 2008 12:00 AM - March 20, 2008 12:00 AM Washington Convention Center Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar 33rd Annual Meeting Print This Page Society of Interventional Radiology News & Events

318

Radiation and Society  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a discussion of the risks, to society, from radiation-associated technologies and urges that science teachers help the public understand the decision-making process relative to nuclear power as well as the problems and alternatives. (PEB)

Shaw, Edward I.

1974-01-01

319

Ethnicity and cardiovascular disease prevention in the United Kingdom: a practical approach to management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Kingdom is a diverse society with 7.9% of the population from black and minority ethnic groups (BMEGs). The causes of the excess cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke morbidity and mortality in BMEGs are incompletely understood though socio-economic factors are important. However, the role of classical cardiovascular (CV) risk factors is clearly important despite the patterns of these risk

G Y H Lip; A H Barnett; A Bradbury; F P Cappuccio; P S Gill; E Hughes; C Imray; K Jolly; K Patel; GYH Lip

2007-01-01

320

Underreporting of conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines: cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Conflicts of interest affect recommendations in clinical guidelines and disclosure of such conflicts is important. However, not all conflicts of interest are disclosed. Using a public available disclosure list we determined the prevalence and underreporting of conflicts of interest among authors of clinical guidelines on drug treatments. Methods We included up to five guidelines published from July 2010 to March 2012 from each Danish clinical specialty society. Using the disclosure list of the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, we identified author conflicts of interest and compared them with the disclosures in the guidelines. For each guideline we extracted methodological characteristics of guideline development. Results Forty-five guidelines from 14 specialty societies were included. Of 254 authors, 135 (53%) had conflicts of interest, corresponding to 43 of the 45 guidelines (96%) having one or more authors with a conflict of interest. Only one of the 45 guidelines (2%) disclosed author conflicts of interest. The most common type of conflict of interest (83 of the 135) was being a consultant, an advisory board member or a company employee. Only 10 guidelines (22%) described the methods used for guideline development, 27 (60%) used references in the text and 11 (24%) graded the types of evidence. Conclusions Conflicts of interest were common, but disclosures were very rare. Most guidelines did not describe how they were developed and many did not describe the evidence behind specific recommendations. Publicly available disclosure lists may assist guideline issuing bodies in ensuring that all conflicts are disclosed.

2013-01-01

321

Animal care guidelines and future directions.  

PubMed

Two notions broadly accepted in developed western societies have made animal care guidelines inevitable. These are that domestic animals are sentient and that humans are responsible to ensure the proper care of domestic animals. Despite these common views, people have differing moral understandings of the human-animal relationship, and there are sharp divisions over how these views should be applied to domestic animal care. Animal care guidelines have been developed by different nations at several organizational levels to represent a compromise that is acceptable to most people. These organizational levels include individual poultry companies, national poultry associations, individual customers of the poultry industry, national associations of customer companies, national governments, and international organizations. Animal care guideline development has typically included input from producers and scientists and, depending on the sponsoring organization, animal advocates and government representatives as well. Animal advocacy groups have also sought to influence domestic animal care by campaigning against animal production practices or by offering their preferred guidelines for producers to adopt in the hope that the endorsement of the welfare group would add value to the product. Originally, animal care guidelines were only recommended, with little or no requirement for compliance. In recent years, the need for retail companies to assure certain welfare standards has led to animal welfare auditing of production facilities. Animal care guidelines primarily have sought to establish standards for handling and husbandry in existing production systems. Future guidelines may put increasing emphasis on adoption of alternative management practices or housing systems. International animal care guidelines are being developed on 2 levels (i.e., among national governments to create a common standard for trade in animal products and within international retail companies to create company-wide animal care standards). These initiatives should tend to unify farm animal care standards worldwide but perhaps at a level some nations might consider lower than preferable. PMID:17495102

Webster, A B

2007-06-01

322

Consensus guidelines on sedation and analgesia in critically ill children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The United Kingdom Paediatric Intensive Care Society Sedation, Analgesia and Neuromuscular Blockade Working Group is a multi-disciplinary expert panel created to produce consensus guidelines on sedation and analgesia in critically ill children and forward knowledge in these areas. Sedation and analgesia are recognised as important areas of critical care practice and adult clinical practice guidelines in these fields remain amongst the

Stephen Playfor; Ian Jenkins; Carolyne Boyles; Imti Choonara; Gerald Davies; Tim Haywood; Gillian Hinson; Anton Mayer; Neil Morton; Tanya Ralph; Andrew Wolf

2006-01-01

323

Development and implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines in physical therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Quality assurance and cost-effectiveness are important issues in modern-day healthcare. They are of great concern to the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). One strategy for improving the quality of physical therapy (physiotherapy) is to minimize undesirable variability in clinical practice by developing and implementing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. However, even well- established guidelines will not contribute to

J. Van der Wees

324

Nanotechnology and society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past experience has shown that the successful introduction of a new technology requires careful attention to the interactions\\u000a between the technology and society. These interactions are bi-directional: on the one hand, technology changes and challenges\\u000a social patterns and, on the other hand, the governance structures and values of the society affect progress in developing\\u000a the technology. Nanotechnology is likely to

Kenneth H. Keller

325

Nanotechnology and society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past experience has shown that the successful introduction of a new technology requires careful attention to the interactions\\u000a between the technology and society. These interactions are bi-directional: on the one hand, technology changes and challenges\\u000a social patterns and, on the other hand, the governance structures and values of the society affect progress in developing\\u000a the technology. \\u000a \\u000a Nanotechnology is likely to

Kenneth H. Keller

2007-01-01

326

The Paleontological Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Paleontological Society, an international non-profit organization founded in 1908, created this Web site devoted to the advancements in paleontology. The site allows paleontologists access to abstracts in a few journals including Paleobiology. Prospective students will discover grant opportunities. Media representatives with questions about the history of life on earth can find contacts for paleontologists. Scientists can also learn about the society's Distinguished Lecture Program, which features lectures in various locations in the United States.

327

Astronomical Society of Victoria  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Astronomical Society of Victoria website promotes its efforts to act as a forum for a wide variety of people interested in astronomy. Users can find learn about the monthly meetings open to the public. The website introduces the Society's many sections including Computing, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Current Phenomena, and Radio Astronomy. The Newcomers link furnishes helpful lists of astronomy books, magazines, and computer software. Everyone will enjoy the fantastic images of the Great Orion Nebula, the Trifid Nebula, and other space phenomena.

328

European civil society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of “civil society” is still the subject of thorough academic research. It emerged, in Europe, in the 18th century\\u000a and implied a culture of civility which, while emphasising autonomy from established institutions, also emphasised the freedom\\u000a to associate and a commitment to common good beyond particular interests. A modern definition of the concept makes civil society\\u000a the sum

Philippe van Amersfoort

2005-01-01

329

Florida Panther Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The Florida Panther Society is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the recovery of the Florida panther population. The Society's Webpage offers background information on panthers, genetic restoration efforts, the state's panther population, field notes on current research/ restoration activities, and photographs of some of the remaining individuals.

330

Digital Systems Software Requirements Guidelines. Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document provides descriptions of 45 failures that are linked to software requirements review guidelines listed in Volume 1 prepared under Contract NRC-00-037. The failure descriptions are lesson learned illustrating why specific software requirement...

M. Hecht H. Hecht

2001-01-01

331

Association between cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis--reappraisal  

PubMed Central

Positive association between cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis is important because it concerns two major public health problems. Men and women with cardiovascular diseases (including severe abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) and peripheral arterial disease) tend to have lower areal and volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) as well as faster bone loss, although findings vary according to skeletal site. On one hand, severe forms of cardiovascular diseases (heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertension, severe AAC) are associated with higher risk of osteoporotic fracture, especially hip fracture. This link was found in the studies based on healthcare databases and the cohort studies. On the other hand, low BMD, history of fragility fracture, vitamin D deficit and increased bone resorption are associated with higher risk of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infraction, stroke, cardiovascular mortality). Moreover, osteocalcin secreted by osteoblasts may be involved in the regulation of energetic and cardiovascular metabolism. The association between both pathologies depends partially on the shared risk factors, and also on the mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of bone and cardiovascular metabolism. Interpretation of the data should take into account methodological limitations: representativeness of the cohorts, quality of the registers and the information obtained from questionnaires, severity of diseases, number of events (statistical power) and their temporal closeness, availability of the information on potential confounders. It seems that patients with severe form of osteoporosis would benefit from assessment of the cardiovascular status and vice versa. However, official guidelines for the clinical practice are still lacking.

Szulc, Pawel

2012-01-01

332

Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is mainly due to (atherosclerotic) cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular morbidity is also increased in comparison with the general population. This increased cardiovascular burden could be caused by 1) an enhanced prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors 2) under treatment of cardiovascular risk factors or 3) RA itself, particularly due to its chronic inflammatory component.

Michael T. Nurmohamed

2009-01-01

333

SMB: Society for Mathematical Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Society for Mathematical Biology (SMB) is an international society devoted to increasing communication between the mathematical and biological communities through holding conferences and publishing journals.

334

Socioeconomic status and cardiovascular risk factors in the Czech Republic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background In western countries, prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and most risk factors is higher in lower socioeconomic groups. The social gradients in the former communist societies are less well known. Because in western countries different indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) are correlated, this gradient is found with a number of different measures of SES. We have analysed the presence and

Martin Bobak; Clyde Hertzman; Zdenka Skodovac; Michael Marmota

335

Cardiovascular drug therapy in the elderly: benefits and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing life expectancy in industrialized societies has resulted in a huge population of older adults with cardiovascular disease. Despite advances in device therapy and surgery, the mainstay of treatment for these disorders remains pharmacological. Hypertension affects two-thirds of older adults and remains a potent risk factor for coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke in this age

Wilbert S. Aronow; William H. Frishman; Jerome L. Fleg

2010-01-01

336

ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.  

PubMed

Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on specific indications, processes, or parameters of care for which high level of evidence data and Class I or Class III guideline recommendations may be lacking but are addressed in ACCF appropriate use criteria documents. Structure/safety measures represent measures developed to address structural aspects of the use of healthcare technology (e.g., laboratory accreditation, personnel training, and credentialing) or quality issues related to patient safety when there are neither guidelines recommendations nor appropriate use criteria. Although the strength of evidence for appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures may not be as strong as that for formal performance measures, they are quality measures that are otherwise rigorously developed, reviewed, tested, and approved in the same manner as ACCF/AHA performance measures. The ultimate goal of the present document is to provide direction in defining and measuring the appropriate use-avoiding not only underuse but also overuse and misuse-and proper application of cardiovascular technology and to describe how such appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures might be developed for the purposes of quality improvement and public reporting. It is anticipated that this effort will help focus the national dialogue on the use of cardiovascular technology and away from the current concerns about volume and cost alone to a more holistic emphasis on value. PMID:21875906

Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

2011-08-29

337

Clinical Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular imaging holds the promise of becoming a key diag- nostic modality in cardiovascular medicine by allowing visualiza- tion of specific targets and pathways that precede or underlie changes in morphology, physiology, and function. As such, mo- lecular imaging aims at detecting precursors or early stages of cardiovascular disease and at monitoring and guiding novel, in- creasingly specific and versatile

Frank M. Bengel

2009-01-01

338

Cardiovascular Effects of Caffeine  

PubMed Central

A review of the literature on the cardiovascular effects of caffeine indicates that moderate caffeine consumption does not cause cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, or an increased incidence of coronary heart disease. Caffeine use is often associated with atherogenic behavior, such as cigarette smoking. Failure to take into account covariables for cardiovascular disease could be responsible for commonly held misconceptions about caffeine and heart disease.

Myers, Martin G.

1992-01-01

339

Tabaco y enfermedad cardiovascular  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tobacco is currently responsible for the death of about 5 million people worldwide each year, being the increase in cardiovascular diseases a substantial part of these deaths. It acts synergistically with other risk factors, so that smokers with hypertension and hypercholesterolemia can have a 20-fold increase in their cardiovascular mortality. Smokers that quit tobacco have a quick decrease in their

VÍCTOR LÓPEZ GARCÍA-ARANDA; JUAN CARLOS; GARCÍA RUBIRA; Víctor López

2004-01-01

340

Cardiovascular Disease in Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a physician, coach, or trainer, we see athletes as healthy, physically fit, and able to tolerate extremes of physical endurance. It seems improbable that such athletes may have, on occasion, underlying life-threatening cardiovascular abnormalities. Regular physical activity promulgates cardiovascular fitness and lowers the risk of cardiac disease. However, under intense physical exertion and with a substrate of significant cardiac

Frederick C. Basilico

1999-01-01

341

Cardiovascular Disease in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost 62 million Americans have one or more types of cardiovascular disease and, of these, more than 32 million are female. This translates into an average of 1 in 5 women, making cardiovascular disease the leading killer of women in the U.S., responsible for more than half a million deaths a year. While it has been known for some time

W. L ANE DUVALL

2003-01-01

342

Psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases.  

PubMed

Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated disorder that affects about 2% to 3% of the adult population. Several reports have demonstrated an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction, hypertension, valvular disease and arrhythmia. In this review we analysed the link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and the possible physiopathologic mechanism of this correlation. PMID:20666273

Vizzardi, Enrico; Raddino, Riccardo; Teli, Melissa; Gorga, Elio; Brambilla, Giulio; Dei Cas, Livio

2010-06-01

343

[S3 guideline--Diagnosis and treatment of colorectal carcinoma: relevance for radiologic imaging and interventions].  

PubMed

The new German S3 guideline "Colorectal Carcinoma" was created as part of the German Guideline Program in Oncology of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany, the German Cancer Society and the German Cancer Aid under the auspices of the German Society for Digestive and Metabolic Diseases and replaces the guideline from 2008. With its evidence-based treatment recommendations, the guideline contains numerous updates and detailed definitions regarding the diagnosis and treatment of colon and rectal cancer. In particular, consensus-based recommendations regarding early detection, preoperative diagnostic method selection, and the use of interventional radiological treatment methods are detailed. The guideline also includes quality indicators so that standardized quality assurance methods can be used to optimize patient-related processes.The present article discusses the significance of the current recommendations for radiological diagnosis and treatment and is intended to enhance the quality of patient information and care by increasing distribution. PMID:23804154

Vogl, T J; Schmiegel, W; Pox, C; Pereira, P L; Brambs, H J; Lux, P; Fischer, S

2013-06-26

344

Cardiovascular Risk in Survivors of Stroke  

PubMed Central

Background Stroke survivors are at significant risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Inadequately managed modifiable risk factors increase the threat of recurrent stroke, development of new co-morbidities, and double the risk of premature mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in stroke survivors who completed a research screening evaluation for entry into exercise rehabilitation studies. The sample collected between January 2001 and June 2005 evaluated 364 community-dwelling men and women aged 34 to 88 years living in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods Each participant’s risk profile was evaluated from data obtained during a medical history and physical examination and from laboratory analysis of a fasting blood sample. Current practice guidelines were used to define risk categories. Results Ninety-nine percent of participants had at least one sub-optimally controlled risk factor. Ninety-one percent had two or more concurrent risk factors inadequately treated. Eighty percent of the participants had pre-hypertension or hypertension, 67% were overweight or obese, 60% had sub-optimal LDL, 45% had impaired fasting glucose, 34% had low HDL, and 14 % were current smokers, while reportedly receiving routine medical care. Conclusions These findings confirm that cardiovascular risk factors remain inadequately managed in stroke survivors, increasing the chance for repeat stroke and cardiovascular event. Systematic assessment of this vulnerable population is imperative at every healthcare encounter.

Kopunek, Susan P.; Michael, Kathleen M.; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Resnick, Barbara; Nahm, Eun-Shim; Whitall, Jill; Goldberg, Andrew; Macko, Richard F.

2007-01-01

345

Lipid screening and cardiovascular health in childhood.  

PubMed

This clinical report replaces the 1998 policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics on cholesterol in childhood, which has been retired. This report has taken on new urgency given the current epidemic of childhood obesity with the subsequent increasing risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in older children and adults. The approach to screening children and adolescents with a fasting lipid profile remains a targeted approach. Overweight children belong to a special risk category of children and are in need of cholesterol screening regardless of family history or other risk factors. This report reemphasizes the need for prevention of cardiovascular disease by following Dietary Guidelines for Americans and increasing physical activity and also includes a review of the pharmacologic agents and indications for treating dyslipidemia in children. PMID:18596007

Daniels, Stephen R; Greer, Frank R

2008-07-01

346

Wisconsin State Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1846 and chartered in 1853, the Wisconsin State Historical Society is the oldest American historical society to receive continuous public funding. Their well-designed Web site also provides a host of searchable archives that will help users find a vast array of materials contained with their collections. The first place that visitors may want to look at is the Archives Online Catalog (ArCat), which is the most comprehensive tool for searching for materials held by the Historical Society. For new users to the site, a "How do I?" section provides quick answers to using their resources, such as how to find historic sites throughout the state or how to conduct genealogical research at the Society. The site also contains numerous educational aids for teachers and students, including lesson plans and a cultural overview of the different periods in Wisconsin archaeology. Overall, the site serves as an excellent introduction to both the collections of the Historical Society and their public outreach programs.

347

[Smoking and cardiovascular diseases].  

PubMed

Smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor and smoking cessation is essential in any approach to cardiovascular prevention. Events occurring wthout any threshold of intensity or duration of consumption, smoking is the essential and often isolated factor in the acute coronary events of the young subjects. The mechanisms involved are mainly thrombosis and spasm. Smoking cessation provides a rapid and very important cardiovascular benefit and has the best cost/benefit ratio for cardiovascular prevention. The main objective is an early, total and definitive cessation. Nicotine replacement therapy can be prescribed in patients with coronary artery disease, including immediately after a myocardial infarction. Passive smoking must also be considered as a cardiovascular risk factor and should be avoided by collective and individual measures. PMID:22514985

Thomas, Daniel

2012-03-01

348

Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.  

PubMed

Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. PMID:24099052

Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

2013-10-01

349

Guidelines on the management of fibromyalgia syndrome - a systematic review.  

PubMed

We compared the methodology and the recommendations of evidence-based guidelines for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) to give an orientation within the continuously growing number of reviews on the therapy of FMS. Systematic searches up to April 2008 of the US-American National Guideline Clearing House, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) and Medline were conducted. Three evidence-based guidelines for the management of FMS published by professional organizations were identified: The American Pain Society (APS) (2005), the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (2007), and the AWMF (2008). The steering committees and panels of APS and AWMF were comprised of multiple disciplines engaged in the management of FMS and included patients, whereas the task force of EULAR only consisted of physicians, predominantly rheumatologists. APS and AWMF ascribed the highest level of evidence to systematic reviews and meta-analyses, whereas EULAR credited the highest level of evidence to randomised controlled studies. Both APS and AWMF assigned the highest level of recommendation to aerobic exercise, cognitive-behavioral therapy, amitriptyline, and multicomponent treatment. In contrast, EULAR assigned the highest level of recommendation to a set of to pharmacological treatment. Although there was some consistency in the recommendations regarding pharmacological treatments among the three guidelines, the APS and AWMF guidelines assigned higher ratings to CBT and multicomponent treatments. The inconsistencies across guidelines are likely attributable to the criteria used for study inclusion, weighting systems, and composition of the panels. PMID:19264521

Häuser, Winfried; Thieme, Kati; Turk, Dennis C

2009-03-04

350

Physical activity, obesity and cardiovascular diseases.  

PubMed

Sedentary lifestyle and overweight are major public health, clinical, and economical problems in modern societies. The worldwide epidemic of excess weight is due to imbalance between physical activity and dietary energy intake. Sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and consequent overweight and obesity markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular physical activity 45-60 min per day prevents unhealthy weight gain and obesity, whereas sedentary behaviors such as watching television promote them. Regular exercise can markedly reduce body weight and fat mass without dietary caloric restriction in overweight individuals. An increase in total energy expenditure appears to be the most important determinant of successful exercise-induced weight loss. The best long-term results may be achieved when physical activity produces an energy expenditure of at least 2,500 kcal/week. Yet, the optimal approach in weight reduction programs appears to be a combination of regular physical activity and caloric restriction. A minimum of 60 min, but most likely 80-90 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per day may be needed to avoid or limit weight regain in formerly overweight or obese individuals. Regular moderate intensity physical activity, a healthy diet, and avoiding unhealthy weight gain are effective and safe ways to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases and to reduce premature mortality in all population groups. Although the efforts to promote cardiovascular health concern the whole population, particular attention should be paid to individuals who are physically inactive, have unhealthy diets or are prone to weight gain. They have the highest risk for worsening of the cardiovascular risk factor profile and for cardiovascular disease. To combat the epidemic of overweight and to improve cardiovascular health at a population level, it is important to develop strategies to increase habitual physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in collaboration with communities, families, schools, work sites, health care professionals, media and policymakers. PMID:16596798

Lakka, T A; Bouchard, C

2005-01-01

351

Inspection Guideline of BWR Core Internals in Japan  

SciTech Connect

There are crack experiences of core internal components worldwide. So Thermal and Nuclear Power Engineering Society in Japan organized the committee to prepare the appropriate inspection and evaluation guidelines for core internal components at February, 2000. This committee consists of scholars and representatives from utilities and vendors in Japan. At this committee, guidelines for rational inspection and the evaluation method for structural integrity of each core internal components have been developed. For BWR, inspection guidelines for main core internal components like shroud support, core shroud, top guide, core plate, jet pump etc. were prepared at March 2002. Basic concept of guidelines and inspection guideline of shroud support as example will be explained here. (authors)

Akio Yamamoto [Chubu Electric Power Company Inc., 1, Higashi-shincho Higashi-ku, Nagoya-shi, ACH 461-8680 (Japan); Naoto Iizuka [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan); Takeshi Yosiinaga [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan); Haruo Fujimori [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Yuuichi Motora [Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

2002-07-01

352

Advanced information society(2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

Masuyama, Keiichi

353

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

354

American Antiquarian Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Worcester, Massachusetts, the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) is an independent research library that was founded in 1812. Its rather impressive collections document the life and spirit of America from the colonial period until the end of Reconstruction in 1876. The Society's holdings include books, newspapers, periodicals, broadsides, music, and local histories. For visitors who may be interested in visiting the AAS to do research, they will want to take a look at the online guidebook to its collections and programs, titled "Under its Generous Dome". The site also offers some online exhibits drawn from the Society's holdings, including "Visions of Christmas", which exhibits the holiday-themed artwork of such individuals as Thomas Nast and Louis Prang. Finally, visitors can also read about various fellowship opportunities offered by the AAS, along with information about tours of the AAS for the general public.

355

Ecological Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1915, the Ecological Society of America (ESA) is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization of scientists that is dedicated to several primary goals related to the promotion of ecological science, raising the public's level of awareness of the importance of ecological science, and increasing the resources available for the conduct of ecological science. The website is an indispensable source of material about ecological science and the society's various activities, including the annual meeting, career opportunities, membership information, and publications. The publications section is particularly useful, as visitors can learn about society journals (such as _Ecology_), monographs, and the popular Issues in Ecology series. Visitors have complete access to the Issues in Ecology series (in English and Spanish). Journalists and the general public will want to look at the Public Affairs Office area which features news releases and the bi-weekly Policy News update, which summarizes major environmental and science policy news from the previous two weeks.

356

The Edith Wharton Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Edith Wharton Society has created a Website to promote the study and discussion of the life and work of this major American novelist and short story writer. Wharton (1862-1937) -- author of Ethan Frome (1911) and the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Age of Innocence (1920), among many other titles -- is highly regarded as a writer of keen insight and polished prose who deftly exposed the social hypocrisy of her era. The Society's Website, hosted by Professor Donna M. Campbell of Gonzaga University, provides information about the society, maintains a membership directory, offers a timely News and Announcements section, posts calls for papers, lists upcoming conferences, and publishes a current Wharton bibliography that includes titles from 1992 to the present. In addition, the site links to Wharton's writings on the Web and sponsors an electronic discussion list, wharton-l.

357

Ohio Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Anyone doing research into the history of Ohio or its role in the Civil War, the War of 1812, or the establishment of the Northwest Territory should find this site very valuable. The Online Collection Catalog contains "more than 230,000 items in the Society's library, newspaper, manuscript, audiovisual, history, natural history, and archaeology collections." In addition, a number of valuable historical documents are available online from the society's state archives, including materials relating to the African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920, part of the Library of Congress's American Memory project; Ohio's role in the Civil War; and the establishment and history of the Northwest Territory. Visitors can also access past and present versions of the Ohio constitution and a Death Certificate Index of Ohioans, 1913-1937. In addition, the site features primary resources for teachers and links to exhibits and programs at the more than 60 different locations of the Ohio Historical Society.

358

International Symbiosis Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Symbiosis Society (ISS) "is primarily involved with the promotion of research and education in the growing field of symbiosis. The Society seeks also to build ongoing and useful communication between the many researchers working in the various sub-fields of symbiosis, as well as connect symbiologists to those in other areas of ecology and biological sciences generally." Hosted by Boston University, the ISS website contains information about membership, and the international journal _Symbiosis_. For authors interested in submitting a manuscript to the journal, the site provides brief, downloadable instructions. In addition, the site links to the websites of Society members working in a variety of areas including Bark Beetles/Fungi, Cyanobacterial Symbioses, Lichens, Marine Symbioses, Mycorhizae, and more. Also, be sure to check out the fascinating images in the Symbiosis Gallery! This site is also reviewed in the June 10, 2005 _NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

359

Guidelines for Children's Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents American's with Disabilities Act guidelines for building school toilet facilities that serve children with disabilities. Several dimension charts are provided showing min/max measurements. (GR)

Gettelman, Alan

1999-01-01

360

Reflecting on use of the GRADE process for development of the 2013 PAD Guidelines.  

PubMed

This article evaluates the methodology used to develop the updated American College of Critical Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Pain Agitation and Delirium (PAD) Guidelines in terms of (1) evaluating the role of a medical librarian in the guidelines development process; (2) summarizing the impressions of the guideline task force members on the use of Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation and anonymous voting to develop guideline questions, statements, and recommendations; and (3) analyzing the impact of this approach to developing clinical practice guidelines on interrater reliability in evaluating evidence, statements, and recommendations. PMID:23716316

Davidson, Judy E; Tung, Avery; Kishman, Charles P; Barr, Juliana

2013-05-28

361

The Cloud Appreciation Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cloud Appreciation Society believes that "clouds are Nature's poetry" and, therefore, "pledges to fight 'blue-sky thinking'." Visitors can find out about the latest cloud related news and events. The website offers a forum for users to ask cloud-related questions and communicate with other cloud enthusiasts. Anyone in the UK can join the society for free and membership will soon be expanding to other areas of the world. Everyone should check out the numerous fascinating pictures in the cloud gallery. Individuals can also contribute their cloud photographs to the continually growing collection. This site is also reviewed in the March 4, 2005_NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

362

Society's expectations of health  

PubMed Central

Sir Edmund Leach argues that doctors in the modern world, fortified by the traditional concept that the life of the sick person must at all costs be preserved, are to some extent guilty of the false antitheses current today between youth and age. Moreover youth means health, age illness and senility. Until this imbalance is corrected society will be in danger of `a kind of civil war between the generations'. Society must be taught again that mortality cannot be avoided or conquered by medical science, and at the same time that `health' is not enshrined in the young alone.

Leach, Edmund

1975-01-01

363

Society for Vector Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formed in 1968, the Society for Vector Ecology (SOVE) is dedicated to studying "all aspects of the biology, ecology, and control of arthropod vectors and the interrelationships between the vectors and the disease agents they transmit." Comprised of researchers and operational and extension personnel around the globe, SOVE tracks and studies the biological organisms that transmit diseases. The SOVE Website contains information related to the Society (e.g., mission, history), its publications (journal, newsletter -- both .pdf format), and professional opportunities (conferences, employment). Several dozen links to additional vector ecology resources are provided.

2002-01-01

364

Virginia Herpetological Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Displaying an earnest enthusiasm for their local herp populations, the Virginia Herpetological Society (VHS) proclaims itself to be a "society for everyone interested in the Education, Conservation, and Research of amphibians and reptiles." The main VHS site links to a host of resources including photos of, and information about, anurans, lizards, salamanders, snakes, and turtles. The site also links to such features as the Virginia Snake ID Guide, downloadable Virginia Herpetological Atlases, Marty's Timber Rattlesnake Summary, Species Accounts, and the Photograph of the Month. Site visitors can even test their knowledge with a fun photographic Virginia Herp Quiz.

365

Time to detoxify medical literature from guideline overdose.  

PubMed

The current financial turmoil in the United States has been attributed to multiple reasons including healthcare expenditure. Health care spending has increased from 5.7 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP) in 1965 to 16 percent of the GDP in 2004. Healthcare is driven with a goal to provide best possible care available at that period of time. Guidelines are generally assumed to have the high level of certainty and security as conclusions generated by the conventional scientific method leading many clinicians to use guidelines as the final arbiters of care. To provide the standard of care, physicians follow guidelines, proposed by either groups of physicians or various medical societies or government organizations like National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This has lead to multiple tests for the patient and has not survived the test of time. This independence leads to lacunae in the standardization of guidelines, hence flooding of literature with multiple guidelines and confusion to patients and physicians and eventually overtreatment, inefficiency, and patient inconvenience. There is an urgent need to restrict articles with Guidelines and develop some strategy like have an intermediate stage of pre-guidelines and after 5-10 years of trials, a systematic launch of the Guidelines. There can be better ways than this for putting together guidelines as has been suggested by multiple authors and researchers. PMID:22807603

Vyas, Dinesh; Vyas, Arpita K

2012-07-14

366

The Discursive Construction of Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall concern of this paper is to consider the concept of society and present some analyses of how `society' is used in participants' discourse as a rhetorical resource. After schematically reviewing several traditional notions of society as they appear in the sociological and allied literatures, we point out some of the difficulties associated with theorizing society and assess the

John Bowers; Kate Iwi

1993-01-01

367

Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: This guideline focuses on long-term administration of antithrombotic drugs designed for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, including two new antiplatelet therapies. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We present 23 recommendations for pertinent clinical questions. For primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, we suggest low-dose aspirin (75-100 mg/d) in patients aged > 50 years over no aspirin therapy (Grade 2B). For patients with established coronary artery disease, defined as patients 1-year post-acute coronary syndrome, with prior revascularization, coronary stenoses > 50% by coronary angiogram, and/or evidence for cardiac ischemia on diagnostic testing, we recommend long-term low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 1A). For patients with acute coronary syndromes who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement, we recommend for the first year dual antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin in combination with ticagrelor 90 mg bid, clopidogrel 75 mg/d, or prasugrel 10 mg/d over single antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing elective PCI with stent placement, we recommend aspirin (75-325 mg/d) and clopidogrel for a minimum duration of 1 month (bare-metal stents) or 3 to 6 months (drug-eluting stents) (Grade 1A). We suggest continuing low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel for 12 months for all stents (Grade 2C). Thereafter, we recommend single antiplatelet therapy over continuation of dual antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Recommendations continue to favor single antiplatelet therapy for patients with established coronary artery disease. For patients with acute coronary syndromes or undergoing elective PCI with stent placement, dual antiplatelet therapy for up to 1 year is warranted.

Vandvik, Per Olav; Lincoff, A. Michael; Gore, Joel M.; Gutterman, David D.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Akl, Elie A.; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

2012-01-01

368

[Childhood diet and cardiovascular risk factors].  

PubMed

Atherosclerosis begins during childhood. A strong relationship has been shown between the prevalence and extent of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated body mass index, blood pressure and plasma lipid concentrations, starting in childhood. These risk factors are influenced by genetic predisposition, but also by environmental factors, and particularly diet. The Nutrition Committee of the French Pediatrics Society of Pediatrics has reviewed the scientific basis of dietary recommendations for children, in order to limit risk factors and thereby to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. This review focuses on the effects of prenatal nutrition; the beneficial effects of breast-feeding on cholesterolemia, blood pressure and corpulence in later life; the impact of dietary lipids on plasma lipid concentrations; the effects of salt and potassium intake on blood pressure; and the relation between lifestyle and corpulence. PMID:22292299

Turck, Dominique

2011-03-01

369

[S2 guideline for infectious endocarditis].  

PubMed

Microbe-induced (infectious) endocarditis is an endovascular infection, caused mainly by bacteria, of cardiovascular structures. The major predilection site are the native heart valves, but involvement of implanted intracardiac foreign material is increasingly being seen. The mortality rate of infectious endocarditis depends on clinical factors and the causal agent, but also on the time of the establishment of the diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. In Germany, the current mortality rate ranges up to 18%. Between January 2003 and July 2004, with the aim of improving patient care and thus the outcome of this condition, a guideline commission worked out recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment and management of the disease for the use of general practitioners and hospital physicians, in particular microbiologists, infectiologists, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. The basis for this guideline was the systematic search through the literature of the European guideline. On the 16th and 28th of June 2004, the entire guideline was formerly approved in a nominal group process. PMID:15662902

Naber, C K; Bauhofer, A; Block, M; Buerke, M; Erbel, R; Graninger, W; Herrmann, M; Horstkotte, D; Kern, P; Lode, H; Mehlhorn, U; Meyer, J; Mügge, A; Niebel, J; Peters, G; Shah, P M; Werdan, K

2004-12-01

370

The Iberoamerican Cerebrovascular Diseases Society: 15 years moving forward.  

PubMed

The Iberoamerican Cerebrovascular Diseases Society was founded 15 years ago. Being aware of the increased burden of stroke in Latin America, its members have been working to enhance the knowledge on stroke among physicians in the region, to increase public awareness on stroke warning signs, and to motivate public health authorities to implement programs that speed the access of stroke patients to specialized units. Besides organizing annual meetings that have convened an increasing number of attendees, the Society has been actively involved in the elaboration of guidelines for stroke classification and therapy that will be practical for use at a regional level, as well as in the consolidation of links with other stroke societies to increase the diffusion of local stroke issues to the medical community at large. The Society is also involved in the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke trial as well as in other studies that will increase the knowledge on stroke management and prognosis in the region. PMID:23692484

Del Brutto, Oscar H; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Sacks, Claudio; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Náder, Juan; Alonso de Leciñana, María; Massaro, Ayrton

2013-06-01

371

Nigeria: Civil Society Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nigeria has earned a well-deserved reputation for having one of the most diverse and complex polities on the African continent. Not surprisingly, its vast civil society reflects this complexity, presenting a daunting challenge to USAID/Nigeria and other d...

2004-01-01

372

Society's Response to Crime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Crime in America will not be effectively reduced until basic changes are made in the structure and quality of life--respect for law and order will not be restored until respect for the nature of society is restored. (Author/JB)|

Schur, Edwin M.

1973-01-01

373

Electrostatics Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the portal of ESA, a society devoted to advancing communication among professionals in the field of electrostatics. ESA sponsors annual meetings and publishes a free bi-monthly newsletter featuring upcoming events and timely news in the field. Proceedings of the yearly conferences are also published for free download on this website.

Cooper, Steve

2006-11-18

374

Researching Society and Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book provides theoretically informed guidance to practicing the key research methods for investigating society and culture. It is a text in both methods and methodology, in which the importance of understanding the historical, theoretical and institutional context in which particular methods have developed is stressed. The contributors of…

Seale, Clive, Ed.

375

The Eugenics Education Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

WILL you allow me, through your columns, to point out another aspect of the present methods of popularising ``eugenics''? I had recently occasion to criticise this popularisation, and especially the methods of the Eugenics Education Society. I then used the following words:-``Sir Francis Galton was in the problems of race an optimist-a splendid optimist; but even he in the last

Karl Pearson

1914-01-01

376

Science, Technology and Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this extract from his presidential address to the British Association, delivered on August 30, Lord Jackson discusses the impact of the progress of science on society, the kinds of benefit which the public derives from this progress, and the kinds of problem which it creates for the community, for government, and for the scientists themselves.

Lord Jackson

1967-01-01

377

Science, Technology, Society: Opportunities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recognizing the potential pitfalls resulting from a lack of human foresight lies at the heart of the science-technology-society (STS) movement. This issue of "Theory Into Practice" is the second part of a two-part series that examines the educational opportunities arising as educators attempt to develop student understanding of STS. In the first…

Lux, Donald G., Ed.

1992-01-01

378

Cooperation in Large Societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consider the following situation involving two agents who belong to a large society. One of the agents needs help to avoid a big loss. The other agent may either incur a low cost to help him or do nothing. If agents do not recognize each other, providing incentives for socially optimal behavior (helping) is, in general, very difficult. We use

Francesc Dilmé

2012-01-01

379

The Disneyization of Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article proposes the idea of Disneyization as a complementary notion to McDonaldization. Disneyization is depicted as a process by which the principles of the Disney theme parks dominate more and more sectors of society. It is presented as comprising four aspects: them- ing, dedifferentiation of consumption, merchandising, and emotional labour. The empirical manifestations of these attributes are outlined. The

Alan Bryman

1999-01-01

380

Man--Society--Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

381

Big Society, Big Deal?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy…

Thomson, Alastair

2011-01-01

382

Creativity In Conscience Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creativity is a result of brain activity which differentiates individuals and could ensure an important competitive advantage for persons, for companies, and for Society in general. Very innovative branches – like software industry, computer industry, car industry – consider creativity as the key of business success. Natural Intelligence Creativity can develop basic creative activities, but Artificial Intelligence Creativity, and, especially,

Ion Gh. Rosca; Dumitru Todoroi

2011-01-01

383

Slovak Metrological Society.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The brief communication describes the establishment of the Slovak Metrological Society (SMS). SMS came into being on October 16, 1990, as the result of a special founding Congress held in DT Zilina with 137 delegates from the whole of Slovakia in attendan...

J. Mandak

1991-01-01

384

The Uncaring Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of events of the past 20 years, e.g., assassinations, Vietnam, and the energy crisis, America has become a society characterized by mistrust and lack of concern. Creeping impersonalization amounts to a devaluation of the importance of human life. As a result, there is now a move toward stressing individual responsibility. (RM)

Kratcoski, Peter C.; Kratcoski, Lucille Dunn

1983-01-01

385

Researching Society and Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides theoretically informed guidance to practicing the key research methods for investigating society and culture. It is a text in both methods and methodology, in which the importance of understanding the historical, theoretical and institutional context in which particular methods have developed is stressed. The contributors of the…

Seale, Clive, Ed.

386

The Duplex Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The duplex society, in which the poor live in close proximity to others but in a separate compartment, is already with us. Unless something deeply changes about family income, more than one-third of future generations will come to adulthood having spent a portion of their childhood in official poverty. (RM)|

Schorr, Alvin L.

1984-01-01

387

Big Society, Big Deal?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

Thomson, Alastair

2011-01-01

388

American Rhinologic Society  

MedlinePLUS

WELCOME TO THE ARS The American Rhinologic Society promotes excellence in the care of patients with disorders of the nose, sinuses, and skull ... specialist in your area. CALENDAR OF EVENTS Future ars meetings 2014 ARS at COSM May 14-18, ...

389

Assessing Contemporary Hungarian Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kolosi, Tamás: A terhes babapiskóta. A rendszerváltás társadalomszerkezete. (The Pregnant Sponge Finger. The Social Structure of the Change of the System) Budapest: Osiris, 2000. Róbert, Péter: Társadalmi mobilitás a tények és vélemények tükrében. (Social Mobility as Reflected by Facts and Views) Budapest: Andorka Rudolf Társadalomtudományi Társaság - Századvég, 2001. Both the two well-known and respected researchers of Hungarian society have

Gabriella Pusztai

2003-01-01

390

Climate Extremes and Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2005, as the United States still was reeling from Hurricane Katrina in August and as the alphabet was too short to contain all of that year's named Atlantic tropical storms (Hurricane Wilma was forming near Jamaica), a timely workshop in Bermuda focused on climate extremes and society (see Eos, 87(3), 25, 17 January 2006). This edited volume, which

Philip Mote

2009-01-01

391

The Massachusetts Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From its auspicious beginnings in 1792, the Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) has grown to be one of the major historical research libraries and manuscript repositories in New England. Along with its public outreach programs (which visitors can learn about on the site), the society also offer a number of fellowship programs for visiting scholars and persons interested in utilizing its collections. For persons interested in doing research at the society, there are over 51 digitized online finding aids available here as well, along the ABIGAL online catalog which may also prove useful. From the homepage, visitors can also view the Object of the Month feature, which gives detailed information and a digitized image of an important object in the Society's holdings, such as a dramatic photograph of the Boston & Albany passenger train from 1885. Of course, users will not want to miss the fine online resources here, including the electronic archive of correspondence of the Adams Family (including those legendary letters between John and Abigail Adams) and the wonderful electronic archive that contains many original documents and papers from Thomas Jefferson in the collection of the MHS.

392

Can combining different risk interventions into a single formulation contribute to improved cardiovascular disease risk reduction? Rationale and design for an international, open-label program to assess the effectiveness of a single pill (amlodipine\\/atorvastatin) to attain recommended target levels for blood pressure and lipids (The JEWEL Program)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn order to prevent cardiovascular events, it is essential to effectively manage overall risk of cardiovascular disease. However, despite guideline recommendations to this effect, current management of the major, modifiable cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidemia is disconnected and patient adherence to therapy is poor. This is particularly important for patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, who are

F. D. Richard Hobbs; Gianfranco Gensini; G. B. John Mancini; Athanasios J. Manolis; Beverly Bauer; Steffen Böhler; Jacques Genest; Ross Feldman; Peter Harvey; Trond G. Jenssen; Michael Metcalfe; Pedro Marques da Silva

2006-01-01

393

Cardiovascular screening in general practice in a low SES area  

PubMed Central

Background Lower social economic status (SES) is related to an elevated cardiovascular (CV) risk. A pro-active primary prevention CV screening approach in general practice (GP) might be effective in a region with a low mean SES. This approach, supported by a regional GP laboratory, was investigated on feasibility, attendance rate and proportion of persons identified with an elevated risk. Methods In a region with a low mean SES, men and women aged ?50/55 years, respectively, were invited for cardiovascular risk profiling, based on SCORE 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular disease and additional risk factors (family history, weight and end organ damage). Screening was performed by laboratory personnel, at the GP practice. Treatment advice was based on Dutch GP guidelines for cardiovascular risk management. Response rates were compared to those in five other practices, using the same screening method. Results 521 persons received invitations, 354 (68%) were interested, 33 did not attend and 43 were not further analysed because of already known diabetes/cardiovascular disease. Eventually 278 risk profiles were analysed, of which 60% had a low cardiovascular risk (SCORE-risk <5%). From the 40% participants with a SCORE-risk ?5%, 60% did not receive medication yet for hypertension/hypercholesterolemia. In the other five GPs response rates were comparable to the currently described GP. Conclusion Screening in GP in a low SES area, performed by a laboratory service, was feasible, resulted in high attendance, and identification and treatment advice of many new persons at risk for cardiovascular disease.

2012-01-01

394

World Society and the English School:An `International Society' Perspective on World Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the English School's notion of `international society' or the `society of states' and various more sociologically informed conceptions of `world' or `global' society is here examined. The English School is located as a variant of classical realism and its notion of `international society' is then explicated by means of a contrast to the neo-realist idea of an

CHRIS BROWN

2001-01-01

395

Guidelines for Cataloging Videotapes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These guidelines were developed for a presentation at the spring conference of the Wisconsin Educational Media Association on April 23, 1982. Following five general statements, separate guidelines are suggested for videotapes, videocassettes, locally produced videorecordings, and videodiscs. Sample catalog cards are given for each category. (DMC)|

Thompson, Glenn

396

Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

1993-08-01

397

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01

398

Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

399

The TEI Hypertext Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines' approach to describing hypertext features. Discusses the rationale behind the design of the tagset and the range of features included in the guidelines. Discusses the relation and integration of TEI mark-up and the HyTime standard. (CFR)

DeRose, Steven J.; Durand, David

1995-01-01

400

Dental trauma guidelines.  

PubMed

Guidelines have been developed for management of numerous medical and dental conditions. If carefully developed and based on best available evidence, they serve a very useful purpose in giving information in dealing with health problems to health care providers as well as patients. The history of trauma guidelines is quite limited, but the American Association of Endodontists has been involved since the 1980s. In recent years, the International Association of Dental Traumatology has developed guidelines for management of traumatic dental injuries, with input from specialists in all relevant disciplines of dentistry. These guidelines, first developed and published in 2001 and updated twice since then, have been accepted as reliable recommendations for the urgent care of traumatic dental injuries; the most recent trauma guidelines were completed by the International Association of Dental Traumatology and published in 2012. The application of these guidelines is to provide both patients and practitioners with the best available information about management of such injuries. As with most guidelines, there are limitations that are primarily related to the level of evidence available, which is low. However, they are useful and, when followed, can lead to better outcomes than when no guidelines are used. PMID:23439046

Bakland, Leif K

2013-03-01

401

Dental trauma guidelines.  

PubMed

Guidelines have been developed for management of numerous medical and dental conditions. If carefully developed and based on best available evidence, they serve a very useful purpose in giving information in dealing with health problems to health care providers as well as patients. The history of trauma guidelines is quite limited, but the American Association of Endodontists has been involved since the 1980s. In recent years, the International Association of Dental Traumatology has developed guidelines for management of traumatic dental injuries, with input from specialists in all relevant disciplines of dentistry. These guidelines, first developed and published in 2001 and updated twice since then, have been accepted as reliable recommendations for the urgent care of traumatic dental injuries; the most recent trauma guidelines were completed by the International Association of Dental Traumatology and published in 2012. The application of these guidelines is to provide both patients and practitioners with the best available information about management of such injuries. As with most guidelines, there are limitations that are primarily related to the level of evidence available, which is low. However, they are useful and, when followed, can lead to better outcomes than when no guidelines are used. PMID:23635976

Bakland, Leif K

402

Species Conservation Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Species Conservation Guidelines (Guidelines) for the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) provide a tool to determine if a project, i.e., a Federal permit, a Federal construction project, or other such action, may adversely affect the bald eagle. Here we describe what actions might have a detrimental impact on the bald eagle and how these effects can be avoided or minimized.

403

Guidelines for glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glycemic control in diabetes patients continues to evolve as new medications are introduced and clinicaltrial data become available. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for 2004, for the first time, provide targets for both preprandial and postprandial glucose levels. The ADA, however, does not provide guidelines regarding specific medication therapy. This paper provides a detailed treatment algorithm that is easy

Stephen Clement

2004-01-01

404

Developing Computer Use in Education: Guidelines, Trends and Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide educational policy-makers and decision-makers with a basis for the development of guidelines for the development of education programs, this report presents an overview of trends and issues in computer education within the countries of the Asia and Pacific region. The impact of computers on society is described, as well as the…

Anderson, Jonathan; And Others

405

Knowledge and Skill Guidelines for Oceanographic Instrumentation Technicians  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (MATE) has provided this overview of knowledge and skill guidelines for Oceanographic Instrumentation Technicians. The document details the knowledge and skills needed, personal characteristics, occupational titles, common platforms, salary range, educational background, typical tasks, tools and equipment used, conferences, trends, professional societies, important publications, and demographics of Oceanographic Instrumentation Technicians.

2011-09-20

406

Guidelines for the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of inflammatory bowel disease represents a key component of clinical practice for members of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). There has been considerable progress in management strategies affecting all aspects of clinical care since the publication of previous BSG guidelines in 2004, necessitating the present revision.Key components of the present document worthy of attention as having been

Craig Mowat; Andrew Cole; Al Windsor; Tariq Ahmad; Ian Arnott; Richard Driscoll; Sally Mitton; Tim Orchard; Matt Rutter; Lisa Younge; Charlie Lees; Gwo-tzer Ho; Jack Satsangi; Stuart Bloom

2011-01-01

407

North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) Guidelines  

MedlinePLUS

North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) Guidelines Search Children can grow up right before our eyes and each child ... are not based on age. By using these guidelines you can match up your child's growth and ...

408

Participation of Women in Neurochemistry Societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women have made important scientific contributions to the field of neurochemistry, and they have also been leaders in neurochemical societies throughout the world. Here I discuss women's involvement and leadership in six neurochemistry societies: American Society for Neurochemistry, Argentine Society for Neurochemistry, International Society for Neurochemistry, European Society for Neurochemistry, Japanese Society for Neurochemistry, and Asian-Pacific Society for Neurochemistry. The

Marjorie B. Lees

2002-01-01

409

Cardiovascular Software Directory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Directory compiled by the Computer Applications Committee of the American College of Cardiology(ACC), is the first edition of a source of information of software for cardiovascular medicine. The scope of the Directory is broad, including software repr...

1988-01-01

410

Radiology Lab 2: Cardiovascular  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Introduction to concepts important in cardiovascular imaging of normal anatomy, including angiographic techniques and cross-sectional methods.Annotated: trueDisease diagnosis: NormalRadiograph type: angiogram

Shaffer, Kitt

2010-02-24

411

Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

1986-01-01

412

Cardiovascular Interactions CVI Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses.

PhD Carl F. Rothe (Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology)

2005-06-22

413

Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)|

Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

1986-01-01

414

Cardiovascular Research Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life for people with cardiovascular disease through research and ... Total Occlusion and Left Main Summit Feb 27-Mar 1, 2014 The Marriott Marquis Hotel New York, ...

415

Aldosterone and cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through its classic effects on sodium and potassium homeostasis, aldosterone, when produced in excess, is associated with\\u000a the development of hypertension and hence with higher cardiovascular and renal risk. In recent years, experimental and epidemiologic\\u000a data have suggested that aldosterone also may be linked to high cardiovascular risk independently of its effects on blood\\u000a pressure. Thus, aldosterone has been associated

Bruno Vogt; Michel Burnier

2009-01-01