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1

Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and management of stable ischemic heart disease.  

PubMed

This overview provides a guideline for the management of stable ischemic heart disease. It represents the work of a primary and secondary panel of participants from across Canada who achieved consensus on behalf of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. The suggestions and recommendations are intended to be of relevance to primary care and specialist physicians with an emphasis on rational deployment of diagnostic tests, expedited implementation of long- and short-term medical therapy, timely consideration of revascularization, and practical follow-up measures. PMID:25064578

Mancini, G B John; Gosselin, Gilbert; Chow, Benjamin; Kostuk, William; Stone, James; Yvorchuk, Kenneth J; Abramson, Beth L; Cartier, Raymond; Huckell, Victor; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Connelly, Kim; Ducas, John; Farkouh, Michael E; Gupta, Milan; Juneau, Martin; O'Neill, Blair; Raggi, Paolo; Teo, Koon; Verma, Subodh; Zimmermann, Rodney

2014-08-01

2

2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology  

PubMed Central

Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology. PMID:25469139

Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Jeong A; Na, Jin Oh; Yang, Dong Hyun

2014-01-01

3

Focused 2012 update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines: recommendations for stroke prevention and rate/rhythm control.  

PubMed

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published the complete set of 2010 Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines in the January, 2011 issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. During its deliberations, the CCS Guidelines Committee engaged to a timely review of future evidence, with periodic composition of focused updates to address clinically important advances. In 2011, results were published from 3 pivotal AF trials: the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonist for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF), the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) study, and the Permanent Atrial Fibrillation Outcome Study Using Dronedarone on Top of Standard Therapy (PALLAS), comparing dronedarone with placebo in patients with permanent AF and additional cardiovascular disease risk-factor burden. Each of these large randomized trials provided clear results with major implications for AF management. Other important evidence that has emerged since the 2010 Guidelines includes findings about prediction instruments for AF-associated stroke and bleeding risk, stroke risk in paroxysmal-AF patients, risk-benefit considerations related to oral anticoagulation in patients with chronic kidney disease, and risk/benefit considerations in the use of antiplatelet agents, alone and in combination with each other or with oral anticoagulants, in AF patients. The Guidelines Committee judged that this extensive and important new evidence required focused updating of the 2010 Guidelines with respect to stroke prevention and rate/rhythm control. This report presents the details of the new recommendations, along with the background and rationale. PMID:22433576

Skanes, Allan C; Healey, Jeff S; Cairns, John A; Dorian, Paul; Gillis, Anne M; McMurtry, M Sean; Mitchell, L Brent; Verma, Atul; Nattel, Stanley

2012-01-01

4

The 2014 canadian cardiovascular society heart failure management guidelines focus update: anemia, biomarkers, and recent therapeutic trial implications.  

PubMed

The 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides discussion on the management recommendations on 3 focused areas: (1) anemia; (2) biomarkers, especially natriuretic peptides; and (3) clinical trials that might change practice in the management of patients with heart failure. First, all patients with heart failure and anemia should be investigated for reversible causes of anemia. Second, patients with chronic stable heart failure should undergo natriuretic peptide testing. Third, considerations should be given to treat selected patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist and to treat patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction with an angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor, when the drug is approved. As with updates in previous years, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2014 Update includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers to best manage patients with heart failure. PMID:25532421

Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Lepage, Serge; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Koshman, Sheri L; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Chan, Michael; De, Sabe; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélčne; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

2015-01-01

5

[Spanish interdisciplinary committee for cardiovascular disease prevention and the spanish society of cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. differences between the european and american guidelines].  

PubMed

The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en. PMID:25444651

Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

2015-01-01

6

Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines on the use of cardiac resynchronization therapy: evidence and patient selection.  

PubMed

Recent landmark trials provided the impetus to update the recommendations for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). This article provides guidance on the prescription of CRT within the confines of published data. A future article will explore the implementation of these guidelines. These guidelines are intended to serve as a framework for the prescription of CRT within the Canadian health care system and beyond. They were developed through a critical evaluation of the existing literature, and expert consensus. The panel unanimously adopted each recommendation. The 8 recommendations relate to ensuring the adequacy of medical therapy before the initiation of CRT, the use of symptom severity to select candidates for CRT, differing recommendations based on the presence or absence of sinus rhythm, the presence of left bundle branch block vs other conduction patterns, and QRS duration. The use of CRT in the setting of chronic right ventricular pacing, left ventricular lead placement, and the routine assessment of dyssynchrony to guide the prescription of CRT are also included. The strength of evidence was weighed, taking full consideration of any risks of bias, as well as any imprecision, inconsistency, and indirectness of the available data. The strength of each recommendation and the quality of evidence were adjudicated. Trade-offs between desirable and undesirable consequences of alternative management strategies were considered, as were values, preferences, and resource availability. These guidelines were externally reviewed by experts, modified based on those reviews, and will be updated as new knowledge is acquired. PMID:23351926

Exner, Derek V; Birnie, David H; Moe, Gordon; Thibault, Bernard; Philippon, François; Healey, Jeffrey S; Tang, Anthony S L; Larose, Éric; Parkash, Ratika

2013-02-01

7

Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines on the use of cardiac resynchronization therapy: implementation.  

PubMed

Recent studies have provided the impetus to update the recommendations for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). This article provides guidance on the implementation of CRT and is intended to serve as a framework for the implementation of CRT within the Canadian health care system and beyond. These guidelines were developed through a critical evaluation of the existing literature, and expert consensus. The panel unanimously adopted each recommendation. The 9 recommendations relate to patient selection in the presence of comorbidities, delivery and optimization of CRT, and resources required to deliver this therapy. The strength of evidence was weighed, taking full consideration of any risk of bias, and any imprecision, inconsistency, and indirectness of the available data. The strength of each recommendation and the quality of evidence were adjudicated. Trade-offs between desirable and undesirable consequences of alternative management strategies were considered, as were values, preferences, and resource availability. These guidelines were externally reviewed by experts, modified based on those reviews, and will be updated as new knowledge is acquired. PMID:24182753

Parkash, Ratika; Philippon, François; Shanks, Miriam; Thibault, Bernard; Cox, Jafna; Low, Aaron; Essebag, Vidal; Bashir, Jamil; Moe, Gordon; Birnie, David H; Larose, Eric; Yee, Raymond; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Kaul, Padma; Redfearn, Damian; Tang, Anthony S; Exner, Derek V

2013-11-01

8

ASCI 2010 standardized practice protocol for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group  

PubMed Central

These practice guidelines are recommended by the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI), the sole society in Asia designated for cardiovascular imaging, to provide a framework to healthcare providers for suggested essential elements in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations of different disease spectra. The guideline is composed of recommendations on the general technique, acquisition of some basic modules, and protocols on stress tests. The protocols for specific diseases are provided in a table format for quick reference to be easily utilized for everyday clinical CMR. PMID:20924794

Choi, Byoung Wook; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

2010-01-01

9

The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and management of heart failure update: Heart failure in ethnic minority populations, heart failure and pregnancy, disease management, and quality improvement/assurance programs  

PubMed Central

Since 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure (HF) guidelines have published annual focused updates for cardiovascular care providers. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF guidelines update focuses on an increasing issue in the western world – HF in ethnic minorities – and in an uncommon but important setting – the pregnant patient. Additionally, due to increasing attention recently given to the assessment of how care is delivered and measured, two critically important topics – disease management programs in HF and quality assurance – have been included. Both of these topics were written from a clinical perspective. It is hoped that the present update will become a useful tool for health care providers and planners in the ongoing evolution of care for HF patients in Canada. PMID:20386768

Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Costigan, Jeannine; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Kori; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; O’Meara, Eileen; Rajda, Miroslav; Siu, Samuel; Stolee, Paul; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Zeiroth, Shelley

2010-01-01

10

European National Society Cardiovascular Journals  

PubMed Central

Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane?k MD, Jřrgen Videbćk MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rřdevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations) PMID:18665206

Alfonso, F.; Ambrosio, G.; Pinto, F.J.; van der Wall, E.E.

2008-01-01

11

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

2009-01-01

12

[New AHA and ACC guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk : Statement of the D•A•CH Society for Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases, the Austrian Atherosclerosis Society and the Working Group on Lipids and Atherosclerosis (AGLA) of the Swiss Society for Cardiology].  

PubMed

Guidelines for the reduction of cholesterol to prevent atherosclerotic vascular events were recently released by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. The authors claim to refer entirely to evidence from randomized controlled trials, thereby confining their guidelines to statins as the primary therapeutic option. The guidelines derived from these trials do not specify treatment goals, but refer to the percentage of cholesterol reduction by statin medication with low, moderate, and high intensity. However, these targets are just as little tested in randomized trials as are the cholesterol goals derived from clinical experience. The same applies to the guidelines of the four patient groups which are defined by vascular risk. No major statin trial has included patients on the basis of their global risk; thus the allocation criteria are also arbitrarily chosen. These would actually lead to a significant increase in the number of patients to be treated with high or maximum dosages of statins. Also, adhering to dosage regulations instead of cholesterol goals contradicts the principles of individualized patient care. The option of the new risk score to calculate lifetime risk up to the age of 80 years in addition to the 10-year risk can be appreciated. Unfortunately it is not considered in the therapeutic recommendations provided, despite evidence from population and genetic studies showing that even a moderate lifetime reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or non-HDL cholesterol has a much stronger effect than an aggressive treatment at an advanced age. In respect to secondary prevention, the new American guidelines broadly match the European guidelines. Thus, the involved societies from Germany, Austria and Switzerland recommend continuing according to established standards, such as the EAS/ESC guidelines. PMID:24770979

Klose, G; Beil, F U; Dieplinger, H; von Eckardstein, A; Föger, B; Gouni-Berthold, I; Koenig, W; Kostner, G M; Landmesser, U; Laufs, U; Leistikow, F; März, W; Merkel, M; Müller-Wieland, D; Noll, G; Parhofer, K G; Paulweber, B; Riesen, W; Schaefer, J R; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Steinmetz, A; Toplak, H; Wanner, C; Windler, E

2014-05-01

13

SCCT guidelines on radiation dose and dose-optimization strategies in cardiovascular CT  

PubMed Central

Over the last few years, computed tomography (CT) has developed into a standard clinical test for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. The emergence of cardiovascular CT during a period of dramatic increase in radiation exposure to the population from medical procedures and heightened concern about the subsequent potential cancer risk has led to intense scrutiny of the radiation burden of this new technique. This has hastened the development and implementation of dose reduction tools and prompted closer monitoring of patient dose. In an effort to aid the cardiovascular CT community in incorporating patient-centered radiation dose optimization and monitoring strategies into standard practice, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography has produced a guideline document to review available data and provide recommendations regarding interpretation of radiation dose indices and predictors of risk, appropriate use of scanner acquisition modes and settings, development of algorithms for dose optimization, and establishment of procedures for dose monitoring. PMID:21723512

Halliburton, Sandra S.; Abbara, Suhny; Chen, Marcus Y.; Gentry, Ralph; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Hausleiter, Jörg

2012-01-01

14

[Civilization stress, cardiovascular risk, evidence-based medicine, guidelines].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases have the pole-position on the list of morbidity and mortality statistics. Despite the great advances have been made in management of cardiovascular diseases, prevalence of these disorders increases worldwide, and even younger and younger ages are threatened. This phenomenon is strongly related to obesity and type 2 diabetes pandemic, which shows an unequivocal association with expansion of modernized life-style. The pathomechanism proposed to have central role is the chronic stress induced by civilized life-conduct. The authors criticizes the everyday practice suggested for management of cardiovascular diseases, focusing on normalization of cardiovascular risk factors, instead of fighting against the primary cause ie. chronic stress. There is growing evidence, that achieving the target values defined in guide-lines will not necessarily result in improvement of patient related clinical outcomes. The statistical approach generally practiced in randomized clinical trials is primarily striving for the drug-sale, instead of discovering novel pathophysiological relations. Pharmaceutical industry having decisive role in research and patient-care is mainly interested in profit-sharing, therefore patients' interest can not be optimally realized, and costs are unnecessarily augmented. Separation of patient-, and business-oriented medical care is an ethical question of fundamental importance. PMID:19403433

Simon, Kornél

2009-05-10

15

American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines  

PubMed Central

Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

2013-01-01

16

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010: implications for cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) provides science-based advice to promote health and reduce risk of major chronic diseases by diet and physical activity. The primary emphasis is on food-based recommendations that meet energy and nutrient needs. The DGA is made in the context of a total diet designed to reduce the incidence and prevalence of overweight and obesity. In addition, the DGA also targets cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. DGA recommends nutrient-dense foods including fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, lean protein foods including seafood, and vegetable oils. This dietary pattern beneficially affects blood lipids and other CVD risk factors. Foods and nutrients to limit include solid fats (saturated fatty acids, trans-fatty acids), dietary cholesterol, added sugars, refined grains, and sodium. Healthy dietary patterns that emphasize nutrient-dense foods will significantly benefit public health, in part, by reducing CVD risk. PMID:21874316

Flock, Michael R; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

2011-12-01

17

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure – 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies  

PubMed Central

Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:18209766

Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

2008-01-01

18

[Comments on the 2013 ESC/EASD guidelines on diabetes, prediabetes and cardiovascular diseases].  

PubMed

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased cardiovascular risk compared with non-diabetics. The new guidelines provide physicians with orientation with respect to disorders in glucose metabolism and the risk of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. An HBA1c level in the range of 6-8% is currently recommended, depending on cardiovascular comorbidities: in young diabetics 6% is recommended to avoid hypoglycemia and in older individuals with cardiovascular complications 8%. The target blood pressure given in the new guidelines is <140/85 mmHg. The guidelines still recommend bypass surgery instead of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for diabetics; however, this recommendation is based on studies that do not reflect current practice and is disputable. Diagnostic measures and therapy of cardiac failure and arrhythmic disorders in the guidelines do not essentially differ between patients with and without diabetes, basically due to a lack of studies. PMID:25416683

Motz, W; Kerner, W; Dörr, R

2014-12-01

19

Putting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines Into Practice to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2008, the federal government of the United States issued its first-ever physical activity guidelines for Americans. These\\u000a guidelines were based on a large body of scientific evidence, including evidence showing that physical activity can reduce\\u000a the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The guidelines encourage any amount of physical activity, and ideally encourage\\u000a 150 min\\/wk of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 min\\/wk

I-Min Lee

2010-01-01

20

2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment guideline: Paradigm shifts in managing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk.  

PubMed

The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults represents a major shift from prior cholesterol management guidelines. The new guidelines include data from individual randomized trials as well as the most comprehensive meta-analyses, and introduce several major paradigm shifts, which include: aiming for ASCVD risk reduction as opposed to targeting LDL-C levels, advocating for the use of evidence-based doses of statins as first line therapy, and utilizing a new risk calculator and risk cut point to guide initiation of statin therapy. These major changes have created controversy and confusion among the medical community, with some clinicians hesitant to embrace the shift. We review the evidence that forms the basis for these major changes, compare them to other major lipid guidelines, and recommend an integrated approach to managing dyslipidemia to decrease atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:25435519

Finkel, Jonathan B; Duffy, Danielle

2014-10-28

21

Implementation of Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background The successful implementation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention guidelines relies heavily on primary care physicians (PCPs) providing risk factor evaluation, intervention and patient education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the degree of awareness and implementation of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention in clinical practice (CEIPC guidelines) among PCPs. Methods A cross-sectional survey of PCPs was conducted in Spain between January and June 2011. A random sample of 1,390 PCPs was obtained and stratified by region. Data were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Results More than half (58%) the physicians were aware of and knew the recommendations, and 62% of those claimed to use them in clinical practice, with general physicians (without any specialist accreditation) being less likely to so than family doctors. Most PCPs (60%) did not assess cardiovascular risk, with the limited time available in the surgery being cited as the greatest barrier by 81%. The main reason to be sceptical about recommendations, reported by 71% of physicians, was that there are too many guidelines. Almost half the doctors cited the lack of training and skills as the greatest barrier to the implementation of lifestyle and behavioural change recommendations. Conclusions Most PCPs were aware of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention (CEIPC guidelines) and knew their content. However, only one third of PCPs used the guidelines in clinical practice and less than half CVD risk assessment tools. PMID:23506390

2013-01-01

22

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference: peripheral arterial disease - executive summary.  

PubMed

This Consensus Conference has been supported by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. The process is dynamic, with intentional structure that requires peer review and feedback from cardiovascular specialists across Canada. The writing and review panel encompassed a broad range of specialists caring for the patient with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). PAD is an often asymptomatic, underdiagnosed, under-recognized and undertreated condition. It is associated with significant morbidity and cardiac mortality. Until recently, little attention has focused on the evaluation and treatment of the disease process itself. The goal of the present paper is to ensure better treatment, to reduce both morbidity and mortality in the patient with vascular disease and, importantly, to serve as a guide to the busy clinician. Although the focus is PAD, there are chapters on thoracic and abdominal aortic disease, renal arterial disease and the evidence supporting management. Screening and diagnostic techniques including history and physical examination as well as noninvasive imaging techniques are reviewed. Medical management for patients with vascular disease including prevention and risk reduction is graded based on evidence, including both pharmacological and nonpharmacological management strategies, followed by an introduction to newer percutaneous techniques. Finally, surgical treatment for claudication including new concepts on the perioperative risk assessment for patients undergoing major vascular surgery is discussed. PMID:16234879

Abramson, Beth L; Huckell, Vic; Anand, Sonia; Forbes, Tom; Gupta, Anil; Harris, Ken; Junaid, Asad; Lindsay, Tom; McAlister, Finlay; Roussin, Andre; Saw, Jacqueline; Teo, Koon Kang; Turpie, Alexander G; Verma, Subodh

2005-10-01

23

Copyright 2006 American Chemical Society 1 Ethical Guidelines to Publication of Chemical Research  

E-print Network

Copyright © 2006 American Chemical Society 1 Ethical Guidelines to Publication of Chemical Research and engineering research. Every editor of a Society journal has the responsibility to establish and maintain of journals published by the American Chemical Society now present a set of ethical guidelines for persons

Chatterjee, Avik P.

24

Home mechanical ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline  

PubMed Central

Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information. PMID:22059178

McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Côté, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, François; Morrison, Debra L; O’Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

2011-01-01

25

Home mechanical ventilation: a Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline.  

PubMed

Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of userfriendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information. PMID:22059178

McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Cote, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, Fracois; Morrison, Debra L; O'Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

2011-01-01

26

Guidelines of the American Society of Mammalogists for the use of wild mammals in research  

E-print Network

Guidelines for use of wild mammal species are updated from the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM) 2007 publication. These revised guidelines cover current professional techniques and regulations involving mammals used in research and teaching...

Sikes, Robert S.; Carroll, Darin S.; Danielson, Brent J.; Dragoo, Jerry W.; Gannon, Michael R.; Gannon, William L.; Hale, David W.; McCain, Christy M.; Odell, Daniel K.; Olson, Link E.; Ressing, Sarah; Timm, Robert M.; Trewhitt, Stephanie A.; Whaley, Janet E.

2011-02-01

27

Recommendations for cardiac chamber quantification by echocardiography in adults: an update from the american society of echocardiography and the European association of cardiovascular imaging.  

PubMed

The rapid technological developments of the past decade and the changes in echocardiographic practice brought about by these developments have resulted in the need for updated recommendations to the previously published guidelines for cardiac chamber quantification, which was the goal of the joint writing group assembled by the American Society of Echocardiography and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. This document provides updated normal values for all four cardiac chambers, including three-dimensional echocardiography and myocardial deformation, when possible, on the basis of considerably larger numbers of normal subjects, compiled from multiple databases. In addition, this document attempts to eliminate several minor discrepancies that existed between previously published guidelines. PMID:25559473

Lang, Roberto M; Badano, Luigi P; Mor-Avi, Victor; Afilalo, Jonathan; Armstrong, Anderson; Ernande, Laura; Flachskampf, Frank A; Foster, Elyse; Goldstein, Steven A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Muraru, Denisa; Picard, Michael H; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Rudski, Lawrence; Spencer, Kirk T; Tsang, Wendy; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

2015-01-01

28

Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease.  

PubMed

This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement aims to provide succinct perspectives on key issues in the management of thoracic aortic disease (TAD). This document is not a comprehensive overview of TAD and important elements of the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of acute aortic syndromes are deliberately not discussed; readers are referred to the 2010 guidelines published by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, and other stakeholders. Rather, this document is a practical guide for clinicians managing adult patients with TAD. Topics covered include size thresholds for surgical intervention, emerging therapies, imaging modalities, medical and lifestyle management, and genetics of TAD. The primary panel consisted of experts from a variety of disciplines that are essential for comprehensive management of TAD patients. The methodology involved a focused literature review with an emphasis on updates since 2010 and the use of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to arrive at specific recommendations. The final document then underwent review by a secondary panel. This document aims to provide recommendations for most patients and situations. However, the ultimate judgement regarding the management of any individual patients should be made by their health care team. PMID:24882528

Boodhwani, Munir; Andelfinger, Gregor; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lindsay, Thomas; McMurtry, M Sean; Therrien, Judith; Siu, Samuel C

2014-06-01

29

Summary of the british transplantation society guidelines for management of the failing kidney transplant.  

PubMed

The British Transplantation Society "Guideline for Transplantation Management of the Failing Kidney Transplant" was published in May 2014. This is the first national guideline in this field. In line with previous guidelines published by the British Transplantation Society, the guideline has used the GRADE system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations.This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for the management of the failing kidney graft in the United Kingdom and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at: http://www.bts.org.uk/MBR/Clinical/Guidelines/Current/Member/Clinical/Current_Guidelines.aspx. PMID:25299519

Andrews, Peter A

2014-12-15

30

The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future. PMID:20529367

2010-01-01

31

Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance  

PubMed Central

The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

2013-01-01

32

Degree of Concordance with DASH Diet Guidelines and Incidence of Hypertension and Fatal Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension advocate the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. Methods We studied whether a greater concordance with the DASH diet is associated with reduced incidence of hypertension (self-reported) and mortality from cardiovascular disease in 20,993 women initially aged 55–69. We created a DASH diet concordance score using food frequency data in 1986 and followed the women for events through 2002. Results No woman had perfect concordance with the DASH diet. Adjusted for age and energy intake, incidence of hypertension was inversely associated with the degree of concordance with the DASH diet, with hazard ratios across quintiles of 1.0, 0.91, 0.95, 0.99, and 0.87 (p trend = 0.02). There also were inverse, but not monotonic, associations between better DASH diet concordance and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, and all CVD. However, after adjustment for other risk factors, there was little evidence that any endpoint was associated with the DASH diet score. Conclusions Our results suggest that greater concordance with DASH guidelines did not have an independent long-term association with hypertension or cardiovascular mortality in this cohort. This implies that very high concordance, as achieved in the DASH trials, may be necessary to achieve the benefits of the DASH diet. PMID:17324731

Folsom, Aaron R.; Parker, Emily D.; Harnack, Lisa J.

2007-01-01

33

Overview of Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging and Procedures for Clinicians: Focus on Appropriate-Use-Criteria Guidelines  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular imaging and procedures have experienced exponential growth over the past 20 years in terms of new modalities, procedure volume, technological sophistication, and cost. As a result, related quality improvement tools have become multifaceted works in progress. This article briefly summarizes the evolution of the time-honored American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines versus the newer American College of Cardiology Foundation appropriate-use-criteria guidelines and how these may interact with emerging performance measures, clinical data registries, and cardiovascular laboratory accreditation initiatives.

Stainback, Raymond F.

2014-01-01

34

2008 Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy: guidelines for renal anemia in chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

The Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT) guideline committee, chaired by Dr Y. Tsubakihara, presents the Japanese guidelines entitled "Guidelines for Renal Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease." These guidelines replace the "2004 JSDT Guidelines for Renal Anemia in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients," and contain new, additional guidelines for peritoneal dialysis (PD), non-dialysis (ND), and pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Chapter 1 presents reference values for diagnosing anemia that are based on the most recent epidemiological data from the general Japanese population. In both men and women, hemoglobin (Hb) levels decrease along with an increase in age and the level for diagnosing anemia has been set at <13.5 g/dL in males and <11.5 g/dL in females. However, the guidelines explicitly state that the target Hb level in erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) therapy is different to the anemia reference level. In addition, in defining renal anemia, the guidelines emphasize that the reduced production of erythropoietin (EPO) that is associated with renal disorders is the primary cause of renal anemia, and that renal anemia refers to a condition in which there is no increased production of EPO and serum EPO levels remain within the reference range for healthy individuals without anemia, irrespective of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In other words, renal anemia is clearly identified as an "endocrine disease." It is believed that defining renal anemia in this way will be extremely beneficial for ND patients exhibiting renal anemia despite having a high GFR. We have also emphasized that renal anemia may be treated not only with ESA therapy but also with appropriate iron supplementation and the improvement of anemia associated with chronic disease, which is associated with inflammation, and inadequate dialysis, another major cause of renal anemia. In Chapter 2, which discusses the target Hb levels in ESA therapy, the guidelines establish different target levels for hemodialysis (HD) patients than for PD and ND patients, for two reasons: (i) In Japanese HD patients, Hb levels following hemodialysis rise considerably above their previous levels because of ultrafiltration-induced hemoconcentration; and (ii) as noted in the 2004 guidelines, although 10 to 11 g/dL was optimal for long-term prognosis if the Hb level prior to the hemodialysis session in an HD patient had been established at the target level, it has been reported that, based on data accumulated on Japanese PD and ND patients, in patients without serious cardiovascular disease, higher levels have a cardiac or renal function protective effect, without any safety issues. Accordingly, the guidelines establish a target Hb level in PD and ND patients of 11 g/dL or more, and recommend 13 g/dL as the criterion for dose reduction/withdrawal. However, with the results of, for example, the CHOIR (Correction of Hemoglobin and Outcomes in Renal Insufficiency) study in mind, the guidelines establish an upper limit of 12 g/dL for patients with serious cardiovascular disease or patients for whom the attending physician determines high Hb levels would not be appropriate. Chapter 3 discusses the criteria for iron supplementation. The guidelines establish reference levels for iron supplementation in Japan that are lower than those established in the Western guidelines. This is because of concerns about long-term toxicity if the results of short-term studies conducted by Western manufacturers, in which an ESA cost-savings effect has been positioned as a primary endpoint, are too readily accepted. In other words, if the serum ferritin is <100 ng/mL and the transferrin saturation rate (TSAT) is <20%, then the criteria for iron supplementation will be met; if only one of these criteria is met, then iron supplementation should be considered unnecessary. Although there is a dearth of supporting evidence for these criteria, there are patients that have been surviving on hemodialysis in Japan for more than 40 years, and since there

Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Nishi, Shinichi; Akiba, Takashi; Hirakata, Hideki; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kubota, Minoru; Kuriyama, Satoru; Komatsu, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakai, Shigeru; Hattori, Motoshi; Babazono, Tetsuya; Hiramatsu, Makoto; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Bessho, Masami; Akizawa, Tadao

2010-06-01

35

Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction  

PubMed Central

In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

2013-01-01

36

Impact of Guidelines on Healthcare from the Patient and Payor Perspective: Example of the American Pain Society Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical practice relies on structured learning that is applied to a patient care setting. Patients present with symptoms and providers try to fit these complaints into known disease categories. Providers depend on memorized algorithms to direct diagnosis and treatment. Well thought-out guidelines developed by professional societies and based on the best available evidence have become the standard in modern medical

Bill McCarberg

2004-01-01

37

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: from evidence to clinical practice – position statement 2014 of Brazilian Diabetes Society  

PubMed Central

There is a very well known correlation between diabetes and cardiovascular disease but many health care professionals are just concerned with glycemic control, ignoring the paramount importance of controlling other risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of serious cardiovascular diseases. This Position Statement from the Brazilian Diabetes Society was developed to promote increased awareness in relation to six crucial topics dealing with diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Glicemic Control, Cardiovascular Risk Stratification and Screening Coronary Artery Disease, Treatment of Dyslipidemia, Hypertension, Antiplatelet Therapy and Myocardial Revascularization. The issue of what would be the best algorithm for the use of statins in diabetic patients received a special attention and a new Brazilian algorithm was developed by our editorial committee. This document contains 38 recommendations which were classified by their levels of evidence (A, B, C and D). The Editorial Committee included 22 specialists with recognized expertise in diabetes and cardiology. PMID:24855495

2014-01-01

38

Wound Healing Society (WHS) venous ulcer treatment guidelines: what's new in five years?  

PubMed

Since the establishment of the guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers by the Wound Healing Society in 2006, there has been an abundance of new literature, both in accord and discord with the guidelines. The goal of this update is to highlight new findings since the publication of these guidelines to assist practitioner and patient in appropriate health care decisions, as well as to drive future research endeavors. PMID:22805581

Tang, Jennifer C; Marston, William A; Kirsner, Robert S

2012-01-01

39

[Diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology 2014].  

PubMed

In September 2014 the European Society of Cardiology issued guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases in adults. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) represents the imaging modality of first choice as it is rapidly and almost ubiquitously available and can evaluate the entire aorta in a single-step examination. In patients with a high clinical suspicion of an acute aortic syndrome based on (family) history and symptoms, CT should be performed without further delay to confirm or refute the diagnosis. Diseases involving the ascending aorta remain a domain of open surgery, be it on an emergency basis in an acute type A dissection or electively in asymptomatic aneurysms with an aortic diameter >5.5 cm. The presence of risk factors (e. g. bicuspid aortic valve, Marfan syndrome and aortic dissection/rupture in the family history) may prompt earlier surgical repair at a lower threshold diameter. The treatment of descending aortic disease is primarily conservative including modification of cardiovascular risk factors. If indicated, endovascular aortic stent graft repair appears to be superior to open surgery for descending thoracic aortic disease or equivalent in the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. The management of aortic diseases related to genetic connective tissue diseases (e. g. Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) is complex and requires special multidisciplinary expertise. PMID:25406331

Eggebrecht, H

2014-12-01

40

FOCUS: the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists' initiative to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room.  

PubMed

The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) introduced the FOCUS initiative (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) in 2005 in response to the need for a rigorous scientific approach to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR). The goal of the project, which is supported by the SCA Foundation, is to identify hazards and develop evidence-based protocols to improve cardiac surgery safety. A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse event. Specifically, the strategic plan of FOCUS includes 3 goals: (1) identifying hazards in the CVOR, (2) prioritizing hazards and developing risk-reduction interventions, and (3) disseminating these interventions. Collectively, the FOCUS initiative, through the work of several groups composed of members from different disciplines such as clinical medicine, human factors engineering, industrial psychology, and organizational sociology, has identified and documented significant hazards occurring daily in our CVORs. Some examples of frequent occurrences that contribute to reduce the safety and quality of care provided to cardiac surgery patients include deficiencies in teamwork, poor OR design, incompatible technologies, and failure to adhere to best practices. Several projects are currently under way that are aimed at better understanding these hazards and developing interventions to mitigate them. The SCA, through the FOCUS initiative, has begun this journey of science-driven improvement in quality and safety. There is a long and arduous road ahead, but one we need to continue to travel. PMID:25232690

Barbeito, Atilio; Lau, William Travis; Weitzel, Nathaen; Abernathy, James H; Wahr, Joyce; Mark, Jonathan B

2014-10-01

41

British Thoracic Society guideline for non-CFbronchiectasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diagnosis, investigation and particularly management of bronchiectasis has been largely empirical and the subject of relatively few controlled clinical trials. There are no clear guidelines, although an Australian position statement has been published concerning bronchiectasis in children. The purposes of these guidelines were therefore threefold: (1) to identify relevant studies in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis; (2) to provide guidelines

M. C. Pasteur; D. Bilton; A. T. Hill

2010-01-01

42

[Diagnostics and therapy of chronic stable coronary artery disease : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology].  

PubMed

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease published in 2013 give practical recommendations for diagnostics and therapy. The approach depends on the clinical picture and symptoms of the patient, the severity and extent of ischemia, the degree and location of coronary stenoses, additional cardiac findings and finally on non-cardiac comorbidities. The selection of suitable diagnostic tools is based on the tabulated pretest probability for the presence of coronary artery disease which plays an important and central role in the diagnostic algorithm. An invasive approach is recommended only in patients with severe angina, i.e. a Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina grading scale of ? CCS3 or in patients who are at high risk for death or myocardial infarction based on the results of the test used for detection of ischemia. Detailed therapeutic recommendations are given for medicinal and interventional or surgical therapy. Medicinal therapy includes drugs both for relief of symptoms and prevention of cardiovascular events. Recommendations are also given for the use of new antianginal drugs. A PCI is only indicated in vessels causing ischemia which can be verified by using fractional flow reserve measurements. The indications for PCI now also include patients with a low SYNTAX score and multivessel disease or left main stenosis; however, the optimal strategy should be individually determined in heart team discussions. PMID:25384852

Athanasiadis, A; Sechtem, U

2014-12-01

43

Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions  

PubMed Central

With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352139

Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

2010-01-01

44

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Familial Hypercholesterolemia.  

PubMed

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common genetic disorder causing premature cardiovascular disease and death. Heterozygous FH conservatively affects approximately 1:500 Canadians, and the more serious homozygous form affects approximately 1:1,000,000 Canadians, although these numbers might be underestimated. Of approximately 83,500 Canadians estimated to have FH, most are undiagnosed, which represents a simultaneous public health deficit and opportunity, because early treatment of heterozygous FH can normalize life expectancy. Diagnostic algorithms for FH incorporate increased plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, pathognomonic clinical features, and family history of early cardiovascular disease and hyperlipidemia. DNA-based detection of causative mutations in FH-related genes can help with diagnosis. Maximizing diagnosis and treatment of FH in Canada will involve a multipronged approach, including: (1) increasing awareness of FH among health care providers and patients; (2) creating a national registry for FH individuals; (3) setting standards for screening, including cascade screening in affected families; (4) ensuring availability of standard-of-care therapies, in particular optimization of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and timely access to future validated therapies; (5) promoting patient-based support and advocacy groups; and (6) forming alliances with international colleagues, resources, and initiatives that focus on FH. This document aims to raise awareness of FH nationally, and to mobilize knowledge translation, patient support, and availability of treatment and health care resources for this underrecognized, but important medical condition. PMID:25448461

Genest, Jacques; Hegele, Robert A; Bergeron, Jean; Brophy, James; Carpentier, Andre; Couture, Patrick; Davignon, Jean; Dufour, Robert; Frohlich, Jiri; Gaudet, Daniel; Gupta, Milan; Krisnamoorthy, Preetha; Mancini, John; McCrindle, Brian; Raggi, Paolo; Ruel, Isabelle; St-Pierre, Julie

2014-12-01

45

Summary of the British Transplantation Society guidelines for transplantation from donors after deceased circulatory death.  

PubMed

The second edition of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for Transplantation from Donors after Deceased Circulatory Death was published in June 2013. The guideline has been extensively revised since the previous edition in 2004 and has used the GRADE system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations. This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for transplantation after deceased circulatory death in the U.K. and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at: http://www.bts.org.uk/MBR/Clinical/Guidelines/Current/Member/Clinical/Current_Guidelines.aspx. PMID:24448588

Andrews, Peter A; Burnapp, Lisa; Manas, Derek

2014-02-15

46

[Therapeutic strategies. Evolution and current status of the European Guidelines on Cardiovascular disease prevention].  

PubMed

The European Guidelines on Dyslipidaemias (2011) and Cardiovascular Prevention (2012) have incorporated important changes. Firstly, it highlights the identification of a group of "very high risk" patients: patients with atherosclerotic disease in any vascular area, diabetes with associated risk factors, advanced chronic renal failure, or a SCORE estimate >10%. Patients with diabetes and no other risk factors, moderate renal failure, severe hypertension, genetic dyslipidaemias, or a SCORE estimate 5-10%, are considered as "high risk". The HDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels are considered as modulators of risks, but not therapeutic objectives per se. The therapeutic objectives are set at LDL cholesterol levels < 70 mg/dl (or at least a reduction of at least 50%) for patients at very high risk, and an LDL < 100 mg/dl for high risk patients. As well as the changes in lifestyle, pharmacological treatment with statins is the focal point of lipid lowering treatments. Other pharmacological options may be considered if the treatment with the maximum tolerable doses of statins do not achieve the therapeutic objectives. PMID:23769961

Guijarro, Carlos; García-Díaz, Juan de Dios

2013-01-01

47

Guidelines in the Register of the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany – A Quality Improvement Campaign  

PubMed Central

The Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) is the umbrella organization of medical scientific societies in Germany. The development of guidelines goes back to an initiative of the medical scientific societies and is coordinated by the AWMF. Rules for the inclusion of guidelines in the AWMF Guideline Register have been defined including how guidelines are classified. S1 guidelines are based only on recommendations by experts, whereas S2 guidelines require a structured consensus process or a systematic literature review. S3 guidelines include both elements. In addition to compulsory disclosure of any potential conflict of interest, transparent handling of potential conflicts of interest is an important confidence-building measure. For years, the trend has been to develop higher order (S2/S3) guidelines, and the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG) has been no exception to the trend. In addition to its responsibility for specific S2 and S3 guidelines, the DGGG is also involved in numerous other interdisciplinary guidelines. When developing a guideline, it is essential to define the guideline?s scope, identify aspects which require improvement and agree on the goals. Target groups affected by the guidelines should be involved if they are interested. Different formats (long and short versions, practical instructions, conventional or electronic decision aids, patient versions) are useful to disseminate the guideline. The guideline can be adapted to local circumstances to encourage implementation of its recommendations. Implementation can be measured using quality indicators. Feedback from practitioners is important as this highlights areas which require improvement. The medical scientific societies in Germany can look back on almost two decades of work spent on developing guidelines, most of it done by unpaid voluntary contributors, making this a very successful quality initiative. PMID:25061235

Nothacker, M. J.; Muche-Borowski, C.; Kopp, I. B.

2014-01-01

48

Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.  

PubMed

To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. PMID:25498265

Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

2014-12-01

49

Response to Kalra et al., The Endocrine Society diabetes and pregnancy guidelines: a critical appraisal.  

PubMed

We would like to thank Drs Kalra and Gupta for their kind and thoughtful words (1) regarding our recently published Endocrine Society Diabetes and Pregnancy Clinical Practice Guideline (2) and we are pleased to comment on several of their observations. The few points from our guideline to which they take exception are, in fact, points with which we mostly agree with them. It is important for users of our - or any - guideline to interpret recommendations based on their strength. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID:25345725

Blumer, Ian

2014-10-24

50

Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases and are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have or

David Andes; L. Ostrosky-Zeichner

2009-01-01

51

European Society of Hypertension Practice Guidelines for home blood pressure monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-monitoring of blood pressure by patients at home (home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM)) is being increasingly used in many countries and is well accepted by hypertensive patients. Current hypertension guidelines have endorsed the use of HBPM in clinical practice as a useful adjunct to conventional office measurements. Recently, a detailed consensus document on HBPM was published by the European Society

G Parati; G S Stergiou; R Asmar; G Bilo; P de Leeuw; Y Imai; K Kario; E Lurbe; A Manolis; T Mengden; E O'Brien; T Ohkubo; P Padfield; P Palatini; T G Pickering; J Redon; M Revera; L M Ruilope; A Shennan; J A Staessen; A Tisler; B Waeber; A Zanchetti; G Mancia

2010-01-01

52

American geriatrics society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.  

PubMed

The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes. PMID:25495432

2015-01-01

53

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16/18 infections. PMID:22418039

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna M; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R; Chelmow, David; Herzig, Abbe; Kim, Jane J; Kinney, Walter; Herschel, W Lawson; Waldman, Jeffrey

2012-07-01

54

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

2013-01-01

55

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

2013-01-01

56

American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

2012-01-01

57

Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.  

PubMed

In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252. PMID:25498256

Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

2014-12-01

58

Clinical competency guidelines for pulmonary rehabilitation professionals: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.  

PubMed

The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that interdisciplinary health care professionals providing pulmonary rehabilitation services need to have certain core competencies. This statement updates the previous clinical competency guidelines for pulmonary rehabilitation professionals, and it complements the AACVPR's Guidelines for Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programs. These competencies provide a common core of 13 professional and clinical competencies inclusive of multiple academic and clinical disciplines. The core competencies include patient assessment and management; dyspnea assessment and management; oxygen assessment, management, and titration; collaborative self-management; adherence; medication and therapeutics; non-chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases; exercise testing; exercise training; psychosocial management; tobacco cessation; emergency responses for patient and program personnel; and universal standard precautions. PMID:25098438

Collins, Eileen G; Bauldoff, Gerene; Carlin, Brian; Crouch, Rebecca; Emery, Charles F; Garvey, Chris; Hilling, Lana; Limberg, Trina; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda

2014-01-01

59

Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.  

PubMed

The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite. We present a review of pertinent pathophysiology. We then discuss primary and secondary prevention measures and therapeutic management. Recommendations are made regarding each treatment and its role in management. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality according to methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2011;22(2):156-166. PMID:25498262

McIntosh, Scott E; Opacic, Matthew; Freer, Luanne; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Cochran, Amalia; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; McDevitt, Marion; Imray, Christopher H; Johnson, Eric L; Dow, Jennifer; Hackett, Peter H

2014-12-01

60

Radiation protection in digestive endoscopy: European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESGE) guideline.  

PubMed

This article expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) about radiation protection for endoscopic procedures, in particular endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Particular cases, including pregnant women and pediatric patients, are also discussed. This Guideline was developed by a group of endoscopists and medical physicists to ensure that all aspects of radiation protection are adequately dealt with. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. The target readership for this Guideline mostly includes endoscopists, anesthesiologists, and endoscopy assistants who may be exposed to X-rays during endoscopic procedures. PMID:22438152

Dumonceau, J-M; Garcia-Fernandez, F J; Verdun, F R; Carinou, E; Donadille, L; Damilakis, J; Mouzas, I; Paraskeva, K; Ruiz-Lopez, N; Struelens, L; Tsapaki, V; Vanhavere, F; Valatas, V; Sans-Merce, M

2012-04-01

61

Clinical practice guidelines for the management of blastomycosis: 2008 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with blastomycosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in the April 2000 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who have blastomycosis. Since 2000, several new antifungal agents have become available, and blastomycosis has been noted more frequently among immunosuppressed patients. New information, based on publications between 2000 and 2006, is incorporated in this guideline document, and recommendations for treating children with blastomycosis have been noted. PMID:18462107

Chapman, Stanley W; Dismukes, William E; Proia, Laurie A; Bradsher, Robert W; Pappas, Peter G; Threlkeld, Michael G; Kauffman, Carol A

2008-06-15

62

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline  

PubMed Central

Objective: We developed clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), ten additional clinicians experienced in treating CAH, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Additional experts were also consulted. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society’s CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend universal newborn screening for severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency followed by confirmatory tests. We recommend that prenatal treatment of CAH continue to be regarded as experimental. The diagnosis rests on clinical and hormonal data; genotyping is reserved for equivocal cases and genetic counseling. Glucocorticoid dosage should be minimized to avoid iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. Mineralocorticoids and, in infants, supplemental sodium are recommended in classic CAH patients. We recommend against the routine use of experimental therapies to promote growth and delay puberty; we suggest patients avoid adrenalectomy. Surgical guidelines emphasize early single-stage genital repair for severely virilized girls, performed by experienced surgeons. Clinicians should consider patients’ quality of life, consulting mental health professionals as appropriate. At the transition to adulthood, we recommend monitoring for potential complications of CAH. Finally, we recommend judicious use of medication during pregnancy and in symptomatic patients with nonclassic CAH. PMID:20823466

Speiser, Phyllis W.; Azziz, Ricardo; Baskin, Laurence S.; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Hensle, Terry W.; Merke, Deborah P.; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; Miller, Walter L.; Montori, Victor M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Ritzen, Martin; White, Perrin C.

2010-01-01

63

Self?reported dietary changes with respect to American cancer society nutrition guidelines (1982–1986)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A follow?up study was conducted by the Illinois Division of the American Cancer Society (ACS) in conjunction with the ongoing National Cancer Prevention Study II (CPSII) to determine whether self?report dietary changes are occurring in accordance with the ACS nutrition guidelines and to identify demographic subgroups that may be targeted for future prevention and education programs. A total of 42,300

Faith G. Davis; Mary E. Fischer; Linda VanHorn; Robin M. Mermelstein; Joanne L. Sylvester

1993-01-01

64

Conflicts and dilemmas in prevention of cardiovascular disease. The new, Norwegian guidelines--a new approach to risk management.  

PubMed

Prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been debated for many years, between an organ-specialist perspective versus a public health view. As an illustration, the Wonca Europe Council decided in 2004 to withdraw its support to the 2003 European Guidelines. This paper discusses the main sources of disagreement, most important the levels of risk when treatment should be offered. The Norwegian Guideline for primary prevention of CVD (2009) introduced a new principle of age-differentiated risk levels. Pharmacological treatment should be offered to all persons aged 40-49 years with 10-year mortality risk ? 1%, all persons aged 50-59 years at ? 5% risk, and all persons aged 60-69 years at ? 10% risk. Lower thresholds for younger persons are based on the fact that life years lost, will be considerable if drugs are prescribed only for risk levels above 5%. For persons aged 60-69 years, age is the dominant risk factor and the benefits of treatment are smaller. The implications of the recommendation are discussed, both at an individual and a societal level. Compared to the European 2007 guidelines, the total sum of life years gained is about the same, but the number of patients treated is considerably lower. PMID:22283824

Gjelsvik, Bjřrn

2012-03-01

65

Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats: Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases  

PubMed Central

Urinary tract disease is a common reason for use (and likely misuse, improper use, and overuse) of antimicrobials in dogs and cats. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available for human medicine. Accordingly, guidelines for diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections were created by a Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases. While objective data are currently limited, these guidelines provide information to assist in the diagnosis and management of upper and lower urinary tract infections in dogs and cats. PMID:21776346

Weese, J. Scott; Blondeau, Joseph M.; Boothe, Dawn; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Guardabassi, Luca; Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Papich, Mark G.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Turnidge, John D.; Sykes, Jane E.

2011-01-01

66

Standardized image interpretation and post processing in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Post Processing  

PubMed Central

With mounting data on its accuracy and prognostic value, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming an increasingly important diagnostic tool with growing utility in clinical routine. Given its versatility and wide range of quantitative parameters, however, agreement on specific standards for the interpretation and post-processing of CMR studies is required to ensure consistent quality and reproducibility of CMR reports. This document addresses this need by providing consensus recommendations developed by the Task Force for Post Processing of the Society for Cardiovascular MR (SCMR). The aim of the task force is to recommend requirements and standards for image interpretation and post processing enabling qualitative and quantitative evaluation of CMR images. Furthermore, pitfalls of CMR image analysis are discussed where appropriate. PMID:23634753

2013-01-01

67

Practice guidelines for the early detection of cervical cancer in Korea: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the Korean Society for Cytopathology 2012 edition  

PubMed Central

The consensus guideline development committee of Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology was reconvened in March 2012. The committee consisted of 36 experts representing 12 university hospitals and professional organizations. The objective of this committee was to develop standardized guidelines for cervical cancer screening tests for Korean women and to distribute these guidelines to every clinician, eventually improving the quality of medical care. Since the establishment of the consensus guideline development committee, evidence-based guidelines have either been developed de novo considering specific Korean situations or by adaptation of preexisting consensus guidelines from other countries. Recommendations for cervical cancer screening tests, management of atypical squamous and glandular cells, and management of low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were developed. Additionally, recommendations for human papillomavirus DNA testing and recommendations for adolescent and pregnant women with abnormal cervical screening test results were also included. PMID:23653837

Lee, Jae Kwan; Hong, Jin Hwa; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hye Sun; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Song, Jae Yun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Yoo, Chong Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyoung; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lee, Ahwon; Lee, Yonghee; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Taek Sang; Lim, Myong Cheol; Chang, Suk-Joon; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Ju, Woong; Joo, Hee Jae; Hur, Soo-Young

2013-01-01

68

2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

69

Performance of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines for dyspepsia in Saudi population: Prospective observational study  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate adherence of primary care physicians (PCPs) to international guidelines when referring patients for upper-gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE), evaluate the importance of alarm symptoms and the performance of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines in a Saudi population. METHODS: A prospective, observational cross-sectional study on dyspeptic patients undergoing UGE who were referred by PCPs over a 4 mo period. Referrals were classified as appropriate or inappropriate according to adherence to ASGE guidelines. RESULTS: Total of 221 dyspeptic patients was enrolled; 161 patients met our inclusion criteria. Mean age was 40.3 years (SD ± 18.1). Females comprised 70.1%. Alarm symptoms included low hemoglobin level (39%), weight loss (18%), vomiting (16%), loss of appetite (16%), difficulty swallowing (3%), and gastrointestinal bleeding (3%). Abnormal endoscopy findings included gastritis (52%), duodenitis (10%), hiatus hernia (7.8%), features suggestive of celiac disease (6.5%), ulcers (3.9%), malignancy (2.6%) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: 17%). Among patients who underwent UGE, 63% met ASGE guidelines, and 50% had abnormal endoscopic findings. Endoscopy was not indicated in remaining 37% of patients. Among the latter group, endoscopy was normal in 54% of patients. There was no difference in proportion of abnormal endoscopic findings between two groups (P = 0.639). CONCLUSION: Dyspeptic patients had a low prevalence of important endoscopic lesions, and none of the alarm symptoms could significantly predict abnormal endoscopic findings. PMID:25605988

Azzam, Nahla A; Almadi, Majid A; Alamar, Hessah Hamad; Almalki, Lamis Atyah; Alrashedi, Rehab Nawaf; Alghamdi, Rawabi Saleh; Al-hamoudi, Waleed

2015-01-01

70

Diagnosis and management of complicated intra-abdominal infection in adults and children: guidelines by the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

Evidence-based guidelines for managing patients with intra-abdominal infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The guidelines are intended for treating patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. New information, based on publications from the period 2003-2008, is incorporated into this guideline document. The panel has also added recommendations for managing intra-abdominal infection in children, particularly where such management differs from that of adults; for appendicitis in patients of all ages; and for necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates. PMID:20034345

Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John E; Bradley, John S; Rodvold, Keith A; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Baron, Ellen J; O'Neill, Patrick J; Chow, Anthony W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Eachempati, Soumitra R; Gorbach, Sherwood; Hilfiker, Mary; May, Addison K; Nathens, Avery B; Sawyer, Robert G; Bartlett, John G

2010-01-15

71

Diagnosis and management of complicated intra-abdominal infection in adults and children: guidelines by the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

Evidence-based guidelines for managing patients with intra-abdominal infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The guidelines are intended for treating patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. New information, based on publications from the period 2003-2008, is incorporated into this guideline document. The panel has also added recommendations for managing intra-abdominal infection in children, particularly where such management differs from that of adults; for appendicitis in patients of all ages; and for necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates. PMID:20163262

Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John E; Bradley, John S; Rodvold, Keith A; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Baron, Ellen J; O'Neill, Patrick J; Chow, Anthony W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Eachempati, Soumitra R; Gorbach, Sherwood; Hilfiker, Mary; May, Addison K; Nathens, Avery B; Sawyer, Robert G; Bartlett, John G

2010-02-01

72

Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines  

PubMed Central

The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:25191516

Brugge, William R.; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B.; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

2014-01-01

73

Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines.  

PubMed

The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:25191516

Brugge, William R; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

2014-01-01

74

Insights from the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists on antimicrobial stewardship guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.  

PubMed

In 2007, the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America published a document that addressed the major considerations for the justification, description, and conduct of antimicrobial stewardship programs. Our document is intended to continue the dialogue of these formalized programmatic strategies. We briefly review the guidelines, including the two primary strategies (prospective auditing with feedback, and preauthorization), and the supplemental strategies (education, information technology, transitional therapy, de-escalation or streamlining, and dose optimization). Discussions are introduced or furthered in the areas of program goals, barriers and solutions, and outcome measures. Definition and training of infectious diseases pharmacists are presented in detail. We offer keys to future success, which include continued collaboration and expanded use of information technology. PMID:19397466

Drew, Richard H; White, Roger; MacDougall, Conan; Hermsen, Elizabeth D; Owens, Robert C

2009-05-01

75

Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Anemia in CKD.  

PubMed

The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) 2012 clinical practice guideline for anemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease provides the structural and evidence base for the Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on this guideline's relevancy and application to the Canadian health care system. While in general agreement, we provide commentary on 11 of the 61 KDIGO guideline statements. Specifically, we agreed that a therapeutic trial of iron is appropriate in cases in which a reduction in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dosage or avoidance of ESA and transfusion is desired, transferrin saturations are >30%, and ferritin concentrations are >500 ?g/L. However, we concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support an upper target or threshold for ferritin and transferrin saturation levels. We agree with the initiation of ESA treatment when hemoglobin (Hb) level is 90-100 g/L; however, we specifically state that an acceptable range for Hb level is 95-115 g/L, with a target of 100-110 g/L, and add caution to individualization above this range due to concerns regarding the safety of ESAs. We agree that ESAs should be used with considerable caution in patients with active malignancy, history of stroke, or history of malignancy, and we suggest initiating ESA therapy at Hb level of 90 g/L and to aim for a Hb level in the range of 90-105 g/L. The reader is encouraged to note the level of evidence and review the entire KDIGO anemia guideline to interpret the guideline statements and commentary appropriately. PMID:24054466

Moist, Louise M; Troyanov, Stéphan; White, Colin T; Wazny, Lori D; Wilson, Jo-Anne; McFarlane, Phil; Harwood, Lori; Sood, Manish M; Soroka, Steven D; Bass, Adam; Manns, Braden J

2013-11-01

76

[French Society of Vascular Medicine good medical practice guidelines on safety and environment in vascular medicine: Treatment of varicose veins].  

PubMed

These guidelines proposed by the French Society of Vascular Medicine define the optimal environment for vascular medicine practice: outpatient clinic; equipment, layout and maintenance of the care center; infection risk prevention (hand hygiene, individual protective measures, exposure to blood, ultrasound apparatus, etc.); common interventions and techniques (liquid and foam sclerotherapy, endovenous thermal treatments). These guidelines do not include phlebectomy and use of ultrasound contrast agents. PMID:25451022

Giordana, P; Miserey, G

2014-12-01

77

Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.  

PubMed

The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss, clarify, comment, or rebut any of the points made in this Commentary. It is our goal to elevate this debate in order to provide women who are afflicted with androgen insufficiency and sexual disorders with the highest quality health care and to relieve their distress and suffering, as well as to improve their quality of life. PMID:17727347

Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

2007-09-01

78

Recording of data of individual measurements of occupational exposure: guideline of the Dutch Society of Occupational Hygiene (October 1999).  

PubMed

Following the recommendations of the European Working Group on Exposure Databases, a Working Group (on Storage of Data of Measurements of Occupational Exposure) of the Dutch Occupational Hygiene Society has developed a Guideline which was presented at the International Symposium on Occupational Exposure Databases and Their Application for the Next Millennium, November 1-3, 1999, London. To establish the present situation, a small-scale telephone survey of monitoring practices and storage of data was done within the Society. The results of the telephone survey and the draft guidance document were discussed with the occupational hygienists and other stakeholders (e.g., authorities, industry, labor unions, and occupational physicians) in a society meeting. This meeting was used to gather ideas on the need and support for a guidance document and to get input for improving the draft guidance document and for implementation of the Guideline. After this meeting, the Guideline was further developed and published by the Dutch Occupational Hygiene Society. The Guideline concentrates on the data elements required when storing exposure data. The data elements presented are the minimum and should be stored minimally to ensure proper interpretation of results at present and in the future and definitions of the items used are given. The Guideline does not prescribe how the data should be stored, or which procedures need to be used to guarantee the quality of the recorded data elements. PMID:11217698

Brederode, D; Linker, F; Marquart, H; Pothuis, J; Slijpen, J; Timmermans, H

2001-02-01

79

Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.  

PubMed

Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

2014-12-01

80

2015 guidelines of the taiwan society of cardiology and the taiwan hypertension society for the management of hypertension.  

PubMed

It has been almost 5 years since the publication of the 2010 hypertension guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology (TSOC). There is new evidence regarding the management of hypertension, including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized trials, post-hoc analyses, subgroup analyses, retrospective studies, cohort studies, and registries. More recently, the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published joint hypertension guidelines in 2013. The panel members who were appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC) also published the 2014 JNC report. Blood pressure (BP) targets have been changed; in particular, such targets have been loosened in high risk patients. The Executive Board members of TSOC and the Taiwan Hypertension Society (THS) aimed to review updated information about the management of hypertension to publish an updated hypertension guideline in Taiwan. We recognized that hypertension is the most important risk factor for global disease burden. Management of hypertension is especially important in Asia where the prevalence rate grows faster than other parts of the world. In most countries in East Asia, stroke surpassed coronary heart disease (CHD) in causing premature death. A diagnostic algorithm was proposed, emphasizing the importance of home BP monitoring and ambulatory BP monitoring for better detection of night time hypertension, early morning hypertension, white-coat hypertension, and masked hypertension. We disagreed with the ESH/ESH joint hypertension guidelines suggestion to loosen BP targets to <140/90 mmHg for all patients. We strongly disagree with the suggestion by the 2014 JNC report to raise the BP target to <150/90 mmHg for patients between 60-80 years of age. For patients with diabetes, CHD, chronic kidney disease who have proteinuria, and those who are receiving antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention, we propose BP targets of <130/80 mmHg in our guidelines. BP targets are <140/90 mmHg for all other patient groups, except for patients ?80 years of age in whom a BP target of <150/90 mmHg would be optimal. For the management of hypertension, we proposed a treatment algorithm, starting with life style modification (LSM) including S-ABCDE (Sodium restriction, Alcohol limitation, Body weight reduction, Cigarette smoke cessation, Diet adaptation, and Exercise adoption). We emphasized a low-salt strategy instead of a no-salt strategy, and that excessively aggressive sodium restriction to <2.0 gram/day may be harmful. When drug therapy is considered, a strategy called "PROCEED" was suggested (Previous experience, Risk factors, Organ damage, Contraindications or unfavorable conditions, Expert's or doctor's judgment, Expenses or cost, and Delivery and compliance issue). To predict drug effects in lowering BP, we proposed the "Rule of 10" and "Rule of 5". With a standard dose of any one of the 5 major classes of anti-hypertensive agents, one can anticipate approximately a 10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (Rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (DBP) (Rule of 5). When doses of the same drug are doubled, there is only a 2-mmHg incremental decrease in SBP and a 1-mmHg incremental decrease in DBP. Preferably, when 2 drugs with different mechanisms are to be taken together, the decrease in BP is the sum of the decrease of the individual agents (approximately 20 mmHg in SBP and 10 mmHg in DBP). Early combination therapy, especially single-pill combination (SPC), is recommended. When patient's initial treatment cannot get BP to targeted goals, we have proposed an adjustment algorithm, "AT GOALs" (Adherence, Timing of administration, Greater doses, Other classes of drugs, Alternative combination or SPC, and LSM + Laboratory tests). Treatment of hypertension in special conditions, including treatment of resistant hypertension, hypertension in women, and perioperative management of hypertension, were also mentioned. The TSOC/THS hypertension guidelines pro

Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Chung-Yin; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chao, Chia-Lun; Liu, Ping-Yen; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Li, Yi-Heng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Chen, Wen-Jone; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Shing-Jong

2015-01-01

81

Italian Society of Hematology practice guidelines for the management of iron overload in thalassemia major and related disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

New measures of iron accumulation in liver and heart (superconducting quantum inference device and magnetic resonance imaging), and oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) are available for managing iron overload in thalassemia major. To assure appropri- ate use of these new health technologies, the Italian Society of Hematology appointed a panel of experts to produce clinical practice- guidelines for the

Emanuele Angelucci; Giovanni Barosi; Clara Camaschella; Maria Domenica Cappellini; Mario Cazzola; Renzo Galanello; Monia Marchetti; Antonio Piga; Sante Tura

2008-01-01

82

British Andrology Society guidelines for the assessment of post vasectomy semen samples (2002)  

PubMed Central

The British Andrology Society guidelines for the assessment of post vasectomy semen samples recommend that initial assessment is undertaken 16 weeks post vasectomy and after the patient has produced at least 24 ejaculates. The laboratory should examine a freshly produced seminal fluid specimen by direct microscopy and if no sperm are seen the centrifugate should be examined for the presence of motile and non-motile spermatozoa. It is recommended that the clinician should give clearance after the production of two consecutive sperm free ejaculates. In cases of persistent identification of non-motile spermatozoa the referring clinician should advise the patient regarding the cessation of other contraceptive precautions. Surgeons are responsible both preoperatively and postoperatively for the counselling of couples regarding complications and the possibility of late recanalisation after clearance. PMID:12401817

Hancock, P; McLaughlin, E

2002-01-01

83

Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.  

PubMed

Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should have quality assertion programmes for implementation and follow-up of routines, teaching, training and clinical outcome. Clinical guidelines on a wide range of relevant topics have been introduced, based on extensive literature retrieval, to facilitate effective and safe management of CVCs. PMID:24593804

Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

2014-05-01

84

European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Consensus Guidelines on Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Hypothyroidism  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Evidence: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify key articles relating to the screening, diagnosis, and management of CH. The evidence-based guidelines were developed with the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, describing both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. In the absence of sufficient evidence, conclusions were based on expert opinion. Consensus Process: Thirty-two participants drawn from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and five other major scientific societies in the field of pediatric endocrinology were allocated to working groups with assigned topics and specific questions. Each group searched the literature, evaluated the evidence, and developed a draft document. These papers were debated and finalized by each group before presentation to the full assembly for further discussion and agreement. Recommendations: The recommendations include: worldwide neonatal screening, approaches to assess the cause (including genotyping) and the severity of the disorder, the immediate initiation of appropriate L-T4 supplementation and frequent monitoring to ensure dose adjustments to keep thyroid hormone levels in the target ranges, a trial of treatment in patients suspected of transient CH, regular assessments of developmental and neurosensory functions, consulting health professionals as appropriate, and education about CH. The harmonization of diagnosis, management, and routine health surveillance would not only optimize patient outcomes, but should also facilitate epidemiological studies of the disorder. Individuals with CH require monitoring throughout their lives, particularly during early childhood and pregnancy. PMID:24446653

Léger, Juliane; Olivieri, Antonella; Donaldson, Malcolm; Torresani, Toni; Krude, Heiko; van Vliet, Guy; Polak, Michel

2014-01-01

85

Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency  

SciTech Connect

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a putative new theory that has been suggested by some to have a direct causative relation with the symptomatology associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). The core foundation of this theory is that there is abnormal venous drainage from the brain due to outflow obstruction in the draining jugular vein and/or azygos veins. This abnormal venous drainage, which is characterised by special ultrasound criteria, called the 'venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score' (VHISS), is said to cause intracerebral flow disturbance or outflow problems that lead to periventricular deposits. In the CCSVI theory, these deposits have a great similarity to the iron deposits seen around the veins in the legs in patients with chronic deep vein thrombosis. Zamboni, who first described this new theory, has promoted balloon dilatation to treat the outflow problems, thereby curing CCSVI and by the same token alleviating MS complaints. However, this theory does not fit into the existing bulk of scientific data concerning the pathophysiology of MS. In contrast, there is increasing worldwide acceptance of CCSVI and the associated balloon dilatation treatment, even though there is no supporting scientific evidence. Furthermore, most of the information we have comes from one source only. The treatment is called 'liberation treatment,' and the results of the treatment can be watched on YouTube. There are well-documented testimonies by MS patients who have gained improvement in their personal quality of life (QOL) after treatment. However, there are no data available from patients who underwent unsuccessful treatments with which to obtain a more balanced view. The current forum for the reporting of success in treating CCSVI and thus MS seems to be the Internet. At the CIRCE office and the MS Centre in Amsterdam, we receive approximately 10 to 20 inquiries a month about this treatment. In addition, many interventional radiologists, who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

Reekers, J. A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [AMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, M. J. [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology (Ireland); Belli, A. M. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Barkhof, F. [MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

2011-02-15

86

The ACC/AHA 2013 guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: the good the bad and the uncertain: a comparison with ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias 2011.  

PubMed

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most important public health problem of our time in both Europe and the rest of the world, accounting for the greatest expenditure in most healthcare budgets. Achieving consistency of clinical care, incorporating new evidence and their synthesis into practical recommendations for clinicians is the task of various guideline committees throughout the world. Any change in a set of guidelines therefore can have far reaching consequences, particularly if they appear to be at variance with the existing guidelines. The present article discusses the recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines 2013 on the control of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults. When compared with the ESC/EAS guidelines on lipid modification in 2011, the ACC/AHA guidelines of 2013 differ markedly. Specifically, (i) the scope is limited to randomized trials only, which excludes a significant body of data and promotes essentially a statin centric approach only; (ii) the abolition of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets in favour of specific statin regimens that produce a 30-50% reduction in LDL-C we believe will confuse many physicians and miss the opportunity for medication adherence and patient engagement in self-management; (iii) the absence of target LDL-C levels in very high-risk patients with high absolute risk or residual risk factors will discourage clinicians to consider the addition of lipid modification treatments and individualize patient care; (iv) a reduction in the threshold for treatment in primary prevention will result in a greater number of patients being prescribed statin therapy, which is potentially good in young patients with high life time risk, but will result in a very large number of older patients offered therapy; and (v) the mixed pool risk calculator used to asses CVD risk in the guidelines for primary prevention has not been fully evaluated. This article discusses the potential implications of adopting the ACC/AHA guidelines on patient care in Europe and beyond and concludes with the opinion that the ESC/EAS guidelines from 2011 seem to be the most wide ranging, pragmatic and appropriate choice for European countries. PMID:24639424

Ray, Kausik K; Kastelein, John J P; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Nicholls, Stephen J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ballantyne, Christie M; Catapano, Alberico L; Reiner, Željko; Lüscher, Thomas F

2014-04-01

87

Standardized terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines  

PubMed Central

The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing and post-biopsy treatment and management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussion of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology web site [www.papsociety.org]. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on a proposed standardized terminology scheme for pancreatobiliary specimens that correlate cytological diagnosis with biological behavior and increasingly conservative patient management of surveillance only. The proposed terminology scheme recommends a six-tiered system: Non-diagnostic, negative, atypical, neoplastic [benign or other], suspicious and positive. Unique to this scheme is the “neoplastic” category separated into “benign” (serous cystadenoma) or “other” (premalignant mucinous cysts, neuroendocrine tumors and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs)). The positive or malignant category is reserved for high-grade, aggressive malignancies including ductal adenocarcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, pancreatoblastoma, lymphoma and metastases. Interpretation categories do not have to be used. Some pathology laboratory information systems require an interpretation category, which places the cytological diagnosis into a general category. This proposed scheme provides terminology that standardizes the category of the various diseases of the pancreas, some of which are difficult to diagnose specifically by cytology. In addition, this terminology scheme attempts to provide maximum flexibility for patient management, which has become increasingly conservative for some neoplasms. PMID:25191517

Pitman, Martha B.; Centeno, Barbara A.; Ali, Syed Z.; Genevay, Muriel; Stelow, Ed; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Schmidt, C. Max; Brugge, William R.; Layfield, Lester J.

2014-01-01

88

Management of Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody Euthyroid Women in Pregnancy: Comparison of the American Thyroid Association and the Endocrine Society Guidelines  

PubMed Central

The presence of thyroid autoantibodies is relatively high in women of childbearing age. There is evidence that positive thyroperoxidase antibody even in euthyroid women may increase the risk of spontaneous and recurrent pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. However, the evidence is not enough to justify recommendation on the screening of pregnant women for thyroid autoantibodies or LT4 supplementation for reducing maternal or fetal complications. In this paper we reviewed the related evidence and compared the new guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and Endocrine Society with respect to the screening and management of positive thyroperoxidase antibody in euthyroid pregnant women. As there was no major contradiction or disagreement between the two guidelines, either one of two guidelines may be used by clinicians for the appropriate management of thyroid autoimmunity during pregnancy. PMID:23738229

Mehran, L.; Tohidi, M.; Sarvghadi, F.; Delshad, H.; Amouzegar, A.; Soldin, O. P.; Azizi, F.

2013-01-01

89

Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has taken on an increasingly important role in the diagnostic evaluation and pre-procedural planning for patients with congenital heart disease. This article provides guidelines for the performance of CMR in children and adults with congenital heart disease. The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols. Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided. Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed. PMID:23763839

2013-01-01

90

European National Society Cardiovascular Journals: Background, rationale and mission statement of the 'Editors' Club' (Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology).  

PubMed

Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane k MD, Jřrgen Videbaek MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rřdevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations). PMID:18665206

Alfonso, F; Ambrosio, G; Pinto, F J; van der Wall, E E

2008-06-01

91

Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Criteria and Society of Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) 2008 Guidelines in Non-Operative Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis.  

PubMed

According to the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a curvature of more than 10° Cobb angle, affecting 2-3% of pediatric population. Idiopathic scoliosis accounts for 80% of all scoliosis cases. Non-operative principles in the therapy of idiopathic scoliosis, including Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) criteria and guidelines proposed by the experts of the Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORTS) were presented. The possibility to carry out quality of life assessments in a conservative procedure was also demonstrated. Based on the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis, SRS criteria, SOSORT 2008 experts' opinion and the knowledge of the possibilities of psychological assessment of conservative IS treatment, rules were proposed regarding nonsurgical IS therapy procedures, with special consideration being paid to the proper treatment start time (age, Risser test, biological maturity, Cobb angle), possibility of curvature progression, the importance of physiotherapy and psychological assessment. The knowledge of SRS criteria and SOSORT guidelines regarding the conservative treatment of IS are essential for proper treatment (the right time to start treatment), and supports establishment of interdisciplinary treatment teams, consisting of a physician, a physiotherapist, an orthopedic technician and a psychologist. PMID:25066033

Korbel, Krzysztof; Kozinoga, Mateusz; Stoli?ski, ?ukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

2014-01-01

92

Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within {+-}7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Correa, Candace R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hardenbergh, Patricia H. [Shaw Regional Cancer Center, Vail, CO (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McQueen, Julie R. [Oncology Patient Navigator, Duke Raleigh Cancer Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, MI (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

2011-09-01

93

Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for CKD Evaluation and Management.  

PubMed

We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a nephrologist when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2) (and for many other scenarios), but suggest urine albumin-creatinine ratio > 60mg/mmol or proteinuria with protein excretion > 1g/d as the referral threshold for proteinuria. PMID:25511161

Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

2015-02-01

94

Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.  

PubMed

This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ? III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:25325682

van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Sřren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

2014-11-01

95

Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.  

PubMed

In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing. PMID:24890806

Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

2014-07-01

96

Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

2013-08-01

97

A comment on the International Society of Geriatric Oncology guidelines: evidence-based advice for the clinical setting.  

PubMed

Largely a disease of older men, prostate cancer is likely to become a growing burden in the developed world as the population ages and overall life expectancy increases. Furthermore, prostate cancer management in older men is not optimal, reflecting the lack of training dedicated to senior adults in fellowship programs and the lack of specific guidelines to manage senior adults. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) convened a multidisciplinary Prostate Cancer Working Group to review the evidence base and provide advice on the management of the disease in senior age groups. The Working Group reported that advancing age, by itself, is not a reliable guide to treatment decision making for men with either localized or advanced prostate cancer. Instead, the SIOG guidelines advise health care teams to assess the patient's underlying health status, which is largely dictated by associated comorbid conditions, but also by dependency in activities of daily living and nutritional status, and to use the findings to categorize the individual into one of four groups: healthy, vulnerable, frail, or terminally ill. The guidelines recommend that a patient categorized as healthy or vulnerable (i.e., with reversible problems following geriatric intervention) should receive the same approach to treatment as a younger patient. Frail patients should be managed using adapted treatment strategies, and the terminally ill should receive symptomatic/palliative care only. The guidelines may have ongoing relevance as the treatment options for prostate cancer expand. PMID:23015683

Fitzpatrick, John M; Graefen, Markus; Payne, Heather A; Scotté, Florian; Aapro, Matti S

2012-01-01

98

Summary of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of CMV Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.  

PubMed

The third edition of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of CMV Disease after Solid Organ Transplantation was published in March 2011. This article summarizes the important changes and advances in management in this rapidly evolving field. The pros and cons of universal, or targeted anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis, and pre-emptive anti-CMV therapy are discussed, especially with respect to advances in CMV polymerase chain reaction monitoring. The evidence for oral anti-CMV prophylaxis using valganciclovir is presented, together with a summary of the treatment of CMV disease and emerging fields such as CMV vaccination, CMV genotyping, and drug resistance. PMID:22002346

Andrews, Peter A; Emery, Vincent C; Newstead, Chas

2011-12-15

99

Endocrine Society of India management guidelines for patients with thyroid nodules: A position statement  

PubMed Central

Thyroid nodules are common. Thyroid cancer is rarer. No guidelines exist for management of thyroid nodules in the Indian context and these recommendations are intended for this purpose. The consensus committee reviewed important articles, including previously published consensus statements. Management points were scored according to the level of evidence. These guidelines cover the clinical evaluation and include the interpretation of imaging and fine needle aspiration cytology of thyroid nodules. The guidelines also cover the management of special situations like thyroid incidentalomas, cystic thyroid lesion and nodules detected during pregnancy. The consensus guidelines represent a summary of current medical evidence for thyroid nodule management and the committee has attempted to optimize the guidelines for the clinical practice setting in India. PMID:21584159

Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash; Nair, Gopalakrishnan; Nair, Vasantha; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Sahay, Rakesh Kumar

2011-01-01

100

ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients. PMID:24374980

Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

2014-02-01

101

ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  

PubMed

The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients. PMID:24355759

Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

2014-02-01

102

AHA Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: 2002 Update Consensus Panel Guide to Comprehensive Risk Reduction for Adult Patients Without Coronary or Other Atherosclerotic Vascular Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

he initial Guide to the Primary Prevention of Cardiovas- cular Diseases was published in 1997 as an aid to healthcare professionals and their patients without established coronary artery disease or other atherosclerotic diseases. 1 It was intended to complement the American Heart Association (AHA)\\/American College of Cardiology (ACC) Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular

Thomas A. Pearson; Steven N. Blair; Stephen R. Daniels; Robert H. Eckel; Joan M. Fair; Stephen P. Fortmann; Barry A. Franklin; Larry B. Goldstein; Philip Greenland; Scott M. Grundy; Yuling Hong; Nancy Houston Miller; Ronald M. Lauer; Ira S. Ockene; Ralph L. Sacco; James F. Sallis; Sidney C. Smith; Neil J. Stone; Kathryn A. Taubert

103

Validation of the Guidelines for the Diagnosis of Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease of the Italian Neurological Society. Study in 72 Italian neurological centres and 1549 patients.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to verify the adherence of Italian family physicians and neurologists to the Guidelines on Diagnosis of Dementia of the Italian Society of Neurology. A multicentre survey was carried out, in 72 neurological centres. The centres included at least 15 consecutive subjects suspected of having a dementia. The adherence of family physicians to the guidelines was poor. Neurologists performed a complete neuropsychological evaluation in a minority of the cases. Patients who had a decrease of Mini Mental Status Examination scores after six months higher than or equal to 4 were more represented among those patients for whom one or more recommendations were not respected. In Italy the adherence to the Guidelines on Diagnosis of Dementia and AlzheimerValidation studys Disease of the Italian Society of Neurology is very poor for family physicians (GPs) and satisfactory, albeit improvable, on the part of neurologists. Respect for the guidelines might improve the outcome of patients with dementia. PMID:15624087

Musicco, M; Sorbi, S; Bonavita, V; Caltagirone, C

2004-12-01

104

Meeting Highlights of the 11th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Los Angeles, February 1–3, 2008  

PubMed Central

This paper features the most interesting presentations and discussions of the 2008 Annual Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, which were held in Los Angeles from February 1 to 3, 2008. With more than 1100 attendees, this was the largest of the SCMR meetings ever. Among this year's highlights were scientific reports on CMR-based risk assessment, non-contrast tissue characterization, 3 T data, and interventional CMR. PMID:19128420

2008-01-01

105

Cancer screening in the United States, 2015: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.  

PubMed

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection along with a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines. The latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) also is described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Affordable Care Act, including the expansion of the Medicaid program. CA Cancer J Clin 2015;65:30-54. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:25581023

Smith, Robert A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brooks, Durado; Doroshenk, Mary; Fedewa, Stacey; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard

2015-01-01

106

Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the infectious diseases society of America.  

PubMed

A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24947530

Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

2014-07-15

107

Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24973422

Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

2014-07-15

108

Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgery Position Statement on Revascularization-Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease.  

PubMed

This position statement addresses issues in revascularization for multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) from the perspective of both cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Recommendations are made based on evidence from clinical trials and observational studies, with an emphasis on the increasing number of individuals with significant comorbid disease burden and functional debilitation who are being referred for definitive management of their multivessel CAD in the context of routine clinical practice. These types of individuals have traditionally not been included in the many clinical trials that have been the basis for guidelines and recommendations, and the objective of the proposed medical intervention or revascularization (or both) would not necessarily be to improve prognosis but to improve quality of life. One purpose of this document is to propose practical multidisciplinary approaches to the management of these patients. Recommendations are made for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable CAD, with specific considerations for individuals with left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure, chronic renal failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We also consider the use of various risk scores, including the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, the EuroSCORE, and the SYNTAX II score. The importance of a heart team approach is also emphasized. The complementary role of coronary bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention is highlighted, along with the importance of optimal medical therapy. PMID:25475448

Teo, Koon K; Cohen, Eric; Buller, Christopher; Hassan, Ansar; Carere, Ronald; Cox, Jafna L; Ly, Hung; Fedak, Paul W; Chan, Kwan; Légaré, Jean-Francois; Connelly, Kim; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Ye, Jian; Gupta, Milan; John Mancini, G B; Dagenais, Gilles; Williams, Randall; Teoh, Kevin; Latter, David A; Townley, Richard; Meyer, Steven R

2014-12-01

109

American Society of Clinical Oncology\\/College Of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an international Expert Panel that conducted a systematic review and evaluation of the literature

M. E. Hammond; D. F. Hayes; M. Dowsett; D. C. Allred; K. L. Hagerty; S. Badve; P. L. Fitzgibbons; G. Francis; N. S. Goldstein; M. Hayes; D. G. Hicks; S. Lester; R. Love; P. B. Mangu; L. McShane; K. Miller; C. K. Osborne; S. Paik; J. Perlmutter; A. Rhodes; H. Sasano; J. N. Schwartz; F. C. Sweep; S. Taube; E. E. Torlakovic; P. Valenstein; G. Viale; D. Visscher; T. Wheeler; R. B. Williams; J. L. Wittliff; A. C. Wolff

2010-01-01

110

Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care  

E-print Network

Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management Patrik Eklund UmeĂĄ University, Sweden 27 June 2008 Patrik Eklund IPMU 2008 Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management #12;Cognitive

Eklund, Patrik

111

The use of supplemental external beam radiotherapy in men with low-risk prostate cancer undergoing brachytherapy before and after the 1999 American Brachytherapy Society Guideline statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeIn 1999, the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommended brachy-monotherapy for men with low-risk prostate cancer because of the potential for increased toxicity with combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy without the proof of increased efficacy. We investigated the patterns of care in the community in this patient population before and after the reporting of the ABS guideline.

Arthur K. Cheung; Ming-Hui Chen; Brian J. Moran; Michelle H. Braccioforte; Daniel E. Dosoretz; Sharon Salenius; Michael Katin; Rudi Ross; Anthony V. D'Amico

2010-01-01

112

Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial urinary bladder cancer  

PubMed Central

In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the TNM staging system 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence. PMID:25371600

Al-mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Alghamdi, Khalid; Bazarbashi, Shouki

2014-01-01

113

European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG) and European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) 2013 joint guidelines on diagnosis and management of rare and emerging fungal diseases.  

PubMed

This guideline is the second in the line of three for fungal diseases by ESCMID and other societies. The guideline tried to follow the AGREE criteria for the development of clinical guidelines. This guideline serves as a European and potentially world-wide recommendation for the diagnosis and management of rare and emerging fungi. They include mucormycosis, hyalohyphomycosis (Fusarium, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium, etc.), phaeohyphomycosis (Alternaria, Bipolaris, Cladosporium, Rhinocladiella, etc.), and emerging yeasts (Saccharomyces, Trichosporon, Rhodotorula, etc.). PMID:24606200

Cornely, O A; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Meis, J F; Ullmann, A J

2014-04-01

114

Cardiovascular risk and bone loss in men undergoing androgen deprivation therapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer: implementation of standardized management guidelines.  

PubMed

Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing standardized guidelines to mitigate metabolic and bone side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with non-metastatic prostate cancer. We conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral teaching hospital. Overall, 236 men (mean age 69.8 ± 7.1) commencing ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer attended a baseline clinic visit between 2007 and 2011, and 153 men were eligible for follow-up after 2 years of continuous ADT. Of these, 113 men had data available for analysis at 2 years. At baseline, 87% of the men were overweight or obese, 61% had hypertension, 56% had hypercholesterolaemia, 27% prior cardiovascular disease, 11% osteoporosis and 40% osteopaenia. After 2 years of ADT, there was an increase in waist circumference (+2.8 ± 6.3 cm, p = 0.002), and, in men without diabetes, in HbA1c (+0.13 ± 0.34%, p = 0.019). Despite this, due to treatment, there were significant reductions in total cholesterol (-0.35 ± 1.00 mmol/L, p < 0.001), and blood pressure (systolic -7.6 ± 19.3 mmHg; diastolic -4.7 ± 11.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). After 2 years, men not receiving anti-resorptive therapy experienced a significant decline in lumbar spine (-0.042 ± 0.134 g/cm(2) , p = 0.012) and total hip bone mineral density (BMD) (-0.026 ± 0.036 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001), whereas bisphosphonate treatment maintained stable BMD. Prevalence of anaemia increased from 13.8 to 32.5%. Older age independently predicted a greater drop in haemoglobin (p = 0.005). We conclude that a structured approach to assess and treat men undergoing ADT effectively improves cardiovascular risk factors and prevents bone decay. Larger studies are needed to determine effects on cardiovascular outcomes, fracture prevention and survival. PMID:23686896

Cheung, A S; Pattison, D; Bretherton, I; Hoermann, R; Lim Joon, D; Ho, E; Jenkins, T; Hamilton, E J; Bate, K; Chan, I; Zajac, J D; Grossmann, M

2013-07-01

115

Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not affect recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery when compared to traditional conservative treatment. Open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach can be attempted using open access technique. Access in the left upper quadrant should be safe. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably in case of first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band. A low threshold for open conversion should be maintained. Peritoneal adhesions should be prevented. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin can reduce incidence of adhesions. Icodextrin may reduce the risk of re-obstruction. HA cannot reduce need of surgery. PMID:21255429

2011-01-01

116

Meeting physical activity guidelines is associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease in black South African women; a 5.5-year follow-up study  

PubMed Central

Background Low levels of physical activity (PA) have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies have examined whether meeting international PA guidelines is associated with reduced risk in a black South African (SA) population. The aims of this study were to compare body composition and cardio-metabolic risk factors for CVD and T2D between active and inactive groups (part 1, cross-sectional analysis) and, to determine whether PA level predicts changes in body composition and cardio-metabolic risk factors for CVD and T2D at follow-up after 5.5-years (part 2, longitudinal analysis). Methods Part 1 included a sample of 240 apparently healthy black SA women (26?±?7 years) who underwent the following measurements at baseline: PA (Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ)), body composition and regional fat distribution (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and computerised tomography), blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations. For part 2, a sub-sample of women (n?=?57) underwent the same measurements after a 5.5-year period. Results At baseline, 61% of women were classified as meeting the guidelines for moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) according to GPAQ. Women who were active had significantly lower body weight (p?guidelines was associated with decreased risk for CVD and T2D in black SA women, but did not prevent the increase in body fat over time. Interventions promoting physical activity to specifically address obesity in this high-risk group are recommended. PMID:24886324

2014-01-01

117

Cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making. PMID:22348281

Payne, Rupert A

2012-01-01

118

Cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making. PMID:22348281

Payne, Rupert A

2012-09-01

119

Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology  

PubMed Central

A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD. PMID:24917550

Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

2014-01-01

120

Guidelines of the Italian Society for Virology on HPV testing and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention  

PubMed Central

Objective To provide guidelines for health-care providers on strategies for cervical cancer prevention based on HPV testing and anti-HPV vaccination. Outcomes Overall efficacy of different preventive strategies, assessing reduction in the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. Evidence Medline and the Cochrane Database were searched for articles in English on subjects related to HPVs, HPV diagnosis, HPV anogenital lesions, cervical cancer, HPV testing, and HPV vaccines, in order to elaborate an up-dated document. Relevant Italian Government publications and position papers from appropriate health and family planning organizations were also reviewed. Values The quality of the evidence and ranking of recommendations for practice were rated using criteria defined by SIV, which were adapted from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. PMID:19087272

Barzon, Luisa; Giorgi, Colomba; Buonaguro, Franco M; Palů, Giorgio

2008-01-01

121

Preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: a common agenda for theAmerican Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association.  

PubMed

Collectively, cardiovascular disease (including stroke), cancer, and diabetes account for approximately two-thirds of all deaths in the United States and about 700 billion US dollars in direct and indirect economic costs each year. Current approaches to health promotion and prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes do not approach the potential of the existing state of knowledge. A concerted effort to increase application of public health and clinical interventions of known efficacy to reduce prevalence of tobacco use, poor diet, and insufficient physical activity-the major risk factors for these diseases-and to increase utilization of screening tests for their early detection could substantially reduce the human and economic cost of these diseases. In this article, the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association review strategies for the prevention and early detection of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as the beginning of a new collaboration among the three organizations. The goal of this joint venture is to stimulate substantial improvements in primary prevention and early detection through collaboration between key organizations, greater public awareness about healthy lifestyles, legislative action that results in more funding for and access to primary prevention programs and research, and reconsideration of the concept of the periodic medical checkup as an effective platform for prevention, early detection, and treatment. PMID:15253917

Eyre, Harmon; Kahn, Richard; Robertson, Rose Marie

2004-01-01

122

Preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: a common agenda for the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association.  

PubMed

Collectively, cardiovascular disease (including stroke), cancer, and diabetes account for approximately two-thirds of all deaths in the U.S. and about US dollars 700 billion in direct and indirect economic costs each year. Current approaches to health promotion and prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes do not approach the potential of the existing state of knowledge. A concerted effort to increase application of public health and clinical interventions of known efficacy to reduce prevalence of tobacco use, poor diet, and insufficient physical activity-the major risk factors for these diseases-and to increase utilization of screening tests for their early detection could substantially reduce the human and economic cost of these diseases. In this article, the American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association, and American Heart Association review strategies for the prevention and early detection of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as the beginning of a new collaboration among the three organizations. The goal of this joint venture is to stimulate substantial improvements in primary prevention and early detection through collaboration between key organizations, greater public awareness about healthy lifestyles, legislative action that results in more funding for and access to primary prevention programs and research, and reconsideration of the concept of the periodic medical checkup as an effective platform for prevention, early detection, and treatment. PMID:15220271

Eyre, Harmon; Kahn, Richard; Robertson, Rose Marie

2004-07-01

123

Report from The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease (Part 1 - Procedural nomenclature).  

PubMed

Interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease is a relatively young and rapidly evolving field. As the profession begins to establish multi-institutional databases, a universal system of nomenclature is necessary for the field of interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the efforts of The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease to establish a system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, focusing both on procedural nomenclature and on the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology. This system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease is a component of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This manuscript is the first part of a two-part series. Part 1 will cover the procedural nomenclature associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. This procedural nomenclature of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code will be used in the IMPACT Registry™ (IMproving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment) of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry® of The American College of Cardiology. Part 2 will cover the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. PMID:21310103

Bergersen, Lisa; Everett, Allen Dale; Giroud, Jorge Manuel; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney Cyril George; Béland, Marie Josée; Krogmann, Otto Nils; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; Gaynor, J William; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry Lane; Weinberg, Paul; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip

2011-06-01

124

Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for the management of blood pressure in CKD.  

PubMed

The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) 2012 clinical practice guideline for the management of blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides the structural and evidence base for the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN) commentary on this guideline's relevancy and application to the Canadian health care system. While in general agreement, we provide commentary on 13 of the 21 KDIGO guideline statements. Specifically, we agreed that nonpharmacological interventions should play a significant role in the management of hypertension in patients with CKD. We also agreed that the approach to the management of hypertension in elderly patients with CKD should be individualized and take into account comorbid conditions to avoid adverse outcomes from excessive BP lowering. In contrast to KDIGO, the CSN Work Group believes there is insufficient evidence to target a lower BP for nondiabetic CKD patients based on the presence and severity of albuminuria. The CSN Work Group concurs with the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendation of a target BP for all non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients without diabetes of ?140 mm Hg systolic and ?90 mm Hg diastolic. Similarly, it is our position that in diabetic patients with CKD and normal urinary albumin excretion, raising the threshold for treatment from <130 mm?Hg systolic BP to <140 mm Hg systolic BP could increase stroke risk and the risk of worsening kidney disease. The CSN Work Group concurs with the CHEP and the Canadian Diabetic Association recommendation for diabetic patients with CKD with or without albuminuria to continue to be treated to a BP target similar to that of the overall diabetes population, aiming for BP levels < 130/80 mm Hg. Consistent with this, the CSN Work Group endorses a BP target of <130/80 mm Hg for diabetic patients with a kidney transplant. Finally, in the absence of evidence for a lower BP target, the CSN Work Group concurs with the CHEP recommendation to target BP<140/90 mm Hg for nondiabetic patients with a kidney transplant. PMID:24725980

Ruzicka, Marcel; Quinn, Robert R; McFarlane, Phil; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ramesh Prasad, G V; Feber, Janusz; Nesrallah, Gihad; MacKinnon, Martin; Tangri, Navdeep; McCormick, Brendan; Tobe, Sheldon; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D; Hiremath, Swapnil

2014-06-01

125

How to replace codeine after tonsillectomy in children under 12 years of age? Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).  

PubMed

The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-rhino-laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL) regarding pain management in children and adults following tonsillectomy. A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a literature review. Guidelines were drawn up based on the articles retrieved and the group members' experience. They were read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. A coordination meeting drew up the final version. Guidelines were graded A, B or C or as professional agreement in decreasing order of level of evidence. At home, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended in association with paracetamol in elevated respiratory risk and especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; in elevated hemorrhagic risk (hemostasis disorder, surgical problems, etc.), tramadol is recommended. Two other treatment schedules (modified NSAIDs and corticosteroids) have not undergone dedicated study and should be assessed. Management of post-tonsillectomy pain in children is founded on individual risk/benefit analysis. PMID:25106698

Constant, I; Ayari Khalfallah, S; Brunaud, A; Deramoudt, V; Fayoux, P; Giovanni, A; Mareau, C; Marianowski, R; Michel, J; Mondain, M; Paganelli, A; Pondaven, S; Schultz, P; Treluyer, J M; Wood, C; Nicolas, R

2014-09-01

126

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

2011-02-01

127

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-03-01

128

American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) practice guideline for the performance of total body irradiation (TBI).  

PubMed

Total body irradiation (TBI) is a specialized radiotherapy technique. It is frequently used as a component of treatment plans involving hematopoietic stem cell transplant for a variety of disorders, most commonly hematologic malignancies. A variety of treatment delivery techniques, doses, and fractionation schemes can be utilized. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for delivery of TBI. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist. Review of the typical indications for TBI is presented, and the importance of integrating TBI into the multimodality treatment plan is discussed. Procedures and special considerations related to the simulation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and quality assurance for patients treated with TBI are reviewed. This practice guideline can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful TBI program. PMID:23334484

Wolden, Suzanne L; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Galvin, James M; Giap, Huan B; Schomberg, Paula J; Rosenthal, Seth A

2013-02-01

129

American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)  

PubMed Central

American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program. PMID:23681017

Seung, Steven K.; Larson, David A.; Galvin, James M.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J.; Yajnik, Santosh V.; Hartford, Alan C.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

2014-01-01

130

Italian Society of Hematology practice guidelines for the management of iron overload in thalassemia major and related disorders.  

PubMed

New measures of iron accumulation in liver and heart (superconducting quantum inference device and magnetic resonance imaging), and oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) are available for managing iron overload in thalassemia major. To assure appropriate use of these new health technologies, the Italian Society of Hematology appointed a panel of experts to produce clinical practice-guidelines for the management of iron overload in thalassemia major and related disorders. The analytical hierarchy process, a technique for multicriteria decision analysis, was applied to relevant key questions in order to identify the alternative strategies, generate explicit criteria for their evaluation, and check how well the alternatives fulfilled the criteria. The result of a comprehensive systematic review of articles released from 1990 to 2007 was used as a source of scientific evidence to compare the decisional options pairwise, and select the final recommendation. Every step in the model was developed from questionnaires and group discussion. The resulting recommendations advise about which examination to carry out in order to plan iron chelation therapy, when to start iron chelation, which iron chelator to choose in regularly transfused patients, how to monitor iron chelation therapy, and when and how to switch standard therapy. PMID:18413891

Angelucci, Emanuele; Barosi, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Cazzola, Mario; Galanello, Renzo; Marchetti, Monia; Piga, Antonio; Tura, Sante

2008-05-01

131

Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED)  

PubMed Central

Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods. PMID:22198778

Dinis-Ribeiro, M.; Areia, M.; de Vries, A. C.; Marcos-Pinto, R.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; O'Connor, A.; Pereira, C.; Pimentel-Nunes, P.; Correia, R.; Ensari, A.; Dumonceau, J. M.; Machado, J. C.; Macedo, G.; Malfertheiner, P.; Matysiak-Budnik, T.; Megraud, F.; Miki, K.; O'Morain, C.; Peek, R. M.; Ponchon, T.; Ristimaki, A.; Rembacken, B.; Carneiro, F.; Kuipers, E. J.

2012-01-01

132

Palliative thoracic radiotherapy in lung cancer: An American Society for Radiation Oncology evidence-based clinical practice guideline  

PubMed Central

Purpose To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of external beam radiotherapy, endobronchial brachytherapy, and concurrent chemotherapy in the setting of palliative thoracic treatment for lung cancer, based on available evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials A Task Force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors synthesized and assessed evidence from 3 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) dose fractionation in thoracic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); (2) clinical utility of initial and salvage endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB); and (3) use of concurrent chemotherapy (CC) with palliative thoracic radiotherapy. Practice guideline recommendations were produced and are contained herein. Results Studies suggest that higher dose/fractionation palliative EBRT regimens (eg, 30 Gy/10 fraction equivalent or greater) are associated with modest improvements in survival and total symptom score, particularly in patients with good performance status. As these improvements are associated with an increase in esophageal toxicity, various shorter EBRT dose/fractionation schedules (eg, 20 Gy in 5 fractions, 17 Gy in 2 weekly fractions, 10 Gy in 1 fraction), which provide good symptomatic relief with fewer side effects, can be used for patients requesting a shorter treatment course and/or in those with a poor performance status. No defined role for EBB in the routine initial palliative treatment of chest disease has been demonstrated; however, EBB can be a reasonable option for the palliation of endobronchial lesions causing obstructive symptomatology including lung collapse, or for hemoptysis after EBRT failure. The integration of concurrent chemotherapy with palliative intent/fractionated radiotherapy is not currently supported by the medical literature. Conclusion This Guideline is intended to serve as a guide for the use of EBRT, EBB, and CC in thoracic palliation of lung cancer outside the clinical trial setting. Further prospective clinical investigations with relevant palliative endpoints into the respective roles of EBB and CC/targeted therapy in the thoracic palliation of lung cancer are warranted, given the current state of the medical literature in these areas.

Rodrigues, George; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Sur, Ranjan; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey; Hahn, Carol A.; Langer, Corey; Miller, Keith L.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin

2011-01-01

133

Update on cardiovascular screening: can we prevent sudden cardiac death in adolescent athletes?  

PubMed

Cardiovascular screening of athletes to prevent sudden death has been a subject of ongoing debate. In the United States, such screening is currently based on history and physical examination. The International Olympic Committee and the European Sports Council require an electrocardiogram (ECG) as part of screening athletes. The 2010 European Society of Cardiology guidelines and recent US studies suggest the usefulness of ECG in screening athletes. This article provides an overview of key aspects of cardiovascular screening currently recommended in the United States and the recommendations for the use of ECG. PMID:23705527

Patel, Dilip R; Luckstead, Eugene F

2013-04-01

134

Peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization for autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: guidelines from the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.  

PubMed

Peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization practices vary significantly among institutions. Effective mobilization regimens include growth factor alone, chemotherapy and growth factor combined, and, more recently, incorporation of plerixafor with either approach. Many institutions have developed algorithms to improve stem cell mobilization success rates and cost-effectiveness. However, an optimal stem cell mobilization regimen has not been defined. Practical guidelines are needed to address important clinical questions, including which growth factor is optimal, what chemotherapy and dose is most effective, and when to initiate leukapheresis. We present recommendations, based on a comprehensive review of the literature, from the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. PMID:24816581

Duong, Hien K; Savani, Bipin N; Copelan, Ed; Devine, Steven; Costa, Luciano J; Wingard, John R; Shaughnessy, Paul; Majhail, Navneet; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Cutler, Corey S; Bensinger, William; Litzow, Mark R; Mohty, Mohamad; Champlin, Richard E; Leather, Helen; Giralt, Sergio; Carpenter, Paul A

2014-09-01

135

2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This guideline is based on the Full Panel Report which is provided as a data supplement to the guideline. The Full Panel Report contains background and additional material related to content, methodology, evidence synthesis, rationale and references and is supported by the NHLBI Systematic Evidence ...

136

Prevention of venous thromboembolism, 2nd edition: Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines.  

PubMed

In 2010, we proposed the first Korean Guidelines for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE). It was applicable to Korean patients, by modifying the contents of the second edition of the Japanese guidelines for the prevention of VTE and the 8th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. From 2007 to 2011, we conducted a nationwide study regarding the incidence of VTE after major surgery using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) database. In addition, we have considered the 9th edition of the ACCP Evidenced-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines, published in 2012. It emphasized the importance of clinically relevant events as opposed to asymptomatic outcomes with preferences for both thrombotic and bleeding outcomes. Thus, in the development of the new Korean guidelines, three major points were addressed: 1) the new guidelines stratify patients into 4 risk groups (very low, low, moderate, and high) according to the actual incidence of symptomatic VTE from the HIRA databases; 2) the recommended optimal VTE prophylaxis for each group was modified according to condition-specific thrombotic and bleeding risks; 3) guidelines are intended for general information only, are not medical advice, and do not replace professional medical care and/or physician advice. PMID:24550640

Bang, Soo-Mee; Jang, Moon Ju; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Hun Gyu; Bae, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Yang-Ki; Kim, Inho; Choi, Won-Il; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Nan Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Oh, Doyeun; Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis

2014-02-01

137

Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for treatment of eye injuries and illnesses in the wilderness: 2014 update.  

PubMed

A panel convened to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for the recognition and treatment of eye injuries and illnesses that may occur in the wilderness. These guidelines are meant to serve as a tool to help wilderness providers accurately identify and subsequently treat or evacuate for a variety of ophthalmologic complaints. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of their supporting evidence and the balance between risks and benefits according to criteria developed by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(4):325-336. PMID:25498259

Paterson, Ryan; Drake, Brandy; Tabin, Geoffrey; Butler, Frank K; Cushing, Tracy

2014-12-01

138

A practice guideline from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors: referral indications for cancer predisposition assessment.  

PubMed

Disclaimer: The practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) are developed by members of the ACMG and NSGC to assist medical geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health-care providers in making decisions about appropriate management of genetic concerns, including access to and/or delivery of services. Each practice guideline focuses on a clinical or practice-based issue and is the result of a review and analysis of current professional literature believed to be reliable. As such, information and recommendations within the ACMG and NSGC joint practice guidelines reflect the current scientific and clinical knowledge at the time of publication, are current only as of their publication date, and are subject to change without notice as advances emerge. In addition, variations in practice, which take into account the needs of the individual patient and the resources and limitations unique to the institution or type of practice, may warrant approaches, treatments, and/or procedures that differ from the recommendations outlined in this guideline. Therefore, these recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does the use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. Genetic counseling practice guidelines are never intended to displace a health-care provider's best medical judgment based on the clinical circumstances of a particular patient or patient population. Practice guidelines are published by the ACMG or the NSGC for educational and informational purposes only, and neither the ACMG nor the NSGC "approve" or "endorse" any specific methods, practices, or sources of information.Cancer genetic consultation is an important aspect of the care of individuals at increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Yet several patient, clinician, and system-level barriers hinder identification of individuals appropriate for cancer genetics referral. Thus, the purpose of this practice guideline is to present a single set of comprehensive personal and family history criteria to facilitate identification and maximize appropriate referral of at-risk individuals for cancer genetic consultation. To develop this guideline, a literature search for hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes was conducted using PubMed. In addition, GeneReviews and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines were reviewed when applicable. When conflicting guidelines were identified, the evidence was ranked as follows: position papers from national and professional organizations ranked highest, followed by consortium guidelines, and then peer-reviewed publications from single institutions. The criteria for cancer genetic consultation referral are provided in two formats: (i) tables that list the tumor type along with the criteria that, if met, would warrant a referral for a cancer genetic consultation and (ii) an alphabetical list of the syndromes, including a brief summary of each and the rationale for the referral criteria that were selected. Consider referral for a cancer genetic consultation if your patient or any of their first-degree relatives meet any of these referral criteria.Genet Med advance online publication 13 November 2014Genetics in Medicine (2014); doi:10.1038/gim.2014.147. PMID:25394175

Hampel, Heather; Bennett, Robin L; Buchanan, Adam; Pearlman, Rachel; Wiesner, Georgia L

2014-11-13

139

Spanish Society of Nephrology document on KDIGO guidelines for the assessment and treatment of chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

The new Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) international guidelines on chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the management of blood pressure (BP) in CKD patients are an update of the corresponding 2002 and 2004 KDOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) guidelines. The documents aim to provide updated guidelines on the assessment, management and treatment of patients with CKD. The first guidelines retain the 2002 definition of CKD but present an improved prognosis classification. Furthermore, concepts about prognosis of CKD, recommendations for management of patients, and criteria for referral to the nephrologist have been updated. The second guideline retains the <130/80 mm Hg-goal for management of BP in patients with CKD presenting increased albuminuria or proteinuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30-300 mg/g, and >300 mg/g, respectively) but recommends a less-strict goal of <140/90 mm Hg in patients with normoalbuminuria. The development of the guidelines followed a predetermined process in which the evidence available was reviewed and assessed. Recommendations on management and treatment are based on the systematic review of relevant studies. The GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was used to assess the quality of evidence and issue the grade of recommendation. Areas of uncertainty are also discussed for the different aspects addressed. PMID:24798565

Gorostidi, Manuel; Santamaría, Rafael; Alcázar, Roberto; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Galcerán, Josep M; Goicoechea, Marián; Oliveras, Anna; Portolés, José; Rubio, Esther; Segura, Julián; Aranda, Pedro; de Francisco, Angel L M; Del Pino, M Dolores; Fernández-Vega, Francisco; Górriz, José L; Luńo, José; Marín, Rafael; Martínez, Isabel; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Orte, Luis M; Quereda, Carlos; Rodríguez-Pérez, José C; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ruilope, Luis M

2014-05-21

140

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers  

PubMed Central

Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:17245481

Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Parker, John D; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Rao, Vivek; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

2007-01-01

141

Treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: Synopsis of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading U.S. cause of death, lost quality of life and medical costs. Nearly one in three Americans die from heart disease and stroke. Most ASCVD is preventable through a healthy lifestyle and effective treatment of cholesterol and blood pressure...

142

AACE\\/TOS\\/ASMBS Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice are systematically developed statements to assist health-care professionals in medical decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document

Jeffrey I. Mechanick; Robert F. Kushner; Harvey J. Sugerman; J. Michael Gonzalez-Campoy; Maria L. Collazo-Clavell; Adam F. Spitz; Caroline M. Apovian; Edward H. Livingston; Robert Brolin; David B. Sarwer; Wendy A. Anderson; John Dixon

2009-01-01

143

Instructional Guidelines. Welding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

144

Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?  

PubMed Central

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement (CS) provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P = 0.28). ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients. PMID:24382996

Christoudias, Moira K.; Collett, Abigail E.; Stull, Tari S.; Gracely, Edward J.; Frazier, Thomas G.; Barrio, Andrea V.

2013-01-01

145

Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines  

PubMed Central

The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed. PMID:25191515

Adler, Douglas; Schmidt, C. Max; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Barthel, James S.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Merchant, Nipun B.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shaaban, Akram M.; Simeone, Diane; Pitman, Martha Bishop; Layfield, Lester J.

2014-01-01

146

Use of 5-?-Reductase Inhibitors for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention: American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Urological Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guideline  

PubMed Central

Purpose To develop an evidence-based guideline on the use of 5-?-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Health Services Committee (HSC), ASCO Cancer Prevention Committee, and the American Urological Association Practice Guidelines Committee jointly convened a Panel of experts, who used the results from a systematic review of the literature to develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of 5-ARIs for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results The systematic review completed for this guideline identified 15 randomized clinical trials that met the inclusion criteria, nine of which reported prostate cancer period prevalence. Conclusion Asymptomatic men with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ? 3.0 ng/mL who are regularly screened with PSA or are anticipating undergoing annual PSA screening for early detection of prostate cancer may benefit from a discussion of both the benefits of 5-ARIs for 7 years for the prevention of prostate cancer and the potential risks (including the possibility of high-grade prostate cancer). Men who are taking 5-ARIs for benign conditions such as lower urinary tract [obstructive] symptoms (LUTS) may benefit from a similar discussion, understanding that the improvement of LUTS relief should be weighed with the potential risks of high-grade prostate cancer from 5-ARIs (although the majority of the Panel members judged the latter risk to be unlikely). A reduction of approximately 50% in PSA by 12 months is expected in men taking a 5-ARI; however, because these changes in PSA may vary across men, and within individual men over time, the Panel cannot recommend a specific cut point to trigger a biopsy for men taking a 5-ARI. No specific cut point or change in PSA has been prospectively validated in men taking a 5-ARI. PMID:19252137

Kramer, Barnett S.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Justman, Stewart; Somerfield, Mark R.; Albertsen, Peter C.; Blot, William J.; Ballentine Carter, H.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Godley, Paul A.; Harris, Russell P.; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wittes, Janet; Zon, Robin; Schellhammer, Paul

2009-01-01

147

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorders - first revision.  

PubMed

In this report, which is an update of a guideline published in 2002 (Bandelow et al. 2002, World J Biol Psychiatry 3:171), recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are presented. Since the publication of the first version of this guideline, a substantial number of new randomized controlled studies of anxiolytics have been published. In particular, more relapse prevention studies are now available that show sustained efficacy of anxiolytic drugs. The recommendations, developed by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Task Force for the Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive and Post-traumatic Stress Disorders, a consensus panel of 30 international experts, are now based on 510 published randomized, placebo- or comparator-controlled clinical studies (RCTs) and 130 open studies and case reports. First-line treatments for these disorders are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and the calcium channel modulator pregabalin. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are equally effective for some disorders, but many are less well tolerated than the SSRIs/SNRIs. In treatment-resistant cases, benzodiazepines may be used when the patient does not have a history of substance abuse disorders. Potential treatment options for patients unresponsive to standard treatments are described in this overview. Although these guidelines focus on medications, non-pharmacological were also considered. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other variants of behaviour therapy have been sufficiently investigated in controlled studies in patients with anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD to support them being recommended either alone or in combination with the above medicines. PMID:18949648

Bandelow, Borwin; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Allgulander, Christer; Ayuso-Gutierrez, José; Baldwin, David S; Buenvicius, Robertas; Cassano, Giovanni; Fineberg, Naomi; Gabriels, Loes; Hindmarch, Ian; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Klein, Donald F; Lader, Malcolm; Lecrubier, Yves; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Liebowitz, Michael R; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Marazziti, Donatella; Miguel, Euripedes C; Oh, Kang Seob; Preter, Maurice; Rupprecht, Rainer; Sato, Mitsumoto; Starcevic, Vladan; Stein, Dan J; van Ameringen, Michael; Vega, Johann

2008-01-01

148

Testing for inherited thrombophilia and consequences for antithrombotic prophylaxis in patients with venous thromboembolism and their relatives. A review of the Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups.  

PubMed

The clinical penetrance of venous thromboembolism (VTE) susceptibility genes is variable, being lower in heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A (mild thrombophilia), and higher in the rare carriers of deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C or S, and those with multiple or homozygous abnormalities (high-risk thrombophilia). The absolute risk of VTE is low, and the utility of laboratory investigation for inherited thrombophilia in patients with VTE and their asymptomatic relatives has been largely debated, leading to the production of several Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups. The risk for VTE largely depends on the family history of VTE. Therefore, indiscriminate search for carriers is of no utility, and targeted screening is potentially more fruitful. In patients with VTE inherited thrombophilia is not scored as a determinant of recurrence, playing a minor role in the decision of prolonging anticoagulation; indeed, a few guidelines consider testing worthwhile to identify carriers of high-risk thrombophilia, particularly those with a family history of VTE. The identification of the asymptomatic carrier relatives of the probands with VTE and thrombophilia could reduce cases of provoked VTE, offering them primary antithrombotic prophylaxis during risk situations. In most guidelines, this is considered justified only for relatives of probands with a deficiency of natural anticoagulants or multiple abnormalities. Counselling the asymptomatic female relatives of individuals with VTE and/or thrombophilia before pregnancy or the prescription of hormonal treatments should be administered with consideration of the risk driven by the type of thrombophilia and the family history of VTE. PMID:23846575

De Stefano, Valerio; Rossi, Elena

2013-10-01

149

SECTION TWELVE Site Design Guidelines References  

E-print Network

Engineering Society of North America, Illumina ng Engineering Society of North America Guidelines. Illumina ng Engineering Society of North America, IESNA G103, Guideline for Security Ligh ng for People, Sustainability Ac on Plan. 2010. Clemson University, Sustainable Green Building Policy. 2005. Illumina ng

Duchowski, Andrew T.

150

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of dementias in primary care.  

PubMed

Objective. To define a practice guideline for biological treatment of dementias for general practitioners in primary care. Methods. TThis paper is a short and practical summary of the World Federation of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the Biological treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias for treatment in primary care ( Ihl et al. 2011 ). The recommendations were developed by a task force of international experts in the field and are based on randomized controlled studies. Results. Anti-dementia medications neither cure, nor arrest, or alter the course of the disease. The type of dementia, the individual symptom constellation and the tolerability and evidence for efficacy should determine what medications should be used. In treating neuropsychiatric symptoms, psychosocial intervention should be the treatment of first choice. For neuropsychiatric symptoms, medications should only be considered when psychosocial interventions are not adequate and after cautious risk-benefit analysis. Conclusions. Depending on the diagnostic entity and clinical presentation different anti-dementia drugs can be recommended. These guidelines provide a practical approach for general practitioners managing dementias. PMID:25195764

Ihl, Ralf; Bunevicius, Robertas; Frölich, Lutz; Winblad, Bengt; Schneider, Lon S; Dubois, Bruno; Burns, Alistair; Thibaut, Florence; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

2014-10-18

151

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infection: 2009 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaa  

PubMed Central

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. PMID:19489710

Mermel, Leonard A.; Allon, Michael; Bouza, Emilio; Craven, Donald E.; Flynn, Patricia; O’Grady, Naomi P.; Raad, Issam I.; Rijnders, Bart J. A.; Sherertz, Robert J.; Warren, David K.

2014-01-01

152

Who needs labs and who needs statins? Comparative and cost effectiveness analyses of non-laboratory-based, laboratory-based, and staged primary cardiovascular disease screening guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors produces significant clinical benefits, but no consensus exists on optimal screening algorithms. This study aimed to evaluate the comparative and cost effectiveness of staged laboratory-based and non-laboratory-based total cardiovascular disease risk assessment. Methods and Results We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and cost-effectiveness modeling methods to compare strategies with and without laboratory components, and using single-stage and multistage algorithms, including approaches based on Framingham risk scores (laboratory-based assessments for all individuals). Analyses were conducted using data from 5,998 adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey without history of CVD, using 10-year CVD death as the main outcome. A micro-simulation model projected lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for 60 Framingham-based, non-laboratory-based, and staged screening approaches. Across strategies the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.774–0.780 in men and 0.812–0.834 in women. There were no statistically significant differences in AUC between multistage and Framingham-based approaches. In cost-effectiveness analyses, multistage strategies had ICERs of $52,000/QALY and $83,000/QALY for men and women, respectively. Single-stage/Framingham-based strategies were dominated (higher cost and lower QALYs) or had unattractive ICERs (>$300,000/QALY) compared to single-stage/non-laboratory-based and multistage approaches. Conclusions Non-laboratory-based CVD risk assessment can be useful in primary CVD prevention, as a substitute for laboratory-based assessments or as the initial component of a multistage approach. Cost-effective multistage screening strategies could avoid 25–75% of laboratory testing used in CVD risk screening with predictive power comparable to Framingham risks. PMID:24425701

Pandya, Ankur; Weinstein, Milton C.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Cutler, David; Gaziano, Thomas A.

2014-01-01

153

A report from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 (August 30-September 3 - Barcelona, Spain).  

PubMed

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress is the largest cardiology conference in the world and this year ran in Barcelona from August 30 to September 3. During the meeting, more than 30,000 cardiologists from over 100 countries met to share their knowledge in all cardiovascular fields, from basic science to management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Apart from more than 4,500 interesting abstracts presented in posters and oral sessions, five new ESC Clinical Practice Guidelines were presented among the latest clinical trial results, updates and registries. PMID:25313372

Dulsat, C

2014-09-01

154

[World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for coastal and fresh waters: Italian translation by the Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health (SItI) Working Group "Movement Sciences for Health"].  

PubMed

The Working Group "Movement Sciences for Health" of the Italian Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health has promoted the Italian translation of the WHO Guidelines for Safe Recreational Water Environments, relating to coastal and freshwater environments. In this article the authors briefly summarize the main areas covered in the guidelines, namely drowning and injury, exposure to cold, heat and sunlight, water quality, contamination of beach sand, exposure to algae and their products, aesthetic issues, exposure to chemical and physical agents, dangerous aquatic organisms, monitoring and assessment hazards and risks. PMID:22033163

Napoli, Christian; Amagliani, Giulia; Arpesella, Marisa; Bonadonna, Lucia; Brandi, Giorgio; Briancesco, Rossella; Capelli, Giovanni; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Frangella, Claudia; Gallč, Francesca; Leoni, Erica; Liguori, Giorgio

2011-01-01

155

Limitations of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel Guidelines on the Use of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We applied the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel (CP) guidelines for the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) to patients treated with this technique to determine the ability of the guidelines to differentiate patients with significantly different clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients treated with APBI and 199 with whole-breast irradiation (WBI) (matched for tumor size, nodal status, age, margins, receptor status, and tamoxifen use) were stratified into the three ASTRO CP levels of suitability ('suitable,' 'cautionary,' and 'unsuitable') to assess rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure, distant metastases, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival based on CP category. Median follow-up was 11.1 years. Results: Analysis of the APBI and WBI patient groups, either separately or together (n = 398), did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in 10-year actuarial rates of IBTR when stratified by the three ASTRO groups. Regional nodal failure and distant metastasis were generally progressively worse when comparing the suitable to cautionary to unsuitable CP groups. However, when analyzing multiple clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variables, only patient age was associated with IBTR using WBI (p = 0.002). Conclusions: The ASTRO CP suitable group predicted for a low risk of IBTR; however, the cautionary and unsuitable groups had an equally low risk of IBTR, supporting the need for continued refinement of patient selection criteria as additional outcome data become available and for the continued accrual of patients to Phase III trials.

Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Arthur, Douglas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Wazer, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Peter; Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle; Kestin, Larry; Ye, Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-03-15

156

2011 Focused Update of 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) focused update updates a single recommendation (or subset of recommendations) in advance of a regularly scheduled guideline update. This document updates one recommendation of the ASCO Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) regarding switch maintenance chemotherapy. Clinical Context Recent results from phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that in patients with stage IV NSCLC who have received four cycles of first-line chemotherapy and whose disease has not progressed, an immediate switch to alternative, single-agent chemotherapy can extend progression-free survival and, in some cases, overall survival. Because of limitations in the data, delayed treatment with a second-line agent after disease progression is also acceptable. Recent Data Seven randomized controlled trials of carboxyaminoimidazole, docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, gemcitabine, and pemetrexed have evaluated outcomes in patients who received an immediate, non–cross resistant alternative therapy (switch maintenance) after first-line therapy. Recommendation In patients with stage IV NSCLC, first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy should be stopped at disease progression or after four cycles in patients whose disease is stable but not responding to treatment. Two-drug cytotoxic combinations should be administered for no more than six cycles. For those with stable disease or response after four cycles, immediate treatment with an alternative, single-agent chemotherapy such as pemetrexed in patients with nonsquamous histology, docetaxel in unselected patients, or erlotinib in unselected patients may be considered. Limitations of this data are such that a break from cytotoxic chemotherapy after a fixed course is also acceptable, with initiation of second-line chemotherapy at disease progression. PMID:21900105

Azzoli, Christopher G.; Temin, Sarah; Aliff, Timothy; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pao, William; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

2011-01-01

157

An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy  

PubMed Central

Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

2013-01-01

158

The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.  

PubMed

The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping of the saphenous vein to the level of the knee (GRADE 1B). We recommend phlebectomy or sclerotherapy to treat varicose tributaries (GRADE 1B) and suggest foam sclerotherapy as an option for the treatment of the incompetent saphenous vein (GRADE 2C). We recommend against selective treatment of perforating vein incompetence in patients with simple varicose veins (CEAP class C(2); GRADE 1B), but we suggest treatment of pathologic perforating veins (outward flow duration ?500 ms, vein diameter ?3.5 mm) located underneath healed or active ulcers (CEAP class C(5)-C(6); GRADE 2B). We suggest treatment of pelvic congestion syndrome and pelvic varices with coil embolization, plugs, or transcatheter sclerotherapy, used alone or together (GRADE 2B). PMID:21536172

Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

2011-05-01

159

Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)  

PubMed Central

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has led to an overwhelming improvement in the prognosis of patients affected by neovascular AMD, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of patients. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by significant economic investments, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations in diagnostic technologies, such as optical coherence tomography, allows unprecedented high-resolution visualisation of disease morphology and provides a promising horizon for early disease detection and efficient therapeutic follow-up. However, definite conclusions from morphologic parameters are still lacking, and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state-of-the-art care to their patients. Trial registration number NCT01318941. PMID:25136079

Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat; Larsen, Michael; Souied, Eric; Schlingemann, Reinier; Eldem, Bora; Monés, Jordi; Richard, Gisbert; Bandello, Francesco

2014-01-01

160

Androgen-Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer and Cardiovascular Risk A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, and American Urological Association Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

discussion regarding the metabolic effects of ADT and its possible association with increased cardiovascular risk. In addition, likely as a result of these reports, internists, endocrinologists, and cardiologists are now being consulted regarding the evaluation and management of patients in whom ADT is being initiated. Most of these physicians are not aware of the possible effects of ADT on cardiovascular

Glenn N. Levine; Anthony V. D'Amico; Peter Berger; Peter E. Clark; Robert H. Eckel; Nancy L. Keating; Richard V. Milani; Arthur I. Sagalowsky; Matthew R. Smith; Neil Zakai

2011-01-01

161

Classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma in adults: guidelines of the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation on initial work-up, management, and follow-up  

PubMed Central

The Italian Society of Hematology (SIE), the Italian Society of Experimental Haematology (SIES) and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation (GITMO) commissioned a project to develop practice guidelines for the initial work-up, therapy and follow-up of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Key questions to the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease were formulated by an Advisory Committee, discussed and approved by an Expert Panel (EP) composed of senior hematologists and one radiotherapist. After a comprehensive and systematic literature review, the EP recommendations were graded according to their supporting evidence. An explicit approach to consensus methodologies was used for evidence interpretation and for producing recommendations in the absence of a strong evidence. The EP decided that the target domain of the guidelines should include only classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as defined by the WHO classification, and exclude lymphocyte predominant histology. Distinct recommendations were produced for initial work-up, first-line therapy of early and advanced stage disease, monitoring procedures and salvage therapy, including hemopoietic stem cell transplant. Separate recommendations were formulated for elderly patients. Pre-treatment volumetric CT scan of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis is mandatory, while FDG-PET is recommended. As to the therapy of early stage disease, a combined modality approach is still recommended with ABVD followed by involved-field radiotherapy; the number of courses of ABVD will depend on the patient risk category (favorable or unfavorable). Full-term chemotherapy with ABVD is recommended in advanced stage disease; adjuvant radiotherapy in patients without initial bulk who achieved a complete remission is not recommended. In the elderly, chemotherapy regimens more intensive than ABVD are not recommended. Early evaluation of response with FDG-PET scan is suggested. Relapsed or refractory patients should receive high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hemopoietic stem cells transplant. Allogeneic transplant is recommended in patients relapsing after autologous transplant. All fertile patients should be informed of the possible effects of therapy on gonadal function and fertility preservation measures should be taken before the initiation of therapy. PMID:19278966

Brusamolino, Ercole; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Barosi, Giovanni; Biti, Giampaolo; Gobbi, Paolo G.; Levis, Alessandro; Marchetti, Monia; Santoro, Armando; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Tura, Sante

2009-01-01

162

SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking  

PubMed Central

Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune ‘resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for ‘good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies. PMID:25387090

Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

2015-01-01

163

SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking.  

PubMed

Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune 'resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for 'good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies. PMID:25387090

Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

2015-02-01

164

Implementation of the NICE guideline - recommendations from the British Fertility Society for national criteria for NHS funding of assisted conception.  

PubMed

Assisted conception providers in England were surveyed to establish the uptake of NICE guideline for infertility particularly in respect of assisted conception and the criteria used to accept patients for NHS funded treatment. Detailed information on selection criteria was obtained from a group of commissioning consortia at an advanced stage in their arrangements. While there was an overall increase in the number of NHS IVF cycles purchased in England, implementation is stalled at one fresh cycle in the vast majority of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). There is little consensus about the criteria used for acceptance into an NHS programme. This is particularly so in respect of social criteria which are often arbitrary and used as a rationing tool. This information complements that provided by the survey of Primary Care Trusts performed in March 2005 by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Infertility (APPGI) in partnership with the National Infertility Awareness Campaign (NIAC) which together provide a basis for recommendations for NHS funding. The recommendations presented should be applied across England and Wales to ensure consistency, fairness and equity of access. PMID:17008271

Kennedy, R; Kingsland, C; Rutherford, A; Hamilton, M; Ledger, W

2006-09-01

165

Cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fatty acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiac societies recommend the intake of 1 g\\/day of the two omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for cardiovascular disease prevention, treatment after a myocardial infarction, prevention of sudden death, and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. These recommendations are based on a body of scientific evidence that encompasses literally thousands of publications. Of four large scale

Clemens von Schacky; William S. Harris

2007-01-01

166

American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy. PMID:19917871

Azzoli, Christopher G.; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

2009-01-01

167

Prevalence and concordance of high cardiovascular disease scores in HIV/AIDS patients from Croatia and Serbia with four international algorithms  

PubMed Central

Introduction We evaluated cardiovascular risks in HIV-infected patients from Croatia and Serbia and the eligibility for statin therapy as recommended by the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines, European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines and European Society of Cardiology and the European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention [1–3]. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional analysis of consecutive patients between 40 and 79 years old who had received antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months was performed. Results Of 254 (132 from Croatia and 122 from Serbia) persons included in the study, 76% were male; median age was 49 years. Up to 51.6% of persons had a high CVD risk. The prevalence of current smoking was 42.9%, hypertension 31.5% and hypercholesterolaemia (>6.2 mmol/L) 35.4%. Statins would be recommended to 21.3% (95% CI, 16.3% to 27.4%) of persons by the EACS, 25.6% (95% CI, 20.2% to 31.9%) by ESC/EAS and 37.9% (95% CI, 31.6 to 44.6%) by the ACC/AHA guidelines. A high 5-year data collection on adverse effects of anti-HIV drugs study risk score (>5%) had a moderate agreement with the high (?20%) 10-year CVD Framingham risk score (kappa=0.47) and high (?5%) 10-year European systematic coronary risk evaluation score algorithm (kappa=0.47), and substantial agreement with the elevated (?7.5%) 10-year Pooled Cohort Atherosclerotic CVD risk equation score (kappa=0.63). Conclusion We found a high prevalence of CVD risks in patients from Croatia and Serbia. The ACC/AHA guideline would recommend statins more often than ESC/EAS and EACS guidelines. PMID:25394056

Begovac, Josip; Dragovic, Gordana; Viskovic, Klaudija; Kusic, Jovana; Perovic Mihanovic, Marta; Lukas, Davorka; Jevtovic, Djordje

2014-01-01

168

Management of the waiting list for cadaveric kidney transplants: report of a survey and recommendations by the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the American Society of Transplantation.  

PubMed

The Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the American Society of Transplantation developed a survey to review the policies of kidney transplant programs in the United States with respect to the management of the steadily expanding waiting list for cadaveric kidneys. The survey was sent to 287 centers, and 192 (67%) responded. The survey indicated that regular follow-up monitoring, most frequently on an annual basis, is required by the majority (71%) of programs. Patients considered to be at high risk and candidates for combined kidney-pancreas transplantation may be monitored more frequently. Annual screening for coronary artery disease is typically required for asymptomatic patients considered to be at high risk for covert disease. Noninvasive techniques are typically used, and a designated cardiologist is usually available to the transplant program. The dialysis nephrologist or the potential transplant recipient is expected to inform the transplant program of intercurrent events that may affect transplant candidacy. Standard health maintenance screening is required, together with the routine updating of serologic and other blood tests that may be relevant to the posttransplant course. Smaller transplant programs (<100 patients on the waiting list) are more likely to maintain closer contact with the wait-listed patients and to attempt to influence their treatment during dialysis and are less likely to cancel transplants because of unanticipated pretransplant medical problems. The work load necessitated by the follow-up monitoring of wait-listed patients was assessed and, in the absence of specific evidence-based information, a series of recommendations were developed to reflect current standards of practice and to suggest future research initiatives. PMID:11805184

Danovitch, Gabriel M; Hariharan, Sundaram; Pirsch, John D; Rush, David; Roth, David; Ramos, Emilio; Starling, Randall C; Cangro, Chuck; Weir, Mattthew R

2002-02-01

169

Ethics Guidelines for Environmental Epidemiologists Introduction  

E-print Network

Ethics Guidelines for Environmental Epidemiologists Introduction "Towards Ethics Guidelines Environment, Vol. 184(1996):137-147. This paper includes the ethics guidelines adopted by the ISEE in 1999 as the Society's official statement on ethical conduct for environmental epidemiologists. Elsevier has kindly

Biederman, Irving

170

Report from The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease (Part 2 - Nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology).  

PubMed

Interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease is a relatively young and rapidly evolving field. As the profession begins to establish multi-institutional databases, a universal system of nomenclature is necessary for the field of interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the efforts of The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease to establish a system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, focusing both on procedural nomenclature and the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology. This system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease is a component of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This manuscript is the second part of the two-part series. Part 1 covered the procedural nomenclature associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. Part 2 will cover the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. PMID:21310094

Bergersen, Lisa; Giroud, Jorge Manuel; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Franklin, Rodney Cyril George; Béland, Marie Josée; Krogmann, Otto Nils; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; Gaynor, J William; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry Lane; Weinberg, Paul; Everett, Allen Dale

2011-06-01

171

[Scientific statement] Report of the Salt Reduction Committee of the Japanese Society of Hypertension(1) Role of salt in hypertension and cardiovascular diseases.  

PubMed

Dietary salt consumption is closely associated with the level of blood pressure (BP); stricter salt reduction more markedly decreased BP. Obesity/metabolic syndrome, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, exercise and mental stress influence the BP-elevating effect of high-salt diet. Observational and intervention studies suggested that salt restriction improved the risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects may differ among the types of the hypertensive complications; salt reduction may decrease the risk of stroke more than that of ischemic heart disease. Small-scale studies demonstrated that excess salt increased the risk of the left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, the urinary protein/albumin levels and end-stage renal failure. These diverse beneficial effects of salt reduction are probably because low-salt diet is an effective strategy to decrease BP and body fluid volume but is less effective to ameliorate the other cardiovascular risk factors. A mean salt intake in Japan is markedly high. Considering the present condition, salt reduction is essential for the prevention and treatment of hypertension and for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24152613

Ando, Katsuyuki; Kawarazaki, Hiroo; Miura, Katsuyuki; Matsuura, Hideo; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Yoshita, Katsushi; Kawamura, Minoru; Kusaka, Miho; Kai, Hisashi; Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Kawano, Yuhei

2013-12-01

172

Guidelines for the investigation of individuals who were place under surveillance for tuberculosis post-landing in Canada. Canadian Thoracic Society, the Tuberculosis Directors of Canada and the Department of National Health and Welfare.  

PubMed Central

There are 2 parts to this article. Part 1 is a preamble, jointly prepared by Immigration and Overseas Health Services, Medical Services Branch and the Bureau of Communicable Disease Epidemiology, LCDC, Department of National Health and Welfare, to provide background information regarding the medical assessment of immigrants prior to landing in Canada. Part 2 is a set of guidelines for the investigation of individuals who were placed under surveillance for tuberculosis post-landing in Canada. It was jointly prepared by the Canadian Thoracic Society, the Tuberculosis Directors of Canada and the Department of National Health and Welfare in consultation with the provincial and territorial epidemiologists and has been approved by the Canadian Lung Association and the Canadian Thoracic Society. PMID:8500032

1993-01-01

173

Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease. National Kidney Foundation guidelines define chronic kidney disease (CKD) as persistent kidney damage (confirmed by renal biopsy or markers of kidney damage) and\\/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL\\/min\\/1.73m2 for greater than three months.Patients with CKD experience higher mortality and adverse cardiovascular (CV) event rates, which remains significant after adjustment for conventional coronary risk

Nagesh S. Anavekar; Marc A. Pfeffer

2004-01-01

174

Review of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Clinical Guidelines for Nutrition Support in Cancer Patients: nutrition screening and assessment.  

PubMed

It is clear that cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may or may not be indicated in these patients depending on individual patient characteristics. This review article, the first in a series of articles to examine the A.S.P.E.N. Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients Cancer Guidelines, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in cancer patients. This first article will provide background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients as well as discuss the role of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in the care of cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the Clinical Guidelines, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequent published studies. Future articles will explore the guidelines related to nutrition support in oncology patients receiving anticancer therapies. PMID:18390787

Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

2008-01-01

175

HIV and Cardiovascular Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

176

Optimal use of left ventriculography at the time of cardiac catheterization: A consensus statement from the society for cardiovascular angiography and interventions.  

PubMed

The rationale to perform left ventriculography at the time of cardiac catheterization has been little studied. The technique and frequency of use of left ventriculography vary by geographic regions, institutions, and individuals. Despite the recent publication of guidelines and appropriate use criteria for coronary angiography, revascularization, and noninvasive imaging, to date there have been no specific guidelines on the performance of left ventriculography. When left ventriculography is performed, proper technique must be used to generate high quality data which can direct patient management. The decision to perform left ventriculography in place of, or in addition to, other forms of ventricular assessment should be made taking into account the clinical context and the type of information each study provides. This paper attempts to show the role of left ventriculography at the time of coronary angiography or left heart catheterization. The recommendations in this document are not formal guidelines but are based on the consensus of this writing group. These recommendations should be tested through clinical research studies. Until such studies are performed, the writing group believes that adoption of these recommendations will lead to a more standardized application of ventriculography and improve the quality of care provided to cardiac patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25370476

Gigliotti, Osvaldo S; Babb, Joseph D; Dieter, Robert S; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Islam, Ashequl M; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Moore, Phillip; Sorajja, Paul; Blankenship, James C

2014-11-01

177

No Testosterone Therapy for Healthy Women, New Guidelines State  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. No Testosterone Therapy for Healthy Women, New Guidelines State Benefits unclear, harms unknown, researchers report (* ... and should not be prescribed testosterone therapy, a new guideline from the Endocrine Society states. "Although limited ...

178

Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes Preamble  

E-print Network

Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes Preamble The following Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes supplement they are incompatible with these regulations. 1. The Max Planck Society is committed

179

Cardiovascular Disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

180

[Dietary fats and cardiovascular health].  

PubMed

Although dietary fat and its role in cardiovascular prevention has been one of the most extensively studied nutritional topics, it continues to be an ever-expanding research area. Particularly thanks to studies on Mediterranean diet, we now know that fat quality is more relevant than the amount of fat we eat in the diet. Thus, saturated and trans fats have been found to increase the risk of atherogenic disease. This is why it is recommended to substitute complex carbohydrates or unsaturated fat for unsaturated and trans fats with the aim of reducing saturated and trans fat intake to <10% and <1%, respectively, of the total calorie intake. Recent population studies, particularly that conducted in Kuopio, Finland, and those on Mediterranean diet, stress the important role of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats as key nutrients in preventing cardiovascular disease in modern societies. Furthermore, a special type of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e. those of the omega-3 (n-3) series, is increasingly becoming essential nutrients for a healthy diet, especially in the case of children. Therefore, there is a rationale for four the Scientific Societies that are strongly committed to disseminate the benefits of a healthy diet in preventing cardiovascular disease, and to prepare a joint statement with the purpose of spreading improved knowledge on the importance of changing to a healthy diet with a well-balanced fat intake for industrialized populations. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary panel of experts from the following institutions has developed the present joint statement targeted at both adults and children of different ages: Spanish Society of Arteriosclerosis, Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine, Spanish Association of Paediatrics, Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Paediatric Nutrition and Dietetics, and Spanish Society for Food Sciences. PMID:21392857

Fernández, Lourdes Carrillo; Serra, Jaime Dalmau; Álvarez, Jesús Román Martínez; Alberich, Rosa Solŕ; Jiménez, Francisco Pérez

2011-03-01

181

[Dietary fats and cardiovascular health].  

PubMed

Although dietary fat and its role in cardiovascular prevention has been one of the most extensively studied nutritional topics, it continues to be an ever-expanding research area. Particularly thanks to studies on Mediterranean diet, we now know that fat quality is more relevant than the amount of fat we eat in the diet. Thus, saturated and trans fats have been found to increase the risk of atherogenic disease. This is why it is recommended to substitute complex carbohydrates or unsaturated fat for unsaturated and trans fats with the aim of reducing saturated and trans fat intake to <10% and <1%, respectively, of the total calorie intake. Recent population studies, particularly that conducted in Kuopio, Finland, and those on Mediterranean diet, stress the important role of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats as key nutrients in preventing cardiovascular disease in modern societies. Furthermore, a special type of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e. those of the omega-3 (n-3) series, is increasingly becoming essential nutrients for a healthy diet, especially in the case of children. Therefore, there is a rationale for four the Scientific Societies that are strongly committed to disseminate the benefits of a healthy diet in preventing cardiovascular disease, and to prepare a joint statement with the purpose of spreading improved knowledge on the importance of changing to a healthy diet with a well-balanced fat intake for industrialized populations. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary panel of experts from the following institutions has developed the present joint statement targeted at both adults and children of different ages: Spanish Society of Arteriosclerosis, Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine, Spanish Association of Paediatrics, Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Paediatric Nutrition and Dietetics, and Spanish Society for Food Sciences. PMID:21345757

Carrillo Fernández, L; Dalmau Serra, J; Martínez Álvarez, J R; Solŕ Alberich, R; Pérez Jiménez, F

2011-03-01

182

[Evidence-based management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Latest guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2010].  

PubMed

Acute myocardial infarction and its consequences (death, chronic ischemic coronary artery disease, heart failure) are still the number 1 causes of death and of cardiovascular diseases in Germany. In this context, patients with STEMI are at the highest risk. The first-line management of STEMI patients often determines if the outcome is life or death. This overview presents the current optimal evidence-based management of STEMI patients as a practice-oriented extract according to the latest ESC guidelines, fully published some weeks ago (http://www.escardio.org).All efforts must be made to keep the respective time intervals between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of reperfusion therapy as short as possible, i.e. best within a dedicated STEMI network. Two of the time intervals are particularly essential: the time delay between the onset of symptoms and the first medical contact (FMC) and the time delay between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion. The time delay between the onset of symptoms and FMC depends on the patient as well as on the organization of the emergency medical service (EMS). Unfortunately, too many patients/bystanders still hesitate to immediately call the EMS. More intense measures must therefore be taken to educate the public. The optimal FMC by medical doctors or paramedics reacts quickly and ideally arrives with ECG equipment for immediate diagnosis of STEMI (persistent ST-segment elevation or presumably new left bundle branch block) before hospital admission. Unfortunately in many cases, the FMC is the emergency room of a hospital. Further decisions can be made without laboratory findings. In Germany, the average time delay between onset of symptoms and FMC is 100 min and therefore longer than in some other European countries.The next critical time interval is that between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion: this interval depends solely on the EMS organization and the distance to the next catheter laboratory with 24 h PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention) availability. The key question for further decisions is whether a primary PCI can be performed within 120 min after FMC. If so, the primary PCI should definitively be preferred. In patients <75 years presenting with a large anterior infarction within 2 h after onset of symptoms, this time interval should not exceed 90 min. For primary PCI an often used measure of quality is the "door-to-balloon" time, which should of course be as short as possible. Therefore, patients with STEMI should be admitted directly to the catheterization laboratory bypassing the emergency room or intensive care unit. In Germany, the average time interval between FMC and start of primary PCI is approximately 120 min just at the upper limit of the guideline recommendations. Some other European countries report a significantly shorter corresponding time delay.If primary PCI is not possible within 120 min (or 90 min) after FMC, thrombolysis must be initiated within 30 min after FMC, either in the EMS ambulance or in a nearby non-PCI hospital. A thrombolytic therapy, however, even if "successful", is not the final therapy: within 24 h (but not before 3 h) cardiac catheterization has to be performed with PCI, if applicable. Analyzing the overall revascularization rates in Germany, 81% receive primary PCI, 7% thrombolysis and 12% no reperfusion therapy. Regarding any reperfusion in STEMI, Germany holds the third place after the Czech Republic and Belgium.Patients presenting at 12-24 h after onset of symptoms or later may possibly benefit from a PCI, even if already asymptomatic, if signs of ischemia/viability in the infarct artery-related area are demonstrable. If this cannot be shown, PCI in these patients is not indicated.The first-line medication aims at dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and anticoagulation. For DAPT, the combination of ASA with a thienopyridine is mandatory. If primary PCI is feasible, DAPT with prasugrel (loading dose of 60 mg, independent of age and weight) is preferred due to its faster onset of action and superior effectiven

Silber, S

2010-12-01

183

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation  

E-print Network

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Student Research Fellowships Inspiring the Physician Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular medical Provides medical Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research

Bushman, Frederic

184

Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children: Recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics  

PubMed Central

Summary This report updates and combines into one document earlier versions of guidelines for preventing and treating opportunistic infections (OIs) among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, last published in 2002 and 2004, respectively. These guidelines are intended for use by clinicians and other health-care workers providing medical care for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in the United States. The guidelines discuss opportunistic pathogens that occur in the United States and one that might be acquired during international travel (i.e., malaria). Topic areas covered for each OI include a brief description of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the OI in children; prevention of exposure; prevention of disease by chemoprophylaxis and/or vaccination; discontinuation of primary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution; treatment of disease; monitoring for adverse effects during treatment; management of treatment failure; prevention of disease recurrence; and discontinuation of secondary prophylaxis after immune reconstitution. A separate document about preventing and treating of OIs among HIV-infected adults and postpubertal adolescents (Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents) was prepared by a working group of adult HIV and infectious disease specialists. The guidelines were developed by a panel of specialists in pediatric HIV infection and infectious diseases (the Pediatric Opportunistic Infections Working Group) from the U.S. government and academic institutions. For each OI, a pediatric specialist with content-matter expertise reviewed the literature for new information since the last guidelines were published; they then proposed revised recommendations at a meeting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in June 2007. After these presentations and discussions, the guidelines underwent further revision, with review and approval by the Working Group, and final endorsement by NIH, CDC, the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (PIDS), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of the evidence supporting the recommendation so readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. An important mode of acquisition of OIs, as well as HIV infection among children, is from their infected mother; HIV-infected women coinfected with opportunistic pathogens might be more likely than women without HIV infection to transmit these infections to their infants. In addition, HIV-infected women or HIV-infected family members coinfected with certain opportunistic pathogens might be more likely to transmit these infections horizontally to their children, resulting in increased likelihood of primary acquisition of such infections in the young child. Therefore, infections with opportunistic pathogens might affect not just HIV-infected infants but also HIV-exposed but uninfected infants who become infected by the pathogen because of transmission from HIV-infected mothers or family members with coinfections. These guidelines for treating OIs in children therefore consider treatment of infections among all children, both HIV-infected and uninfected, born to HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV infection is increasingly seen among adolescents with perinatal infection now surviving into their teens and among youth with behaviorally acquired HIV infection. Although guidelines for postpubertal adolescents can be found in the adult OI guidelines, drug pharmacokinetics and response to treatment may differ for younger prepubertal or pubertal adolescents. Therefore, these guidelines also apply to treatment of HIV-infected youth who have not yet completed pubertal development. Major changes in the guidelines include 1) greater emphasis on the importance of antiretroviral therapy for p

Mofenson, Lynne M.; Brady, Michael T.; Danner, Susie P.; Dominguez, Kenneth L.; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S.; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

2010-01-01

185

Pulmonary rehabilitation exercise prescription in chronic obstructive lung disease: US survey and review of guidelines and clinical practices.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, progressive disorder associated with disabling symptoms, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and substantial morbidity and mortality. Current national guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Many PR exercise programs are based on guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine. Recommendations have also been published by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the American Thoracic Society. Translating exercise science into effective training and clinical care requires interpretation and the use of diverse national PR guidelines and recommendations. Pulmonary rehabilitation clinicians often vary in their education and background, with most nurses and respiratory care practitioners lacking formal training in exercise physiology. Patients often have comorbidities that may further complicate exercise provision and prescription. This article describes the results of an informal, nonscientific survey of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation members exploring current PR exercise prescription practices as a basis for discussion and reviews current national exercise recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further, it describes areas of uncertainty regarding exercise prescription in PR and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines, clinician preparedness, and patient complexity. PMID:23846840

Garvey, Chris; Fullwood, M Dot; Rigler, Julia

2013-01-01

186

Forms & Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

2003 DCP Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials 2003 Step 1: Developing a Cancer Prevention Clinical Trial Forms & Guidelines General Guidelines for Consortia Lead Organization to add Participating to Consortium (doc, 63kb) NCI Request for Proposals,

187

Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.  

PubMed

The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ? 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into perspective with new insights in terms of safety issues. PMID:24613429

Bruckert, Eric; Ferričres, Jean

2014-03-01

188

Tobacco and Cardiovascular Health.  

PubMed

Tobacco consumption has been inextricably intertwined with society and its evolution. At one time, centuries ago, thought to be a sign of refinement and nobility, fortunately, this perception has been changing worldwide. Currently, this change in perception has been so dramatic that laws are enacted to limit tobacco exposure through second-hand smokers. Countless studies continue to emerge on tobacco's healthcare toll to the point that we now consider indisputable facts that smokers have a higher incidence of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, among many others. However, there are other less well-known emerging facts that still require close attention such as the effect on the immune and hematopoietic systems. Tobacco smoke is injurious to all major organs in our bodies. With over 30 known carcinogens, it should not be surprising that it affects all aspects of human health. In this chapter, we will focus on the effects of tobacco on cardiovascular health. PMID:25225032

Mainali, Prajeena; Pant, Sadip; Rodriguez, Alexis Phillip; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Mehta, Jawahar L

2014-09-16

189

Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.  

PubMed

Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. PMID:25354948

Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

2014-11-01

190

Implementation of the NICE guideline – Recommendations from the British Fertility Society for national criteria for NHS funding of assisted conception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Assisted conception providers in England were surveyed to establish the uptake of NICE Guidelines for Infertility particularly in respect of assisted conception and the criteria used to accept patients for NHS funded treatment. Detailed information on selection criteria was obtained from a group of commissioning consortia at an advanced stage in their arrangements. While there was an overall increase

R. Kennedy; C. Kingsland; A. Rutherford; W. Ledger

2006-01-01

191

World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Unipolar Depressive Disorders. Part 2: Maintenance Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder-Update 2015.  

PubMed

Abstract These guidelines for the treatment of unipolar depressive disorders systematically review available evidence pertaining to the biological treatment of patients with major depression and produce a series of practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful based on the available evidence. These guidelines are intended for use by all physicians assessing and treating patients with these conditions. The relevant data have been extracted primarily from various treatment guidelines and panels for depressive disorders, as well as from meta-analyses/reviews on the efficacy of antidepressant medications and other biological treatment interventions identified by a search of the MEDLINE database and Cochrane Library. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and was then categorized into five levels of evidence (CE A-F) and five levels of recommendation grades (RG 1-5). This second part of the WFSBP guidelines on depressive disorders covers the management of the maintenance phase treatment, and is primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including pharmacological and hormonal medications, electroconvulsive therapy and other brain stimulation treatments) of adults and also, albeit to a lesser extent, children, adolescents and older adults. PMID:25677972

Bauer, Michael; Severus, Emanuel; Köhler, Stephan; Whybrow, Peter C; Angst, Jules; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

2015-02-01

192

CARDIOVASCULAR Editor, Nature  

E-print Network

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Editor, Nature Philip Campbell Insights Publisher Sarah Greaves Publishing Imaging of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease J. Sanz & Z. A. Fayad Cover illustration The human heart is increasing in the developing world. Cardiovascular disease usually stems from vascular dysfunction

Cai, Long

193

Younger age of escalation of cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indian subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk factors start early, track through the young age and manifest in middle age in most societies. We conducted epidemiological studies to determine prevalence and age-specific trends in cardiovascular risk factors among adolescent and young urban Asian Indians. METHODS: Population based epidemiological studies to identify cardiovascular risk factors were performed in North India in 1999–2002. We evaluated major

Rajeev Gupta; Anoop Misra; Naval K Vikram; Dimple Kondal; Shaon Sen Gupta; Aachu Agrawal; RM Pandey

2009-01-01

194

HIV Infection, Antiretroviral Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

In the last 15 years, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has determined a dramatic reduction of both morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects, transforming this infection in a chronic and manageable disease. Patients surviving with HIV in the developed world, in larger number men, are becoming aged. As it would be expected for a population of comparable age, many HIV-infected individuals report a family history of cardiovascular disease, a small proportion have already experienced a cardiovascular event and an increasing proportion has diabetes mellitus. Smoking rate is very high while an increasing proportion of HIV-infected individuals have dyslipidaemia. Studies suggest that these traditional risk factors could play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease in these patients as they do in the general population. Thus, whilst the predicted 10-year cardiovascular disease risk remains relatively low at present, it will likely increase in relation to the progressive aging of this patient population. Thus, the long-term follow-up of HIV infected patients has to include co-morbidity management such as cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment. Two intriguing aspects related to the cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection are the matter of current investigation: 1) while these subjects share many cardiovascular risk factors with the general population, HIV infection itself increases cardiovascular risk; 2) some HAART regimens too influence atherosclerotic profile, partly due to lipid changes. Although the mechanisms involved in the development of cardiovascular complications in HIV-infected patients remain to be fully elucidated, treatment guidelines recommending interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease in these individuals are already available; however, their application is still limited. PMID:21776340

de Gaetano Donati, Katleen; Cauda, Roberto; Iacoviello, Licia

2010-01-01

195

Hypertension, concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and mortality: the Singapore Cardiovascular Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current hypertension (HTN) guidelines recommend the assessment of other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in individuals with HTN for further management. Few studies in Asian populations have been published to identify the outcome of individuals with HTN and other CVD risk factors. This study aims to assess the effect of HTN alone, and in combination with other CVD risk

J Lee; S Ma; D Heng; S K Chew; K Hughes; E S Tai

2008-01-01

196

AHA\\/ACC Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

improves patient survival, reduces recurrent events and the need for interventional procedures, and improves the quality of life for these patients. The compelling evidence from recent clinical trials was the impetus to revise the 1995 guidelines. As examples, the many lipid reduction trials have generated significant changes in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Adult Treatment Panel III report.

Sidney C. Smith; Steven N. Blair; Robert O. Bonow; Lawrence M. Brass; Manuel D. Cerqueira; Kathleen Dracup; Valentin Fuster; Antonio Gotto; Scott M. Grundy; Nancy Houston Miller; Alice Jacobs; Daniel Jones; Ronald M. Krauss; Lori Mosca; Ira Ockene; Richard C. Pasternak; Thomas Pearson; Marc A. Pfeffer; Rodman D. Starke; Kathryn A. Taubert

197

Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline From the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society,

Bernard Levin; David A. Lieberman; Beth McFarland; Kimberly S. Andrews; Durado Brooks; John Bond; Chiranjeev Dash; Francis M. Giardiello; Seth Glick; David Johnson; C. Daniel Johnson; Theodore R. Levin; Perry J. Pickhardt; Douglas K. Rex; Robert A. Smith; Alan Thorson; Sidney J. Winawer

2008-01-01

198

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*  

PubMed Central

The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

2014-01-01

199

CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY?  

PubMed Central

The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

2014-01-01

200

Guidelines 2.0: systematic development of a comprehensive checklist for a successful guideline enterprise  

PubMed Central

Background: Although several tools to evaluate the credibility of health care guidelines exist, guidance on practical steps for developing guidelines is lacking. We systematically compiled a comprehensive checklist of items linked to relevant resources and tools that guideline developers could consider, without the expectation that every guideline would address each item. Methods: We searched data sources, including manuals of international guideline developers, literature on guidelines for guidelines (with a focus on methodology reports from international and national agencies, and professional societies) and recent articles providing systematic guidance. We reviewed these sources in duplicate, extracted items for the checklist using a sensitive approach and developed overarching topics relevant to guidelines. In an iterative process, we reviewed items for duplication and omissions and involved experts in guideline development for revisions and suggestions for items to be added. Results: We developed a checklist with 18 topics and 146 items and a webpage to facilitate its use by guideline developers. The topics and included items cover all stages of the guideline enterprise, from the planning and formulation of guidelines, to their implementation and evaluation. The final checklist includes links to training materials as well as resources with suggested methodology for applying the items. Interpretation: The checklist will serve as a resource for guideline developers. Consideration of items on the checklist will support the development, implementation and evaluation of guidelines. We will use crowdsourcing to revise the checklist and keep it up to date. PMID:24344144

Schünemann, Holger J.; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Etxeandia, Itziar; Falavigna, Maicon; Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem; Ventresca, Matthew; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Kowalski, Sérgio; Baldeh, Tejan; Zhang, Yuan; Raid, Ulla; Neumann, Ignacio; Norris, Susan L.; Thornton, Judith; Harbour, Robin; Treweek, Shaun; Guyatt, Gordon; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Reinap, Marge; Brožek, Jan; Oxman, Andrew; Akl, Elie A.

2014-01-01

201

NIH Stem Cell Research Guidelines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A hot topic of recent news has been the lifting of the ban, put in place by the NIH in January 1999, on research using human pluripotent stem cells derived from human embryos and fetal tissue. The ban was lifted on August 25, 2000 with the strong endorsement of President Clinton. Now, the National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Research Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells is available online in HTML format. According to the site, "The NIH received approximately 50,000 comments from members of Congress, patient advocacy groups, scientific societies, religious organizations, and private citizens. This Notice presents the final Guidelines together with NIH's response to the substantive public comments that addressed provisions of the Guidelines." (For more on the NIH guidelines, see the August 25, 2000 Scout Report).

202

Can we trust the guidelines? Comparison between the data presented and the recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel  

PubMed Central

Introduction Clinicians often do not have the time and possibilities to read all scientific evidence necessary to maintain high quality patient care. They rely on guidelines made by experts to help them in their daily work. Methods We compared the 2012 recommendations and the arguments of the IAS-USA Panel with the data referenced and presented with the original data of the studies. Special topic was the timing of antiretroviral therapy. Only studies included in the guideline text were analyzed. Results There is a large discrepancy between the data and the recommendations concerning early antiviral therapy. The studies are either not designed to answer this question or the data is not sufficient to support the arguments. The authors highlight benefits without mention of side effects or other problems. Neither in transmission rates, nor mortality, AIDS events, co-morbidities (hepatitis B and C excluded) or decreasing the risk of malignancy, the data presented support early therapy. Conclusions A large discrepancy between the underlining data and the recommendation made by the IAS-USA Panel exists concerning early antiviral therapy. PMID:25397510

Jan Piso, Rein

2014-01-01

203

Real-life evaluation of European and American high-risk strategies for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with first myocardial infarction  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the detection rate (sensitivity) of the high-risk strategy recommended in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE/UK) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In particular, to evaluate the ability to ensure statin therapy to contemporary Europeans destined for a first myocardial infarction (MI). Design 393 consecutive statin-naďve, CVD-free patients without diabetes hospitalised for a first MI, 247 of whom were 40–75?years of age. We assumed they had undergone a health check the day before their MI and estimated the predicted risk. Primary outcome Sensitivity of the risk-based eligibility for primary prevention with statins recommended by the guidelines. Results All recommended risk scores rank-ordered patients similarly, but the sensitivity of the cut point above which statin therapy should be considered differed substantially. In younger patients (age 40–60), 62% of men and 13% of women qualified for statin therapy by ACC/AHA criteria, compared with only 2% of men and no women using the ESC criteria recommended for most non-Eastern European countries. In those 60–75?years of age, the ACC/AHA guidelines captured all men and 85% of women, compared with 12% and 2%, respectively, using the new ESC guideline. This guideline restricted the eligibility for primary prevention with statins substantially by reclassifying many European countries from ‘high-risk’ to ‘low-risk’, whereas the eligibility was expanded in the ACC/AHA and the new NICE/UK guidelines by lowering the decision threshold. Conclusions The 2012 ESC guidelines differ substantially from the 2013 ACC/AHA and 2014 NICE/UK guidelines in ability to secure statin therapy to those destined for a first MI. A great opportunity for primary prevention with statins remains unexploited in Europe. PMID:25326211

Mortensen, Martin B; Falk, Erling

2014-01-01

204

Human immunodeficiency virus & cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) significantly changed the prevalence of the cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS. In developed countries, a 30 per cent reduction in the prevalence of cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion was observed, possibly related to a reduction of opportunistic infections and myocarditis. In developing countries, however, where the availability of HAART is limited, and the pathogenic impact of nutritional factors is significant, a 32 per cent increase was seen in the prevalence of cardiomyopathy and related high mortality rate from congestive heart failure. Also, some HAART regimens in developed countries, especially those including protease inhibitors, may cause, in a high proportion of HIV-infected patients, a lipodystrophy syndrome that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events related to a process of accelerated atherosclerosis. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving HAART regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk factors, according to the most recent clinical guidelines. PMID:22310821

Barbaro, Giuseppe; Barbarini, Giorgio

2011-12-01

205

Human immunodeficiency virus & cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) significantly changed the prevalence of the cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS. In developed countries, a 30 per cent reduction in the prevalence of cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion was observed, possibly related to a reduction of opportunistic infections and myocarditis. In developing countries, however, where the availablity of HAART is limited, and the pathogenic impact of nutritional factors is significant, a 32 per cent increase was seen in the prevalence of cardiomyopathy and related high mortality rate from congestive heart failure. Also, some HAART regimens in developed countries, especially those including protease inhibitors, may cause, in a high proportion of HIV-infected patients, a lipodystrophy syndrome that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events related to a process of accelerated atherosclerosis. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving HAART regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk factors, according to the most recent clinical guidelines. PMID:22310821

Barbaro, Giuseppe; Barbarini, Giorgio

2011-01-01

206

[Sk2 guidelines"diagnosis and therapy of snoring in adults" : compiled by the sleep medicine working group of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery].  

PubMed

These guidelines aim to facilitate high quality medical care of adults with snoring problems. The guidelines were devised for application in both in- and outpatient environments and are directed primarily at all those concerned with the diagnosis and therapy of snoring. According to the AWMF three-level concept, these represent S2k guidelines.A satisfactory definition of snoring does not currently exist. Snoring is the result of vibration of soft tissue structures in narrow regions of the upper airway during breathing while asleep. Ultimately, these vibrations are caused by the sleep-associated decrease in muscle tone in the area of the upper airway dilator muscles. A multitude of risk factors for snoring have been described and its occurrence is multifactorial. Data relating to the frequency of snoring vary widely, depending on the way in which the data are collected. Snoring is usually observed in middle-aged individuals and affected males predominate. Clinical diagnosis of snoring should comprise a free evaluation of the patient's medical history. Where possible this should also involve their bed partner and the case history can be complimented by questionnaires. To determine the airflow relevant structures, a clinical examination of the nose should be performed. This examination may also include nasal endoscopy. Examination of the oropharynx is particularly important and should be performed. The larynx and the hypopharynx should be examined. The size of the tongue and the condition of the mucous membranes should be recorded as part of the oral cavity examination, as should the results of a dental assessment. Facial skeleton morphology should be assessed for orientation purposes. Technical examinations may be advisable in individual cases. In the instance of suspected sleep-related breathing disorders, relevant comorbidities or where treatment for snoring has been requested, an objective sleep medicine examination should be performed. Snoring is not-at least as we currently understand it-a disease associated with a medical threat; therefore there is currently no medical necessity to treat the condition. All overweight patients with snoring problems should strive to lose weight. If snoring is associated with the supine position, positional therapy can be considered. Some cases of snoring can be appropriately treated using an intraoral device. Selected minimally invasive surgical procedures on the soft palate can be recommended to treat snoring, provided that examinations have revealed a suitable anatomy. The choice of technique is determined primarily by the individual anatomy. At an appropriate interval after the commencement or completion a therapeutic measure, a follow-up examination should be conducted to assess the success of the therapy and to aid in the planning of any further treatments. PMID:24221222

Stuck, B A; Dreher, A; Heiser, C; Herzog, M; Kühnel, T; Maurer, J T; Pistner, H; Sitter, H; Steffen, A; Verse, T

2013-11-01

207

COASTAL GUIDELINES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the coastal subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential regulatory limits, and the cost of regulation. Legislation/Enabling Authority: ...

208

Clinical nutrition guidelines of the French Speaking Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP): Summary of recommendations for adults undergoing non-surgical anticancer treatment.  

PubMed

Up to 50% of patients with cancer suffer from weight loss and undernutrition (as called cachexia) even though it is rarely screened or properly handled. Patients' prognosis and quality of life could be greatly improved by simple and inexpensive means encompassing nutritional status assessment and effective nutritional care. These guidelines aim to give health professionals and patients practical and up-to-date advice to manage nutrition in the principal situations encountered during the cancer course according to the type of tumour and treatment (i.e. radio and/or chemotherapy). Specific suggestions are made for palliative and elderly patients because of specific risks of undernutrition and related comorbidities in this subset. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations are detailed as stated by current literature and consensus opinion of clinical experts in each field. PMID:24794790

2014-08-01

209

The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

2014-01-01

210

1997 Guidelines for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Unexplained Fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the first in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners. The targeted patients and setting for

Walter T. Hughes; Donald Armstrong; Gerald P. Bodey; Arthur E. Brown; John E. Edwards; Ronald Feld; Philip Pizzo; Kenneth V. I. Rolston; Jerry L. Shenep; Lowell S. Young

1997-01-01

211

Diagnosis and Management of Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A Practice Guideline  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the second in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are pediatricians, family practitioners, and internists. The targeted patients and setting for

Alan L. Bisno; Michael A. Gerber; Richard H. Schwartz

1997-01-01

212

Guidelines for Antimicrobial Treatment of Uncomplicated Acute Bacterial Cystitis and Acute Pyelonephritis in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is part of the series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of this guideline is to provide assistance to clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of two specific types of urinary tract infections (UTIs): uncomplicated, acute, symptomatic bacterial cystitis and acute pyelonephritis in women. The guideline

John W. Warren; Elias Abrutyn; J. Richard Hebel; James R. Johnson; Anthony J. Schaeffer; Walter E. Stamm

1999-01-01

213

Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group  

PubMed Central

Background In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT-scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric edema, small-bowel feces sign, devascularization) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water-Soluble-Contrast-Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The radiologic appearance of WSCM in the colon within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM maybe administered either orally or via NGT both immediately at admission or after failed conservative treatment for 48 hours. The use of WSCM is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution, surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not decrease recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery. Open surgery is often used for strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach is advisable using open access technique. Access in left upper quadrant or left flank is the safest and only completely obstructing adhesions should be identified and lysed with cold scissors. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably if first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band. A low threshold for open conversion should be maintained. Peritoneal adhesions should be prevented. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin decrease incidence of adhesions. Icodextrin may reduce the risk of re-obstruction. HA cannot reduce need of surgery. Adhesions quantification and scoring maybe useful for achieving standardized assessment of adhesions severity and for further research in diagnosis and treatment of ASBO. PMID:24112637

2013-01-01

214

Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. Heart diseases and stroke are ...

215

Understanding cardiovascular disease  

MedlinePLUS

Cardiovascular disease is the broad term for problems with the heart and blood vessels. These problems are often ... and tissue. High blood pressure (hypertension) is a cardiovascular disease that can lead to other problems, such as ...

216

[The German guideline "legal evaluation after closed head injury"].  

PubMed

In 2005, the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurowissenschaftliche Begutachtung" (German Society for Neuroscientific Legal Evaluation) together with other Societies published a guideline for the legal evaluation of patients with closed head injuries. Meanwhile, not only scientific progress in imaging techniques but also in other fields such as neuropsychology has necessitated a revision, which is presented here. In the mean time, the handling of guidelines has been systematised in Germany so that a registration with the Cooperation of German Medical Learned Societies is applied for and publication in the German Guideline Registry is expected. PMID:23986459

Wallesch, C W; Fries, W; Marx, P; du Mesnil de Rochemont, R; Roschmann, R; Schmidt, R; Schwerdtfeger, K; Tegenthoff, M; Widder, B

2013-09-01

217

Internal Medicine Cardiovascular Medicine ------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-print Network

methods, and novel therapeutic measures of various cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, heart of cardiovascular diseases ·Imaging techniques (echocardiography, MRI, CT, RI, NOGA) in cardiovas- cular diseases polymorphisms and risk factors in cardiovascular disease ·Differentiation of smooth muscle cells

Miyashita, Yasushi

218

UK Centre for Cardiovascular  

E-print Network

of cardiovascular disease and diabetes to improve human life It is an important team effort between the UniversityT AGAINST hEART DISEASE 7 #12;CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIAbETES IS A GLObAL ChALLENGE Diabetes-centre imaging trials. Our work showing the superiority of MRI for diagnosing cardiovascular disease has

Berzins, M.

219

Sixth Annual Cardiovascular  

E-print Network

Feinberg School of Medicine EarthphotoscourtesyofNASA #12;CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE is still the leading cause cardiovascular disease as their major health problem and thus fail to partner with their healthcare providers in cardiovascular disease. Recognition of these differences requires communication of this information to women

MacIver, Malcolm A.

220

Silicon Baroreceptors: Modeling Cardiovascular  

E-print Network

Silicon Baroreceptors: Modeling Cardiovascular Pressure Transduction in Analog VLSI John Lazzaro pressure used in a neural control system in the cardiovascular system. The chip computes the representation as a first step to understanding the neural computation of cardiovascular control; we hope to apply

Lazzaro, John

221

FRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR  

E-print Network

FRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCE SPON S ORED BY LOCATION/TIME Li Ka Shing Center for Learning at 11:45 a.m. TUESDAy, SEpTEmbER 11, 2012 Raising HDL: Will it Work to Prevent Cardiovascular Events-14, 2012 CVI AnnuAl MeMber retreAt Robert Harrington, MD Stanford University Cardiovascular Clinical

Puglisi, Joseph

222

Ethical and Clinical Aspects of Intensive Care Unit Admission in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Guidelines of the Ethics Commission of the French Society of Hematology  

PubMed Central

Admission of patients with hematological malignancies to intensive care unit (ICU) raises recurrent ethical issues for both hematological and intensivist teams. The decision of transfer to ICU has major consequences for end of life care for patients and their relatives. It also impacts organizational human and economic aspects for the ICU and global health policy. In light of the recent advances in hematology and critical care medicine, a wide multidisciplinary debate has been conducted resulting in guidelines approved by consensus by both disciplines. The main aspects developed were (i) clarification of the clinical situations that could lead to a transfer to ICU taking into account the severity criteria of both hematological malignancy and clinical distress, (ii) understanding the process of decision-making in a context of regular interdisciplinary concertation involving the patient and his relatives, (iii) organization of a collegial concertation at the time of the initial decision of transfer to ICU and throughout and beyond the stay in ICU. The aim of this work is to propose suggestions to strengthen the collaboration between the different teams involved, to facilitate the daily decision-making process, and to allow improvement of clinical practice. PMID:25349612

Malak, Sandra; Sotto, Jean-Jacques; Ceccaldi, Joël; Colombat, Philippe; Casassus, Philippe; Jaulmes, Dominique; Rochant, Henri; Cheminant, Morgane; Beaussant, Yvan; Zittoun, Robert; Bordessoule, Dominique

2014-01-01

223

Metabolic biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Cardiac and peripheral vascular biomarkers are increasingly becoming targets of both research and clinical practice. As of 2008, cardiovascular-related medical care accounts for greater than 20% of all the economic costs of illness in the United States. In the age of burgeoning financial pressures on the entire health care system, never has it been more important to try to understand who is at risk for cardiovascular disease in order to prevent new events. In this paper, we will discuss the cost of cardiovascular disease to society, clarify the definition of and need for biomarkers, offer an example of a current biomarker, namely high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and finally examine the approval process for utilizing these in clinical practice. PMID:23386789

Montgomery, Jana E; Brown, Jeremiah R

2013-01-01

224

ISHNE/EHRA expert consensus on remote monitoring of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs).  

PubMed

We are in the midst of a rapidly evolving era of technology-assisted medicine. The field of telemedicine provides the opportunity for highly individualized medical management in a way that has never been possible before. Evolving medical technologies using cardiac implantable devices with capabilities for remote monitoring permit evaluation of multiple parameters of cardiovascular physiology and risk, including cardiac rhythm, device function, blood pressure values, the presence of myocardial ischaemia, and the degree of compensation of congestive heart failure. Cardiac risk, device status, and response to therapies can now be assessed with these electronic systems of detection and reporting. This document reflects the extensive experience from investigators and innovators around the world who are shaping the evolution of this rapidly expanding field, focusing in particular on implantable pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy (both with and without defibrillation properties), loop recorders, and hemodynamic monitoring devices. This document covers the basic methodologies, guidelines for their use, experience with existing applications, and the legal and reimbursement aspects associated with their use. To adequately cover this important emerging topic, the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology and the European Heart Rhythm Association combined their expertise in this field. We hope that the development of this field can contribute to improve care of our cardiovascular patients. PMID:22276627

Dubner, Sergio; Auricchio, Angelo; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Vardas, Panos; Stone, Peter; Brugada, Josep; Piotrowicz, Ryszard; Hayes, David L; Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Zareba, Wojciech; Schuger, Claudio; Aktas, Mehmet K; Chudzik, Michal; Mittal, Suneet; Varma, Niraj

2012-01-01

225

SBF GUIDELINES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the use of synthetic based drilling fluids in the offshore and coastal subcategories of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential reg limits, and the cost o...

226

Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery)  

PubMed Central

Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients. Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a frequent death cause among people who sustain blunt trauma. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference. PMID:24606950

2014-01-01

227

Measured outcomes with hypnosis as an experimental tool in a cardiovascular physiology laboratory.  

PubMed

The authors detail their multidisciplinary collaboration of cardiologists, physiologists, neurologists, psychologists, engineers, and statisticians in researching the effects of hypnosis on the cardiovascular system and their additions to that incomplete literature. The article details their results and provides guidelines for researchers interested in replicating their research on hypnosis' effect on the cardiovascular system. PMID:22443528

Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Giordano, Nunzia; Andreatta, Elisa; Regaldo, Giuseppe; Tosello, Maria T; Rossi, Augusto M; Bordin, Daniele; Giacomello, Margherita; Facco, Enrico

2012-01-01

228

Guidelines for Authors: A new Form of Censorship?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores characteristics and similarities of recommendations made by two professional societies and three publishers for avoiding sexist language and attitudes in written materials, and suggests that these recommendations (guidelines) constitute a form of censorship. (JM)

Kingston, Albert J.; Lovelace, Terry L.

1977-01-01

229

[What are the cardiovascular complications of the analgesics and glucocorticoids?].  

PubMed

When prescribing a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment but also an analgesic or a glucocorticoid, the cardiovascular risk of the patient should be assessed. The analgesics have few cardiovascular side effects and the main complications observed are linked essentially to the vagal action of the opioids. Acetaminophen is considered by several scientific societies to be the first line analgesic treatment, particularly in case of cardiovascular risk but with caution since cardiovascular toxicity of acetaminophen cannot be totally excluded. An overdose of dextropropoxyphene can result in cardiotoxicity. On the other hand, the glucocorticoids need to be prescribed cautiously, at the lowest possible dose and for the shortest possible duration due to the non-negligible cardiovascular risk, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypokaliemia. PMID:17078595

Bertin, Philippe

2006-09-01

230

Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.  

PubMed

These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations. PMID:12658506

Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

2003-05-01

231

Is Low-Impact Aerobic Dance an Effective Cardiovascular Workout?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents results of an investigation comparing energy cost and cardiovascular responses of aerobic dance routines performed at different intensity levels in varying amounts of energy expenditure. For low-impact dance to meet minimum guidelines suggested by the American College of Sports Medicine, it should be performed at high intensity. (SM)

Williford, Henry N.; And Others

1989-01-01

232

Obesity and cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

Jokinen, E

2015-03-01

233

Hernia Surgery: From Guidelines to Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Over the last 30 years, hernia surgery has developed into an evidence-based practice assisted by the development of guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prior to 1993, best practice in the UK was a nylon darn repair under general anaesthesia as an in-patient with prolonged recovery. The publication of The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSE) Guidelines on Groin Hernia Repair stimulated debate and coincided with the introduction of mesh hernioplasty and laparoscopic techniques. Further evolution of hernia management has occurred to enable the production of the European Hernia Society (EHS) guidelines in 2008. RESULTS The EHS guidelines cover all aspects of abdominal wall surgery including: indications for operation; investigations; organising surgical care; techniques; local anaesthesia; after-care, complications and outcome; and information for patients. CONCLUSIONS Surgeons have many choices when selecting an appropriate hernia operation for an individual patient. The EHS guidelines provide a basis for this decision-making. PMID:19416585

Kingsnorth, Andrew N

2009-01-01

234

Canadian guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) that includes recommendations relevant for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of CRS is based on type and duration of symptoms and an objective finding of inflammation of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses. Chronic rhinosinusitis is categorized based on presence or absence of nasal polyps, and this distinction leads to differences in treatment. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is treated with intranasal corticosteroids. Antibiotics are recommended when symptoms indicate infection (pain or purulence). For CRS without nasal polyps, intranasal corticosteroids and second-line antibiotics (ie, amoxicillin– clavulanic acid combinations or fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity) are recommended. Saline irrigation, oral steroids, and allergy testing might be appropriate. Failure of response should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses and referral to an otolaryngologist. Patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery require postoperative treatment and follow-up. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide diagnosis and treatment approaches based on the current understanding of the disease and available evidence. Additionally, the guidelines provide the expert opinion of a diverse group of practice and academic experts to help guide clinicians where evidence is sparse. PMID:24336538

Kaplan, Alan

2013-01-01

235

Process description and evaluation of Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines development  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper describes the process used to arrive at recommended physical activity guidelines for Canadian school-aged children and youth (5-17 years), adults (18-64 years) and older adults (?65 years). METHODS: The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) Physical Activity Measurement and Guidelines (PAMG) Steering Committee used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument to inform the

Mark S Tremblay; Michelle E Kho; Andrea C Tricco; Mary Duggan

2010-01-01

236

Cardiovascular Diseases (and Oral Health)  

MedlinePLUS

Cardiovascular Diseases Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Conditions Heart Disease and Dental Treatment Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack) High Blood ... it is a current list. Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Conditions Periodontal disease can affect your overall health. Over time, it ...

237

Sponsored by: Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute  

E-print Network

Prentice Women's Hospital, Chicago IL The Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute's Center for Vascular Disease and limitations of imaging techniques in various cardiovascular diseases. #12;TARGET AUDIENCE This continuingSponsored by: Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute of Northwestern Memorial Hospital Northwestern

238

Postdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology Job Description A postdoctoral position is available at Colorado State University, Department of Biomedical Sciences; Center for Cardiovascular and physiological roles of new components of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of cardiovascular

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

239

Geochemistry and Cardiovascular Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deficiencies or excesses in the content or availability of trace elements in rocks and soils, or in water flowing through them, is hypothesized as a possible cause of certain chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Geographic distribution of cardiovascular diseases is often associated with geochemical differences. This trend is particularly evident in the United States and in Europe, with higher rates

R. Masironi; J. R. Todd; P. Elwood; D. B. R. Poole

1979-01-01

240

Androgens and Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globally, cardiovascular disease will continue causing most human deaths for the foreseeable future. The consistent gen- der gap in life span of approximately 5.6 yr in all advanced economies must derive from gender differences in age- specific cardiovascular death rates, which rise steeply in par- allel for both genders but 5-10 yr earlier in men. The lack of inflection point

PETER Y. LIU; ALISON K. DEATH; DAVID J. HANDELSMAN

2003-01-01

241

ISMuLT Guidelines for muscle injuries  

PubMed Central

Summary Muscle injuries are frequent in high demand sports. No guidelines are available in the scientific literature. ISMuLT, the “Italian Society of Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons”, in line with its multidisciplinary mission, is proud to cover this gap. PMID:24596685

Maffulli, Nicola; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Nanni, Gianni; Barazzuol, Michele; Via, Alessio Giai; Ramponi, Carlo; Brancaccio, Paola; Lisitano, Gianfranco; Rizzo, Diego; Freschi, Marco; Galletti, Stefano; Melegati, Gianluca; Pasta, Giulio; Testa, Vittorino; Valent, Alessandro; Del Buono, Angelo

2013-01-01

242

Meeting Technology Guidelines for Teacher Preparation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recounts one school of education's attempt to follow guidelines suggested by the International Society for Technology Education in preparing preservice educators to use computers effectively. The article addresses the ongoing professional development of teachers and makes suggestions for those involved in developing a technological component to…

Widmer, Connie Carol; Amburgey, Valeria

1994-01-01

243

Guidelines on the radical management of patients with lung cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A joint initiative by the British Thoracic Society and the Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland was undertaken to update the 2001 guidelines for the selection and assessment of patients with lung cancer who can potentially be managed by radical treatment.

Eric Lim; David Baldwin; Michael Beckles; John Duffy; James Entwisle; Corinne Faivre-Finn; Keith Kerr; Alistair Macfie; Jim McGuigan; Simon Padley; Sanjay Popat; Nicholas Screaton; Michael Snee; David Waller; Chris Warburton; Thida Win

2010-01-01

244

DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF CASES CARDIOVASCULAR  

E-print Network

DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF CASES CARDIOVASCULAR Cardiovascular disease .........................................................36 Crop Disorder.....................................................12 Digestive Disease/Plant/worms...........................14 Liver disease ......................................................14 Liver tumor

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

245

Development of evidence-based remote telemetry policy guidelines for a multifacility hospital system.  

PubMed

Over 10 years ago, the standards for cardiac monitoring were set forth by the Councils on Cardiovascular Nursing, Clinical Cardiology, and Cardiovascular Disease in the Young. The standards were endorsed by the International Society of Computerized Electrocardiology and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The American Heart Association printed the standards as an American Heart Association Scientific Statement. The standards provided direction related to remote telemetry monitoring to acute care hospitals. Since the standards were published, remote monitoring of cardiac patients has increased dramatically prompting research and literature related to appropriate utilization. Appropriate and safe telemetry monitoring requires clearly written evidence-based facility policies. This article describes the process whereby a team of Veterans Hospital Administration nurses from across the country reviewed 70 remote telemetry policies representing 75 Veterans Hospital Administration hospitals for clarity, consistency, and congruency to existing levels of evidence found in the literature. This article describes the processes, successes, and challenges of compiling an evidence-based remote telemetry policy guideline. PMID:25470261

George, Karen J; Walsh-Irwin, Colleen; Queen, Caleb; Heuvel, Kimberly Vander; Hawkins, Carrie; Roberts, Susan

2015-01-01

246

Women, lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease risk.  

PubMed

Atherosclerosis, lipoprotein structure, lipoprotein metabolism and role in atherogenesis, epidemiology of lipoproteins and coronary artery disease, and current public health guidelines for cholesterol control are described. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels rise with age in both men and women. High density lipoprotein (HDL) levels decline after menopause. Special aspects of coronary risk in women include the stronger role of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and HDL. In addition, the effects of exogenous hormone therapy, both in the form or oral contraceptives and post menopausal hormone replacement should be considered. Careful attention to these issues may reduce cardiovascular morbidity in adult women. PMID:2188715

LaRosa, J C

1990-05-01

247

Clinical practice guideline for the management of chronic kidney disease in patients infected with HIV: 2014 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.  

PubMed

It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. PMID:25234519

Lucas, Gregory M; Ross, Michael J; Stock, Peter G; Shlipak, Michael G; Wyatt, Christina M; Gupta, Samir K; Atta, Mohamed G; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K; Pham, Paul A; Bruggeman, Leslie A; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Ray, Patricio E; Kalayjian, Robert C

2014-11-01

248

ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.  

PubMed

Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on specific indications, processes, or parameters of care for which high level of evidence data and Class I or Class III guideline recommendations may be lacking but are addressed in ACCF appropriate use criteria documents. Structure/safety measures represent measures developed to address structural aspects of the use of healthcare technology (e.g., laboratory accreditation, personnel training, and credentialing) or quality issues related to patient safety when there are neither guidelines recommendations nor appropriate use criteria. Although the strength of evidence for appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures may not be as strong as that for formal performance measures, they are quality measures that are otherwise rigorously developed, reviewed, tested, and approved in the same manner as ACCF/AHA performance measures. The ultimate goal of the present document is to provide direction in defining and measuring the appropriate use-avoiding not only underuse but also overuse and misuse-and proper application of cardiovascular technology and to describe how such appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures might be developed for the purposes of quality improvement and public reporting. It is anticipated that this effort will help focus the national dialogue on the use of cardiovascular technology and away from the current concerns about volume and cost alone to a more holistic emphasis on value. PMID:21880456

Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

2011-09-27

249

ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.  

PubMed

Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on specific indications, processes, or parameters of care for which high level of evidence data and Class I or Class III guideline recommendations may be lacking but are addressed in ACCF appropriate use criteria documents. Structure/safety measures represent measures developed to address structural aspects of the use of healthcare technology (e.g., laboratory accreditation, personnel training, and credentialing) or quality issues related to patient safety when there are neither guidelines recommendations nor appropriate use criteria. Although the strength of evidence for appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures may not be as strong as that for formal performance measures, they are quality measures that are otherwise rigorously developed, reviewed, tested, and approved in the same manner as ACCF/AHA performance measures. The ultimate goal of the present document is to provide direction in defining and measuring the appropriate use-avoiding not only underuse but also overuse and misuse-and proper application of cardiovascular technology and to describe how such appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures might be developed for the purposes of quality improvement and public reporting. It is anticipated that this effort will help focus the national dialogue on the use of cardiovascular technology and away from the current concerns about volume and cost alone to a more holistic emphasis on value. PMID:21875906

Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

2011-09-27

250

Assistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine  

E-print Network

in Cardiovascular Disease (or eligible), and advanced certification or training in cardiovascular imaging is highlyAssistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Medicine The Cardiovascular Medicine Division and the Cardiovascular Institute at Stanford

Quake, Stephen R.

251

Introduction: Cardiovascular physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

2007-03-01

252

Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 1 Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 2  

E-print Network

a world-class education, and conduct cutting- edge cardiovascular research. As heart disease remains into improved tools for cardiovascular disease detection, prevention and treatment. In late 2012, Dr. Robert CStanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 1 2013­2014 #12;Stanford Cardiovascular Institute | page 2

Kay, Mark A.

253

Arterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients.  

PubMed

The dramatic change of the natural history of HIV-infected patients by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has exposed these patients to cardiovascular risk, including cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In HIV-infected patients, the development of arterial hypertension, at least in the medium-long term is an established feature, although recognized predictors of its development have not been clearly identified. In addition, conflicting data regarding the influence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are reported. The presence of a proinflammatory state and oxidative stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction seem, however, to play a pathophysiologic role. In this review, we examine and provide a comprehensive, literature based, consideration of the pathophysiologic aspects of hypertension in these patients. HIV-infected patients, independently of the presence of hypertension, remain at very high cardiovascular risk due to the presence of the same cardiovascular risk factors recognized for the general population with, in addition, the indirect influence of the ART, essentially via its effect on lipid metabolism. This review based on the evidence from the literature, concludes that the management of HIV-infected patients in terms of cardiovascular prevention emerges as a priority. The consideration of cardiovascular risk in these patients should receive the same emphasis given for the general population at high cardiovascular risk, including adequate blood pressure control according to international guidelines. PMID:23807242

Calň, Lorenzo A; Caielli, Paola; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Gianpaolo

2013-08-01

254

When Choosing Wisely meets clinical practice guidelines.  

PubMed

The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation launched the Choosing Wisely campaign in 2012 and until today convinced more than 50 US specialist societies to develop lists of interventions that may not improve people's health but are potentially harmful. We suggest combining these new efforts with the already existing efforts in clinical practice guideline development. Existing clinical practice guidelines facilitate a more participatory and evidence-based approach to the development of top 5 lists. In return, adding top 5 lists (for overuse and underuse) to existing clinical practice guidelines nicely addresses a neglected dimension to clinical practice guideline development, namely explicit information on which Do or Don't do recommendations are frequently disregarded in practice. PMID:25499114

Strech, Daniel; Follmann, Markus; Klemperer, David; Lelgemann, Monika; Ollenschläger, Günter; Raspe, Heiner; Nothacker, Monika

2014-01-01

255

Quality indicators for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease in primary care in nine European countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: With free movement of labour in Europe, European guidelines on cardiovascular care and the enlargement of the European Union to include countries with disparate health care systems, it is important to develop common quality standards for cardiovascular prevention and risk management across Europe. METHODS: Panels from nine European countries (Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Slovenia, United Kingdom and

Stephen M. Campbell; Sabine Ludt; Jan Van Lieshout; Nicole Boffin; Michel Wensing; Davorina Petek; Richard Grol; Martin O. Roland

2008-01-01

256

Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

1986-01-01

257

Cardiovascular Interactions CVI Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses.

PhD Carl F. Rothe (Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology)

2005-06-22

258

Cardiovascular complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis - Assessment, prevention and treatment  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Morbidity and mortality rates are higher in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than in the general population. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure now represent one of the most common causes of death in RA. Indeed, RA appears to represent an independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease, similar to diabetes mellitus. However, no clear guidelines with regards to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and prevention in RA have been developed. This review highlights recent investigations on the assessment, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in RA. PMID:20510241

Kaplan, Mariana J.

2010-01-01

259

Dyslipidemia, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetic Patients  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

2013-01-01

260

How effective are the ESC/EAS and 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines in treating dyslipidemia? Lessons from a lipid clinic.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: There is a paucity of data regarding the attainment of lipid-lowering treatment goals according to the recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines. The aim of the present study was to assess how applicable these 2013 recommendations are in the setting of an Outpatient University Hospital Lipid Clinic. Methods: This was a retrospective (from 1999 to 2013) observational study including 1000 consecutive adults treated for hyperlipidemia and followed up for ?3 years. Comparisons for the applicability of current European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) and recent ACC/AHA guidelines were performed. Results: Achievement rates of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets set by ESC/EAS were 21%, 44% and 62% among patients at very high, high and moderate cardiovascular risk, respectively, receiving statin monotherapy. Among individuals on high-intensity statins only 47% achieved the anticipated ?50% LDL-C reduction, i.e. the ACC/AHA target. The corresponding rate was significantly greater among those on statin?+?ezetimibe (76%, p?guidelines were observed in patients on statin?+?ezetimibe compared with statin monotherapy (37, 50 and 71% for the three risk groups, p?guidelines may be associated with undertreatment of high risk patients due to suboptimal LDL-C response to high-intensity statins in clinical practice. Adding ezetimibe substantially increases the rate of the ESC/EAS LDL-C target achievement together with the rate of LDL-C lowering response suggested by the ACC/AHA. PMID:25418708

Barkas, Fotios; Milionis, Haralampos; Kostapanos, Michael S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses; Liberopoulos, Evangelos

2014-11-24

261

Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.  

PubMed

The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber. PMID:22872372

Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

2012-12-01

262

Melatonin in cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

This editorial refers to "Cardiovascular effects of melatonin receptor agonists". The hormone melatonin is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland, retina, several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Based on the data available, the last 18 years indicate that melatonin influences multiple factors of the cardiovascular function. Multiple evidences reveal that the rhythmicity of melatonin has a crucial role in a variety of cardiovascular pathophysiological processes including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive and possibly as an antilipidemic function. Melatonin receptors receive and transduce melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology. The melatonin message is translated through the interaction between the melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) and its coupling to G proteins, which are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, depression and cardiovascular diseases. Based on the data available, melatonin seems to have cardioprotective properties via its direct free radical scavenger activity. Melatonin efficiently interacts with several reactive oxygen species (receptor-independent actions). Collectively, these protective actions of melatonin may have potential clinical applicability for individuals with cardiovascular disease. PMID:22916801

Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto

2012-11-01

263

Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of 35 years engaged in regular and intensive EE. PMID:24408890

Predel, Hans-Georg

2014-11-21

264

Cardiovascular Complications in HIV Management: Past, Present, and Future  

PubMed Central

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly improved the prognosis for many individuals with HIV infection. Consequently, HIV infection has become a chronic and manageable disease. The focus on long-term management of patients with HIV infection has broadened to include comorbid conditions, most notably cardiovascular disease. Patients with HIV infection share many cardiovascular risk factors with the general population, and HIV infection itself may increase cardiovascular risk. Changes in lipid profiles associated with increased cardiovascular risk that have been observed with some HAART regimens have been a cause for concern among clinicians who treat HIV-infected patients. However, the lipid effects of HAART seem to depend on the type and duration of regimens employed. They can be managed effectively according to current guidelines that recommend lifestyle changes (eg, improved diet, increased exercise, smoking cessation) and pharmacologic therapy described in established treatment paradigms for patients on antiretroviral therapy and similar to measures currently used by the general population. A review of the clinical data indicates that the virologic and immunologic benefits of HAART clearly outweigh any metabolic effects observed in some patients over time and that preexisting, established cardiovascular risk factors contribute significantly to the potential development of cardiovascular events. These benefits of antiretroviral therapy have been demonstrated in studies comparing the superior efficacy of continuous vs. intermittent HAART. PMID:19295335

Aberg, Judith A.

2009-01-01

265

Endocrine Society  

MedlinePLUS

... About Us Leadership and Staff Strategic Plan Society History Conflicts of Interest Advertising Disclaimer Employment at the Society Sister Societies Hormone Science to Health Home Online Store Corporate Relations News ...

266

Guidelines for heart transplantation  

PubMed Central

Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic surgery (NVVC and NVT). The indication for heart transplantation is defined as: ‘End-stage heart disease not remediable by more conservative measures’. Contraindications are: irreversible pulmonary hypertension/elevated pulmonary vascular resistance; active systemic infection; active malignancy or history of malignancy with probability of recurrence; inability to comply with complex medical regimen; severe peripheral or cerebrovascular disease and irreversible dysfunction of another organ, including diseases that may limit prognosis after heart transplantation. Considering the difficulties in defining end-stage heart failure, estimating prognosis in the individual patient and the continuing evolution of available therapies, the present criteria are broadly defined. The final acceptance is done by the transplant team which has extensive knowledge of the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure on the one hand and thorough experience with heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support on the other hand. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:79-87.) PMID:18345330

de Jonge, N.; Kirkels, J.H.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A.P.W.M.; Brügemann, J.; Erasmus, M.E.; Klautz, R.J.M.; Verwey, H.F.; Oomen, A.; Peels, C.H.; Golüke, A.E.J.; Nicastia, D.; Koole, M.A.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

2008-01-01

267

Tropical fevers: Management guidelines  

PubMed Central

Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a ‘syndromic approach’ to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes. PMID:24678147

Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M.; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N.; Kalantri, S.; Peter, J. V.; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M.; Chugh, T. D.; Rungta, Narendra

2014-01-01

268

Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Aging  

PubMed Central

Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (e.g. renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics and exercise training. PMID:22499901

Dai, Dao-Fu; Ungvari, Zoltan

2013-01-01

269

Mitochondria and cardiovascular aging.  

PubMed

Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and in cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity, and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (eg, renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics, and exercise training. PMID:22499901

Dai, Dao-Fu; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Ungvari, Zoltan

2012-04-13

270

Tea and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

There is increasing evidence for a protective effect of tea consumption against cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the available epidemiological data providing evidence for and against such an effect. We also review observational and intervention studies that investigated an effect of tea and tea extracts on cardiovascular risk factors, including blood pressure, serum lipids, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Finally, we review potential mechanisms of benefit, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-proliferative effects, as well as favorable effects on endothelial function. Overall, the observational data suggest a benefit, but results are mixed and likely confounded by lifestyle and background dietary factors. The weight of evidence indicates favorable effects on risk factors and a number of plausible mechanisms have been elucidated in experimental and translational human studies. Despite the growing body evidence, it remains uncertain whether tea consumption should be recommended to the general population or to patients as a strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:21477653

Deka, Apranta; Vita, Joseph A.

2011-01-01

271

National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Operated by the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Association of Health Plans (AAHP), The National Guideline Clearinghouse provides information about hundreds of "evidence-based clinical practice guidelines" for health care professionals. Guidelines from over 100 different medical organizations can be searched or browsed by disease or condition; treatment or intervention method; or issuing organization. Each record includes the date of release and current status of the guideline, major recommendations for interventions and practices, organization(s) and committee members responsible for the guideline, and methods used to collect evidence and rate the quality of evidence. A link to the full text of the guideline is provided if available. When more than one guideline has been released on a topic, users can compare selected guidelines in chart format. A News section tells developers how to submit guidelines to the Clearinghouse.

1999-01-01

272

Having a Change of Heart: A Lesson on Cardiovascular Anatomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiologycal Society's 2006 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org. The purpose of this activity is to investigate and develop a model of the normal anatomy of the human heart/circulatory system and then to explore and model the effects of several cardiovascular disease processes. Students should understand basic cellular respiration. Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to: plan and design a model of a human heart with basic systemic circulation and evaluate impact of cardiovascular diseases on normal circulation.

Cynthia Pfirrmann (Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School)

2006-08-01

273

Psychosocial aspects in cardiac rehabilitation: From theory to practice. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation of the European Society of Cardiology.  

PubMed

A large body of empirical research shows that psychosocial risk factors (PSRFs) such as low socio-economic status, social isolation, stress, type-D personality, depression and anxiety increase the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and also contribute to poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and prognosis in patients with established CHD. PSRFs may also act as barriers to lifestyle changes and treatment adherence and may moderate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Furthermore, there appears to be a bidirectional interaction between PSRFs and the cardiovascular system. Stress, anxiety and depression affect the cardiovascular system through immune, neuroendocrine and behavioural pathways. In turn, CHD and its associated treatments may lead to distress in patients, including anxiety and depression. In clinical practice, PSRFs can be assessed with single-item screening questions, standardised questionnaires, or structured clinical interviews. Psychotherapy and medication can be considered to alleviate any PSRF-related symptoms and to enhance HRQoL, but the evidence for a definite beneficial effect on cardiac endpoints is inconclusive. A multimodal behavioural intervention, integrating counselling for PSRFs and coping with illness should be included within comprehensive CR. Patients with clinically significant symptoms of distress should be referred for psychological counselling or psychologically focused interventions and/or psychopharmacological treatment. To conclude, the success of CR may critically depend on the interdependence of the body and mind and this interaction needs to be reflected through the assessment and management of PSRFs in line with robust scientific evidence, by trained staff, integrated within the core CR team. PMID:25059929

Pogosova, Nana; Saner, Hugo; Pedersen, Susanne S; Cupples, Margaret E; McGee, Hannah; Höfer, Stefan; Doyle, Frank; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

2014-07-24

274

Nanomedicine and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Nanomedicine has become an important tool in the imaging and therapy of numerous diseases. This is due, in large part, to the ability to generate multifunctional nanoagents bearing combinations of targeting, diagnostic, and therapeutic moieties, allowing for the tailoring of the properties of the synthesized nanomaterials. With respect to cardiovascular disease and its sequelae, nanomedicine has the potential to detect and treat some of the leading causes of death and disability in the developed world, including atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. As such, this review focuses on some of the most poignant examples of the utility of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease that have been recently reported. PMID:20369034

McCarthy, Jason R.

2010-01-01

275

Hyperuricemia and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

There is an increasing prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia worldwide. Gout confers a significant individual and social burden and is increasingly recognized as a prevalent chronic disease state requiring appropriate long-term management. Gout and hyperuricemia appear to be independent risk factors for incident hypertension, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Multiple epidemiologic studies confirm an association between hyperuricemia and "cardiometabolic disease". We review the evidence stating the relationship between hyperuricemia and the development of comorbid conditions contributing to cardiovascular risk and disease. PMID:24554489

Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Di Giacomantonio, Anna Vittoria; Di Giosia, Paolo; Ferri, Claudio

2014-12-01

276

A Model of Cardiovascular Disease Giving a Plausible Mechanism for the Effect of Fractionated Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular

Mark P. Little; Anna Gola; Ioanna Tzoulaki

2009-01-01

277

Underreporting of conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines: cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Conflicts of interest affect recommendations in clinical guidelines and disclosure of such conflicts is important. However, not all conflicts of interest are disclosed. Using a public available disclosure list we determined the prevalence and underreporting of conflicts of interest among authors of clinical guidelines on drug treatments. Methods We included up to five guidelines published from July 2010 to March 2012 from each Danish clinical specialty society. Using the disclosure list of the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, we identified author conflicts of interest and compared them with the disclosures in the guidelines. For each guideline we extracted methodological characteristics of guideline development. Results Forty-five guidelines from 14 specialty societies were included. Of 254 authors, 135 (53%) had conflicts of interest, corresponding to 43 of the 45 guidelines (96%) having one or more authors with a conflict of interest. Only one of the 45 guidelines (2%) disclosed author conflicts of interest. The most common type of conflict of interest (83 of the 135) was being a consultant, an advisory board member or a company employee. Only 10 guidelines (22%) described the methods used for guideline development, 27 (60%) used references in the text and 11 (24%) graded the types of evidence. Conclusions Conflicts of interest were common, but disclosures were very rare. Most guidelines did not describe how they were developed and many did not describe the evidence behind specific recommendations. Publicly available disclosure lists may assist guideline issuing bodies in ensuring that all conflicts are disclosed. PMID:23642105

2013-01-01

278

Expert witness testimony guidelines: identifying areas for improvement.  

PubMed

Expert witnesses play an invaluable, if controversial, role by deciphering medical events for juries in cases of alleged negligence. We review expert witness guidelines among major surgical societies and identify gaps within these standards, as our hope is that this spurs discussion addressing areas for improvement. Of 8 surgical societies with accessible guidelines, none included specific compensation guidelines or limits, detailed reporting mechanisms regarding unethical behavior by legal professionals, or addressed the appropriateness of testifying frequently and exclusively for one side. Several processes possibly deterring grossly inaccurate testimony have been adopted by other surgical societies and should potentially be addressed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. These include offering an expert witness testimony certification path, strengthening the formalized grievance process, and encouraging members to sign an affirmation statement. PMID:25389319

Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Folbe, Adam J

2015-02-01

279

[Treatment of elderly hypertension based on various hypertension management guidelines--comparison between European and American guidelines and Japanese guidelines].  

PubMed

In civilized countries blood pressure is increased in association with age. Elderly population is lately increased both in Japan and Western countries and therefore elderly hypertensive patients are expected to increase. Recently, several guidelines and statements for the treatment of hypertension, such as JNC 7, 2003 ESH/ESC, 2003 WHO/ISH, and BSH IV, are reported in Western countries. In Japan, Japanese Society of Hypertension reported guidelines for management of hypertension in 2000 (JSH 2000) and JSH 2000 is now revised and a new version was published at the end of 2004 (JSH 2004). In this article, management of hypertension (when starts the treatment, target blood pressure level, and choice of drugs, etc) in the elderly is described based on these guidelines and statements. PMID:15948374

Matsuoka, Hiroaki

2005-06-01

280

Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

281

Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

Jenkins, C. David

1988-01-01

282

Cardiovascular Actions of Neurotrophins  

PubMed Central

Neurotrophins were christened in consideration of their actions on the nervous system and, for a long time, they were the exclusive interest of neuroscientists. However, more recently, this family of proteins has been shown to possess essential cardiovascular functions. During cardiovascular development, neurotrophins and their receptors are essential factors in the formation of the heart and critical regulator of vascular development. Postnatally, neurotrophins control the survival of endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes and regulate angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Recent studies suggest the capacity of neurotrophins, via their tropomyosin-kinase receptors, to promote therapeutic neovascularization in animal models of hindlimb ischemia. Conversely, the neurotrophin low-affinity p75NTR receptor induces apoptosis of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and impairs angiogenesis. Finally, nerve growth factor looks particularly promising in treating microvascular complications of diabetes or reducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the infarcted heart. These seminal discoveries have fuelled basic and translational research and thus opened a new field of investigation in cardiovascular medicine and therapeutics. Here, we review recent progress on the molecular signaling and roles played by neurotrophins in cardiovascular development, function, and pathology, and we discuss therapeutic potential of strategies based on neurotrophin manipulation. PMID:19126759

CAPORALI, ANDREA; EMANUELI, COSTANZA

2010-01-01

283

CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE FELLOWSHIP PROCEDURE TRACKING FORM  

E-print Network

1 CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE FELLOWSHIP PROCEDURE TRACKING FORM Please complete and return this form: Date of Original Certification: _________________ Expiration: ______________ CARDIOVASCULAR PROCEDURES

Ford, James

284

Brand Guidelines molecular foundry brand guidelines  

E-print Network

Brand Guidelines july 2012 #12;molecular foundry brand guidelines Vision Our vision defines why we success. People / Research / Collaboration / Enthusiasm #12;Signature #12;molecular foundry brand in a fixed relationship with the logo mark. Our signature is the foundation of our brand and should be used

Lee, Jason R.

285

NCI Digital Media Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

NCI Digital Media Guidelines The NCI Digital Media Guidelines provide developers and content managers guidance on the visual and content standards, as well as policies and procedures, in effect for National Cancer Institute (NCI) digital media – including

286

[Cardiovascular system and aging].  

PubMed

Aging is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors. Age-related morphologic changes in large resistance vessels include an intima-media-thickening and increased deposition of matrix substance, ultimately leading to a reduced compliance and an increased stiffness of the vessels. Aging of the heart is mainly characterized by an increase of the left ventricular mass in relation to the chamber volume and a decrease of diastolic function. There is some controversy in regard to the question if these changes in the vessel wall are the consequence of aging or if a decrease in physical activity is a major contributor of this process. With age the cardiovascular profile is changing. Whereas smoking is less prominent, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus are more often encountered. Primary and secondary prevention through cardiovascular risk factor management is also very important in the aging population due to the increased risk of acute vascular complications with age. Preventive measures have to include life style factor interventions as well as optimized drug therapy. There is no scientific evidence that vascular aging can be prevented by administration of supplements such as antioxidant vitamins. Aspirin is effective for cardiovascular prevention up to a higher age. Betablockers and ACE-inhibitors are generally underused in older patients after myocardial infarctions. Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular complications up to an age of 80 years. Myocardial infarction in elderly patients is often characterized by atypical symptoms and may be even silent. Interventional therapy in elderly patients is as successful as in younger patients but has an increased complication rate. Ambulatory cardiac rehabilitation in elderly patients leads to significant improvements of physical capacity, well-being and quality of life and may help to prevent social isolation. PMID:16405288

Saner, H

2005-12-01

287

Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

A commonly-assumed paradigm holds that the primary genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease resides within the DNA sequence of our genes. This paradigm can be challenged. For example, how do sequence changes in the non-coding region of the genome influence phenotype? Why are all diseases not shared between identical twins? Part of the answer lies in the fact that the environment or exogenous stimuli clearly influence disease susceptibility, but it was unclear in the past how these effects were signalled to the static DNA code. Epigenetics is providing a newer perspective on these issues. Epigenetics refers to chromatin-based mechanisms important in the regulation of gene expression that do not involve changes to the DNA sequence per se. The field can be broadly categorized into three areas: DNA base modifications (including cytosine methylation and cytosine hydroxymethylation), post-translational modifications of histone proteins, and RNA-based mechanisms that operate in the nucleus. Cardiovascular disease pathways are now being approached from the epigenetic perspective, including those associated with atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, ischemia-reperfusion damage, and the cardiovascular response to hypoxia and shear stress, among many others. With increasing interest and expanding partnerships in the field, we can expect new insights to emerge from epigenetic perspectives of cardiovascular health. This paper reviews the principles governing epigenetic regulation, discusses their presently-understood importance in cardiovascular disease, and considers the growing significance we are likely to attribute to epigenetic contributions in the future, as they provide new mechanistic insights and a host of novel clinical applications. PMID:23261320

Webster, Andrew L H; Yan, Matthew Shu-Ching; Marsden, Philip A

2013-01-01

288

Research Gaps on Use of Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain: Findings From a Review of the Evidence for an American Pain Society and American Academy of Pain Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic noncancer pain is common and use of opioids is increasing. Previously published guidelines on use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain have been based primarily on expert consensus due to lack of strong evidence. We conducted searches on Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases through July 2008 to identify studies that addressed one or more of 37 Key Questions

Roger Chou; Jane C. Ballantyne; Gilbert J. Fanciullo; Perry G. Fine; Christine Miaskowski

2009-01-01

289

Nutrition and health: guidelines for dental practitioners.  

PubMed

Good nutrition is vital to overall health, and poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nutritional factors are implicated in many oral and systemic diseases and conditions, including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, dental caries and some cancers including oral cancers. This review focuses on the evidence for the relations between key nutritional factors and health. Energy intake is related to body weight and obesity, highlighting the importance of lower-energy diets and regular physical activity for body weight maintenance and for preventing obesity. Evidence is presented for the health benefits of high quality carbohydrates, such as whole grain products, and fruits and vegetables, in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The adverse effects of sugar, sweetened beverages, and trans and saturated fats on several diseases including caries, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are described. The health benefits of unsaturated fats, antioxidants, B vitamins and vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, periodontitis, cancer, and other conditions are documented. Both benefits and harmful effects of dairy product intake on health are discussed. Based on the evidence, nutritional guidelines are provided, as well as key recommendations for preventing obesity. Dentists can play a critical role in motivating and enabling healthy food choices. PMID:19467151

Palacios, C; Joshipura, Kj; Willett, Wc

2009-09-01

290

Human cardiovascular responses to passive heat stress.  

PubMed

Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. © 2015 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 5: 17-43, 2015. PMID:25589263

Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E

2015-01-01

291

National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is based on the work of The State Library of Ohio, the National Bookmobile Guidelines Committee, and staff of local Ohio bookmobile programs. Draft guidelines were approved by the 7th National Bookmobile Conference (May 31-June 2, 1992). The Guidelines provide brief statements of standards followed by specifics which indicate…

Ohio State Library, Columbus.

292

National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These guidelines were developed by the bookmobile community that has met in Columbus, Ohio, since 1985 for their annual conference. The guidelines comprise the collaborative effort of hundreds of conference participants and representatives from 79 libraries throughout the United States and Canada, who discussed the guidelines in regional and state…

Ohio State Library, Columbus.

293

Hyperlipidemia as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Elevated levels of blood lipids are well documented risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Current classification schemes and treatment levels for hyperlipidemia are based on the National Cholesterol Education Panel’s (NCEP) Adult Treatment Program-3 (ATP-III) guidelines. Statins are the preferred class of drugs to lower elevated low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). There are other classes to augment or substitute for statins, such as ezetimibe, fibrates, niacin and dietary supplements. Extensive research over the last decade has raised the question whether or not ATP-III guidelines are sufficiently aggressive. New guidelines from ATP-IV are expected to be released in the near future, but in the meantime physicians are faced with uncertainty about how low to target LDL-C, whether to pharmacologically treat high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels and how best to achieve target goals. PMID:23402469

Nelson, Robert H.

2012-01-01

294

Barriers to cardiovascular risk prevention and management in Germany – an analysis of the EURIKA study  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose Despite the availability of risk engines to determine cardiovascular risk, risk factor control is suboptimal. Using EURIKA data we compared risk factor control in Germany with that of 11 other European countries (rest of Europe [ROE]) to identify differences and opportunities for improvement. Methods EURIKA was a multinational, cross-sectional study in 12 European countries including Germany from May 2009 to January 2010. Physicians’ attitudes to risk factor control based on the 2007 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in a representative cohort of 7641 primary care outpatients aged ?50 years with no CV disease and at least one major CV risk factor were determined. Results Compared to the ROE, German physicians were more frequently male (72.7% vs 62.6%), had a higher mean age (51.7 ± 8.4 vs 47.0 ± 9.7 years), faced higher patient loads (37.9% vs 16.5% had >199 patients/week), and involved other health sector professionals (dieticians, psychologists) less (31.8% vs 41.0% in the ROE). The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on CVD prevention were more important for German physicians (60.6% vs 55.9%), while those who didn’t use them gave reasons for nonuse as too many (62.5% vs 46.2%), too confusing, unrealistic, or not applicable to their patients. Risk engines were used less (54.5% vs 70.7%), with perceived lack of time (65.5% vs 60.2%) a frequent reason for nonuse. Risk factor control in German patients was inadequate (control rates: hypertension 36.3%, dyslipidemia 30.4%, type 2 diabetes 40.6%, obesity 28.8%) but largely comparable to other ROE countries; however, physicians tended to overestimate control rates. Conclusion EURIKA provides comprehensive data on the status of primary prevention of CVD in clinical practice in Germany and reveals considerable potential for improving the primary prevention of CVD. PMID:22536072

Schmieder, Roland E; Goebel, Matthias; Bramlage, Peter

2012-01-01

295

The McCormick Undergraduate Research Society Peer Education Committee  

E-print Network

The McCormick Undergraduate Research Society Peer Education Committee MURS Peer undergraduates and guide them in understanding the realities of research and available Advising Program: Guidelines and Protocol Peer Advisers McCormick undergraduates

Shull, Kenneth R.

296

[Hypertension and cardiovascular risk: the J-curve concept].  

PubMed

The optimization of the pharmacologic treatment in hypertensive patients is encouraged by four reports: the high prevalence of hypertension and more particularly in the elderly, the lack of blood pressure control in more than half of patients, the frequency of the association to other cardiovascular risk factors and the existence of a residual risk under treatment. All these factors are combined to raise the cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. Several interventional studies highlighted a reduction of the cardiovascular risk proportional to the reduction of blood pressure under treatment. Thus arose the question of the optimal blood pressure: the guidelines propose values lower than 140/90 mmHg for the non-complicated essential hypertension and lower than 130/80 mmHg in secondary prevention, for the patients with diabetes or renal impairment. However, this strict blood pressure goal for the high cardiovascular risk patients is not confirmed by clinical trials, strict blood pressure goal being potentially deleterious. The concept of «the lower the better» tends to be abandoned. Since more than three decades, the assumption of a paradoxical increase of the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with a high reduction of blood pressure (the «J-Curve» concept) remains the subject of many studies and controversies. PMID:21049440

Yannoutsos, A; Mourad, J-J; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, M

2010-11-01

297

The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Context: It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. Conclusions: The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25093157

Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

2014-01-01

298

Cardiovascular and renal outcome in subjects with K\\/DOQI stage 1-3 chronic kidney disease: the importance of urinary albumin excretion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Ini- tiative guidelines aim to define chronic kidney disease (CKD) and classify its stages. Stage 3 CKD generally re- ceives more attention than stage 1 or 2, because the more impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in stage 3 sug- gests a higher cardiovascular and renal risk. In this study we evaluated cardiovascular and renal

Auke H. Brantsma; J. L. Bakker; Hans L. Hillege; Dick de Zeeuw; Ronald T. Gansevoort

2008-01-01

299

Ethiopian cardiovascular studies  

PubMed Central

No large series of patients with cardiovascular disease has yet been reported from Ethiopia, where only limited means for investigation are at present available. The authors therefore studied the types of heart disease detected by mass miniature radiography in a largely self-selected population at the Addis Ababa Tuberculosis Centre, and examined the value of this method of cardiac case-finding. Rheumatic heart disease occurred in 34.8% of patients, but syphilitic aortitis, hypertension, “cardiomyopathy” and tuberculous pericarditis were also common. Endomyocardial fibrosis was not seen; this may be a further significant fact in the search for its cause. Mass miniature radiography is valuable for detecting symptomatic patients with the cardiovascular diseases mentioned above. The technique described in this paper could be used in other developing countries as it uses a single method of screening for 2 groups of diseases. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:5306099

Parry, E. H. O.; Gordon, C. G. I.

1968-01-01

300

Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

1976-01-01

301

Relevance of guideline-based ICD indications to clinical practice  

PubMed Central

The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has established itself as life-saving therapy in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. Remarkable technological advances have made ICDs easier and safer to implant, with improved therapeutic and diagnostic functions and reduced morbidity. Guidelines on ICD indications have been proposed by American and European scientific societies since a number of years, based upon trials and expert opinion. In the context of variable economic and political constraints, it is questionable whether these guidelines may be applied to all settings. This review discusses the guideline-based indications, critically examines their applicability to clinical practice, and discusses alternatives to ICD therapy. PMID:24568834

Al-Jefairi, Nora; Burri, Haran

2014-01-01

302

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes has been shown to be increasing at a rapid rate in the United States. There estimates of 23.6 million individuals with diabetes with 1.6 million new cases being diagnosed annually. [1] Diabetes has long been known as a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Experts indicate 38% of patients admitted to the hospital are diabetic.[2] Therefore one

Barbara “Bobbi” Leeper; Dl Mcgee

1979-01-01

303

Alcohol and cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcohol in moderation is associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease in healthy men and women. New evidence suggests\\u000a that this association, described in over 70 epidemiologic studies, is causal and can be explained, in part, by alcohol’s beneficial\\u000a effects on serum lipids and clotting factors. Recently, the inverse association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease\\u000a also has been reported

Eric Rimm

2000-01-01

304

[Croatian guidelines for perioperative enteral nutrition of surgical patients].  

PubMed

Nutritional status of patients significantly affects the outcome of surgical treatment, whether it's about being obese or malnutrition with loss of muscle mass. Inadequate nutritional support in the perioperative period compromises surgical procedures even in patients who are adequately nourished. In this paper, particular attention was paid to malnourished patients, and their incidence in population hospitalized in surgical wards can be high up to 30%. Special emphasis was paid to the appropriateness of preoperative fasting and to the acceptance of new knowledge in this area of treatment. The aim of this working group was to make guidelines for perioperative nutritional support with different modalities of enteral nutrition. The development of these guidelines was attended by representatives of Croatian Medical Association: Croatian Society for Digestive Surgery, Croatian Society for Clinical Nutrition, Croatian Society of Surgery, Croatian Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Croatian Trauma Society and the Croatian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. The guidelines are designed as a set of questions that arise daily in clinical practice when preparing patients for surgery and after the surgical treatment, which relate to the assessment of nutritional status, perioperative nutritional support, duration of preoperative fasting period and the selection of food intake route. Assessment of nutritional status and the use of different modes of enteral nutrition should enter into standard protocols of diagnosis and treatment in the Croatian hospitals. PMID:25327004

Zeli?, Marko; Bender, Darija Vranesi?; Keleci?, Dina Ljubas; Zupan, Zeljko; Cicvari?, Tedi; Maldini, Branka; Durut, Iva; Raheli?, Velimir; Skegro, Mate; Majerovi?, Mate; Perko, Zdravko; Susti?, Alan; Madzar, Tomislav; Kovaci?, Borna; Kekez, Tihomir; Krznari?, Zeljko

2014-01-01

305

National Space Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Space Society (NSS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of a spacefaring civilization. The NSS web site features information about the organization, its mission and vision, membership information, and a listing of NSS local chapters. The library features links to videos, books, and other publications on space settlements and bases, space policy, and technology. There is also information on the organization's magazine, "Ad Astra," including instructions for authors, publishing and advertising guidelines, and some archived content. Other materials include news articles, event announcements, and information on current space missions.

2005-02-01

306

[Guidelines for quality management of dialysis solutions].  

PubMed

A Best Practice Guideline about Dialysis fluid purity has been developed under the leadership of the Spanish Society of Nephrology. The Guideline has established recommendations for standards for preparing dialysate: water, concentrates and hemodialysis proportioning systems. The Guideline was based on the European pharmacopoeia, the Real Farmacopea Espańola, the AAMI Standards and Recommended Practices, European Best Practice Guidelines for Haemodialysis (Section IV), literature reviews, according to their level of evidence, and the opinion of the expert spanish group. Two levels of quality of water were defined: purified water and high purified water (Ultra pure) and for dialysate: standard dialysate and ultra pure dialysate. Regular use of ultra pure dialysate is necessary for hemofiltration and hemodiafiltration on-line and desirable for high-flux hemodialysis to prevent and delay the occurrence of complications: inflammation, malnutrition, anemia and amyloidosis. Water, concentrates and dialysate quality requirements are defined as maximum allowable contaminant levels: chemicals (1.1.2), microbial and endotoxins: [table: see text] Monitoring frequency, maintenance and corrective actions were specified. Methods of sampling and analysis were described in appendix (Anexos). For microbiological monitoring, TSA or R2A medium are recommended, incubated during 5 days at a temperature of 30-35 degrees C. The dialysate quality assurance process involves all dialysis staff members and requires strict protocols. The physician in charge of hemodialysis has the ultimate responsibility for dialysate quality. All suggestions and questions about this Guideline are wellcome to www.senefro.org PMID:15083969

Pérez García, R; González Parra, E; Ceballos, F; Escallada Cotero, R; Gómez-Reino, Ma I; Martín-Rabadán, P; Pérez García, A; Ramírez Chamond, R; Sobrino, P E; Solozábal, C

2004-01-01

307

C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, and Cardiovascular Disease Prediction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events. METHODS We analyzed data from 52 prospective studies that included 246,669 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease to investigate the value of adding CRP or fibrinogen levels to conventional risk factors for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. We calculated measures of discrimination and reclassification during follow-up and modeled the clinical implications of initiation of statin therapy after the assessment of CRP or fibrinogen. RESULTS The addition of information on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a prognostic model for cardiovascular disease that included age, sex, smoking status, blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total cholesterol level increased the C-index, a measure of risk discrimination, by 0.0050. The further addition to this model of information on CRP or fibrinogen increased the C-index by 0.0039 and 0.0027, respectively (P<0.001), and yielded a net reclassification improvement of 1.52% and 0.83%, respectively, for the predicted 10-year risk categories of “low” (<10%), “intermediate” (10% to <20%), and “high” (?20%) (P<0.02 for both comparisons). We estimated that among 100,000 adults 40 years of age or older, 15,025 persons would initially be classified as being at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event if conventional risk factors alone were used to calculate risk. Assuming that statin therapy would be initiated in accordance with Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (i.e., for persons with a predicted risk of ?20% and for those with certain other risk factors, such as diabetes, irrespective of their 10-year predicted risk), additional targeted assessment of CRP or fibrinogen levels in the 13,199 remaining participants at intermediate risk could help prevent approximately 30 additional cardiovascular events over the course of 10 years. CONCLUSIONS In a study of people without known cardiovascular disease, we estimated that under current treatment guidelines, assessment of the CRP or fibrinogen level in people at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event could help prevent one additional event over a period of 10 years for every 400 to 500 people screened. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.) PMID:23034020

2013-01-01

308

Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective  

PubMed Central

The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with “normal” lipid profiles and high CRP values who benefited from statin therapy. The backdrop to JUPITER during this period was an increasing awareness of a rising cardiovascular risk burden and imperfect methods of risk evaluation, so that a significant number of individuals were being denied beneficial therapies. Other concerns have been a high level of residual risk in those who are treated, poor patient adherence, a need to follow guidelines more closely, a dual global epidemic of obesity and diabetes, and a progressively deteriorating level of physical activity in the population. Calls for new and more effective means of reducing risk for coronary heart disease are intensifying. In view of compelling evidence supporting earlier and aggressive therapy in people with high risk burdens, JUPITER simply offers another choice for stratification and earlier risk reduction in primary prevention patients. When indicated, and in individuals unwilling or unable to change their diet and lifestyles sufficiently, the benefits of statins greatly exceed the risks. Two side effects of interest are myotoxicity and an increase in the incidence of diabetes. PMID:21267417

Kones, Richard

2010-01-01

309

Omega-3 Index and Cardiovascular Health  

PubMed Central

Recent large trials with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the cardiovascular field did not demonstrate a beneficial effect in terms of reductions of clinical endpoints like total mortality, sudden cardiac arrest or other major adverse cardiac events. Pertinent guidelines do not uniformly recommend EPA + DHA for cardiac patients. In contrast, in epidemiologic findings, higher blood levels of EPA + DHA were consistently associated with a lower risk for the endpoints mentioned. Because of low biological and analytical variability, a standardized analytical procedure, a large database and for other reasons, blood levels of EPA + DHA are frequently assessed in erythrocytes, using the HS-Omega-3 Index® methodology. A low Omega-3 Index fulfills the current criteria for a novel cardiovascular risk factor. Neutral results of intervention trials can be explained by issues of bioavailability and trial design that surfaced after the trials were initiated. In the future, incorporating the Omega-3 Index into trial designs by recruiting participants with a low Omega-3 Index and treating them within a pre-specified target range (e.g., 8%–11%), will make more efficient trials possible and provide clearer answers to the questions asked than previously possible. PMID:24566438

von Schacky, Clemens

2014-01-01

310

European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I: assessment  

E-print Network

European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I: assessment A working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS) has developed the first European assessment guidelines of Tourette Syn- drome (TS). The available literature including national

Paschou, Peristera

311

Association between Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Risk in Chinese Youth Independent of Age and Pubertal Stage  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Childhood and adolescence are critical periods of habit formation with substantial tracking of lifestyle and cardiovascular risk into adulthood. There are various guidelines on recommended levels of physical activity in youth of school-age. Despite the epidemic of obesity and diabetes in China, there is a paucity of data in this regard in Chinese youth. We examined the association of

Alice PS Kong; Kai-Chow Choi; Albert MC Li; Stanley SC Hui; Michael HM Chan; YK Wing; Ronald CW Ma; Christopher WK Lam; Joseph TF Lau; Wing Yee So; Gary TC Ko; Juliana CN Chan

2010-01-01

312

Autism Society  

MedlinePLUS

... Privacy Policy Site Map Autism Society | 4340 East-West Hwy, Suite 350 | Bethesda, Maryland 20814 | 1(800) 328-8476 The Autism Society improves the lives of all affected by autism through education, advocacy, services, research and support.

313

Evaluation of a toolkit to improve cardiovascular disease screening and treatment for people with type 2 diabetes: protocol for a cluster-randomized pragmatic trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The gap between the level of care recommended by evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and the actual care delivered to patients in practice has been well established. The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) created an implementation strategy to improve the implementation of its 2008 guidelines. This study will evaluate the impact of the strategy to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) screening, prevention

Baiju R Shah; Onil Bhattacharyya; Catherine Yu; Muhammad Mamdani; Janet A Parsons; Sharon E Straus; Merrick Zwarenstein

2010-01-01

314

[New ESC guidelines on cardiac pacing and cardiac resynchronization therapy : what has changed?].  

PubMed

The latest guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) on cardiac pacing and cardiac resynchronization therapy were presented and published in June 2013. Compared to the last guidelines from 2007 several substantial changes have been made. The new guidelines are much more clinically oriented with a special focus on practicability. The intention is a better usefulness not only for electrophysiologists but also for cardiologists, internists and general practitioners. PMID:25403982

Kuck, K-H; Tönnis, T

2014-12-01

315

Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.  

PubMed

Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. PMID:24099052

Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

2013-10-01

316

Cardiovascular determinants of life span  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases rises with aging and is one of the main causes of mortality in western countries.\\u000a In view of the progressively aging population, there is an urge for a better understanding of age-associated cardiovascular\\u000a diseases and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The risk factors for cardiovascular diseases include unhealthy diet, diabetes,\\u000a obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity,

Yi Shi; Giovanni G. Camici; Thomas F. Lüscher

2010-01-01

317

Improving cardiovascular outcomes using electronic health records.  

PubMed

Improving quality of care through the enhanced use of digital technologies is becoming an increasingly primary focus of the health care industry in general and cardiovascular (CV) medicine in particular. The recent rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) has the potential to improve the management of CV disease by removing variability and assuring at least consideration of guideline-recommended care and appropriate use criteria. This can lead to improved cardiac outcomes at all phases of care; beginning with the automated identification of patients who are at increased risk, implementing evidence based medicine for primary CV prevention, using online decision support tools for acute management, and, possibly most importantly, by connecting the health care provider and the patient through open accessibility to their EHR. The widespread use of EHR is the dawn of a new era where evidence based guidelines can be seamlessly translated to patient care and where patients are actively involved in their own health. As transformative as this will be, it is important to recognize that we are currently experiencing only the very earliest potential of the EHR in improving CV outcomes. PMID:24408676

Roumia, Mazen; Steinhubl, Steven

2014-02-01

318

Assistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine  

E-print Network

degree and are board certified (or eligible) in Cardiovascular Disease or Radiology. AdvancedAssistant, Associate & Full Professor in Cardiovascular Imaging Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Medicine The Cardiovascular Institute and the Departments of Medicine and Radiology at Stanford

Quake, Stephen R.

319

[Stress and cardiovascular disease].  

PubMed

Risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been studied intensely since the 1950s. Results on stress as a risk factor for CVD have been inconsistent, but mainly positive. The risk is mediated through lifestyle, but more direct physiological mechanisms (e.g. autonomous nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are also found. Personality and general coping resources influence stress-appraisal, stress-coping and stress-response. Future studies should integrate stress as a cause (stressor), as a subjective reaction (perception), and as a physiological reaction in the same longitudinal studies with repeated measures. PMID:22277363

Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost; Jřrgensen, Torben

2012-01-23

320

Guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia in the UK: report of the working party on hospital-acquired pneumonia of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.  

PubMed

These evidence-based guidelines have been produced after a systematic literature review of a range of issues involving prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Prevention is structured into sections addressing general issues, equipment, patient procedures and the environment, whereas in treatment, the structure addresses the use of antimicrobials in prevention and treatment, adjunctive therapies and the application of clinical protocols. The sections dealing with diagnosis are presented against the clinical, radiological and microbiological diagnosis of HAP. Recommendations are also made upon the role of invasive sampling and quantitative microbiology of respiratory secretions in directing antibiotic therapy in HAP/ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:18445577

Masterton, R G; Galloway, A; French, G; Street, M; Armstrong, J; Brown, E; Cleverley, J; Dilworth, P; Fry, C; Gascoigne, A D; Knox, Alan; Nathwani, Dilip; Spencer, Robert; Wilcox, Mark

2008-07-01

321

Water conservation plan guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Water Conservation Plan Guidelines are addressed to water system planners but use of the Guidelines is not required by federal law or regulation. The first part of the document introduces the Guidelines and provides information to the States about their nature and possible use. The second part of the document, written for water systems, is an overview to the organization, content, and the use of the Guidelines. The next three parts contain the water conservation plan Guidelines: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced. The Basic Guidelines are designed for use by water systems serving populations of 10,000 or fewer; The Intermediate Guidelines are designed for water systems serving between 10,000 and 100,000 people; The Advanced Guidelines are designed for water systems serving more than 100,000 people. Six appendixes to the Guidelines provide supporting information: detailed descriptions of conservation measures (Appendix A), conservation benchmarks (Appendix B), acronyms and a glossary (Appendix C), information resources (Appendix D), funding sources (Appendix E), and state contacts (Appendix F).

NONE

1998-08-06

322

Guidelines for the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of inflammatory bowel disease represents a key component of clinical practice for members of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). There has been considerable progress in management strategies affecting all aspects of clinical care since the publication of previous BSG guidelines in 2004, necessitating the present revision.Key components of the present document worthy of attention as having been

Craig Mowat; Andrew Cole; Al Windsor; Tariq Ahmad; Ian Arnott; Sally Mitton; Tim Orchard; Matt Rutter; Lisa Younge; Charlie Lees; Gwo-tzer Ho; Jack Satsangi; Stuart Bloom; Richard Driscoll

2011-01-01

323

Quality Improvement Guidelines for Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Leiomyomata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is assuming an important role in the treatment of women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomata worldwide. The following guidelines, which have been jointly published with the Society of Interventional Radiology in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, are intended to ensure the safe practice of UAE by identifying the elements of appropriate patient selection, anticipated outcomes,

David M. Hovsepian; Gary P. Siskin; Joseph Bonn; John F. Cardella; Timothy W. I. Clark; Leo E. Lampmann; Donald L. Miller; Reed A. Omary; Jean-Pierre Pelage; Dheeraj Rajan; Marc S. Schwartzberg; Richard B. Towbin; Woodruff J. Walker; David Sacks

2004-01-01

324

Annual Faculty Review Guidelines Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences  

E-print Network

for a university, college or professional society award for teaching o Development of innovative teaching methods the following guidelines in development and submission of materials for the Annual Faculty Review process.01.99.M2, each faculty member must be reviewed annually, given a written report of his or her evaluation

Boas, Harold P.

325

One theoretical framework for cardiovascular disease prevention in women.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for women in the United States. Vulnerable and underserved women are even less likely to participate in healthy lifestyle behaviors to prevent CVD than the general US population. Many women are not aware that they are at risk for CVD and do not modify unhealthy lifestyle behaviors to reduce their risks for CVD. Healthcare providers may not promote awareness of CVD or consistently counsel female patients concerning lifestyle behavior modifications to reduce their risks for CVD. "The Evidence-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women 2011 Update: A Guideline From the American Heart Association" provides a guide for healthcare providers to help women lower their risk for heart disease. By using a theoretical approach, nurses can facilitate implementation of these evidence-based guidelines to help women reduce their risks for CVD. Commonly used intrapersonal, interpersonal, and organizational- and community-level health behavior change theories that can be used to effectively promote CVD risk reduction in women will be discussed. The theoretical basis for changing CVD risk behaviors in women can be applied by using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to guide planning, implementing, and evaluating health behavior programs. The purpose of this article was to help nurses improve healthcare delivery by using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model as a theoretical framework to guide CVD risk reduction efforts for women. PMID:21912271

Peterson, Jane Anthony

2012-01-01

326

Management of cardiovascular risk: the importance of meeting lipid targets.  

PubMed

Strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in primary and secondary prevention focus on optimization of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. Since the 2004 update of the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines, developments in the field of preventive cardiology have included new guidelines for women and for familial hypercholesterolemia; a risk assessment algorithm incorporating the inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP); and clinical trial data confirming the efficacy of aggressive lipid management. Within secondary prevention in particular, there is a need for more widespread use of intensive statin therapy to achieve low LDL cholesterol levels to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients at high risk for recurrent events. Within primary prevention, individuals with diabetes mellitus, mixed dyslipidemia, or elevated hsCRP also are at increased risk and may warrant treatment with aggressive lipid-modifying therapy. In this article, we provide an update on recent guidelines, risk algorithms, and trials related to the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease. PMID:22697390

Gotto, Antonio M; Moon, Jennifer E

2012-07-01

327

Cardiovascular medication: improving adherence  

PubMed Central

Introduction Adherence to medication is generally defined as the extent to which people take medications as prescribed by their healthcare providers. It can be assessed in many ways (e.g., by self-reporting, pill counting, direct observation, electronic monitoring, or by pharmacy records). This review reports effects of intervention on adherence to cardiovascular medications however adherence has been measured. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to improve adherence to long-term medication for cardiovascular disease in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: patient health education; prescriber education; prompting mechanisms; reminder packaging (calendar [blister] packs; multi-dose pill boxes); and simplified dosing.

2009-01-01

328

Cardiovascular medication: improving adherence  

PubMed Central

Introduction Adherence to medication is generally defined as the extent to which people take medications as prescribed by their healthcare providers. It can be assessed in many ways (e.g., by self-reporting, pill counting, direct observation, electronic monitoring, or by pharmacy records). This review reports effects of intervention on adherence to cardiovascular medications however adherence has been measured. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to improve adherence to long-term medication for cardiovascular disease in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: patient health education, prescriber education, prompting mechanisms, reminder packaging (calendar [blister] packs, multi-dose pill boxes), and simplified dosing. PMID:21481286

2011-01-01

329

Optimization in Cardiovascular Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluid mechanics plays a key role in the development, progression, and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Advances in imaging methods and patient-specific modeling now reveal increasingly detailed information about blood flow patterns in health and disease. Building on these tools, there is now an opportunity to couple blood flow simulation with optimization algorithms to improve the design of surgeries and devices, incorporating more information about the flow physics in the design process to augment current medical knowledge. In doing so, a major challenge is the need for efficient optimization tools that are appropriate for unsteady fluid mechanics problems, particularly for the optimization of complex patient-specific models in the presence of uncertainty. This article reviews the state of the art in optimization tools for virtual surgery, device design, and model parameter identification in cardiovascular flow and mechanobiology applications. In particular, it reviews trade-offs between traditional gradient-based methods and derivative-free approaches, as well as the need to incorporate uncertainties. Key future challenges are outlined, which extend to the incorporation of biological response and the customization of surgeries and devices for individual patients.

Marsden, Alison L.

2014-01-01

330

[Phytotherapy in cardiovascular medicine].  

PubMed

There is widespread use of herbal medicine in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases. The discussion about the benefit of these drugs is still controversial because of lack of scientific evidence. Ginkgo biloba, Crataegus and Garlic are often recommended substances for patients with cardiovascular diseases. For these substances there is a lot of data available from experimental and clinical studies, unfortunately not always adhering to the criteria of evidence based medicine. Extracts from ginkgo biloba contain several active constituents, mainly flavonoids and terpens, which have antioxidative properties and an inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation by inhibiting platelet activation factor PAF. Ginkgo is mainly used in vascular dementia and peripheral vascular disease. Garlic shows a modest lipid-lowering effect in the same range as a low-cholesterol diet. Effect on blood pressure seems to be at best minor. Crataegus is often used in patients with heart failure because of its positive inotropic effect. Additionally, crataegus acts as an antiarrhythmic substance by prolonging refractory period of the action potential. PMID:12125179

Zbinden, S; Seiler, Ch

2002-06-01

331

14 CFR 67.311 - Cardiovascular.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cardiovascular. 67.311 Section 67.311 Aeronautics...Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.311 Cardiovascular. Cardiovascular standards for a third-class airman...

2013-01-01

332

14 CFR 67.311 - Cardiovascular.  

... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cardiovascular. 67.311 Section 67.311 Aeronautics...Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.311 Cardiovascular. Cardiovascular standards for a third-class airman...

2014-01-01

333

14 CFR 67.111 - Cardiovascular.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cardiovascular. 67.111 Section 67.111 Aeronautics...First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.111 Cardiovascular. Cardiovascular standards for a first-class airman...

2013-01-01

334

14 CFR 67.211 - Cardiovascular.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cardiovascular. 67.211 Section 67.211 Aeronautics...Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.211 Cardiovascular. Cardiovascular standards for a second-class medical...

2013-01-01

335

Cardiovascular Research Institute Application for Membership  

E-print Network

Cardiovascular Research Institute Application for Membership Mission of the CVRI · establish a nationally and internationally recognized center of excellence for the study of cardiovascular and cellular biology to clinical application) and innovation among cardiovascular investigators · develop

Finley Jr., Russell L.

336

14 CFR 67.211 - Cardiovascular.  

... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cardiovascular. 67.211 Section 67.211 Aeronautics...Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.211 Cardiovascular. Cardiovascular standards for a second-class medical...

2014-01-01

337

Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research, and they are to use those developed by professional organization such as the ATA as well as those developed by their own institutions. PMID:24050615

Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

2013-01-01

338

Cardiovascular Technology Program Needs Assessment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1990/91, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Cardiovascular Technology program. Fifty-two local hospitals were surveyed to gather information on the employment demand, employment benefits and career preparation requirements for cardiovascular technologists (CVTs), yielding a 62% response…

Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

339

Geochemistry, soils and cardiovascular diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The hypothesis is presented that deficiencies or excesses in the content or availability of trace elements in rocks and soils, or in water flowing through them, may be a possible cause of certain chronic diseases, including cardiovascular ones. The geographic distribution of cardiovascular diseases is often associated with geochemical differences. This trend is particulalry evident in the United States

R. Masironi

1987-01-01

340

Cardiovascular involvement in relapsing polychondritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relapsing polychondritis is an inflammatory disease that characteristically involves cartilagenous tissues. Cardiovascular involvement is a fairly common complication and the second most frequent cause of mortality in this disease. The case of a man with a progressive cardiac involvement, aortic incompetence, mitral regurgitation, and finally complete atrioventricular block offered the opportunity of reviewing the cardiovascular complications in relapsing polychondritis. The

Attilio Del Rosso; Nunzia Rosa Petix; Mauro Pratesi; Alessandro Bini

1997-01-01

341

Some Pascal style guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for developing a style of writing Pascal programs to allow reasonable rehosting success prompted a study on Pascal style. Presented is a subset of guidelines developed from that research, plus some philosophy behind proper interpretation and enforcement of those guidelines. Styling is defined for the programming areas of: description using comments, expression with identifier names and conditionals, and

David Marca

1981-01-01

342

Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

1993-08-01

343

NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for  

E-print Network

NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 3, Supportive Analyses and References The Smart Grid Interoperability Panel ­ Cyber Security Working Group August 2010 #12;NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 3, Supportive Analyses and References The Smart Grid Interoperability

344

Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

345

Engineering Technology Curriculum Guidelines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes curriculum guidelines for the following engineering technologies: chemical, industrial, mining, petroleum, nuclear, civil, mechanical, electrical, automotive, and manufacturing. In a few years, these Engineering Council for Professional Development committee guidelines are intended to become the criteria by which programs will be judged…

Gershon, J. J.

1977-01-01

346

Guideline 2: Informed Consent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on informed consent. Guidelines cover underlying concepts, usual components, informed consent as a process, information to include, what to provide, when to obtain informed consent, and…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

347

The TEI Hypertext Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines' approach to describing hypertext features. Discusses the rationale behind the design of the tagset and the range of features included in the guidelines. Discusses the relation and integration of TEI mark-up and the HyTime standard. (CFR)

DeRose, Steven J.; Durand, David

1995-01-01

348

Business Education Curriculum Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These business education curriculum guidelines are designed as a guide for teachers, counselors, and administrators involved with business education in Montana. Introductory materials include the goals of business education and suggested curriculum patterns for different business and office education programs. Guidelines are provided for 17…

Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

349

Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001  

E-print Network

Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001 Revised February 2004 Revised March 15, 2007 Page 1 of 5 INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES College of Business Louisiana Tech University The University supports an experiential an internship course(s) that students may apply as credit toward their academic degrees. The internship must

Selmic, Sandra

350

NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for  

E-print Network

NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 1, Smart Grid Cyber Security Strategy, Architecture, and High-Level Requirements The Smart Grid Interoperability Panel ­ Cyber Security Working Group August 2010 #12;NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 1, Smart Grid Cyber Security

351

Conservation and solar guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines are given for selecting R-values and infiltration levels, and determining the size of the solar collection area for passive solar buildings. The guidelines are based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of conservation and passive solar strategies. Tables are given for 90 cities in the US and the results are also displayed on maps. An example is included.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01

352

Disparities in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases among women  

PubMed Central

This article reviews literature pertinent to cardiovascular disparities in women, focusing primarily on heart failure (HF). It provides an in-depth look at causes, biological influences, self-management and lack of adherence to HF-treatment guidelines in women. Disparities in treatment of causative factors of HF, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, contribute to women having poorer HF outcomes than men. This article discusses major contributing reasons for nonadherence to medication regimes for HF in women, including advanced age at time of diagnosis, likelihood of multiple comorbidities, lack of social support and low socioeconomic status. Limited inclusion of women in clinical trials and the scarcity of gender analyses for HF and other cardiovascular diseases continues to limit the applicability of research findings to women. PMID:22757737

McSweeney, Jean; Pettey, Christina; Lefler, Leanne L; Heo, Seongkum

2012-01-01

353

Provision of cardiovascular genetic counseling services: current practice and future directions.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular genetic counseling has emerged as a specialty critical to the care of patients with heritable cardiovascular disease. Current strategies to meet the growing demand are not clear. We sought to characterize practice patterns of cardiac genetic counseling by developing a novel survey distributed to the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Listserv to assess clinical practice, cardiovascular training, and education. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize clinical practice; Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were used to compare the practice of cardiovascular genetic counselors (CVGCs) to those who did not identify cardiology as a specialty (non-CVGCs). A total of 153 individuals completed the survey. Of the 105 participants who reported seeing a cardiac genetics patient, 42 (40 %) identified themselves as a CVGC. The most common conditions for which genetic counseling was provided were hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (71 % of participants), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (61 %), long QT syndrome (LQTS) (56 %), and genetic syndromes with cardiovascular disease (55 %). CVGCs were significantly more confident than non-CVGCs in providing genetic counseling for seven cardiovascular diseases (2.3?×?10(-6)???p???0.021). Eighty-six percent of genetic counselors sought additional education related to cardiovascular genetics and listed online courses as the most desirable method of learning. These data suggest a growing interest in cardiovascular genetic counseling and need for additional training resources among the NSGC membership. PMID:24788056

Somers, Allyson E; Ware, Stephanie M; Collins, Kathleen; Jefferies, John L; He, Hua; Miller, Erin M

2014-12-01

354

European Society of Intensive Care Medicine statement: intensive care medicine in Europe--structure, organisation and training guidelines of the Multidisciplinary Joint Committee of Intensive Care Medicine (MJCICM) of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS).  

PubMed

This article describes the structures and institutions in the European Union by which professional training and qualification in medical specialities will be harmonised. All main medical specialities are represented in the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) by speciality sections. For intensive care medicine, as a multidisciplinary speciality, a new structure of a Multidisciplinary Joint Committee of Intensive Care Medicine (MJCICM) within the UEMS was established in 1999. In this MJCICM the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care are represented by delegates without voting capacity in a Standing Advisory Board. Statements and recommendations which the MJCICM has worked out until now are presented: Definitions of intensive care medicine, structural conditions for education and training, continuing medical education, criteria for accreditation of intensive care medicine training centres, common core curriculum for optional specialist training in intensive care medicine, as well as an intensive care units accreditation visiting programme and standards for medical treatment and nursing care. PMID:12583367

De Lange, Simon; Van Aken, Hugo; Burchardi, Hilmar

2002-11-01

355

Cardiovascular Risk in the Vietnamese Community  

E-print Network

.....................................................................................15 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................16Cardiovascular Risk in the Vietnamese Community Formative Research from Houston, Texas U ...........................................................17 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

Bandettini, Peter A.

356

Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community  

E-print Network

.....................................................................................13 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................13Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community Formative Research from Lowell, Massachusetts U ...........................................................14 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

Bandettini, Peter A.

357

Cardiovascular Risk in the Filipino Community  

E-print Network

.....................................................................................12 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................12Cardiovascular Risk in the Filipino Community Formative Research from Daly City and San Francisco ...........................................................13 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

Bandettini, Peter A.

358

Semaphorins in cardiovascular medicine.  

PubMed

During organogenesis, patterning is primarily achieved by the combined actions of morphogens. Among these, semaphorins represent a general system for establishing the appropriate wiring architecture of biological nets. Originally discovered as evolutionarily conserved steering molecules for developing axons, subsequent studies on semaphorins expanded their functions to the cardiovascular and immune systems. Semaphorins participate in cardiac organogenesis and control physiological vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, which result from a balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. These signals are altered in several diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of semaphorins in vascular biology, emphasizing the mechanisms by which these molecules control vascular patterning and lymphangiogenesis, as well as in genetically inherited and degenerative vascular diseases. PMID:25154329

Corŕ, Davide; Astanina, Elena; Giraudo, Enrico; Bussolino, Federico

2014-10-01

359

Cardiovascular involvement in leptospirosis.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular involvement was studied in 50 patients with serologically proved leptospirosis. Twelve (24%) patients had dyspnoea and 18 (36%) had transient hypotension during the illness. None of them had cardiac enlargement, development of new murmur or pericardial rub. Various electrocardiographic abnormalities occurred in 70 percent of patients. Atrial fibrillation was the most common major arrhythmia (14%). Conduction system abnormalities were seen in 36 percent of patients. T-wave changes were observed in 30 percent of patients. Left ventricular function as assessed by echocardiography and Doppler examination was normal. Three (6%) patients died due to renal failure. In conclusion, even though ECG abnormalities were frequently seen in leptospirosis, there was no data to support associated left ventricular dysfunction. Dyspnoea and hypotension occurring in patients of leptospirosis must be due to a noncardiac mechanism. PMID:9062020

Rajiv, C; Manjuran, R J; Sudhayakumar, N; Haneef, M

1996-01-01

360

Cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies.  

PubMed

Inevitably, a small proportion of patients with systematic hypertension will develop hypertensive crisis at some point. Hypertensive crises can be divided into hypertensive emergency or hypertensive urgency according to the presence or lack of acute target organ damage. In this review, we discuss cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, congestive heart failure, and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises, including those caused by cocaine use. Each presents in a unique fashion, although some hypertensive emergency patients report nonspecific symptoms. Treatment includes several effective and rapid-acting medications to safely reduce the blood pressure, protect remaining end-organ function, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications, and thereby improve patient outcomes. PMID:25620633

Papadopoulos, D P; Sanidas, E A; Viniou, N A; Gennimata, V; Chantziara, V; Barbetseas, I; Makris, T K

2015-02-01

361

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance artefacts  

PubMed Central

The multitude of applications offered by CMR make it an increasing popular modality to study the heart and the surrounding vessels. Nevertheless the anatomical complexity of the chest, together with cardiac and respiratory motion, and the fast flowing blood, present many challenges which can possibly translate into imaging artefacts. The literature is wide in terms of papers describing specific MR artefacts in great technical detail. In this review we attempt to summarise, in a language accessible to a clinical readership, some of the most common artefacts found in CMR applications. It begins with an introduction of the most common pulse sequences, and imaging techniques, followed by a brief section on typical cardiovascular applications. This leads to the main section on common CMR artefacts with examples, a short description of the mechanisms behind them, and possible solutions. PMID:23697969

2013-01-01

362

Biosafety guidelines for sorting of unfixed cells.  

PubMed

The International Society of Analytical Cytology (ISAC) Biohazard Working Group presents guidelines for sorting of unfixed cells, including known biohazardous samples, using jet-in-air, deflected-droplet cell sorters. There is a risk that personnel operating these instruments could become exposed to droplets and aerosols containing biological agents present in the samples. The following guidelines can aid in the prevention of exposures of laboratory personnel to pathogens contained in the sort samples. The document provides biosafety recommendations for sample handling, operator training and protection, laboratory facility design, and instrument setup and maintenance. In addition, it describes in detail methods for assessment of instrument aerosol containment. Recommendations provided here may also help laboratories to obtain institutional and/or regulatory agency approval for sorting of unfixed and known biohazardous samples. PMID:9181299

Schmid, I; Nicholson, J K; Giorgi, J V; Janossy, G; Kunkl, A; Lopez, P A; Perfetto, S; Seamer, L C; Dean, P N

1997-06-01

363

The Poetry Society of America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With a lyre serving as their organization's totem, the Poetry Society of America has served the poetry community of the United States for over seventy years. The Society may be best known for its annual awards, which include the prestigious Frost Award, the Cecil Hemly Memorial Award, and the Shelley Memorial Award. Aspiring poets can read about the entry guidelines for these awards, along with being able to peruse a list of previous recipients of both the Frost Award and Shelley Memorial Award, including such literary luminaries as Conrad Aiken, Kenneth Rexroth, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks and Wallace Stevens. Even more compelling is the inclusion of works by the most recent recipients, whose august number includes Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Also on the website are lists of helpful outside poetry-related websites, a calendar of upcoming events sponsored by the Society, and a direct link to the Favorite Poem Project, which was begun by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky.

364

Planetary Society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

365

The Year in Cardiology 2012: focus on cardiovascular disease prevention.  

PubMed

Current data suggest that advances in cardiovascular (CV) treatment have resulted in significant reduction in CV mortality but also in prolongation of life with disability. Focus on CV prevention is likely to reverse this unfavourable trend. In this review we provide information on the new European guidelines on CV prevention and discuss biomarkers and vascular imaging techniques which can assist in refining CV risk prediction. Finally, we provide new information on lifestyle and pharmacological advances which are likely to result in significant CV risk reduction. PMID:23284098

Charakida, Marietta; Masi, Stefano; Deanfield, John Eric

2013-01-01

366

Use of a Heart Team in Decision-Making for Patients with Complex Coronary Disease at Hospitals in Michigan Prior to Guideline Endorsement  

PubMed Central

Background Revascularization decisions can profoundly impact patient survival, quality of life, and procedural risk. Although use of Heart Teams to make revascularization decisions is growing, data on their implementation in the real-world are limited. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of Heart Teams and their association with collaboration in routine practice. Methods A survey of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons at 31 hospitals in Michigan was performed in May, 2011 – prior to the recommendation for using Heart Teams in national guidelines. This survey included all percutaneous coronary intervention-performing hospitals in Michigan participating in the Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium and Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality Collaborative. It targeted both the use of Heart Teams and multidisciplinary Case Conferences. Results There were 53 physician survey respondents from 27 hospitals with 4 hospitals not responding. Among respondents, 11 (40.7%) hospitals reported no Heart Teams or Case Conferences while 7 (25.9%) hospitals reported either a Heart Team or Case Conference. However, there was disagreement about the presence of a Heart Team at seven hospitals, and about Case Conferences at nine hospitals. Hospitals with definite Heart Teams reported significantly greater levels of collaboration between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Conclusion The overall presence of Heart Teams prior to their recommendation in national guidelines was limited. Even among hospitals with a potential Heart Team, there was substantial disagreement between respondents about their presence. Further refinement of the definition of a Heart Team and measures of successful implementation are needed. PMID:25415332

Bruckel, Jeffrey T.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Seth, Milan; Prager, Richard L.; Jensen, Andrea; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

2014-01-01

367

A commentary on access to cardiovascular services: Nursing roles and initiatives  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses (CCCN) applauds the work done by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society in setting benchmarks for wait times. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society is to be commended for developing the benchmark documents, as well as for establishing strategies for systematic dissemination to increase awareness, advocacy and implementation of the benchmarks across Canada. Quality nursing care, as defined within the CCCN framework, includes working with health teams to ensure that patients have timely access to specialized personnel, tests and procedures as required to prevent disease, promote health, address acute and episodic interventions, and to provide rehabilitative and palliative services, depending on patient need. To extend the access to care discussion, the CCCN suggests that further engagement of all stakeholders, especially clients/patients, is needed to find solutions to wait times and define benchmarks. In addition, preventing heart disease and promoting ‘health care’ should be recognized and acted on as central to reducing wait times for cardiovascular care. Finally, access to cardiovascular services will be more efficient when the first point of care is broadened to include nurses and other health care professionals. Nurses occupy creative, cost-effective roles directly aimed at reducing wait times and improving care while patients wait. The expanded role of interprofessional education and health care teams, as well as the inclusion of patients and families in program improvement, are solutions that the CCCN suggests may contribute to improved access to cardiovascular care and a sustainable health care system in Canada. PMID:18273482

Eastwood, Cathy; Doucet, Janine; Estrella-Holder, Estrelita; MacDonald, June; Nichols, Natalie; Sherrard, Heather; Smigorowsky, Marcie; Yates, Gillian; Woodend, Kirsten

2008-01-01

368

A guideline management system.  

PubMed

This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

2004-01-01

369

[Dietary habits and cardiovascular diseases].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases are a major public health problem worldwide. They are the main cause of death in industrialized countries, while the mortality associated with cardiovascular disease is increasing in less developed countries. The modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease are cigarette smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Obesity has been recorded in 10%-25% of the population, indicating that poor or inappropriate diet is one of the most common causes of cardiovascular disease. Unhealthy dietary habits including place and way of taking meals, number of daily meals and excessive salt intake from processed foods also contribute to body mass gain. In the present study, dietary habits were assessed in cardiovascular patients versus control group by use of Dietary Habits Questionnaire. Study results showed a statistically significantly higher (P < 0.05) prevalence of inappropriate eating habits in cardiovascular patients (lower number of daily meals, more often skipping breakfast and having dinner) than in control group. In conclusion, many lifestyle and individual behavior modifications are needed in most patients with or at a high risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20649073

Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Doko Jelini?, Jagoda; Bergovec, Mijo; Ruzi?, Alen; Persi?, Viktor

2010-05-01

370

Treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular outcomes: the journey so far--is this the end for statins?  

PubMed

Dyslipidemia is common and is associated with the highest population-attributable risk for cardiovascular disease. Of various cardiovascular preventive therapies, the evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting the importance of aggressive lipid lowering is the most robust, particularly for statins. Despite the use of proven therapies, cardiovascular disease event rates remain relatively high, underpinning the development of novel therapies. In addition to testing new drugs to reduce low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, there has been a major focus on treatments that can favorably influence high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This review provides an overview of the important relationship between lipids and cardiovascular disease, the lipid-modifying therapeutic approaches to reducing cardiovascular disease, new guidelines and recommendations, and the challenges ahead for the treatment of dyslipidemia, particularly whether statins will remain at the forefront of recommended therapies. PMID:24727468

Zoungas, S; Curtis, A J; McNeil, J J; Tonkin, A M

2014-08-01

371

Salt, Arterial Pressure, and Cardiovascular and Renal Damage  

PubMed Central

This brief review deals with some novel developments regarding the possible role of salt in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal disorders. Studies in both humans and experimental animals are discussed. Increased salt intake is usually associated with an increase in arterial pressure although some controversies still exist. Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure (defined as an increase in arterial pressure on dietary salt overload) was demonstrated in many animal species as well as in humans. However, findings in rats, the most often used animal model, also demonstrated that this salt sensitivity was not uniform; some strains are salt sensitive, while other strains are salt resistant. Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure in humans is also not uniform; less than one-third of normotensive individuals and less than one-half of hypertensive individuals are salt sensitive. Of great importance are findings that excessive salt intake may damage target organs (cardiovascular system and kidneys) irrespective of arterial pressure. Together with an ever-growing consensus that sodium intake in acculturated societies is high, these findings also emphasize the need for reduction in salt intake. Therefore, the adverse cardiovascular and renal effects of salt continue to be a subject of intense study. Current data indicate that a reduction in salt intake should ameliorate, if not prevent, cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality, particularly among individuals with hypertension. PMID:21603444

Susic, Dinko; Fares, Hassan; Frohlich, Edward D.

2009-01-01

372

A look at statin cost-effectiveness in view of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol management guidelines.  

PubMed

The 2013 cholesterol management guidelines presented a major shift in recommendations on which patients at risk of cardiovascular disease should be treated and how to treat them. Implementation of the guidelines is estimated to increase substantially the number of people who would be eligible for statin therapy. As the medical community considers the broad population impact of the new cholesterol guidelines, the issue of cost-effectiveness plays a role. This review covers the basic fundamentals of cost-effectiveness analysis and summarizes the key cost-effectiveness studies that relate to the new cholesterol guidelines. PMID:25052768

Deańo, Roderick C; Pandya, Ankur; Jones, Erica C; Borden, William B

2014-09-01

373

A multifaceted strategy using mobile technology to assist rural primary healthcare doctors and frontline health workers in cardiovascular disease risk management: protocol for the SMARTHealth India cluster randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Blood Pressure related disease affected 118 million people in India in the year 2000; this figure will double by 2025. Around one in four adults in rural India have hypertension, and of those, only a minority are accessing appropriate care. Health systems in India face substantial challenges to meet these gaps in care, and innovative solutions are needed. Methods We hypothesise that a multifaceted intervention involving capacity strengthening of primary healthcare doctors and non-physician healthcare workers through use of a mobile device-based clinical decision support system will result in improved blood pressure control for individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular disease event when compared with usual healthcare. This intervention will be implemented as a stepped wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial in 18 primary health centres and 54 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh involving adults aged ?40 years at high cardiovascular disease event risk (approximately 15,000 people). Cardiovascular disease event risk will be calculated based on World Health Organisation/International Society of Hypertension’s region-specific risk charts. Cluster randomisation will occur at the level of the primary health centres. Outcome analyses will be conducted blinded to intervention allocation. Expected outcomes The primary study outcome is the difference in the proportion of people meeting guideline-recommended blood pressure targets in the intervention period vs. the control period. Secondary outcomes include mean reduction in blood pressure levels; change in other cardiovascular disease risk factors, including body mass index, current smoking, reported healthy eating habits, and reported physical activity levels; self-reported use of blood pressure and other cardiovascular medicines; quality of life (using the EQ-5D); and cardiovascular disease events (using hospitalisation data). Trial outcomes will be accompanied by detailed process and economic evaluations. Significance The findings are likely to inform policy on a scalable strategy to overcome entrenched inequities in access to effective healthcare for under-served populations in low and middle income country settings. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registry India CTRI/2013/06/003753. PMID:24274431

2013-01-01

374

[Guidelines on "pharmacotherapy of neurodegenerative dementia" : An update].  

PubMed

This article presents the evidence-based pharmacotherapeutic options for the most common forms of neurodegenerative dementia. The aim is to present the recommendations derived from the relevant studies on the neurological, psychiatric and geriatric practice of treatment for dementia patients. The text is derived from the 2009 guidelines of the German Society of Neurology (DGN, lead management: K. Fassbinder), the S3 guidelines of the DGN/German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGPPN, lead management: G. Deuschl and W. Maier) and the latest amendments of the European Federation of Neurological Societies/European Society of Neurology (EFNS-ENS, Sorbi et al. Eur J Neurol 19:1159-1179, 2012) guidelines. The forms of neurodegenerative dementia addressed are Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body dementia. Specific statements on the treatment of dementia in Parkinson's disease and vascular dementia can be found in separate guidelines. An analogous article on psychosocial interventions was recently published in Der Nervenarzt (Kurz, Nervenarzt 84:93-103, 2013). PMID:25476188

Fassbender, K; Frölich, L

2014-12-01

375

Guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To provide physicians and allied health care professionals with guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice. OPTIONS: The full range and quality of nonpharmacologic therapies available for the management of migraine. OUTCOMES: Improvement in the nonpharmacologic management of migraine. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The creation of the guidelines followed a needs assessment by members of the Canadian Headache Society and included a statement of objectives; development of guidelines by multidisciplinary working groups using information from literature reviews and other resources; comparison of alternative clinical pathways and description of how published data were analysed; definition of the level of evidence for data in each case; evaluation and revision of the guidelines at a consensus conference held in Ottawa on Oct. 27-29, 1995; redrafting and insertion of tables showing key variables and data from various studies and tables of data with recommendations; and reassessment by all conference participants. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Augmentation of the use of nonpharmacologic therapies for the acute and prophylactic management of migraine is likely to lead to substantial benefits in both human and economic terms. RECOMMENDATIONS: Both the avoidance of migraine trigger factors and the use of nonpharmacologic therapies have a part to play in overall migraine management. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of Canadian experts in neurology, emergency medicine, psychiatry, psychology and family medicine, and consumers. Previous guidelines did not exist. Field testing of the guidelines is in progress. PMID:9679487

Pryse-Phillips, W E; Dodick, D W; Edmeads, J G; Gawel, M J; Nelson, R F; Purdy, R A; Robinson, G; Stirling, D; Worthington, I

1998-01-01

376

Rectosigmoid Junction Coding Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Coding Guidelines Rectosigmoid Junction C199 Primary Site A tumor is classified as rectosigmoid when differentiation between rectum and sigmoid is not possible. A tumor is classified as rectal if • lower margin lies less than 16 cm from the anal

377

Thyroid Coding Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Coding Guidelines THYROID GLAND C739 Coding Hormone Therapy Code Hormone Therapy as 01 for follicular and/or papillary thyroid cancer when thyroid hormone therapy is given. Do not code replacement therapy as treatment unless the tumor is papillary

378

Lymphoma Coding Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Coding Guidelines LYMPHOMA M9590/3-M9738/3 See the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (DB) for more information and coding instructions. First Course of Therapy Do not code

379

CUNY International Travel Guidelines  

E-print Network

CUNY International Travel Guidelines Safety and Risk Management Approved by the Board of Trustees November 28, 2011 Revised May 7, 2014 #12;As best practices for the implementation and oversight of travel ......................................................................................................................................................1 2. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL DEFINED

Rosen, Jay

380

CUNY International Travel Guidelines  

E-print Network

CUNY International Travel Guidelines Safety and Risk Management Approved by the Board of Trustees November 28, 2011 Revised June 8, 2012 #12;As best practices for the implementation and oversight of travel...............................................................................................................................................................1 2. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL DEFINED

Dennehy, John

381

Curriculum Guidelines for Physiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guidelines developed by the Section on Physiology of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. Primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, and specific behavioral objectives are discussed. (MLW)

Journal of Dental Education, 1986

1986-01-01

382

Cardiovascular Research The University of Birmingham  

E-print Network

systemic cardiovascular and respiratory homeostasis in health and disease. The group consists of basic in diseases of metabolism including diabetes and metabolic syndrome; the impact upon cardiovascular regulationCardiovascular Research The University of Birmingham #12;2 Cardiovascular Sciences in Birmingham

Birmingham, University of

383

Brand Guidelines AUGUST | V . .  

E-print Network

Brand Guidelines AUGUST | V . . Brand Guidelines AUGUST | #12;1 Table of Contents . Overview . What is a Brand? How is it Used? . The UCI Brand 3.1 Core Idea 3.2 Positioning Statement 3.3 How We Do It 3.4 Brand Pillars 3.5 Who is UCI 3.5 Personality Attributes . UCI Brand Identity System 4.1 Core Elements 4

Rose, Michael R.

384

Support Guidelines.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource, created by Laura Wish Morgan, a prominent family law and child support attorney, is offered primarily as an aid to other attorneys "who wish to research the law of child support in general and child support guidelines in particular." The site features links to child support guidelines for each state and the District of Columbia, weekly overviews of current notable child support cases, monthly articles on current legal issues concerning child support, and a collection of related links.

385

Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

1999-01-01

386

Developing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines to Promote Healthy Diets and Lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the…

Albert, Janice L.; Samuda, Pauline M.; Molina, Veronika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

2007-01-01

387

The Marfan Syndrome. Fact Sheet [and] Physical Education and Activity Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of two brochures, the first explaining the Marfan Syndrome and a second providing guidelines for physical education and activity for people who have this syndrome are provided. The brochure on factual information about Marfan syndrome outlines the associated medical problems involving the cardiovascular system, the skeleton,…

National Marfan Foundation, Port Washington, NY.

388

Cardiovascular & Respiratory Modeling, Analysis & Control  

E-print Network

Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems: Modeling, Analysis & Control J. J. Batzel, F. Kappel, D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 1.7.3 Sensitivity analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 2 Respiratory Modeling 45 2.1 Respiratory Control Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 2.1.1 General features of respiration

Batzel, Jerry

389

Cardiovascular disease prevention in rural Nigeria in the context of a community based health insurance scheme: QUality Improvement Cardiovascular care Kwara-I (QUICK-I)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading contributor to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. Guidelines\\u000a for CVD prevention care in low resource settings have been developed but little information is available on strategies to\\u000a implement this care. A community health insurance program might be used to improve patients' access to care. The operational\\u000a research project \\

Marleen Hendriks; Lizzy Brewster; Ferdinand Wit; Oladimeji Akeem Bolarinwa; Aina Olufemi Odusola; William Redekop; Navin Bindraban; Albert Vollaard; Shade Alli; Peju Adenusi; Kayode Agbede; Tanimola Akande; Joep Lange; Constance Schultsz

2011-01-01

390

Cardiovascular benefits of exercise.  

PubMed

Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460-377 BC) wrote "in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one's strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise." Plato (427-347 BC) referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129-217 AD) penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22807642

Agarwal, Shashi K

2012-01-01

391

[Cardiovascular rehabilitation today].  

PubMed

The authors submit a clearly-arranged article summarizing the contemporary situation in cardiorehabilitation. They explain the term "cardiorehabilitation" as well as to whom it is assigned and who should put it in practise. It contains facts gathered from analysis of numerous randomized studies executed worldwide on thousands of patients. Benefits for various groups of patients are emphasized. The positive effect of cardiorehabilitation is proved by decrease of both morbidity and mortality, total as well as cardiovascular. The physical condition of patients, their weight, blood pressure, lipid profile, glycaemia and sensitivity to insuline, fibrinolytical activity are favourably influenced by cardiorehabilitation. It was observed that the ectopic activity of myocardium decreases, anginose attacks are reduced and that the consumption of oxygen after excercise rises. Among the other benefits may be counted lower occurrence of tumorous diseases, improved quality of life and minimalisation of depressions. There is given evidence that the risks of cardiorehabilitation are often overvalued. Positive effect of this treatment is proven, as well as the effect of the pharmacological or cathetrisation and surgical treatments. PMID:19227952

Karel, I; Skalická, H

2009-01-01

392

Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides structural and functional cardiovascular information with excellent soft tissue contrast. Real-time MRI can guide transcatheter cardiovascular interventions in large animal models, and may prove superior to x-ray and adjunct modalities for peripheral vascular, structural heart and cardiac electrophysiology applications. We describe technical considerations, pre-clinical work and early clinical studies in this emerging field. PMID:17662914

Raman, Venkatesh K.; Lederman, Robert J.

2008-01-01

393

Forgotten cardiovascular diseases in Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the global burden of cardiovascular disease is now carried by low and middle income countries. Unfortunately, many\\u000a of these regions are still grappling with poverty and infection-related cardiovascular diseases, such as endomyocardial fibrosis,\\u000a tuberculous pericarditis and rheumatic heart disease. In addition, Africa has its unique diseases that occur more commonly\\u000a in Africans as peripartum cardiomyopathy or, almost uniquely

Karen Sliwa; Ana Olga Mocumbi

2010-01-01

394

Cardiovascular physiology in space flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system have been studied since the first manned flights. In several instances, the results from these investigations have directly contradicted the predictions based on established models. Results suggest associations between space flight's effects on other organ systems and those on the cardiovascular system. Such findings provide new insights into normal human physiology. They must also be considered when planning for the safety and efficiency of space flight crewmembers.

Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

1991-01-01

395

Gaps between Global Guidelines and Local Practices in CKD-MBD  

PubMed Central

The term 'chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder' (CKD-MBD) is a new term that, in contrast to the old term 'renal osteodystrophy', implies a systemic syndrome associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This new terminology is in line with previous studies that show elevated serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. In order to improve outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD, many countries have developed clinical practice guidelines. Globally, the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines are the most commonly used. However, whether these global guidelines can be successfully implemented on a local level needs to be studied. Differences in medical care and social factors between countries may limit the generalizability of global guidelines. Reports from the Korean registry and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) suggest that many dialysis patients are not within the target ranges recommended by the KDOQI and KDIGO guidelines for serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH, suggesting gaps between global guidelines and local practices. Clinical studies with Korean CKD-MBD patients are necessary to compare Korean practices and outcomes to those suggested by global guidelines and to determine the target serum mineral levels associated with the best local outcomes. PMID:25606042

2014-01-01

396

Gaps between Global Guidelines and Local Practices in CKD-MBD.  

PubMed

The term 'chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder' (CKD-MBD) is a new term that, in contrast to the old term 'renal osteodystrophy', implies a systemic syndrome associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This new terminology is in line with previous studies that show elevated serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. In order to improve outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD, many countries have developed clinical practice guidelines. Globally, the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines are the most commonly used. However, whether these global guidelines can be successfully implemented on a local level needs to be studied. Differences in medical care and social factors between countries may limit the generalizability of global guidelines. Reports from the Korean registry and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) suggest that many dialysis patients are not within the target ranges recommended by the KDOQI and KDIGO guidelines for serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH, suggesting gaps between global guidelines and local practices. Clinical studies with Korean CKD-MBD patients are necessary to compare Korean practices and outcomes to those suggested by global guidelines and to determine the target serum mineral levels associated with the best local outcomes. PMID:25606042

Kim, Gheun-Ho

2014-12-01

397

[National Guidelines System: the Italian experience].  

PubMed

The Italian's experience of the guidelines development group is discussed through the evaluation of its ten years of activity. Focus is placed on the Italian guidelines working group organization and on the kind of documents developed. The horizontal architecture of the system and the several partnerships settled over time allowed the definition of a small coordinating group connected with a multitude of territorial stakeholders, such as scientific societies and local health units pertaining to the Italian National Health System. Different kinds of documents were produced, as adaptations of already existing guidelines elaborated by international institutions, short reviews addressing specific clinical issues and consensus conferences aimed at providing clinical governance on issues which lack on evidence. The steps needed to produce a high quality guideline are presented, considering and comparing all the different international experiences, to define and discuss a common and well-structured methodology, and to face the ethical and epistemological implications of each method. The multidisciplinary of the working groups, the importance of the active surveillance on conflicts of interests, the definition of a minimum set of rules to be followed during the whole activity and the transparency of all the steps are the milestones of the Italian experience. The lack of a continuous and stable source of funding and the subsequent instability of the central structure are endangering all the knowledge and the experience gained during these years of activity. It is therefore crucial to guarantee and safeguard the role of a national, independent and public institution in the supervision of the guidelines development process and the provision of clinical governance. PMID:24736962

Mele, Alfonso; D'Angelo, Franca; Della Seta, Maurella; Lacorte, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Paola; Morciano, Cristina; De Masi, Salvatore

2014-01-01

398

Assessment of Patients with a DePuy ASR Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacement: Results of Applying the Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery in a Tertiary Referral Hospital  

PubMed Central

The prognosis associated with the DePuy ASR hip cup is poor and varies according to the series. This implant was withdrawn from use in 2010 and all patients needed to be assessed. We present the results of the assessment of our patients treated with this device, according to the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery (SECCA) algorithm published in 2011. This retrospective study evaluates 83 consecutive ASR cups, followed up at a mean of 2.9 years. Serum levels of chromium and cobalt, as well as the acetabular abduction angle, were determined in order to assess their possible correlation with failure, defined as the need for revision surgery. The mean Harris Hip Score was 83.2 (range 42–97). Eight arthroplasties (13.3%) required revision due to persistent pain and/or elevated serum levels of chromium/cobalt. All the cups had a correct abduction angle, and there was no correlation between elevated serum levels of metal ions and implant failure. Since two previous ASR implants were exchanged previously to the recall, the revision rate for ASR cups in our centre is 18.2% at 2.9 years. PMID:25431677

Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Ramiro, Sebastián Garcia; Combalía, Andrés; Riba, Josep

2014-01-01

399

Advancing the future of physical activity guidelines in Canada: an independent expert panel interpretation of the evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada, has initiated a review of their physical activity guidelines to promote healthy active living for Canadian children, youth, adults and older adults; previous guidelines were released in 2002, 2002, 1998 and 1999 respectively. Several background papers from this project were published recently and provide foundation

Antero Kesäniemi; Chris J Riddoch; Bruce Reeder; Steven N Blair; Thorkild IA Sřrensen

2010-01-01

400

Pharmacoeconomics guidelines: The need of hour for India  

PubMed Central

Although the government pays for approximately 20% of drugs used in India, private out-of-pocket expenditure in India on health-care is one of the highest in the world. Preparing pharmacoeconomics guidelines will be an important step in order to establish Health Technology Assessment (HTA) in India. Areas in which HTA could be applied in the Indian context include, drug pricing, development of clinical practice guidelines and prioritizing interventions that represent the greatest value within a limited budget. All this calls for action, both by government and civil-society organizations, to make access to essential medicines a priority. PMID:25126523

Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Oberoi, Avneet

2014-01-01

401

IOM and DHHS Meeting on Making Clinical Practice Guidelines Appropriate for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND The increasing prevalence of Americans with multiple (2 or more) chronic conditions raises concerns about the appropriateness and applicability of clinical practice guidelines for patient management. Most guidelines clinicians currently rely on have been designed with a single chronic condition in mind, and many such guidelines are inattentive to issues related to comorbidities. PURPOSE In response to the need for guideline developers to address comorbidities in guidelines, the Department of Health and Human Services convened a meeting in May 2012 in partnership with the Institute of Medicine to identify principles and action options. RESULTS Eleven principles to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to the population with multiple chronic conditions were identified during the meeting. They are grouped into 3 interrelated categories: (1) principles intended to improve the stakeholder technical process for developing guidelines; (2) principles intended to strengthen content of guidelines in terms of multiple chronic conditions; and (3) principles intended to increase focus on patient-centered care. CONCLUSION This meeting built upon previously recommended actions by identifying additional principles and options for government, guideline developers, and others to use in strengthening the applicability of clinical practice guidelines to the growing population of people with multiple chronic conditions. The suggested principles are helping professional societies to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to persons with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:24821897

Goodman, Richard A.; Boyd, Cynthia; Tinetti, Mary E.; Von Kohorn, Isabelle; Parekh, Anand K.; McGinnis, J. Michael

2014-01-01

402

Cardiovascular Risk Reduction. The Problems Facing Our Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Continued and expanded efforts to educate people as to what factors contribute to coronary heart disease will help to decrease its occurrence. Risk factors include: cholesterol, smoking, hypertension, obesity, heredity, psychological influences, and the taking of oral contraceptives or alcohol. (CJ)

Harrison, Donald C.; Winston, Mary

1982-01-01

403

Impact of lipid-lowering therapy on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia in patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events in UK primary care – a retrospective database study  

PubMed Central

Aims To estimate the prevalence of dyslipidaemias in high-risk patients new to lipid-modifying therapy (LMT), and establish the extent to which these lipid abnormalities are addressed by treatment in UK clinical practice. Methods The PRIMULA study was a retrospective analysis, conducted using the UK General Practice Research Database. Two periods were studied as follows: a pretreatment period, defined as the 12 months before initiation of LMT (the index date), and a follow-up period of at least 12 months. Patients included in the study (n = 25,011) had dyslipidaemia with at least one abnormal lipid measurement [total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or triglycerides (TG)] in the pretreatment period. All patients were at high risk of cardiovascular events, which was defined as having a history of cardiovascular disease, a 10-year Framingham risk score higher than 20%, diabetes or hypertension, as defined by the Joint British Societies 2 guidelines. Results At the index date, 98% of patients were initiated on statin monotherapy. After 12 months of treatment, 15.2% (sub-group range: 11.0–22.9%) of all high-risk patients had no lipid abnormalities. The proportions of patients with high TC or LDL-C levels decreased from 98.8% to 68.9%, and from 99.2% to 68.7%, respectively, over 12 months. The prevalence of high TG levels decreased from 45.0% to 26.9%, whereas that of low HDL-C levels increased, from 16.6% to 18.0%. Risk factors for cardiovascular events were not consistently associated with the likelihood of attaining optimal lipid levels. Conclusions Despite widespread use of statins, many individuals at high risk of cardiovascular events have persistently abnormal lipid levels, with over two-thirds of patients not achieving target levels of LDL-C or TC. Management of dyslipidaemia is therefore suboptimal in this important high-risk group in UK standard practice. PMID:23944233

Jameson, K; Amber, V; D’Oca, K; Mills, D; Giles, A; Ambegaonkar, B

2013-01-01

404

Cardiovascular Disease Self-Care Interventions  

PubMed Central

Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of increased morbidity and mortality globally. Clinical practice guidelines recommend that individuals with CVD are routinely instructed to engage in self-care including diet restrictions, medication adherence, and symptom monitoring. Objectives. To describe the nature of nurse-led CVD self-care interventions, identify limitations in current nurse-led CVD self-care interventions, and make recommendations for addressing them in future research. Design. Integrative review of nurse-led CVD self-care intervention studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and CINAHL. Primary studies (n = 34) that met the inclusion criteria of nurse-led RCT or quasiexperimental CVD self-care intervention studies (years 2000 to 2012) were retained and appraised. Quality of the review was assured by having at least two reviewers screen and extract all data. Results. A variety of self-care intervention strategies were studied among the male (57%) and Caucasian (67%) dominated samples. Combined interventions were common, and quality of life was the most frequent outcome evaluated. Effectiveness of interventions was inconclusive, and in general results were not sustained over time. Conclusions. Research is needed to develop and test tailored and inclusive CVD self-care interventions. Attention to rigorous study designs and methods including consistent outcomes and measurement is essential. PMID:24223305

Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Yoon, Hye-Won; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Chyun, Deborah

2013-01-01

405

Pharmacogenetics and Cardiovascular Disease—Implications for Personalized Medicine  

PubMed Central

The past decade has seen tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetic factors influencing response to a variety of drugs, including those targeted at treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the case of clopidogrel, warfarin, and statins, the literature has become sufficiently strong that guidelines are now available describing the use of genetic information to guide treatment with these therapies, and some health centers are using this information in the care of their patients. There are many challenges in moving from research data to translation to practice; we discuss some of these barriers and the approaches some health systems are taking to overcome them. The body of literature that has led to the clinical implementation of CYP2C19 genotyping for clopidogrel, VKORC1, CYP2C9; and CYP4F2 for warfarin; and SLCO1B1 for statins is comprehensively described. We also provide clarity for other genes that have been extensively studied relative to these drugs, but for which the data are conflicting. Finally, we comment briefly on pharmacogenetics of other cardiovascular drugs and highlight ?-blockers as the drug class with strong data that has not yet seen clinical implementation. It is anticipated that genetic information will increasingly be available on patients, and it is important to identify those examples where the evidence is sufficiently robust and predictive to use genetic information to guide clinical decisions. The review herein provides several examples of the accumulation of evidence and eventual clinical translation in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics. PMID:23686351

Cavallari, Larisa H.

2013-01-01

406

Developing clinical practice guidelines: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and accounting for comorbid conditions in guideline development  

PubMed Central

Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this third paper we discuss the issues of: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the two emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and how guideline developers should approach dealing with the issue of patients who will be the subject of guidelines having co-morbid conditions. PMID:22762242

2012-01-01

407

Tsunami Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site assists the international Tsunami Society in its mission to distribute "knowledge about tsunamis to scientists, officials, and the public." In the first section of the site, scientists can download articles from the 2002 and 2003 issues of the journal Science of Tsunami Hazards. Visitors can also view footage from tsunamis around the world. The second section of the site discusses the details of the society including its origin, award recipients, and symposiums.

408

Guidelines for Project Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

Ben-Arieh, David

2001-01-01

409

Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.  

PubMed

A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human i