Sample records for cardiovascular society guidelines

  1. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    PubMed Central

    Hundley, W Gregory; Bluemke, David; Bogaert, Jan G; Friedrich, Matthias G; Higgins, Charles B; Lawson, Mark A; McConnell, Michael V; Raman, Subha V; van Rossum, Albert C; Flamm, Scott; Kramer, Christopher M; Nagel, Eike; Neubauer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations. PMID:19257889

  2. [Perioperative evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular risk patients for noncardiac surgery : Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology/European Society of Anaesthesiology 2014].

    PubMed

    Grossmann, E; Ninke, T; Probst, S; Kaisers, U X

    2015-04-01

    In late summer 2014, the joint working group of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) presented new guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular risk patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. In addition to the preoperative collation of patient and intervention-specific risks, the guidelines deal with anaesthesiological and cardiological aspects of the perioperative management of patients with diseases of the heart and common comorbidities. This article summarizes the essential aspects of the guidelines in a clearly arranged form. PMID:25701066

  3. The 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Focus Update: anemia, biomarkers, and recent therapeutic trial implications.

    PubMed

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Lepage, Serge; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Koshman, Sheri L; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Chan, Michael; De, Sabe; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides discussion on the management recommendations on 3 focused areas: (1) anemia; (2) biomarkers, especially natriuretic peptides; and (3) clinical trials that might change practice in the management of patients with heart failure. First, all patients with heart failure and anemia should be investigated for reversible causes of anemia. Second, patients with chronic stable heart failure should undergo natriuretic peptide testing. Third, considerations should be given to treat selected patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist and to treat patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction with an angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor, when the drug is approved. As with updates in previous years, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2014 Update includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers to best manage patients with heart failure. PMID:25532421

  4. The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update: focus on rehabilitation and exercise and surgical coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve E; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert S; Nigam, Anil; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Van Le, Vy; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides focused discussions on the management recommendations on 2 topics: (1) exercise and rehabilitation; and (2) surgical coronary revascularization in patients with heart failure. First, all patients with stable New York Heart Association class I-III symptoms should be considered for enrollment in a tailored exercise training program, to improve exercise tolerance and quality of life. Second, selected patients with suitable coronary anatomy should be considered for bypass graft surgery. As in previous updates, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2013 Update also includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers manage their patients with heart failure. PMID:24480445

  5. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Paul F; Lougheed, Jane; Dancea, Adrian; McGillion, Michael; Barbosa, Nicole; Chan, Carol; Dillenburg, Rejane; Atallah, Joseph; Buchholz, Holger; Chant-Gambacort, Catherine; Conway, Jennifer; Gardin, Letizia; George, Kristen; Greenway, Steven; Human, Derek G; Jeewa, Aamir; Price, Jack F; Ross, Robert D; Roche, S Lucy; Ryerson, Lindsay; Soni, Reeni; Wilson, Judith; Wong, Kenny

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric heart failure (HF) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. This article presents guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis, and early medical management of HF in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The guidelines are intended to assist practitioners in office-based or emergency room practice, who encounter children with undiagnosed heart disease and symptoms of possible HF, rather than those who have already received surgical palliation. The guidelines have been developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and are accompanied by practical Recommendations for their application in the clinical setting, supplemented by online material. This work does not include Recommendations for advanced management involving ventricular assist devices, or other device therapies. PMID:24267800

  6. Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes in Patients at Metabolic Risk: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Rosenzweig; Ele Ferrannini; Scott M. Grundy; Steven M. Haffner; Robert J. Heine; Edward S. Horton; Ryuzo Kawamori

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to develop clinical practice guidelines for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients at metabolic risk. Conclusions: Healthcare providers should incorporate into their practice concrete measures to reduce the risk of developing CVD and T2DM. These include the regular screening and identifi- cation of patients at metabolic risk

  7. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and management of heart failure update: Heart failure in ethnic minority populations, heart failure and pregnancy, disease management, and quality improvement/assurance programs

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Costigan, Jeannine; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Kori; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; O’Meara, Eileen; Rajda, Miroslav; Siu, Samuel; Stolee, Paul; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Zeiroth, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure (HF) guidelines have published annual focused updates for cardiovascular care providers. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF guidelines update focuses on an increasing issue in the western world – HF in ethnic minorities – and in an uncommon but important setting – the pregnant patient. Additionally, due to increasing attention recently given to the assessment of how care is delivered and measured, two critically important topics – disease management programs in HF and quality assurance – have been included. Both of these topics were written from a clinical perspective. It is hoped that the present update will become a useful tool for health care providers and planners in the ongoing evolution of care for HF patients in Canada. PMID:20386768

  8. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

  9. National osteoporosis society vitamin D guideline summary.

    PubMed

    Aspray, Terry J; Bowring, Claire; Fraser, William; Gittoes, Neil; Javaid, M Kassim; Macdonald, Helen; Patel, Sanjeev; Selby, Peter; Tanna, Nuttan; Francis, Roger M

    2014-09-01

    The National Osteoporosis Society (NOS) published its document, Vitamin D and Bone Health: A Practical Clinical Guideline for Patient Management, in 2013 as a practical clinical guideline on the management of vitamin D deficiency in adult patients with, or at risk of developing, bone disease. There has been no clear consensus in the UK on vitamin D deficiency its assessment and treatment, and clinical practice is inconsistent. This guideline is aimed at clinicians, including doctors, nurses and dieticians. It recommends the measurement of serum 25 (OH) vitamin D (25OHD) to estimate vitamin D status in the following clinical scenarios: bone diseases that may be improved with vitamin D treatment; bone diseases, prior to specific treatment where correcting vitamin D deficiency is appropriate; musculoskeletal symptoms that could be attributed to vitamin D deficiency. The guideline also states that routine vitamin D testing is unnecessary where vitamin D supplementation with an oral antiresorptive treatment is already planned and sets the following serum 25OHD thresholds: <30 nmol/l is deficient; 30-50 nmol/l may be inadequate in some people; >50 nmol/l is sufficient for almost the whole population. For treatment, oral vitamin D3 is recommended with fixed loading doses of oral vitamin D3 followed by regular maintenance therapy when rapid correction of vitamin D deficiency is required, although loading doses are not necessary where correction of deficiency is less urgent or when co-prescribing with an oral antiresorptive agent. For monitoring, serum calcium (adjusted for albumin) should be checked 1 month after completing a loading regimen, or after starting vitamin D supplementation, in case primary hyperparathyroidism has been unmasked. However, routine monitoring of serum 25OHD is generally unnecessary but may be appropriate in patients with symptomatic vitamin D deficiency or malabsorption and where poor compliance with medication is suspected. The guideline focuses on bone health as, although there are numerous putative effects of vitamin D on immunity modulation, cancer prevention and the risks of cardiovascular disease and multiple sclerosis, there remains considerable debate about the evaluation of extraskeletal factors and optimal vitamin D status in these circumstances. PMID:25074538

  10. Society of Hair Testing guidelines for drug testing in hair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail A. A. Cooper; Robert Kronstrand; Pascal Kintz

    The Society of Hair Testing (SoHT) Guidelines for Drug Testing in Hair provide laboratories with recommended best practice guidelines whether they are currently offering drug testing in hair, or plan to offer a hair testing service in the future. The guidelines include reference to recommended sample collection and storage procedures, through sample preparation, pre-treatment and analysis and the use of

  11. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure – 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:18209766

  12. Educational Toward a cardiovascular pathology training Report on the forum held in Vancouver, March 6, 2004, Society for Cardiovascular Pathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaetano Thienea; Anton E. Beckerb; L. Maximilian Bujac; John T. Fallond; Bruce M. McManuse; Frederick J. Schoenf; Gayle L. Wintersf

    Cardiovascular pathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology that requires both clinical education and expertise in contemporary physiopathology. The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology sponsored a special workshop within the frame of the USCAP Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, March 6-12, 2004, to address the present and future role of cardiovascular pathology in research, clinical care, and education. Clearly, the recruitment

  13. Following ergonomics guidelines decreases physical and cardiovascular workload during cleaning tasks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Afshin Samani; Andreas Holtermann; Karen Søgaard; Pascal Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of ergonomics guidelines on muscular activity, postural and cardiovascular load during cleaning. Eighteen cleaners performed 10 min of cleaning tasks in two locations; three min in a laboratory and seven min in a lecture room. All participants performed the task with or without focusing on ergonomics guidelines (ergonomics\\/non-ergonomics session). Bipolar surface electromyography was recorded

  14. [Cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. An anamnestic guideline].

    PubMed

    Dalla Pozza, R

    2013-04-01

    Being overweight in childhood causes several cardiovascular risk factors which in turn contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis. Being overweight itself represents a risk factor, but also contributes to an increased prevalence of arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Thus, cardiovascular prevention should be included in the management of obese children. Most of all, therapy of adiposity should be performed, as weight reduction and increased fitness represent protective factors. Moreover, a detailed cardiovascular workup and therapy of secondary vascular disease must also be performed. Subclinical changes at the level of the endothelium may be diagnosed using modern imaging techniques such as the measurement of the intima-media thickness of the carotid artery. In general, the overweight child should be considered as a future patient with vascular disease! The following article focuses on the prevalence, diagnostics and therapeutic options in the cardiovascular management of overweight children. PMID:23529592

  15. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  16. [New recommendations in European cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines (Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care 2000: an International Consensus on Science].

    PubMed

    Jakubaszko, Juliusz; Smereka, Jacek; Sehn, Marek

    2002-01-01

    The article presents most important changes in international guidelines for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In this article guideline changes in basic and advanced life support published in Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care--a Consensus on Science are discussed. Major changes in guidelines presented in this article include: pulse check, ventilation technique for rescue breathing, compression technique, abdominal thrust recommendations, precordial thump, universal algorithm changes. PMID:12715725

  17. British Thoracic Society community acquired pneumonia guideline and the NICE pneumonia guideline: how they fit together

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W S; Smith, D L; Wise, M P; Welham, S A

    2015-01-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) guideline for the management of adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) published in 2009 was compared with the 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Pneumonia Guideline. Of the 36 BTS recommendations that overlapped with NICE recommendations, no major differences were found in 31, including those covering key aspects of CAP management: timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, severity assessment and empirical antibiotic choice. Of the five BTS recommendations where major differences with NICE were identified, one related to antibiotic duration in low and moderate severity CAP, two to the timing of review of patients and two to legionella urinary antigen testing. PMID:26019876

  18. British Thoracic Society community acquired pneumonia guideline and the NICE pneumonia guideline: how they fit together

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W S; Smith, D L; Wise, M P; Welham, S A

    2015-01-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) guideline for the management of adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) published in 2009 was compared with the 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Pneumonia Guideline. Of the 36 BTS recommendations that overlapped with NICE recommendations, no major differences were found in 31, including those covering key aspects of CAP management: timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, severity assessment and empirical antibiotic choice. Of the five BTS recommendations where major differences with NICE were identified, one related to antibiotic duration in low and moderate severity CAP, two to the timing of review of patients and two to legionella urinary antigen testing. PMID:25977290

  19. Home mechanical ventilation: a Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Cote, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, Fracois; Morrison, Debra L; O'Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of userfriendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information. PMID:22059178

  20. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics. PMID:25825221

  1. [Statement of the Spanish Interdisciplinary Cardiovascular Prevention Committee (CEIPC for its Spanish acronym) on the 2012 European Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Angel; Lobos Bejarano, José María; Villar Alvarez, Fernando; Sans, Susana; Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Moreno Carriles, Rosa María; Maiques, Antonio; Lizcano, Angel; Lizarbe, Vicenta; Gil Núñez, Antonio; Fornés Ubeda, Francisco; Elosua, Roberto; de Santiago Nocito, Ana; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; de Álvaro Moreno, Fernando; Cortés, Olga; Cordero, Alberto; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Armario, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Based on the two main frameworks for evaluating scientific evidence (SEC and GRADE) European cardiovascular prevention guidelines recommend interventions across all life stages using a combination of population-based and high-risk strategies with diet as the cornerstone of prevention. The evaluation of cardiovascular risk (CVR) incorporates HDL levels and psychosocial factors, a very high risk category, and the concept of age-risk. They also recommend cognitive-behavioural methods (e.g., motivational interviewing, psychological interventions) led by health professionals and with the participation of the patient's family, to counterbalance psychosocial stress and reduce CVR through the institution of positive habits such as a healthy diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and adherence to treatment. Additionally, public health interventions - such as smoking ban in public areas or the elimination of trans fatty acids from the food chain - are also essential. Other innovations include abandoning antiplatelet therapy in primary prevention and the recommendation of maintaining blood pressure within the 130-139/80-85mmHg range in diabetic patients and individuals with high CVR. Finally, due to the significant impact on patient progress and medical costs, special emphasis is given to the low therapeutic adherence levels observed. In sum, improving cardiovascular prevention requires a true partnership among the political class, public administrations, scientific and professional associations, health foundations, consumer associations, patients and their families. Such partnership would promote population-based and individual strategies by taking advantage of the broad spectrum of scientific evidence available, from clinical trials to observational studies and mathematical models to evaluate population-based interventions, including cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:23726872

  2. British Thoracic Society guidelines for home oxygen use in adults.

    PubMed

    Hardinge, Maxine; Annandale, Joe; Bourne, Simon; Cooper, Brendan; Evans, Angela; Freeman, Daryl; Green, Angela; Hippolyte, Sabrine; Knowles, Vikki; MacNee, William; McDonnell, Lynn; Pye, Kathy; Suntharalingam, Jay; Vora, Vandana; Wilkinson, Tom

    2015-06-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) Home Oxygen Guideline provides detailed evidence-based guidance for the use of home oxygen for patients out of hospital. Although the majority of evidence comes from the use of oxygen in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the scope of the guidance includes patients with a variety of long-term respiratory illnesses and other groups in whom oxygen is currently ordered, such as those with cardiac failure, cancer and end-stage cardiorespiratory disease, terminal illness or cluster headache. It explores the evidence base for the use of different modalities of oxygen therapy and patient-related outcomes such as mortality, symptoms and quality of life. The guideline also makes recommendations for assessment and follow-up protocols, and risk assessments, particularly in the clinically challenging area of home oxygen users who smoke. The guideline development group is aware of the potential for confusion sometimes caused by the current nomenclature for different types of home oxygen, and rather than renaming them, has adopted the approach of clarifying those definitions, and in particular emphasising what is meant by long-term oxygen therapy and palliative oxygen therapy. The home oxygen guideline provides expert consensus opinion in areas where clinical evidence is lacking, and seeks to deliver improved prescribing practice, leading to improved compliance and improved patient outcomes, with consequent increased value to the health service. PMID:25870317

  3. Implementation of the Canadian Paediatric Society’s hyperbilirubinemia guidelines: A survey of Ontario hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Elizabeth Kathleen; Guttmann, Astrid; Sprague, Ann E; Ramsay, Timothy; Walker, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2007, the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) published guidelines aimed at preventing severe hyperbilirubinemia. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether hospitals had implemented these guidelines; to investigate how guideline-recommended care is organized; and to understand the factors influencing guideline implementation. METHODS: The present study was an online survey conducted from December 2011 to May 2012 of all Ontario hospitals offering maternal-newborn services. RESULTS: A total of 97 of 100 eligible hospitals responded. Seventy-seven of the 97 (79%) respondents reported having implemented universal neonatal bilirubin screening. Among these hospitals, hospital-based postdischarge follow-up was reported more frequently than follow-up at community-based locations: hospital laboratory (n=40 [52%]), mother-baby care unit (n=32 [42%]), outpatient clinic (n=25 [33%]), primary care provider in community (n=19 [25%]) and community laboratory (n=8 [10%]). The CPS guidelines were the most frequently reported factor influencing implementation (n=74 [96%]). DISCUSSION: The survey provides valuable insight into the impact of a complex guideline in Canada’s largest province. There was heterogeneity in how hospitals organized services, but there was a notable trend toward hospital-based postdischarge care. The shift to hospital-based care runs counter to current health policy directions and highlights the lack of integration among health care sectors. CONCLUSION: The majority of Ontario hospitals implemented universal bilirubin screening following the release of the CPS guidelines. Further analysis is needed to determine the impact that the guidelines and the differences in implementation have had on clinical outcomes and the utilization of health services. PMID:24665223

  4. Overview of Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging and Procedures for Clinicians: Focus on Appropriate-Use-Criteria Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stainback, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging and procedures have experienced exponential growth over the past 20 years in terms of new modalities, procedure volume, technological sophistication, and cost. As a result, related quality improvement tools have become multifaceted works in progress. This article briefly summarizes the evolution of the time-honored American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines versus the newer American College of Cardiology Foundation appropriate-use-criteria guidelines and how these may interact with emerging performance measures, clinical data registries, and cardiovascular laboratory accreditation initiatives. PMID:25574346

  5. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

  6. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future. PMID:20529367

  7. Fostering diffusion of scientific contents of National Society Cardiovascular Journals: The new ESC search engine.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Gonçalves, Lino; Pinto, Fausto; Timmis, Adam; Ector, Hugo; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Vardas, Panos

    2015-05-01

    European Society of Cardiology (ESC) National Society Cardiovascular Journals (NSCJs) are high-quality biomedical journals focused on cardiovascular diseases. The Editors' Network of the ESC devises editorial initiatives aimed at improving the scientific quality and diffusion of NSCJ. In this article we will discuss on the importance of the Internet, electronic editions and open access strategies on scientific publishing. Finally, we will propose a new editorial initiative based on a novel electronic tool on the ESC web-page that may further help to increase the dissemination of contents and visibility of NSCJs. PMID:26062994

  8. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker; Douglas, Pamela S; Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Altus, Philip; Barnard, Denise D; Blankenship, James C; Casey, Donald E; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Gilchrist, Ian C; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lakoski, Susan G; Le, D Elizabeth; Lesser, John R; Levine, Glenn N; Mehran, Roxana; Russo, Andrea M; Sorrentino, Matthew J; Williams, Mathew R; Wong, John B; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22678595

  9. Evaluation and management of the atrial fibrillation patient: a report from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Beckley, Philip D; Deering, Thomas F; Clark, Carol L; Amin, Alpesh N; Bauer, Kenneth A; Cryer, Byron; Mansour, Moussa; Scheiman, James M; Zenati, Marco A; Newby, L Kristin; Peacock, W Frank; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, and its prevalence is growing. The care of patients with AF is complex and involves multiple specialties and venues of care. Guideline recommendations are available for AF therapy; however, their implementation can be challenging. The Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care has developed an accreditation program, formulated by an expert committee on AF. Accreditation is based on specific criteria in 7 domains: (1) community outreach, (2) prehospital care, (3) early stabilization, (4) acute care, (5) transitions of care, (6) clinical quality measures, and (7) governance. This document presents the rationale, discussion, and supporting evidence for these criteria, in an effort to maximize effective and efficient AF care. PMID:23892939

  10. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis: an electronic guideline implementability appraisal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lotte JEW van Dijk; Willianne LDM Nelen; Thomas M D’Hooghe; Gerard AJ Dunselman; Rosella PMG Hermens; Christina Bergh; Karl G Nygren; Arnold HM Simons; Petra de Sutter; Catherine Marshall; Jako S Burgers; Jan AM Kremer

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are intended to improve healthcare. However, even if guidelines are excellent, their implementation is not assured. In subfertility care, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guidelines have been inventoried, and their methodological quality has been assessed. To improve the impact of the ESHRE guidelines and to improve European subfertility care, it is important to

  11. Guideline-driven telemonitoring and follow-up of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices using IEEE 11073, HL7 & IHE profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maohua Yang; Catherine E. Chronaki; Christian Lupkes; Andreas Thiel; Manuela Plosnig; Lynne Hinterbuchner; Elena Arbelo; Gokce Banu Laleci; Yildiray Kabak; Fernandez Duarte; Alejandra Guillen; Xavier Navarro; Asuman Dogac; Marco Eichelberg; Andreas Hein

    2011-01-01

    For patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs), telemonitoring promises improved quality of life and safety, since events recorded by the device or observed by the patient can alert a health professional. Taking into account the latest clinical guidelines when responding to such alerts, is a topic of active research addressed by the iCARDEA project. A key technical challenge is

  12. Clinical guideline for pharmacological management of cancer pain: the Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine recommendations.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Shima, Yasuo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hosoya, Miki; Matoba, Motohiro

    2013-09-01

    Pain is the most frequent and distressing symptom in cancer patients. As part of a worldwide effort to improve the quality of pain control, several clinical guidelines for the management of cancer pain have been published and revised in the last decade. The Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine first published a Japanese clinical guideline for the management of cancer pain in 2000. Since then, many clinical studies concerning cancer pain management have been conducted, new drugs have become available in Japan and the methodology of developing a guideline has been refined. Therefore, we decided to develop a novel clinical guideline. This review paper summarizes the recommendations and the rationales of this new clinical guideline for the pharmacological management of cancer pain. In addition, a short summary of the clinical guideline development process is provided. This new Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine guideline highlights the importance of conducting well-designed studies to identify the best practices in cancer pain management. PMID:23885114

  13. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: from evidence to clinical practice – position statement 2014 of Brazilian Diabetes Society

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a very well known correlation between diabetes and cardiovascular disease but many health care professionals are just concerned with glycemic control, ignoring the paramount importance of controlling other risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of serious cardiovascular diseases. This Position Statement from the Brazilian Diabetes Society was developed to promote increased awareness in relation to six crucial topics dealing with diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Glicemic Control, Cardiovascular Risk Stratification and Screening Coronary Artery Disease, Treatment of Dyslipidemia, Hypertension, Antiplatelet Therapy and Myocardial Revascularization. The issue of what would be the best algorithm for the use of statins in diabetic patients received a special attention and a new Brazilian algorithm was developed by our editorial committee. This document contains 38 recommendations which were classified by their levels of evidence (A, B, C and D). The Editorial Committee included 22 specialists with recognized expertise in diabetes and cardiology. PMID:24855495

  14. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debbie Saslow; Carla Boetes; Wylie Burke; Steven Harms; Martin O. Leach; Constance D. Lehman; Elizabeth Morris; Etta Pisano; Mitchell Schnall; Stephen Sener; Robert A. Smith; Ellen Warner; Martin Yaffe; Kimberly S. Andrews; Christy A. Russell

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at different defined levels of risk. Screening MRI is recommended for women with an approximately 20-25% or

  15. Interventional radiology for critical hemorrhage in obstetrics: Japanese Society of Interventional Radiology (JSIR) procedural guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Woodhams, Reiko; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Hiraki, Takao; Yoshimatsu, Misako; Hyodoh, Hideki; Kubo, Takahiko; Takeda, Satoru; Minakami, Hisanori

    2015-04-01

    There has been an increasing demand for interventional radiology (IR) procedures for the treatment of severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) (also called critical hemorrhage in obstetrics). The Japanese Society of Interventional Radiology Guideline Committee developed the practical guidelines for IR procedures for severe PPH using evidence-based methodology. This article aimed to describe the rationale for developing these guidelines and to provide the answers for clinical questions about IR procedures consisting of current available evidence and the consensus among experts. PMID:25694338

  16. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352139

  17. British Thoracic Society guideline for non-CFbronchiectasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Pasteur; D. Bilton; A. T. Hill

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis, investigation and particularly management of bronchiectasis has been largely empirical and the subject of relatively few controlled clinical trials. There are no clear guidelines, although an Australian position statement has been published concerning bronchiectasis in children. The purposes of these guidelines were therefore threefold: (1) to identify relevant studies in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis; (2) to provide guidelines

  18. Canadian Thoracic Society: Presenting a new process for clinical practice guideline production

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Bhattacharyya, Onil K; Brouwers, Melissa C; Estey, Elizabeth A; Harrison, Margaret B; Hernandez, Paul; Palda, Valerie A; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    A key mandate of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is to promote evidence-based respiratory care through clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). To improve the quality and validity of the production, dissemination and implementation of its CPGs, the CTS has revised its guideline process and has created the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee to oversee this process. The present document outlines the basic methodological tools and principles of the new CTS guideline production process. Important features include standard methods for choosing and formulating optimal questions and for finding, appraising, and summarizing the evidence; use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system for rating the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations; use of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation instrument for quality control during and after guideline development and for appraisal of other guidelines; use of the ADAPTE process for adaptation of existing guidelines to the local context; and use of the GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool to augment implementability of guidelines. The CTS has also committed to develop guidelines in new areas, an annual guideline review cycle, and a new formal process for dissemination and implementation. Ultimately, it is anticipated that these changes will have a significant impact on the quality of care and clinical outcomes of individuals suffering from respiratory diseases across Canada. PMID:20011719

  19. Diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the Swiss guidelines. Official guidelines of the Swiss Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Russi, E W; Karrer, W; Brutsche, M; Eich, C; Fitting, J W; Frey, M; Geiser, T; Kuhn, M; Nicod, L; Quadri, F; Rochat, T; Steurer-Stey, C; Stolz, D

    2013-01-01

    The new Swiss Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Guidelines are based on a previous version, which was published 10 years ago. The Swiss Respiratory Society felt the need to update the previous document due to new knowledge and novel therapeutic developments about this prevalent and important disease. The recommendations and statements are based on the available literature, on other national guidelines and, in particular, on the GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) report. Our aim is to advise pulmonary physicians, general practitioners and other health care workers on the early detection and diagnosis, prevention, best symptomatic control, and avoidance of COPD as well as its complications and deterioration. PMID:23406723

  20. Doctors’ knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Sajita; Fung, Selwyn Sze-Wang; Waters, David D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is an unmet need for strategies to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore. The main objective of this study was to investigate Singapore physicians’ response to the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for treatment of cholesterol and their impact on clinical practice. Methods This survey was conducted in two stages, qualitative and quantitative. Physicians were initially screened on the basis of an initial screener questionnaire, and eligible physicians were then included in the study. Results Qualitative (n=19) and quantitative (n=66) surveys were completed by eligible physicians from Singapore. Physicians were less familiar with the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines (35%) as compared with the Singapore Ministry of Health (MoH) lipid guidelines 2006 (49%). Of the physicians whose opinion was sought on the ACC/AHA guidelines, more than 50% disagreed with the definition of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy; recommendation of atorvastatin 40–80 mg and rosuvastatin 20–40 mg as medications for high-intensity statin therapy; and classification of individuals who would benefit from moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy. Most physicians assumed that Asians may be intolerant to high-intensity statin therapy. Conclusion Although embracing the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines in clinical practice is expected to provide better clinical care to patients, our study revealed high reluctance by physicians, especially in the use of high-dose statins. However, ACC/AHA guidelines can be easily adopted in Asia as there is a wealth of data available for atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with similar efficacy and safety profiles in the white and Asian populations.

  1. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William R; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Remote Environments published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(1):41-49. PMID:25498266

  2. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Andes; L. Ostrosky-Zeichner

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases and are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have or

  3. Cardiovascular Health, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Baman, Timir S.; Gupta, Sanjaya; Day, Sharlene M.

    2010-01-01

    Context: An athlete’s health may be endangered if he or she continues to compete after diagnosis of certain cardiovascular conditions. The most worrisome risk is sudden cardiac death; the annual rate in US athletes is 1 in 50 000 to 200 000. Evidence Acquisition: Part 2 of this review highlights the current guidelines and controversies surrounding compatibility of participation with a variety of cardiac conditions in competitive and recreational athletics. Data sources were limited to peer-reviewed publications from 1984 to the April 2009. Results: The guidelines published by the American College of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology provide a framework for safe competitive and recreational sports participation in athletes with a broad spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiovascular disorders. These guidelines are necessarily conservative because it is not currently possible to individualize risk prediction. Few data are available in many areas, particularly in the noncompetitive arena or in older athletes. Conclusions: Published national guidelines are currently the foundation governing return-to-play decisions in athletes with cardiovascular conditions. Further studies are needed to refine risk stratification algorithms to allow athletes with cardiovascular conditions to reap the health benefits of regular exercise and sports participation without undue risk. PMID:23015920

  4. Clinician-patient risk discussion for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease prevention: importance to implementation of the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seth S; Sperling, Laurence S; Blaha, Michael J; Wilson, Peter W F; Gluckman, Ty J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Stone, Neil J

    2015-04-01

    Successful implementation of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines hinges on a clear understanding of the clinician-patient risk discussion (CPRD). This is a dialogue between the clinician and patient about potential for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk reduction benefits, adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and patient preferences. Designed especially for primary prevention patients, this process of shared decision making establishes the appropriateness of a statin for a specific patient. CPRD respects the autonomy of an individual striving to make an informed choice aligned with personal values and preferences. Dedicating sufficient time to high-quality CPRD offers an opportunity to strengthen clinician-patient relationships, patient engagement, and medication adherence. We review the guideline-recommended CPRD, the general concept of shared decision making and decision aids, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Risk Estimator application as an implementation tool, and address potential barriers to implementation. PMID:25835448

  5. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-03-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:24462332

  6. The British Thoracic Society guidelines on the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David R; Callister, Matthew Ej

    2015-08-01

    The British Thoracic Society guideline for the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules is published as a supplement to this edition of the journal. It provides recommendations for the management of an individual with single or multiple pulmonary nodules and is a comprehensive reference text. PMID:26135833

  7. McMASTER UNIVERSITY Complete Policy Title: Guidelines for Student Societies Annual Financial Reporting

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    - Signed financial report for the prior year. If this documentation is received by October 1st , the feesMcMASTER UNIVERSITY Complete Policy Title: Guidelines for Student Societies Annual Financial Reporting Requirements Approved by: Director, of Finance Date of Most Recent Approval: January 31, 2007

  8. Management guidelines in essential hypertension: report of the second working party of the British Hypertension Society

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Sever; G Beevers; C Bulpitt; A Lever; L Ramsay; J Reid; J Swales

    1993-01-01

    Several important new issues have arisen in the management of patients with hypertension. A working party of the British Hypertension Society has therefore reviewed available intervention studies on anti-hypertensive treatment and made recommendations on blood pressure thresholds for intervention, on non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments, and on treatment goals. This report also provides guidelines on blood pressure measurement, essential investigations, referrals

  9. Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Licskai, Christopher; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT) methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research ‘Knowledge-to-Action’ process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel ‘Clinical Assembly – KT Action Team’, and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding. PMID:23936883

  10. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes. PMID:25495432

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252. PMID:25498256

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155. PMID:25498261

  13. The Age of Discontinuity; Guidelines to Our Changing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    Concentrating on the social dimension of human experience and existence, this book probes certain profound changes occurring in contemporary technology, economy, society, politics, and education. The author discusses four major discontinuities: (1) the impact of the new technology on the industrial structure; (2) the shift from an "international…

  14. Infection control guidelines for the cardiac catheterization laboratory: Society guidelines revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles E. Chambers; Michael D. Eisenhauer; Lynn B. McNicol; Peter C. Block; William J. Phillips; Gregory J. Dehmer; Frederick A. Heupler; James C. Blankenship

    2006-01-01

    In the early years of diagnostic cardiac catheterization, strict sterile precautions were required for cutdown procedures. Thirteen years ago, when the original guidelines were written, the brachial arteriotomy was still frequently utilized, femoral closure devi- ces were uncommon, ''implantables,'' such as intracoronary stents and PFO\\/ASD clo- sure devices, were in their infancy, and percutaneous valve replacement was not a consideration.

  15. Infection control guidelines for the cardiac catheterization laboratory: society guidelines revisited.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Charles E; Eisenhauer, Michael D; McNicol, Lynn B; Block, Peter C; Phillips, William J; Dehmer, Gregory J; Heupler, Frederick A; Blankenship, James C

    2006-01-01

    In the early years of diagnostic cardiac catheterization, strict sterile precautions were required for cutdown procedures. Thirteen years ago, when the original guidelines were written, the brachial arteriotomy was still frequently utilized, femoral closure devices were uncommon, "implantables," such as intracoronary stents and PFO/ASD closure devices, were in their infancy, and percutaneous valve replacement was not a consideration. In 2005, the cardiac catheterization laboratory is a complex interventional suite with percutaneous access routine and device implantation standard. Despite frequent device implantation, strict sterile precautions are often not observed. Reasons for this include a decline in brachial artery cutdown, limited postprocedure follow-up with few reported infections, limited use of hats and masks in televised cases, and lack of current guidelines. Proper sterile technique has the potential to decrease the patient infection rate. Hand washing remains the most important procedure for preventing infections. Caps, masks, gowns, and gloves help to protect the patient by maintaining a sterile field. Protection of personnel may be accomplished by proper gowning, gloving, and eye wear, disposal of contaminated equipment, and prevention and care of puncture wounds and lacerations. With the potential for acquired disease from blood-borne pathogens, the need for protective measures is as essential in the cardiac catheterization laboratory as is the standard Universal Precautions, which are applied throughout the hospital. All personnel should strongly consider vaccination for hepatitis B. Maintenance of the cardiac catheterization laboratory environment includes appropriate cleaning, limitation of traffic, and adequate ventilation. In an SCAI survey, members recommended an update on guidelines for infection control in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The following revision of the original 1992 guidelines is written specifically to address the increased utilization of the catheterization laboratory as an interventional suite with device implantation. In this update, infection protection is divided into sections on the patient, the laboratory personnel, and the laboratory environment. Additionally, specific CDC recommendation sections highlight recommendations from other published guidelines. PMID:16331649

  16. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

  17. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

  18. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Opacic, Matthew; Freer, Luanne; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Cochran, Amalia; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; McDevitt, Marion; Imray, Christopher H; Johnson, Eric L; Dow, Jennifer; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite. We present a review of pertinent pathophysiology. We then discuss primary and secondary prevention measures and therapeutic management. Recommendations are made regarding each treatment and its role in management. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality according to methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2011;22(2):156-166. PMID:25498262

  19. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22578925

  20. Guideline for treatment of bipolar disorder by the Japanese Society of Mood Disorders, 2012.

    PubMed

    Kanba, Shigenobu; Kato, Tadafumi; Terao, Takeshi; Yamada, Kazuo

    2013-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Mood Disorders established a committee for treatment guidelines of mood disorders, which created the first edition of a treatment guideline for bipolar disorders on 10 March 2011. The committee has now created a second edition, which we report here. In creating this treatment guideline, the first step was to have several bipolar disorder specialists review well-conducted studies and meta-analyses. Based on this evidence, and with a consensus among the specialists, treatment procedures that were considered optimal were compiled and the strength of recommendation for each treatment method was determined. The first draft, prepared in this manner, was further revised through a process of critical investigation by all committee members to produce the final edition. PMID:23773266

  1. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  2. Use of epoetin in patients with cancer: evidence-based clinical practice guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Douglas Rizzo; Alan E. Lichtin; Steven H. Woolf; Jerome Seidenfeld; Charles L. Bennett; David Cella; Benjamin Djulbegovic; Matthew J. Goode; Ann A. Jakubowski; Stephanie J. Lee; Carole B. Miller; Mark U. Rarick; David H. Regan; George P. Browman; Michael S. Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Anemia resulting from cancer or its treat- ment is an important clinical problem increasingly treated with the recombinant hematopoietic growth factor erythropoi- etin. To address uncertainties regarding indications and efficacy, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology devel- oped an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the use of epoetin in pa- tients with cancer. The

  3. Dietary fat and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Jennifer R.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a significant cause of death in industrialized society. Although some controversy persists, scientific evidence largely suggests that it is possible to reduce blood cholesterol by dietary measures and that reduction of hypercholesterolaemia is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. There is, furthermore, general consensus amongst health authorities with regard to dietary guidelines for modifying hypercholesterolaemia. This paper examines how dietary intervention, with particular emphasis on dietary fat, may influence the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease.

  4. Standardized image interpretation and post processing in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Post Processing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With mounting data on its accuracy and prognostic value, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming an increasingly important diagnostic tool with growing utility in clinical routine. Given its versatility and wide range of quantitative parameters, however, agreement on specific standards for the interpretation and post-processing of CMR studies is required to ensure consistent quality and reproducibility of CMR reports. This document addresses this need by providing consensus recommendations developed by the Task Force for Post Processing of the Society for Cardiovascular MR (SCMR). The aim of the task force is to recommend requirements and standards for image interpretation and post processing enabling qualitative and quantitative evaluation of CMR images. Furthermore, pitfalls of CMR image analysis are discussed where appropriate. PMID:23634753

  5. [Intermittent claudication--a major cardiovascular risk factor. Proposed guidelines for investigation and treatment].

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Wahlberg, E; Hedin, U; Ostergren, J

    1999-03-31

    Intermittent claudication is a common disorder, the diagnosis of which can usually be made on the basis of careful history taking and physical examination. Treatment should be focused on abstinence from smoking, increased daily walking distance, risk-factor modification, and aspirin prophylaxis. Laboratory studies including duplex ultrasonography should be limited to cases where uncertainty exists or to the preoperative work-up for invasive intervention. Intermittent claudication patients merit special attention as a category at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and in whom risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes need to be identified and treated. PMID:10218341

  6. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Lougheed, M Diane; Lemiere, Catherine; Ducharme, Francine M; Licskai, Chris; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H; FitzGerald, Mark; Leigh, Richard; Watson, Wade; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines. METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus for the updated guideline: the role of noninvasive measurements of airway inflammation for the adjustment of anti-inflammatory therapy; the initiation of adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for uncontrolled asthma; the role of a single inhaler of an ICS/long-acting beta2-agonist combination as a reliever, and as a reliever and a controller; and the escalation of controller medication for acute loss of asthma control as part of a self-management action plan. The expert panel followed an adaptation process to identify and appraise existing guidelines on the specified topics. In addition, literature searches were performed to identify relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. The panel formally assessed and graded the evidence, and made 34 recommendations. RESULTS: The updated guideline recommendations outline a role for inclusion of assessment of sputum eosinophils, in addition to standard measures of asthma control, to guide adjustment of controller therapy in adults with moderate to severe asthma. Appraisal of the evidence regarding which adjunct controller therapy to add to ICS and at what ICS dose to begin adjunct therapy in children and adults with poor asthma control supported the 2010 CTS Consensus Summary recommendations. New recommendations for the adjustment of controller medication within written action plans are provided. Finally, priority areas for future research were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The present clinical practice guideline is the first update of the CTS Asthma Guidelines following the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee’s new guideline development process. Tools and strategies to support guideline implementation will be developed and the CTS will continue to regularly provide updates reflecting new evidence. PMID:22536582

  7. Practice guidelines for the early detection of cervical cancer in Korea: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the Korean Society for Cytopathology 2012 edition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Kwan; Hong, Jin Hwa; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hye Sun; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Song, Jae Yun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Yoo, Chong Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyoung; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lee, Ahwon; Lee, Yonghee; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Taek Sang; Lim, Myong Cheol; Chang, Suk-Joon; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Ju, Woong; Joo, Hee Jae; Hur, Soo-Young

    2013-01-01

    The consensus guideline development committee of Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology was reconvened in March 2012. The committee consisted of 36 experts representing 12 university hospitals and professional organizations. The objective of this committee was to develop standardized guidelines for cervical cancer screening tests for Korean women and to distribute these guidelines to every clinician, eventually improving the quality of medical care. Since the establishment of the consensus guideline development committee, evidence-based guidelines have either been developed de novo considering specific Korean situations or by adaptation of preexisting consensus guidelines from other countries. Recommendations for cervical cancer screening tests, management of atypical squamous and glandular cells, and management of low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were developed. Additionally, recommendations for human papillomavirus DNA testing and recommendations for adolescent and pregnant women with abnormal cervical screening test results were also included. PMID:23653837

  8. Assessment of acute myocardial infarction: current status and recommendations from the North American society for cardiovascular imaging and the European society of cardiac radiology

    PubMed Central

    Oudkerk, Matthijs; Bluemke, David; Bremerich, Jens; Esteves, Fabio P.; Garcia, Ernest V.; Gutberlet, Matthias; Hundley, W. Gregory; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Kwong, Raymond K.; Nagel, Eike; Lerakis, Stamatios; Oshinski, John; Paul, Jean-François; Underwood, Richard; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Rees, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of imaging tests that are used in the setting of acute myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome. Each has their strengths and limitations. Experts from the European Society of Cardiac Radiology and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging together with other prominent imagers reviewed the literature. It is clear that there is a definite role for imaging in these patients. While comparative accuracy, convenience and cost have largely guided test decisions in the past, the introduction of newer tests is being held to a higher standard which compares patient outcomes. Multicenter randomized comparative effectiveness trials with outcome measures are required. PMID:20972835

  9. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis: an electronic guideline implementability appraisal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are intended to improve healthcare. However, even if guidelines are excellent, their implementation is not assured. In subfertility care, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guidelines have been inventoried, and their methodological quality has been assessed. To improve the impact of the ESHRE guidelines and to improve European subfertility care, it is important to optimise the implementability of guidelines. We therefore investigated the implementation barriers of the ESHRE guideline with the best methodological quality and evaluated the used instrument for usability and feasibility. Methods We reviewed the ESHRE guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis to assess its implementability. We used an electronic version of the guideline implementability appraisal (eGLIA) instrument. This eGLIA tool consists of 31 questions grouped into 10 dimensions. Seven items address the guideline as a whole, and 24 items assess the individual recommendations in the guideline. The eGLIA instrument identifies factors that influence the implementability of the guideline recommendations. These factors can be divided into facilitators that promote implementation and barriers that oppose implementation. A panel of 10 experts from three European countries appraised all 36 recommendations of the guideline. They discussed discrepancies in a teleconference and completed a questionnaire to evaluate the ease of use and overall utility of the eGLIA instrument. Results Two of the 36 guideline recommendations were straightforward to implement. Five recommendations were considered simply statements because they contained no actions. The remaining 29 recommendations were implementable with some adjustments. We found facilitators of the guideline implementability in the quality of decidability, presentation and formatting, apparent validity, and novelty or innovation of the recommendations. Vaguely defined actions, lack of facilities, immeasurable outcomes, and inflexibility within the recommendations formed barriers to implementation. The eGLIA instrument was generally useful and easy to use. However, assessment with the eGLIA instrument is very time-consuming. Conclusions The ESHRE guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis could be improved to facilitate its implementation in daily practice. The eGLIA instrument is a helpful tool for identifying obstacles to implementation of a guideline. However, we recommend a concise version of this instrument. PMID:21247418

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society consensus conference recommendations on heart failure 2006: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J Malcolm O; Liu, Peter; Demers, Catherine; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Johnstone, David E; Jong, Philip; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Parker, John D; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; Svendsen, Anna M; Teo, Koon; Tsuyuki, Ross T; White, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure remains a common diagnosis, especially in older individuals. It continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, but major advances in both diagnosis and management have occurred and will continue to improve symptoms and other outcomes in patients. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published its first consensus conference recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in 1994, followed by two brief updates, and reconvened this consensus conference to provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and management strategies. New clinical trial evidence and meta-analyses were critically reviewed by a multidisciplinary primary panel who developed both recommendations and practical tips, which were reviewed by a secondary panel. The resulting document is intended to provide practical advice for specialists, family physicians, nurses, pharmacists and others who are involved in the care of heart failure patients. Management of heart failure begins with an accurate diagnosis, and requires rational combination drug therapy, individualization of care for each patient (based on their symptoms, clinical presentation and disease severity), appropriate mechanical interventions including revascularization and devices, collaborative efforts among health care professionals, and education and cooperation of the patient and their immediate caregivers. The goal is to translate best evidence-based therapies into clinical practice with a measureable impact on the health of heart failure patients in Canada. PMID:16450016

  11. Use of the Food Guide Pyramid and US Dietary Guidelines to Improve Dietary Intake and Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in Active-Duty Air Force Members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Capt PATRICIA J GAMBERA; BARBARA O SCHNEEMAN; PAUL A DAVIS

    1995-01-01

    Objective To determine whether adoption of dietary patterns consistent with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Food Guide Pyramid, combined with exercise training, result in significant reductions in cardiovascular risk compared with a regimen of exercise therapy alone.Design A randomized trial to compare the effects of exercise alone (n=17) with the effects of exercise and dietary intervention (n=15).Setting

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. This is an updated version of the original Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for the Out-of-Hospital Evaluation and Treatment of Accidental Hypothermia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(4):425-445. PMID:25498264

  13. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss, clarify, comment, or rebut any of the points made in this Commentary. It is our goal to elevate this debate in order to provide women who are afflicted with androgen insufficiency and sexual disorders with the highest quality health care and to relieve their distress and suffering, as well as to improve their quality of life. PMID:17727347

  14. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  15. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. PMID:25443771

  16. Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Vilmann, Peter; Frost Clementsen, Paul; Colella, Sara; Siemsen, Mette; De Leyn, Paul; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Herth, Felix J; Larghi, Alberto; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Hassan, Cesare; Crombag, Laurence; Korevaar, Daniël A; Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-07-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in Endoscopy and the European Respiratory Journal. PMID:26034060

  17. 2015 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology and the Taiwan Hypertension Society for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Chung-Yin; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chao, Chia-Lun; Liu, Ping-Yen; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Li, Yi-Heng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Chen, Wen-Jone; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2015-01-01

    It has been almost 5 years since the publication of the 2010 hypertension guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology (TSOC). There is new evidence regarding the management of hypertension, including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized trials, post-hoc analyses, subgroup analyses, retrospective studies, cohort studies, and registries. More recently, the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published joint hypertension guidelines in 2013. The panel members who were appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC) also published the 2014 JNC report. Blood pressure (BP) targets have been changed; in particular, such targets have been loosened in high risk patients. The Executive Board members of TSOC and the Taiwan Hypertension Society (THS) aimed to review updated information about the management of hypertension to publish an updated hypertension guideline in Taiwan. We recognized that hypertension is the most important risk factor for global disease burden. Management of hypertension is especially important in Asia where the prevalence rate grows faster than other parts of the world. In most countries in East Asia, stroke surpassed coronary heart disease (CHD) in causing premature death. A diagnostic algorithm was proposed, emphasizing the importance of home BP monitoring and ambulatory BP monitoring for better detection of night time hypertension, early morning hypertension, white-coat hypertension, and masked hypertension. We disagreed with the ESH/ESH joint hypertension guidelines suggestion to loosen BP targets to <140/90 mmHg for all patients. We strongly disagree with the suggestion by the 2014 JNC report to raise the BP target to <150/90 mmHg for patients between 60-80 years of age. For patients with diabetes, CHD, chronic kidney disease who have proteinuria, and those who are receiving antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention, we propose BP targets of <130/80 mmHg in our guidelines. BP targets are <140/90 mmHg for all other patient groups, except for patients ?80 years of age in whom a BP target of <150/90 mmHg would be optimal. For the management of hypertension, we proposed a treatment algorithm, starting with life style modification (LSM) including S-ABCDE (Sodium restriction, Alcohol limitation, Body weight reduction, Cigarette smoke cessation, Diet adaptation, and Exercise adoption). We emphasized a low-salt strategy instead of a no-salt strategy, and that excessively aggressive sodium restriction to <2.0 gram/day may be harmful. When drug therapy is considered, a strategy called "PROCEED" was suggested (Previous experience, Risk factors, Organ damage, Contraindications or unfavorable conditions, Expert's or doctor's judgment, Expenses or cost, and Delivery and compliance issue). To predict drug effects in lowering BP, we proposed the "Rule of 10" and "Rule of 5". With a standard dose of any one of the 5 major classes of anti-hypertensive agents, one can anticipate approximately a 10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (Rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (DBP) (Rule of 5). When doses of the same drug are doubled, there is only a 2-mmHg incremental decrease in SBP and a 1-mmHg incremental decrease in DBP. Preferably, when 2 drugs with different mechanisms are to be taken together, the decrease in BP is the sum of the decrease of the individual agents (approximately 20 mmHg in SBP and 10 mmHg in DBP). Early combination therapy, especially single-pill combination (SPC), is recommended. When patient's initial treatment cannot get BP to targeted goals, we have proposed an adjustment algorithm, "AT GOALs" (Adherence, Timing of administration, Greater doses, Other classes of drugs, Alternative combination or SPC, and LSM + Laboratory tests). Treatment of hypertension in special conditions, including treatment of resistant hypertension, hypertension in women, and perioperative management of hypertension, were also mentioned. The TSOC/THS hypertension guidelines pro

  18. Overview: the 2nd Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; Kritharides, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Recent years have seen the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) focus its attention on improving outcomes for Indigenous people within Australia and New Zealand. The most visible of these activities has been the convening of conferences devoted specifically to understanding and overcoming the burden of cardiovascular disparities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders within Australia and Maori and Pacific Islander populations within New Zealand. Following from the success of the first meeting, the second was held in Alice Springs in 2011. Alongside plenary sessions discussing primary prevention, improved care, secondary prevention and the social and cultural determinants of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), targeted workshops outlined the issues and priority activities for the CSANZ into the future. These included discussion of Workforce, Improving Chronic Care, Reducing the burden of Rheumatic Heart Disease and Reducing Disparities in Hospital Care. PMID:22877731

  19. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should have quality assertion programmes for implementation and follow-up of routines, teaching, training and clinical outcome. Clinical guidelines on a wide range of relevant topics have been introduced, based on extensive literature retrieval, to facilitate effective and safe management of CVCs. PMID:24593804

  20. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency targeted testing and augmentation therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Marciniuk, DD; Hernandez, P; Balter, M; Bourbeau, J; Chapman, KR; Ford, GT; Lauzon, JL; Maltais, F; O’Donnell, DE; Goodridge, D; Strange, C; Cave, AJ; Curren, K; Muthuri, S

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted) attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ?11 ?mol/L) who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation) because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality. PMID:22536580

  1. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, J. A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [AMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, M. J. [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology (Ireland); Belli, A. M. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Barkhof, F. [MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a putative new theory that has been suggested by some to have a direct causative relation with the symptomatology associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). The core foundation of this theory is that there is abnormal venous drainage from the brain due to outflow obstruction in the draining jugular vein and/or azygos veins. This abnormal venous drainage, which is characterised by special ultrasound criteria, called the 'venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score' (VHISS), is said to cause intracerebral flow disturbance or outflow problems that lead to periventricular deposits. In the CCSVI theory, these deposits have a great similarity to the iron deposits seen around the veins in the legs in patients with chronic deep vein thrombosis. Zamboni, who first described this new theory, has promoted balloon dilatation to treat the outflow problems, thereby curing CCSVI and by the same token alleviating MS complaints. However, this theory does not fit into the existing bulk of scientific data concerning the pathophysiology of MS. In contrast, there is increasing worldwide acceptance of CCSVI and the associated balloon dilatation treatment, even though there is no supporting scientific evidence. Furthermore, most of the information we have comes from one source only. The treatment is called 'liberation treatment,' and the results of the treatment can be watched on YouTube. There are well-documented testimonies by MS patients who have gained improvement in their personal quality of life (QOL) after treatment. However, there are no data available from patients who underwent unsuccessful treatments with which to obtain a more balanced view. The current forum for the reporting of success in treating CCSVI and thus MS seems to be the Internet. At the CIRCE office and the MS Centre in Amsterdam, we receive approximately 10 to 20 inquiries a month about this treatment. In addition, many interventional radiologists, who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  2. Awareness of the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension and their use in clinical practices: 2009 survey results.

    PubMed

    Obara, Taku; Ubeda, Sergio Ramón Gutiérrez; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Matsuura, Hideo; Ishimitsu, Toshihiko; Takata, Masanobu; Rakugi, Hiromi; Imai, Yutaka

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate physicians' awareness and use of the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH) Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH2004 and JSH2009), and determine what changes need to be implemented in the future. A questionnaire was used to survey physicians' awareness and their use of JSH2004 and JSH2009. Physicians attending educational seminars on hypertension that were held during the months after the publication of JSH2009 (January-April 2009) were asked to participate in the survey. Of the 5795 respondents, 88% were aware of the JSH2009 publication. Furthermore, physicians were also aware of JSH2004, with about 90% using JSH2004 in their practice. A hypertension blood pressure (BP) reference value of 140/90?mm?Hg was used by 55% in office BP, whereas 31% used 135/85?mm?Hg for home BP. Target BP levels used by physicians were 130/80?mm?Hg for patients with diabetes or kidney disease (52%) and for elderly patients with diabetes or kidney disease (45%), whereas 140/90?mm?Hg was used for elderly patients with low cardiovascular disease risk (44%) and for patients with chronic-phase stroke (27%). Answers to the questionnaire varied among physicians according to sex, age, workplace and specialty. The majority of the participating Japanese physicians were familiar with both JSH2004 and JSH2009, with many following the guidelines in their practice. However, some physicians use different reference values for hypertension and target BP levels. Physicians' adherence to and use of the guidelines should be regularly examined and promoted. PMID:25832921

  3. Statistical and data reporting guidelines for the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Graeme L; Dunning, Joel; Seifert, Burkhardt; Sodeck, Gottfried; Carr, Matthew J; Burger, Hans Ulrich; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    As part of the peer review process for the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EJCTS) and the Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery (ICVTS), a statistician reviews any manuscript that includes a statistical analysis. To facilitate authors considering submitting a manuscript and to make it clearer about the expectations of the statistical reviewers, we present up-to-date guidelines for authors on statistical and data reporting specifically in these journals. The number of statistical methods used in the cardiothoracic literature is vast, as are the ways in which data are presented. Therefore, we narrow the scope of these guidelines to cover the most common applications submitted to the EJCTS and ICVTS, focusing in particular on those that the statistical reviewers most frequently comment on. PMID:25971435

  4. ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR 2011 Appropriate Use Criteria for Echocardiography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance American College of Chest Physicians.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Garcia, Mario J; Haines, David E; Lai, Wyman W; Manning, Warren J; Patel, Ayan R; Picard, Michael H; Polk, Donna M; Ragosta, Michael; Parker Ward, R; Weiner, Rory B

    2011-03-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where echocardiography is frequently considered. This document combines and updates the original transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2007 (1) and the original stress echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2008 (2). This revision reflects new clinical data, reflects changes in test utilization patterns,and clarifies echocardiography use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria.The indications (clinical scenarios)were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC).The 202 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9,to designate appropriate use(median 7 to 9), uncertain use(median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Ninety-seven indications were rated as appropriate, 34 were rated as uncertain, and 71 were rated as inappropriate. In general,the use of echocardiography for initial diagnosis when there is a change in clinical status or when the results of the echocardiogram are anticipated to change patient management were rated appropriate. Routine testing when there was no change in clinical status or when results of testing were unlikely to modify management were more likely to be inappropriate than appropriate/uncertain.The AUC for echocardiography have the potential to impact physician decision making,healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore,recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:21338862

  5. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21087721

  6. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21232696

  7. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:20975004

  8. The ASM Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Microbiology: A Case Study of the Advocacy Role of Societies in Reform Efforts.

    PubMed

    Horak, Rachel E A; Merkel, Susan; Chang, Amy

    2015-05-01

    A number of national reports, including Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action, have called for drastic changes in how undergraduate biology is taught. To that end, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has developed new Curriculum Guidelines for undergraduate microbiology that outline a comprehensive curriculum for any undergraduate introductory microbiology course or program of study. Designed to foster enduring understanding of core microbiology concepts, the Guidelines work synergistically with backwards course design to focus teaching on student-centered goals and priorities. In order to qualitatively assess how the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are used by educators and learn more about the needs of microbiology educators, the ASM Education Board distributed two surveys to the ASM education community. In this report, we discuss the results of these surveys (353 responses). We found that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are being implemented in many different types of courses at all undergraduate levels. Educators indicated that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines were very helpful when planning courses and assessments. We discuss some specific ways in which the ASM Curriculum Guidelines have been used in undergraduate classrooms. The survey identified some barriers that microbiology educators faced when trying to adopt the ASM Curriculum Guidelines, including lack of time, lack of financial resources, and lack of supporting resources. Given the self-reported challenges to implementing the ASM Curriculum Guidelines in undergraduate classrooms, we identify here some activities related to the ASM Curriculum Guidelines that the ASM Education Board has initiated to assist educators in the implementation process. PMID:25949769

  9. European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Stergiou, George; O'Brien, Eoin; Asmar, Roland; Beilin, Lawrence; Bilo, Grzegorz; Clement, Denis; de la Sierra, Alejandro; de Leeuw, Peter; Dolan, Eamon; Fagard, Robert; Graves, John; Head, Geoffrey A; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Lurbe, Empar; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mengden, Thomas; Myers, Martin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M; Shennan, Andrew; Staessen, Jan A; vanMontfrans, Gert; Verdecchia, Paolo; Waeber, Bernard; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-07-01

    Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published a comprehensive position paper dealing with all aspects of the technique, based on the available scientific evidence for ABPM. The present work represents an updated schematic summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, and is aimed at providing recommendations for proper use of this technique in a clinical setting by both specialists and practicing physicians. The present article details the requirements and the methodological issues to be addressed for using ABPM in clinical practice, The clinical indications for ABPM suggested by the available studies, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension, are outlined in detail, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is discussed. The role of ABPM in pharmacological, epidemiological, and clinical research is also briefly mentioned. Finally, the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the situation of different countries with regard to the reimbursement and the availability of ABPM in primary care practices, hospital clinics, and pharmacies. PMID:24886823

  10. International Society Of Neuropathology--Haarlem consensus guidelines for nervous system tumor classification and grading.

    PubMed

    Louis, David N; Perry, Arie; Burger, Peter; Ellison, David W; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Aldape, Kenneth; Brat, Daniel; Collins, V Peter; Eberhart, Charles; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fuller, Gregory N; Giangaspero, Felice; Giannini, Caterina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Kleihues, Paul; Korshunov, Andrey; Kros, Johan M; Beatriz Lopes, M; Ng, Ho-Keung; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Paulus, Werner; Pietsch, Torsten; Rosenblum, Marc; Rushing, Elisabeth; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Wiestler, Otmar; Wesseling, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Major discoveries in the biology of nervous system tumors have raised the question of how non-histological data such as molecular information can be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors. To address this question, a meeting of neuropathologists with expertise in molecular diagnosis was held in Haarlem, the Netherlands, under the sponsorship of the International Society of Neuropathology (ISN). Prior to the meeting, participants solicited input from clinical colleagues in diverse neuro-oncological specialties. The present "white paper" catalogs the recommendations of the meeting, at which a consensus was reached that incorporation of molecular information into the next WHO classification should follow a set of provided "ISN-Haarlem" guidelines. Salient recommendations include that (i) diagnostic entities should be defined as narrowly as possible to optimize interobserver reproducibility, clinicopathological predictions and therapeutic planning; (ii) diagnoses should be "layered" with histologic classification, WHO grade and molecular information listed below an "integrated diagnosis"; (iii) determinations should be made for each tumor entity as to whether molecular information is required, suggested or not needed for its definition; (iv) some pediatric entities should be separated from their adult counterparts; (v) input for guiding decisions regarding tumor classification should be solicited from experts in complementary disciplines of neuro-oncology; and (iv) entity-specific molecular testing and reporting formats should be followed in diagnostic reports. It is hoped that these guidelines will facilitate the forthcoming update of the fourth edition of the WHO classification of central nervous system tumors. PMID:24990071

  11. Standardized terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Martha B.; Centeno, Barbara A.; Ali, Syed Z.; Genevay, Muriel; Stelow, Ed; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Schmidt, C. Max; Brugge, William R.; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing and post-biopsy treatment and management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussion of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology web site [www.papsociety.org]. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on a proposed standardized terminology scheme for pancreatobiliary specimens that correlate cytological diagnosis with biological behavior and increasingly conservative patient management of surveillance only. The proposed terminology scheme recommends a six-tiered system: Non-diagnostic, negative, atypical, neoplastic [benign or other], suspicious and positive. Unique to this scheme is the “neoplastic” category separated into “benign” (serous cystadenoma) or “other” (premalignant mucinous cysts, neuroendocrine tumors and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs)). The positive or malignant category is reserved for high-grade, aggressive malignancies including ductal adenocarcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, pancreatoblastoma, lymphoma and metastases. Interpretation categories do not have to be used. Some pathology laboratory information systems require an interpretation category, which places the cytological diagnosis into a general category. This proposed scheme provides terminology that standardizes the category of the various diseases of the pancreas, some of which are difficult to diagnose specifically by cytology. In addition, this terminology scheme attempts to provide maximum flexibility for patient management, which has become increasingly conservative for some neoplasms. PMID:25191517

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Eifling, Kurt P; Ellis, Mark A; Gaudio, Flavio G; Otten, Edward M; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the recognition, prevention, and treatment of heat illness. We present a review of the classifications, pathophysiology, and evidence-based guidelines for planning and preventive measures as well as best practice recommendations for both field and hospital-based therapeutic management of heat illness. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence, and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Heat-Related Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(4):351-361. PMID:25498263

  13. [Referral for rehabilitation in case of permanent visual handicap; guideline of the Dutch Society of Ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    de Boer, M R; Langelaan, M; Jansonius, N M; van Rens, G H M B

    2005-07-01

    The Dutch Society of Ophthalmology (NOG) has developed an evidence-based guideline for the referral of visually impaired people for rehabilitation and support. Referral for rehabilitation and support must be preceded by diagnosis and treatment. Consultation of an ophthalmologist is essential. Information about the disease should be given to the patient orally as well as in writing. The ophthalmologist brings up the possibility of rehabilitation in the presence of a visual acuity < 0.5 and/or visual field of < 30 degrees in the better eye and a well-defined request for help. Visually impaired patients with a relatively simple request for help are referred to a specialised optometrist whenever possible. Visually impaired patients with more complex requests for help are referred to a multidisciplinary (regional or national) rehabilitation centre for people with a visual handicap. Visually impaired and blind patients are informed about the existence of patient organisations. Referral for rehabilitation is done by means of a structured letter with all relevant information. A copy of this letter should be sent to the family physician and all other attending physicians. PMID:16035151

  14. [Laparotomy closure - do we know how?(Guideline of the European Hernia Society)].

    PubMed

    East, B; Muysoms, F E

    2015-02-01

    The recurrence rate of surgical treatment of incisional hernia is high. The material and surgical technique used to close the abdominal wall following every surgery contribute as important risk factors in incisional hernia formation. However, by optimising abdominal wall closure, many patients can be spared from developing this type of complication. The European Hernia Society has established a Guidelines Development Group with a goal to research the literature and write a series of recommendations of how to close the abdomen and minimize the risk of incisional hernia in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine. To decrease the incidence of incisional hernias, the following is recommended: To utilise a non-midline approach to a laparotomy whenever possible. To perform a continuous suturing technique using a slowly absorbable monofilament suture in a single layer aponeurotic closure technique. To perform the small bites technique with a suture to wound length (SL/WL) ratio at least 4/1. Not to close the peritoneum separately. To avoid rapidly resorbable materials. To consider using a prophylactic mesh in high-risk patients. To use the smallest trocar size adequate for the procedure and closing the fascial defect if trocars larger or equal to 10 mm are used in laparoscopic surgery. Key words: incisional hernia laparotomy laparotomy closure suturing material. PMID:25659254

  15. Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Criteria and Society of Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) 2008 Guidelines in Non-Operative Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Krzysztof; Kozinoga, Mateusz; Stoli?ski, ?ukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    According to the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a curvature of more than 10° Cobb angle, affecting 2-3% of pediatric population. Idiopathic scoliosis accounts for 80% of all scoliosis cases. Non-operative principles in the therapy of idiopathic scoliosis, including Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) criteria and guidelines proposed by the experts of the Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORTS) were presented. The possibility to carry out quality of life assessments in a conservative procedure was also demonstrated. Based on the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis, SRS criteria, SOSORT 2008 experts' opinion and the knowledge of the possibilities of psychological assessment of conservative IS treatment, rules were proposed regarding nonsurgical IS therapy procedures, with special consideration being paid to the proper treatment start time (age, Risser test, biological maturity, Cobb angle), possibility of curvature progression, the importance of physiotherapy and psychological assessment. The knowledge of SRS criteria and SOSORT guidelines regarding the conservative treatment of IS are essential for proper treatment (the right time to start treatment), and supports establishment of interdisciplinary treatment teams, consisting of a physician, a physiotherapist, an orthopedic technician and a psychologist. PMID:25066033

  16. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Correa, Candace R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hardenbergh, Patricia H. [Shaw Regional Cancer Center, Vail, CO (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McQueen, Julie R. [Oncology Patient Navigator, Duke Raleigh Cancer Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, MI (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within {+-}7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  17. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the KDIGO clinical practice guideline for CKD evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a nephrologist when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2) (and for many other scenarios), but suggest urine albumin-creatinine ratio > 60mg/mmol or proteinuria with protein excretion > 1g/d as the referral threshold for proteinuria. PMID:25511161

  18. Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Søren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ? III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:25325682

  19. An analysis of the impact of FDA's guidelines for addressing cardiovascular risk of drugs for type 2 diabetes on clinical development.

    PubMed

    Viereck, Christopher; Boudes, Pol

    2011-05-01

    We examined the impact of FDA's 2008 guidelines for addressing cardiovascular risks of new therapies for type 2 diabetes on clinical trials. We focused on the new class of incretin-modulating drugs, exenatide, sitagliptin, saxagliptin and liraglutide, which were approved in 2005-2010. We contrasted these findings with those from 2 different groups: 1. diabetes drugs approved in the same timeframe but with a non-incretin mechanism of action (colesevelam HCl and bromocriptine mesylate) and 2. diabetes drugs with NDAs delayed and not yet approved within the same time frame (vildagliptin, alogliptin, insulin inhalation powder, and exenatide long acting release). The new guidelines have had an important impact on clinical development. Review time has increased over 2-fold. The increase is seen even if a drug with the same mechanism of action has been already approved. Whereas exenatide (approved in 2005) required 10 months of regulatory review, the approval of liraglutide in 2010 required more than twice as long (21 months). In contrast, the marketing authorization of liraglutide in the EU required 14 months. Additionally, the manufacturer of vildagliptin announced in June 2008, 30 months after the NDA was filed, that a re-submission to meet FDA's demands was not planned. The drug however received marketing authorization in the EU in 2007. The number of randomized patients and patient-years in NDAs increased more than 2.5 and 4 fold, respectively since the guidelines. The significant cost increases and negative publicity because of rare adverse reactions will adversely affect future clinical research in type 2 diabetes and not address its burgeoning health care impact. PMID:21266202

  20. Vitamin D dose response is underestimated by Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Malachi J; Murray, Barbara F

    2013-01-01

    Objective The recommended daily intakes of vitamin D according to the recent Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) of the Endocrine Society are three- to fivefold higher than the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report. We speculated that these differences could be explained by different mathematical approaches to the vitamin D dose response. Methods Studies were selected if the daily dose was ?2000?IU/day, the duration exceeded 3 months, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were measured at baseline and post-therapy. The rate constant was estimated according to the CPG approach. The achieved 25OHD result was estimated according to the following: i) the regression equation approach of the IOM; ii) the regression approach of the Vitamin D Supplementation in Older Subjects (ViDOS) study; and iii) the CPG approach using a rate constant of 2.5 (CPG2.5) and a rate constant of 5.0 (CPG5.0). The difference between the expected and the observed 25OHD result was expressed as a percentage of observed and analyzed for significance against a value of 0% for the four groups. Results Forty-one studies were analyzed. The mean (95% CI) rate constant was 5.3 (4.4–6.2) nmol/l per 100?IU per day, on average twofold higher than the CPG rate constant. The mean (95% CI) for the difference between the expected and observed expressed as a percentage of observed was as follows: i) IOM, ?7 (?16,+2)% (t=1.64, P=0.110); ii) ViDOS, +2 (?8,+12)% (t=0.40, P=0.69); iii) CPG2.5, ?21 (?27,?15)% (t=7.2, P<0.0001); and iv) CPG5.0+3 (?4,+10)% (t=0.91, P=0.366). Conclusion The CPG ‘rule of thumb’ should be doubled to 5.0?nmol/l (2.0?ng/ml) per 100?IU per day, adopting a more risk-averse position. PMID:23781324

  1. Meeting Highlights of the 11th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Los Angeles, February 1–3, 2008

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper features the most interesting presentations and discussions of the 2008 Annual Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, which were held in Los Angeles from February 1 to 3, 2008. With more than 1100 attendees, this was the largest of the SCMR meetings ever. Among this year's highlights were scientific reports on CMR-based risk assessment, non-contrast tissue characterization, 3 T data, and interventional CMR. PMID:19128420

  2. Cardiac Surgery in Germany during 2014: A Report on Behalf of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Andreas; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Lewandowski, Jana; Frie, Michael; Ernst, Markus; Hekmat, Khosro; Schiller, Wolfgang; Gummert, Jan F; Cremer, Joachim Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Based on a voluntary registry of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS), data of all heart surgery procedures performed in 78 German cardiac surgical units during the year 2014 are presented. In 2014, a total of 100,398 cardiac surgical procedures (implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and pacemaker procedures excluded) were submitted to the registry. More than 14.2% of the patients were older than 80 years, describing an increase of 0.4% compared with the previous year. The unadjusted in-hospital mortality for 40,006 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (84.7% on-pump, 15.3% off-pump) was 2.6%. In 31,359 isolated valve procedures (including 9,194 catheter-based procedures), an in-hospital mortality of 4.4% was observed. This annual updated registry of the GSTCVS is published since 1989. It is an important tool for quality assurance and voluntary public reporting by illustrating current standards and actual developments for nearly all cardiac surgical procedures in Germany. PMID:26011675

  3. Assessment of the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or invasive procedures: Guidelines of the Italian Society for Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benilde Cosmi; Adriano Alatri; Marco Cattaneo; Paolo Gresele; Marco Marietta; Francesco Rodeghiero; Armando Tripodi; Luca Ansaloni; Maurizio Fusari; Stefania Taddei

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis of recommendationsThe Italian Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SISET: Società Italiana per lo Studio dell’ Emostasi e della Trombosi) promoted the development of a series of guidelines which would adopt evidence-based medicine methodology on clinically relevant problems in the field of haemostasis and thrombosis.The objective of the present guidelines is to provide recommendations for the pre-operative and pre-procedural assessment

  4. Cardiological Society of India Practice Guidelines for Angiography in Patients with Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, S.; Seth, A.; Sethi, K.K.; Tyagi, S.; Gupta, R.; Tiwari, S.C.; Mehrotra, S.; Seth, Ashok; Guha, Santanu; Deb, P.K.; Dasbiswas, Arup; Mohanan, P.P.; Venugopal, K.; Sinha, Nakul; Pinto, Brian; Banerjee, Amal; Sengottuvelu, G.; Mehran, Roxana; Collough, Peter Mc

    2012-01-01

    Preamble The potential risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) has made utilization of coronary angiography in the work-up for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in CKD quite low.1 This is in contrast to increasing prevalence and severity of CAD as the serum creatinine rises.2 In fact most CKD patients will succumb to CAD and not to ESRD.3 Thus the judicious use of CAG/PCI in this setting is of prime importance but underused. The CSI began to develop guidelines for Indian context as most guidelines are those developed by ACC/AHA or ESC. The aim was to assist the physicians in selecting the best management strategy for an individual patient under his care based on an expert committee who would review the current data and write the guidelines with relevance to the Indian context. The guidelines were developed initially in June 2010 as an initiative of Delhi CSI. Three interventional cardiologist (SB, AS, KKS), one nephrologist (SCT) and two clinical cardiologists (ST, RG) along with Dr. Roxana Mehran (New York) and Dr. Peter McCullough (Missouri), U.S.A.; were involved in a three-way teleconference to discuss/debate the data. This was presented by SB, and over the next two hours each data subset was debated/agreed/deleted and this resulted in the “Guidelines for CAG in Renal Dysfunction Patients”. These were then written and re- circulated to all for final comments. Further, these guidelines were updated and additional Task Force Members nominated by Central CSI were involved in the formation of the final CSI Guidelines. Both (Roxana Mehran and Peter McCullough) reviewed these updated Guidelines in October 2012 and after incorporating the views of all the Task Force members—the final format is as it is presented in this final document. PMID:23186627

  5. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the infectious diseases society of America.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

    2014-07-15

    A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24947530

  6. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Dennis L; Bisno, Alan L; Chambers, Henry F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gorbach, Sherwood L; Hirschmann, Jan V; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Montoya, Jose G; Wade, James C

    2014-07-15

    A panel of national experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to update the 2005 guidelines for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The panel's recommendations were developed to be concordant with the recently published IDSA guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The focus of this guideline is the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of diverse SSTIs ranging from minor superficial infections to life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. In addition, because of an increasing number of immunocompromised hosts worldwide, the guideline addresses the wide array of SSTIs that occur in this population. These guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical skills in promptly diagnosing SSTIs, identifying the pathogen, and administering effective treatments in a timely fashion. PMID:24973422

  7. Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care

    E-print Network

    Eklund, Patrik

    Cognitive disorders Epidemiology Dementia care and society Logic of dementia guidelines Cognitive disorder diagnosis Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management Patrik Eklund Umeå University, Sweden 27 June 2008 Patrik Eklund IPMU 2008 Non-classical logic for Elderly Care Management #12;Cognitive

  8. European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction: How to use existing assays clinically and for clinical trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred S. Apple; Alan H. B. Wu; Allan S. Jaffe

    2002-01-01

    Background The European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology guidelines for redefinition of myocardial infarction suggest that the cutoff value for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) be the 99th percentile of the reference population at a level measured with imprecision (coefficient of variation) ?10%. No current commercially available troponin assay meets this requirement. Accordingly, questions have been

  9. British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines on the diagnosis and management of Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ragunath, Krish; Ang, Yeng; Kang, Jin-Yong; Watson, Peter; Trudgill, Nigel; Patel, Praful; Kaye, Philip V; Sanders, Scott; O'Donovan, Maria; Bird-Lieberman, Elizabeth; Bhandari, Pradeep; Jankowski, Janusz A; Attwood, Stephen; Parsons, Simon L; Loft, Duncan; Lagergren, Jesper; Moayyedi, Paul; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; de Caestecker, John

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines provide a practical and evidence-based resource for the management of patients with Barrett's oesophagus and related early neoplasia. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument was followed to provide a methodological strategy for the guideline development. A systematic review of the literature was performed for English language articles published up until December 2012 in order to address controversial issues in Barrett's oesophagus including definition, screening and diagnosis, surveillance, pathological grading for dysplasia, management of dysplasia, and early cancer including training requirements. The rigour and quality of the studies was evaluated using the SIGN checklist system. Recommendations on each topic were scored by each author using a five-tier system (A+, strong agreement, to D+, strongly disagree). Statements that failed to reach substantial agreement among authors, defined as >80% agreement (A or A+), were revisited and modified until substantial agreement (>80%) was reached. In formulating these guidelines, we took into consideration benefits and risks for the population and national health system, as well as patient perspectives. For the first time, we have suggested stratification of patients according to their estimated cancer risk based on clinical and histopathological criteria. In order to improve communication between clinicians, we recommend the use of minimum datasets for reporting endoscopic and pathological findings. We advocate endoscopic therapy for high-grade dysplasia and early cancer, which should be performed in high-volume centres. We hope that these guidelines will standardise and improve management for patients with Barrett's oesophagus and related neoplasia. PMID:24165758

  10. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with Q fever by the Armed Forces Infectious Diseases Society.

    PubMed

    Hartzell, Joshua D; Gleeson, Todd; Scoville, Stephanie; Massung, Robert F; Wortmann, Glenn; Martin, Gregory J

    2012-05-01

    This issue in the series Current Topics in Military Tropical Medicine focuses on Q Fever. Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Over 150 confirmed cases have occurred among U.S. military personnel deployed to Iraq since 2007. Acute Q fever is underdiagnosed because of a myriad of possible clinical presentations but typically presents as a flu-like illness. The most common chronic manifestation is endocarditis. Most providers are not familiar with the diagnosis, treatment, or appropriate follow-up of this disease. In order to facilitate the care of patients infected with C. burnetii, the Armed Forces Infectious Diseases Society convened a panel of experts in the field to develop practical guidelines for those caring for infected patients. The recommendations and rationale are reviewed in this article. PMID:22645872

  11. Diagnostic Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease: Movement Disorder Society Task Force Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Litvan, Irene; Goldman, Jennifer G.; Tröster, Alexander I.; Schmand, Ben A.; Weintraub, Daniel; Petersen, Ronald C.; Mollenhauer, Brit; Adler, Charles H.; Marder, Karen; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Aarsland, Dag; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C.; Burn, David J.; Barker, Roger A.; Emre, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is common in nondemented Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients and may be a harbinger of dementia. In view of its importance, the Movement Disorder Society commissioned a task force to delineate diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in PD. The proposed diagnostic criteria are based on a literature review and expert consensus. This article provides guidelines to characterize the clinical syndrome and methods for its diagnosis. The criteria will require validation, and possibly refinement, as additional research improves our understanding of the epidemiology, presentation, neurobiology, assessment, and long-term course of this clinical syndrome. These diagnostic criteria will support future research efforts to identify at the earliest stage those PD patients at increased risk of progressive cognitive decline and dementia who may benefit from clinical interventions at a predementia stage. PMID:22275317

  12. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated? PMID:19477657

  13. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites. PMID:23512728

  14. Breeding soundness evaluations of 3,648 yearling beef bulls using the 1993 Society for Theriogenology guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, S P; Spitzer, J C; Hopkins, F M; Higdon, H L; Bridges, W C

    2002-09-01

    Our objective was to perform a retrospective analysis of breeding soundness evaluations (BSEs) as classified by the 1993 Society for Theriogenology (SFT) guidelines [Chenoweth et al., Guidelines for using the bull breeding soundness evaluation form, in: Theriogenology Handbook, 1993, pp. B-10]. Data included BSE information obtained from five performance-testing stations in South Carolina (SC1, SC2, SC3) and Tennessee (TN1, TN2) from 1986 through 1999 on 3648 Angus, Brangus, Charolais, Chianina, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Polled Hereford, Santa Gertrudis, Simbrah, and Simmental bulls. Analyses were simplified by classifying all bulls as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory potential breeders. Of the 3648 bulls evaluated, 76.2% were classified as satisfactory potential breeders. Of all bulls evaluated, 4.0% were unsatisfactory due to inadequate spermatozoal motility, 7.0% due to inadequate spermatozoal morphology and 2.6% due to a combination of inadequate motility and morphology. Unsatisfactory classifications due to non-spermatozoal parameters out of all bulls were 10.2%, with 7.1% for inadequate scrotal circumference and 3.1% for physical abnormalities. For satisfactory and unsatisfactory bulls, respectively, means and standard deviations were 35.8 +/- 2.7 and 33.0 +/- 4.1 cm (P < 0.001) for scrotal circumference, 63 +/- 18 and 35 +/- 24% (P < 0.001) for percent motility, and 86 +/- 7 and 63 +/- 21% (P < 0.001) for percent normal morphology. PMID:12212894

  15. Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: management of recent-onset atrial fibrillation and flutter in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Macle, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia managed by emergency physicians. There is increasing evidence that most patients with recent-onset AF or atrial flutter (AFL) can be safely managed in the emergency department (ED) without the need for hospital admission. The priorities for ED management of recent-onset AF/AFL include rapid assessment of potential hemodynamic instability and identification and treatment of the underlying or precipitating cause. A careful evaluation of the patient's history should be performed to determine the time of onset of the arrhythmia. All patients should be stratified using a predictive index for the risk of stroke (eg, CHADS(2)). For stable patients with recent-onset AF/AFL, a strategy of either rate control or rhythm control could be selected based on multiple factors including the duration of AF and the severity of symptoms. If a strategy of rhythm control has been selected, either electrical or pharmacologic cardioversion may be used. Before proceeding to cardioversion in the absence of systemic anticoagulation, physicians must be confident that the duration of AF/AFL is clearly <48 hours and that the patient is not at a particularly high risk of stroke. When the duration of AF/AFL is >48 hours or uncertain, rate control should be optimized first and the patients should receive therapeutic anticoagulation for 3 weeks before and 4 weeks after planned cardioversion. Adequate follow-up of patients with recent-onset AF/AFL is recommended to identify structural heart disease and evaluate the need for long-term antithrombotic or antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:21329861

  16. [European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of complex grown-up congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Miltner, B; Lancellotti, P; Seghaye, M-C

    2014-01-01

    The number of patients with Grown-Up Congenital Heart disease (GUCH) consulting adult cardiologists is steadily increasing. These patients have either a non-diagnosed congenital heart disease revealed at adulthood, or a diagnosed congenital heart disease for which one or multiple interventions have possibly been performed during childhood. In this article, we summarize the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology of 2010 for complex congenital heart disease. PMID:24640304

  17. Cancer screening in the United States, 2015: a review of current American cancer society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brooks, Durado; Doroshenk, Mary; Fedewa, Stacey; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection along with a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines. The latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) also is described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Affordable Care Act, including the expansion of the Medicaid program. PMID:25581023

  18. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally, percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research. PMID:22424518

  19. Consensus document on the radial approach in percutaneous cardiovascular interventions: position paper by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions and Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care** and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Martial; Pristipino, Christian; Di Mario, Carlo; Nolan, James; Ludwig, Josef; Tubaro, Marco; Sabate, Manel; Mauri-Ferré, Josepa; Huber, Kurt; Niemelä, Kari; Haude, Michael; Wijns, William; Dudek, Dariusz; Fajadet, Jean; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2013-03-01

    Radial access use has been growing steadily but, despite encouraging results, still varies greatly among operators, hospitals, countries and continents. Twenty years from its introduction, it was felt that the time had come to develop a common evidence-based view on the technical, clinical and organisational implications of using the radial approach for coronary angiography and interventions. The European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) has, therefore, appointed a core group of European and non-European experts, including pioneers of radial angioplasty and operators with different practices in vascular access supported by experts nominated by the Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Their goal was to define the role of the radial approach in modern interventional practice and give advice on technique, training needs, and optimal clinical indications. PMID:23354100

  20. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

    2014-08-01

    A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD. PMID:24917550

  1. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in pregnancy in relation to current guidelines of the Polish Society of Arterial Hypertension from 2011].

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak-Chiche?, Ludwina; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2012-10-01

    Arterial hypertension concerns 7-10% of pregnancies and leads to an increased risk of complications for both, the mother and the child. This rate will probably rise in the years to come due to the notable tendency among women to delay the decision to become pregnant - values of blood pressure and occurrence of arterial hypertension increase with age, as well as due to the growing problem of obesity resulting from inappropriate dietary habits and lack of regular everyday physical activity. Difficulties with management of that clinical condition are partly related with lack of unified and widely accepted guidelines. Different opinions in the subject of terminology and classification of pregnancy hypertension or indications for pharmacotherapy as well as choice of the optimal antihypertensive drug, emerge from objective causes such as combination of various pathogenetic factors typical for arterial hypertension itself and those connected with pregnancy elsewhere stressed priorities of therapy from the point of view of the health of the mother and of the fetus, as well as lack of randomized clinical trials due to obvious ethical purposes, but also from the fact that pregnancy hypertension is a focus of attention for different specialists - obstetricians, hypertensiologists and perinatologists. A good cooperation regarding experience and information among all of these specializations would be the most beneficial for pregnant women and their children. Lack of new modern antihypertensive agents, safe and effective in pregnancy while the older ones are being withdrawn from the market as their production is no longer cost-effective for pharmacological companies, has become an increasing problem in many countries, and Poland among them. The aim of the following publication was to present the statement on management of pregnancy hypertension from the current guidelines of the Polish Society of Arterial Hypertension 2011 to gynecologists and obstetricians, with a commentary According to the guidelines, methyldopa, labetalol (or metoprolol), long-acting nifedipine or verapamil should be used in the therapy of mild and moderate pregnancy hypertension, preferably in the given order In case of severe and life-threatening arterial hypertension, labetalol intravenously should be administered and if it is still not sufficient, eventually sodium nitroprusside or hydralazine could be ordered, bearing in mind their possible adverse effects. Unfortunately labetalol, nifedipine, hydralazine and sodium nitroprusside are no longer available in Poland, which significantly narrows the practical treatment possibilities in the pregnant population. Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor blockers are contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding, as well as aldosteron inhibitors, as suggest in the guidelines. In the paper the authors present the guidelines and also, based on the information available to date in medical journals, other hypertension pharmacotherapeutic options possible for consideration in pregnancy which could be helpful in management of severe arterial hypertension in pregnancy. PMID:23383565

  2. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  3. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  4. Key issues in carcinogen risk assessment guidelines, Society for Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Deisler, P.F. Jr.; McCallum, D.; Hilaire, C.; Spitzer, H.L.; Strauss, H.; Wilson, J.D.; Zimmerman, R.

    1993-08-01

    On December 4, 1992, the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) held a workshop, under a cooperative agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency and the California Environmental Protection Agency, to examine three issues in cancer risk assessment: (1) improvement of risk characterization; (2) use of meta-analysis; and (3) use of biological data in qualitative and quantitative risk assessments. The SRA's Organizing/Advisory Committee for the workshop recruited panels of experts to consider and present their views on each issue. The workshop did not seek consensus from the panelists. A Drafting Subcommittee of the Organizing/Advisory Committee developed its own recommendations and observations based on the information and ideas presented and discussed at the workshop. This report summarizes the recommendations and observations of the Drafting Subcommittee.

  5. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the use of epinephrine in outdoor education and wilderness settings: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Flavio G; Lemery, Jay; Johnson, David E

    2014-12-01

    The Epinephrine Roundtable took place on July 27, 2008, during the 25th Annual Meeting of the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) in Snowmass, CO. The WMS convened this roundtable to explore areas of consensus and uncertainty in the field treatment of anaphylaxis. Panelists were selected on the basis of their relevant academic or professional experience. There is a paucity of data that address the treatment of anaphylaxis in the wilderness. Anaphylaxis is a rare disease, with a sudden onset and drastic course that does not lend itself to study in randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, the panel endorsed the following position based on the limited available evidence and review of published articles, as well as expert consensus. The position represents the consensus of the panelists and is endorsed by the WMS. In 2014, the authors reviewed relevant articles published since the Epinephrine Roundtable. The following is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(4):185-187. PMID:25498258

  6. Italian Society of Hematology practice guidelines for the management of iron overload in thalassemia major and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Barosi, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Cazzola, Mario; Galanello, Renzo; Marchetti, Monia; Piga, Antonio; Tura, Sante

    2008-05-01

    New measures of iron accumulation in liver and heart (superconducting quantum inference device and magnetic resonance imaging), and oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) are available for managing iron overload in thalassemia major. To assure appropriate use of these new health technologies, the Italian Society of Hematology appointed a panel of experts to produce clinical practice-guidelines for the management of iron overload in thalassemia major and related disorders. The analytical hierarchy process, a technique for multicriteria decision analysis, was applied to relevant key questions in order to identify the alternative strategies, generate explicit criteria for their evaluation, and check how well the alternatives fulfilled the criteria. The result of a comprehensive systematic review of articles released from 1990 to 2007 was used as a source of scientific evidence to compare the decisional options pairwise, and select the final recommendation. Every step in the model was developed from questionnaires and group discussion. The resulting recommendations advise about which examination to carry out in order to plan iron chelation therapy, when to start iron chelation, which iron chelator to choose in regularly transfused patients, how to monitor iron chelation therapy, and when and how to switch standard therapy. PMID:18413891

  7. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED)

    PubMed Central

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M.; Areia, M.; de Vries, A. C.; Marcos-Pinto, R.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; O'Connor, A.; Pereira, C.; Pimentel-Nunes, P.; Correia, R.; Ensari, A.; Dumonceau, J. M.; Machado, J. C.; Macedo, G.; Malfertheiner, P.; Matysiak-Budnik, T.; Megraud, F.; Miki, K.; O'Morain, C.; Peek, R. M.; Ponchon, T.; Ristimaki, A.; Rembacken, B.; Carneiro, F.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods. PMID:22198778

  8. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS clinical expert consensus statement on the use of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices in cardiovascular care (Endorsed by the American heart assocation, the cardiological society of India, and sociedad latino Americana de cardiologia intervencion; Affirmation of value by the canadian association of interventional cardiology-association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention).

    PubMed

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. PMID:25851050

  9. [Diagnosis and conservative treatment of low back pain: review and guidelines of the Croatian Vertebrologic Society].

    PubMed

    Grazio, Simeon; Curkovi?, Bozidar; Vlak, Tonko; Kes, Vanja Basi?; Jeli?, Miroslav; Buljan, Danijel; Gnjidi?, Zoja; Nemci?, Tomislav; Grubisi?, Frane; Bori?, Igor; Kauzlari?, Neven; Mustapi?, Matej; Demarin, Vida

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very common condition with high costs of patient care. Medical doctors of various specialties from Croatia have brought an up-to-date review and guidelines for diagnosis and conservative treatment of low back pain, which should result in the application of evidence-based care and eventually better outcomes. As LBP is a multifactorial disease, it is often not possible to identify which factors may be responsible for the onset of LBP and to what extent they aggravate the patient's symptoms. In the diagnostic algorithm, patient's history and clinical examination have the key role. Furthermore, most important is to classify patients into those with nonspecific back pain, LBP associated with radiculopathy (radicular syndrome) and LBP potentially associated with suspected or confirmed severe pathology. Not solely a physical problem, LBP should be considered through psychosocial factors too. In that case, early identification of patients who will develop chronic back pain will be helpful because it determines the choice of treatment. In order to make proper assessment of a patient with LBP (i.e. pain, function), we should use validated questionnaires. Useful approach to a patient with LBP is to apply the principles of content management. Generally, acute and chronic LBP cases are treated differently. Besides providing education, in patients with acute back pain, advice seems to be crucial (especially to remain active), along with the use of drugs (primarily in terms of pain control), while in some patients spinal manipulation (performed by educated professional) or/and short-term use of lumbosacral orthotic devices can also be considered. The main goal of treating patients with chronic LBP is renewal of function, even in case of persistent pain. For chronic LBP, along with education and medical treatment, therapeutic exercise, physical therapy and massage are recommended, while in patients with a high level of disability intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach has proved to be effective. PMID:23814971

  10. Screening, Assessment, and Care of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in Adults With Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Berman, Barry S.; Gruman, Jessie; Champion, Victoria L.; Massie, Mary Jane; Holland, Jimmie C.; Partridge, Ann H.; Bak, Kate; Somerfield, Mark R.; Rowland, Julia H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. Results On the basis of content review of the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs of the ad hoc panel members. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety at periodic times across the trajectory of care. Assessment should be performed using validated, published measures and procedures. Depending on levels of symptoms and supplementary information, differing treatment pathways are recommended. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression increases the risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality. This guideline adaptation is part of a larger survivorship guideline series. Conclusion Although clinicians may not be able to prevent some of the chronic or late medical effects of cancer, they have a vital role in mitigating the negative emotional and behavioral sequelae. Recognizing and treating effectively those who manifest symptoms of anxiety or depression will reduce the human cost of cancer. PMID:24733793

  11. Efficacy of a strategy for implementing a guideline for the control of cardiovascular risk in a primary healthcare setting: the SIRVA2 study a controlled, blinded community intervention trial randomised by clusters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the methodology used to assess a strategy for implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for cardiovascular risk control in a health area of Madrid. Background The results on clinical practice of introducing CPGs have been little studied in Spain. The strategy used to implement a CPG is known to influence its final use. Strategies based on the involvement of opinion leaders and that are easily executed appear to be among the most successful. Aim The main aim of the present work was to compare the effectiveness of two strategies for implementing a CPG designed to reduce cardiovascular risk in the primary healthcare setting, measured in terms of improvements in the recording of calculated cardiovascular risk or specific risk factors in patients' medical records, the control of cardiovascular risk factors, and the incidence of cardiovascular events. Methods This study involved a controlled, blinded community intervention in which the 21 health centres of the Number 2 Health Area of Madrid were randomly assigned by clusters to be involved in either a proposed CPG implementation strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk, or the normal dissemination strategy. The study subjects were patients ? 45 years of age whose health cards showed them to belong to the studied health area. The main variable examined was the proportion of patients whose medical histories included the calculation of their cardiovascular risk or that explicitly mentioned the presence of variables necessary for its calculation. The sample size was calculated for a comparison of proportions with alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.20, and assuming that the intervention would lead to a 15% increase in the measured variables. Corrections were made for the design effect, assigning a sample size to each cluster proportional to the size of the population served by the corresponding health centre, and assuming losses of 20%. This demanded a final sample size of 620 patients. Data were analysed using summary measures for each cluster, both in making estimates and for hypothesis testing. Analysis of the variables was made on an intention-to-treat basis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01270022 PMID:21504570

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. Scientific Advisory Board, Osteoporosis Society of Canada.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend clinical practice guidelines for the assessment of people at risk for osteoporosis, and for effective diagnosis and management of the condition. OPTIONS: Screening and diagnostic methods: risk-factor assessment, clinical evaluation, measurement of bone mineral density, laboratory investigations. Prophylactic and corrective therapies: calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation, physical activity and fall-avoidance techniques, ovarian hormone therapy, bisphosphonate drugs, other drug therapies. Pain-management medications and techniques. OUTCOMES: Prevention of loss of bone mineral density and fracture; increased bone mass; and improved quality of life. EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and clinical studies and reports were examined, with emphasis on recent randomized controlled trials. Clinical practice in Canada and elsewhere was surveyed. Availability of treatment products and diagnostic equipment in Canada was considered. VALUES: Cost-effective methods and products that can be adopted across Canada were considered. A high value was given to accurate assessment of fracture risk and osteoporosis, and to increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and fracture risk and minimizing side effects of diagnosis and treatment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Proper diagnosis and management of osteoporosis minimize injury and disability, improve quality of life for patients and reduce costs to society. Rationally targeted methods of screening and diagnosis are safe and cost effective. Harmful side effects and costs of recommended therapies are minimal compared with the harms and costs of untreated osteoporosis. Alternative therapies provide a range of choices for physicians and patients. RECOMMENDATIONS: Population sets at high risk should be identified and then the diagnosis confirmed through bone densitometry. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the preferred measurement technique. Radiography can be adjunct when indicated. Calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation should be at currently recommended levels. Patients should be counselled in fall-avoidance techniques and exercises. Immobilization should be avoided. Guidelines for management of acute pain are listed. Ovarian hormone therapy is the therapy of choice for osteoporosis prevention and treatment in postmenopausal women. Bisphosphonates are an alternative therapy for women with established osteoporosis who cannot or prefer not to take ovarian hormone therapy. PMID:8873639

  13. Practice Guidelines for blood component therapy: A report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Blood Component Therapy.

    PubMed

    1996-03-01

    In 1994, the American Society of Anesthesiologists established the Task Force on Blood Component Therapy to develop evidence-based indications for transfusing red blood cells, platelets, fresh-frozen plasma, and cryoprecipitate in perioperative and peripartum settings. The guidelines were developed according to an explicit methodology. The principal conclusions of the task force are that red blood cell transfusions should not be dictated by a single hemoglobin "trigger" but instead should be based on the patient's risks of developing complications of inadequate oxygenation. Red blood cell transfusion is rarely indicated when the hemoglobin concentration is greater than 10 g/dL and is almost always indicated when it is less than 6 g/dL. The indications for autologous transfusion may be more liberal than for allogeneic (homologous) transfusion. The risks of bleeding in surgical and obstetric patients are determined by the extent and type of surgery, the ability to control bleeding, the actual and anticipated rate of bleeding and the consequences of uncontrolled bleeding. Prophylactic platelet transfusion is ineffective when thrombocytopenia is due to increased platelet destruction. Surgical and obstetric patients with microvascular bleeding usually require platelet transfusion if the platelet count is less than 50 times 10(9)/l and rarely therapy if it is greater than 100 times 10(9)/l. Fresh-frozen plasma is indicated for urgent reversal of warfarin therapy, correction of known coagulation factor deficiencies for which specific concentrates are unavailable, and correction of microvascular bleeding when prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times are >1.5 times normal. It is contraindicated for augmentation of plasma volume or albumin concentration. Cryoprecipitate should be considered for patients with von Willebrand's disease unresponsive to desmopressin, bleeding patients with von Willebrand's disease, and bleeding patients with fibrinogen levels below 80-100 mg/dL. The task force recommends careful adherence to proper indications for blood component therapy to reduce the risks of transfusion. (Key words:Practice guide-lines: anemia: blood component therapy; coagulopathy; cryoprecipitate; fresh-frozen plasma; red blood cells; transfusion.) PMID:8659805

  14. ACC/AHA 2006 guideline update on perioperative cardiovascular evaluation for noncardiac surgery: focused update on perioperative beta-blocker therapy--a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Update the 2002 Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiovascular Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery).

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Lee A; Beckman, Joshua A; Brown, Kenneth A; Calkins, Hugh; Chaikof, Elliott L; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Freeman, William K; Froehlich, James B; Kasper, Edward K; Kersten, Judy R; Riegel, Barbara; Robb, John F

    2007-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines makes every effort to avoid any actual, potential, or perceived conflict of interest that might arise as a result of an industry relationship or personal interest of the writing committee. Specifically, all members of the writing committee, as well as peer reviewers of the document, were asked to provide disclosure statements of all such relationships that might be perceived as real or potential conflicts of interest. These statements are reviewed by the parent task force, reported orally to all members of the writing committee at each meeting, and updated and reviewed by the writing committee as changes occur. Please see Appendix 1 for author relationships with industry and Appendix 2 for peer reviewer relationships with industry. These guidelines attempt to define practices that meet the needs of most patients in most circumstances. These guideline recommendations reflect a consensus of expert opinion after a thorough review of the available, current scientific evidence and are intended to improve patient care. If these guidelines are used as the basis for regulatory/payer decisions, the ultimate goal is quality of care and serving the patient's best interests. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and patient in light of all the circumstances presented by that patient. PMID:17179239

  15. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This guideline is based on the Full Panel Report which is provided as a data supplement to the guideline. The Full Panel Report contains background and additional material related to content, methodology, evidence synthesis, rationale and references and is supported by the NHLBI Systematic Evidence ...

  16. Treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: Synopsis of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading U.S. cause of death, lost quality of life and medical costs. Nearly one in three Americans die from heart disease and stroke. Most ASCVD is preventable through a healthy lifestyle and effective treatment of cholesterol and blood pressure...

  17. Interventional spine and pain procedures in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications: guidelines from the american society of regional anesthesia and pain medicine, the European society of regional anaesthesia and pain therapy, the american academy of pain medicine, the international neuromodulation society, the north american neuromodulation society, and the world institute of pain.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer; Benzon, Honorio T; Provenzano, David A; Buvanendran, Asokumar; De Andres, José; Deer, Timothy R; Rauck, Richard; Huntoon, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Interventional spine and pain procedures cover a far broader spectrum than those for regional anesthesia, reflecting diverse targets and goals. When surveyed, interventional pain and spine physicians attending the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 11th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting exhorted that existing ASRA guidelines for regional anesthesia in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed that procedure-specific and patient-specific factors necessitated separate guidelines for pain and spine procedures.In response, ASRA formed a guidelines committee. After preliminary review of published complication reports and studies, committee members stratified interventional spine and pain procedures according to potential bleeding risk as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk procedures. The ASRA guidelines were deemed largely appropriate for the low- and intermediate-risk categories, but it was agreed that the high-risk targets required an intensive look at issues specific to patient safety and optimal outcomes in pain medicine.The latest evidence was sought through extensive database search strategies and the recommendations were evidence-based when available and pharmacology-driven otherwise. We could not provide strength and grading of these recommendations as there are not enough well-designed large studies concerning interventional pain procedures to support such grading. Although the guidelines could not always be based on randomized studies or on large numbers of patients from pooled databases, it is hoped that they will provide sound recommendations and the evidentiary basis for such recommendations. PMID:25899949

  18. Treatment planning methodology for the Miami Multichannel Applicator following the American Brachytherapy Society recently published guidelines: the Lahey Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Mower, Herbert W; McKee, Andrea B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a standardized procedure from simulation to treatment delivery for the multichannel Miami applicator, in order to increase planning consistency and reduce errors. A plan is generated prior to the 1st treatment using the CT images acquired with the applicator in place, and used for all 3 fractions. To confirm the application placement before each treatment fraction, an AP image is acquired and compared with the AP baseline image taken at simulation. A preplanning table is generated using the EBRT doses and is used to compute the maximum allowable D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and the mean allowable dose for the upper vaginal wall per HDR brachytherapy fraction. These data are used to establish the criteria for treatment planning dose optimization. A step-by-step treatment planning approach was developed to ensure appropriate coverage for the tumor (D90 > 100% prescribed dose of 700 cGy/fraction) and the uninvolved vaginal surface (dose for the entire treatment length > 600 cGy/fraction), while keeping the organs at risk below the tolerance doses. The equivalent dose 2 Gy (EQD2) tolerances for the critical structures are based on the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recently published guidelines. An independent second check is performed before the 1st treatment using an in-house Excel spreadsheet. This methodology was successfully applied for our first few cases. For these patients: the cumulative tumor dose was 74-79 EQD2 Gy10 (ABS recommended range 70-85); tumor D90 was >100% of prescribed dose (range 101%-105%); cumulative D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower than the tolerances of 90, 75, and 75 EQD2 Gy3, respectively; cumulative upper vaginal wall mean dose was below the tolerance of 120 EQD2 Gy3; the second check agreement was within 5%. By using a standardized procedure the planning consistency was increased and all dosimetric criteria were met. PMID:23318396

  19. Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Vilmann, Peter; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Colella, Sara; Siemsen, Mette; De Leyn, Paul; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Herth, Felix J; Larghi, Alberto; Vasquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Hassan, Cesare; Crombag, Laurence; Korevaar, Daniël A; Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-06-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the European Respiratory Journal. Recommendations 1 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with abnormal mediastinal and/or hilar nodes at computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET), endosonography is recommended over surgical staging as the initial procedure (Recommendation grade A). The combination of endobronchial ultrasound with real-time guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and endoscopic (esophageal) ultrasound with fine needle aspiration, with use of a gastrointestinal (EUS-FNA) or EBUS (EUS-B-FNA) scope, is preferred over either test alone (Recommendation grade C). If the combination of EBUS and EUS-(B) is not available, we suggest that EBUS alone is acceptable (Recommendation grade C).Subsequent surgical staging is recommended, when endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement (Recommendation grade B). 2 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell peripheral lung cancer without mediastinal involvement at CT or CT-PET, we suggest that EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA should be performed before therapy, provided that one or more of the following conditions is present: (i) enlarged or fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-avid ipsilateral hilar nodes; (ii) primary tumor without FDG uptake; (iii) tumor size ??3?cm (Fig.?3a?-?c) (Recommendation grade C). If endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement, we suggest that mediastinoscopy is considered, especially in suspected N1 disease (Recommendation grade C).If PET is not available and CT does not reveal enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes, we suggest performance of EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA and/or surgical staging (Recommendation grade C). 3 In patients with suspected or proven?

  20. Evidence-based guidelines for treatment of cervical cancer in Japan: Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology (JSGO) 2007 edition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoru Nagase; Yoshiki Inoue; Naohiko Umesaki; Daisuke Aoki; Masatsugu Ueda; Hideki Sakamoto; Shigemitsu Kobayashi; Ryo Kitagawa; Takafumi Toita; Shoji Nagao; Kiyoshi Hasegawa; Ichio Fukasawa; Keiichi Fujiwara; Yoh Watanabe; Kiyoshi Ito; Hitoshi Niikura; Tsuyoshi Iwasaka; Kazunori Ochiai; Hidetaka Katabuchi; Toshiharu Kamura; Ikuo Konishi; Noriaki Sakuragi; Tadao Tanaka; Yasuo Hirai; Yuji Hiramatsu; Makio Mukai; Hiroyuki Yoshikawa; Tadao Takano; Kosuke Yoshinaga; Takeo Otsuki; Michiko Sakuma; Noriyuki Inaba; Yasuhiro Udagawa; Nobuo Yaegashi

    2010-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for gynecologic cancers have been published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and\\u000a the National Cancer Institute. Whereas these guidelines form the basis for the standard of care for gynecologic malignancies\\u000a in the United States, it has proven difficult to institute them in Japan due to differences in patient characteristics, health-care\\u000a delivery systems, and insurance programs. Therefore,

  1. ACCF/ASNC/ACR/AHA/ASE/SCCT/SCMR/SNM 2009 appropriate use criteria for cardiac radionuclide imaging: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Robert C; Berman, Daniel S; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Heidenreich, Paul A; Henkin, Robert E; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pohost, Gerald M; Williams, Kim A

    2009-06-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac radionuclide imaging (RNI) is frequently considered. This document is a revision of the original Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (SPECT MPI) Appropriateness Criteria, published 4 years earlier, written to reflect changes in test utilization and new clinical data, and to clarify RNI use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine appropriate use criteria (AUC) on a frequent basis. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Sixty-seven clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of cardiac RNI for diagnosis and risk assessment in intermediate- and high-risk patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while testing in low-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Additionally, use for perioperative testing was found to be inappropriate except for high selected groups of patients. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making, test performance, and reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:19451357

  2. Implementing ethics in the professions: preparing guidelines on scientific communication for the Society for Neuroscience. Commentary on 'Implementing ethics in the professions: examples from environmental epidemiology' (Soskolne and Sieswerda).

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Michael J

    2003-04-01

    In 1994, the governing council of the Society for Neuroscience was asked to make a brief statement on an issue regarding responsible conduct in publishing. The present article reviews how that initial request grew over the next four years into a lengthy document. Drawing on that experience, which was presided over by the author, comments are made about the potential impact of such guidelines, the lessons learned, and the proper role of professional societies in promoting responsible conduct in research. PMID:12774651

  3. AACE\\/TOS\\/ASMBS Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey I. Mechanick; Robert F. Kushner; Harvey J. Sugerman; J. Michael Gonzalez-Campoy; Maria L. Collazo-Clavell; Adam F. Spitz; Caroline M. Apovian; Edward H. Livingston; Robert Brolin; David B. Sarwer; Wendy A. Anderson; John Dixon

    2009-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice are systematically developed statements to assist health-care professionals in medical decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document

  4. Quality Evaluation Guidelines as a Means of Renewal and Revitalisation of Services by Voluntary Associations. Report of an International League of Societies for Persons with Mental Handicap (ILSMH) Seminar (London, England, United Kingdom, April 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International League of Societies for Persons with Mental Handicaps, Brussels (Belgium).

    These guidelines for service evaluation arose out of a 1986 meeting of the International League of Societies for Persons with Mental Handicap. An introduction focuses on the concepts of support and service and the need for minimizing restrictiveness and empowering the individual. Seven principles are enumerated, specifying the rights of people…

  5. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography performed according to the guidelines of the American Society of Echocardiography in patients with mitral valve prolapse, flail, and endocarditis: Diagnostic accuracy in the identification of mitral regurgitant defects by correlation with surgical findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eustachio Agricola; Michele Oppizzi; Michele De Bonis; Francesco Maisano; Lucia Toracca; Tiziana Bove; Ottavio Alfieri

    2003-01-01

    Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography is a useful tool to study mitral regurgitation. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiplane transesophageal echocardiography performed according to the guidelines of the American Society of Echocardiography. We used 4 midesophageal and 2 transgastric views in 313 patients with degenerative lesions, endocarditic lesions, or both to identify regurgitant defects, comparing transesophageal echocardiography results with surgical findings.

  6. Impact of European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on the Use of Contrast Agents in Liver Ultrasound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riccardo Lencioni; C LOTILDE DELLA PINA; Laura Crocetti; Dania Cioni

    1. Impact of European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on the Use of Contrast\\u000a Agents in Liver Ultrasound\\u000a \\u000a Riccardo Lencioni6, Clotilde Della Pina6, Laura Crocetti6 and Dania Cioni6\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a (6) \\u000a Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncology, Transplants, and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Conclusions\\u000a Despite the improvement in detection and characterization of focal liver lesions

  7. Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas; Schmidt, C. Max; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Barthel, James S.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Merchant, Nipun B.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shaaban, Akram M.; Simeone, Diane; Pitman, Martha Bishop; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed. PMID:25191515

  8. Use of 5-?-Reductase Inhibitors for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention: American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Urological Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Barnett S.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Justman, Stewart; Somerfield, Mark R.; Albertsen, Peter C.; Blot, William J.; Ballentine Carter, H.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Godley, Paul A.; Harris, Russell P.; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wittes, Janet; Zon, Robin; Schellhammer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop an evidence-based guideline on the use of 5-?-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Health Services Committee (HSC), ASCO Cancer Prevention Committee, and the American Urological Association Practice Guidelines Committee jointly convened a Panel of experts, who used the results from a systematic review of the literature to develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of 5-ARIs for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results The systematic review completed for this guideline identified 15 randomized clinical trials that met the inclusion criteria, nine of which reported prostate cancer period prevalence. Conclusion Asymptomatic men with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ? 3.0 ng/mL who are regularly screened with PSA or are anticipating undergoing annual PSA screening for early detection of prostate cancer may benefit from a discussion of both the benefits of 5-ARIs for 7 years for the prevention of prostate cancer and the potential risks (including the possibility of high-grade prostate cancer). Men who are taking 5-ARIs for benign conditions such as lower urinary tract [obstructive] symptoms (LUTS) may benefit from a similar discussion, understanding that the improvement of LUTS relief should be weighed with the potential risks of high-grade prostate cancer from 5-ARIs (although the majority of the Panel members judged the latter risk to be unlikely). A reduction of approximately 50% in PSA by 12 months is expected in men taking a 5-ARI; however, because these changes in PSA may vary across men, and within individual men over time, the Panel cannot recommend a specific cut point to trigger a biopsy for men taking a 5-ARI. No specific cut point or change in PSA has been prospectively validated in men taking a 5-ARI. PMID:19252137

  9. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Yoshino, Takayuki; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Baba, Eishi; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2015-03-01

    The Japanese guidelines for the testing of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer have been used for the past 5 years. However, new findings of RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutations that can further predict the therapeutic effects of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy necessitated a revision of the guidelines. The revised guidelines included the following five basic requirements for RAS mutation testing to highlight a patient group in which anti-EGFR antibody therapy may be ineffective: First, anti-EGFR antibody therapy may not offer survival benefit and/or tumor shrinkage to patients with expanded RAS mutations. Thus, current methods to detect KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13) mutations are insufficient for selecting appropriate candidates for this therapy. Additional testing of extended KRAS/NRAS mutations is recommended. Second, repeated tests are not required for the detection; tissue materials of either primary or metastatic lesions are applicable for RAS mutation testing. Evaluating RAS mutations prior to anti-EGFR antibody therapy is recommended. Third, direct sequencing with manual dissection or allele-specific PCR-based methods is currently applicable for RAS mutation testing. Fourth, thinly sliced sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks are applicable for RAS mutation testing. One section stained with H&E should be provided to histologically determine whether the tissue contains sufficient amount of tumor cells for testing. Finally, RAS mutation testing must be performed in laboratories with appropriate testing procedures and specimen management practices. PMID:25800101

  10. Guidelines for the emergency management of asthma in adults. CAEP/CTS Asthma Advisory Committee. Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians and the Canadian Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, R C; Grunfeld, A F; Hodder, R V; Verbeek, P R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a set of comprehensive, standardized evidence-based guidelines for the assessment and treatment of acute asthma in adults in the emergency setting. OPTIONS: The use of medications was evaluated by class, dose, route, onset of action and optimal mode of delivery. The use of objective measurements and clinical features to assess response to therapy were evaluated in relation to the decision to admit or discharge the patient or arrange for follow-up care. OUTCOMES: Control of symptoms and disease reflected in hospital admission rates, frequency of treatment failures following discharge, resolution of symptoms and improvement of spirometric test results. EVIDENCE: Previous guidelines, articles retrieved through a search of MEDLINE, emergency medical abstracts and information from members of the expert panel were reviewed by members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Where evidence was not available, consensus was reached by the expert panel. The resulting guidelines were reviewed by members of the parent organizations. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: As many as 80% of the approximate 400 deaths from asthma each year in Canada are felt to be preventable. The use of guidelines, aggressive emergency management and consistent use of available options at discharge are expected to decrease the rates of unnecessary hospital admissions and return visits to emergency departments because of treatment failures. Substantial decreases in costs are expected from the use of less expensive drugs, or drug delivery systems, fewer hospital admissions and earlier return to full activity after discharge. RECOMMENDATIONS: Beta2-agonists are the first-line therapy for the management of acute asthma in the emergency department (grade A recommendation). Bronchodilators should be administered by the inhaled route and titrated using objective and clinical measures of airflow limitation (grade A). Metered-dose inhalers are preferred to wet nebulizers, and a chamber (spacer device) is recommended for severe asthma (grade A). Anticholinergic therapy should be added to beta 2 agonist therapy in severe and life-threatening cases and may be considered in cases of mild to moderate asthma (grade A). Aminophylline is not recommended for use in the first 4 hours of therapy (grade A). Ketamine and succinylcholine are recommended for rapid sequence intubation in life-threatening cases (grade B). Adrenaline (administered subcutaneously or intravenously), salbutamol (administered intravenously) and anesthetics (inhaled) are recommended as alternatives to conventional therapy in unresponsive life-threatening cases (grade B). Severity of airflow limitation should be determined according to the forced expiratory volume at 1 second or the peak expiratory flow rate, or both, before and after treatment and at discharge (grade A). Consideration for discharge should be based on both spirometric test results and assessment of clinical risk factors for relapse (grade A). All patients should be considered candidates for systemic corticosteroid therapy at discharge (grade A). Those requiring corticosteroid therapy should be given 30 to 60 mg of prednisone orally (or equivalent) per day for 7 to 14 days; no tapering is required (grade A). Inhaled corticosteroids are an integral component of therapy and should be prescribed for all patients receiving oral corticosteroid therapy at discharge (grade A). Patients should be given a discharge treatment plan and clear instructions for follow-up care (grade C). VALIDATION: The guidelines share the same principles of those from the British Thoracic Society and the National Institutes of Health. Two specific validation initiatives have been undertaken: (a) several Canadian centres have been involved in the collection of comprehensive administrative data to assess compliance and outcome measures and (b) a survey of Canadian emergency physicians co

  11. A report from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 (August 30-September 3 - Barcelona, Spain).

    PubMed

    Dulsat, C

    2014-09-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress is the largest cardiology conference in the world and this year ran in Barcelona from August 30 to September 3. During the meeting, more than 30,000 cardiologists from over 100 countries met to share their knowledge in all cardiovascular fields, from basic science to management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Apart from more than 4,500 interesting abstracts presented in posters and oral sessions, five new ESC Clinical Practice Guidelines were presented among the latest clinical trial results, updates and registries. PMID:25313372

  12. Cancer screening in the United States, 2013: a review of current American Cancer Society guidelines, current issues in cancer screening, and new guidance on cervical cancer screening and lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Brooks, Durado; Cokkinides, Vilma; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W

    2013-01-01

    Each year the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its recommendations for early cancer detection, a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, current ACS cancer screening guidelines are summarized, as are updated guidelines on cervical cancer screening and lung cancer screening with low-dose helical computed tomography. The latest data on the use of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey also are described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. PMID:23378235

  13. Pharmacogenomics and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established critical pathways and specific loci modulating therapeutic responses to commonly used drugs such as clopidogrel, warfarin, and statins. In addition, genomic approaches have defined mechanisms and genetic variants underlying important toxicities with these and other drugs. These findings have not only resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described to date might be deployed in clinical decision making. PMID:23689943

  14. Guidelines for noninvasive vascular laboratory testing: a report from the American Society of Echocardiography and the Society for Vascular Medicine and Biology.

    PubMed

    Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Gardin, Julius M; Jaff, Michael; Mohler, Emile; Roman, Mary; Naqvi, Tasneem Z

    2006-11-01

    Accompanying the rapid growth of interest in percutaneous vascular interventions, there has been increasing interest among cardiologists in performing noninvasive vascular testing using ultrasound. In an attempt to provide recommendations on the best practices in vascular laboratory testing, this report has been prepared by a writing group from the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and the Society for Vascular Medicine and Biology. The document summarizes principles integral to vascular duplex ultrasound--including color Doppler, spectral Doppler waveform analysis, power Doppler, and the use of contrast. Appropriate indications and interpretation of carotid artery, renal artery, abdominal aorta, and peripheral artery ultrasound imaging are described. A dedicated section summarizes noninvasive techniques for physiologic vascular testing of the lower extremity arteries--including measurement of segmental pressures and pulse volume plethysmography. The use of exercise testing in the evaluation of peripheral artery disease, ultrasound evaluation of the lower extremities after percutaneous revascularization, and the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm (PSA) is also discussed. A section on the important topic of vascular laboratory accreditation is included. Finally, additional details regarding proper technique for performance of the various vascular tests and procedures are included in the Appendix. PMID:17288127

  15. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

  16. Cardiovascular Health of Patients With Cancer and Cancer Survivors: A Roadmap to the Next Level.

    PubMed

    Barac, Ana; Murtagh, Gillian; Carver, Joseph R; Chen, Ming Hui; Freeman, Andrew M; Herrmann, Joerg; Iliescu, Cezar; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L; Okwuosa, Tochi M; Plana, Juan Carlos; Ryan, Thomas D; Rzeszut, Anne K; Douglas, Pamela S

    2015-06-30

    Many existing and emerging cancer therapies have a significant effect on the cardiovascular health of patients with cancer and cancer survivors. This paper examines current aspects of interdisciplinary cardio-oncology clinical care delivery and education in the United States and outlines how these data provide a platform for future development of the field. We present the results of the nationwide survey on cardio-oncology services, practices, and opinions, conducted among chiefs of cardiology and program directors, which demonstrate ranges of clinical activities and identify significant interest for increased educational opportunities and expert training of cardiovascular physicians in this field. The survey respondents recognized clinical relevance but emphasized lack of national guidelines, lack of funds, and limited awareness and infrastructure as the main challenges for development and growth of cardio-oncology. We discuss potential solutions to unmet needs through interdisciplinary collaboration and the active roles of professional societies and other stakeholders. PMID:26112199

  17. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat; Larsen, Michael; Souied, Eric; Schlingemann, Reinier; Eldem, Bora; Monés, Jordi; Richard, Gisbert; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has led to an overwhelming improvement in the prognosis of patients affected by neovascular AMD, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of patients. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by significant economic investments, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations in diagnostic technologies, such as optical coherence tomography, allows unprecedented high-resolution visualisation of disease morphology and provides a promising horizon for early disease detection and efficient therapeutic follow-up. However, definite conclusions from morphologic parameters are still lacking, and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state-of-the-art care to their patients. Trial registration number NCT01318941. PMID:25136079

  18. SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune ‘resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for ‘good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies. PMID:25387090

  19. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character.

  20. Prevalence and concordance of high cardiovascular disease scores in HIV/AIDS patients from Croatia and Serbia with four international algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Begovac, Josip; Dragovic, Gordana; Viskovic, Klaudija; Kusic, Jovana; Perovic Mihanovic, Marta; Lukas, Davorka; Jevtovic, Djordje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated cardiovascular risks in HIV-infected patients from Croatia and Serbia and the eligibility for statin therapy as recommended by the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines, European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines and European Society of Cardiology and the European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention [1–3]. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional analysis of consecutive patients between 40 and 79 years old who had received antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months was performed. Results Of 254 (132 from Croatia and 122 from Serbia) persons included in the study, 76% were male; median age was 49 years. Up to 51.6% of persons had a high CVD risk. The prevalence of current smoking was 42.9%, hypertension 31.5% and hypercholesterolaemia (>6.2 mmol/L) 35.4%. Statins would be recommended to 21.3% (95% CI, 16.3% to 27.4%) of persons by the EACS, 25.6% (95% CI, 20.2% to 31.9%) by ESC/EAS and 37.9% (95% CI, 31.6 to 44.6%) by the ACC/AHA guidelines. A high 5-year data collection on adverse effects of anti-HIV drugs study risk score (>5%) had a moderate agreement with the high (?20%) 10-year CVD Framingham risk score (kappa=0.47) and high (?5%) 10-year European systematic coronary risk evaluation score algorithm (kappa=0.47), and substantial agreement with the elevated (?7.5%) 10-year Pooled Cohort Atherosclerotic CVD risk equation score (kappa=0.63). Conclusion We found a high prevalence of CVD risks in patients from Croatia and Serbia. The ACC/AHA guideline would recommend statins more often than ESC/EAS and EACS guidelines. PMID:25394056

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy. PMID:19917871

  2. DGGG Guidelines Programme: Status Quo – Quo Vadis!

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Linde, I.; Bütof, C.; Kreienberg, R.; Gass, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Guidelines programme of the German Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (DGGG) is an executive part of the DGGG Guidelines Commission. It includes in-house planning and organisation of all guidelines as well as representation outside of the DGGG. This article does not concern the development of the guidelines as much as it concerns the planning, organisation, registration, editing and publication of the guidelines in context of the DGGG Guidelines programme. It targets interested parties, especially authors and coordinators of guidelines. PMID:24882875

  3. Guidelines for the antibiotic treatment of endocarditis in adults: report of the Working Party of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. S. J. Elliott; J. Foweraker; F. K. Gould; J. D. Perry; J. A. T. Sandoe

    2004-01-01

    The BSAC Guidelines on Endocarditis were last published in 1998. The Guidelines presented here have been updated and extended to reflect changes in both the antibiotic resistance characteristics of causative organisms and the availability of new antibiotics. Randomized, controlled trials suitable for the development of evidenced-based guidelines in this area are still lacking, and therefore a consensus approach has again

  4. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule prior to capsule endoscopy in these patients (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In the presence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis, ESGE recommends that dedicated small bowel cross-sectional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis or computed tomography enterography/enteroclysis should be used first (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 In patients with established Crohn's disease, based on ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends dedicated cross-sectional imaging for small-bowel evaluation since this has the potential to assess extent and location of any Crohn's disease lesions, to identify strictures, and to assess for extraluminal disease (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In patients with unremarkable or nondiagnostic findings from such cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as a subsequent investigation, if deemed to influence patient management (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). When capsule endoscopy is indicated, ESGE recommends use of the PillCam patency capsule to confirm functional patency of the small bowel (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 7 ESGE strongly recommends against the use of small-bowel capsule endoscopy for suspected coeliac disease but suggests that capsule endoscopy could be used in patients unwilling or unable to undergo conventional endoscopy (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). PMID:25826168

  5. Lipid target achievement among patients with very high and high cardiovascular risk in a lipid clinic.

    PubMed

    Barkas, Fotios; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Kostapanos, Michael S; Liamis, George; Tziallas, Dimitrios; Elisaf, Moses

    2015-04-01

    This was a retrospective study that assessed achievement of lipid-lowering treatment targets in the setting of a University Hospital Lipid Clinic. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal attainment according to National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines was recorded in 1000 consecutive adult patients followed for ?3 years (mean 8 years). The LDL-C targets according to the NCEP ATP III were attained by 66% and 86% of patients with "very high" (n = 477) and "high" (n = 408) cardiovascular risk, respectively. Fewer patients were within LDL-C goals according to the ESC/EAS guidelines: 25% and 42%. Overall, 92% of the patients were on statins: 67% were on statin monotherapy, while 33% were on combinations with ezetimibe (25%), ?-3 fatty acids (5%), fibrates (4%), or colesevelam (2%). Even in a specialist lipid clinic, a large proportion of patients are not at goal according to the recent ESC/EAS guidelines. PMID:24830420

  6. Blood Pressure Targets and Absolute Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (?60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ?60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ?20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ?20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ?20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  7. Cardiovascular Genetic Medicine: Evolving Concepts, Rationale, and Implementation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ray E. Hershberger

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular genetic medicine is devoted to the identification and understanding of cardiac conditions resulting from genetic\\u000a and genomic mechanisms and to the development and validation of diagnostic and treatment algorithms and guidelines. Cardiovascular\\u000a genetic medicine clinics now provide expert cardiovascular subspecialty care, genetic counseling and clinical genetic testing,\\u000a and will eventually provide disease-specific gene or genetic therapies. Currently, the most

  8. [Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics].

    PubMed

    Scibona, Paula; Angriman, Federico; Simonovich, Ventura; Heller, Martina M; Belloso, Waldo H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current medical practice takes into account information based on population studies and benefits observed in large populations or cohorts. However, individual patients present great differences in both toxicity and clinical efficacy that can be explained by variations in adherence, unknown drug to drug interactions and genetic variability. The latter seems to explain from 20% up to 95% of patient to patient variability. Treating patients with cardiovascular disorders faces the clinician with the challenge to include genomic analysis into daily practice. There are several examples within cardiovascular disease of treatments that can vary in toxicity or clinical usefulness based on genetic changes. One of the main factors affecting the efficacy of Clopidogrel is the phenotype associated with polymorphisms in the gene CYP 2C9. Furthermore, regarding oral anticoagulants, changes in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 play an important role in changing the clinical response to anticoagulation. When analyzing statin treatment, one of their main toxicities (myopathy) can be predicted by the SLCO1B1 polymorphism. The potential for prediction of toxicity and clinical efficacy from the use of genetic analysis warrants further studies aiming towards its inclusion in daily clinical practice. PMID:24636047

  9. Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes Preamble

    E-print Network

    Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes Preamble The following Guidelines for Doctoral Training at Max Planck Institutes supplement they are incompatible with these regulations. 1. The Max Planck Society is committed

  10. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011. PMID:21572115

  11. Pharmacogenomics: Application to the Management of Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J A Johnson; L H Cavallari; A L Beitelshees; J P Lewis; A R Shuldiner; D M Roden

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen substantial advances in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics. Genetic determinants of response to clopidogrel and warfarin have been defined, resulting in changes to the product labels for these drugs that suggest the use of genetic information as a guide for therapy. Genetic tests are available, as are guidelines for incorporation of genetic information into patient-care decisions. These guidelines

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation exercise prescription in chronic obstructive lung disease: US survey and review of guidelines and clinical practices.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Chris; Fullwood, M Dot; Rigler, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, progressive disorder associated with disabling symptoms, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and substantial morbidity and mortality. Current national guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Many PR exercise programs are based on guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine. Recommendations have also been published by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the American Thoracic Society. Translating exercise science into effective training and clinical care requires interpretation and the use of diverse national PR guidelines and recommendations. Pulmonary rehabilitation clinicians often vary in their education and background, with most nurses and respiratory care practitioners lacking formal training in exercise physiology. Patients often have comorbidities that may further complicate exercise provision and prescription. This article describes the results of an informal, nonscientific survey of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation members exploring current PR exercise prescription practices as a basis for discussion and reviews current national exercise recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further, it describes areas of uncertainty regarding exercise prescription in PR and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines, clinician preparedness, and patient complexity. PMID:23846840

  13. Non-cardiovascular effects associated with statins.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chintan S; Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Statins form the pharmacologic cornerstone of the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In addition to beneficial cardiovascular effects, statins seem to have multiple non-cardiovascular effects. Although early concerns about statin induced hepatotoxicity and cancer have subsided owing to reassuring evidence, two of the most common concerns that clinicians have are myopathy and diabetes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that statins are associated with a modest increase in the risk of myositis but not the risk of myalgia. Severe myopathy (rhabdomyolysis) is rare and often linked to a statin regimen that is no longer recommended (simvastatin 80 mg). Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses suggest an increase in the risk of diabetes with statins, particularly with higher intensity regimens in people with two or more components of the metabolic syndrome. Other non-cardiovascular effects covered in this review are contrast induced nephropathy, cognition, cataracts, erectile dysfunction, and venous thromboembolism. Currently, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines indicate that the cardiovascular benefits of statins generally outweigh non-cardiovascular harms in patients above a certain threshold of cardiovascular risk. Literature is also accumulating on the potential non-cardiovascular benefits of statins, which could lead to novel applications of this class of drug in the future. PMID:25035309

  14. Tobacco and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Prajeena; Pant, Sadip; Rodriguez, Alexis Phillip; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-04-01

    Tobacco consumption has been inextricably intertwined with society and its evolution. At one time, centuries ago, thought to be a sign of refinement and nobility, fortunately, this perception has been changing worldwide. Currently, this change in perception has been so dramatic that laws are enacted to limit tobacco exposure through second-hand smokers. Countless studies continue to emerge on tobacco's healthcare toll to the point that we now consider indisputable facts that smokers have a higher incidence of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, among many others. However, there are other less well-known emerging facts that still require close attention such as the effect on the immune and hematopoietic systems. Tobacco smoke is injurious to all major organs in our bodies. With over 30 known carcinogens, it should not be surprising that it affects all aspects of human health. In this chapter, we will focus on the effects of tobacco on cardiovascular health. PMID:25225032

  15. Primary prevention with statins in cardiovascular diseases: A Saudi Arabian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, D.; Jahan, K.; Habibullah, K.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) constitutes one of the major causes of deaths and disabilities, globally claiming 17.3 million lives a year. Incidence of CVD is expected to rise to 25 million by 2030, and Saudi Arabia, already witnessing a rapid rise in CVDs, is no exception. Statins are the drugs of choice in established CVDs. In the recent past, evidence was increasingly suggesting benefits in primary prevention. But over the last decade Saudi Arabia has a witnessed significant rise in CVD-related deaths. Smoking, high-fat, low-fiber dietary intake, lack of exercise, sedentary life, high blood cholesterol and glucose levels were reported as frequent CVD-risk factors among Saudis, who may therefore be considered for primary prevention with statin. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, in particular, indicates that treatment should be directed at reducing the disorder with lipid-modifying agents and therapeutic lifestyle changes. The recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines has reported lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target levels, prescribed by the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). The new ACC/AHA guidelines have overemphasized the use of statin while ignoring lipid targets, and have recommended primary prevention with moderate-intensity statin to individuals with diabetes aged 40–75 years and with LDL-C 70–189 mg/dL. Treatment with statin was based on estimated 10-year atherosclerotic-CVD (ASCVD) risk in individuals aged 40–75 years with LDL-C 70 to 189 mg/dL and without clinical ASCVD or diabetes. Adoption of the recent ACC/AHA guidelines will lead to inclusion of a large population for primary prevention with statins, and would cause over treatment to some who actually would not need statin therapy but instead should have been recommended lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, adoption of this guideline may potentially increase the incidences of statin intolerance and side-effects. On the other hand, the most widely used lipid management guideline, the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, targets lipid levels at different stages of disease activity before recommending statins. Hence, the 2011 ESC/EAC still offers a holistic and pragmatic approach to treating lipid abnormalities in CVD. Therefore, it is the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, and not the recent ACC/AHA guidelines, that should be adopted to draw guidance on primary prevention of CVD in Saudi Arabia.

  16. Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

    2014-11-01

    Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. PMID:25354948

  17. Sodium intake and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-03-13

    Sodium is an essential nutrient. Increasing sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure, whereas low sodium intake results in increased renin and aldosterone levels. Randomized controlled trials have reported reductions in blood pressure with reductions in sodium intake, to levels of sodium intake <1.5 g/d, and form the evidentiary basis for current population-wide guidelines recommending low sodium intake. Although low sodium intake (<2.0 g/d) has been achieved in short-term feeding clinical trials, sustained low sodium intake has not been achieved by any of the longer term clinical trials (>6-month duration). It is assumed that the blood pressure-lowering effects of reducing sodium intake to low levels will result in large reductions in cardiovascular disease globally. However, current evidence from prospective cohort studies suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and cardiovascular events, based on studies from >300 000 people, and suggests that the lowest risk of cardiovascular events and death occurs in populations consuming an average sodium intake range (3-5 g/d). The increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with higher sodium intake (>5 g/d) is most prominent in those with hypertension. A major deficit in the field is the absence of large randomized controlled trials to provide definitive evidence on optimal sodium intake for preventing cardiovascular events. Pending such trials, current evidence would suggest a recommendation for moderate sodium intake in the general population (3-5 g/d), with targeting the lower end of the moderate range among those with hypertension. PMID:25767289

  18. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI))

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, K.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Bone, H.-G.; Bardutzky, J.; Dempfle, C.-E.; Forst, H.; Gastmeier, P.; Gerlach, H.; Gründling, M.; John, S.; Kern, W.; Kreymann, G.; Krüger, W.; Kujath, P.; Marggraf, G.; Martin, J.; Mayer, K.; Meier-Hellmann, A.; Oppert, M.; Putensen, C.; Quintel, M.; Ragaller, M.; Rossaint, R.; Seifert, H.; Spies, C.; Stüber, F.; Weiler, N.; Weimann, A.; Werdan, K.; Welte, T.

    2010-01-01

    Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources. PMID:20628653

  19. [Influenza and pneumococcal immunization in cardiovascular prevention].

    PubMed

    Sosa Liprandi, María Inés; Sosa Liprandi, Alvaro; Fernández, Alberto; Stecher, Daniel; Bonvehí, Pablo; Verón, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A group of interdisciplinary experts (cardiologists, clinicians, infectologists met with the purpose of analyzing the evidence revealed by the relationship between respiratory diseases caused by influenza, pneumococcal diseases and cardiovascular events, and the role played by immunization strategies applied in cardiovascular prevention. The present statement summarizes the conclusions reached by the expertise of the aforementioned professionals. Systematic revisions imply consistent evidence that influenza and pneumococcal infection lead to acute myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. Studies published during the last 15 years suggest that vaccination against influenza and S. pneumoniae reduce the risk of acute coronary syndromes. With the current evidence, and considering cost-effectiveness, reducing operating expenses and safety profile of the vaccines, scientific societies, national and international government health agencies strongly recommend incorporating immunization programs in those patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24918678

  20. Dutch guidelines for interventional cardiology: institutional and operator competence and requirements for training

    PubMed Central

    Aengevaeren, W.R.M.; Laarman, G.J.; Suttorp, M.J.; ten Berg, J.M.; van Boven, A.J.; de Boer, M.J.; Piek, J.J.; van Ommen, G.V.A.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Smits, P.; Deckers, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional cardiology is an expanding field within cardiovascular medicine and today it is generally accepted that cardiologists require specific training, knowledge and skills. Hospitals where coronary interventions are performed must be properly equipped and able to provide specialised care. Percutaneous coronary interventions are frequently used for coronary revascularisation. The public should have confidence in the uniformity of high quality care. Therefore, such quality of care should be maintained by certification of the individual operators, general guidelines for institutional requirements and formal audits. The Netherlands Society of Cardiology (NVVC) will be implementing a new registration system for cardiologists with a subspecialisation that will include registration for interventional cardiology. The NVVC asked the Working Group of Interventional Cardiology (WIC) to update the 1994 Dutch guidelines on operator and institutional competence, and requirements for training in interventional cardiology in order to incorporate them into the official directives. The present guidelines represent the expert opinion of the Dutch interventional cardiology community and are in accordance with international regulations. After two rounds of discussion, the NVVC approved the guidelines in November 2004 during the autumn meeting. PMID:25696433

  1. AHA\\/ACC Guidelines for Preventing Heart Attack and Death in Patients With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sidney C. Smith; Steven N. Blair; Robert O. Bonow; Lawrence M. Brass; Manuel D. Cerqueira; Kathleen Dracup; Valentin Fuster; Antonio Gotto; Scott M. Grundy; Nancy Houston Miller; Alice Jacobs; Daniel Jones; Ronald M. Krauss; Lori Mosca; Ira Ockene; Richard C. Pasternak; Thomas Pearson; Marc A. Pfeffer; Rodman D. Starke; Kathryn A. Taubert

    improves patient survival, reduces recurrent events and the need for interventional procedures, and improves the quality of life for these patients. The compelling evidence from recent clinical trials was the impetus to revise the 1995 guidelines. As examples, the many lipid reduction trials have generated significant changes in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Adult Treatment Panel III report.

  2. Safety guideline: reducing the risk from cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture 2015: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland British Orthopaedic Association British Geriatric Society.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R; White, S M; Moppett, I K; Parker, M J; Chesser, T J S; Costa, M L; Johansen, A; Wilson, H; Timperley, A J

    2015-05-01

    Concise guidelines are presented for the preparation and conduct of anaesthesia and surgery in patients undergoing cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture. The Working Party specifically considered recent publications highlighting complications occurring during the peri-operative period. The advice presented is based on previously published advice and clinical studies. PMID:25866041

  3. Research Ethical Guidelines and Anonymity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walford, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    That researchers should give anonymity to research sites and to the individuals involved in research is usually taken as an ethical norm. Such a norm is embodied internationally in most of the ethical guidelines and codes of practice of the various educational, sociological and psychological research associations and societies. This paper…

  4. Executive Summary: The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Byington, Carrie L.; Shah, Samir S.; Alverson, Brian; Carter, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Mace, Sharon E.; McCracken, George H.; Moore, Matthew R.; St Peter, Shawn D.; Stockwell, Jana A.; Swanson, Jack T.

    2011-01-01

    Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and surgery. These guidelines are intended for use by primary care and subspecialty providers responsible for the management of otherwise healthy infants and children with CAP in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Site-of-care management, diagnosis, antimicrobial and adjunctive surgical therapy, and prevention are discussed. Areas that warrant future investigations are also highlighted. PMID:21890766

  5. [Guideline-conform diagnostics in language impairments].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Jungheim, M; Schwemmle, C; Miller, S

    2014-04-01

    In order to distinguish more accurately and easily between language difficulties in need of therapy or special support versus language impairments a S2K guideline was developed by interdisciplinary teams of different (medical) societies and professional associations. This guideline was published in 2011 and has replaced all existing monodisciplinary guidelines. According to the new S2K guideline standardised measures of language testing are mandatory. Apart from reviewing the S2K guidelines, this article aims to suggest how these guidelines can be established in clinical practice. By closely following this new guideline, testing and diagnosing children with language difficulties is believed to be enhanced considerably, and also comply with quality management standards. PMID:24577293

  6. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  7. Draft guidelines regarding appropriate use of (131)I-MIBG radiotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors : Guideline Drafting Committee for Radiotherapy with (131)I-MIBG, Committee for Nuclear Oncology and Immunology, The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Jinguji, Megumi; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Since the 1980s when clinical therapeutic trials were initiated, (131)I-MIBG radiotherapy has been used in foreign countries for unresectable neuroendocrine tumors including malignant pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. In Japan, (131)I-MIBG radiotherapy has not been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare; however, personally imported (131)I-MIBG is now available for therapeutic purposes in a limited number of institutions. These updated draft guidelines aim to provide useful information concerning (131)I-MIBG radiotherapy, to help prevent side effects and protect physicians, nurses, other health care professionals, patients and their families from radiation exposure. The committee has also provided appendices on topics such as practical guidance for attending physicians, patient management, and referring physicians. PMID:25773397

  8. NIH Stem Cell Research Guidelines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A hot topic of recent news has been the lifting of the ban, put in place by the NIH in January 1999, on research using human pluripotent stem cells derived from human embryos and fetal tissue. The ban was lifted on August 25, 2000 with the strong endorsement of President Clinton. Now, the National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Research Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells is available online in HTML format. According to the site, "The NIH received approximately 50,000 comments from members of Congress, patient advocacy groups, scientific societies, religious organizations, and private citizens. This Notice presents the final Guidelines together with NIH's response to the substantive public comments that addressed provisions of the Guidelines." (For more on the NIH guidelines, see the August 25, 2000 Scout Report).

  9. Pretransplant cardiovascular evaluation and posttransplant cardiovascular risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James B Young; Hans-Hellmut Neumayer; Robert D Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Modern immunosuppression has expanded access to kidney transplantation by limiting the risk of rejection. However, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the principal cause of death with a functioning graft, threatening the long-term survival of transplant recipients. The article reviews the leading risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity both before and after kidney transplantation. Evidence linking poor renal function to CVD is discussed.

  10. COASTAL GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: Developed to support effluent guidelines for the coastal subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential regulatory limits, and the cost of regulation. Legislation/Enabling Authority: ...

  11. Homocysteine and cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arduino A Mangoni; Stephen H. D Jackson

    2002-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite the well-known effectiveness of vitamin supplementation in reducing homocysteine levels, it is not known whether lowering of homocysteine levels is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to discuss the epidemiologic evidence about the relation between homocysteine and cardiovascular disease, the pathophysiologic

  12. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Huang, Bin [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States) [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Divison of Cancer Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Tucker, Thomas C. [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  13. 1997 Guidelines for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Unexplained Fever

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter T. Hughes; Donald Armstrong; Gerald P. Bodey; Arthur E. Brown; John E. Edwards; Ronald Feld; Philip Pizzo; Kenneth V. I. Rolston; Jerry L. Shenep; Lowell S. Young

    1997-01-01

    This is the first in a series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide assistance to clinicians when making decisions on treating the conditions specified in each guideline. The targeted providers are internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners. The targeted patients and setting for

  14. [Sk2 guidelines"diagnosis and therapy of snoring in adults" : compiled by the sleep medicine working group of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Dreher, A; Heiser, C; Herzog, M; Kühnel, T; Maurer, J T; Pistner, H; Sitter, H; Steffen, A; Verse, T

    2013-11-01

    These guidelines aim to facilitate high quality medical care of adults with snoring problems. The guidelines were devised for application in both in- and outpatient environments and are directed primarily at all those concerned with the diagnosis and therapy of snoring. According to the AWMF three-level concept, these represent S2k guidelines.A satisfactory definition of snoring does not currently exist. Snoring is the result of vibration of soft tissue structures in narrow regions of the upper airway during breathing while asleep. Ultimately, these vibrations are caused by the sleep-associated decrease in muscle tone in the area of the upper airway dilator muscles. A multitude of risk factors for snoring have been described and its occurrence is multifactorial. Data relating to the frequency of snoring vary widely, depending on the way in which the data are collected. Snoring is usually observed in middle-aged individuals and affected males predominate. Clinical diagnosis of snoring should comprise a free evaluation of the patient's medical history. Where possible this should also involve their bed partner and the case history can be complimented by questionnaires. To determine the airflow relevant structures, a clinical examination of the nose should be performed. This examination may also include nasal endoscopy. Examination of the oropharynx is particularly important and should be performed. The larynx and the hypopharynx should be examined. The size of the tongue and the condition of the mucous membranes should be recorded as part of the oral cavity examination, as should the results of a dental assessment. Facial skeleton morphology should be assessed for orientation purposes. Technical examinations may be advisable in individual cases. In the instance of suspected sleep-related breathing disorders, relevant comorbidities or where treatment for snoring has been requested, an objective sleep medicine examination should be performed. Snoring is not-at least as we currently understand it-a disease associated with a medical threat; therefore there is currently no medical necessity to treat the condition. All overweight patients with snoring problems should strive to lose weight. If snoring is associated with the supine position, positional therapy can be considered. Some cases of snoring can be appropriately treated using an intraoral device. Selected minimally invasive surgical procedures on the soft palate can be recommended to treat snoring, provided that examinations have revealed a suitable anatomy. The choice of technique is determined primarily by the individual anatomy. At an appropriate interval after the commencement or completion a therapeutic measure, a follow-up examination should be conducted to assess the success of the therapy and to aid in the planning of any further treatments. PMID:24221222

  15. Metabolic biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jana E; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac and peripheral vascular biomarkers are increasingly becoming targets of both research and clinical practice. As of 2008, cardiovascular-related medical care accounts for greater than 20% of all the economic costs of illness in the United States. In the age of burgeoning financial pressures on the entire health care system, never has it been more important to try to understand who is at risk for cardiovascular disease in order to prevent new events. In this paper, we will discuss the cost of cardiovascular disease to society, clarify the definition of and need for biomarkers, offer an example of a current biomarker, namely high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and finally examine the approval process for utilizing these in clinical practice. PMID:23386789

  16. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT-scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric edema, small-bowel feces sign, devascularization) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water-Soluble-Contrast-Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The radiologic appearance of WSCM in the colon within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM maybe administered either orally or via NGT both immediately at admission or after failed conservative treatment for 48 hours. The use of WSCM is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution, surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not decrease recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery. Open surgery is often used for strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach is advisable using open access technique. Access in left upper quadrant or left flank is the safest and only completely obstructing adhesions should be identified and lysed with cold scissors. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably if first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band. A low threshold for open conversion should be maintained. Peritoneal adhesions should be prevented. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin decrease incidence of adhesions. Icodextrin may reduce the risk of re-obstruction. HA cannot reduce need of surgery. Adhesions quantification and scoring maybe useful for achieving standardized assessment of adhesions severity and for further research in diagnosis and treatment of ASBO. PMID:24112637

  17. Italian Society of Hematology, Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation guidelines for the management of indolent, nonfollicular B-cell lymphoma (marginal zone, lymphoplasmacytic, and small lymphocytic lymphoma).

    PubMed

    Tarella, Corrado; Arcaini, Luca; Baldini, Luca; Barosi, Giovanni; Billio, Atto; Marchetti, Monia; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Vitolo, Umberto; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Tura, Sante

    2015-02-01

    Indolent nonfollicular B-cell lymphoma (INFBCL) has been classified in the World Health Organization 2008 system among the mature B-cell neoplasms and includes nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL), and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). Recently, the array and sequencing technologies have provided new insights into their molecular pathogenesis; the molecular discoveries, however, have not yet translated into consistent changes in their management. Thus, the therapy for INFBCL remains challenging. To promote widespread adoption of appropriate clinical practice, the Italian Society of Hematology and affiliate societies (Italian Society of Experimental Hematology and Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation) reviewed the evidence regarding the management of these lymphomas to produce evidence-based recommendations aimed at contributing to therapy optimization and standardization. We used the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, which is based on a sequential assessment of the quality of evidence, followed by an analysis of the benefit/risk balance and subsequent judgment about the strength of recommendations. For issues without consistent evidence, we used the consensus technique. We have provided separate recommendations for diagnostic and staging requirements, first-line therapy, and postinduction therapy for the most frequent INFBCLs (ie, LPL, SLL, and nodal, splenic, and gastric MZL). PMID:25108679

  18. Misguided guidelines for managing labor.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Wayne R; Friedman, Emanuel A

    2015-06-01

    In a recent review we expressed concerns about new guidelines for the assessment and management of labor recommended jointly by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). These guidelines are based heavily on a new concept of how cervical dilatation and fetal descent progress, derived from the work of Zhang et al. In their Viewpoint article they have addressed, but not allayed, the concerns we described in our review. We assert that the dilatation curve promulgated by Zhang et al cannot be reconciled with direct clinical observation. Even if they were correct, however, it still does not follow that the ACOG/SMFM guidelines should recommend replacing the coherent system of identifying and managing labor aberrations described by Friedman. That system is grounded in well-established clinical principles based on decades of use and the objectively documented association of some labor abnormalities with poor fetal and maternal outcomes. Recommendations for new clinical management protocols should require the demonstration of superior outcomes through extensive, preferably prospective, assessment. Using untested guidelines for the management of labor may adversely affect women and children. Even if those guidelines were to reduce the currently excessive cesarean delivery rate, the price of that benefit is likely to be a trade-off in harm to parturients and their offspring. The nature and degree of that harm needs to be documented before considering adoption of the guidelines. PMID:25891996

  19. Brand Guidelines molecular foundry brand guidelines

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jason R.

    Brand Guidelines july 2012 #12;molecular foundry brand guidelines Vision Our vision defines why we success. People / Research / Collaboration / Enthusiasm #12;Signature #12;molecular foundry brand guidelines Signature :: 5 Signature :: Introduction The Molecular Foundry signature consists of the logotype

  20. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... SCAI-QIT PCI Risk Assessment Tools Advocacy Interventional Cardiology Designation Contribute to SCAI PAC Get Involved Advocacy ... Miss Out on the Education from Interventional & Invasive Cardiology's Annual Meeting in San Diego with SCAI 2015 ...

  1. [Quality management in cardiovascular echography].

    PubMed

    Gullace, Giuseppe

    2002-12-01

    The quality management of an organization can be defined as the ability to identify, plan and implement programs of measure, analysis, verification and control that allow to monitor management, resources, activities, processes and output/outcome of the same organization, including the satisfaction of the customers. Whatever the model used, it is demonstrated that the management-quality system, either for professional quality or for organization, turns out to be effective even in the health organizations within and to any level of organizational-structural complexity. The present paper concerns the experience of the Italian Society of Cardiovascular Echography (SIEC) on quality certification, both as a scientific society compared to other health organizations and to cardiovascular echo laboratories, and the definition of minimum requirements for the accreditation of the same laboratories. The model most frequently used for quality management is represented by the ISO 9000: Vision 2000, that is a management model with specific reference to the organization and the customer satisfaction. The model applied to the health structure needs a rapid change in mentality that addresses the operators to define, share and achieve objectives to be brought on by means of an active collaboration, group activity and deep sense of belonging necessary to the attainment of expected objectives. When the model is applied by a scientific society, it is necessary to take into account the different structural and functional organization, the constitution and the operators differing on the point of view of origin, experiences, mentality, and roles. The ISO 9000: Vision 2000 model can be applied also to the cardiovascular echo laboratory which may be compared to a simple organization; for its corrected functioning, SIEC has defined minimal requirements for the accreditation, realization and modalities to carry out and manage quality. The quality system represents a new way of operating of an organization that enhances capability and performance of the operators, stimulates their creativity and facilitates the activities of all, to guarantee both the quality of the product and the satisfaction of operators and customers at the same time. PMID:12611211

  2. Adiponectin and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Medhavi Jogi; Mandeep Bajaj

    Adiponectin, an adipocytokine secreted by adipose tissue, enhances insulin sensitivity and inhibits vascular inflammation.\\u000a Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and other cardiovascular\\u000a complications. Furthermore, enhancing adiponectin concentrations by lifestyle changes or pharmacological therapy can have\\u000a cardiovascular-protective effects. In this chapter, we review the association between adiponectin and cardiovascular disease\\u000a and discuss treatment strategies to ameliorate

  3. Imaging in Cardiovascular Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Schäfers; Klaus Tiemann; Michael Kuhlmann; Lars Stegger; Klaus Schäfers; Sven Hermann

    \\u000a Despite enormous investment into cardiovascular research on all levels worldwide, cardiovascular events such as myocardial\\u000a infarction, heart failure, tachyarrhythmia or stroke remain the major causes for death and inability in all developed countries.\\u000a Conventional clinical cardiovascular imaging nowadays provides high-resolution visualization of the morphology of vessels\\u000a and the myocardium. To translate the available patient imaging technologies into animals, especially mice

  4. Dietary sodium and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrew; O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-06-01

    Although an essential nutrient, higher sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure (BP), forming the basis for current population-wide sodium restriction guidelines. While short-term clinical trials have achieved low intake (<2.0 g/day), this has not been reproduced in long-term trials (>6 months). Guidelines assume that low sodium intake will reduce BP and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared to moderate intake. However, current observational evidence suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and CVD; the lowest risks observed with 3-5 g/day but higher risk with <3 g/day. Importantly, these observational data also confirm the association between higher intake (>5 g/day) and increased risk of CVD. Although lower intake may reduce BP, this may be offset by marked increases in neurohormones and other adverse effects which may paradoxically be adverse. Large randomised clinical trials with sufficient follow-up are required to provide robust data on the long-term effects of sodium reduction on CVD incidence. Until such trials are completed, current evidence suggests that moderate sodium intake for the general population (3-5 g/day) is likely the optimum range for CVD prevention. PMID:25983308

  5. Practice guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert S. A. Hayward; Mark C. Wilson; Sean R. Tunis; Gordon H. Guyatt; Karen-Ann Moore; Eric B. Bass

    1996-01-01

    To determine features of the presentation of clinical practice guidelines that may enhance their use by internists, we conducted\\u000a a cross-sectional survey to which 1,513 (60%) of 2,513 eligible internists responded. Endorsements by respected colleagues\\u000a and by major organizations were identified as very important by 72% and 69% of respondents, respectively. Respondents preferred\\u000a short pamphlets and manuals summarizing a number

  6. Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Noel Bairey Merz, C.

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive hormones, most commonly prescribed as oral contraceptives (OC), are a widely utilized method to prevent ovulation, implantation and therefore pregnancy. The Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated cardiovascular risk linked to menopausal hormone therapy among women without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, prompting review of the safety, efficacy and side effects of other forms of hormone therapy. A variety of basic science, animal and human data suggest that contraceptive hormones have anti-atheromatous effects, however relatively less is known regarding the impact on atherosclerosis, thrombosis, vasomotion and arrhythmogenesis. Newer generation OC formulations currently in use indicate no increased myocardial infarction (MI) risk for current users, but a persistent increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). There are no cardiovascular data available for the newest generation contraceptive hormone formulations, including those that contain newer progestins that lower blood pressure, as well as the non-oral routes (topical and vaginal). Current guidelines indicate that, as with all medication, contraceptive hormones should be selected and initiated by weighing risks and benefits for the individual patient. Women 35 years and older should be assessed for cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, smoking, diabetes, nephropathy and other vascular diseases including migraines, prior to use. Existing data are mixed with regard to possible protection from OC for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; longer-term cardiovascular follow-up of menopausal women with regard to prior OC use, including subgroup information regarding adequacy of ovulatory cycling, the presence of hyperandrogenic conditions, and the presence of prothrombotic genetic disorders is needed to address this important issue. PMID:19147038

  7. Cardiovascular Disease in Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L ANE DUVALL

    2003-01-01

    Almost 62 million Americans have one or more types of cardiovascular disease and, of these, more than 32 million are female. This translates into an average of 1 in 5 women, making cardiovascular disease the leading killer of women in the U.S., responsible for more than half a million deaths a year. While it has been known for some time

  8. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between ... content was last reviewed on 7/5/2012. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  9. Antimicrobial management of intra-abdominal infections: Literature's guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Federico; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial management of severe intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) involves a delicate balance of optimizing empirical therapy, which has been shown to improve clinical outcomes, while simultaneously reducing unnecessary antimicrobial use. Two sets of guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections were recently published. In 2010, the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (SIS-IDSA) created guidelines for the diagnosis and management of complicated IAIs. The new SIS-IDSA guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines represent additional contributions, made by specialists worldwide, to the debate regarding proper antimicrobial drug methodology. These guidelines represent the conclusions of the consensus conference held in Bologna, Italy, in July 2010 during the first congress of the WSES. PMID:22408344

  10. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations. PMID:12658506

  11. Medical Groups Issue Guidelines for Treating First Seizure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Groups Issue Guidelines for Treating First Seizure Epilepsy medication recommended to help stave off second attack ... the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. After a review of all available evidence, ...

  12. 75 FR 47819 - Workshop on Optimizing Clinical Trial Design for the Development of Pediatric Cardiovascular Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ...Pediatrics (AAP), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the Society for Cardiovascular...developing devices for the pediatric cardiology market. The information gathered in...guidance on optimal designs for pediatric cardiology device trials. Date and Time:...

  13. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Cífková, Renata; Kraj?oviechová, Alena

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in women in developed countries. Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in women, particularly after the menopause. Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been identified as the key lipid parameter in both genders whereas HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides have been more closely associated, in some studies, with cardiovascular risk in women. Menopause has been shown to be associated with an increase in total and LDL-cholesterol and a decrease in HDL-cholesterol (predominantly in the HDL2 subfraction). Despite its beneficial effects on the lipid profile, hormone replacement therapy is not recommended for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in women. The latest meta-analysis of statin trials with gender-specific outcomes showed a similar benefit in women and men. The addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin in patients with acute coronary syndromes showed a further reduction of the primary endpoint in both genders. While there are no gender-related differences in drug treatment of dyslipidemia, current guidelines, to avoid overtreatment, strongly suggest risk estimation before initiating lipid-lowering treatment in women without manifest cardiovascular disease. PMID:26026998

  14. The Lebanese Society of Cardiology: Plans and Perspectives, Navigating Against Contrary Winds and Progressing Against All Odds

    PubMed Central

    Kossaify, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Scientific societies in medicine theoretically aim to improve a medical field as a science; however, this role is expanding nowadays to seeking also the improved practice of a certain medical field. In this regard, the current Lebanese Society of Cardiology (2013–2015) has laid many plans and considered many perspectives. These concern mainly, but not exclusively, the increase of public awareness regarding prevention, investment in research, implementation of guidelines, support of continuous medical education, organization of cardiology symposia and congresses, and achievement of national registries regarding main cardiac conditions, as well as the society’s main objective of decreasing the burden of cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Nonetheless, the implementation of such plans and perspectives is facing contrary winds related to a multifaceted phenomenon: the dominance of private medicine with a subsequent lack of teamwork, the dominance of private media, the social and political unrest in Lebanon, significant discrepancies in the scientific background of cardiologists, and the absence of a standardized national cardiology licensing exam. Importantly, the implementation of such plans and perspectives requires individual commitment, along with the cooperation of the Order of Physicians, the Syndicate of Hospitals in Lebanon (representing private hospitals) and the Ministry of Health. Moreover, industry must be more committed to medical scientific societies; the support of cardiology events organized without the auspices of the Lebanese Society of Cardiology is not encouraged because of the presence of significant conflict of interest. PMID:25452697

  15. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Young Adults: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dieu-My T; Zimmerman, Lani M

    2015-01-01

    This extensive literature review focuses on cardiovascular risk factors in young adults, with an emphasis on hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Multiple studies have confirmed that hyperlipidemia and hypertension during young adulthood are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in later decades, and CHD is one type of cardiovascular disease. The primary risk factors identified in the literature that are predictive of CHD are age; gender; race/ethnicity; smoking status; high blood pressure; and elevated lipid levels, especially low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The current guidelines are insufficient to address screening and treatment in young adults with cardiovascular risk factors. Future studies are warranted to confirm the extent of cardiovascular risks in young adults, which can then be targeted to this population for prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:24743652

  16. DEGRO Practical Guidelines for Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Luise Sautter-Bihl; Rainer Souchon; Wilfried Budach; Felix Sedlmayer; Petra Feyer; Wolfgang Harms; Wulf Haase; Jürgen Dunst; Frederik Wenz; Rolf Sauer

    2008-01-01

    \\u000a \\u000a Background and Purpose:\\u000a   The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by\\u000a the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (DEGRO). These recommendations were complementing the\\u000a S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society (DKG) elaborated in 2004. The present DEGRO recommendations are based on a

  17. DEGRO Practical Guidelines for Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Luise Sautter-Bihl; Wilfried Budach; Jürgen Dunst; Petra Feyer; Wulf Haase; Wolfgang Harms; Felix Sedlmayer; Rainer Souchon; Frederik Wenz; Rolf Sauer

    2007-01-01

    \\u000a Background:  The present paper is an update of the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast\\u000a cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) [34]. These recommendations have been elaborated on\\u000a the basis of the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society that were revised in March 2007 by an interdisciplinary panel

  18. Effects of acute and chronic sleep deprivation on cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Tobaldini, E; Pecis, M; Montano, N

    2014-09-01

    Sleep is a fundamental physiological process, characterized by the activation of several cortical and subcortical neural networks. The relation between sleep and cardiovascular system is complex and bidirectional: sleep disor- ders may alter cardiovascular system, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk, while, on the contrary, cardio- vascular diseases are characterized by an alteration of physiological sleep. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular functions during different sleep stages, with sympatho-vagal balance dynamically shifting towards sympathetic or vagal predominance across different sleep stages. Sleep deprivation (SD) has becoming one of the most relevant health problem in modern societies. SD can be related to aging, which is associated with increased sleep fragmentation, and to sleep disorders, such as sleep disordered breathing and neurological disorders. Experimental studies in animals showed that SD significantly affects cardiovascular functions, altering heart rate and blood pressure responses, and increasing sympathetic activity and neuroendocrine response to stressor stimu- li. Clinical studies in humans have shown that SD, either due to experimental sleep loss and to sleep disorders, can affect different biological pathways, such as cardiovascular autonomic control, inflammation, immunity responses and metabolism. All these alterations may predispose subjects with SD to an increased cardiovascular risk. Hence, it is fundamental to identify the presence of a sleep disorder, which could be per se responsible for sleep loss, or the presence of sleep deprivation due to other factors, such as social life, habits etc., in order to identify subjects at high risk for cardiovascular events. PMID:25828682

  19. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS clinical expert consensus statement on the use of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American heart association, the Cardiological society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian association of interventional Cardiology-association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    PubMed

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. PMID:25850944

  20. Canadian guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) that includes recommendations relevant for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of CRS is based on type and duration of symptoms and an objective finding of inflammation of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses. Chronic rhinosinusitis is categorized based on presence or absence of nasal polyps, and this distinction leads to differences in treatment. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is treated with intranasal corticosteroids. Antibiotics are recommended when symptoms indicate infection (pain or purulence). For CRS without nasal polyps, intranasal corticosteroids and second-line antibiotics (ie, amoxicillin– clavulanic acid combinations or fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity) are recommended. Saline irrigation, oral steroids, and allergy testing might be appropriate. Failure of response should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses and referral to an otolaryngologist. Patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery require postoperative treatment and follow-up. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide diagnosis and treatment approaches based on the current understanding of the disease and available evidence. Additionally, the guidelines provide the expert opinion of a diverse group of practice and academic experts to help guide clinicians where evidence is sparse. PMID:24336538

  1. UCT Finance Guidelines fg004_catering Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    UCT Finance Guidelines fg004_catering Page 1 of 2 Finance Department, UCT, Private Bag, Rondebosch, educating for life and addressing the challenges facing our society." Finance Guideline FG004 ­ Catering at UCT meetings and events Related Finance Policy GEN001 ­ Funds deposited with or held by UCT Objective

  2. ESH-ESC guidelines for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Erdine, Serap; Ari, Oben; Zanchetti, A; Cifkova, R; Fagard, R; Kjeldsen, S; Mancia, G; Poulter, N; Rahn, K H; Rodicio, J L; Ruilope, L M; Staessen, J; van Zwieten, P; Waeber, B; Williams, B

    2006-06-01

    The following is a brief statement of the 2003 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)-European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The continuous relationship between the level of blood pressure and cardiovascular risk makes the definition of hypertension arbitrary. Since risk factors cluster in hypertensive individuals, risk stratification should be made and decision about the management should not be based on blood pressure alone, but also according to the presence or absence of other risk factors, target organ damage, diabetes, and cardiovascular or renal damage, as well as on other aspects of the patient's personal, medical and social situation. Blood pressure values measured in the doctor's office or the clinic should commonly be used as reference. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring may have clinical value, when considerable variability of office blood pressure is found over the same or different visits, high office blood pressure is measured in subjects otherwise at low global cardiovascular risk, there is marked discrepancy between blood pressure values measured in the office and at home, resistance to drug treatment is suspected, or research is involved. Secondary hypertension should always be investigated. The primary goal of treatment of patient with high blood pressure is to achieve the maximum reduction in long-term total risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This requires treatment of all the reversible factors identified, including smoking, dislipidemia, or diabetes, and the appropriate management of associated clinical conditions, as well as treatment of the raised blood pressure per se. On the basis of current evidence from trials, it can be recommended that blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, be intensively lowered at least below 140/90 mmHg and to definitely lower values, if tolerated, in all hypertensive patients, and below 130/80 mmHg in diabetics. Lifestyle measures should be instituted whenever appropriate in all patients, including subjects with high normal blood pressure and patients who require drug treatment. The purpose is to lower blood pressure and to control other risk factors and clinical conditions present. In most, if not all, hypertensive patients, therapy should be started gradually, and target blood pressure achieved progressively through several weeks. To reach target blood pressure, it is likely that a large proportion of patients will require combination therapy with more than one agent. The main benefits of antihypertensive therapy are due to lowering of blood pressure per se. There is also evidence that specific drug classes may differ in some effect or in special groups of patients. The choice of drugs will be influenced by many factors, including previous experience of the patient with antihypertensive agents, cost of drugs, risk profile, presence or absence of target organ damage, clinical cardiovascular or renal disease or diabetes, patient's preference. PMID:16810473

  3. ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-09-27

    Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on specific indications, processes, or parameters of care for which high level of evidence data and Class I or Class III guideline recommendations may be lacking but are addressed in ACCF appropriate use criteria documents. Structure/safety measures represent measures developed to address structural aspects of the use of healthcare technology (e.g., laboratory accreditation, personnel training, and credentialing) or quality issues related to patient safety when there are neither guidelines recommendations nor appropriate use criteria. Although the strength of evidence for appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures may not be as strong as that for formal performance measures, they are quality measures that are otherwise rigorously developed, reviewed, tested, and approved in the same manner as ACCF/AHA performance measures. The ultimate goal of the present document is to provide direction in defining and measuring the appropriate use-avoiding not only underuse but also overuse and misuse-and proper application of cardiovascular technology and to describe how such appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures might be developed for the purposes of quality improvement and public reporting. It is anticipated that this effort will help focus the national dialogue on the use of cardiovascular technology and away from the current concerns about volume and cost alone to a more holistic emphasis on value. PMID:21875906

  4. ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-09-27

    Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on specific indications, processes, or parameters of care for which high level of evidence data and Class I or Class III guideline recommendations may be lacking but are addressed in ACCF appropriate use criteria documents. Structure/safety measures represent measures developed to address structural aspects of the use of healthcare technology (e.g., laboratory accreditation, personnel training, and credentialing) or quality issues related to patient safety when there are neither guidelines recommendations nor appropriate use criteria. Although the strength of evidence for appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures may not be as strong as that for formal performance measures, they are quality measures that are otherwise rigorously developed, reviewed, tested, and approved in the same manner as ACCF/AHA performance measures. The ultimate goal of the present document is to provide direction in defining and measuring the appropriate use-avoiding not only underuse but also overuse and misuse-and proper application of cardiovascular technology and to describe how such appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures might be developed for the purposes of quality improvement and public reporting. It is anticipated that this effort will help focus the national dialogue on the use of cardiovascular technology and away from the current concerns about volume and cost alone to a more holistic emphasis on value. PMID:21880456

  5. 47 Cardiovascular evaluation of English premiership rugby players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Ghani; H Raju; A Zaidi; N Sheikh; S Gati; J Somauroo; S Kemp; S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionRecent experience of pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation (PPCE) in Italian athletes demonstrates a significant reduction in mortality from cardiomyopathies and cardiac conduction disorders. Although PPCE is endorsed by large medical and sporting organisations, including the European Society of Sports Cardiology, the International Olympic Committee and FIFA, the state health system in the UK (and many other Western countries) does not support

  6. Cardiovascular drug therapy in the elderly: benefits and challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilbert S. Aronow; William H. Frishman; Jerome L. Fleg

    2010-01-01

    Increasing life expectancy in industrialized societies has resulted in a huge population of older adults with cardiovascular disease. Despite advances in device therapy and surgery, the mainstay of treatment for these disorders remains pharmacological. Hypertension affects two-thirds of older adults and remains a potent risk factor for coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke in this age

  7. Cardiovascular Interactions CVI Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Carl F. Rothe (Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology)

    2005-06-22

    The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses.

  8. The shortcomings of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Leier, Carl V; Geleris, Paraschos; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of medical knowledge related to diagnosis and management over the last 5-6 decades has altered the course of diseases, improved clinical outcomes and increased survival. Thus, it has become difficult for the practicing physician to evaluate the long-term effects of a particular therapy on survival of an individual patient. Further, the approach by each physician to an individual patient with the same disease is not always uniform. In an attempt to assist physicians in applying newly acquired knowledge to patients, clinical practice guidelines were introduced by various scientific societies. Guidelines assist in facilitating the translation of new research discoveries into clinical practice; however, despite the improvements over the years, there are still several issues related to guidelines that often appear ‘lost in translation'. Guidelines are based on the results of randomized clinical trials, other nonrandomized studies, and expert opinion (i.e. the opinion of most members of the guideline committees). The merits and limitations of randomized clinical trials, guideline committees, and presentation of guidelines will be discussed. In addition, proposals to improve guidelines will be presented. PMID:25790843

  9. Interventional Cardiovascular MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milind Y. Desai; Albert C. Lardo; Joao A. C. Lima

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the Western world and the incidence is projected to increase\\u000a in the future (1). Traditionally, X-ray techniques have been the mainstay in terms of imaging modality for diagnostic and therapeutic cardiovascular\\u000a procedures. However, there are inherent limitations to this technology including inability to perform three-dimensional imaging,\\u000a poor soft tissue

  10. Epidemiology of Sleep Disturbances and Cardiovascular Consequences.

    PubMed

    Badran, Mohammad; Yassin, Bishr Abu; Fox, Nurit; Laher, Ismail; Ayas, Najib

    2015-07-01

    It is increasingly recognized that disruption of sleep and reduced amounts of sleep can have significant adverse cardiovascular consequences. For example, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common underdiagnosed disorder characterized by recurrent nocturnal asphyxia resulting from repetitive collapse of the upper airway; this leads to repetitive episodes of nocturnal hypoxemia and arousal from sleep. Risk factors for disease include obesity, increased age, male sex, and family history. In epidemiologic studies, OSA appears to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and treatment is associated with better outcomes. Habitual short sleep duration is common in today's society. In epidemiologic studies, short sleep duration is associated with a number of adverse health effects, including all-cause mortality, weight gain, and incident CVD. Given the links between sleep disorders and adverse health outcomes, obtaining adequate quality and amounts of sleep should be considered a component of a healthy lifestyle, similar to good diet and exercise. PMID:26037823

  11. Guidelines on the radical management of patients with lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Lim; David Baldwin; Michael Beckles; John Duffy; James Entwisle; Corinne Faivre-Finn; Keith Kerr; Alistair Macfie; Jim McGuigan; Simon Padley; Sanjay Popat; Nicholas Screaton; Michael Snee; David Waller; Chris Warburton; Thida Win

    2010-01-01

    A joint initiative by the British Thoracic Society and the Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland was undertaken to update the 2001 guidelines for the selection and assessment of patients with lung cancer who can potentially be managed by radical treatment.

  12. Endocannabinoids and cardiovascular prevention: real progress?

    PubMed

    Nodari, Savina; Manerba, Alessandra; Metra, Marco; Dei Cas, Livio

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to increase and represents one of the principal causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. After the discovery of a specific receptor of the psychoactive principle of marijuana, the cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, several studies have demonstrated the role of this system in the control of food intake and energy balance and its overactivity in obesity. Recent studies with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant have demonstrated favorable effects such as a reduction in body weight and waist circumference and an improvement in metabolic factors (cholesterol, triglycerides, glycemia etc). Therefore, the antagonism of the endocannabinoid (EC) system, if recent data can be confirmed, could be a new treatment target for high risk overweight or obese patients. Obesity is a growing problem that has epidemic proportions worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of premature death (1-3). Individuals with a central deposition of fats have elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (including stroke, heart failure and myocardial infarction) and, because of a growing prevalence not only in adults but also in adolescents, it was reclassified in AHA guidelines as a "major modifiable risk factor" for coronary heart disease (4, 5). Although first choice therapy in obesity is based on correcting lifestyle (diet and physical activity) in patients with abdominal obesity and high cardiovascular risk and diabetes, often it is necessary to use drugs which reduce the risks. The EC system represents a new target for weight control and the improvement of lipid and glycemic metabolism (6, 7). PMID:21977272

  13. Cardiovascular disease mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Onwuanyi, Anekwe E.; Clarke, Aubrey; Vanderbush, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Although mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has been declining, it remains the leading cause of death among urban U.S. blacks. McCord and Freeman reported CVD as the major contributor to excess mortality in Central Harlem. However the disease-specific CVD mortality was not assessed. Thus, it was unclear what the distribution of specific CVDs was in Central Harlem and their contribution to excess mortality. We reviewed the vital statistics records of New York City (NYC) Department of Health for 1990 and identified all cases in which the cause of death was coded as cardiovascular (International Classification of Diseases-ICD, 9th Revision, codes 391, 393-398, 401-404, 410, 411, 414-417, 420-438 and 440-444). The total and disease-specific CVD mortality for NYC and Central Harlem were calculated using the appropriate 1990 census data as the denominator. Central Harlem residents aged between 25-64 years were at least twice as likely to die from cardiovascular causes, compared to NYC residents. Hypertension-related deaths, ICD codes 401 (essential hypertension), 402 (hypertensive heart disease), 403 (hypertensive renal disease), and 404 (hypertensive heart and renal disease), were the major cause of excess death for men and women in Central Harlem. These findings show the importance of hypertension as the main determinant of the excess cardiovascular mortality in urban blacks and suggest an increased risk of cardiovascular death in blacks residing in Central Harlem. PMID:14717470

  14. Nutrition and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Berciano, Silvia; Ordovás, José M

    2014-09-01

    A multitude of studies have been published on the relationship between cardiovascular disease risk and a variety of nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns. Despite the well-accepted notion that diet has a significant influence on the development and prevention of cardiovascular disease, the foods considered healthy and harmful have varied over the years. This review aims to summarize the current scientific evidence on the cardioprotective effect of those foods and nutrients that have been considered healthy as well as those that have been deemed unhealthy at any given time in history. For this purpose, we reviewed the most recent literature using as keywords foods and nutrients (ie, meat, omega-3) and cardiovascular disease-related terms (ie, cardiovascular diseases, stroke). Emphasis has been placed on meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. In general, there is a paucity of intervention studies with a high level of evidence supporting the benefits of healthy foods (ie, fruits and vegetables), whereas the evidence supporting the case against those foods considered less healthy (ie, saturated fat) seems to be weakened by most recent evidence. In summary, most of the evidence supporting the benefits and harms of specific foods and nutrients is based on observational epidemiological studies. The outcome of randomized clinical trials reveals a more confusing picture with most studies providing very small effects in one direction or another; the strongest evidence comes from dietary patterns. The current status of the relationship between diet and cardiovascular disease risk calls for more tailored recommendations based on genomic technologies. PMID:25172070

  15. Assessment of cardiovascular risk in diabetes: Risk scores and provocative testing.

    PubMed

    Lam, Teresa; Burns, Kharis; Dennis, Mark; Cheung, N Wah; Gunton, Jenny E

    2015-05-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus, who have a risk of cardiovascular mortality two to four times that of people without diabetes. An individualised approach to cardiovascular risk estimation and management is needed. Over the past decades, many risk scores have been developed to predict CVD. However, few have been externally validated in a diabetic population and limited studies have examined the impact of applying a prediction model in clinical practice. Currently, guidelines are focused on testing for CVD in symptomatic patients. Atypical symptoms or silent ischemia are more common in the diabetic population, and with additional markers of vascular disease such as erectile dysfunction and autonomic neuropathy, these guidelines can be difficult to interpret. We propose an algorithm incorporating cardiovascular risk scores in combination with typical and atypical signs and symptoms to alert clinicians to consider further investigation with provocative testing. The modalities for investigation of CVD are discussed. PMID:25987961

  16. Interactive Cardiovascular System Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The cardiovascular portion of the InnerBody website is a road map to the human cardiovascular system. It displays all of the main veins and arteries of the human body allowing the user to click on various parts of body and dozens of links to the many different systems appear. Users can hover over the links to discover what each part is named, or click on the link to be brought to a thorough definition and description of the selected system. Users may also �zoom in� on certain parts to view more detail. In addition to the interactive �map,� InnerBody also has images and descriptions about common issues that arise within the cardiovascular system.

  17. Screening for Cardiovascular Disease in Survivors of Thoracic Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jacob Adams; Robert G. Prosnitz; Louis S. Constine; Lawrence B. Marks; Steven E. Lipshultz

    \\u000a \\u000a Background and purpose  A solid body of evidence demonstrates that therapeutic thoracic radiotherapy can injure the cardiovascular system. However,\\u000a there is little consensus on how to screen survivors who received this therapy. This review intends to assess recent evidence\\u000a on radiotherapy-related cardiac injury with the goal of formulating evidence-based guidelines.

  18. Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: A position statement from the European Association of CardioThoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Vahanian; O. Alfieri; N. Al-Attar; M. Antunes; J. J. Bax; B. Cormier; A. Cribier; P. De Jaegere; G. Fournial; A. P. Kappetein; J. Kovac; S. Ludgate; F. Maisano; N. Moat; F. W. Mohr; P. Nataf; L. Piérard; J. L. Pomar; J. Schofer; P. Tornos; M. Tuzcu; Hout van B. A; Segesser von L. K; T. Walther

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To critically review the available transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and their results, as well as propose recommendations for their use and development. Methods and results: A committee of experts including European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and European Society of Cardiology representatives met to reach a consensus based on the analysis of the available data obtained with transcatheter aortic

  19. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive and lipid- lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Vanichakarn, P; Hwa, J; Stitham, J

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes to the clinical management guidelines for hypertension and hyperlipidemia have placed emphasis on prevention through the pharmacological control and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors. In conjunction with proper diet and lifestyle changes, such risk factor control necessitates the use of safe and effective pharmacotherapy. However, many patients fail to reach or maintain therapeutic goals due to inadequacy and/or variability in response to antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications. Thus, given the contribution of both hypertension and hyperlipidemia in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease, a personalized approach to pharmacotherapy, as well as disease prevention, seems particularly prudent. With the advancement of cardiovascular pharmacogenetics, the aim is to identify genetic biomarkers of drug-response and disease-susceptibility in order to make informed and individualized decisions, improving patient care through proper drug selection and dosing. PMID:25109793

  20. Having a Change of Heart: A Lesson on Cardiovascular Anatomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cynthia Pfirrmann (Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School)

    2006-08-01

    This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiologycal Society's 2006 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org. The purpose of this activity is to investigate and develop a model of the normal anatomy of the human heart/circulatory system and then to explore and model the effects of several cardiovascular disease processes. Students should understand basic cellular respiration. Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to: plan and design a model of a human heart with basic systemic circulation and evaluate impact of cardiovascular diseases on normal circulation.

  1. [Nutrition and cardiovascular mortality].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2006-08-13

    About 17 million persons die in cardiovascular disease yearly in the world. Most part of this disease can be prevented by the elimination of primary risk factors, thus by the abolishment of unhealthy nutrition, physical inactivity and by the absence of smoking. The cost-effective national program, as well as the life style with decreasing individual risk factors can give a trend to decrease the cardiovascular mortality. Individually the usual blood pressure and cholesterol control, the inhibition of obesity and the life style without smoking are able to decrease the organic changes, which produce the lethal consequences of this disease. The different kinds of diets can significantly influence the development of human diseases. The Western diet has atherogenic effect, increases the risk of myocardial infarction. The Mediterranean diet beneficially influences the life expectancy at birth. The Far-East Japanese diet could specially be important from the viewpoint of nutrition, because the longest life expectancy at birth and the smallest cardiovascular mortality can be found there. The quality nutrition factors (vitamins, vitamin like materials, polyphenols in wine and fruit juices, trace elements, omega-3 fatty acids) play an important role in the decreasing of oxidative stress and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:16981422

  2. Cardiovascular Actions of Neurotrophins

    PubMed Central

    CAPORALI, ANDREA; EMANUELI, COSTANZA

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophins were christened in consideration of their actions on the nervous system and, for a long time, they were the exclusive interest of neuroscientists. However, more recently, this family of proteins has been shown to possess essential cardiovascular functions. During cardiovascular development, neurotrophins and their receptors are essential factors in the formation of the heart and critical regulator of vascular development. Postnatally, neurotrophins control the survival of endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes and regulate angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Recent studies suggest the capacity of neurotrophins, via their tropomyosin-kinase receptors, to promote therapeutic neovascularization in animal models of hindlimb ischemia. Conversely, the neurotrophin low-affinity p75NTR receptor induces apoptosis of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and impairs angiogenesis. Finally, nerve growth factor looks particularly promising in treating microvascular complications of diabetes or reducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the infarcted heart. These seminal discoveries have fuelled basic and translational research and thus opened a new field of investigation in cardiovascular medicine and therapeutics. Here, we review recent progress on the molecular signaling and roles played by neurotrophins in cardiovascular development, function, and pathology, and we discuss therapeutic potential of strategies based on neurotrophin manipulation. PMID:19126759

  3. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  4. Tomatoes and Cardiovascular Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joye K. Willcox; George L. Catignani; Sheryl Lazarus

    2003-01-01

    Diet is believed to play a complex role in the development of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the Western world. Tomatoes, the second most produced and consumed vegetable nationwide, are a rich source of lycopene, beta-carotene, folate, potassium, vitamin C, flavonoids, and vitamin E. The processing of tomatoes may significantly affect the bioavailability of these nutrients. Homogenization,

  5. Optimal prehospital cardiovascular care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane H. Brice; Terence Valenzuela; Joseph P. Ornato; Robert A. Swor; Jerry Overton; Ronald G. Pirrallo; James Dunford; Robert M. Domeier

    2001-01-01

    Optimal prehospital cardiovascular care may improve the morbidity and mortality associated with acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) that begin in the community. Reducing the time delays from AMI symptom onset to intervention begins with maximizing effective patient education to reduce patient delay in recognizing symptoms and seeking assistance. Transportation delays can be minimized by appropriate use of 911 systems and improving

  6. Cardiovascular sequelae of tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Rempher, Kenneth J

    2006-03-01

    Smoking is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been implicated in sudden cardiac death. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, physical inactivity, and smoking are the leading contributors to poor cardiovascular health. This article reviews the cardiovascular pathology inherent with smoking and provide insight to help develop an appropriate plan of care. PMID:16546004

  7. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    Operated by the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Association of Health Plans (AAHP), The National Guideline Clearinghouse provides information about hundreds of "evidence-based clinical practice guidelines" for health care professionals. Guidelines from over 100 different medical organizations can be searched or browsed by disease or condition; treatment or intervention method; or issuing organization. Each record includes the date of release and current status of the guideline, major recommendations for interventions and practices, organization(s) and committee members responsible for the guideline, and methods used to collect evidence and rate the quality of evidence. A link to the full text of the guideline is provided if available. When more than one guideline has been released on a topic, users can compare selected guidelines in chart format. A News section tells developers how to submit guidelines to the Clearinghouse.

  8. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M.; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N.; Kalantri, S.; Peter, J. V.; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M.; Chugh, T. D.; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a ‘syndromic approach’ to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes. PMID:24678147

  9. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, N.; Kirkels, J.H.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A.P.W.M.; Brügemann, J.; Erasmus, M.E.; Klautz, R.J.M.; Verwey, H.F.; Oomen, A.; Peels, C.H.; Golüke, A.E.J.; Nicastia, D.; Koole, M.A.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic surgery (NVVC and NVT). The indication for heart transplantation is defined as: ‘End-stage heart disease not remediable by more conservative measures’. Contraindications are: irreversible pulmonary hypertension/elevated pulmonary vascular resistance; active systemic infection; active malignancy or history of malignancy with probability of recurrence; inability to comply with complex medical regimen; severe peripheral or cerebrovascular disease and irreversible dysfunction of another organ, including diseases that may limit prognosis after heart transplantation. Considering the difficulties in defining end-stage heart failure, estimating prognosis in the individual patient and the continuing evolution of available therapies, the present criteria are broadly defined. The final acceptance is done by the transplant team which has extensive knowledge of the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure on the one hand and thorough experience with heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support on the other hand. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:79-87.) PMID:18345330

  10. Practice guidelines: a new reality in medicine. I. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Woolf, S H

    1990-09-01

    There is growing interest in the use of practice guidelines for physicians as a means of reducing inappropriate care, controlling geographic variations in practice patterns, and making more effective use of health care resources. Recent developments at the national health policy level suggest that practice guidelines will play an increasingly prominent role in the practice of medicine. The federal government has created a new US Public Health Service agency with responsibility for practice guidelines. Guidelines have been developed by more than 35 physician organizations and specialty societies. The American Medical Association and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies have endorsed practice guidelines and are organizing specialty societies to set policy on the subject. Academic medical centers have formed a research consortium on practice guidelines. Independent research centers (eg, the RAND Corporation and the Institute of Medicine) are developing methods for assessing appropriateness and setting guidelines. Other groups, such as hospitals, insurers, managed care plans, and private enterprises, are also directly involved. The implications of these developments are far reaching. PMID:2203320

  11. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  12. Japanese Guideline for Allergic Rhinitis 2014.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kimihiro; Kurono, Yuichi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Ogino, Satoshi; Uchio, Eiichi; Odajima, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Like asthma and atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis is an allergic disease, but of the three, it is the only type I allergic disease. Allergic rhinitis includes pollinosis, which is intractable and reduces quality of life (QOL) when it becomes severe. A guideline is needed to understand allergic rhinitis and to use this knowledge to develop a treatment plan. In Japan, the first guideline was prepared after a symposium held by the Japanese Society of Allergology in 1993. The current 7th edition was published in 2013, and is widely used today. To incorporate evidence based medicine (EBM) introduced from abroad, the most recent collection of evidence/literature was supplemented to the Practical Guideline for the Management of Allergic Rhinitis in Japan 2013. The revised guideline includes assessment of diagnosis/treatment and prescriptions for children and pregnant women, for broad clinical applications. An evidence-based step-by-step strategy for treatment is also described. In addition, the QOL concept and cost benefit analyses are also addressed. Along with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact of Asthma (ARIA), this guideline is widely used for various clinical purposes, such as measures for patients with sinusitis, childhood allergic rhinitis, oral allergy syndrome, and anaphylaxis and for pregnant women. A Q&A section regarding allergic rhinitis in Japan was added to the end of this guideline. PMID:25178177

  13. Poster Presentation Guidelines Guidelines for Poster Presentations

    E-print Network

    Poster Presentation Guidelines Guidelines for Poster Presentations The poster size shall poster board will be marked with a program number on the upper left corner. The number is identical their own material prior to the poster session at least by one hour before the opening of the session

  14. Design Guidelines INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    .............................................................................................................9 LANDSCAPE DESIGN ............Design Guidelines March 2005 #12;INTRODUCTION INTENT The Boise State University (BSU) Design Guidelines are intended for the use by design professionals as a resource to facilitate the design of BSU

  15. GUIDELINES FOR APPOINTMENTS,

    E-print Network

    GUIDELINES FOR APPOINTMENTS, REAPPOINTMENTS, PROMOTION AND TENURE FOR FACULTY EXCERPT from ..................14 Appeal Procedure.................................................................................................................................................15 JOINT APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES

  16. Cardiovascular and renal outcome in subjects with K\\/DOQI stage 1-3 chronic kidney disease: the importance of urinary albumin excretion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Auke H. Brantsma; J. L. Bakker; Hans L. Hillege; Dick de Zeeuw; Ronald T. Gansevoort

    2008-01-01

    Background. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Ini- tiative guidelines aim to define chronic kidney disease (CKD) and classify its stages. Stage 3 CKD generally re- ceives more attention than stage 1 or 2, because the more impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in stage 3 sug- gests a higher cardiovascular and renal risk. In this study we evaluated cardiovascular and renal

  17. Thiazolidinediones and cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Chilton; Elaine Chiquette

    2005-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones hold promise for reducing cardiovascular events and human atherosclerosis. Similar to statins and angiotensin-converting\\u000a enzyme inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ? (PPAR?) exerts anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic actions\\u000a in the vessel wall. A number of clinical trials in subjects with or without diabetes have shown that thiazolidinedione therapy\\u000a can reduce in-stent restenosis and delay progression of atherosclerosis measured by carotid

  18. Phytoestrogens and Cardiovascular Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricky Y. K. Man; Susan W. S. Leung; Hwee Teoh; Adrian Quan; Wendy Keung; Mary Y. K. Lee

    \\u000a Dietary intake of phytoestrogens has been associated with a reduction in risk of cardiovascular disorders including coronary\\u000a heart disease, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Phytoestrogens have long been found to be structurally similar to the female\\u000a sex hormone, 17ß-estradiol, and have a wide range of estrogenic effects. Like 17ß-estradiol, phytoestrogens such as genistein\\u000a have been suggested to exert its cardioprotective actions through

  19. National Bookmobile Guidelines, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Library, Columbus.

    These guidelines were developed by the bookmobile community that has met in Columbus, Ohio, since 1985 for their annual conference. The guidelines comprise the collaborative effort of hundreds of conference participants and representatives from 79 libraries throughout the United States and Canada, who discussed the guidelines in regional and state…

  20. Cardiovascular Risk and Statin Use in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Michael Edward; Green, Lee A.; Sen, Ananda; Kircher, Sheetal; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Statins reduce the risk of mortality and coronary artery disease in individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Using nationally representative data, we examined the relationships between statin use and cardiovascular risk, diagnosis of hyperlipidemia, and other risk factors. METHODS We analyzed data from the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of the US civilian noninstitutionalized population. The study sample had a total of 16,712 individuals aged 30 to 79 years. Those who reported filling at least 2 statin prescriptions were classified as statin users. We created multiple logistic regression models for statin use as the dependent variable, with cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Overall, 58.2% (95% CI, 54.6%–61.7%) of individuals with coronary artery disease and 52.0% (95% CI, 49.4%–54.6%) of individuals with diabetes aged older than 40 years were statin users. After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic factors, the probability of being on a statin was significantly higher among individuals with both hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease, at 0.44 (95% CI, 0.40–0.48), or hyperlipidemia only, at 0.32 (95% CI, 0.30–0.33), than among those with coronary artery disease only, at 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07–0.15). A similar pattern was seen in people with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS In this nationally representative sample, many people at high risk for cardiovascular events, including those with coronary artery disease, diabetes, or both, were not receiving statins despite evidence that these agents reduce adverse events. This undertreatment appears to be related to placing too much emphasis on hyperlipidemia and not enough on cardiovascular risk. Recently released guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association offer an opportunity to improve statin use by focusing on cardiovascular risk instead of lipid levels. PMID:24821892

  1. C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, and Cardiovascular Disease Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events. METHODS We analyzed data from 52 prospective studies that included 246,669 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease to investigate the value of adding CRP or fibrinogen levels to conventional risk factors for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. We calculated measures of discrimination and reclassification during follow-up and modeled the clinical implications of initiation of statin therapy after the assessment of CRP or fibrinogen. RESULTS The addition of information on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a prognostic model for cardiovascular disease that included age, sex, smoking status, blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total cholesterol level increased the C-index, a measure of risk discrimination, by 0.0050. The further addition to this model of information on CRP or fibrinogen increased the C-index by 0.0039 and 0.0027, respectively (P<0.001), and yielded a net reclassification improvement of 1.52% and 0.83%, respectively, for the predicted 10-year risk categories of “low” (<10%), “intermediate” (10% to <20%), and “high” (?20%) (P<0.02 for both comparisons). We estimated that among 100,000 adults 40 years of age or older, 15,025 persons would initially be classified as being at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event if conventional risk factors alone were used to calculate risk. Assuming that statin therapy would be initiated in accordance with Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (i.e., for persons with a predicted risk of ?20% and for those with certain other risk factors, such as diabetes, irrespective of their 10-year predicted risk), additional targeted assessment of CRP or fibrinogen levels in the 13,199 remaining participants at intermediate risk could help prevent approximately 30 additional cardiovascular events over the course of 10 years. CONCLUSIONS In a study of people without known cardiovascular disease, we estimated that under current treatment guidelines, assessment of the CRP or fibrinogen level in people at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event could help prevent one additional event over a period of 10 years for every 400 to 500 people screened. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.) PMID:23034020

  2. Should preclinical vascular abnormalities be measured in asymptomatic adults to improve cardiovascular risk stratification?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. de Graaf; S. Holewijn; A. F. H. Stalenhoef; A. D. Sniderman

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Guideline groups have issued contradictory decisions as to the value of noninvasive tests in asymptomatic adults at intermediate cardiovascular risk. Reclassification has only recently been accepted as a critical criterion to determine the utility of a diagnostic test. The present review examines potential limitations in reclassification and evaluates the utility of carotid ultrasound, pulse wave velocity and

  3. Research report Therapeutic drug and cardiovascular disease risk monitoring in patients with bipolar disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy M. Kilbourne; Edward P. Post; Mark S. Bauer; John E. Zeber; Laurel A. Copeland; Chester B. Good; Harold Alan Pincus

    Objectives: We assessed whether patients with bipolar disorder received serum drug level and toxicity monitoring for mood stabilizers and assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related risk factors attributed to atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods: A population-based study of individuals with bipolar disorder was conducted between July 2004 and July 2006. Based on American Psychiatric and American Diabetes Association guidelines, we assessed whether

  4. Association between Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Risk in Chinese Youth Independent of Age and Pubertal Stage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice PS Kong; Kai-Chow Choi; Albert MC Li; Stanley SC Hui; Michael HM Chan; YK Wing; Ronald CW Ma; Christopher WK Lam; Joseph TF Lau; Wing Yee So; Gary TC Ko; Juliana CN Chan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood and adolescence are critical periods of habit formation with substantial tracking of lifestyle and cardiovascular risk into adulthood. There are various guidelines on recommended levels of physical activity in youth of school-age. Despite the epidemic of obesity and diabetes in China, there is a paucity of data in this regard in Chinese youth. We examined the association of

  5. Cardiovascular determinants of life span

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Shi; Giovanni G. Camici; Thomas F. Lüscher

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases rises with aging and is one of the main causes of mortality in western countries.\\u000a In view of the progressively aging population, there is an urge for a better understanding of age-associated cardiovascular\\u000a diseases and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The risk factors for cardiovascular diseases include unhealthy diet, diabetes,\\u000a obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity,

  6. Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander G. Logan; T. Douglas Bradley

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in North America. To improve outcomes, it will likely be necessary\\u000a to identify new potentially treatable conditions. Sleep apnea affects approximately 50% of patients with cardiovascular disease\\u000a and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Continuous positive airway pressure is currently the treatment of choice\\u000a and has many short-term favorable effects. The

  7. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with “normal” lipid profiles and high CRP values who benefited from statin therapy. The backdrop to JUPITER during this period was an increasing awareness of a rising cardiovascular risk burden and imperfect methods of risk evaluation, so that a significant number of individuals were being denied beneficial therapies. Other concerns have been a high level of residual risk in those who are treated, poor patient adherence, a need to follow guidelines more closely, a dual global epidemic of obesity and diabetes, and a progressively deteriorating level of physical activity in the population. Calls for new and more effective means of reducing risk for coronary heart disease are intensifying. In view of compelling evidence supporting earlier and aggressive therapy in people with high risk burdens, JUPITER simply offers another choice for stratification and earlier risk reduction in primary prevention patients. When indicated, and in individuals unwilling or unable to change their diet and lifestyles sufficiently, the benefits of statins greatly exceed the risks. Two side effects of interest are myotoxicity and an increase in the incidence of diabetes. PMID:21267417

  8. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. PMID:22844804

  9. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  10. Therapeutic potential of ginseng in the management of cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Karmazyn, Morris; Moey, Melissa; Gan, Xiaohong Tracey

    2011-10-22

    Although employed in Asian societies for thousands of years, the use of ginseng as an herbal medication for a variety of disorders has increased tremendously worldwide in recent years. Ginseng belongs to the genus Panax, of which there exists a variety, generally reflecting their geographic origin. North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) are two such varieties possessing a plethora of pharmacological properties, which are attributed primarily to the presence of different ginsenosides that bestow these ginsengs with distinct pharmacodynamic profiles. The many cardiovascular benefits attributed to ginseng include cardioprotection, antihypertensive effects, and attenuation of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. Experimental studies have revealed a number of beneficial properties of ginseng, particularly in the area of cardiac protection, where ginseng and ginsenosides have been shown to protect the ischaemic and reperfused heart in a variety of experimental models. Emerging evidence also suggests that ginseng attenuates myocardial hypertrophy, thus blunting the remodelling and heart failure processes. However, clinical evidence of efficacy is not convincing, likely owing primarily to the paucity of well designed, randomized, controlled clinical trials. Adding to the complexity in understanding the cardiovascular effects of ginseng is the fact that each of the different ginseng varieties possesses distinct cardiovascular properties, as a result of their respective ginsenoside composition, rendering it difficult to assign a general, common cardiovascular effect to ginseng. Additional challenges include the identification of mechanisms (likely multifaceted) that account for the effects of ginseng and determining which ginsenoside(s) mediate these cardiovascular properties. These concerns notwithstanding, the potential cardiovascular benefit of ginseng is worthy of further studies in view of its possible development as a cardiovascular therapeutic agent, particularly as adjunctive therapy to existing medications. PMID:21985167

  11. Improving cardiovascular outcomes using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Roumia, Mazen; Steinhubl, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Improving quality of care through the enhanced use of digital technologies is becoming an increasingly primary focus of the health care industry in general and cardiovascular (CV) medicine in particular. The recent rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) has the potential to improve the management of CV disease by removing variability and assuring at least consideration of guideline-recommended care and appropriate use criteria. This can lead to improved cardiac outcomes at all phases of care; beginning with the automated identification of patients who are at increased risk, implementing evidence based medicine for primary CV prevention, using online decision support tools for acute management, and, possibly most importantly, by connecting the health care provider and the patient through open accessibility to their EHR. The widespread use of EHR is the dawn of a new era where evidence based guidelines can be seamlessly translated to patient care and where patients are actively involved in their own health. As transformative as this will be, it is important to recognize that we are currently experiencing only the very earliest potential of the EHR in improving CV outcomes. PMID:24408676

  12. CRP in Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahir Karakas; Wolfgang Koenig

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a Abstract\\u000a   In primary prevention, traditional risk factors are a useful\\u000a first step in determining who is at cardiovascular\\u000a risk, however, it has been noted that a considerable\\u000a number of those at risk cannot be identified on the basis\\u000a of traditional risk factors alone. Among blood biomarkers,\\u000a C-reactive protein (CRP), measured by\\u000a high-sensitivity assays (hsCRP), has received widespread\\u000a interest and a

  13. Pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines: nurses' involvement in development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E; Winkelman, Chris; Gélinas, Céline; Dermenchyan, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The 2013 American College of Critical Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine clinical practice guidelines for the management of pain, agitation, and delirium in adult patients in the intensive care unit serves as a living example of nurses' involvement in the development and implementation of professional guidelines. Nurses who served on this guideline-writing panel describe their experiences. Specific examples from the pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines for care are used to explore the roles of the nurse leader, nurse informaticist, staff nurse, and nurse researcher in relationship to guideline implementation. PMID:26033098

  14. Perils of the new labor management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Wayne R; Friedman, Emanuel A

    2015-04-01

    Recent guidelines issued jointly by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine for assessing labor progress differ substantially from those described initially by Friedman, which have guided clinical practice for decades. The guidelines are based on results obtained from new and untested methods of analyzing patterns of cervical dilatation and fetal descent. Before these new guidelines are adopted into clinical practice, the results obtained by these unconventional analytic approaches should be validated and shown to be superior, or at least equivalent, to currently accepted standards. The new guidelines indicate the patterns of labor originally described by Friedman are incorrect and, further, are inapplicable to modern obstetric practice. We contend that the original descriptions of normal and abnormal labor progress, which were based on direct clinical observations, accurately describe progress in dilatation and descent, and that the differences reported more recently are likely attributable to patient selection and the potential inaccuracy of very high-order polynomial curve-fitting methods. The clinical evaluation of labor is a process of serially estimating the likelihood of a safe vaginal delivery. Because many factors contribute to that likelihood, such as cranial molding, head position and attitude, and the bony architecture and capacity of the pelvis, graphic labor patterns should never be used in isolation. The new guidelines are based heavily on unvalidated notions of labor progress and ignore clinical parameters that should remain cornerstones of intrapartum decision-making. PMID:25218127

  15. An explanation of recommendation differences: illustrations from recent atrial fibrillation guidelines.

    PubMed

    Camm, Christian F; Camm, A John

    2014-01-01

    The development of guidelines and their use in all areas of medicine has greatly expanded in recent years. However, despite a shared evidence base, recommendations provided by different professional societies and healthcare authorities often vary considerably. The rapid advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) and the multiplicity of guidelines devoted to AF have made it particularly susceptible to this problem. Many nonmedical aspects are important in the development of guidelines, and without understanding them correct interpretation of guidelines is difficult. Conflicts of interest, the regulatory environment, and local data all influence guidelines. Nuanced wording, resource availability, and strategic purpose add complexity to guideline recommendations. This article reviews major AF guidelines from around the world and discusses aspects which have nothing to do with the scientific evidence base in order to help the practicing physician understand and make better use of differing guideline recommendations. PMID:24286557

  16. Cardiovascular medication: improving adherence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to medication is generally defined as the extent to which people take medications as prescribed by their healthcare providers. It can be assessed in many ways (e.g., by self-reporting, pill counting, direct observation, electronic monitoring, or by pharmacy records). This review reports effects of intervention on adherence to cardiovascular medications however adherence has been measured. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to improve adherence to long-term medication for cardiovascular disease in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: patient health education, prescriber education, prompting mechanisms, reminder packaging (calendar [blister] packs, multi-dose pill boxes), and simplified dosing. PMID:21481286

  17. Cardiovascular medication: improving adherence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to medication is generally defined as the extent to which people take medications as prescribed by their healthcare providers. It can be assessed in many ways (e.g., by self-reporting, pill counting, direct observation, electronic monitoring, or by pharmacy records). This review reports effects of intervention on adherence to cardiovascular medications however adherence has been measured. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to improve adherence to long-term medication for cardiovascular disease in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: patient health education; prescriber education; prompting mechanisms; reminder packaging (calendar [blister] packs; multi-dose pill boxes); and simplified dosing.

  18. Call to Action on Use and Reimbursement for Home Blood Pressure Monitoring A Joint Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American Society of Hypertension, and the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses’ Association

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Thomas G.; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R.; Artinian, Nancy T.; Goff, David

    2010-01-01

    The standard method for the measurement of blood pressure (BP) in clinical practice has traditionally been to use readings taken with the auscultatory technique by a physician or nurse in a clinic or office setting. While such measurements are likely to remain the cornerstone for the diagnosis and management of hypertension for the foreseeable future, it is becoming increasingly clear that they often give inadequate or even misleading information about a patient’s true BP status. All clinical measurements of BP may be regarded as surrogate estimates of the “True” BP, which may regarded as the average level over prolonged periods of time. In the past 30 years there has been an increasing trend to supplement office or clinic readings with out-of-office measurements of BP, taken either by the patient or a relative at home (home or self-monitoring- HBPM) or by an automated recorder for 24 hours (ambulatory blood pressure monitoring- ABPM). Of the two methods HBPM has the greatest potential for being incorporated into the routine care of hypertensive patients, in the same way that home blood glucose monitoring performed by the patient has become a routine part of the management of diabetes. The currently available monitors are relatively reliable, easy to use, inexpensive, and accurate, and are already being purchased in large numbers by patients. Despite this, their use has only been cursorily endorsed in current guidelines for the management of hypertension, and there have been no detailed recommendations as to how they should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. And despite the fact that there is strong evidence that HBPM can predict clinical outcomes and improve clinical care, the cost of the monitors is not generally reimbursed. It is the purpose of this Call to Action paper to address the issues of the incorporation of HBPM into the routine management of hypertensive patients and its reimbursement. PMID:18497370

  19. Recommendations for ensuring early thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians for the Emergency Cardiac Care Coalition.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend practical steps to ensure early thrombolytic therapy and thereby reduce mortality and morbidity associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). OPTIONS: Various factors were considered that influence time to thrombolysis related to patients, independent practitioners and health care systems. OUTCOMES: Reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. EVIDENCE: Early initiation of thrombolytic therapy reduces morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. The ECC Coalition analysed the factors that might impede early implementation of thrombolytic therapy. VALUES: Published data were reviewed, and recommendations were based on consensus opinion of the Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) Coalition. The ECC Coalition comprises 20 professional, nongovernment and government organizations and has a mandate to improve emergency cardiac care services through collaboration. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Early thrombolytic therapy reduces morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. Implementation of the recommendations will result in reduced time to thrombolytic therapy, streamlining of current practices and enhanced cooperation among health care professionals to expedite care. Depending on existing practices, implementation may require protocol development, and public and professional education. Although costs are associated with educating the public and health care professionals, they are outweighed by the financial and social benefits of reduced morbidity and mortality. RECOMMENDATIONS: Early recognition of AMI symptoms by the public and health care professionals, early access to the emergency medical services system and early action by emergency care providers in administering thrombolytic therapy (within 30 minutes after the patient's arrival at the emergency department). VALIDATION: No similar consensus statements or practice guidelines for thrombolytic therapy in Canada are available for comparison. PMID:8630837

  20. Cardiovascular Malformations Among Preterm Infants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsty Tanner; Nilofer Sabrine; Christopher Wren

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Preterm birth and cardiovas- cular malformations are the 2 most common causes of neonatal and infant death, but there are no published population-based reports on the relationship between them. We undertook this study to determine the preva- lence and spectrum of cardiovascular malformations in a preterm population, the prevalence of prematurity among infants with cardiovascular malformations, and the influence

  1. Postdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    or ancestry, sex, gender, disability, veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, or genderPostdoctoral Fellow Neural Cardiovascular Physiology Job Description A postdoctoral position and physiological roles of new components of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of cardiovascular

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in centenarians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Galioto; Ligia J. Dominguez; Antonella Pineo; Anna Ferlisi; Ernesto Putignano; Mario Belvedere; Giuseppe Costanza; Mario Barbagallo

    Several studies have shown that centenarians have better cardiovascular risk profiles compared to younger old people. Some reports have revealed that cardiovascular diseases (i.e. hypertension, diabetes, angina and\\/or myocardial infarction) are less common in cente- narians respect to 70 and 80 years old persons. In order to explain this evidence, there is a growing number of hypothesis that consider a

  3. Cardiovascular involvement in relapsing polychondritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Attilio Del Rosso; Nunzia Rosa Petix; Mauro Pratesi; Alessandro Bini

    1997-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is an inflammatory disease that characteristically involves cartilagenous tissues. Cardiovascular involvement is a fairly common complication and the second most frequent cause of mortality in this disease. The case of a man with a progressive cardiac involvement, aortic incompetence, mitral regurgitation, and finally complete atrioventricular block offered the opportunity of reviewing the cardiovascular complications in relapsing polychondritis. The

  4. The Cardiovascular Curriculum Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, R. C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The National Heart and Blood Vessel Research and Demonstration Center has developed a program called the Cardiovascular Curriculum Education Project, designed for secondary school students, which consists of self-instructional education units on cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. Describes its three major components and method of…

  5. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. PMID:24099052

  6. Water conservation plan guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-08-06

    These Water Conservation Plan Guidelines are addressed to water system planners but use of the Guidelines is not required by federal law or regulation. The first part of the document introduces the Guidelines and provides information to the States about their nature and possible use. The second part of the document, written for water systems, is an overview to the organization, content, and the use of the Guidelines. The next three parts contain the water conservation plan Guidelines: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced. The Basic Guidelines are designed for use by water systems serving populations of 10,000 or fewer; The Intermediate Guidelines are designed for water systems serving between 10,000 and 100,000 people; The Advanced Guidelines are designed for water systems serving more than 100,000 people. Six appendixes to the Guidelines provide supporting information: detailed descriptions of conservation measures (Appendix A), conservation benchmarks (Appendix B), acronyms and a glossary (Appendix C), information resources (Appendix D), funding sources (Appendix E), and state contacts (Appendix F).

  7. Emergency Evacuation Guidelines For

    E-print Network

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    for assisting persons with disabilities in an evacuation. This document is available in alternate formats from............................................................ Developmental Disabilities.......................................................... Medical Conditions................................................................... Assisting Persons With Disabilities General Guidelines

  8. Colorectal cancer screening and surveillance: Clinical guidelines and rationale—Update based on new evidence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sidney Winawer; Robert Fletcher; Douglas Rex; John Bond; Randall Burt; Joseph Ferrucci; Theodore Ganiats; Theodore Levin; Steven Woolf; David Johnson; Lynne Kirk; Scott Litin; Clifford Simmang

    2003-01-01

    We have updated guidelines for screening for colorectal cancer. The original guidelines were prepared by a panel convened by the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and published in 1997 under the sponsorship of a consortium of gastroenterology societies. Since then, much has changed, both in the research rature and in the clinical context. The present report summarizes

  9. Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    .....................................................................................13 ii. Factors Associated With Cardiovascular Disease............................................13Cardiovascular Risk in the Cambodian Community Formative Research from Lowell, Massachusetts U ...........................................................14 v. Perceptions of Heart Disease

  10. A critical appraisal of the use of Internet for calculating cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed Central

    Gillois, P.; Colombet, I.; Dréau, H.; Degoulet, P.; Chatellier, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper aims to retrieve and evaluate the quality of the Internet sites providing information on cardiovascular risk. We searched web pages related to risk prediction using six search engines. Sites proposing a cardiovascular risk prediction were selected for evaluation. The quality of each site was checked against criteria testing the validity, type and potential usefulness of information for physicians or patients. Search engines retrieved about 50 10(6) web pages. Eight sites were included. Only 2 of them provided calculation of cardiovascular risk based on Framingham equation. The others proposed algorithms, guidelines, or general information on cardiovascular health. Most sites lacked details to ensure quality of information. Present search engines are inefficient to retrieve precise and valid information. Facing the inflation of medical information, a systematic approach to validate the quality of a site is mandatory. Application of Evidence Based Medicine concepts gives a solution for evaluation of internet-based medical information. PMID:10566465

  11. Provision of cardiovascular genetic counseling services: current practice and future directions.

    PubMed

    Somers, Allyson E; Ware, Stephanie M; Collins, Kathleen; Jefferies, John L; He, Hua; Miller, Erin M

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular genetic counseling has emerged as a specialty critical to the care of patients with heritable cardiovascular disease. Current strategies to meet the growing demand are not clear. We sought to characterize practice patterns of cardiac genetic counseling by developing a novel survey distributed to the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Listserv to assess clinical practice, cardiovascular training, and education. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize clinical practice; Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were used to compare the practice of cardiovascular genetic counselors (CVGCs) to those who did not identify cardiology as a specialty (non-CVGCs). A total of 153 individuals completed the survey. Of the 105 participants who reported seeing a cardiac genetics patient, 42 (40%) identified themselves as a CVGC. The most common conditions for which genetic counseling was provided were hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (71% of participants), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (61%), long QT syndrome (LQTS) (56%), and genetic syndromes with cardiovascular disease (55%). CVGCs were significantly more confident than non-CVGCs in providing genetic counseling for seven cardiovascular diseases (2.3?×?10(-6)???p???0.021). Eighty-six percent of genetic counselors sought additional education related to cardiovascular genetics and listed online courses as the most desirable method of learning. These data suggest a growing interest in cardiovascular genetic counseling and need for additional training resources among the NSGC membership. PMID:24788056

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance artefacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The multitude of applications offered by CMR make it an increasing popular modality to study the heart and the surrounding vessels. Nevertheless the anatomical complexity of the chest, together with cardiac and respiratory motion, and the fast flowing blood, present many challenges which can possibly translate into imaging artefacts. The literature is wide in terms of papers describing specific MR artefacts in great technical detail. In this review we attempt to summarise, in a language accessible to a clinical readership, some of the most common artefacts found in CMR applications. It begins with an introduction of the most common pulse sequences, and imaging techniques, followed by a brief section on typical cardiovascular applications. This leads to the main section on common CMR artefacts with examples, a short description of the mechanisms behind them, and possible solutions. PMID:23697969

  13. Red alert for women's heart: the urgent need for more research and knowledge on cardiovascular disease in women: proceedings of the workshop held in Brussels on gender differences in cardiovascular disease, 29 September 2010.

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Swahn, Eva; Appelman, Yolande E; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Ten Cate, Hugo; Nilsson, Peter M; Huisman, Menno V; Stam, Hans C G; Eizema, Karin; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2011-06-01

    A recent report of the EuroHeart project has shown that women are still underrepresented in many cardiovascular clinical trials, while important gender differences are present within most areas of heart disease. As the burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in middle-aged women relative to men, a more profound understanding is needed of the fundamental biological differences that exist between men and women. In the current review, we aim to address the need for more explanatory sex-specific cardiovascular research to be able to adapt existing guidelines for a better heart health in women. PMID:21406440

  14. High-density lipoprotein levels and risk of cardiovascular events: a review.

    PubMed

    Mureddu, Gian Francesco; Brandimarte, Filippo; De Luca, Leonardo

    2012-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong and independent predictor of major cardiovascular events in a wide range of patients. The relationship between HDL-C cholesterol and cardiovascular risk appears to be linear, continuous, negative and independent of other risk factors such as blood pressure, smoking and BMI. In addition, the inverse relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular events does not depend on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, so a substantial residual cardiovascular risk is maintained also in individuals with LDL-C levels below the target recommended by scientific guidelines. Furthermore, a strong relationship among HDL-C levels, progression of atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular diseases has been also demonstrated. Treatments that increase HDL-C levels have been shown to be effective in reducing incidence of cardiovascular diseases both in primary and secondary prevention settings. However, proof that increasing HDL-C levels by pharmacological treatment is able to confer a reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes independent of changes in LDL-C or triglycerides levels is not completely defined. Among currently available compounds, statins do not seems to have a sufficient effect on HDL-C profile. Studies on fibrates have shown inconclusive results. Although niacin has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events paralleling the regression of atherosclerosis, significant side-effects still limit its use. The potential benefit of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibition is still under investigation. The combination therapy of fibrates with statins is also controversial. Thus, despite the potentially favorable effect of raising HDL-C levels, the available guidelines still do not consider HDL-C levels as a specific target for therapy. Further studies are needed to assess the role of new compounds to raise HDL-C levels or modify HDL composition and functionality. PMID:21986488

  15. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  16. Guidelines to Console Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuma, Jean R.

    This brochure contains guidelines concerning the use of the master control panel of the language laboratory at the University of Hawaii. Three sections of guidelines are provided: (1) master control panel including teacher headset functions and student booth functions, (2) "things to know"--including the switch functions, instant communication…

  17. NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for

    E-print Network

    NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 1, Smart Grid Cyber Security Strategy, Architecture, and High-Level Requirements The Smart Grid Interoperability Panel ­ Cyber Security Working Group August 2010 #12;NISTIR 7628 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 1, Smart Grid Cyber Security

  18. Towards European urinalysis guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timo T Kouri; Vanya A Gant; Giovanni B Fogazzi; Walter Hofmann; Hans O Hallander; Walter G Guder

    2000-01-01

    Improved standardized performance is needed because urinalysis continues to be one of the most frequently requested laboratory tests. Since 1997, the European Confederation of Laboratory Medicine (ECLM) has been supporting an interdisciplinary project aiming to produce European urinalysis guidelines. More than seventy clinical chemists, microbiologists and ward-based clinicians, as well as representatives of manufacturers are taking part. These guidelines aim

  19. Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines for Land Managers in the Wildland -Urban Interface #12;Authors.491.6303 http://csfs.colostate.edu/ All photos CSFS unless otherwise noted. #12;1 Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines for Land Managers in the Wildland-Urban Interface As a consequence of the current mountain pine

  20. Strengthening Certification Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Libbee

    1995-01-01

    The teacher certification process is complex, confusing, and important. After explaining the fundamentals of certification, this article suggests pragmatic strategies geographers can use to influence state certification procedures and requirements. The most effective way to change certification guidelines in order to require more geography for preservice teachers may be to change the problems certification guidelines are intended to solve. However,

  1. Conservation and solar guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines are given for selecting R-values and infiltration levels, and determining the size of the solar collection area for passive solar buildings. The guidelines are based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of conservation and passive solar strategies. Tables are given for 90 cities in the US and the results are also displayed on maps. An example is included.

  2. Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Internship Guidelines Adopted 2001 Revised February 2004 Revised March 15, 2007 Page 1 of 5 INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES College of Business Louisiana Tech University The University supports an experiential an internship course(s) that students may apply as credit toward their academic degrees. The internship must

  3. The TEI Hypertext Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRose, Steven J.; Durand, David

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines' approach to describing hypertext features. Discusses the rationale behind the design of the tagset and the range of features included in the guidelines. Discusses the relation and integration of TEI mark-up and the HyTime standard. (CFR)

  4. Parking Procedures GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    Parking Procedures GUIDELINES: Issued: Date Issued ­ January 9, 2014 Revised: Date Revised ­ June 10, 2014 PURPOSE: To establish guidelines for the regulation of parking on the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine campus to ensure fair and equitable parking arrangements while

  5. RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION

    E-print Network

    #12;RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME II Ont. June 1993 Amended April 1994 #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION PREFACE Ltd., Calgary, Alberta. #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Fraser

  6. The future of simulation technologies for complex cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Cates, Christopher U; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    Changing work practices and the evolution of more complex interventions in cardiovascular medicine are forcing a paradigm shift in the way doctors are trained. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), carotid artery stenting (CAS), and acute stroke intervention procedures are forcing these changes at a faster pace than in other disciplines. As a consequence, cardiovascular medicine has had to develop a sophisticated understanding of precisely what is meant by 'training' and 'skill'. An evolving conclusion is that procedure training on a virtual reality (VR) simulator presents a viable current solution. These simulations should characterize the important performance characteristics of procedural skill that have metrics derived and defined from, and then benchmarked to experienced operators (i.e. level of proficiency). Simulation training is optimal with metric-based feedback, particularly formative trainee error assessments, proximate to their performance. In prospective, randomized studies, learners who trained to a benchmarked proficiency level on the simulator performed significantly better than learners who were traditionally trained. In addition, cardiovascular medicine now has available the most sophisticated virtual reality simulators in medicine and these have been used for the roll-out of interventions such as CAS in the USA and globally with cardiovascular society and industry partnered training programmes. The Food and Drug Administration has advocated the use of VR simulation as part of the approval of new devices and the American Board of Internal Medicine has adopted simulation as part of its maintenance of certification. Simulation is rapidly becoming a mainstay of cardiovascular education, training, certification, and the safe adoption of new technology. If cardiovascular medicine is to continue to lead in the adoption and integration of simulation, then, it must take a proactive position in the development of metric-based simulation curriculum, adoption of proficiency benchmarking definitions, and then resolve to commit resources so as to continue to lead this revolution in physician training. PMID:22733836

  7. Acute Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Appraisal of Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kirk J.; Hu, Tian; Fee, Colin; Wang, Richard; Smith, Morgan; Bazzano, Lydia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few clinical practice guidelines provide management recommendations for acute hypertensive episodes except in the context of specific conditions such as pregnancy and stroke. Methods We performed a systematic search to identify guidelines addressing acute hypertension and appraised the guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) validated quality assessment tool. Two reviewers independently appraised and one extracted key recommendations. Literature on secondary hypertension, hypertension in pregnancy, preeclampsia/eclampsia, stroke, aortic dissection, and pheochromocytoma was excluded. Results Three guidelines were identified, sponsored by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) in conjunction with the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). AGREE II yielded mean domain (%) and overall assessment scores (1-7) as follows: NHLBI: 73%, 5.5; ACEP: 67%, 5.5; and ESH/ESC: 56%, 4.5. In hypertensive emergencies, the NHLBI guideline recommends reducing mean arterial pressure by ?25% for the first hour, and then to 160/100-110 mmHg by 2-6 hours with subsequent gradual normalization in 24-48 hours. The ESH/ESC has similar recommendations. The ACEP does not address guidelines for hypertensive emergency but focuses on whether screening for target organ damage or medical intervention in patients with asymptomatic elevated blood pressure in emergency departments reduces the rate of adverse outcomes, concluding that routine screening does not reduce adverse outcomes, but patients with poor follow-up may benefit from routine screening. Conclusion NHLBI and ESH/ESC guidelines are high quality and provide similar recommendations for management of asymptomatic acute hypertensive episodes and hypertensive emergencies. Additional research is needed to inform clinical practice guidelines for this common condition. PMID:25598731

  8. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System: Clinical Science and Cardiovascular Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Arena, Ross; Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-Chul; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S; O'Keefe, James H; Milani, Richard V; Blair, Steven N

    2015-07-01

    Substantial evidence has established the value of high levels of physical activity, exercise training (ET), and overall cardiorespiratory fitness in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This article reviews some basics of exercise physiology and the acute and chronic responses of ET, as well as the effect of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on cardiovascular diseases. This review also surveys data from epidemiological and ET studies in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, particularly coronary heart disease and heart failure. These data strongly support the routine prescription of ET to all patients and referrals for patients with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary heart disease and heart failure, to specific cardiac rehabilitation and ET programs. PMID:26139859

  9. Sirtuins, aging, and cardiovascular risks.

    PubMed

    Favero, Gaia; Franceschetti, Lorenzo; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    The sirtuins comprise a highly conserved family proteins present in virtually all species from bacteria to mammals. Sirtuins are members of the highly conserved class III histone deacetylases, and seven sirtuin genes (sirtuins 1-7) have been identified and characterized in mammals. Sirtuin activity is linked to metabolic control, apoptosis, cell survival, development, inflammation, and healthy aging. In this review, we summarize and discuss the potential mutual relations between each sirtuin and cardiovascular health and the impact of sirtuins on oxidative stress and so age-related cardiovascular disorders, underlining the possibility that sirtuins will be novel targets to contrast cardiovascular risks induced by aging. PMID:26099749

  10. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ?10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students. PMID:25941640

  11. Insights and perspectives on dietary modifications to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article summarizes presentations from, “Insights and Perspectives on Dietary Modifications to Reduce the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease”, a symposium held at the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in conjunction with Experimental Biology 2014 in San Dieg...

  12. Cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in three Chinese communities in 1989.

    PubMed

    Rao, X; Hsu-Hage, B H; Wahlqvist, M L; Li, Y; Liu, X; Zhang, K; Kuang, T; Zhang, D; Dai, Z

    1995-09-01

    The cardiovascular risk prevalence of 935 adult Chinese living in Chauzhou, Meizhou, and Xinhui cities of Guangdong Province, China, is reported. The three communities are geographically separated, and represent the three major dialect group in Guangdong Province (Teochew, Hakka and Cantonese respectively) which are also the major donor populations of overseas Chinese to Australia and South East Asia. Taking into account historical data, the conventional cardiovascular risk factor prevalence of these combined communities in China as a whole is on the increase and approaches or even exceeds that in Western Society. However, the three communities are not very alike in their prevalences of individual conventional cardiovascular risk factors, notably for hyperlipidaemia (most prevalent in Chauzhou), hypertension (most prevalent in Chauzhou men at 12.4% and least in Meizhou women 5.0%) and cigarette smoking (most prevalent in Xinhui men at 72.7% and least in Xinhui women, 0%). They are similar in stature, body weight, BMI, and waist-to-hip ratio, with very low prevalences of overweight/obesity, or abdominal obesity. An understanding of the contributors to sub-ethnic difference in cardiovascular risk should emerge with further study of these Chinese populations. PMID:24394352

  13. [Therapy of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e.?V.)].

    PubMed

    Streif, W; Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Andres, O; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Beutel, K; Dittmer, R; Gehrisch, S; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Haselböck, J; Hassenpflug, W-A; Heine, S; Holzhauer, S; King, S; Kirchmaier, C M; Krause, M; Kreuz, W; Lösche, W; Mahnel, R; Maurer, M; Nimtz-Talaska, A; Olivieri, M; Rott, H; Schambeck, Ch M; Schedel, A; Schilling, F H; Schmugge, M; Schneppenheim, R; Scholz, U; Scholz, T; Schulze, H; Siegemund, A; Strauß, G; Sykora, K-W; Wermes, C; Wiegering, V; Wieland, I; Zieger, B; Zotz, R B

    2014-01-01

    Inherited disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group. For optimal prevention and management of bleeding, classification and diagnosis of the underlying defect are highly recommended. An interdisciplinary guideline for a diagnostic approach has been published (AWMF # 086-003 S2K; Hämostaseologie 2014; 34: 201-212). Underlying platelet disorder, platelet count, age and clinical situation modify treatment. Exclusive transfusion of platelet concentrates may be inappropriate as potentially adverse effects can outweigh its benefit. A stepwise and individually adjusted approach for restitution and maintenance of haemostasis is recommended. Administration of antifibrinolytics is generally endorsed, but is of particular use in Quebec disease. Restricted to older children, desmopressin is favourable in storage pool disease and unclassified platelet disorders. Although licensed only for patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia and alloantibodies, in clinical practice rFVIIa is widely used in inherited platelet disorders with severe bleeding tendency. This guideline aims at presenting the best available advice for the management of patients with inherited platelet function disorders. PMID:25370176

  14. Cardiovascular risk assessment and cholesterol management in adolescents: getting to the heart of the matter

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Holly C.; de Ferranti, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Adolescence is a common time for the identification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, including elevated cholesterol. Guidelines for the detection and treatment of hypercholesterolemia differ for children and adults. This review highlights these differences and discusses special considerations for cholesterol management in the adolescent population. Recent findings Several longitudinal studies have confirmed that the number of cardiovascular risk factors present in adolescence, including elevated cholesterol, lead to atherosclerosis in adults. There is increased awareness that other chronic medical conditions, including diabetes, congenital heart disease, inflammatory diseases, and childhood cancer, can accelerate this process. There is a move to screen and treat more young patients with elevated cholesterol to prevent future cardiovascular disease. New markers of atherosclerosis are being used to quantify cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents in research populations. The safety and efficacy of several interventions, including drug therapy, is increasingly established. Summary Comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment is important for adolescent health and includes assessment of family history and tobacco use along with measurement of body mass index and blood pressure. Additionally, cholesterol screening is recommended for overweight adolescents or those with an unknown family history and for all patients by the age of 20. Providers caring for adolescents should be familiar with both the pediatric and adult cholesterol screening and treatment guidelines as well as how common adolescent conditions affect cholesterol levels. PMID:20489635

  15. Improving patient adherence to lifestyle advice (IMPALA): a cluster-randomised controlled trial on the implementation of a nurse-led intervention for cardiovascular risk management in primary care (protocol)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marije S Koelewijn-van Loon; Ben van Steenkiste; Gaby Ronda; Michel Wensing; Henri E Stoffers; Glyn Elwyn; Richard Grol; Trudy van der Weijden

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients at high risk of cardiovascular diseases are managed and monitored in general practice. Recommendations for cardiovascular risk management, including lifestyle change, are clearly described in the Dutch national guideline. Although lifestyle interventions, such as advice on diet, physical exercise, smoking and alcohol, have moderate, but potentially relevant effects in these patients, adherence to lifestyle advice in general

  16. Cardiovascular & Respiratory Modeling, Analysis & Control

    E-print Network

    Batzel, Jerry

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 1.7.3 Sensitivity analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 2 Respiratory Modeling 45 2Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems: Modeling, Analysis & Control J. J. Batzel, F. Kappel, D.1 Respiratory Control Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 2.1.1 General features of respiration

  17. Cardiovascular Interactions Model and Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Carl F. Rothe (Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology)

    2005-06-22

    The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses.

  18. Cardiovascular Implications of Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Institution: NIH Library User Name Password Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Cardiovascular Implications of Erectile Dysfunction Bryan ... PDF Free PPT Slides of All Figures Classifications Cardiology Patient Page Services Article Usage Statistics E-mail ...

  19. Cardiovascular disease and environmental exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K D Rosenman

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the possible association between cardiovascular disease and occupational and environmental agents. The effects of carbon monoxide, fibrogenic dusts, carbon disulphide, heavy metals, noise, radiation, heat, cold, solvents and fluorocarbons are discussed. New directions for investigation are suggested.

  20. A multifaceted strategy using mobile technology to assist rural primary healthcare doctors and frontline health workers in cardiovascular disease risk management: protocol for the SMARTHealth India cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood Pressure related disease affected 118 million people in India in the year 2000; this figure will double by 2025. Around one in four adults in rural India have hypertension, and of those, only a minority are accessing appropriate care. Health systems in India face substantial challenges to meet these gaps in care, and innovative solutions are needed. Methods We hypothesise that a multifaceted intervention involving capacity strengthening of primary healthcare doctors and non-physician healthcare workers through use of a mobile device-based clinical decision support system will result in improved blood pressure control for individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular disease event when compared with usual healthcare. This intervention will be implemented as a stepped wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial in 18 primary health centres and 54 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh involving adults aged ?40 years at high cardiovascular disease event risk (approximately 15,000 people). Cardiovascular disease event risk will be calculated based on World Health Organisation/International Society of Hypertension’s region-specific risk charts. Cluster randomisation will occur at the level of the primary health centres. Outcome analyses will be conducted blinded to intervention allocation. Expected outcomes The primary study outcome is the difference in the proportion of people meeting guideline-recommended blood pressure targets in the intervention period vs. the control period. Secondary outcomes include mean reduction in blood pressure levels; change in other cardiovascular disease risk factors, including body mass index, current smoking, reported healthy eating habits, and reported physical activity levels; self-reported use of blood pressure and other cardiovascular medicines; quality of life (using the EQ-5D); and cardiovascular disease events (using hospitalisation data). Trial outcomes will be accompanied by detailed process and economic evaluations. Significance The findings are likely to inform policy on a scalable strategy to overcome entrenched inequities in access to effective healthcare for under-served populations in low and middle income country settings. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registry India CTRI/2013/06/003753. PMID:24274431

  1. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Gösta; Eriksson, Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, as in many other European countries, traffic noise is an important environmental health issue. At present, almost two million people are exposed to average noise levels exceeding the outdoor national guideline value (55 dB(A)). Despite efforts to reduce the noise burden, noise-related health effects, such as annoyance and sleep disturbances, are increasing. The scientific interest regarding more serious health effects related to the cardiovascular system is growing, and several experimental and epidemiological studies have been performed or are ongoing. Most of the studies on cardiovascular outcomes have been related to noise from road or aircraft traffic. Few studies have included railway noise. The outcomes under study include morning saliva cortisol, treatment for hypertension, self-reported hypertension, and myocardial infarction. The Swedish studies on road traffic noise support the hypothesis of an association between long-term noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. However, the magnitude of effect varies between the studies and has been shown to depend on factors such as sex, number of years at residence, and noise annoyance. Two national studies have been performed on the cardiovascular effects of aircraft noise exposure. The first one, a cross-sectional study assessing self-reported hypertension, has shown a 30% risk increase per 5 dB(A) noise increase. The second one, which to our knowledge is the first longitudinal study assessing the cumulative incidence of hypertension, found a relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.19) per 5 dB(A) noise increase. No associations have been found between railway noise and cardiovascular diseases. The findings regarding noise-related health effects and their economic consequences should be taken into account in future noise abatement policies and community planning. PMID:21537104

  2. Adiponectin and cardiovascular inflammatory responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukihiro Takemura; Kenneth Walsh; Noriyuki Ouchi

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a cause of many metabolic and cardiovascular disorders through its ability to promote chronic systemic\\u000a inflammation. Recent studies have found that adipose tissues secrete numerous cytokines that are referred to as adipokines.\\u000a Although most adipokines induce inflammation, adiponectin inhibits inflammatory reactions and protects against metabolic and\\u000a cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on the anti-inflammatory properties of

  3. Cardiovascular physiology in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system have been studied since the first manned flights. In several instances, the results from these investigations have directly contradicted the predictions based on established models. Results suggest associations between space flight's effects on other organ systems and those on the cardiovascular system. Such findings provide new insights into normal human physiology. They must also be considered when planning for the safety and efficiency of space flight crewmembers.

  4. Testosterone and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Gioia, Angelo; Giovannini, Lara; Boscaro, Marco; Corona, Giovanni; Carpi, Angelo; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-04-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is one of the most common causes of death in the western populations and, nowadays, its incidence is increasing even in the developing countries; although CV disease affects both sexes, it is more frequent in males in whom it shortens the average life expectancy. In this regard, this difference has been wrongly attributed for many years to the negative effects of testosterone (T); however, nowadays, a large amount of evidence suggests that this hormone may have protective effects on the CV system and that, indeed, the low levels of T could be associated with an increased CV risk and with an augmentation of morbidity and mortality in males. Such an aspect gains great relevance in light of the consideration that T decrease, besides occurring as a consequence of rare pathological conditions, can often take place with natural aging, causing a state of "male menopause", also called late-onset hypogonadism. In this review, we aimed to summarize the present state of the art concerning the association between T deficit and CV disease by analyzing the protective role of T on CV system and the relationship of this hormonal lack with metabolic syndrome, CV morbidity and mortality, and with the CV complications, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke, that frequently occur in T deficiency. PMID:23475207

  5. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashi K

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC) wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one’s strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC) referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD) penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22807642

  6. [Homocysteine and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Lutteri, L; Chapelle, J P; Gielen, J

    1999-06-01

    Homocystinuria is an uncommon genetic disease characterized by a marked increase of serum homocysteine (HCY), an intermediate of methionine metabolism. In patients with homocystinuria, hyperhomocysteinemia promotes the development of atherosclerotic lesions and is responsible for premature coronary artery disease. Recently, several studies have also demonstrated that moderate hyperhomocysteinemia--not necessarily linked to an inborn metabolic defect--may also be considered as an independant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The main mechanisms of HCY atherogenic action are thought to be LDL oxydation, inhibition of vascular endothelium growth combined with stimulation of smooth muscular cells proliferation, and interference with the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. Cofactors of key enzymes in HCY metabolism, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin B6, may be given, alone or in combination, for the treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteinemia can be assessed by basal plasma HCY concentration and/or by HCY levels measured after a methionine loading test. Mainly measured till now in specialized laboratories using rather complex techniques (HPLC, GCMS, amino acid analyser ...), HCY determination is today spreading widely owing to the development of automated immunoassays. PMID:10446525

  7. Contrasting Cholesterol Management Guidelines for Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Colantonio, Lisandro D; Baber, Usman; Banach, Maciej; Tanner, Rikki M; Warnock, David G; Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Safford, Monika M; Wanner, Christoph; Howard, George; Muntner, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Lipid Work Group recommends statins for adults ?50 years old with CKD. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association endorses statins for adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, adults with LDL cholesterol?190 mg/dl, and adults 40-79 years old with LDL cholesterol=70-189 mg/dl and diabetes or a 10-year predicted risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease ?7.5% estimated using the Pooled Cohort risk equations. Using data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study, we calculated the agreement for statin treatment between these two guidelines for adults 50-79 years old with CKD (eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) or albuminuria?30 mg/g) not on dialysis. We assessed the validity of the Pooled Cohort risk equations in individuals with CKD. Study participants were enrolled between 2003 and 2007, and we report incident cardiovascular disease events (stroke and coronary heart disease) through December of 2010. Among 4726 participants with CKD, 2366 (50%) were taking statins, and 1984 (42%) were recommended statins by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline but not taking them. Overall, 376 (8%) participants did not meet the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association criteria for initiating statin treatment. Cardiovascular disease incidence was low (3.0/1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval, 0.1 to 5.9) among these participants. The Pooled Cohort risk equations were well calibrated (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-squared=2.7, P=0.45) with moderately good discrimination (C index, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 0.77). In conclusion, these guidelines show high concordance for statin treatment for adults with CKD. PMID:25395432

  8. [Diagnosis of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e.?V.)].

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Schulze, H; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Gehrisch, S; Geisen, C; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Harbrecht, U; Kappert, G; Kirchmaier, C; Kehrel, B; Lösche, W; Krause, M; Mahnel, R; Meyer, O; Pilgrimm, A K; Pillitteri, D; Rott, H; Santoso, S; Siegemund, A; Schambeck, C; Scheer, M; Schmugge, M; Scholl, T; Strauss, G; Zieger, B; Zotz, R; Hermann, M; Streif, W

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are often not detected until bleeding occurs. In clinical settings only a few methods have proven to be useful for identification and classification of inherited platelet disorders. For a rational diagnostic approach, a stepwise algorithm is recommended. Patient history and clinical investigation are mandatory. Von Willebrand disease and other coagulation disorders should always be ruled out prior to specific platelet testing. Platelet count, size, volume (MPV) and morphology may guide further investigations. The PFA-100® CT is suited for screening for severe platelet defects. Platelet aggregometry allows assessment of multiple aspects of platelet function. Flow cytometry enables diagnosis of thrombasthenia Glanzmann, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and storage pool defects. Molecular genetics may confirm a putative diagnosis or pave the way for identifying new defects. We present an unabridged version of the interdisciplinary guideline. PMID:24903476

  9. CRITICALITY SAFETY POSTING GUIDELINES

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, M.A.

    2001-11-01

    This document provides a set of guidelines in the preparation of criticality safety postings. Guidance is provided in word choice, word arrangement, common human factors considerations. and use of color to highlight limits, cautions, and permissives.

  10. Melanoma Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    Coding Guidelines MELANOMA C440-C449 with Histology 8720-8780 Reportability In situ melanoma, including early or evolving in situ melanoma, is reportable Early or evolving melanoma is not reportable Thickness (Depth) in millimeters (mm) [Based

  11. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  12. Support Guidelines.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource, created by Laura Wish Morgan, a prominent family law and child support attorney, is offered primarily as an aid to other attorneys "who wish to research the law of child support in general and child support guidelines in particular." The site features links to child support guidelines for each state and the District of Columbia, weekly overviews of current notable child support cases, monthly articles on current legal issues concerning child support, and a collection of related links.

  13. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  14. Evidence For and Against Dietary Recommendations to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based dietary guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have changed significantly over the past 9 years. Now less emphasis is placed on total dietary fat and cholesterol restriction and more emphasis on restricting saturated fat. The public outcry to stop demonizing saturated fats has been around for some time. We are now hearing more agreement from medical researchers and clinicians alike, as they become aware of evidence that some saturated fatty acids are not harmful and some are actually beneficial. Another criticism of the dietary guidelines is their failure to look at more meaningful outcomes in research. Instead of using low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol to measure risk, they should use markers for inflammation, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome—all well-known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Perhaps the recommendations that arise from dietary research would be more meaningful if they were presented more simply: in terms of whole foods (like dairy products and fresh meat), rather than nutrients (like saturated fat). PMID:26175635

  15. Algorithms for builder guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.; Lekov, A.B.

    1989-06-01

    The Builder Guidelines are designed to make simple, appropriate guidelines available to builders for their specific localities. Builders may select from passive solar and conservation strategies with different performance potentials. They can then compare the calculated results for their particular house design with a typical house in the same location. Algorithms used to develop the Builder Guidelines are described. The main algorithms used are the monthly solar ratio (SLR) method for winter heating, the diurnal heat capacity (DHC) method for temperature swing, and a new simplified calculation method (McCool) for summer cooling. This paper applies the algorithms to estimate the performance potential of passive solar strategies, and the annual heating and cooling loads of various combinations of conservation and passive solar strategies. The basis of the McCool method is described. All three methods are implemented in a microcomputer program used to generate the guideline numbers. Guidelines for Denver, Colorado, are used to illustrate the results. The structure of the guidelines and worksheet booklets are also presented. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Audit of cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetic patients referred for insulin therapy: a cardiological perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter A Henriksen; K Ann Lockman; Sharon J Robertson; Donna Clark; Janet Ip Barclay; John Chalmers; Ian W Campbell

    2004-01-01

    We present an audit of cardiovascular risk, and drug prescription of 250 type 2 diabetic patients referred from primary care to a District General Hospital for prescription of 250 type 2 diabetic patients referred from primary care to a District General Hospital for management of insulin therapy. Prescription patterns were compared to current UK guidelines for primary and secondary prevention

  17. Heterogeneity in statin indications within the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Lima, João A C; Nallamothu, Brahmajee; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-01-01

    A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden. PMID:25456869

  18. Trading off dietary choices, physical exercise and cardiovascular disease risks.

    PubMed

    Grisolía, José M; Longo, Alberto; Boeri, Marco; Hutchinson, George; Kee, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Despite several decades of decline, cardiovascular diseases are still the most common causes of death in Western societies. Sedentary living and high fat diets contribute to the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. This paper analyses the trade-offs between lifestyle choices defined in terms of diet, physical activity, cost, and risk of cardiovascular disease that a representative sample of the population of Northern Ireland aged 40-65 are willing to make. Using computer assisted personal interviews, we survey 493 individuals at their homes using a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) questionnaire administered between February and July 2011 in Northern Ireland. Unlike most DCE studies for valuing public health programmes, this questionnaire uses a tailored exercise, based on the individuals' baseline choices. A "fat screener" module in the questionnaire links personal cardiovascular disease risk to each specific choice set in terms of dietary constituents. Individuals are informed about their real status quo risk of a fatal cardiovascular event, based on an initial set of health questions. Thus, actual risks, real diet and exercise choices are the elements that constitute the choice task. Our results show that our respondents are willing to pay for reducing mortality risk and, more importantly, are willing to change physical exercise and dietary behaviours. In particular, we find that to improve their lifestyles, overweight and obese people would be more likely to do more physical activity than to change their diets. Therefore, public policies aimed to target obesity and its related illnesses in Northern Ireland should invest public money in promoting physical activity rather than healthier diets. PMID:23906130

  19. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-07-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 ?M in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 ?bpm in heart rate and 51 ?mmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 ?M and 30 ?M, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  20. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 ?M in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 ?bpm in heart rate and 51 ?mmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 ?M and 30 ?M, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation.

  1. PPARs and the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Milton; Chang, Lin; Fan, Yanbo; Zhang, Jifeng

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone-receptor superfamily. Originally cloned in 1990, PPARs were found to be mediators of pharmacologic agents that induce hepatocyte peroxisome proliferation. PPARs also are expressed in cells of the cardiovascular system. PPAR? appears to be highly expressed during atherosclerotic lesion formation, suggesting that increased PPAR? expression may be a vascular compensatory response. Also, ligand-activated PPAR? decreases the inflammatory response in cardiovascular cells, particularly in endothelial cells. PPAR?, similar to PPAR?, also has pleiotropic effects in the cardiovascular system, including antiinflammatory and antiatherosclerotic properties. PPAR? activation inhibits vascular smooth muscle proinflammatory responses, attenuating the development of atherosclerosis. However, PPAR? overexpression may lead to elevated macrophage inflammation and atherosclerosis. Conversely, PPAR? ligands are shown to attenuate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by improving endothelial cell proliferation and survival while decreasing endothelial cell inflammation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Furthermore, the administration of PPAR ligands in the form of TZDs and fibrates has been disappointing in terms of markedly reducing cardiovascular events in the clinical setting. Therefore, a better understanding of PPAR-dependent and -independent signaling will provide the foundation for future research on the role of PPARs in human cardiovascular biology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1415–1452. PMID:19061437

  2. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in a Traditional African Population with a High Infectious Load: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J. E.; van Bodegom, David; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background To test the inflammatory origin of cardiovascular disease, as opposed to its origin in western lifestyle. Population-based assessment of the prevalences of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease in an inflammation-prone African population, including electrocardiography and ankle-arm index measurement. Comparison with known prevalences in American and European societies. Methodology/Principal Findings Traditional population in rural Ghana, characterised by adverse environmental conditions and a high infectious load. Population-based sample of 924 individuals aged 50 years and older. Median values for cardiovascular risk factors, including waist circumference, BMI, blood pressure, and markers of glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation. Prevalence of myocardial infarction detected by electrocardiography and prevalence of peripheral arterial disease detected by ankle-arm index. When compared to western societies, we found the Ghanaians to have more proinflammatory profiles and less cardiovascular risk factors, including obesity, dysglycaemia, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension. Prevalences of cardiovascular disease were also lower. Definite myocardial infarction was present in 1.2% (95%CI: 0.6 to 2.4%). Peripheral arterial disease was present in 2.8% (95%CI: 1.9 to 4.1%). Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that for the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease inflammatory processes alone do not suffice and additional factors, probably lifestyle-related, are mandatory. PMID:23071653

  3. Guidelines for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hand eczema.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L; Andersen, Klaus E; Chosidow, Oliver; Coenraads, Peter Jan; Elsner, Peter; English, John; Fartasch, Manigé; Gimenez-Arnau, Ana; Nixon, Rosemary; Sasseville, Denis; Agner, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The guidelines aim to provide advice on the management of hand eczema (HE), using an evidence- and consensus-based approach. The guidelines consider a systematic Cochrane review on interventions for HE, which is based on a systematic search of the published literature (including hand-searching). In addition to the evidence- and consensus-based recommendation on the treatment of HE, the guidelines cover mainly consensus-based diagnostic aspects and preventive measures (primary and secondary prevention). Treatment recommendations include non-pharmacological interventions, topical, physical and systemic treatments. Topical corticosteroids are recommended as first line treatment in the management of HE, however continuous long-term treatment beyond six weeks only when necessary and under careful me-dical supervision. Alitretinoin is recommended as a second line treatment (relative to topical corticosteroids) for patients with severe chronic HE. Randomized control trials (RCT) are missing for other used systemic treatments and comparison of systemic drugs in “head-to-head” RCTs are needed.The guidelines development group is a working group of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) and has carefully tried to reconcile opposite views, define current optimal practice and provide specific recommendations, and meetings have been chaired by a professional moderator of the AWMF (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wis-senschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften; Association of the Scientific Medi-cal Societies in Germany).No financial support was given by any medical company. The guidelines are expected to be valid until December 2017 at the latest. PMID:25763418

  4. IOM and DHHS Meeting on Making Clinical Practice Guidelines Appropriate for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Richard A.; Boyd, Cynthia; Tinetti, Mary E.; Von Kohorn, Isabelle; Parekh, Anand K.; McGinnis, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing prevalence of Americans with multiple (2 or more) chronic conditions raises concerns about the appropriateness and applicability of clinical practice guidelines for patient management. Most guidelines clinicians currently rely on have been designed with a single chronic condition in mind, and many such guidelines are inattentive to issues related to comorbidities. PURPOSE In response to the need for guideline developers to address comorbidities in guidelines, the Department of Health and Human Services convened a meeting in May 2012 in partnership with the Institute of Medicine to identify principles and action options. RESULTS Eleven principles to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to the population with multiple chronic conditions were identified during the meeting. They are grouped into 3 interrelated categories: (1) principles intended to improve the stakeholder technical process for developing guidelines; (2) principles intended to strengthen content of guidelines in terms of multiple chronic conditions; and (3) principles intended to increase focus on patient-centered care. CONCLUSION This meeting built upon previously recommended actions by identifying additional principles and options for government, guideline developers, and others to use in strengthening the applicability of clinical practice guidelines to the growing population of people with multiple chronic conditions. The suggested principles are helping professional societies to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to persons with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:24821897

  5. Cardiovascular consequences of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Ayas, Najib; Laher, Ismail

    2012-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a common health concern that is characterized by repetitive episodes of asphyxia. This condition has been linked to serious long-term adverse effects such as hypertension, metabolic dysregulation, and cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanism for the initiation and aggravation of cardiovascular disease has not been fully elucidated, oxidative stress and subsequent endothelial dysfunction play major roles. Animal models, which have the advantage of being free of comorbidities and/or behavioral variables (that commonly occur in humans), allow invasive measurements under well-controlled experimental conditions, and as such are useful tools in the study of the pathophysiological mechanisms of sleep apnea. This review summarizes currently available information on the cardiovascular consequences of sleep apnea and briefly describes common experimental approaches useful to sleep apnea in different animal models. PMID:22048845

  6. Radiotherapy and anthracyclines – cardiovascular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wo?niewski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is to analyze the impact of radiotherapy and anthracyclines on the cardiovascular system, based on a survey of contemporary literature. Currently, high efficiency of anticancer therapies has increased the rate of survival in patients treated for cancer. It should be emphasized, however, that these treatments damage not only the affected but also the healthy tissue. Consequently, with the increase of survival rate in these patients, the number of patients with complaints regarding numerous organs and systems also increases as a result of earlier treatment. Thus, during the first decade of the 21st century, a number of concerns about the relationship between cancer treatment and dysfunction of the cardiovascular system were resolved. Anthracyclines, as well as radiotherapy, are capable of damaging the cardiovascular system, both at the central level, by the deterioration of cardiac function, and at peripheral levels, by increasing the hemodynamic and thrombotic changes.

  7. Undergraduates Understanding of Cardiovascular Phenomena

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Joel A. Michael (Rush Medical College Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology)

    2002-06-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the studentsÂ? answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the studentsÂ? inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  8. Current Genomics in Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Vinit; Brouilette, Scott; Abrams, Dominic; Schilling, Richard; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a heterogeneous, complex trait that has a major impact on human morbidity and mortality. Common genetic variation may predispose to common forms of CVD in the community, and rare genetic conditions provide unique pathogenetic insights into these diseases. With the advent of the Human Genome Project and the genomic era, new tools and methodologies have revolutionised the field of genetic research in cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we describe the rationale for the current emphasis on large-scale genomic studies, elaborate on genome wide association studies and summarise the impact of genomics on clinical cardiovascular medicine and how this may eventually lead to new therapeutics and personalised medicine. PMID:23450299

  9. Pediatric CKD and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Safder, Osama; Al sharif, Shafiqa; Kari, Jameela A

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the possible risk factors for early atherosclerosis in children with CKD. Endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of atherosclerosis, starts early in renal disease, as indicated by increased carotid artery intima media thickness, carotid arterial wall stiffness, impaired flow mediated dilatation, and coronary artery calcification, which are frequently present in children with CKD. Many risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, renal bone disease, hyperhomocysteinemia, and uremia-related cardiovascular risk factors are associated with CKD. All of these risk factors are modifiable and optimal clinical management can delay or prevent cardiovascular disease. Another strategy to decrease the risk of premature cardiac disease and death in children with CKD is to slow the progression of renal disease. PMID:24720458

  10. Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Edwina H.; Robledo, Candace; Boghossian, Nansi; Zhang, Cuilin; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Although cardiovascular disease has traditionally been viewed as a condition of aging individuals, increasing focus has turned to its developmental origins. Since birthweight has been related to cardiovascular disease risk, research into factors such as gravid conditions that affect fetal growth have grown. Associations between maternal diabetes and childhood obesity from sibling studies suggest a causal role but prospective studies of gestational diabetes remain mixed. Preeclampsia and increased offspring blood pressure has been consistently observed but evidence for other cardiovascular outcomes is lacking. While maternal obesity is associated with childhood obesity, causality remains unclear and paternal obesity should be investigated as an independent risk factor. Environmental chemical exposures in utero, particularly obesogens, are now emerging as another concern, as is conception by infertility treatment. Few studies have investigated subclinical measures of endothelial function or atherosclerosis and more research in these areas may help reveal the underlying pathogenesis. PMID:25364653

  11. Health Education & Behavior 2012 Society for Public

    E-print Network

    van Geen, Alexander

    Health Education & Behavior XX(X) 1­8 © 2012 Society for Public Health Education Reprints Health Orga- nization guideline for arsenic of 10 µg/L because of naturally occurring arsenic has been associated with cancers of the skin, bladder, and lung (Chen & Ahsan 2004; Marshall et al

  12. Liver elastography, comments on EFSUMB elastography guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Molo, Chiara De; Ignee, Andre; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-01-01

    Recently the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Guidelines and Recommendations have been published assessing the clinical use of ultrasound elastography. The document is intended to form a reference and to guide clinical users in a practical way. They give practical advice for the use and interpretation. Liver disease forms the largest section, reflecting published experience to date including evidence from meta-analyses with shear wave and strain elastography. In this review comments and illustrations on the guidelines are given. PMID:24151351

  13. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  14. Global approach to cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: Reality and opportunities for intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L De Nicola; R Minutolo; P Chiodini; C Zoccali; P Castellino; C Donadio; M Strippoli; F Casino; M Giannattasio; F Petrarulo; M Virgilio; E Laraia; B R Di Iorio; V Savica; G Conte

    2006-01-01

    The current implementation into nephrology clinical practice of guidelines on treatment of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. We designed a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate the prevalence and treatment of eight modifiable CV risk factors in 1058 predialysis CKD patients (stage 3: n=486; stage 4: n=430, stage 5: n=142) followed for at least 1 year

  15. Guidelines for drug donations.

    PubMed Central

    Hogerzeil, H. V.; Couper, M. R.; Gray, R.

    1997-01-01

    Drug donations are usually given in response to acute emergencies, but they can also be part of development aid. Donations may be given directly by governments, by non-governmental organisations, as corporate donations (direct or through private voluntary organisations), or as private donations to single health facilities. Although there are legitimate differences between these donations, basic rules should apply to them all. This common core of "good donation practice" is the basis for new guidelines which have recently been issued by the World Health Organisation after consultation with all relevant United Nations agencies, the Red Cross, and other major international agencies active in humanitarian emergency relief. This article summarises the need for such guidelines, the development process, the core principles, and the guidelines themselves and gives practical advice to recipients and donor agencies. PMID:9116555

  16. The role of testosterone therapy in cardiovascular mortality: culprit or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Alukal, Joseph; Weintraub, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Testosterone therapy is recommended for men with symptomatic androgen deficiency and unequivocally low testosterone levels. Although the prevalence of hypogonadism seems relatively constant, studies of prescribing patterns in both the United States and the United Kingdom show a dramatic increase in testosterone prescription in recent years, possibly due to increased marketing and inappropriate therapy. Concurrent with this, there has been growing concern regarding the potential adverse effects of testosterone therapy, particularly its cardiovascular risks. In this review, we present our current understanding of the implications of testosterone deficiency, as well as the conflicting evidence surrounding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone replacement therapy. Although there is a lack of adequate data, based on the current evidence, we conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and increased cardiovascular risk after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline recommended safety monitoring. PMID:25687258

  17. Guidelines for use of fishes in research: revised and expanded

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bart, Henry L., Jr.; Bowker, James D.; Bowser, Paul R.; MacMillan, J. Randy; Nickum, John G.; Rachlin, Joseph W.; Rose, James D.; Sorensen, Peter W.; Warkentine, Barbara E.; Whitledge, Greg W.

    2014-01-01

    The Guidelines for the Use of Fishes in Research (2014; 2014 Guidelines), now available through the American fisheries Society (AFS) website and in print from the AFS bookstore, is a resource to aid researchers and regulatory authorities regarding responsible, scientifically valid research on fish and aquatic wildlife. The Guidelines for the Use of Fishes in Field Research (American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists [ASIH] et al. 1987, 1988) emphasized field research and was followed by the 2004 Guidelines including laboratory research topics. Each version of the Guidelines has been jointly endorsed and/or published by the ASIH, the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists (AIFRB), and AFS--each focusing on the scientific understanding, global conservation, and sustainability of aquatic animals, fisheries, and ecosystems. Changes with time necessitate revisions to make the Guidelines consistent with contemporary practices and scientific literature so to remain relevant as a technical resource. This document provides not only general principles relevant for field and laboratory research endeavors but includes specific requirements for researchers working within the United States and outside of the country. Within the scope of their expertise, the 2014 Uses of Fishers in Research (UFR) Committee members updated and revised sections, resulting in a 90-page 2014 Guidelines having undergone through peer review. As before, topical areas were addressed (see Table of Contents on page 416). Expanded coverage was provided on U.S. and international agencies and programs relevant to research with fishes. The Surgical Procedures and the Marking and Tagging section received special focus by a UFR Subcommittee. Feeds and Feeding and the Administration of Drugs, Biologics and Other Chemicals are just some of the newly added topics. The 2014 Guidelines is user-friendly by way of hyperlinks to external Internet sites, intradocument sections, and tables of acronyms with corresponding terms, low regulatory priority drugs, and Office of International des Epizooties notifiable disease agents. Again, the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) role is explained, expectations for research are provided, and a brief checklist for IACUC readiness is included. Overall, the ,i>2014 Guidelines is the taxon-specific resource for our professional societies and is a principal document for standards on the care and use of fish and aquatic vertebrates in research.

  18. Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Incident Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Emily B.; Bayliss, Elizabeth A.; Daugherty, Stacie L.; Steiner, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women and men with diabetes. Previous cross-sectional studies of prevalent diabetes have found that women are less likely to meet ADA and AHA guidelines for control of cardiovascular risk factors (hemoglobin A1c, LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure), but have not studied the critical period immediately after diagnosis. Methods To assess gender differences in cardiovascular risk factors at the time of diabetes diagnosis (baseline) and one year later (follow-up), we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 6,547 individuals with incident diabetes in an integrated care delivery system. We assessed mean cardiovascular risk factor values by gender and adjusted odds ratios of attaining ADA goals. Findings Compared with men, at baseline women had lower hemoglobin A1c (7.9% vs. 8.2%, P<0.001), higher LDL cholesterol (118.9 vs. 111.5 mg/dL, P < 0.001), higher systolic blood pressure (131.9 vs. 130.5 mmHg, P<0.001), and lower diastolic blood pressure (79.1 vs. 79.7 mmHg, P=0.006). At follow-up, the hemoglobin A1c gender gap had closed (6.9% vs. 6.9%, P=0.39), and the gender gaps had decreased for blood pressure (129.8/77.0 vs. 128.9/77.6, P=0.009) and LDL cholesterol (104.0 vs 98.2 mg/dL, P<0.001). These associations varied by age. Adjusted odds ratios showed similar relationships. Conclusions In this cohort of individuals with incident diabetes, men and women had important differences in risk factor control at the time of diabetes diagnosis. These differences varied by age, and decreased over time. PMID:24439948

  19. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  20. Appropriateness criteria for cardiovascular imaging use in heart failure: report of literature review.

    PubMed

    Garbi, Madalina; McDonagh, Theresa; Cosyns, Bernard; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Edvardsen, Thor; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Nieman, Koen; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-02-01

    The Imaging Task Force appointed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) identified the need to develop appropriateness criteria for the use of cardiovascular imaging in heart failure as a result of continuously increasing demand for imaging in diagnosis, definition of aetiology, follow-up, and treatment planning. This article presents the report of literature review performed in order to inform the process of definition of clinical indications and to aid the decisions of the appropriateness criteria voting panel. The report is structured according to identified common heart failure clinical scenarios. PMID:25550363

  1. Assessment of Patients with a DePuy ASR Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacement: Results of Applying the Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery in a Tertiary Referral Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Ramiro, Sebastián Garcia; Combalía, Andrés; Riba, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis associated with the DePuy ASR hip cup is poor and varies according to the series. This implant was withdrawn from use in 2010 and all patients needed to be assessed. We present the results of the assessment of our patients treated with this device, according to the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery (SECCA) algorithm published in 2011. This retrospective study evaluates 83 consecutive ASR cups, followed up at a mean of 2.9 years. Serum levels of chromium and cobalt, as well as the acetabular abduction angle, were determined in order to assess their possible correlation with failure, defined as the need for revision surgery. The mean Harris Hip Score was 83.2 (range 42-97). Eight arthroplasties (13.3%) required revision due to persistent pain and/or elevated serum levels of chromium/cobalt. All the cups had a correct abduction angle, and there was no correlation between elevated serum levels of metal ions and implant failure. Since two previous ASR implants were exchanged previously to the recall, the revision rate for ASR cups in our centre is 18.2% at 2.9 years. PMID:25431677

  2. Guidelines International Network: toward international standards for clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Forland, Frode; Macbeth, Fergus; Ollenschläger, Günter; Phillips, Sue; van der Wees, Philip

    2012-04-01

    Guideline development processes vary substantially, and many guidelines do not meet basic quality criteria. Standards for guideline development can help organizations ensure that recommendations are evidence-based and can help users identify high-quality guidelines. Such organizations as the U.S. Institute of Medicine and the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have developed recommendations to define trustworthy guidelines within their locales. Many groups charged with guideline development find the lengthy list of standards developed by such organizations to be aspirational but infeasible to follow in entirety. Founded in 2002, the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) is a network of guideline developers that includes 93 organizations and 89 individual members representing 46 countries. The G-I-N board of trustees recognized the importance of guideline development processes that are both rigorous and feasible even for modestly funded groups to implement and initiated an effort toward consensus about minimum standards for high-quality guidelines. In contrast to other existing standards for guideline development at national or local levels, the key components proposed by G-I-N will represent the consensus of an international, multidisciplinary group of active guideline developers. This article presents G-I-N's proposed set of key components for guideline development. These key components address panel composition, decision-making process, conflicts of interest, guideline objective, development methods, evidence review, basis of recommendations, ratings of evidence and recommendations, guideline review, updating processes, and funding. It is hoped that this article promotes discussion and eventual agreement on a set of international standards for guideline development. PMID:22473437

  3. Cardiovascular disease and environmental exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, K D

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the possible association between cardiovascular disease and occupational and environmental agents. The effects of carbon monoxide, fibrogenic dusts, carbon disulphide, heavy metals, noise, radiation, heat, cold, solvents and fluorocarbons are discussed. New directions for investigation are suggested. PMID:465378

  4. Bile Acids Regulate Cardiovascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Sandeep; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Research over the last decade has uncovered roles for bile acids (BAs) that extend beyond their traditional functions in regulating lipid digestion and cholesterol metabolism. BAs are now recognized as signaling molecules that interact with both plasma membrane and nuclear receptors. Emerging evidence indicates that by interacting with these receptors BAs regulate their own synthesis, glucose and energy homeostasis, and other important physiological events. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the actions of BAs on cardiovascular function. In the heart and the systemic circulation, BAs interact with plasma membrane G-protein coupled receptors, e.g. TGR5 and muscarinic receptors, and nuclear receptors, e.g. the farnesoid (FXR) and pregnane (PXR) xenobiotic receptors. BA receptors are expressed in cardiovascular tissue, however, the mechanisms underlying BA-mediated regulation of cardiovascular function remain poorly understood. BAs reduce heart rate by regulating channel conductance and calcium dynamics in sino-atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, and regulate vascular tone via both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. End-stage-liver disease, obstructive jaundice and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are prominent conditions in which elevated serum BAs alter vascular dynamics. This review focuses on BAs as newly-recognized signaling molecules that modulate cardiovascular function. PMID:21707953

  5. Telomere biology in cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Kurz

    2004-01-01

    Summary Advanced age brings about significant changes to cardiovascular physiology, and is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. The basis for this associa- tion remains unclear, but it has been suggested that atherogenesis may share common mech- anisms with the ageing process. Ageing at the cellular level leads to a condition known as replicative senescence, which is

  6. Therapeutic angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Anthony Ware; Michael Simons

    2003-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the management of ischaemic cardiovascular disease during the past three decades, there remains a significant population of patients who are not served well by current treatment approaches. Stimulating revascularization in ischaemic regions is an attractive novel therapeutic strategy, and several angiogenic agents anticipated to have the potential to achieve this goal have been clinically evaluated in

  7. Cardiovascular physiology at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hooper, T; Mellor, A

    2011-03-01

    The role of the cardiovascular system is to deliver oxygenated blood to the tissues and remove metabolic effluent. It is clear that this complex system will have to adapt to maintain oxygen deliver in the profound hypoxia of high altitude. The literature on the adaptation of both the systemic and pulmonary circulations to high altitude is reviewed. PMID:21465906

  8. Cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    Childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity is an important and increasingly prevalent public health problem in Canada and worldwide. High adiposity in youth is indicated in clinical practice by plotting body mass index on appropriate percentile charts normed for age and sex, although waist measures might be a further tool. High adiposity can lead to adiposopathy in youth, with associated increases in inflammation and oxidative stress, changes in adipokines, and endocrinopathy. This is manifest as cardiometabolic risk factors in similar patterns to those in noted in obese adults. Obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors have been shown to be associated with vascular changes indicative of early atherosclerosis, and ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. These cardiovascular consequences are evident in youth, but childhood obesity is also predictive of similar consequences in adulthood. Childhood obesity and risk factors have been shown to track into adulthood and worsen in most individuals. The result is an exponential acceleration of atherosclerosis, which can be predicted to translate into an epidemic of premature cardiovascular disease and events. A change in paradigm is needed toward preventing and curing atherosclerosis and not just preventing cardiovascular disease. This would necessarily create an imperative for preventing and treating childhood obesity. Urgent attention, policy, and action are needed to avoid the enormous future social and health care costs associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obesity in youth. PMID:25661547

  9. Laser therapy in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindge, David

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. It is broadly defined to include anything which adversely affects the heart or blood vessels. One-third of Americans have one or more forms of it. By one estimate, average human life expectancy would increase by seven years if it were eliminated. The mainstream medical model seeks mostly to "manage" cardiovascular disease with pharmaceuticals or to surgically bypass or reopen blocked vessels via angioplasty. These methods have proven highly useful and saved countless lives. Yet drug therapy may be costly and ongoing, and it carries the risk of side effects while often doing little or nothing to improve underlying health concerns. Similarly, angioplasty or surgery are invasive methods which entail risk. Laser therapy1 regenerates tissue, stimulates biological function, reduces inflammation and alleviates pain. Its efficacy and safety have been increasingly well documented in cardiovascular disease of many kinds. In this article we will explore the effects of laser therapy in angina, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and other conditions. The clinical application of various methods of laser therapy, including laserpuncture and transcutaneous, supravascular and intravenous irradiation of blood will be discussed. Implementing laser therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease offers the possibility of increasing the health and wellbeing of patients while reducing the costs and enhancing safety of medical care.

  10. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  11. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  12. Obesity, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Mathieu; I Lemieux; J-P Després

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, a highly prevalent condition, is heterogeneous with regard to its impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Epidemiological observations and metabolic investigations have consistently demonstrated that the accumulation of excess visceral fat is related to an increased risk of CVD as well as several metabolic and inflammatory perturbations. In the past decade, data from several studies have served to emphasize

  13. Global risk of cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Poulter

    2003-01-01

    UK death rates from coronary heart disease are among the highest in the world. This is because the UK has high levels of standard risk factors and a low level of intervention on those risk factors. The most important modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are dyslipidaemia (particularly high LDL cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol), smoking, hypertension, glucose intolerance, and central obesity.

  14. CSU Research Colloquium Cardiovascular Research at CSU

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    that focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular bases of cardiovascular function in health and disease-top to bed-side efforts to understand and develop new interventions for cardiovascular disease in people CSU Research Colloquium Cardiovascular Research at CSU: Molecules, Models and Mankind Hilton Fort

  15. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  16. Clinical prediction rules in practice: review of clinical guidelines and survey of GPs

    PubMed Central

    Plüddemann, Annette; Wallace, Emma; Bankhead, Clare; Keogh, Claire; Van der Windt, Danielle; Lasserson, Daniel; Galvin, Rose; Moschetti, Ivan; Kearley, Karen; O’Brien, Kirsty; Sanders, Sharon; Mallett, Susan; Malanda, Uriell; Thompson, Matthew; Fahey, Tom; Stevens, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background The publication of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) studies has risen significantly. It is unclear if this reflects increasing usage of these tools in clinical practice or how this may vary across clinical areas. Aim To review clinical guidelines in selected areas and survey GPs in order to explore CPR usefulness in the opinion of experts and use at the point of care. Design and setting A review of clinical guidelines and survey of UK GPs. Method Clinical guidelines in eight clinical domains with published CPRs were reviewed for recommendations to use CPRs including primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke, diabetes mellitus, fracture risk assessment in osteoporosis, lower limb fractures, breast cancer, depression, and acute infections in childhood. An online survey of 401 UK GPs was also conducted. Results Guideline review: Of 7637 records screened by title and/or abstract, 243 clinical guidelines met inclusion criteria. CPRs were most commonly recommended in guidelines regarding primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (67%) and depression (67%). There was little consensus across various clinical guidelines as to which CPR to use preferentially. Survey: Of 401 responders to the GP survey, most were aware of and applied named CPRs in the clinical areas of cardiovascular disease and depression. The commonest reasons for using CPRs were to guide management and conform to local policy requirements. Conclusion GPs use CPRs to guide management but also to comply with local policy requirements. Future research could focus on which clinical areas clinicians would most benefit from CPRs and promoting the use of robust, externally validated CPRs. PMID:24686888

  17. Sleep apnea and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Floras, John S

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea is evident in approximately 10% of adults in the general population, but in certain cardiovascular diseases, and in particular those characterized by sodium and water retention, its prevalence can exceed 50%. Although sleep apnea is not as yet integrated into formal cardiovascular risk assessment algorithms, there is increasing awareness of its importance in the causation or promotion of hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, atrial arrhythmias, and stroke, and thus, not surprisingly, as a predictor of premature cardiovascular death. Sleep apnea manifests as two principal phenotypes, both characterized by respiratory instability: obstructive (OSA), which arises when sleep-related withdrawal of respiratory drive to the upper airway dilator muscles is superimposed upon a narrow and highly compliant airway predisposed to collapse, and central (CSA), which occurs when the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide falls below the apnea threshold, resulting in withdrawal of central drive to respiratory muscles. The present objectives are to: (1) review the epidemiology and patho-physiology of OSA and CSA, with particular emphasis on the role of renal sodium retention in initiating and promoting these processes, and on population studies that reveal the long-term consequences of untreated OSA and CSA; (2) illustrate mechanical, autonomic, chemical, and inflammatory mechanisms by which OSA and CSA can increase cardiovascular risk and event rates by initiating or promoting hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke; (3) highlight insights from randomized trials in which treating sleep apnea was the specific target of therapy; (4) emphasize the present lack of evidence that treating sleep apnea reduces cardiovascular risk and the current clinical equipoise concerning treatment of asymptomatic patients with sleep apnea; and (5) consider clinical implications and future directions of clinical research and practice. PMID:24084492

  18. Copyright Guidelines for UNBC Faculty,

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Copyright Guidelines for UNBC Faculty, Staff and Students Revised March 2013 #12;Copyright.........................................................................................................3 Your Copyright Obligations ...............................................................................3 Flowchart: Copyright Guidelines for UNBC Faculty, Staff and Students ......4 Steps to Determine

  19. Current Fat Guidelines and Recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current dietary guidelines, including those of the US government [Dietary Guidelines (USDA/DHHS, 2005), Dietary Reference Intakes [reference DRI macronutrient book], National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, 2001)], American Heart Association (AHA, 2206), American Diabetes Association (2006) and...

  20. PREVENTION GUIDELINES SYSTEM/DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Prevention Guidelines System gives public health practitioners quick access to the most current CDC recommendations and guidelines for the prevention, control, treatment and detection of infectious and chronic diseases, environmental hazards, natural or human-generated disast...

  1. Guidelines for Retrofit Performance Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Ternes, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    A data specification guideline developed for use in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Single-Family Building Energy Retrofit Research Program is applicable to field monitoring studies of cooling retrofits. The guideline was developed to promote...

  2. 2012 Guidelines for Water Reuse

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual is a revision of the "2004 Water Reuse Guidelines." This document is a summary of reuse guidelines, with supporting information, for the benefit of utilities of utilities and regulatory agencies, particularly EPA....

  3. EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents fifteen technical guidelines to evaluate the suitability of an ecological indicator for a particular monitoring program. The guidelines are organized within four evaluation phrases: conceptual relevance, feasibility of implementation, response variability...

  4. Curricular Guidelines in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, A. Birk; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Curricular guidelines for biochemistry are presented, developed by the Section on Biochemistry and Nutrition and the Section on Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids. (MLW)

  5. Training Guidelines: Bricks Operatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual offers guidelines for training of personnel involved in the manufacture of bricks, including employment practices; handling and preparation of raw materials; making, drying, firing, sorting, packing, and loading of bricks. A major emphasis is placed on industrial safety. (MF)

  6. Guidelines for Theatre Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    Prepared to help school administrators and theatre arts teachers establish and maintain a safe environment for the actors, technicians, and audience members who participate in educational theatre programs, this guide is divided into two major sections. The first section presents administrative guidelines covering recommended procedures, teacher…

  7. Noise Assessment Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Theodore J.; McMahon, Nancy M.

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in its efforts to provide decent housing and a suitable living environment, is concerned with noise as a major source of environmental pollution. To this end, these guidelines are presented to provide site screening techniques. The procedures described have been developed so that people…

  8. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  10. Curricular Guidelines in Occlusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Curricular guidelines proposed by the American Association of Dental Schools are outlined, including notes on the interrelationship of occlusion content and other disciplines, an overview of the curriculum, preclinical and clinical goals and objectives, prerequisites, a core content outline, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  11. Prenatal Testing Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miriam Kuppermann; Mary E. Norton

    2005-01-01

    Numerous advances over the past 15 years have led to a much wider array of prenatal testing options for pregnant women who are interested in obtaining information regarding the chromosomal status of their fetus. However, despite recent data calling into question the assumptions underlying current testing guidelines, including those inherent in the risk-based threshold for offering invasive testing, chorionic villus

  12. Virginia School Health Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    Virginia's Department of Education and Department of Health are concerned with the health of children and youth, and with the implementation of comprehensive school health programs. These guidelines provide a basis for developing a model school health program or for enriching an existing program, focusing on health services and school environment.…

  13. Camp Unit Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultsman, John T.; Cottrell, Richard L.

    This document provides a set of generalized guidelines for the design of units in large family campgrounds. Managers of recreational lands have two responsibilities and goals: to protect the natural resources, and to provide an enjoyable experience for users. With these goals in mind, unique variables to each unit such as shade, site aesthetics,…

  14. BUCKLEY AMENDMENT GUIDELINES Confidentiality

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    BUCKLEY AMENDMENT GUIDELINES Confidentiality: Regardless of the function you are performing, non-academic, or medical, is confidential and cannot be given or made available to anyone other than confidentiality, and to ensure that only University officials with a legitimate educational interest have access

  15. Space Guidelines for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Coordinating Committee for Higher Education, Madison.

    The following guidelines are recommended: stack space--for each 10 volumes, one square foot of space; reading room--25 square feet per station x 20% of the total undergraduate population; carrel space--25% of the graduate enrollment x 45 square feet; office and auxilliary space--135 square feet x full time equivalent staff. (NI)

  16. Brandeis University General Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    1 Brandeis University General Guidelines Boards of Advisors (BOA) The Provost acts as the manager, both reviewing and organizing the BOAs; the President gives final approval. The Board of Advisors (BOA establish a Board of Advisors (BOA). The President and the Provost must give their permission

  17. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-01-01

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as

  18. Guidelines for RECORD KEEPING

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Guidelines for SCIENTIFIC RECORD KEEPING in the Intramural Research Program at the NIH National are dependent on our vigilance in maintain ing the highest quality of records for every as pect of the science for Scientific Record Keeping into everyday practice. These Guide lines set forth the general principles

  19. GUIDELINES FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Guidelines for Exposure Assessment describe the general concepts of exposure assessment including definitions and associated units, and by providing guidance on the planning and conducting of an exposure assessment. Guidance is also provided on presenting the results of the e...

  20. RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Risk Assessment Guidelines were developed, based on recommendations from the National Academy of Science, to help guide EPA scientists in assessing the risks from chemicals or other agents in the environment. They also inform EPA decision makers and the general public ab...

  1. Informational Guidelines for

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    To comply with judicial order or subpoena P In a health or safety emergency Requests to disclose informationInformational Guidelines for Western Michigan University Faculty and Staff Family Educational and financial information. To facilitate and encourage dialogue between students and their parents, WMU offers

  2. Athletic Equity Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Guidelines are presented to ensure the equality of athletic programs for males and females in the Washington state schools. This guide is designed as a foundation for the development of local school and district athletic programs. The essential components for athletic program equality in Washington are: (1) athletic equity plan development; (2)…

  3. Developing a Clinical Diabetes Guideline in Diabetes Research Network in Iran

    PubMed Central

    NASLI-ESFAHANI, Ensieh; PEIMANI, Maryam; RAMBOD, Camelia; OMIDVAR, Maryam; LARIJANI, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of evidence-based clinical guidelines to raising standards of medical care in diabetes is a core element of coping with the global diabetes epidemic. The purpose of this study was to develop a systematic clinical diabetes guideline from the latest scientific evidences and also to localize its recommendations according to regional and cultural needs of our society. Searches were conducted using NICE, SIGN, WDPCP, IDF, JDC, ADA, AACE, ICSI, CDA, AMDA, IDC, NyDoH guidelines which were examined and criticized and scored using Agree method. Guidelines which got higher score in some important areas of Agree scale including: rigor of development, clarity and comprehensiveness of the recommendations and applicability, especially in the climatic conditions of our country were selected. The existing recommendations were extracted by committee members and supporting evidences of each recommendation were determined based on the sources listed in the clinical guideline. Recommendations grading were classified from grade A to D based on the quality of their supporting evidences (BEL1-5). This guideline covered all areas related to diabetes including screening and diagnosis, lifestyle modification and patient education, management, complications and hypoglycemia. Regarding capacities of this guideline and lack of comprehensive and updated guidelines in our country and region, it is suggested that designing a pilot study to implement this Learner-centered guideline and finding its weaknesses can lead to patient care improvement and also propel us towards our goal to design a comprehensive guideline in compliance with regional and national needs in Middle East.

  4. EAU Guidelines on Prostate Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Aus; C. C. Abbou; D. Pacik; H. van Poppel; J. M. Wolff; F. Zattoni

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To develop clinical guidelines for the management of patients with prostate cancer.Methods: Guidelines were compiled by a working panel based on current literature following a literature review using MEDLINE. Already published structured analysis from national and international guidelines was used, and panel consensus was employed when literature evidence was absent or of poor quality.Results: The full text of the

  5. Sepsis guidelines: Clinical practice implications.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Karen D; Thiessen, Kellie

    2015-06-11

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012 Guidelines offer recommendations for the care of severely septic patients. These guidelines are appraised and summarized briefly in this article, and a case example illustrates the integration process. These guidelines are important for multidisciplinary team members working together toward the common goal of reducing sepsis mortality. PMID:25968978

  6. Policy Guidelines Faculty Development Leave

    E-print Network

    Boas, Harold P.

    "FDL Policy Guidelines" and "Department & College Application Procedures" · Leave Period for FacultyPolicy Guidelines Faculty Development Leave Program FY 14 Updated 9/3/2012 #12;Texas A&M System. #12;· All Faculty Development Leave FY14 guidelines are located at http://dof.tamu.edu/node/13 under

  7. Comparison of the five 2011 guidelines for the treatment of carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Veith, Frank J

    2012-05-01

    In 2011, five independent, international guideline committees reported their recommendations for the management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. These included the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the Society for Vascular Surgery, the European Society of Cardiology, the Australasian, and the UK National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence. As the recommendations of these five guideline committees were based on the same published literature, it would be expected that they are similar, at least to a large extent. Surprisingly, there were considerable differences between the five guidelines regarding the management of both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid patients. The differences in the recommendations between the five Guideline Committees are analyzed and discussed. PMID:22542347

  8. Guidelines for respiratory motion management in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Ariji, Takaki; Kumazaki, Yu; Shimbo, Munefumi; Tohyama, Naoki; Nishio, Teiji; Okumura, Masahiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion management (RMM) systems in external and stereotactic radiotherapies have been developed in the past two decades. Japanese medical service fee regulations introduced reimbursement for RMM from April 2012. Based on thorough discussions among the four academic societies concerned, these Guidelines have been developed to enable staff (radiation oncologists, radiological technologists, medical physicists, radiotherapy quality managers, radiation oncology nurses, and others) to apply RMM to radiation therapy for tumors subject to respiratory motion, safely and appropriately. PMID:23239175

  9. [Brazilian guidelines for the manegement of intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Pontes-Neto, Octávio M; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Valiente, Raul; Friedrich, Maurício; Pedreira, Bruno; Rodrigues, Bruno Castelo Branco; Liberato, Bernardo; Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez de

    2009-09-01

    Among the stroke subtypes, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has the worst prognosis and still lacks a specific treatment. The present manuscript contains the Brazilian guidelines for the management of ICH. It was elaborated by the executive committee of the Brazilian Cerebrovascular Diseases Society and was based on a broad review of articles about the theme. The text aims to provide a rational for the management of patients with an acute ICH, with the diagnostic and therapeutic resources that are available in Brazil. PMID:19838537

  10. Gestational diabetes guidelines in a HAPO world.

    PubMed

    Leary, Joyce; Pettitt, David J; Jovanovic, Lois

    2010-08-01

    The impact of gestational diabetes on maternal and fetal health has been increasingly recognized. However, universal consensus on the diagnostic methods and thresholds has long been lacking. Published guidelines from major societies differ considerably from one another, ranging in recommendations from aggressive screening to no routine screening at all. As a result, real-world practice is equally varied. The recently published Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study, and two randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment of mild maternal hyperglycemia, have served to confirm the findings of smaller, nonrandomized studies solidifying the link between maternal hyperglycemia and adverse perinatal outcomes. In response to these studies, the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) has formulated new guidelines for screening and diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy. Key components of the IADPSG guidelines include the recommendation to screen high-risk women at the first encounter for pre-gestational diabetes, to screen universally at 24-28 weeks' gestation, and to screen with use of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test interpreting abnormal fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations as individually sufficient for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Furthermore, to translate the continuous association between maternal glucose and adverse outcomes demonstrated in the HAPO cohort, they recommend thresholds for positive screening tests at which the odds of elevated birth weight, cord C-peptide, and fetal percent body fat are 1.75 relative to odds of those outcomes at mean glucose values. Opponents to the IADPSG recommendations will likely be those who favor risk-based screening in addition to those who endorse the 50-g glucose challenge test followed by the 100-g oral glucose tolerance test as a more cost-effective, familiar, and possibly, well-validated screening tool. Others may argue that the diagnostic thresholds chosen by the IADPSG are arbitrary and will continue to miss many cases of abnormal glucose metabolism and therefore leave open the possibility of adverse perinatal outcomes due to untreated gestational diabetes. Finally, the potential economic impact of the IADPSG guidelines are unknown, and with minimal long-term data yet available on the offspring of the HAPO cohort, a true cost-effectiveness analysis will be difficult to perform accurately. Given these potential points of contention, the responses of professional and international groups to the IADPSG guidelines are difficult to gauge. Regardless, these guidelines serve to advance the discussion on appropriate screening and diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:20832745

  11. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  12. BSACI guideline for the management of chronic urticaria and angioedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, R J; Leech, S C; Till, S; Huber, P A J; Nasser, S M; Clark, A T

    2015-03-01

    This guidance for the management of patients with chronic urticaria and angioedema has been prepared by the Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI). The guideline is based on evidence as well as on expert opinion and is aimed at both adult physicians and paediatricians practising in allergy. The recommendations are evidence graded. During the development of these guidelines, all BSACI members were included in the consultation process using a Web-based system. Their comments and suggestions were carefully considered by the Standards of Care Committee. Where evidence was lacking, a consensus was reached by the experts on the committee. Included in this management guideline are clinical classification, aetiology, diagnosis, investigations, treatment guidance with special sections on children with urticaria and the use of antihistamines in women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Finally, we have made recommendations for potential areas of future research. PMID:25711134

  13. Economic cost of primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngalesoni, Frida; Ruhago, George; Norheim, Ole F; Robberstad, Bjarne

    2014-08-11

    Tanzania is facing a double burden of disease, with non-communicable diseases being an increasingly important contributor. Evidence-based preventive measures are important to limit the growing financial burden. This article aims to estimate the cost of providing medical primary prevention interventions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among at-risk patients, reflecting actual resource use and if the World Health Organization (WHO)'s CVD medical preventive guidelines are implemented in Tanzania. In addition, we estimate and explore the cost to patients of receiving these services. Cost data were collected in four health facilities located in both urban and rural settings. Providers' costs were identified and measured using ingredients approach to costing and resource valuation followed the opportunity cost method. Unit costs were estimated using activity-based and step-down costing methodologies. The patient costs were obtained through a structured questionnaire. The unit cost of providing CVD medical primary prevention services ranged from US$30-41 to US$52-71 per patient per year at the health centre and hospital levels, respectively. Employing the WHO's absolute risk approach guidelines will substantially increase these costs. The annual patient cost of receiving these services as currently practised was estimated to be US$118 and US$127 for urban and rural patients, respectively. Providers' costs were estimated from two main viewpoints: 'what is', that is the current practice, and 'what if', reflecting a WHO guidelines scenario. The higher cost of implementing the WHO guidelines suggests the need for further evaluation of whether these added costs are reasonable relative to the added benefits. We also found considerably higher patient costs, implying that distributive and equity implications of access to care require more consideration. Facility location surfaced as the main explanatory variable for both direct and indirect patient costs in the regression analysis; further research on the influence of other provider characteristics on these costs is important. PMID:25113027

  14. Master's Level Training in Industrial\\/Organizational Psychology: Does It Meet the SIOP Guidelines?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wanda A. Trahan; Hunter A. McAllister

    2002-01-01

    In order to assess the extent to which terminal master's level I\\/O programs were consistent with Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) guidelines, recent graduates of master's level I\\/O and related programs were surveyed. The survey focused on the competency areas emphasized in the SIOP (1994) guidelines: data collection and analysis competencies, core I\\/O competencies, and additional I\\/O competencies.

  15. Consensus Review of the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease in People With Hemophilia A and B

    PubMed Central

    Boral, Leonard I.; Cohen, Alice J.; Smyth, Susan S.; White, Gilbert C.

    2015-01-01

    With advances in care, increasing numbers of people with hemophilia (PWH) achieve near-normal life expectancies and present with typical age-related cardiovascular conditions. Evidence-based guidelines for medical or surgical management of cardiovascular conditions in individuals with hemophilia are limited. Published recommendations exist for the management of some common cardiovascular conditions (eg, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation), but identifying optimal strategies for anticoagulant or antithrombotic therapy constitutes the primary challenge of managing nonoperative cardiovascular disease (CVD) in PWH. In general, as long as factor concentrates or other hemostatic therapies maintain adequate hemostasis, the recommended medical and surgical management of CVD in PWH parallels that in individuals without hemophilia. The presence of factor inhibitors complicates hemophilia management. Published outcomes of CVD treatment in PWH are similar to those in the general population. Specific knowledge about factor replacement, factor inhibitors, and disease-specific treatment distinguishes the cardiovascular care of PWH from similar care of individuals without this rare bleeding disorder. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary approach incorporating a hematologist with an onsite coagulation laboratory, ideally associated with a hemophilia treatment center, is integral to the management of CVD in PWH. PMID:25436468

  16. Sex-specific risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline: pregnancy and menopause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biology of sex differences is integral to personalized medicine. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline are two related conditions, with distinct sex differences in morbidity and clinical manifestations, response to treatments, and mortality. Although mortality from all-cause cardiovascular diseases has declined in women over the past five years, due in part to increased educational campaigns regarding the recognition of symptoms and application of treatment guidelines, the mortality in women still exceeds that of men. The physiological basis for these differences requires further research, with particular attention to two physiological conditions which are unique to women and associated with hormonal changes: pregnancy and menopause. Both conditions have the potential to impact life-long cardiovascular risk, including cerebrovascular function and cognition in women. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of hypertensive pregnancy disorders on cardiovascular disease and cognitive function later in life, and examines the effects of post-menopausal hormone treatments on cardiovascular risk and cognition in midlife women. We suggest that hypertensive pregnancy disorders and menopause activate vascular components, i.e., vascular endothelium and blood elements, including platelets and leukocytes, to release cell-membrane derived microvesicles that are potential mediators of changes in cerebral blood flow, and may ultimately affect cognition in women as they age. Research into specific sex differences for these disease processes with attention to an individual’s sex chromosomal complement and hormonal status is important and timely. PMID:23537114

  17. Cyberethics and co-operation in the information society.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Christian; Bichler, Robert M; Raffl, Celina

    2009-12-01

    The task of this paper is to ground the notion of cyberethics of co-operation. The evolution of modern society has resulted in a shift from industrial society towards informational capitalism. This transformation is a multidimensional shift that affects all aspects of society. Hence also the ethical system of society is penetrated by the emergence of the knowledge society and ethical guidelines for the information age are needed. Ethical issues and conflicts in the knowledge society are connected to topics of ecological and social sustainability. For information ethics and cyberethics, the sustainable design of society, social, and socio-technological systems is important. In this context the notions of sustainability and co-operation are discussed. Based on these categories, the approach of cyberethics of co-operation can be theoretically grounded. PMID:19440854

  18. Cardiovascular stress of photochemotherapy (PUVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafone, R.A.; Rhodes, A.R.; Audley, M.; Freedberg, I.M.; Abelmann, W.H.

    1980-11-01

    The recently devised therapy for psoriasis and related skin diseases, consisting of long-wave ultraviolet light and oral 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA), was investigated for its cardiovascular effects. In seventeen patients, long-wave ultraviolet light therapy in a treatment enclosure (mean duration, 19.3 minutes) resulted in ambient temperatures of 39.2 degrees C +/- 2.1 degrees C (SD) and skin temperatures of 38.2 degrees C +/- 1.4 degrees C. In upright subjects, heart rate rose 30.8% to 114.4 +/- 25.2 beats per minute (bpm). Intensive room air conditioning, outside of the treatment enclosure, although significantly lowering skin and ambient temperatures, did not affect the heart rates significantly. PUVA therapy is associated with a definite cardiovascular stress when the box type of therapeutic unit is used. Possible modifications are discussed.

  19. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    There are alarming increases in the incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of these diseases is significantly reduced by appropriate lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity. However, the exact mechanisms by which exercise influences the development and progression of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this paper we review some important exercise-induced changes in cardiac, vascular, and blood tissues and discuss recent clinical trials related to the benefits of exercise. We also discuss the roles of boosting antioxidant levels, consequences of epicardial fat reduction, increases in expression of heat shock proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, mitochondrial adaptation, and the role of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial potassium channels in the contributing to the cardioprotection offered by exercise. In terms of vascular benefits, the main effects discussed are changes in exercise-induced vascular remodeling and endothelial function. Exercise-induced fibrinolytic and rheological changes also underlie the hematological benefits of exercise. PMID:22701195

  20. Role of Peripheral Vascular Resistance for the Association Between Major Depression and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouzinova, Elena V.; Wiborg, Ove; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Major depression and cardiovascular diseases are 2 of the most prevalent health problems in Western society, and an association between them is generally accepted. Although the specific mechanism behind this comorbidity remains to be elucidated, it is clear that it has a complex multifactorial character including a number of neuronal, humoral, immune, and circulatory pathways. Depression-associated cardiovascular abnormalities associate with cardiac dysfunctions and with changes in peripheral resistance. Although cardiac dysfunction in association with depression has been studied in detail, little attention was given to structural and functional changes in resistance arteries responsible for blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. This review discusses recent achievements in studies of depression-associated abnormalities in resistance arteries in humans and animal experimental models. The changes in arterial structure, contractile and relaxing functions associated with depression symptoms are discussed, and the role of these abnormalities for the pathology of major depression and cardiovascular diseases are suggested. PMID:25469807

  1. American Society for Microbiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Professional and academic scientific organizations have long had a strong web-based presence, and many of them have contributed mightily to online educational initiatives. The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has done their part by creating this set of resources for undergraduate educators working in the fields of bioterrorism, microbiology, and related topics. One of the strongest sections here includes the curriculum guidelines, which include basic recommendations for what an introductory course in microbiology should cover in terms of skills, safety, and laboratory content. Additionally, visitors can also learn what bioterrorism related topics should be covered in similar courses. The site is rounded out by a set of links to external resources, such as the Bioscience Education Network, the National Academy Press, and a collection of science videos from the Annenberg/CPB Learner website.

  2. Insulin Sensitizers and Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tina K. Thethi; Shipra Singh; Vivian Fonseca

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a progressive disease caused by insulin resistance (IR) in the skeletal muscle, adipose tissue,\\u000a and liver in conjunction with impaired pancreatic secretion. Epidemiologic studies have shown IR to be an independent risk\\u000a factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Insulin resistance contributes to the development of atherosclerosis through multiple\\u000a other well-established risk factors such as hypertension,

  3. Functional foods and cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clare M. Hasler; Susan Kundrat; Deborah Wool

    2000-01-01

    Functional foods are foods that, by virtue of physiologically active food components, provide health benefits beyond basic\\u000a nutrition. Many functional foods have been found to be potentially beneficial in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular\\u000a disease, the leading cause of mortality in the United States. These foods include soybeans, oats, psyllium, flaxseed, garlic,\\u000a tea, fish, grapes, nuts, and stanol- and

  4. Autonomic cardiovascular regulation in obesity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Laederach-Hofmann; L Mussgay

    2000-01-01

    Obese persons suffer from an increased mortality risk supposedly due to cardiovascular disorders related to either continuously lowered parasympathetic or altered sympa- thetic activation. Our cross-sectional correlation study establishes the relationship between obesity and autonomic regulation as well as salivary cortisol levels. Three patient cohorts were sampled, covering ranges of body mass index (BMI) of 27-32 (n=17), 33-39 (n=13) and

  5. Cost-effectiveness of cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely preventable and prevention expenditures are relatively low. The randomised controlled SPRING-trial (SPRING-RCT) shows that cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in general practice with and without self-monitoring both decreases cardiovascular risk, with no additional effect of self-monitoring. For considering future approaches of cardiovascular risk reduction, cost effectiveness analyses of regular care and additional self-monitoring are performed from a societal perspective on data from the SPRING-RCT. Methods Direct medical and productivity costs are analysed alongside the SPRING-RCT, studying 179 participants (men aged 50–75 years, women aged 55–75 years), with an elevated cardiovascular risk, in 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Standard cardiovascular treatment according to Dutch guidelines is compared with additional counselling based on self-monitoring at home (pedometer, weighing scale and/ or blood pressure device) both by trained practice nurses. Cost-effectiveness is evaluated for both treatment groups and patient categories (age, sex, education). Results Costs are €98 and €187 per percentage decrease in 10-year cardiovascular mortality estimation, for the control and intervention group respectively. In both groups lost productivity causes the majority of the costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is approximately €1100 (95% CI: -5157 to 6150). Self-monitoring may be cost effective for females and higher educated participants, however confidence intervals are wide. Conclusions In this study population, regular treatment is more cost effective than counselling based on self-monitoring, with the majority of costs caused by lost productivity. Trial registration Trialregister.nl identifier: http://NTR2188 PMID:23418958

  6. Cardiovascular outcome trials of glucose-lowering drugs or strategies in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Sourij, Harald; Califf, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    Few trials of glucose-lowering drugs or strategies in people with type 2 diabetes have investigated cardiovascular outcomes, even though most patients die from cardiovascular causes despite the beneficial effects of lipid-reducing and blood pressure-lowering treatments. The evidence-based reduction in risk of microvascular disease with glucose lowering has resulted in guidelines worldwide recommending optimisation of glycosylated haemoglobin, but no trial results have shown unequivocal cardiovascular risk reduction with glucose lowering. However, results of the post-trial follow-up of the UK Prospective Diabetes Study, and of a meta-analysis of the four glucose-lowering outcome trials completed to date, suggest about a 15% cardiovascular relative risk reduction per 1% decrement in HbA1c. The 2008 US Food and Drug Administration industry guidance for licensing of antidiabetic drugs greatly increased the number of cardiovascular outcome trials in diabetes, but most trials opted for non-inferiority designs aiming primarily to show absence of cardiovascular toxicity in the shortest possible time. This unintended consequence of the new regulations has meant that the potential long-term benefits, and the possible risks of new therapies, are not being assessed effectively. Also, essential head-to-head trials of therapies for this complex progressive disease, to answer issues such as how best to achieve and maintain optimum glycaemia without promoting weight gain or hypoglycaemia, are not being undertaken. In this Series paper, we summarise randomised controlled cardiovascular outcome trials in type 2 diabetes, provide an overview of ongoing trials and their limitations, and speculate on how future trials could be made more efficient and effective. PMID:24910232

  7. Strategies for Reducing the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities. PMID:25655487

  8. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy, although the majority of studies have been largely confined to non-cardiac cells. Despite the unique arrangement of mitochondria in the adult heart, emerging data suggest that changes in mitochondrial morphology may be relevant to various aspects of cardiovascular biology-these include cardiac development, the response to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, and apoptosis. Interestingly, the machinery required for altering mitochondrial shape in terms of the mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins are all present in the adult heart, but their physiological function remains unclear. In this article, we review the current developments in this exciting new field of mitochondrial biology, the implications for cardiovascular physiology, and the potential for discovering novel therapeutic strategies for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:20631158

  9. Cardiovascular Dementia - A Different Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Udhaya; Heese, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The number of dementia patients has been growing in recent years and dementia represents a significant threat to aging people all over the world. Recent research has shown that the number of people affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia is growing at an epidemic pace. The rapidly increasing financial and personal costs will affect the world's economies, health care systems, and many families. Researchers are now exploring a possible connection among AD, vascular dementia (VD), diabetes mellitus (type 2, T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CD). This correlation may be due to a strong association of cardiovascular risk factors with AD and VD, suggesting that these diseases share some biologic pathways. Since heart failure is associated with an increased risk of AD and VD, keeping the heart healthy may prove to keep the brain healthy as well. The risk for dementia is especially high when diabetes mellitus is comorbid with severe systolic hypertension or heart disease. In addition, the degree of coronary artery disease (CAD) is independently associated with cardinal neuropathological lesions of AD. Thus, the contribution of T2DM and CD to AD and VD implies that cardiovascular therapies may prove useful in preventing AD and dementia. PMID:20448820

  10. Cardiovascular dementia - a different perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Udhaya; Heese, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The number of dementia patients has been growing in recent years and dementia represents a significant threat to aging people all over the world. Recent research has shown that the number of people affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia is growing at an epidemic pace. The rapidly increasing financial and personal costs will affect the world's economies, health care systems, and many families. Researchers are now exploring a possible connection among AD, vascular dementia (VD), diabetes mellitus (type 2, T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CD). This correlation may be due to a strong association of cardiovascular risk factors with AD and VD, suggesting that these diseases share some biologic pathways. Since heart failure is associated with an increased risk of AD and VD, keeping the heart healthy may prove to keep the brain healthy as well. The risk for dementia is especially high when diabetes mellitus is comorbid with severe systolic hypertension or heart disease. In addition, the degree of coronary artery disease (CAD) is independently associated with cardinal neuropathological lesions of AD. Thus, the contribution of T2DM and CD to AD and VD implies that cardiovascular therapies may prove useful in preventing AD and dementia. PMID:20448820

  11. Cardiovascular physiology - Effects of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments during spaceflight and its groundbase analog, bedrest, provide consistent data which demonstrate that numerous changes in cardiovascular function occur as part of the physiological adaptation process to the microgravity environment. These include elevated heart rate and venous compliance, lowered blood volume, central venous pressure and stroke volume, and attenuated autonomic reflex functions. Although most of these adaptations are not functionally apparent during microgravity exposure, they manifest themselves during the return to the gravitational challenge of earth's terrestrial environment as orthostatic hypotension and instability, a condition which could compromise safety, health and productivity. Development and application of effective and efficient countermeasures such as saline "loading," intermittent venous pooling, pharmacological treatments, and exercise have become primary emphases of the space life sciences research effort with only limited success. Successful development of countermeasures will require knowledge of the physiological mechanisms underlying cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity which can be obtained only through controlled, parallel groundbased research to complement carefully designed flight experiments. Continued research will provide benefits for both space and clinical applications as well as enhance the basic understanding of cardiovascular homeostasis in humans.

  12. Improving outcomes for acute coronary syndrome patients in the hospital setting: successful implementation of the American Heart Association "Get With The Guidelines" program by Phase I cardiac rehabilitation nurses.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Frances M; Cafarelli, Mary; Petrakos, Karen; Christophersen, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    A treatment gap exists between published guidelines for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and application of these guidelines in clinical practice. The "Get With The Guidelines" program is a quality initiative developed by the American Heart Association to help acute care providers bridge this gap, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This article describes how cardiac rehabilitation nurses successfully implemented the program using a prospective case-management model in the acute care setting. An overview of the program including purpose, benefits, tools, and resources is provided along with start-up considerations, potential barriers, training needs, and keys to success. PMID:17545819

  13. FELASA guidelines and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Guillen, Javier

    2012-05-01

    The Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) has been releasing guidelines and recommendations on several laboratory animal science disciplines for more than 15 y. The Working Groups producing these documents comprise specialists in each of the addressed topics, are nominated by the FELASA constituent associations, and are elected by the FELASA Board of Management. The FELASA guidelines and recommendations are not regulatory but rather are proposals based on scientific knowledge and the state of the art of laboratory animal science activities. Because they are supported by laboratory animal science associations that represent the vast majority of European professionals, these guidelines and recommendations have influenced the development of various regulatory requirements in Europe, including those related to education and training, routine laboratory animal activities, and animal health monitoring. Some reports fill existing gaps in the European legal framework or complement it. The Working Groups occasionally collaborate with other European organizations, thus enhancing the professional input and effect of the documents produced. The recently established AALAS-FELASA Liaison Body may result in future international cooperation that benefits laboratory animal science and welfare in a global context. PMID:22776188

  14. FELASA Guidelines and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) has been releasing guidelines and recommendations on several laboratory animal science disciplines for more than 15 y. The Working Groups producing these documents comprise specialists in each of the addressed topics, are nominated by the FELASA constituent associations, and are elected by the FELASA Board of Management. The FELASA guidelines and recommendations are not regulatory but rather are proposals based on scientific knowledge and the state of the art of laboratory animal science activities. Because they are supported by laboratory animal science associations that represent the vast majority of European professionals, these guidelines and recommendations have influenced the development of various regulatory requirements in Europe, including those related to education and training, routine laboratory animal activities, and animal health monitoring. Some reports fill existing gaps in the European legal framework or complement it. The Working Groups occasionally collaborate with other European organizations, thus enhancing the professional input and effect of the documents produced. The recently established AALAS–FELASA Liaison Body may result in future international cooperation that benefits laboratory animal science and welfare in a global context. PMID:22776188

  15. Progress in national and regional guidelines development and deployment for the clinical prevention and control of CVD and diabetes in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Valluri, Sruthi; Gaziano, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Successful efforts to reduce cardiovascular disease in many countries have come as a result of both population based interventions and individually guided interventions. Guidelines serve two purposes directed at the promotion of the individually guided interventions. First, they serve as a method to summarize approved and successful life-style and medical interventions to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Second, they guide health providers on how to identify those at high risk for cardiovascular disease and who might benefit from the available interventions. However, guidelines have been increasingly complex and at times contradictory from one body to another or they may not exist at all in certain countries. This paper will review the current status of guidelines for the region as well as for individual countries. Guidelines for the prevention of CVD as a whole will be evaluated as well as guidelines for individual risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes. Finally, this paper will address the pitfalls of individual risk factor based guidelines as opposed to the absolute risk approach integrating multiple risk factors into one comprehensive set of guidelines. PMID:24267441

  16. Progress in national and regional guidelines development and deployment for the clinical prevention and control of CVD and diabetes in Africa.

    PubMed

    Valluri, Sruthi; Gaziano, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Successful efforts to reduce cardiovascular disease in many countries have come as a result of both population based interventions and individually guided interventions. Guidelines serve two purposes directed at the promotion of the individually guided interventions. First, they serve as a method to summarize approved and successful life-style and medical interventions to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Second, they guide health providers on how to identify those at high risk for cardiovascular disease and who might benefit from the available interventions. However, guidelines have been increasingly complex and at times contradictory from one body to another or they may not exist at all in certain countries. This paper will review the current status of guidelines for the region as well as for individual countries. Guidelines for the prevention of CVD as a whole will be evaluated as well as guidelines for individual risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes. Finally, this paper will address the pitfalls of individual risk factor based guidelines as opposed to the absolute risk approach integrating multiple risk factors into one comprehensive set of guidelines. PMID:24267441

  17. Automated generation of patient-tailored electronic care pathways by translating computer-interpretable guidelines into hierarchical task networksI

    E-print Network

    ten Teije, Annette

    Society of Pediatric Oncology. We show that an HTN planning domain can be generated from the corresponding guideline, pediatric oncology, Hodgkin disease IThis document is an extended version of the paper entitled

  18. Evaluation of developmental toxicity studies of glyphosate with attention to cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Gary L.; Kimmel, Carole A.; Williams, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate has undergone multiple safety tests for developmental toxicity in rats and rabbits. The European Commission’s 2002 review of available glyphosate data discusses specific heart defects observed in several individual rabbit developmental toxicity studies, but describes the evidence for a potential causal relationship as equivocal. The present assessment was undertaken to analyze the current body of information generated from seven unpublished rabbit studies in order to determine if glyphosate poses a risk for cardiovascular malformations. In addition, the results of six unpublished developmental toxicity studies in rats were considered. Five of the seven rabbit studies (dose range: 10–500?mg/kg/day) were GLP- and testing guideline-compliant for the era in which the studies were performed; a sixth study predated testing and GLP guidelines, but generally adhered to these principles. The seventh study was judged inadequate. In each of the adequate studies, offspring effects occurred only at doses that also caused maternal toxicity. An integrated evaluation of the six adequate studies, using conservative assumptions, demonstrated that neither the overall malformation rate nor the incidence of cardiovascular malformations increased with dose up to the point where severe maternal toxicity was observed (generally ?150?mg/kg/day). Random occurrences of cardiovascular malformations were observed across all dose groups (including controls) and did not exhibit a dose–response relationship. In the six rat studies (dose range: 30–3500?mg/kg/day), a low incidence of sporadic cardiovascular malformations was reported that was clearly not related to treatment. In summary, assessment of the entire body of the developmental toxicity data reviewed fails to support a potential risk for increased cardiovascular defects as a result of glyphosate exposure during pregnancy. PMID:23286529

  19. Physical activity in women: current guidelines and strategies for promoting compliance.

    PubMed

    Chin, Homer G

    2014-09-01

    The benefits of physical activity are significant. The risks of premature death, cardiovascular disease, strokes, diabetes mellitus, certain cancers, and cognitive impairment are decreased with moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity physical activity. Guidelines have been published by the American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, and US Department of Health and Human Services. The availability of pedometers has popularized step-based programs. Unfortunately, compliance with these guidelines is poor. Physical activity counseling should be a part of every woman's health maintenance encounter. The 5 A's consisting of assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange can be effective in increasing physical activity. PMID:24979353

  20. Cardiovascular Health Score and the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Aijun; Chen, Shuohua; Wu, Yuntao; Cai, Jun; Chen, Youren; Yang, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 the American Heart Association proposed a definition of ideal health behaviors and health factors to measure cardiovascular health, from which Huffman et al. created the Cardiovascular Health Score (CVH score) to estimate these metrics on an individual level. We performed a prospective cohort study among employees of the Kailuan Group Corporation, who underwent a physical examination in 2006–2007 to investigate the relationship between the CVH score and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 91,598 individuals free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline were included in the final analysis. We calculated baseline CVH score for each metric (poor=0, intermediate=1, ideal=2 points; range=0–14 points for all seven metrics) and categorized them into three groups: inadequate (0–4 points), average (5–9 points), and optimum (10–14 points). Incidence of total number of CVD events, myocardial infarction, and stroke was analyzed among these three groups and each incremental point on the CVH score. During an average 6.81 years of follow-up, there were 3276 CVD events, 2579 strokes and 747 myocardial infarction occurred. After adjusting for several confounding factors, each better health category of the CVH score was associated with reduced odds of 47% for all CVD events, and each point higher on the CVH score was associated with reduced odds of 18%. Similar trends were detected in the risks for myocardial infarction and stroke. A higher CVH score is therefore a protective factor for CVD, myocardial infarction, and stroke. PMID:26154254

  1. Discrepancies between ESMO and NCCN breast cancer guidelines: An appraisal.

    PubMed

    Zagouri, Flora; Liakou, Paraskevi; Bartsch, Rupert; Peccatori, Fedro A; Tsigginou, Alexandra; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Zografos, George C; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios; Azim, H A

    2015-08-01

    An ever growing number of medical organizations, societies, working groups and governmental agencies issue algorithms i.e. guidelines, of decision making flowcharts in diagnosis and treatment in a variety of diseases. In the field of evidence-based diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, a large number of guidelines are available both from medical associations and national health departments. Among the most appreciated and utilized comprehensive guides is the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Breast Cancer Guidelines and from the other side of the Atlantic the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines in Breast Cancer. Although there is much concordance between the guidelines from these two organizations, it is intriguing to locate their discrepancies also. The aim of this report is to present a number of different points between ESMO and NCCN in the whole spectrum of breast cancer management, from prevention and diagnosis to treatment and follow up. This systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines using a predefined search strategy and summarizes in detail, the differences between ESMO and NCCN guidelines regarding genetic risk evaluation and screening, surgery, chemotherapy, endocrine treatment, targeted biological agents, radiotherapy, pregnancy and fertility and follow-up. PMID:25818651

  2. Diets for cardiovascular disease prevention: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher; Reamy, Brian V

    2009-04-01

    Patients often initiate commercial dietary plans to reduce obesity and prevent cardiovascular disease. Such plans include very low-carbohydrate, low-carbohydrate, very low-fat, and Mediterranean diets. Published evidence on several popular diets has made it easier for physicians to counsel patients about the health benefits and risks of such plans. Although the Atkins, Zone, Sugar Busters!, and South Beach diets have data proving that they are effective for weight loss and do not increase deleterious disease-oriented outcomes, they have little evidence of patient-oriented benefits. In contrast, the Mediterranean diet has extensive patient-oriented outcome data showing a significant risk reduction in mortality rates and in rates of fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction. The American Heart Association released guidelines in 2006 that integrate recommendations from a variety of diets into a single plan. Physicians should emphasize diets that are rich in fruits, vegetables, and healthful fatty acids and that limit saturated fat intake. A stepwise individualized patient approach, with incorporation of one or two dietary interventions every three to six months, may be a practical way to help reduce a patient's cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:19378874

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Suh, Sang-il

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An intracranial aneurysm, with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is a relevant health problem. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a critical concern for individual health; even an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is an anxious condition for the individual. The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the management of intracranial aneurysms, with or without rupture. Materials and Methods We performed an extensive literature search, using Medline. We met in person to discuss recommendations. This document is reviewed by the Task Force Team of the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology (KSIN). Results We divided the current guideline for ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) and unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). The guideline for RIAs focuses on diagnosis and treatment. And the guideline for UIAs focuses on the definition of a high-risk patient, screening, principle for treatment and selection of treatment method. Conclusion This guideline provides practical, evidence-based advice for the management of patients with an intracranial aneurysm, with or without rupture. PMID:25426300

  4. Conflicts of interest and clinical recommendations: comparison of two concurrent clinical practice guidelines for primary immune thrombocytopenia developed by different methods.

    PubMed

    George, James N; Vesely, Sara K; Woolf, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    The growing influence of practice guidelines has increased concern for potential sources of bias. Two recent guidelines for primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) provided a unique opportunity for a systematic comparison of different methods of practice guideline development. One guideline (International Consensus Report [ICR]) was supported by pharmaceutical companies that produce products for ITP. The ICR panel members were selected for expertise in ITP; 16 (73%) reported associations with pharmaceutical companies. The other guideline was sponsored by the American Society of Hematology (ASH); panel members were selected for lack of conflicts and for expertise in guideline development as well as for ITP. Discrepancies were conspicuous when the guidelines addressed treatment. In contrast to the ASH guideline, the ICR gave stronger recommendations for agents manufactured by companies from which the ICR or its panel members received support. These data provide direct evidence that differences in financial support and methods of evidence evaluation can influence recommendations. PMID:23550214

  5. Tsunami Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site assists the international Tsunami Society in its mission to distribute "knowledge about tsunamis to scientists, officials, and the public." In the first section of the site, scientists can download articles from the 2002 and 2003 issues of the journal Science of Tsunami Hazards. Visitors can also view footage from tsunamis around the world. The second section of the site discusses the details of the society including its origin, award recipients, and symposiums.

  6. Impact of Mediterranean diet education versus posted leaflet on dietary habits and serum cholesterol in a high risk population for cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wanda JE Bemelmans; Jan Broer; Vries de J. H. M; Karin Fam Hulshof; Jo F May; Betty Meyboom-de Jong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of intensive group education on the Mediterranean diet on dietary intake and serum total cholesterol after 16 and 52 weeks, compared to a posted leaflet with the Dutch nutritional guidelines, in the context of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design: Controlled comparison study of an intervention group given intensive group education about the Mediterranean

  7. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark M. Mitsnefes

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally\\u000a high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular\\u000a complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors,\\u000a mortality and morbidity in children with

  8. A nationwide postal questionnaire survey: the presence of airway guidelines in anaesthesia department in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Sweden, airway guidelines aimed toward improving patient safety have been recommended by the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. Adherence to evidence-based airway guidelines is known to be generally poor in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine whether airway guidelines are present in Swedish anaesthesia departments. Methods A nationwide postal questionnaire inquiring about the presence of airway guidelines was sent out to directors of Swedish anaesthesia departments (n?=?74). The structured questionnaire was based on a review of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care voluntary recommendations of guidelines for airway management. Mean, standard deviation, minimum/maximum, percentage (%) and number of general anaesthesia performed per year as frequency (n), were used to describe, each hospital type (university, county, private). For comparison between hospitals type and available written airway guidelines were cross tabulation used and analysed using Pearson’s Chi-Square tests. A p- value of less than 0 .05 was judged significant. Results In total 68 directors who were responsible for the anaesthesia departments returned the questionnaire, which give a response rate of 92% (n 68 of 74). The presence of guidelines showing an airway algorithm was reported by 68% of the departments; 52% reported having a written patient information card in case of a difficult airway and guidelines for difficult airways, respectively; 43% reported the presence of guidelines for preoperative assessment; 31% had guidelines for Rapid Sequence Intubation; 26% reported criteria for performing an awake intubation; and 21% reported guidelines for awake fibre-optic intubation. A prescription for the registered nurse anaesthetist for performing tracheal intubation was reported by 24%. The most frequently pre-printed preoperative elements in the anaesthesia record form were dental status and head and neck mobility. Conclusions Despite recommendations from the national anaesthesia society, the presence of airway guidelines in Swedish anaesthesia departments is low. From the perspective of safety for both patients and the anaesthesia staff, airway management guidelines should be considered a higher priority. PMID:24708670

  9. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  10. Magnesium Modifies the Cardiovascular Mortality Risk Associated with Hyperphosphatemia in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Fujii, Naohiko; Shoji, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Terumasa; Rakugi, Hiromi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Background In vitro studies have shown inhibitory effects of magnesium (Mg) on phosphate-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells, raising the possibility that maintaining a high Mg level may be useful for reducing cardiovascular risks of patients with hyperphosphatemia. We examined how serum Mg levels affect the association between serum phosphate levels and the risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Methods A nationwide register-based cohort study was conducted using database of the Renal Data Registry of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy in 2009. We identified 142,069 patients receiving in-center hemodialysis whose baseline serum Mg and phosphate levels were available. Study outcomes were one-year cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Serum Mg levels were categorized into three groups (lower, <2.7 mg/dL; intermediate, ?2.7, <3.1 mg/dL; and higher, ?3.1 mg/dL). Results During follow-up, 11,401 deaths occurred, out of which 4,751 (41.7%) were ascribed to cardiovascular disease. In multivariable analyses, an increase in serum phosphate levels elevated the risk of cardiovascular mortality in the lower- and intermediate-Mg groups, whereas no significant risk increment was observed in the higher-Mg group. Moreover, among patients with serum phosphate levels of ?6.0 mg/dL, the cardiovascular mortality risk significantly decreased with increasing serum Mg levels (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] of the lower-, intermediate-, and higher-Mg groups were 1.00 (reference), 0.81 [0.66–0.99], and 0.74 [0.56–0.97], respectively.). An interaction between Mg and phosphate on the risk of cardiovascular mortality was statistically significant (P?=?0.03). Conclusion Serum Mg levels significantly modified the mortality risk associated with hyperphosphatemia in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:25545498

  11. Whole body radiotherapy: A TBI-guideline

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Total Body Irradiation (TBI) is one main component in the interdisciplinary treatment of widely disseminated malignancies predominantly of haematopoietic diseases. Combined with intensive chemotherapy, TBI enables myeloablative high dose therapy and immuno-ablative conditioning treatment prior to subsequent transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow stem cells or peripheral blood progenitor stem cells. Jointly prepared by DEGRO and DGMP, the German Society of Radio-Oncology, and the German Association of Medical Physicists, this DEGRO/DGMP-Leitlinie Ganzkoerper-Strahlenbehandlung - DEGRO/DGMP Guideline Whole Body Radiotherapy, summarises the concepts, principles, facts and common methods of Total Body Irradiation and poses a set of recommendations for reliable and successful application of high dose large-field radiotherapy as essential part of this interdisciplinary, multi-modality treatment concept. The guideline is geared towards radio-oncologists, medical physicists, haematooncolo-gists, and all contributing to Whole Body Radiotherapy. To guide centres intending to start or actualise TBI criteria are included. The relevant treatment parameters are defined and a sample of a form is given for reporting TBI to international registries. PMID:21206634

  12. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of communityacquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. Conclusion The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions. PMID:25909312

  13. Homocysteine: Role in Cardiovascular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arash Sabetisoofyani; Douglas F. Larson; Ronald Ross Watson

    \\u000a Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular ischemic events.\\u000a \\u000a Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease, stroke, hypertension, arrhythmia, and\\u000a peripheral vascular disease.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Some factors induce elevation of homocysteine concentration such as mutations in the enzymes responsible for homocysteine\\u000a metabolism: cystathionine ?-synthase (C?S) or 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, nutritional deficiencies in B vitamin\\u000a cofactors

  14. Applied Pharmacogenomics in Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual heterogeneity in drug response is a central feature of all drug therapies. Studies in individual patients, families, and populations over the past several decades have identified variants in genes encoding drug elimination or drug target pathways that in some cases contribute substantially to variable efficacy and toxicity. Important associations of pharmacogenomics in cardiovascular medicine include clopidogrel and risk for in-stent thrombosis, steady-state warfarin dose, myotoxicity with simvastatin, and certain drug-induced arrhythmias. This review describes methods used to accumulate and validate these findings and points to approaches—now being put in place at some centers—to implementing them in clinical care. PMID:24111889

  15. [Cardiovascular complications of alpha interferon].

    PubMed

    Le Corguillé, Monika; Pochmalicki, Gilbert; Eugène, Claude

    2007-12-01

    Interferon-alpha is a biological response modifier with antiviral and tumoral effect that is used in the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis. Cardiovascular complications occurred in clinical trials of interferon. The most common presentations of cardio toxicity were cardiac arrhythmia, dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial extrasystole and symptoms of ischemic heart disease, including myocardial infarction and other effects less common and dangerous: low-level conduction impairment or reversible hypertension. The physiopathology of this cardiotoxicity remains unknown, but rigorous cardiological monitoring of all patients receiving this treatment seems necessary. PMID:18176361

  16. Developing and implementing dietary guidelines in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Kamala

    2008-01-01

    Single nutrients are no solution to the problem of malnutrition. It is essential that food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) are developed and implemented to overcome the diet related diseases and promote health in the population. A multidisciplinary group was constituted to develop FBDGs in India. A manual with scientific details and an abridged version were prepared with 6 goals and 14 dietary guidelines covering all age groups to overcome the public health nutritional problems. The guidelines are based on dietary patterns and specific outcomes of health and disease. Dietary diversification has been suggested as the practical approach. Diets from locally available and culturally accepted foods in household measures have been suggested to ensure optimal health. For successful implementation of FBDGs, political/bureaucratic commitment are essential. It must become a tool in the developmental plans for food, nutrition, agriculture, rural, educational and biotechnology policies. Workshops and meetings were organized to sensitise the administrative set-up. The intersectoral nature of FBDG for implementation was highlighted. The department of women and child development, which is responsible for implementing the National Nutritional Policy, was recognized as nodal agency. Meetings were organised for secondary target audiences. The press was invited to participate in popularization of the FBDGs. Social marketing strategies were used to match the local dietary and cultural aspects. Interpersonal communication and professional societies were used for better dissemination. Industry and legislative bodies were requested to take active action in this regard. The FBDGs have to be implemented to achieve food and nutrition security and the Millennium Development Goals. PMID:18296304

  17. Lipoprotein(a) as a cardiovascular risk factor: current status

    PubMed Central

    Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Chapman, M. John; Ray, Kausik; Borén, Jan; Andreotti, Felicita; Watts, Gerald F.; Ginsberg, Henry; Amarenco, Pierre; Catapano, Alberico; Descamps, Olivier S.; Fisher, Edward; Kovanen, Petri T.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Lesnik, Philippe; Masana, Luis; Reiner, Zeljko; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgözoglu, Lale; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies. Methods and results The robust and specific association between elevated Lp(a) levels and increased cardiovascular disease (CVD)/coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, together with recent genetic findings, indicates that elevated Lp(a), like elevated LDL-cholesterol, is causally related to premature CVD/CHD. The association is continuous without a threshold or dependence on LDL- or non-HDL-cholesterol levels. Mechanistically, elevated Lp(a) levels may either induce a prothrombotic/anti-fibrinolytic effect as apolipoprotein(a) resembles both plasminogen and plasmin but has no fibrinolytic activity, or may accelerate atherosclerosis because, like LDL, the Lp(a) particle is cholesterol-rich, or both. We advise that Lp(a) be measured once, using an isoform-insensitive assay, in subjects at intermediate or high CVD/CHD risk with premature CVD, familial hypercholesterolaemia, a family history of premature CVD and/or elevated Lp(a), recurrent CVD despite statin treatment, ?3% 10-year risk of fatal CVD according to European guidelines, and/or ?10% 10-year risk of fatal + non-fatal CHD according to US guidelines. As a secondary priority after LDL-cholesterol reduction, we recommend a desirable level for Lp(a) <80th percentile (less than ?50 mg/dL). Treatment should primarily be niacin 1–3 g/day, as a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled intervention trials demonstrates reduced CVD by niacin treatment. In extreme cases, LDL-apheresis is efficacious in removing Lp(a). Conclusion We recommend screening for elevated Lp(a) in those at intermediate or high CVD/CHD risk, a desirable level <50 mg/dL as a function of global cardiovascular risk, and use of niacin for Lp(a) and CVD/CHD risk reduction. PMID:20965889

  18. 20142015 Promotion and Tenure External Evaluation Guidelines Page 1 Guidelines on External Evaluations

    E-print Network

    Evaluations Promotion and Tenure Review 20142015 These guidelines present recommended standards and procedures20142015 Promotion and Tenure External Evaluation Guidelines Page 1 Guidelines on External, and Research & Graduate Studies may have additional guidelines or requirements for external evaluations

  19. Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines

    E-print Network

    Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines Introduction The basic criterion for blocking a Web page Categories of material which will be blocked Requesting the unblocking of Aberdeen applies a Web Content Filtering service to all web pages accessed from the undergraduate network

  20. CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 CAD Standards Guideline

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Stephen José

    CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 1 CAD Standards;CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION (pg.3) CAD Standards Survey/GIS Standards Design Standards 1.0.0 CAD STANDARDS CHECKLIST (pg.4) 2.0.0 CAD

  1. Guidelines START 1/12 (July 2014) Application Guidelines1

    E-print Network

    Fuchs, Clemens

    . The project should be in the field of non-profit-oriented scientific/scholarly research and it must be planned for a duration of 72 months. Non-profit oriented scientific/scholarly research is research whose valueGuidelines START 1/12 (July 2014) Application Guidelines1 START-Programme Programme aims

  2. Postdoctoral program guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Miller, Andrew W.; Sava, Dorina Florentina; Liu, Yanli; Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Hall, Lisa Michelle; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Ekoto, Isaac

    2012-04-01

    We, the Postdoc Professional Development Program (PD2P) leadership team, wrote these postdoc guidelines to be a starting point for communication between new postdocs, their staff mentors, and their managers. These guidelines detail expectations and responsibilities of the three parties, as well as list relevant contacts. The purpose of the Postdoc Program is to bring in talented, creative people who enrich Sandia's environment by performing innovative R&D, as well as by stimulating intellectual curiosity and learning. Postdocs are temporary employees who come to Sandia for career development and advancement reasons. In general, the postdoc term is 1 year, renewable up to five times for a total of six years. However, center practices may vary; check with your manager. At term, a postdoc may apply for a staff position at Sandia or choose to move to university, industry or another lab. It is our vision that those who leave become long-term collaborators and advocates whose relationships with Sandia have a positive effect upon our national constituency.

  3. Translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Senn, Todd; Hazen, Stanley L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is the systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints of small molecules or metabolite profiles that are related to a variety of cellular metabolic processes in a cell, organ, or organism. Although messenger RNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses do not tell the whole story of what might be happening in a cell, metabolic profiling provides direct and indirect physiologic insights that can potentially be detectable in a wide range of biospecimens. Although not specific to cardiac conditions, translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers has followed the traditional path of biomarker discovery from identification and confirmation to clinical validation and bedside testing. With technological advances in metabolomic tools (such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry) and more sophisticated bioinformatics and analytical techniques, the ability to measure low-molecular-weight metabolites in biospecimens provides a unique insight into established and novel metabolic pathways. Systemic metabolomics may provide physiologic understanding of cardiovascular disease states beyond traditional profiling and may involve descriptions of metabolic responses of an individual or population to therapeutic interventions or environmental exposures. PMID:22824112

  4. Personalized Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Flammer, Andreas J.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a novel medical model with all decisions and practices being tailored to individual patients in whatever ways possible. In the era of genomics, personalized medicine combines the genetic information for additional benefit in preventive and therapeutic strategies. Personalized medicine may allow the physician to provide a better therapy for patients in terms of efficiency, safety and treatment length to reduce the associated costs. There was a remarkable growth in scientific publication on personalized medicine within the past few years in the cardiovascular field. However, so far, only very few cardiologists in the USA are incorporating personalized medicine into clinical treatment. We review the concepts, strengths, limitations and challenges of personalized medicine with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). There are many challenges from both scientific and policy perspectives to personalized medicine, which can overcome them by comprehensive concept and understanding, clinical application, and evidence based practices. Individualized medicine serves a pivotal role in the evolution of national and global healthcare reform, especially, in the CVDs fields. Ultimately, personalized medicine will affect the entire landscape of health care system in the near future. PMID:23091501

  5. Genetic testing in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; MacRae, Calum A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review is designed to outline the major developments in genetic testing in the cardiovascular arena in the past year or so. This is an exciting time in genetic testing as whole exome and whole genome approaches finally reach the clinic. These new approaches offer insight into disease causation in families in which this might previously have been inaccessible, and also bring a wide range of interpretative challenges. Recent findings Among the most significant recent findings has been the extent of physiologic rare coding variation in the human genome. New disease genes have been identified through whole exome studies in neonatal arrhythmia, congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease that were simply inaccessible with other techniques. This has not only shed light on the challenges of genetic testing at this scale, but has also sharply defined the limits of prior gene-panel focused testing. As novel therapies targeting specific genetic subsets of disease become available, genetic testing will become a part of routine clinical care. Summary The pace of change in sequencing technologies has begun to transform clinical medicine, and cardiovascular disease is no exception. The complexity of such studies emphasizes the importance of real-time communication between the genetics laboratory and genetically informed clinicians. New efforts in data and knowledge management will be central to the continued advancement of genetic testing. PMID:24717670

  6. Cocoa, chocolate and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Galleano, Monica; Oteiza, Patricia I.; Fraga, Cesar G.

    2009-01-01

    A significant body of evidence demonstrates that diets rich in fruit and vegetables promote health, and attenuate, or delay, the onset of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, certain cancers, and several other age-related degenerative disorders. The concept that moderate chocolate consumption could be part of a healthy diet has gained acceptance in the last years based on the health benefits ascribed to selected cocoa components. Specifically, cocoa as a plant and chocolate as food contain a series of chemicals that can interact with cell and tissue components providing protection against the development and amelioration of pathological conditions. The most relevant effects of cocoa and chocolate have been related to CVD. The mechanisms behind these effects are still under investigation. However the maintenance or restoration of vascular NO production and bioavailability and the antioxidant effects are the mechanisms most consistently supported by experimental data. This review will summarize the most recent research on the cardiovascular effects of cocoa flavanoles and related compounds. PMID:19701098

  7. FDA's perspectives on cardiovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric A; Patel-Raman, Sonna M; O'Callaghan, Kathryn; Hillebrenner, Matthew G

    2009-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision process for approving or clearing medical devices is often determined by a review of robust clinical data and extensive preclinical testing of the device. The mission statement for the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is to review the information provided by manufacturers so that it can promote and protect the health of the public by ensuring the safety and effectiveness of medical devices deemed appropriate for human use (Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act, Section 903(b)(1, 2(C)), December 31, 2004; accessed December 17, 2008 http://www.fda.gov/opacom/laws/fdcact/fdctoc.htm). For high-risk devices, such as ventricular assist devices (VADs), mechanical heart valves, stents, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, pacemakers, and defibrillators, the determination is based on FDA's review of extensive preclinical bench and animal testing followed by use of the device in a clinical trial in humans. These clinical trials allow the manufacturer to evaluate a device in the intended use population. FDA reviews the data from the clinical trial to determine if the device performed as predicted and the clinical benefits outweigh the risks. This article reviews the regulatory framework for different marketing applications related to cardiovascular devices and describes the process of obtaining approval to study a cardiovascular device in a U.S. clinical trial. PMID:20559979

  8. Cardiovascular disease and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its increased stiffness, which reverts after treatment with levothyroxine. Mortality seems mildly reduced, although the risk of myocardial infarction is increased. The risk of atrial fibrillation is related to thyroid function over the whole spectrum: from a reduced risk in overt and subclinical hypothyroidism, a progressively increased risk in people with different levels of reduced TSH to a physiologically 'dose-dependent' effect of thyroid hormones on the heart in overt hyperthyroidism. Heart failure represents an intriguing clinical situation in which triiodothyronine treatment might be beneficial. In conclusion, subclinical dysthyroid states affect the heart with subsequent changes in morbidity and mortality. Subclinical hyperthyroidism seems a more serious condition than subclinical hypothyroidism, which should affect treatment decision in a more aggressive manner. PMID:24943297

  9. Bench to Bedside Primer: The Cardiovascular System and Hypertension

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jannette Moehlman (Dakota Middle School)

    2011-10-07

    This bench-to-bedside is a four-page Â?primerÂ? (a booklet of basic principles) that highlights cardiovascular physiology. This primer should be readable by your students or the general public to help inform them about the organ system, diseases that affect it, and basic and clinical research being done on it. It could also be used as a teaching model your students could follow in creating their own bench-to-beside primer.This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiological SocietyÂ?s 2011 Frontiers Online in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org.

  10. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocols 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This document is an update to the 2008 publication of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Protocols. Since the time of the original publication, 3 additional task forces (Reporting, Post-Processing, and Congenital Heart Disease) have published documents that should be referred to in conjunction with the present document. The section on general principles and techniques has been expanded as more of the techniques common to CMR have been standardized. There is still a great deal of development in the area of tissue characterization/mapping, so these protocols have been in general left as optional. The authors hope that this document continues to standardize and simplify the patient-based approach to clinical CMR. It will be updated at regular intervals as the field of CMR advances. PMID:24103764

  11. Visceral Obesity- The Link Among Inflammation, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Disease

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patrick Mathieu (Laval Hospital Research Center/Quebec Heart Institute Surgery)

    2009-02-23

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity, fostered by the modern lifestyle characterized by the lack of physical activity and an energy-dense diet, has contributed to create an unprecedented condition in human history where a majority of overfed individuals will soon surpass the number of malnourished.1 Obesity-associated disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, an atherogenic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, have undoubtedly contributed to create an atherosclerosis-prone environment and thereby the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of mortality in Westernized societies. A growing body of evidence indicates that obesity is a heterogeneous condition in which body fat distribution is closely associated with metabolic perturbations and, thus, with CVD risk.2 In this regard, accumulation of visceral (intra-abdominal) fat is strongly associated with insulin resistance and with a typical atherogenic dyslipidemic state.3

  12. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section 870...Devices § 870.2100 Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is...

  13. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17 Section...Services § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition... Medicare Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section 870...Devices § 870.2100 Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section 870...Devices § 870.2100 Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section 870...Devices § 870.2100 Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section 870...Devices § 870.2100 Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is...

  18. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; G?sowski, Jerzy; G?uszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for affluent countries, and “de-stiffening” will be the goal of the next decades. PMID:22174583

  19. Canadian Consensus Practice Guidelines for Bisphosphonate Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALIYA A. KHAN; GEORGE K. B. SÁNDOR; EDWARD DORE; ARCHIBALD D. MORRISON; MAZEN ALSAHLI; FAIZAN AMIN; EDMUND PETERS; DAVID A. HANLEY; SULTAN R. CHAUDRY; DAVID W. DEMPSTER; FRANCIS H. GLORIEUX; ALAN J. NEVILLE; REENA M. TALWAR; CAMERON M. CLOKIE; MAJD AL MARDINI; TERRI PAUL; SUNDEEP KHOSLA; ROBERT G. JOSSE; SUSAN SUTHERLAND; DAVID K. LAM; ROBERT P. CARMICHAEL; NICK BLANAS; DAVID KENDLER; STEVEN PETAK; LOUIS GEORGES ST-MARIE; JACQUES BROWN; A. WAYNE EVANS; LORENA RIOS; JULIET E. COMPSTON

    Objective. Following publication of the first reports of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in patients receiving bisphosphonates in 2003, a call for national multidisciplinary guidelines based upon a sys- tematic review of the current evidence was made by the Canadian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (CAOMS) in association with national and international societies concerned with ONJ. The purpose of

  20. 2005 National Cave and Karst Management Symposium 53 Cave Management Guidelines for

    E-print Network

    Smith, Dan

    2005 National Cave and Karst Management Symposium 53 Cave Management Guidelines for Western (1885) with the European #12;54 2005 National Cave and Karst Management Symposium Horne discovery karst research group and more recently the Alberta Speleological Society. The most significant cave

  1. 2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society". The base pay approach operating budget base. #12;· FY 2012 ­ A budget reduction based on the total FY 2011 State Target amount2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH

  2. Smart strategic planning for cardiovascular services.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Karen

    2005-12-01

    Strategic planning for cardiovascular services should include formation of a cardiovascular advisory committee composed of key stakeholders. The strategic plan should include an internal assessment, external market analysis, review of operations, development of strategies and initiatives, and a financial analysis. The organization's mission and vision, as well as its financial situation, need to be considered in formulating strategies. PMID:16355753

  3. Cardiovascular effects of microgravity: evolution of understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of cardiovascular effects of spaceflight has evolved throughout the course of the American manned spaceflight program. Originally descriptive in nature, the present understanding is based on empiric measurements of vascular volume, cardiac output, vascular reflexes, and peripheral and central autonomic control. More detailed understanding of cardiovascular effects has allowed us to separate those symptoms from symptoms caused by musculoskeletal or neurovestibular abnormalities.

  4. Evaluation of a Comprehensive Cardiovascular Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, J. David; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An experimental curriculum, the Cardiovascular Curriculum Education Project, consisting of a series of independent, self-instructional units focusing on cardiovascular diseases, was developed for a secondary school health curriculum. Study results indicate that the experimental curriculum was successful in improving students' knowledge of…

  5. PET and SPECT in cardiovascular molecular imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence W. Dobrucki; Albert J. Sinusas

    2009-01-01

    The current focus of cardiovascular medicine is on early detection and prevention of disease, to control the escalating costs of health care. To achieve this goal, novel imaging approaches that allow for early detection of disease and risk stratification are needed. Traditionally, the diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication of cardiovascular disease were based on techniques that measured changes in metabolism, blood

  6. Cardiovascular reactivity, stress, and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Webb, Heather E.; Zourdos, Michael C.; Acevedo, Edmund O.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress has been proposed as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Acute mental stress can activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis, eliciting the release of catecholamines (NE and EPI) resulting in the elevation of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Combined stress (psychological and physical) can exacerbate these cardiovascular responses, which may partially contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and increased proportionate mortality risks experienced by some occupations (e.g., firefighting and law enforcement). Studies have supported the benefits of physical activity on physiological and psychological health, including the cardiovascular response to acute stress. Aerobically trained individuals exhibit lower sympathetic nervous system (e.g., HR) reactivity and enhanced cardiovascular efficiency (e.g., lower vascular reactivity and decreased recovery time) in response to physical and/or psychological stress. In addition, resistance training has been demonstrated to attenuate cardiovascular responses and improve mental health. This review will examine stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity and plausible explanations for how exercise training and physical fitness (aerobic and resistance exercise) can attenuate cardiovascular responses to stress. This enhanced functionality may facilitate a reduction in the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction. Finally, this review will also address the interaction of obesity and physical activity on cardiovascular reactivity and CVD. PMID:24223557

  7. Cardiovascular Disease in Elders: Is It Inevitable?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Riegel; Jill A. Bennett

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death and disability in America. The burden of cardiovascular disease is higher in elders than in younger populations, presumably because of life-long exposure to risk factors such as hypertension, smoking, abnormal blood lipids, lack of exercise, and\\/or obesity. Many assume that it is too late to attempt to modify risk factors in elders

  8. Dioxins and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Review (EHP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of its large public health burden, the risk factors for cardiovascular disease remain incompletely understood. Here we review the association of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with exposure to dioxin, a pollutant resulting from the production and combustion of ch...

  9. Human factors guidelines for nuclear power plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchel, J. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, Waters et al. reported to the Human Factors Society on developing human factors criteria for a new reactor plant. They correctly indicated that much of the guidance documentation in human factors engineering has derived from MIL-STD-1472 and its antecedents. Guidelines for human-computer interface have sprung primarily from the Smith and Mosier compendium and its source documents. NUREG-0700, which is currently being updated, was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a general evaluation guide for inspecting control rooms. In addition, the Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, US Department of Energy, the NRC, and others have published a number of specialized documents on a range of subjects. The number of guidelines and standards has grown in the past few years to an impressive number, including those published by international organizations and professional societies. This paper provides an update on current efforts to provide appropriate guidance for the power industry and, perhaps more importantly, offers a perspective on how users should think about using the available materials and what else is needed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) continues to be one of the principal participants in providing guidance to the utilities. Human factors guidelines is indeed a timely topic, currently of great interest to EPRI's constituents and to designers of new and upgraded nuclear power plants (NPMs) in the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Instrumentation and Control Upgrade Initiative programs.

  10. Executive summary of the consensus document on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; Von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the metabolic disorders and their impact on patients with HIV infection requires an individualized study and continuous updating. HIV patients have the same cardiovascular risk factors as the general population. The HIV infection per se increases the cardiovascular risk, and metabolic disorders caused by some antiretroviral drugs are added risk factors. For this reason, the choice of drugs with a good metabolic profile is essential. The most common metabolic disorders of HIV infected-patients (insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia or osteopenia), as well as other factors of cardiovascular risk, such as hypertension, should also be dealt with according to guidelines similar to the general population, as well as insisting on steps to healthier lifestyles. The aim of this document is to provide a query tool for all professionals who treat HIV-patients and who may present or display any metabolic disorders listed in this document. PMID:25096166

  11. Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic…

  12. SPRING 2005 Brand usage guidelines

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    , it is crucial that all external communication from Durham University is branded consistently. This helpsISSUE 1 SPRING 2005 Brand usage guidelines #12;#12;DURHAM UNIVERSITY BRAND USAGE GUIDELINES As you with confidence and modernity. Introducing the new marque THE NEW MARQUE #12;DURHAM UNIVERSITY BRAND USAGE

  13. Training Guidelines for Employee Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This set of guidelines is intended for use by employers desiring to establish the training needs of those involved in employee relations. The 16 guidelines cover the following principal activities normally associated with employee relations: staff management policy and aims, staff recruitment and selection, terms and conditions of employment,…

  14. GUIDELINES FOR MUTAGENICITY RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guidelines published today are products of a two-year Agency-wide effort, which has included many scientists from the larger scientific community. These guidelines set forth principles and procedures to guide EPA scientists in the conduct of Agency risk assessments, and to in...

  15. FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS 2014 PROPOSAL GUIDELINES DEADLINES: Due to College Dean for final approval resulting in Faculty Research Grants, please contact Debra Cummings (AD308, Ext. 2590) or e-mail her at dcummngs@memphis.edu. #12;2014 Guidelines for Faculty Research Grants PURPOSE The Faculty Research Grants

  16. FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS 2014 PROPOSAL GUIDELINES (Revised October, 2013) DEADLINES: Due to College or wish to review sample proposals resulting in Faculty Research Grants, please contact Debra Cummings (AD308, Ext. 2590) or e-mail her at dcummngs@memphis.edu. 2014 Guidelines for Faculty Research Grants

  17. FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS 2013 PROPOSAL GUIDELINES DEADLINES: Due to College Dean for final approval resulting in Faculty Research Grants, please contact Debra Cummings (AD308, Ext. 2590) or e-mail her at dcummngs@memphis.edu. #12;2013 Guidelines for Faculty Research Grants PURPOSE The Faculty Research Grants

  18. FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    FACULTY RESEARCH GRANTS 2015 PROPOSAL GUIDELINES DEADLINES: Due to College Dean for final approval sample proposals resulting in Faculty Research Grants, please contact Debra Cummings (AD308, ext. 2590) or e-mail dcummngs@memphis.edu. #12;2015Guidelines for Faculty Research Grants PURPOSE The Faculty

  19. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM POSTER GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM POSTER GUIDELINES aresty.rutgers.edu/symposium Please follow the guidelines below for poster formatting to ensure that we are able to print your poster and that it matches your expectations. At the Symposium, we will provide thumbtacks or ticky-tack to hang your poster

  20. Guidelines on Security and Privacy

    E-print Network

    Guidelines on Security and Privacy in Public Cloud Computing WayneJansen TimothyGrance Special Publication 800-144 #12;ii NIST Special Publication 800-144 Guidelines on Security and Privacy in Public Cloud and Ramaswamy Chandramouli, also from NIST, provided input on cloud security in early drafts. Thanks also go