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Sample records for cardioverter defibrillator patients

  1. Patient perceptions of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    MacIver, Jane; Tibbles, Alana; Billia, Filio; Ross, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a class I recommendation for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions to occur between physicians and heart failure patients. Few studies have reported the patient’s perspective on the timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Aim: To determine patient awareness, preferences and timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Design: Grounded theory was used to collect and analyze interview data from 25 heart failure patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Setting and participants: Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, from the Heart Function Clinic at University Health Network (Toronto, Canada). Results: The sample (n = 25) was predominately male (76%) with an average age of 62 years. Patients identified three stages where they felt implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation should be discussed: (1) prior to implantation, (2) with any significant deterioration but while they were of sound mind to engage in and communicate their preferences and (3) at end of life, where patients wished further review of their previously established preferences and decisions about implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation. Most patients (n = 17, 68%) said they would consider deactivation, six (24%) were undecided and two (8%) were adamant they would never turn it off. Conclusion: The patient preferences identified in this study support the need to include information on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation at implant, with change in clinical status and within broader discussions about end-of-life treatment preferences. Using this process to help patients determine and communicate their implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation preferences may reduce the number of patients experiencing distressing implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks at end of life. PMID:27110361

  2. Adjuvant antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T Jared; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2014-04-01

    The risk of sudden cardiac death from ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia in patients with cardiomyopathy related to structural heart disease has been favorably impacted by the wide adaptation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for both primary and secondary prevention. Unfortunately, after ICD implantation both appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapies are common. ICD shocks in particular can have significant effects on quality of life and disease-related morbidity and mortality. While not indicated for primary prevention of ICD therapies, beta-blockers and antiarrhythmic drugs are a cornerstone for secondary prevention of them. This review will summarize our current understanding of adjuvant antiarrhythmic drug therapy in ICD patients. The review will also discuss the roles of nonantiarrhythmic drug approaches that are used in isolation and in combination with antiarrhythmic drugs to reduce subsequent risk of ICD shocks. PMID:24288157

  3. Dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Is it useful in patient with permanent atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Porres-Aracama, José M; Cerezuela, José Luis; García-Urra, Francisco; Luque-Lezcano, Oscar; Herrero, Vicente

    2016-08-01

    In patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implant indication, a single-chamber device is the choice because AF does not provide interesting information for the treatment. It is very unusual to find patients with permanent AF that coexist with atrial tachycardia with various degree of Atrioventricular block. PMID:27525075

  4. Infections after cardioverter-defibrillator implantation: observations in 335 patients over 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, H. J.; Pfitzner, P.; Klein, H.; Wenzlaff, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence of infection after implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator and the management of this complication. SUBJECTS--335 consecutive patients who had a cardioverter-defibrillator implanted between January 1984 and December 1993. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of infection within the first month after implantation (early infection) and after the first month (late infection). RESULTS--Infections associated with cardioverter-defibrillator devices occurred in 13 patients (3.9%) during a mean follow up of 22 (11) months. All patients had general signs of inflammation, fever (> 37.5 degrees C), and leucocytosis (> 10,000/ml) with or without purulent drainage. Five patients (38%) had infections during the first implantation, whereas eight patients (62%) had infections after replacement of the pulse generator. Early infection was observed in four patients (31%) and late infection in nine (69%). Incidence of infection was higher in patients who underwent epicardial cardioverter-defibrillator implantation (12/207 patients, 5.8%) than in those who received nonthoracotomy lead systems (1/125 patients, 0.8%) (P < 0.05). Infections were caused by staphyloccocus in 10 patients, pseudomonas in two patients, and streptococcus in one patient. The whole device had to be removed in all patients. During a mean follow up of 39 (29) months seven patients died: six of congestive heart failure and one of myocardial reinfarction. CONCLUSIONS--Infection, one of the most serious complications after cardioverter-defibrillator implantation, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. When infection occurs the system must be removed to avoid a fatal outcome. PMID:7888255

  5. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Automated Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (AICD), simply known as an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), has been used in patients for more than 30 years. An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator that is implanted in patients who are at a risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or any such related event. Typically, patients with these types of occurrences are on anticoagulant therapy. The desired International Normalized Ratio (INR) for these patients is in the range of 2–3 to prevent any subsequent cardiac event. These patients possess a challenge to the dentist in many ways, especially during oral surgical procedures, and these challenges include risk of sudden death, control of post-operative bleeding and pain. This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death. PMID:26236132

  6. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work? An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has wires with ... tune the programming of your ICD so it works better to correct irregular heartbeats. The type of ...

  7. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Allen, M

    2006-09-01

    An increasing number of patients are now treated cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators and the technology of these is constantly changing. It is vital to have a good understanding of how they function and what the real risks are. Understanding how the device should work when functioning normally, and the possible effects of electromagnetic interference, is paramount to their safe management in the peri-operative period. Knowing when a device should be disabled or reprogrammed requires careful consideration. Information from the patient's pacemaker clinic should be sought whenever possible and can be invaluable. In addition, the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency have published the first set of UK guidelines on the management of implantable devices in the presence of surgical diathermy and this will undoubtedly provide a firm foundation on which anaesthetists can base much of their practice. PMID:16922756

  8. Experience With the Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator in Patients at High Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Michael; Quick, Silvio; Pfluecke, Christian; Rottstädt, Fabian; Szymkiewicz, Steven J.; Ringquist, Steven; Strasser, Ruth H.; Speiser, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. Methods: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. Results: Ninety-four patients (1.6%) were treated by the WCD in response to ventricular tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation. The incidence rate was 8.4 (95% confidence interval, 6.8–10.2) per 100 patient-years. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation had an incidence rate of 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 12.2–29.0) per 100 patient-years. In contrast, an incidence rate of 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–10.3) was observed in the remaining cardiac diagnosis groups, including dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Among 120 shocked patients, 112 (93%) survived 24 hours after treatment, whereas asystole was observed in 2 patients (0.03%) with 1 resulting death. ConclusionS: This large cohort represents the first nationwide evaluation of WCD use in patients outside the US healthcare system and confirms the overall value of the WCD in German treatment pathways. PMID:27458236

  9. Bilateral Subclavian Vein Occlusion in a SAPHO Syndrome Patient Who Needed an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Masato; Yamamoto, Yuko; Yamada, Shintaro; Maemura, Sonoko; Nakata, Ryo; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takizawa, Masataka; Uozumi, Hiroki; Ikenouchi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-25

    A 79-year-old Asian man was hospitalized because of progressive exertional dyspnea with decreasing left ventricular ejection fraction and frequent non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Pre-procedure venography for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation showed occlusion of the bilateral subclavian veins. In consideration of subcutaneous humps in the sterno-clavicular area and palmoplantar pustulosis, we diagnosed him as having synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome and speculated that it induced peri-osteal chronic inflammation in the sterno-clavicular area, resulting in occlusion of the adjacent bilateral subclavian veins. An automatic external defibrillator (AED) was installed in the patient's house and total subcutaneous ICD was considered. Venous thrombosis in SAPHO syndrome is not frequent but has been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of bilateral subclavian vein occlusion in a SAPHO syndrome patient who needs ICD implantation. PMID:27181039

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Jiří; Neužil, Petr; Vymazal, Josef; Janotka, Marek; Brada, Jiří; Žáček, Radovan; Vopálka, Roman; Weichet, Jiří; Reddy, Vivek Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our aim was to evaluate the potential for safely imaging patients with a new type of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator called the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. With the increasing number of patients with cardiac implantable devices who are indicated for MRI, there is a growing need for establishing MRI compatibility of cardiac implantable devices. Methods and Results Patients with implanted S-ICD systems underwent one or more types of anatomical MRI scans. The S-ICD was programmed off and patients were monitored throughout the imaging procedure. Device function was evaluated pre- and post-scan. Patients were asked to report immediately any pain, torqueing movement, or heating sensation in the area of the pocket or electrode. Fifteen patients underwent a total of 22 examinations at 1.5 T. Scans included brain, spine, knee, and heart. Two patients were re-scanned due to complaints of heating over the can during lumbar scans, which was caused by a thermistor probe placed on the skin to measure skin temperature. All the remaining scans occurred without incident. No evidence of device malfunction was observed. Conclusion This study is the first to domonstrate the feasibility of exposing S-ICD patients to MRI using the scanning and monitoring protocol described. More data are required to support S-ICD as a MRI conditional device. PMID:25687749

  11. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S.; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.03–1.08 for a 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  12. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer L; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.08 for a 0.5 g/m(3) decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  13. Indications for dual-chamber (DDD) pacing in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients.

    PubMed

    Santini, M; Ansalone, G; Auriti, A; Magris, B; Pandozi, C; Altamura, G

    1996-09-12

    New technologic development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) keeps up with the exponential increase of their use for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. The first-generation ICD with limited shock capability alone could be considered adequate in most cardiac arrest victims, but it was not suitable for sudden death prevention in all high-risk patients with cardiac disease. The second-generation ICD was comprised of hybrid pacemaker-defibrillator systems that provided on-demand ventricular antibradycardia pacing. The third-generation devices include additional functions, such as antitachycardia pacing for ventricular tachycardia (VT) reversion and low-energy ventricular cardioversion, in addition to ventricular defibrillation and single-chamber ventricular demand pacing. In the near future, advanced dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing and defibrillating systems will also be available. The dual chamber ICD will allow atrial inhibited/dual-chamber (AAI/DDD) rate-responsive pacing, simultaneous atrial and ventricular sensing to optimize the arrhythmia identification, and ICD shock delivery in the proper arrhythmia-related chamber. Clinical benefits of these devices compared with their cost and complexity will require careful evaluation. PMID:8820847

  14. [Implantable cardioverter defibrillator: an update].

    PubMed

    le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Aliot, Etienne

    2007-01-01

    Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator is now a well established therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death. In secondary prevention (patients with a previous cardiac arrest) defibrillator can be considered as a class I indication, if there is no transient or reversible cause. The level of proof is A. in primary prevention the defibrillator is indicated in coronary artery disease patients with or without symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II or III), an ejection fraction lower than 30 %, measured at least one month after a myocardial infarction and 3 months after a revascularisation, surgery or angioplasty (level of proof B). It is also indicated in symptomatic spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardias with underlying heart disease (level of proof B), in patients with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia, poorly tolerated, without underlying heart disease for which pharmacological treatment or ablation can not be performed or failed (level of proof B). Finally it is also indicated in patients with syncope of unknown cause with sustained ventricular tachycardia or inducible ventricular fibrillation, with an underlying heart disease (level of proof B). The guidelines proposed by the different societies have also proposed class IIa recommendations which are the following: coronary artery disease patients with left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction between 31 or 35 %) measured at least one month after a myocardial infarction and 3 months after a revascularisation with an inducible ventricular arrhythmia. It can be also indicated in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies with an ejection fraction lower than 30% and NYHA class II or III. It can be also indicated in familial or inherited conditions with a high risk of sudden cardiac death by ventricular fibrillation without any other efficient known treatment and finally in heart failure patients remaining symptomatic, in class III or IV NYHA, with an optimal medical therapy, an

  15. Florid psychopathology in patients receiving shocks from implanted cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, J.; Turkington, D.; Thomas, G.; McComb, J.; Tynan, M.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives—To increase awareness of the potential for disabling anxiety and depression in patients receiving shocks from implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs).
Patients and methods—ICDs are implanted in patients at this hospital for control of serious ventricular tachyarrhythmias inadequately controlled by drug treatment, who are unsuitable for map guided antiarrhythmic surgery. All are reviewed regularly at a dedicated ICD clinic and are advised to make contact between visits if they experience shocks. Symptoms of anxiety or depression were not actively sought, nor was a patient support group operating at the time of this data collection. When overt psychopathology was identified, patients were referred to a designated psychiatrist for management.
Results—Over a six year period, six (17%) of 35 patients with ICDs developed florid psychiatric problems after experiencing shocks. None had premorbid psychiatric predisposition. Of the six patients suffering severe psychiatric problems, four were men, their age range was 30-63 years, and left ventricular ejection fraction was 18-40%. All shocks were appropriate for clinical arrhythmias and ranged in frequency from two in six months to 111 in 24 hours. All six patients manifested severe anxiety, focused on fear of future shocks. Depression was also evident in three patients and two had become housebound. All responded within weeks to anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs, combined with relaxation and cognitive therapies. Ongoing psychiatric therapy was refused by one patient, and was required for between three and 18 months in the remainder. One patient died and one received a cardiac transplant during the follow up period (median 27.5 months, range 8-43).
Conclusions—Because ICD implantation occurs against a complex medical background with inevitable psychological stress, all such patients should be considered at high risk for developing psychopathology.

 Keywords: implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

  16. Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillators in children, young adults and patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bordachar, Pierre; Marquié, Christelle; Pospiech, Thomas; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Jalal, Zakaria; Haissaguerre, Michel; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-15

    The demonstration of severe complications in patients implanted with a transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has led to the development of devices equipped with a subcutaneous lead. This new technique offers numerous advantages but also certain disadvantages. Various studies or anecdotal clinical cases have specifically been conducted with this subcutaneous defibrillation system in children and/or patients with congenital heart disease. Results of these studies suggest: 1) a high feasibility despite being limited by a selection process that excludes patients requiring permanent pacing and patients declared ineligible during pre-screening; 2) good efficacy of electrical shocks in reducing induced or spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias; 3) in this specific subset of patients, 2 types of complications have been particularly described: a risk of device exteriorization and infection, and a large number of inappropriate therapies primarily related to T-wave oversensing. The subcutaneous ICD could therefore constitute the gold standard for patients with complex congenital heart disease with no venous access to the heart or with a persistent shunt increasing the risk of systemic emboli as well as in young patients with channelopathy or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not requiring long-term pacing. Technological change (reduction in device size, better differentiation between R- and T-waves, possibility of pacing if device coupled with a leadless pacemaker) could reduce the limitations and complications and thereby increase the indications in this sub-group of patients. PMID:26519678

  17. The Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Daniel; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) is a subcutaneous alternative to conventional transvenous ICD (TV-ICD) systems, which have previously been shown to treat life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias in cardiac disease patients. A review of the literature reveals that S-ICDs have similar shock efficacy rates for both induced and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias when compared with TV-ICDs. Furthermore, S-ICDs seem to have a higher specificity for withholding therapy when supraventricular tachycardia is present compared with TV-ICDs. The advantages of the S-ICD system are numerous: fewer vascular complications including thrombosis and hemothorax, avoidance of fluoroscopy, and an easier means of lead replacement. These advantages make the S-ICD system most suitable for younger patients who may require replacements in later life, those with abnormal venous anatomy, and individuals prone to infection and/or central vein thrombosis. However, S-ICDs are not without their complications and are associated with a higher incidence of inappropriate shocks secondary to T wave oversensing. S-ICDs also lack antitachycardia pacing, making them a suboptimal device in patients with recurrent monomorphic ventricular tachycardia who would otherwise benefit from the antitachycardia pacing offered in TV-ICDs. Lastly, the limited number of long-term randomized, head-to-head studies involving direct comparison with TV-ICDs poses a challenge in the implementation of the S-ICD. PMID:26807549

  18. [Full dental rehabilitation of a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Imre, Ildikó; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2012-06-01

    During dental rehabilitation of a patient with ICD, an upper telescope retained overdenture with acrylic baseplate and lower cantilever bridges were constructed. In the consultation following the anamnesis and the clinical examination, the cardiologist did not believe antibiotic profilaxis to be necessary, adding that it is advisable to avoid the use of ultrasonic depurator and electrocauter. Nowadays after saving the life the improving of patient's better quality of life is an important aspect. The risk of ICD-implantation is minimal however, not negligible, the patient can pursue a way of life free of limitation. According to the latest trends, the number of ICD-implantations will increase exponentially in the near future, due to the aging of the population, the simplification and safeness of implantation and the increase of patients who can be treated with the device. In case of arritmia or putative dysfunction, the latest ICD-s are able to send emergency alert to the arritmia centre with the help of an outer transmitter. Probably the system will completely change the follow-up of patients with ICD within the next few years, clinical researches of its efficiency are going on at present. PMID:22826909

  19. Patients with pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Peter M; Rozner, Marc A; Sera, Valerie; Stecker, Eric C

    2013-11-01

    The preparation of patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) for the perioperative period necessitates familiarity with recommendations from the American Society of Anesthesiologists and Heart Rhythm Society. Even clinicians who are not CIED experts should understand the indications for implantation, as well as the basic functions, operations, and limitations of these devices. Before any scheduled procedure, proper CIED function should be verified and a specific CIED prescription obtained. Acquiring the requisite knowledge base and developing the systems to competently manage the CIED patient ensures safe and efficient perioperative care. PMID:24182719

  20. iPad2® Use in Patients With Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Causes Electromagnetic Interference: The EMIT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Teri M.; Chien, Gianna; Connolly, Therese F.; Grewal, Gurinder S.; Liang, David; Chien, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 140 million iPads® have been sold worldwide. The iPad2®, with magnets embedded in its frame and Smart Cover and 3G cellular data capability, can potentially cause electromagnetic interference in implantable cardioverter defibrillators. This can lead to potentially life‐threatening situations in patients. The goal of this study was to determine whether the iPad2® can cause electromagnetic interference in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Methods and Results Twenty‐seven patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators were studied. The iPad2® was held at reading distance and placed directly over the device with cellular data capability activated and deactivated. The manufacturers/models of devices and the patients' body mass index were noted. The presence of electromagnetic interference was detected by using a programmer supplied by each manufacturer. Magnet mode with suspension of anti‐tachycardia therapy was triggered in 9 (33%) patients. All occurred when the iPad2® was placed directly over the device. The cellular data status did not cause interference and no noise or oversensing was noted. There was no significant difference between the mean body mass index of the groups with or without interference. Conclusions The iPad2® can trigger magnet mode in implantable cardioverter defibrillators when laid directly over the device. This is potentially dangerous if patients should develop life‐threatening arrhythmias at the same time. As new electronic products that use magnets are produced, the potential risk to patients with implantable defibrillators needs to be addressed. PMID:24721802

  1. Safety of Electromagnetic Articulography in Patients with Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joglar, Jose A.; Nguyen, Carol; Garst, Diane M.; Katz, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: "Electromagnetic articulography (EMA)" uses a helmet to create alternating magnetic fields for tracking speech articulator movement. An important safety consideration is whether EMA magnetic fields interfere with the operation of speakers' pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). In this investigation, individuals…

  2. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Discharge in a Patient with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: What Is the Mechanism?

    PubMed

    Docekal, Jermey; Singh, David K

    2016-03-01

    The response to antitachycardia pacing can sometimes reveal clues about tachycardia mechanisms. This article discusses a case in which the diagnosis of typical atrioventricular nodal reciprocating tachycardia could be firmly established from the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator interrogation alone. PMID:26920189

  3. Athletes with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Ponamgi, Shiva P; DeSimone, Christopher V; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Athletes with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) represent a diverse group of individuals who may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death when engaging in vigorous physical activity. Therefore, they are excluded by the current guidelines from participating in most competitive sports except those classified as low intensity, such as bowling and golf. The lack of substantial data on the natural history of the cardiac diseases affecting these athletes as well as the unknown efficacy of ICDs in terminating life-threatening arrhythmias occurring during intense exercise has resulted in the restrictive nature of these now decade old guidelines. PMID:26100423

  4. Quality of Life in Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tomzik, Juliane; Koltermann, Katharina C.; Zabel, Markus; Willich, Stefan N.; Reinhold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the indisputable mortality advantages of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), no consensus exists regarding their impact on quality of life (QoL). This systematic review investigates differences in QoL between patients with ICDs and controls. We systematically searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PsychINFO databases. Articles were included if they were published after the year 2000 and reported on original studies with a control group. Five randomized controlled trials with a total of 5,138 patients and 10 observational studies with a total of 1,513 patients met the inclusion criteria. Nine studies found comparable QoL for ICD recipients and patients in the control groups, three studies found an increased QoL for ICD patients, and three studies found a decreased QoL for ICD patients. The question of whether QoL relates to ICD therapy cannot be answered conclusively due to the heterogeneity of the existing studies. Lower QoL was apparent among patients with an ICD who experienced several device discharges. Medical staff should be particularly aware of the signs of both psychological and physical disorders in these patients. Further investigations on QoL in ICD patients are desirable, but ethical reasons restrict the conduct of randomized trials. PMID:26664905

  5. Ventricular tachycardia initiated by high energy cardioversion in a patient with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed Central

    Chinushi, M.; Aizawa, Y.; Higuchi, K.

    1997-01-01

    A transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was implanted into a 58 year old woman with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who had drug refractory monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT). Antitachycardia pacing failed to terminate the VT; termination was attempted at 24 J, which was above the defibrillation threshold. When cardioversion at 24 J was delivered, VT with a different morphology and slower rate was reproducibly initiated. At 3 J, however, the original VT was successfully terminated without initiation of the slower VT. A new VT may be induced by high energy cardioversion. This may be a manifestation of the proarrhythmic potential of ICDs. PMID:9155621

  6. Sleep, Psychosocial Functioning, and Device-Specific Adjustment in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs).

    PubMed

    McCrae, Christina S; Roth, Alicia J; Ford, Jessica; Crew, Earl C; Conti, Jamie B; Berry, Richard B; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-01-01

    Rates of sleep disorders and associated adjustment were examined in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs; n = 42; Mage = 61.57, SD = 12.60). One night of ambulatory polysomnography, 14 days of sleep diaries, and questionnaires (mood, sleepiness, fatigue, device acceptance) were administered. Controlling for ischemia, MANCOVA examined adjustment by sleep diagnosis. Apnea was most common (28.6%), followed by Insomnia (16.7%) and Comorbid Insomnia/Apnea (11.9%). Patients with insomnia reported poorer mood, greater sleepiness, and lower device acceptance than good sleepers; they also demonstrated poorer mood and less ICD device acceptance than patients with sleep apnea. Patients with comorbid insomnia/apnea also exhibited poorer mood and less ICD device acceptance than good sleepers; however, comorbid patients did not significantly differ from insomnia or apnea patients on any measure. Those with disordered sleep (regardless of type) reported greater fatigue than good sleepers. Assessment (and treatment) of difficulties with sleep, mood, fatigue, and device acceptance may be important for the comprehensive clinical management of ICD patients. Further research appears warranted. PMID:25174823

  7. Bipolar Radiofrequency Neurotomy to Treat Neck and Back Pain in Patients with Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Alexander; Dadabayev, Alisher; Rosenquist, Ellen; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    We report 2 cases of successful treatment of neck and back pain with bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the cervical and lumbar facet joints in patients with an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD).Two patients with complex cardiac histories and AICD devices were treated with bipolar RFA of the facet joints. One presented with axial neck pain and the other with axial back pain. The histories and physical examinations were consistent with facetogenic pain. Diagnostic medial branch block resulted in more than 70% pain relief lasting for several days, allowing patients to perform routine daily activities without significant pain. However, we were concerned about the use of conventional RFA of the medial branches of nerves for the fear of interference with the function of AICD by the RF currents and energy. We took advantage of the localized and limited current of bipolar RFA to perform this procedure for the cervical or lumbar facet joints avoiding any interference with the function of AICD. The procedures provided long-term pain relief to the patients, and marked improvement in their functional status without any evident complications related to the function of their AICD.This case report describes the safe and successful completion of bipolar RFA of the medial branch nerves to treat cervical and lumbar facetogenic pain in patients with AICD. This modality of treatment may be considered in patients with AICD. We are finding it to be increasingly common that patients who present with chronic neck and back pain have AICDs in place. PMID:27008309

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With 'MR-conditional' devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  10. Indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Chinushi, Masaomi; Washizuka, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Since the first clinical use of implantable defibrillator in human, the technology and the function of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have been much improved and now, ICD can be implanted within the chest wall. ICD is the most reliable therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with documented VT/VF and the efficacy is most clear in patients with depressed heart function. It is now extended as a tool of the primary prevention of SCD in high risk patients after myocardial infarction. However, such beneficial effect is not applicable to DCM though patients might have depressed heart function. ICD is not free from procedure- or device-related problems which need to be resolved. From unknown causes, VT/VF might recur in an incessant form and an emergency admission is needed. Therefore, even during ICD therapy, patients often require antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation. PMID:15206546

  11. No Electromagnetic Interference Occurred in a Patient with a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System and a Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Shabari, Farshad Raissi; Kar, Biswajit; Loyalka, Pranav; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    The use of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators is a novel option for preventing arrhythmia-mediated cardiac death in patients who are at risk of endovascular-device infection or in whom venous access is difficult. However, the potential for electromagnetic interference between subcutaneous defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices is largely unknown. We report the case of a 24-year-old man in whom we observed no electromagnetic interference between a subcutaneous implanted cardioverter-defibrillator and a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System, at 3 different pump speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in this circumstance. PMID:27127441

  12. No Electromagnetic Interference Occurred in a Patient with a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System and a Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Kar, Biswajit; Loyalka, Pranav; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The use of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators is a novel option for preventing arrhythmia-mediated cardiac death in patients who are at risk of endovascular-device infection or in whom venous access is difficult. However, the potential for electromagnetic interference between subcutaneous defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices is largely unknown. We report the case of a 24-year-old man in whom we observed no electromagnetic interference between a subcutaneous implanted cardioverter-defibrillator and a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System, at 3 different pump speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in this circumstance. PMID:27127441

  13. Spiritual well-being may buffer psychological distress in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD).

    PubMed

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Crawford, Sybil; Tran, Chau; Goldberg, Robert; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Ockene, Ira

    2012-10-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and has been associated with a worse prognosis. The authors examined whether spiritual wellbeing is associated with reduced psychological distress in patients with ICDs. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Wellbeing (FACIT-SWB) questionnare and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to measure spiritual wellbeing and overall psychological distress. Multivariate linear regression was used to explore the relationship between these variables.The study sample included 46 ICD outpatients (32 M, 14 F; age range 43-83). An inverse association between HADS and FACIT-SWB scores was found, persisting after adjustment for demographics, anxiety/depression, medications, therapist support, and functional status (F = 0.001; β= -0.31, CI: -0.44, -0.19). In conclusion, spiritual wellbeing was independently associated with lower psychological distress in ICD outpatients. Spiritual wellbeing could act as a protective factor against psychological distress in these high-risk patients. PMID:23050210

  14. Spiritual well-being may buffer psychological distress in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Crawford, Sybil; Tran, Chau; Goldberg, Robert; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and has been associated with a worse prognosis. The authors examined whether spiritual wellbeing is associated with reduced psychological distress in patients with ICDs. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Wellbeing (FACIT-SWB) questionnare and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to measure spiritual wellbeing and overall psychological distress. Multivariate linear regression was used to explore the relationship between these variables. The study sample included 46 ICD outpatients (32 M, 14 F; age range 43–83). An inverse association between HADS and FACIT-SWB scores was found, persisting after adjustment for demographics, anxiety/depression, medications, therapist support, and functional status (F = 0.001; β= −0.31, CI: −0.44, −0.19). In conclusion, spiritual wellbeing was independently associated with lower psychological distress in ICD outpatients. Spiritual wellbeing could act as a protective factor against psychological distress in these high-risk patients. PMID:23050210

  15. Radiotherapy in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Søgaard, Mette; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with implantable cardiac rhythm devices undergo radiotherapy (RT) for cancer and are thereby exposed to the risk of device failure. Current safety recommendations seem to have limitations by not accounting for the risk of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators malfunctioning at low radiation doses. Besides scant knowledge about optimal safety measures, only little is known about the exact prevalence of patients with devices undergoing RT. In this review, we provide a short overview of the principles of RT and present the current evidence on the predictors and mechanisms of device malfunctions during RT. We also summarize practical recommendations from recent publications and from the industry. Strongly associated with beam energy of photon RT, device malfunctions occur at ∼3% of RT courses, posing a substantial issue in clinical practice. Malfunctions described in the literature typically consist of transient software disturbances and only seldom manifest as a permanent damage of the device. Through close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists, a tailored individualized approach might be necessary in this patient group in waiting time for updated international guidelines in the field. PMID:26041870

  16. [The Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (WCD)].

    PubMed

    Helms, Thomas M; Müller, A; Schwab, J O; Bänsch, D; Karle, C; Klingenheben, T; Zugck, C; Perings, C

    2015-06-01

    While the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has been proven to be the best choice for patients with long-term risk for sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD), the question is how to manage patients with only temporary risk, e.g., during the guidelines-recommended waiting period until the decision for an ICD can be made. These patient groups should be monitored around the clock to guarantee a lifesaving shock within a few minutes, if necessary.These conditions can be accomplished by the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) in the outpatient sector. The WCD is worn on the skin and consists of four nonadhesive ECG electrodes as well as three defibrillation electrodes-two at the back and one at the front-embedded in a garment. The defibrillation unit is connected via a cord and can be worn over the shoulder or on a belt. Cardiac events can be recorded and retrospectively analyzed by the treating physician.The WCD is a safe and effective measure to terminate potentially lethal ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. It may be used early after myocardial infarction with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as for patients with acute heart failure in nonischemic cardiomyopathy with uncertain cause and prognosis. In addition, it may be used for patients waiting for heart transplantation, for patients who cannot be implanted an ICD due to comorbidities, and for patients after explantation of their ICD, e.g., because of infection until reimplantation.One may expect that risk stratification of patients with the WCD will lead to even better selection for ICD use. PMID:25939989

  17. Advances in implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, John; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2016-03-01

    Since the first implant in 1980, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) technology has progressed rapidly. Modern ICD's have hundreds of programmable options with the general goal of preventing inappropriate shocks and providing shocks for truly life threatening symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias. New studies on ICD programming have shown the benefits of prolonged detection intervals in reaching this goal. Anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) therapy has become an important adjunct to defibrillator shocks. Remote monitoring technologies have surfaced which have been shown to identify arrhythmias and problems with the device in an expedient fashion. The subcutaneous ICD offers the advantage of avoiding intravascular leads and their inherent risks. Lastly, the current understanding of the effects of MRI in ICD patients has advanced creating new opportunities to provide MRI safely to such patients. PMID:26653411

  18. A trial design for evaluation of empiric programming of implantable cardioverter defibrillators to improve patient management.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John M; Sterns, Laurence D; Hanson, Jodi L; Ousdigian, Kevin T; Otterness, Mary F; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2004-11-12

    The delivery of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy is sophisticated and requires the programming of over 100 settings. Physicians tailor these settings with the intention of optimizing ICD therapeutic efficacy, but the usefulness of this approach has not been studied and is unknown. Empiric programming of settings such as anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) has been demonstrated to be effective, but an empiric approach to programming all VT/VF detection and therapy settings has not been studied. A single standardized empiric programming regimen was developed based on key strategies with the intention of restricting shock delivery to circumstances when it is the only effective and appropriate therapy. The EMPIRIC trial is a worldwide, multi-center, prospective, one-to-one randomized comparison of empiric to physician tailored programming for VT/VF detection and therapy in a broad group of about 900 dual chamber ICD patients. The trial will provide a better understanding of how particular programming strategies impact the quantity of shocks delivered and facilitate optimization of complex ICD programming. PMID:15541169

  19. Readability and Content of Patient Education Material Related to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Carroll, Sandra L.; Schwartz, Lisa; Vaandering, Katie; Toor, Gurjit K.; Arthur, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly offered to patients for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Candidates for ICD receive ICD-related patient education material when they make decisions to consent or decline a primary prevention ICD. Printed patient education material directed at ICD candidates has not been the focus of direct appraisal. Objective We evaluated the readability and content of ICD-related print education materials made available to patients who were enrolled in a study involving patient decision making for ICD from 3 ICD sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Methods All ICD print materials referred to during interviews and/or that were available in ICD site waiting rooms were collected for analysis. Readability testing was conducted using the SMOG (“simple measurement of gobbledygook”) and Fry methods. The material was evaluated according to selected plain-language criteria, thematic content analysis, and rhetoric analysis. Results Twenty-one print materials were identified and analyzed. Documents were authored by device manufacturers, tertiary care hospitals, and cardiac support organizations. Although many documents adhered to plain-language recommendations, text-reading levels were higher than recommended. Twelve major content themes were identified. Content focused heavily on the positive aspects of living with the device to the exclusion of other possible information that could be relevant to the decisions that patients made. Conclusions Print-based patient education materials for ICD candidates are geared to a highly literate population. The focus on positive information to the exclusion of potentially negative aspects of the ICD, or alternatives to accepting 1, could influence and/or confuse patients about the purpose and implications of this medical device. Development of print materials is indicated that includes information about possible problems and that would be relevant for the

  20. Association of Physician Certification and Outcomes Among Patients Receiving an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeptha P.; Luebbert, Jeffrey J.; Wang, Yongfei; Rathore, Saif S.; Chen, Jersey; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Hammill, Stephen C.; Lampert, Rachel I.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2009-01-01

    Context Allowing nonelectrophysiologists to perform implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) procedures is controversial. However, it is not known whether outcomes of ICD implantation vary by physician specialty. Objective To determine the association of implanting physician certification with outcomes following ICD implantation. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort study using cases submitted to the ICD Registry performed between January 2006 and June 2007. Patients were grouped by the certification status of the implanting physician into mutually exclusive categories: electrophysiologists, nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, thoracic surgeons, and other specialists. Hierarchical logistic regression models were developed to determine the independent association of physician certification with outcomes. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital procedural complication rates and the proportion of patients meeting criteria for a defibrillator with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D) who received that device. Results Of 111 293 ICD implantations included in the analysis, 78 857 (70.9%) were performed by electrophysiologists, 24 399 (21.9%) by nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1862 (1.7%) by thoracic surgeons, and 6175 (5.5%) by other specialists. Compared with patients whose ICD was implanted by electrophysiologists, patients whose ICD was implanted by either nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists or thoracic surgeons were at increased risk of complications in both unadjusted (electrophysiologists, 3.5% [2743/78 857]; nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 4.0% [970/24 399]; thoracic surgeons, 5.8% [108/1862]; P < .001) and adjusted analyses (relative risk [RR] for nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1.11 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01–1.21]; RR for thoracic surgeons, 1.44 [95% CI, 1.15–1.79]). Among 35 841 patients who met criteria for CRT-D, those whose ICD was implanted by physicians other than electrophysiologists were significantly

  1. Hospice Use Following Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Parzynski, Craig S.; Spertus, John A.; Mor, Vincent; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Older recipients of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are at increased risk for short-term mortality in comparison with younger patients. Although hospice use is common among decedents aged >65, its use among older ICD recipients is unknown. Methods and Results— Medicare patients aged >65 matched to data in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry – ICD Registry from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010 were eligible for analysis (N=194 969). The proportion of ICD recipients enrolled in hospice, cumulative incidence of hospice admission, and factors associated with time to hospice enrollment were evaluated. Five years after device implantation, 50.9% of patients were either deceased or in hospice. Among decedents, 36.8% received hospice services. The cumulative incidence of hospice enrollment, accounting for the competing risk of death, was 4.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%–4.8%) within 1 year and 21.3% (95% CI, 20.7%–21.8%) at 5 years. Factors most strongly associated with shorter time to hospice enrollment were older age (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.73–1.81), class IV heart failure (versus class I; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.66–1.94); ejection fraction <20 (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48–1.67), and greater hospice use among decedents in the patients’ health referral region. Conclusions— More than one-third of older patients dying with ICDs receive hospice care. Five years after implantation, half of older ICD recipients are either dead or in hospice. Hospice providers should be prepared for ICD patients, whose clinical trajectories and broader palliative care needs require greater focus. PMID:27016104

  2. Longitudinal changes in intracardiac repolarization lability in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Guduru, Abhilash; Lansdown, Jason; Chernichenko, Daniil; Berger, Ronald D.; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While it is known that elevated baseline intracardiac repolarization lability is associated with the risk of fast ventricular tachycardia (FVT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF), the effect of its longitudinal changes on the risk of FVT/VF is unknown. Methods and Results: Near-field (NF) right ventricular (RV) intracardiac electrograms (EGMs) were recorded every 3–6 months at rest in 248 patients with structural heart disease [mean age 61.2 ± 13.3; 185(75%) male; 162(65.3%) ischemic cardiomyopathy] and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) [201 (81%) primary prevention]. Intracardiac beat-to-beat QT variability index (QTVINF) was measured on NF RV EGM. During the first study phase (median 18 months), participants made on average 2.4 visits. Then remote follow-up was continued for an additional median period of 3 years. Average QTVINF did not change during the first year after ICD implantation (−0.342 ± 0.603 at baseline vs. −0.262 ± 0.552 at 6 months vs. −0.334 ± 0.603 at 12 months); however, it decreased thereafter (−0.510 ± 0.603 at 18 months; P = 0.042). Adjusted population-averaged GEE model showed that the odds of developing FVT/VF increased by 75% for each 1 unit increase in QTVINF. (OR 1.75 [95%CI 1.05–2.92]; P = 0.031). However, individual patient–specific QTVINF trends (increasing, decreasing, flat) varied from patient to patient. For a given patient, the odds of developing FVT/VF were not associated with increasing or decreasing QTVINF over time [OR 1.27; (95%CI 0.05–30.10); P = 0.881]. Conclusion: While on average the odds of FVT/VF increased with an increase in QTVINF, patient-specific longitudinal trends in QTVINF did not affect the odds of FVT/VF. PMID:23964242

  3. Influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although proton radiotherapy is a promising new approach for cancer patients, functional interference is a concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy on ICDs. Methods The experimental set-up simulated proton radiotherapy for a patient with an ICD. Four new ICDs were placed 0.3 cm laterally and 3 cm distally outside the radiation field in order to evaluate the influence of secondary neutrons. The cumulative in-field radiation dose was 107 Gy over 10 sessions of irradiation with a dose rate of 2 Gy/min and a field size of 10 × 10 cm2. After each radiation fraction, interference with the ICD by the therapy was analyzed by an ICD programmer. The dose distributions of secondary neutrons were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation. Results The frequency of the power-on reset, the most serious soft error where the programmed pacing mode changes temporarily to a safety back-up mode, was 1 per approximately 50 Gy. The total number of soft errors logged in all devices was 29, which was a rate of 1 soft error per approximately 15 Gy. No permanent device malfunctions were detected. The calculated dose of secondary neutrons per 1 Gy proton dose in the phantom was approximately 1.3-8.9 mSv/Gy. Conclusions With the present experimental settings, the probability was approximately 1 power-on reset per 50 Gy, which was below the dose level (60-80 Gy) generally used in proton radiotherapy. Further quantitative analysis in various settings is needed to establish guidelines regarding proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with ICDs. PMID:22284700

  4. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programme for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitchet, A; Doherty, P J; Bundy, C; Bell, W; Fitzpatrick, A P; Garratt, C J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a 12 week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) programme on patients who have undergone implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Design: Sixteen patients with ICDs (14 (88%) male, mean (SD) age 58 (10) years, range 34–74 years) were randomised to either attend an individually tailored CCR programme or receive usual care. They then changed to the alternative regimen for a further 12 weeks. Exercise capacity was assessed using a treadmill exercise test at baseline, after usual care, after CCR and 12 weeks after CCR to assess maintenance effects. Hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scores were recorded at each stage. Results: Exercise times (min:s; mean (SD)) increased by 16% from a baseline mean of 9:55 (2:33) to 11:11 (2:17) following attendance at CCR (95% confidence interval (CI) 0:34 to 1:58; p = 0.001). This improvement was maintained 12 weeks after attendance at CCR, at 11:20 (2:17) (p = 1.00). HAD scores for anxiety and depression decreased during CCR from a baseline of 13.4 (3.6) to 8.1 (3.6), 95% CI 3.5 to 7.0 (p < 0.001) and 9.9 (3.4) to 6.7 (2.9), 95% CI 1.9 to 4.4 (p = 0.002), respectively. These improvements were maintained at 12 weeks after CCR. No ventricular arrhythmias or ICD discharges occurred during the exercise components of the CCR. The total number of ventricular arrhythmias and ICD discharges was similar 12 weeks before, during, and 12 weeks after CCR. Conclusions: CCR appears to be safe for patients with ICDs. It can improve exercising ability and lower the levels of psychological distress. A larger multicentre study is recommended to confirm these findings. PMID:12527665

  5. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators--general and anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy G; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2014-01-01

    A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia), special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary. PMID:24907883

  6. Athletes with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Ponamgi, Shiva P.; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Athletes with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) represent a diverse group of individuals who may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) when engaging in vigorous physical activity. Therefore, they are excluded by the current guidelines from participating in most competitive sports except those classified as low intensity, such as bowling and golf. The lack of substantial data on the natural history of the cardiac diseases affecting these athletes, as well as the unknown efficacy of implanted ICDs in terminating life-threatening arrhythmias occurring during intense exercise, have resulted in the restrictive nature of these now decade old guidelines. Recently, there is emerging data, derived from a few retrospective studies and a large prospective registry that demonstrates the relative safety of high-risk athletes participating in competitive sports and challenges the prohibitive nature of these guidelines. Nevertheless, the safe participation of all athletes with an ICD in competitive sports continues to be contemplated. The increased number of inappropriate shocks, damage to the ICD/pacemaker system, and the questionable efficacy of the delivered shock in the setting of vigorous physical activity are some of the main challenges faced by these athletes who choose to continue participation in competitive sports. The fear of SCD and ICD shocks faced by these athletes is also associated with a negative psychological burden and affects their quality of life, as does restricting them from all competitive sports. Therefore, shared decision making is necessary between the clinician and athlete after carefully analyzing the risks and benefits associated with competitive sports participation. PMID:26100423

  7. Serum-Based Oxylipins Are Associated with Outcomes in Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Harms, Amy C.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cheng, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with systolic heart failure are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying these events. We sought to better understand if oxylipins, a diverse class of lipid metabolites derived from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, were associated with these outcomes in recipients of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods Among 479 individuals from the PROSE-ICD study, baseline serum were analyzed and quantitatively profiled for 35 known biologically relevant oxylipin metabolites. Associations with ICD shocks for ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Six oxylipins, 17,18-DiHETE (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99 per SD change in oxylipin level), 19,20-DiHDPA (HR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.98), 5,6-DiHETrE (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.91), 8,9-DiHETrE (HR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.95), 9,10-DiHOME (HR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.00), and PGF1α (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.71) were associated with the risk of appropriate ICD shock after multivariate adjustment for clinical factors. Additionally, 4 oxylipin-to-precursor ratios, 15S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3), 17,18-DiHETE / FA (20:5-ω3), 19,20-DiHDPA / FA (20:5-ω3), and 5S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3) were positively associated with the risk of all-cause mortality. Conclusion In a prospective cohort of patients with primary prevention ICDs, we identified several novel oxylipin markers that were associated with appropriate shock and mortality using metabolic profiling techniques. These findings may provide new insight into the potential biologic pathways leading to adverse events in this patient population. PMID:27281224

  8. When to consider an implantable cardioverter defibrillator following myocardial infarction?

    PubMed

    Szwejkowski, Benjamin R; Wright, Gary A; Connelly, Derek T; Gardner, Roy S

    2015-12-01

    After reading this article the reader should be familiar with: Current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use post myocardial infarction (MI) and ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Primary prevention ICD guidelines. Secondary prevention ICD guidelines. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients post MI and the use of ICDs. Programming ICDs. PMID:26526420

  9. Determining the risks of magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 tesla for patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jennifer D; Costa, Heather S; Russo, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Conventional pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator product labeling currently cautions against exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there is a growing clinical need for MRI, without an acceptable alternative imaging modality in many patients with cardiac devices. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of MRI at 1.5 T for patients with cardiac devices by measuring the frequency of device failures and clinically relevant device parameter changes. Data from a single-center retrospective review of 109 patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (the MRI group) who underwent 125 clinically indicated MRI studies were compared to data from a prospective cohort of 50 patients with cardiac devices who did not undergo MRI (the control group). In the MRI group, there were no deaths, device failures requiring generator or lead replacement, induced arrhythmias, losses of capture, or electrical reset episodes. Decreases in battery voltage of ≥0.04 V occurred in 4%, pacing threshold increases of ≥0.5 V in 3%, and pacing lead impedance changes of ≥50 Ω in 6%. Although there were statistically significant differences between the MRI and control groups for the mean change in pacing lead impedance (-6.2 ± 23.9 vs 3.0 ± 22.1 Ω) and left ventricular pacing threshold (-0.1 ± 0.3 vs 0.1 ± 0.2 V), these differences were not clinically important. In conclusion, MRI in patients with cardiac devices resulted in no device or lead failures. A small number of clinically relevant changes in device parameter measurements were noted. However, these changes were similar to those in a control group of patients who did not undergo MRI. PMID:22921995

  10. Evaluation of defibrillation safety and shock reduction in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients with increased time to detection: A randomized SANKS study

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Mahito; Zhu, Xin; Takagi, Takahito; Sahara, Naohiko; Narabayashi, Yuriko; Hashimoto, Hikari; Ito, Naoshi; Enomoto, Yoshinari; Kujime, Shingo; Sakai, Tuyoshi; Sakata, Takao; Matushita, Noriko; Fukamizu, Seiji; Okano, Yoshifumi; Anami, Yoshiaki; Tejima, Tomoyuki; Kuroiwa, Kouji; Ikeda, Takanori; Sakurada, Harumizu; Sugi, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract11Abstract publication information: The abstracts of this study were presented at the conferences below:[1] Mahito N, Naoshi I, Yoshinari E, et al. Evaluation of defibrillation safety with the increased number of sensing to reduce shocks for ventricular fibrillation in Japanese ICD patients. 5th APHRS; 2012.[2] Mahito N, Xin Z, Naoshi I, et al. Evaluation of Defibrillation Safety with the increased Number of Sensing to Reduce Shocks for Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia in Japanese ICD Patients – SANKS STUDY. Venue of the 8th Tawara-Aschoff-Meeting; 2012. Background The need for ways to minimize the number of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks is increasing owing to the risk of its adverse effects on life expectancy. Studies have shown that a longer detection time for ventricular tachyarrhythmia reduces the safety of therapies, in terms of syncope and mortality, but not substantially in terms of the success rate. We aimed to evaluate the effects of increased number of intervals to detect (NID) VF on the safety of ICD shock therapy and on the reduction of inappropriate shocks. Methods The present study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, crossover study. Randomized VF induction testing with NID 18/24 or 30/40 was performed to compare the success rate of defibrillation with a 25-J shock and the time to detection. Inappropriate shock episodes were simulated retrospectively to evaluate a possibility of episodes avoidable at NID 24/32 and 30/40. Results Thirty-one consecutive patients implanted with an ICD or cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (CRT-D) were enrolled in this study. The success rate of defibrillation was 100% in both NID groups at the first shock. The time from VF induction to detection showed a significant increase in the NID 30/40 group (6.16±1.29 s vs. 9.00±1.31 s, p<0.001). Among the 120 patients implanted with an ICD or CRT-D, 10 experienced 32 inappropriate shock episodes. The inappropriate shock

  11. Unipolar ventricular pacing reduces inappropriate shocks from a separate cardioverter defibrillator in a post-Fontan patient.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell I; Jedeikin, Roy; Pfeiffer, Sharon; Pedersen, Scott

    2006-04-01

    This report describes a 20-year-old man with complex congenital heart disease and inappropriate epicardial implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks secondary to double counting of ventricular-paced spikes and QRS complexes from a separate bipolar epicardial dual-chamber pacemaker. Adjusting to a unipolar paced-ventricular mode resolved any double counting via pacemaker-ICD interaction. PMID:16627457

  12. Under-Utilization of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Patients with Heart Failure - The Current State of Sudden Cardiac Death Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Emert, Martin; Biria, Mazda; Chotia, Rashaad; Guda, Rajeshwer; Bommana, Sudharani; Pimentel, Rhea; Vacek, James; Dendi, Raghuveer; Berenbom, Loren; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite ACC/AHA guidelines indicating implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as class I therapy for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with EF≤35%, ICD utilization rates in real world practice have been low. Objective To determine the rate of ICD implantation at a tertiary care academic center and to assess the reasons for under-utilization of the same. Methods Review of a prospectively collected database which included all patients diagnosed with an EF≤35% was performed to assess the rate of ICD implantation and mortality. Reasons for non-implantation of ICD were then assessed from detailed chart review. Results A total of 707 patients (age 69.4 ± 14.1 years) with mean EF of 26±7% were analyzed. Only 28% (200/707) of patients had ICDs implanted. Mortality was lower in the group with ICD (25% vs 37%, p=0.004). When patients who either died or were lost to follow-up prior to 2005 were excluded, ICD utilization rate was still low at 37.6%. The most common reason for non-implantation of ICD was physicians not discussing this option with their patients. Patient refusal was the second most common reason. Conclusions ICD Implantation rates for primary prevention of SCD in patients with EF≤35% is low. Physician and patient education should be addressed to improve the utilization rates. PMID:25852239

  13. Physicians' preferences and attitudes about end-of-life care in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Sherazi, Saadia; Daubert, James P; Block, Robert C; Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Abdel-Gadir, Khalid; DiSalle, Michael R; Haley, James M; Shah, Abrar H

    2008-10-01

    Clinical guidance is deficient regarding deactivation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in patients with terminal illnesses. We hypothesized that many physicians are apprehensive about discussing ICD deactivation with their dying patients. Thus, we conducted an anonymous survey of all the physicians in the Department of Medicine at Unity Health System in Rochester, NY. The survey collected information about the knowledge and preferences of these physicians regarding the medical, ethical, and legal issues involved in caring for patients with an ICD and terminal illness. Of the 204 surveys distributed, 87 (43%) were returned. Among the physicians who responded, 64 (74%) reported experience caring for a patient with an ICD and terminal illness. Forty physicians (46%) either thought it was illegal or were not sure if it was legal to deactivate an ICD in these circumstances. However, if reassured about the legality of discontinuing ICD therapy, 79 (91%) of these same respondents said that they would be willing to discuss voluntary ICD deactivation with their dying patients. With increased knowledge about managing the withdrawal of this potentially life-prolonging therapy, physicians are likely to become more skilled at caring for dying patients with an ICD. PMID:18828973

  14. Defibrillation testing at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John M; Marinskis, Germanas

    2011-04-01

    This survey assesses the current practices of testing defibrillation function at the time of the first implanted cardioverter defibrillator placement. Responses have been collected from 57 European heart rhythm management centres. The results of the survey show an extraordinary inconsistency in the approaches to defibrillation testing (19.3% of responders report no testing at the time of implantation). A policy statement on this topic would help to improve patient care and unify the procedure according to evidence based data. PMID:21447521

  15. Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device Already in Place

    PubMed Central

    Subzposh, Faiz; Hankins, Shelley R.; Kutalek, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a biventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), and a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) developed a pocket hematoma and infection after an ICD generator change. The biventricular ICD was extracted, and the patient was given a full course of antibiotics. Because he had no indications for bradycardia pacing or biventricular pacing, he was implanted with a subcutaneous ICD under full anticoagulation. There was no interference in sensing or shock delivery from the ICD. The LVAD readings were unchanged during and after the procedure. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and both devices were functioning normally. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the implantation of a subcutaneous ICD in the presence of an LVAD. This report illustrates that both devices can be implanted successfully in the same patient. In addition, the subcutaneous ICD minimizes the risk of bloodstream infections, which can be fatal in patients who have life-supporting devices such as an LVAD. PMID:25873825

  16. Prevalence and outcomes of patients receiving implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for primary prevention not based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levine, Yehoshua C; Tuttle, Mark K; Rosenberg, Michael A; Goldberg, Randal; Matos, Jason; Samuel, Michelle; Kramer, Daniel B; Buxton, Alfred E

    2015-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation outside practice guidelines remains contentious, particularly during the mandated waiting periods in patients with recent cardiac events. We assessed the prevalence and outcomes of non-guideline-based (NGB) ICD implantations in a tertiary academic medical center, with a specific focus on adjudication of arrhythmia events. All patients who underwent initial primary prevention ICD implantation at our institution from 2004 to 2012 were categorized as having received guideline-based (GB) or NGB implants and were retrospectively assessed for first episode of appropriate ICD therapy and total mortality. Of 807 patients, 137 (17.0%) received NGB implants. During a median follow-up of 2.9 years, patients with NGB implants had similar times to first appropriate ICD therapy (median time to event 1.94 vs 2.17 years in patients with GB implants, p = 0.20). After multivariable analysis, patients with NGB implants remained at higher risk for death (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2, p = 0.03) but not appropriate ICD therapy (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.5 to 1.3, p = 0.51). Furthermore, only 1 of 125 patients who underwent implant within the 40-day waiting period after myocardial infarction or 3-month waiting period after revascularization or cardiomyopathy diagnosis received an appropriate therapy within this period. In conclusion, few patients received NGB ICD implants in our academic medical center. Although these patients have similar long-term risk of receiving appropriate ICD therapy compared with patients with GB implants, this risk is very low during the waiting periods mandated by clinical practice guidelines. These results suggest that there is little need to rush into implanting ICDs during these waiting periods. PMID:25840578

  17. Primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators in end-stage kidney disease patients on dialysis: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Patrick H.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Middleton, John P.; Hammill, Stephen C.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death among end-stage kidney disease patients (ESKD) on dialysis, but the benefit of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in this population is uncertain. We conducted this investigation to compare the mortality of dialysis patients receiving a primary prevention ICD with matched controls. Methods We used data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's ICD Registry to select dialysis patients who received a primary prevention ICD, and the Get with the Guidelines-Heart Failure Registry to select a comparator cohort. We matched ICD recipients and no-ICD patients using propensity score techniques to reduce confounding, and overall survival was compared between groups. Results We identified 108 dialysis patients receiving primary prevention ICDs and 195 comparable dialysis patients without ICDs. One year (3-year) mortality was 42.2% (68.8%) in the ICD registry cohort compared with 38.1% (75.7%) in the control cohort. There was no significant survival advantage associated with ICD [hazard ratio (HR) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66–1.13, log-rank P = 0.29]. After propensity matching, our analysis included 86 ICD patients and 86 matched controls. Comparing the propensity-matched cohorts, 1 year (3 years) mortality was 43.4% (74.0%) in the ICD cohort and 39.7% (76.6%) in the control cohort; there was no significant difference in mortality outcome between groups (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.67–1.31, log-rank P = 0.71). Conclusions We did not observe a significant association between primary prevention ICDs and reduced mortality among ESKD patients receiving dialysis. Consideration of the potential risks and benefits of ICD implantation in these patients should be undertaken while awaiting the results of definitive clinical trials. PMID:25404241

  18. Migration of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patch causing massive hemothorax.

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, R L; Hamer, M E; Swiryn, S

    1996-01-01

    The automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is composed of shocking electrodes (patches or coils), sensing electrodes, and a generator implanted in the abdominal wall. A number of complications with defibrillators have been reported, including migration of the various components. We describe a patient in whom one of the patches, originally sutured extrapericardially, migrated in the right hemithorax and eroded into the ipsilateral lung. The resultant massive hemothorax necessitated urgent thoracotomy, patch removal, and hematoma evacuation. A hybrid implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system was created as a replacement to minimize surgery while protecting the patient from sudden death. Images PMID:8680276

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress in Patients With Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jessica; Rosman, Lindsey; Wuensch, Karl; Irvine, Jane; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to a history of cardiac arrest, device implantation, and ICD shock. There has been very little examination of treatment of PTSD symptoms in these patients. This study evaluated the effect of a specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for ICD patients with high levels of PTSD symptoms: a manualized program consisting of 8 telephone sessions with a trained counselor, a patient education book, and a stress management procedure on compact disc. Participants were 193 ICD patients, who were randomized to CBT or usual cardiac care (UCC) who completed self-report surveys at the time of recruitment and 6 and 12 months after initial measurement. Previous publication on the primary research evaluation questions reported that the CBT condition resulted in greater improvement on PTSD and depression symptoms than the UCC for the general population of ICD patients, but did not evaluate the effect on those with elevated symptoms of PTSD. The authors conducted secondary analyses of the effect of treatment on high and low PTSD symptom groups based on a cutoff for the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (Weiss & Marmar, 1997). Participants in the CBT group who had high symptoms experienced significantly greater symptom reduction from baseline to 12 months (d = 2.44, p = .021) than the UCC group (d = 1.12). Participants with low symptoms had small reductions regardless of group assignment (d = 0.16, p = .031). ICD-focused CBT was sufficient to produce a large, statistically significant reduction in PTSD symptoms in ICD patients with indications for treatment. PMID:27415850

  20. Anger-induced T-wave alternans predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel; Shusterman, Vladimir; Burg, Matthew; McPherson, Craig; Batsford, William; Goldberg, Anna; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether T-wave alternans (TWA) induced by anger in a laboratory setting predicts future ventricular arrhythmias (VT/VF) in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Background Anger can precipitate spontaneous VT/VF, and induce TWA. Whether anger-induced TWA predicts future arrhythmias is unknown. Methods Sixty-two patients with ICDs underwent ambulatory ECG during a mental stress protocol, three months post-implant. TWA was analyzed using time-domain methods. After ≥ 1 year follow-up, ICD stored data was reviewed to determine incidence of ICD-terminated VT/VF. Results Patients with ICD-terminated arrhythmias during follow-up (N=10) had higher TWA induced by anger, 13.2uV (iqr 9.3-16), compared to 9.3uV (7.5-11.5) (p<0.01). Patients in the highest quartile of anger-induced TWA (>11.9uV, N=15) were more likely to experience arrhythmias by one year than those in the lower quartiles, (33% versus 4%), and during extended follow-up (40% versus 9%, p<0.01 for both.) In multivariable regression controlling for ejection fraction, prior clinical arrhythmia, and wide QRS, anger-induced TWA remained a significant predictor of arrhythmia, with likelihood in the top quartile 10.8 times that of other patients (CI 1.6-113, p<0.05.) Conclusion Anger-induced TWA predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with ICDs, suggesting that emotion-induced repolarization instability may be one mechanism linking stress and sudden death. Whether there is a clinical role for anger-induced TWA testing requires further study. PMID:19245968

  1. Characteristics associated with low treatment satisfaction in patients with implanted cardioverter defibrillators: results from the LICAD study.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Deisenhofer, Isabelle; Simon, Heidi; Schmitt, Claus; Baumert, Jens J

    2005-06-01

    The evaluation of low treatment satisfaction (LTS) with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) remains a neglected area of clinical research. However, a trustful attitude toward an ICD is crucial. Within the scope of ICD health technology assessment, we searched for predictors of LTS. Of 195 ICD patients enrolled (mean 59.8 years, standard deviation 12.6), 163 (83.6%) were men and 26 (16.4%) were women. We measured anxiety, helplessness, and depression with standardized instruments and LTS with 11 dichotomous items concerning a mistrustful attitude, a negative body image, and low appraisal. A total of 47 (24.1%) patients were considered as LTS patients. Multivariate logistic regression was used for assessment of LTS. Adjusted for age and survey, LTS was significantly more prevalent in depressed, anxious, and phobic patients. Multivariate logistic regression including medical and psychological covariates revealed the experience of > or =5 shocks with an odds ratio (OR) of 10.17 (95% CI 3.57-29.00, P < or = 0.001), being employed with an OR of 8.07 (95% CI 2.39-27.19, P < or = 0.001), and feelings of helplessness (OR 4.61, 95% CI 1.79-11.90, P < or = 0.002) as the most important predictors for LTS. Women had a slightly not significant effect on LTS. Age, educational status, and depression were not significant. LTS patients required more support for living with the ICD (P < or = 0.001). Thus, LTS serves as surrogate measure for deteriorated psychic health. Clinicians should be advised to identify LTS patients and to consider psychotherapeutic counseling for them. PMID:15955182

  2. What Are the Risks of Having an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Risks of Having an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator? Unnecessary Electrical ... prescribe medicine so unnecessary pulses occur less often. Risks Related to Surgery Although rare, some ICD risks ...

  3. Predictors of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads.

    PubMed

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Vittala, Satya S; Challa, Suresh; Raizada, Amol; Tondato, Fernando J; Lee, Howard R; Chaliki, Hari P

    2013-01-01

    Patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) leads have an increased prevalence of tricuspid regurgitation. However, the roles of cardiac rhythm and lead-placement duration in the development of severe tricuspid regurgitation are unclear. We reviewed echocardiographic data on 26 consecutive patients who had severe tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker or AICD placement; before treatment, they had no organic tricuspid valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, or severe tricuspid regurgitation. We compared the results to those of 26 control subjects who had these same devices but no more than mild tricuspid regurgitation. The patients and control subjects were similar in age (mean, 81 ±6 vs 81 ±8 yr; P = 0.83), sex (male, 42% vs 46%; P = 0.78), and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.60 ±0.06 vs 0.58 ± 0.05; P = 0.4). The patients had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (92% vs 65%; P=0.01) and longer median duration of pacemaker or AICD lead placement (49.5 vs 5 mo; P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and right ventricular systolic pressure by multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=6.4; P = 0.03) and duration of lead placement (odds ratio=1.5/yr; P = 0.001) were independently associated with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Out study shows that atrial fibrillation and longer durations of lead placement might increase the risk of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemakers or AICDs. PMID:24391312

  4. Predictors of Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients with Permanent Pacemaker or Automatic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Leads

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Mohammad Q.; Vittala, Satya S.; Challa, Suresh; Raizada, Amol; Tondato, Fernando J.; Lee, Howard R.; Chaliki, Hari P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) leads have an increased prevalence of tricuspid regurgitation. However, the roles of cardiac rhythm and lead-placement duration in the development of severe tricuspid regurgitation are unclear. We reviewed echocardiographic data on 26 consecutive patients who had severe tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker or AICD placement; before treatment, they had no organic tricuspid valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, or severe tricuspid regurgitation. We compared the results to those of 26 control subjects who had these same devices but no more than mild tricuspid regurgitation. The patients and control subjects were similar in age (mean, 81 ±6 vs 81 ±8 yr; P = 0.83), sex (male, 42% vs 46%; P = 0.78), and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.60 ±0.06 vs 0.58 ± 0.05; P = 0.4). The patients had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (92% vs 65%; P=0.01) and longer median duration of pacemaker or AICD lead placement (49.5 vs 5 mo; P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and right ventricular systolic pressure by multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=6.4; P = 0.03) and duration of lead placement (odds ratio=1.5/yr; P = 0.001) were independently associated with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Out study shows that atrial fibrillation and longer durations of lead placement might increase the risk of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemakers or AICDs. PMID:24391312

  5. Efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychiatric symptoms in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Maia, A.C.C.O.; Braga, A.A.; Soares-Filho, G.; Pereira, V.; Nardi, A.E.; Silva, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article is a systematic review of the available literature on the benefits that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) offers patients with implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and confirms its effectiveness. After receiving the device, some patients fear that it will malfunction, or they remain in a constant state of tension due to sudden electrical discharges and develop symptoms of anxiety and depression. A search with the key words “anxiety”, “depression”, “implantable cardioverter”, “cognitive behavioral therapy” and “psychotherapy” was carried out. The search was conducted in early January 2013. Sources for the search were ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, and PsycINFO. A total of 224 articles were retrieved: 155 from PubMed, 69 from ISI Web of Knowledge. Of these, 16 were written in a foreign language and 47 were duplicates, leaving 161 references for analysis of the abstracts. A total of 19 articles were eliminated after analysis of the abstracts, 13 were eliminated after full-text reading, and 11 articles were selected for the review. The collection of articles for literature review covered studies conducted over a period of 13 years (1998-2011), and, according to methodological design, there were 1 cross-sectional study, 1 prospective observational study, 2 clinical trials, 4 case-control studies, and 3 case studies. The criterion used for selection of the 11 articles was the effectiveness of the intervention of CBT to decrease anxiety and depression in patients with ICD, expressed as a ratio. The research indicated that CBT has been effective in the treatment of ICD patients with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Research also showed that young women represented a risk group, for which further study is needed. Because the number of references on this theme was small, further studies should be carried out. PMID:24652325

  6. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  7. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs.

  8. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jaber; R Ehrlich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  9. Development and Testing of an Intervention to Improve Outcomes for Partners Following Receipt of an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Thompson, Elaine A.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe 3 foundational studies and how their results were used to formulate, design, and test a novel partner intervention for implementation in the immediate post-ICD (implantable cardioverter defibrillator) period after returning home. Nursing’s expanding role into chronic illness management in the creation of evidence-based practice is highlighted. A randomized clinical trial comparing 2 intervention programs is being conducted with patients who receive an ICD for the first time and their intimate partners. Primary outcomes are physical functioning, psychological adjustment, relationship impact, and health care utilization. PMID:23107992

  10. Association Between Comorbidities and Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients With and Without an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Khazanie, Prateeti; Hellkamp, Anne S; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Masoudi, Frederick A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Heidenreich, Paul A; Yancy, Clyde W; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2015-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is associated with improved outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF), but whether this association holds among older patients with multiple comorbid illnesses and worse HF burden remains unclear. Methods and Results Using the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s ICD Registry and the Get With The Guidelines–Heart Failure (GWTG-HF) registry linked with Medicare claims, we examined outcomes associated with primary-prevention ICD versus no ICD among HF patients aged ≥65 years in clinical practice. We included patients with an ejection fraction ≤35% who received (ICD Registry) and who did not receive (GWTG-HF) an ICD. Compared with patients with an ICD, patients in the non-ICD group were older and more likely to be female and white. In matched cohorts, the 3-year adjusted mortality rate was lower in the ICD group versus the non-ICD group (46.7% versus 55.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.76; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.83). There was no associated difference in all-cause readmission (HR 0.99; 95% CI 0.92 to 1.08) but a lower risk of HF readmission (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97). When compared with no ICD, ICDs were also associated with better survival in patients with ≤3 comorbidities (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87) and >3 comorbidities (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.93) and in patients with no hospitalization for HF (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.86) and at least 1 prior HF hospitalization (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.82). In subgroup analyses, there were no interactions between ICD and mortality risk for comorbidity burden (P=0.95) and for prior HF hospitalization (P=0.46). Conclusion Among older HF patients, ICDs for primary prevention were associated with lower risk of mortality even among those with high comorbid illness burden and prior HF hospitalization. PMID:26251283

  11. [Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Hagendorff, A; Kühne, C; Reinhardt, S; Klein, N

    2015-06-01

    Brady- and tachyarrhythmias at the end of life are common observations. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators answer with antibrady and antitachycardia pacing, which will not be associated with any complaints of the dying patient. In contrast, defibrillation and cardioversion shocks are extremely painful. Therefore shocks should be inactivated at the end of life. Family doctors, internists, emergency physicians and paramedics are unable to inactivate shocks. Deactivation of shocks at the end of life is not comparable to euthanasia or assisted suicide, but allow the patient to die at the end of an uncurable endstage disease. Deactivation of shocks should be discussed with the patient before initial implantation of the devices. The precise moment of the inactivation at the end of life should be discussed with patients and relatives. There is no common recommendation for the time schedule of this decision; therefore it should be based on the individual situation of the patient. Emergency health care physicians need magnets and sufficient information to inactivate defibrillators. The wishes of the patient have priority in the decision process and should be written in the patient's advance directive, which must be available in the final situation. However the physician must not necessarily follow every wish of the patient. As long as the laws in the European Union are not uniform, German recommendations are needed. PMID:26001358

  12. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in a 34-year-old patient with eating disorders and after the third sudden cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Orzechowski, Piotr; Bilinska, Maria; Przybylski, Andrzej; Szumowski, Lukasz; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are psychiatric diseases associated with the highest mortality rate of any other psychiatric disorders. More recently, long-term outcome studies with follow-up of over 20 years report a mortality of between 15% and 18% (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). The sudden death secondary to arrhythmias is often the cause of death in these patients (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). A case of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia (VA) in a patient with ED is presented. Clinical records (cardiologic, psychiatric), electrocardiograms, echocardiogram, coronary angiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance, and endocrine diagnostics were performed. Finally a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was implanted in the patient after her third cardiac arrest. An optimal approach to antiarrhythmic therapy in such patients is a real challenge for a cardiologist. PMID:24535846

  13. Deactivation of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Brock, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), are the most effective treatment for life-threatening arrhythmias. Patients or their surrogates may request device deactivation to avoid prolongation of the dying process or in other settings, such as after device-related complications or with changes in their health care goals. Despite published guidelines outlining theoretical and practical aspects of this common clinical scenario, significant uncertainty remains for both patients and health care providers regarding the ethical and legal status of CIED deactivation. This review outlines the ethical and legal principles supporting CIED deactivation at patients’ request, centered upon patient autonomy and authority over their own medical treatment. The empirical literature describing stakeholder views and experiences surrounding CIED deactivation is described, along with lessons for future research and practice guidance surrounding the care of patients with CIEDs. PMID:23217433

  14. The first cardioverter defibrillator implanted in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Tantchou Tchoumi Jacques; Budzee, Appolonia; Butera, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac deaths, which account for approximately 350 000 deaths each year, is a major health care problem. Antiarrhythmic drugs have not been reliable in preventing sudden cardiac death. Although β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and revascularization play a role in prevention of sudden cardiac death, the development and subsequent refinement of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator has made the most important contribution to its management. We report the first documented implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator in central, eastern and western Africa. PMID:27279942

  15. Circadian variations in the occurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Kozák, Milan; Krivan, Lubomír; Semrád, Borivoj

    2003-03-01

    A circadian distribution has been demonstrated in episodes of sudden cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, ventricular premature complexes, heart rate variability, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the circadian distribution of ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes in a population of ICD patients. Data were gathered from 72 patients (55 men, 17 women; mean age 62.7 +/- 12.2 years, mean LVEF 0.0037 +/- 0.0011) with ICDs implanted for standard indications. Patients were followed every 3 months over a mean period of 21 +/- 12.8 months. At each examination, symptoms at arrhythmia onset and perception of ICD therapy were recorded, and the ICD memory was interrogated. During follow-up, 1,023 episodes' of malignant ventricular arrhythmias were detected and effectively terminated, 506 of which were fully analyzed. A morning peak in ventricular tachyarrhythmias was demonstrated between 7:00 and 11:00 AM, and an afternoon peak between 6:00 and 7:00 PM. A significantly lower occurrence of VT was observed at 1:00 AM and between 4:00 and 6:00 AM. A circadian distribution in the occurrence of ventricular tachycardias was found. The three striking features of the data are: the early morning peak (about three hours after waking up), relatively stable incidence throughout waking hours, and decline in incidence in the previous period. PMID:12698674

  16. Erroneous discharge of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by an electric razor.

    PubMed

    Seifert, T; Block, M; Borggrefe, M; Breithardt, G

    1995-08-01

    We report an unusual case of the erroneous discharge of a third-generation multiprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a 64-year-old patient with a history of recurrent ventricular tachycardias caused by electromagnetic interference while shaving with an electric razor. Electromagnetic interference was related to a defect in the electrode's insulation and could not be provoked in an intact electrode. PMID:7479183

  17. Economic evaluations of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Lidia; Pinilla-Domínguez, Pilar; García-Quintana, Antonio; Caballero-Dorta, Eduardo; García-García, F Javier; Linertová, Renata; Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the cost-effectiveness studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) for primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). A systematic review of the literature published in English or Spanish was performed by electronically searching MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, NHS-EED, and EconLit. Some keywords were implantable cardioverter defibrillator, heart failure, heart arrest, myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, syncope, sudden death. Selection criteria were the following: (1) full economic evaluations published after 1995, model-based studies or alongside clinical trials (2) that explored the cost-effectiveness of ICD with or without associated treatment compared with placebo or best medical treatment, (3) in adult patients for primary or secondary prevention of SCD because of ventricular arrhythmias. Studies that fulfilled these criteria were reviewed and data were extracted by two reviewers. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed and a narrative synthesis was prepared. In total, 24 studies were included: seven studies on secondary prevention and 18 studies on primary prevention. Seven studies were performed in Europe. For secondary prevention, the results showed that the ICD is considered cost-effective in patients with more risk. For primary prevention, the cost-effectiveness of ICD has been widely studied, but uncertainty about its cost-effectiveness remains. The cost-effectiveness ratios vary between studies depending on the patient characteristics, methodology, perspective, and national settings. Among the European studies, the conclusions are varied, where the ICD is considered cost-effective or not dependent on the study. PMID:25323413

  18. The Significance of Shocks in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Anthony; Kaura, Amit; Sunderland, Nicholas; Dhillon, Paramdeep S

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) trials have unequivocally shown a reduction in mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and depressed left ventricular function. However, there is a strong association between shocks and increased mortality in ICD recipients. It is unclear if shocks are merely a marker of a more severe cardiovascular disease or directly contribute to the increase in mortality. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between ICD shocks and mortality, and explore possible mechanisms. Data examining the effect of shocks in the absence of spontaneous arrhythmias as well as studies of non-shock therapy and strategies to reduce shocks are analysed to try and disentangle the shocks versus substrate debate.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John M

    2002-01-01

    Cost-efficacy assessment of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy has proved contentious and may have limited uptake of ICD therapy, particularly in Europe. Published modeling assessments are too inaccurate to determine clinical practice, and assessments based on clinical studies are incomplete (from the cost-efficacy viewpoint). Although ICD therapy seems certain to be most cost-effective in patients who are likely to have good longevity if their risk of sudden cardiac death is countered, the benefit of ICD therapy is not necessarily limited to such groups. Physicians and health economists need to develop a better understanding of how to assess high-technology therapy costs so that uptake of such therapy is appropriately expedited with due regard to ethical and cost constraints. PMID:11843460

  20. The Significance of Shocks in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Anthony; Kaura, Amit; Sunderland, Nicholas; Dhillon, Paramdeep S; Scott, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) trials have unequivocally shown a reduction in mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and depressed left ventricular function. However, there is a strong association between shocks and increased mortality in ICD recipients. It is unclear if shocks are merely a marker of a more severe cardiovascular disease or directly contribute to the increase in mortality. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between ICD shocks and mortality, and explore possible mechanisms. Data examining the effect of shocks in the absence of spontaneous arrhythmias as well as studies of non-shock therapy and strategies to reduce shocks are analysed to try and disentangle the shocks versus substrate debate. PMID:27617089

  1. Patient barriers to implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Laura Lihua; Lim, Choon Pin; Aung, Soe Tin; Quetua, Paul; Ho, Kah Leng; Chong, Daniel; Teo, Wee Siong; Sim, David; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Device therapy is efficacious in preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with reduced ejection fraction. However, few who need the device eventually opt to undergo implantation and even fewer reconsider their decisions after deliberation. This is due to many factors, including unresolved patient barriers. This study identified the factors that influenced patients’ decision to decline implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation, and those that influenced patients who initially declined an implant to reconsider having one. METHODS A single-centre survey was conducted among 240 patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and met the ICD implantation criteria, but had declined ICD implantation. RESULTS Participants who refused ICD implantation were mostly male (84%), Chinese (71%), married (72%), currently employed (54%), and had up to primary or secondary education (78%) and monthly income of < SGD 3,000 (51%). Those who were more likely to reconsider their decision were aware that SCD was a consequence of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, knowledgeable of the preventive role of ICDs, currently employed and aware that their doctor strongly recommended the implant. Based on multivariate analysis, knowledge of the role of ICDs for primary prophylaxis was the most important factor influencing patient decision. CONCLUSION This study identified the demographic and social factors of patients who refused ICD therapy. Knowledge of the role of ICDs in preventing SCD was found to be the strongest marker for reconsidering ICD implantation. Measures to address this information gap may lead to higher rates of ICD implantation. PMID:27075476

  2. The dilemma of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Revenco, Diana; Morgan, James P; Tsao, Lana

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy in heart failure patients were established by multiple device trials; however, very few geriatric patients (patients ≥ 65 years old) were included in these studies. This article explores the controversies of ICD implantation in the geriatric population, management of delivered ICD therapy in this age group, and the end of life care in patients with ICD. PMID:22783305

  3. Impact of Magnesium L-Lactate on Occurrence of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baker, William L; Kluger, Jeffrey; Coleman, Craig I; White, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the antiarrhythmic efficacy and quality of life (QoL) impact of oral magnesium Llactate on patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Methods: This prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial randomized 70 patients with an ICD to receive oral magnesium L-lactate 3 tablets twice daily (504mg elemental magnesium daily) or matching placebo for 12 months. Patients were seen at baseline, 12, 24, 36, and 52 weeks. The primary endpoints were the cumulative occurrence of ICD therapy [either shock or anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP)] or QoL between the groups. Results: Among the 70 randomized patients with a mean ± SD follow-up of 6.4 ± 4.1 months, 10 patients in the placebo group and 8 in the magnesium group experienced either ICD shock or ATP [HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.12; p=0.706]. Without significant arrhythmia suppression, only minimal effects on QoL were seen. Eighty six percent of all patients had serum intracellular magnesium deficiency. Conclusion: In our underpowered trial, patients with ICDs had intracellular magnesium deficiency but oral magnesium Llactate only nonsignificantly reduced the occurrence of ICD therapies and had little impact on HrQoL. PMID:27006710

  4. Improving the appropriateness of sudden arrhythmic death primary prevention by implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction. Point of view

    PubMed Central

    Disertori, Marcello; Gulizia, Michele M.; Casolo, Giancarlo; Delise, Pietro; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Lunati, Maurizio; Mestroni, Luisa; Salerno-Uriarte, Jorge; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the current guidelines for the primary prevention of sudden arrhythmic death, which are based on ejection fraction, do not allow the optimal selection of patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction of ischemic and nonischemic etiology for implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. Ejection fraction alone is limited in both sensitivity and specificity. An analysis of the risk of sudden arrhythmic death with a combination of multiple tests (ejection fraction associated with one or more arrhythmic risk markers) could partially compensate for these limitations. We propose a polyparametric approach for defining the risk of sudden arrhythmic death using ejection fraction in combination with other clinical and arrhythmic risk markers (i.e. late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance, T-wave alternans, programmed ventricular stimulation, autonomic tone, and genetic testing) that have been validated in nonrandomized trials. In this article, we examine these approaches to identify three subsets of patients who cannot be comprehensively assessed by the current guidelines: patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and a relatively low risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value; patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and high competitive risk of death due to evolution of heart failure or noncardiac causes; and patients with ejection fraction between 35 and 45% with relatively high risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value. PMID:26895401

  5. Remote monitoring of implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: a safe, time-saving, and cost-effective means for follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Raatikainen, M.J. Pekka; Uusimaa, Paavo; van Ginneken, Mireille M.E.; Janssen, Jacques P.G.; Linnaluoto, Markku

    2008-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether internet-based remote monitoring offers a safe, practical, and cost-effective alternative to the in-office follow-up visits of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Methods and results Forty-one patients (62 ± 10 years, range 41–76, 83% male) with previously implanted ICD were followed for 9 months. One-hundred and nineteen scheduled and 18 unscheduled data transmissions were performed. There were no device-related adverse events. Over 90% of the patients found the system easy to use. Physicians reported the system as being ‘very easy’ or ‘easy’ to use and found the data comparable to traditional device interrogation in 99% of the cases. They were able to address all unscheduled data transmissions remotely. Compared with the in-office visits, remote monitoring required less time from patients (6.9 ± 5.0 vs. 182 ± 148 min, P < 0.001) and physicians (8.4 ± 4.5 vs. 25.8 ± 17.0 min, P < 0.001) to complete the follow-up. Substitution of two routine in-office visits during the study by remote monitoring reduced the overall cost of routine ICD follow-up by 524€ per patient (41%). Conclusion Remote monitoring offers a safe, feasible, time-saving, and cost-effective solution to ICD follow-up. PMID:18703585

  6. Appropriate evaluation and treatment of heart failure patients after implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge: time to go beyond the initial shock.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, Joseph D; Saxonhouse, Sherry J; Woo, Gregory W; Burkart, Thomas A; Miles, William M; Conti, Jamie B; Schofield, Richard S; Sears, Samuel F; Aranda, Juan M

    2009-11-24

    Multiple clinical trials support the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure (HF). Unfortunately, several complicating issues have arisen from the universal use of ICDs in HF patients. An estimated 20% to 35% of HF patients who receive an ICD for primary prevention will experience an appropriate shock within 1 to 3 years of implant, and one-third of patients will experience an inappropriate shock. An ICD shock is associated with a 2- to 5-fold increase in mortality, with the most common cause being progressive HF. The median time from initial ICD shock to death ranges from 168 to 294 days depending on HF etiology and the appropriateness of the ICD therapy. Despite this prognosis, current guidelines do not provide a clear stepwise approach to managing these high-risk patients. An ICD shock increases HF event risk and should trigger a thorough evaluation to determine the etiology of the shock and guide subsequent therapeutic interventions. Several combinations of pharmacologic and device-based interventions such as adding amiodarone to baseline beta-blocker therapy, adjusting ICD sensitivity, and employing antitachycardia pacing may reduce future appropriate and inappropriate shocks. Aggressive HF surveillance and management is required after an ICD shock, as the risk of sudden cardiac death is transformed to an increased HF event risk. PMID:19926003

  7. Assessment of a remote monitoring system for implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Masella, Cristina; Zanaboni, Paolo; Di Stasi, Francesca; Gilardi, Serena; Ponzi, Patrizia; Valsecchi, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre study in five Italian hospitals to assess the feasibility of a remote monitoring service for the follow-up of implanted cardiac devices. The system was designed to monitor device performance as well as physiological aspects of the patient's condition. Sixty-seven patients (mean age 64 years) affected by chronic heart failure and with a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator for cardiac re-synchronization therapy (CRT-D) were enrolled for a three-month observation period. A total of 267 device recordings were transmitted through the ordinary telephone network, with a success rate of 99%. The telemonitoring service was more efficient than conventional face-to-face follow-up in terms of the time savings: both for physicians (4.7 minutes versus 15 minutes for remote and conventional monitoring) and for patients (6.6 minutes versus 116.3 minutes). In addition, a total of 23 clinical events occurred during the study, but only two cases required a clinic visit, thus reducing inappropriate hospital admissions. Finally, the service was well accepted by all the users. PMID:18776073

  8. Age dependent efficacy of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator treatment: observations in 450 patients over an 11 year period

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, H.; Pfitzner, P.; Achtelik, M.; Fieguth, H.

    1997-01-01

    Objective—To determine whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) treatment is beneficial in elderly patients with life threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias.
Design—Since January 1984, ICDs were implanted in 450 patients to evaluate surgical risk, complications and mean survival in relation to patient age; 81 patients (18%) were ⩽ 50 years at the time of ICD implant, 254 patients (56%) were between 51 and 64 years, and the remaining 115 (26%) were ⩾ 65 years. Epicardial lead systems were implanted in 209 patients (46%), while transvenous lead systems were implanted in 241 (54%).
Results—13 patients (3%) died perioperatively, more often after epicardial (11 of 209 patients, 5%) than after transvenous ICD implantation (one of 241 patients, < 1%) (p < 0.05). During a mean (SD) follow up of 28 (24) months (range < 1 to 114 months), 90 patients (20%) died. Of these, nine (2%) died from sudden arrhythmic death; five (1%) died suddenly, probably as a result of non-arrhythmic causes; 55 (12%) died from other cardiac causes (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction); and 21 (5%) died from non-cardiac causes. The three, five, and seven year survival for arrhythmic mortality was 95% in patients ⩽ 50 years compared with a three year survival of 93% and a five and seven year survival of 91% in patients of 51 to 64 years, and a three, five, and seven year survival of 99% in patients ⩾ 65 years. 362 patients (80%) received ICD discharges (21 (43) shocks per patient), with a similar incidence among all three patient groups (⩽ 50 years, 80%; 51 to 64 years, 81%; ⩾ 65 years, 79%). The time interval between ICD implant and the first ICD treatment was shorter in patients ⩾ 65 years (8 (8) months) than in patients between 51 and 64 years (11 (14) months) or ⩽ 50 years (11 (11) months) (p < 0.05). Survival time following first appropriate shock was 30 (24) months in patients ⩽ 50 years, 30 (26

  9. Serratia marcescens: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, S.; Choy, AM.

    2015-01-01

    We present a unique case of a patient who experienced recurrent infections of his implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) site with the bacterium Serratia marcescens. This report highlights the virulence of this bacterium, its resistance to antibiotic therapy, and its ability to remain latent for prolonged periods between episodes of sepsis. It also demonstrates the merits of reimplanting devices at different sites in the context of Serratia marcescens infection. PMID:26605092

  10. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27605232

  11. Overview of implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac resynchronisation therapy in heart failure management

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pow-Li; Foo, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials have established the benefits of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of heart failure patients. As adjuncts to guideline-directed medical therapy, ICDs confer mortality benefits from sudden cardiac arrest, while CRT reduces mortality, hospitalisation rates and improves functional capacity. This review discusses the use of ICDs and CRT devices in heart failure management, outlining the evidence supporting their use, indications and contraindications. PMID:27440409

  12. Perspectives on Withdrawing Pacemaker and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapies at End of Life: Results of a Survey of Medical and Legal Professionals and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapa, Suraj; Mueller, Paul S.; Hayes, David L.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the opinions of medical professionals, legal professionals, and patients regarding the withdrawal of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and pacemaker therapy at the end of life. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: A survey regarding 5 cases that focused on withdrawal of ICD or pacemaker therapy at the end of life was constructed and sent to 5270 medical professionals, legal professionals, and patients. The survey was administered from March 1, 2008, to March 1, 2009. RESULTS: Of the 5270 recipients of the survey, 658 (12%) responded. In a terminally ill patient requesting that his ICD be turned off, most legal professionals (90% [63/70]), medical professionals (98% [330/336]), and patients (85% [200/236]) agreed the ICD should be turned off. Most legal professionals (89%), medical professionals (87%), and patients (79%) also considered withdrawal of pacemaker therapy in a non–pacemaker-dependent patient appropriate. However, significantly more legal (81%) than medical professionals (58%; P<.001) or patients (68%, P=.02) agreed with turning off a pacemaker in the pacemaker-dependent patient. A similar number of legal professionals thought turning off a device was legal regardless of whether it was an ICD or pacemaker (45% vs 38%; P=.50). However, medical professionals were more likely to perceive turning off an ICD as legal than turning off a pacemaker (85% vs 41%; P<.001). CONCLUSION: Most respondents thought device therapy should be withdrawn if the patient requested its withdrawal at the end of life. However, opinions of medical professionals and patients tended to be dependent on the type of device, with turning off ICDs being perceived as more acceptable than turning off pacemakers, whereas legal professionals tended to perceive all devices as similar. Thus, education and discussion regarding managing devices at the end of life are important when having end-of-life discussions and making end-of-life decisions to better understand

  13. [Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator and Perioperative Magnet Application: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Miho; Tokuhira, Natsuko; Sawa, Teiji; Ibuki, Takae

    2015-02-01

    An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can falsely recognize noise by monopolar electrocautery as tachyarrhythmia and deliver inappropriate antitachycardia therapy. Application of a clinical magnet on an ICD suspends antitachycardia therapy, but it has not been widely used for this purpose. A 67-year-old male underwent laryngopharyngectomy, cervical esophagectomy, right neck dissection, tracheostomy and reconstruction with free jejunal transplant for recurrent hypopharyngeal cancer. He had an ICD (PARADYM DR8550, Sorin) implanted below the left clavicle for ventricular tachycardia and prolonged QT syndrome. During the operation, a clinical magnet was left on the ICD to disable antitachycardia therapy. The magnet mode of the ICD provided asynchronous AAI pacing at 96 beats x min(-1). The surgery proceeded uneventfully. No episode of ventricular tachyarrythmia or pacing inhibition by electromagnetic interference was observed on electrocardiogram. This case illustrated the potential role of a clinical magnet as an alternative to reprogramming of an ICD by a programmer in the perioperative management of a patient with an ICD when a technical expert to operate a programmer is not available. PMID:26121817

  14. Sensing and detection in Medtronic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark L; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Ensuring sensing and detection of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) was a prerequisite for the clinical trials that established the survival benefit of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). However, for decades, a high incidence of unnecessary shocks limited patients' and physicians' acceptance of ICD therapy. Oversensing, misclassification of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) as VT, and self-terminating VT accounted for the vast majority of unnecessary shocks. Medtronic ICDs utilize sensitive baseline settings with minimal blanking periods to ensure accurate sensing of VF, VT, and SVT electrograms. Programmable algorithms reject oversensing caused by far-field R waves, T waves, and non-physiologic signals caused by lead failure. A robust hierarchy of SVT-VT discriminators minimize misclassification of SVT as VT. These features, combined with evidence-based programming, have reduced the 1‑year inappropriate shock rate to 1.5 % for dual-/triple-chamber ICDs and to 2.5 % for single-chamber ICDs. PMID:27624809

  15. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators for Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in CKD: A Meta-analysis of Patient-Level Data from 3 Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Patrick H.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Han, Joo Yoon; Edwards, Rex; Bardy, Gust H.; Bigger, J. Thomas; Buxton, Alfred E.; Moss, Arthur J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Steinman, Richard; Dorian, Paul; Hallstrom, Al; Cappato, Riccardo; Kadish, Alan H.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.; Mark, Daniel B.; Hess, Paul L.; Inoue, Lurdes Y. T.; Sanders, Gillian D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefit of a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is uncertain. Study Design Meta-analysis of patient-level data from randomized controlled trials. Setting & Population Patients with symptomatic heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction of <35%. Selection Criteria for Studies From 7 available randomized control studies with patient level data, we selected studies with available data on important covariates. Studies without patient-level data on baseline eGFR were excluded. Intervention Primary prevention ICD versus usual care Outcomes Mortality, re-hospitalizations, and effect modification by estimated GFR (eGFR) Results We included data from the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial I (MADIT-I), MADIT-II, and the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT). 2,867 patients were included; 36.3% had at least stage 3 CKD (eGFR<60). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the probability of death during follow-up was 43.3% among 1,334 patients receiving usual care and 35.8% among 1,533 ICD recipients. After adjustment for baseline differences, there was evidence that the survival benefit of ICDs in comparison to usual care depends on eGFR (posterior probability for null interaction p <0.001). The ICD was associated with survival benefit among patients with an eGFR ≥ 60 (adjusted HR (aHR)=0.49 [95% posterior credible interval (PCI) 0.24-0.95]) but not among patients with eGFR <60 (aHR = 0.80 [95% PCI 0.40-1.53]). eGFR did not modify the association between the ICD and re-hospitalizations. Limitations Few patients with eGFR <30 were available. Differences in trial-to-trial measurement techniques may lead to residual confounding. Conclusions Reductions in baseline eGFR decrease the survival benefit associated with the ICD. These findings should be confirmed by additional studies specifically targeting patients with varying levels of eGFR. PMID:24518128

  16. Generator and Lead-Related Complications of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Yaminisharif, Ahmad; Soofizadeh, Nader; Shafiee, Akbar; Kazemisaeid, Ali; Jalali, Arash; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increase in the number of patients treated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) requests more attention regarding its complications. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the generator- and lead-related complications at implantation and during follow-up in the patients who were treated with ICD for primary and secondary prevention reasons. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 255 consecutive patients who underwent transvenous ICD implantation for the first time in a 7-year period and were followed-up for 3 years at Tehran Heart Center. The personal and clinical data of the patients as well as specific data on the ICD implantation were retrieved. The frequency of each of the complications was reported and the study variables were compared between the patients with and without complications using Student’s t-test and chi-square test where appropriate. P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Out of a total of 525 implanted leads and 255 implanted devices in 255 patients (mean age = 62.57 ± 13.50 years; male = 196 [76.9%]), complications leading to generator or lead replacement occurred in 32 patients (12.5%). The results revealed no significant difference between the patients with and without complications regarding gender and age (P = 0.206 and P = 0.824, respectively). Also, no significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the ejection fraction (P = 0.271). Lead fracture was the most frequent lead-related complication and was observed in 17 patients (6.6%). Besides, it was mainly observed in the RV leads. Generator-related complications leading to generator replacement were observed in 2 patients (0.7%). Conclusions: Despite considerable improvements in the ICD technology, the rate of the ICD complications leading to device replacement and surgical revision, especially those related to the leads, is still clinically important. PMID:24936484

  17. Clinical experience with the transvenous Medtronic Pacer Cardioverter Defibrillator (PCD) System.

    PubMed Central

    Golino, A; Pappone, C; Panza, A; Santomauro, M; Iorio, D; De Amicis, V; Chiariello, M; Spampinato, N

    1993-01-01

    We review our experience with the transvenous Medtronic Pacer Cardioverter Defibrillator System (Model 7217B), a multifunction implantable pacer defibrillator combined with a transvenous lead system (Transvene). From April 1991 to October 1992, we implanted this device in 19 consecutive patients (11 men and 8 women; average age, 56.5 years). Nine patients (47.4%), 5 with coronary artery disease and 4 with dilated cardiomyopathy, had an ejection fraction of < 30%. The average operative time was 129 minutes. In 18 patients (94.7%), the transvenous lead system provided effective sensing, pacing, and defibrillation during intraoperative testing. In each of these cases, the defibrillation threshold was less than 18 J. In 1 patient (5.3%), it was necessary to switch to epicardial leads, which were implanted through a left thoracotomy. All patients were extubated in the recovery room. The average hospital stay was 8 days. There was no early mortality or morbidity. During a maximum follow-up period of 17 months (mean, 9.2 months), no sudden death occurred. The implantable system terminated 245 ventricular tachycardia episodes in 14 patients (73.7%) and 82 ventricular fibrillation episodes in 13 patients (68.4%). Two hundred eleven (86.1%) of the ventricular tachycardia episodes were resolved by antitachycardia pacing alone. In 2 patients (10.5%), the caval electrode became dislocated; repositioning of the electrode was followed by repeat defibrillation threshold evaluation. Our experience shows that the transvenous Medtronic Pacer Cardioverter Defibrillator System provides safe, effective treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Because the perioperative mortality and morbidity are extremely low, use of this device may be particularly beneficial in patients with a high operative risk. Moreover, the lower number of unpleasant therapeutic shocks should increase patient a acceptance of the device. Images PMID:8298322

  18. Survival Benefit of the Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Among Older Patients: Does Age Matter? An Analysis of Pooled Data From 5 Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Paul L.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Han, Joo Y.; Edwards, Rex; Bardy, Gust H.; Bigger, J. Thomas; Buxton, Alfred; Cappato, Riccardo; Dorian, Paul; Hallstrom, Al; Kadish, Alan H.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Mark, Daniel B.; Moss, Arthur J.; Steinman, Richard; Inoue, Lurdes Y.T.; Sanders, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of patient age on the risks of death or rehospitalization after primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement is uncertain. Methods and Results Data from 5 major ICD trials were merged: MADIT-I, MUSTT, MADIT-II, DEFINITE, and SCD-HeFT . Median age at enrollment was 62 (interquartile range 53-70) years. Compared with their younger counterparts, older patients had a greater burden of comorbid illness. In unadjusted exploratory analyses, ICD recipients were less likely to die than non-recipients in all age groups: hazard ratio (HR) 0.48, 95% posterior credible interval (PCI) 0.33-0.69 among patients <55 years; HR 0.69, 95%PCI 0.53-0.90 among patients 55-64 years; HR 0.67, 95%PCI 0.53-0.85 among patients 65-74 years; and HR 0.54, 95%PCI 0.37-0.78 among patients > 75 years. Sample sizes were limited among patients > 75 years. In adjusted Bayesian Weibull modeling, point estimates indicate ICD efficacy persists but is attenuated with increasing age. There was evidence of an interaction between age and ICD treatment on survival (two-sided posterior tail probability of no interaction < 0.01). Using an adjusted Bayesian logistic regression model, there was no evidence of an interaction between age and ICD treatment on rehospitalization (two-sided posterior tail probability of no interaction 0.44). Conclusions In this analysis, the survival benefit of the ICD exists but is attenuated with increasing age. The latter finding may be due to the higher burden of comorbid illness, competing causes of death, or limited sample size of older patients. There was no evidence that age modifies the association between ICD treatment and rehospitalization. PMID:25669833

  19. Submuscular versus subcutaneous pectoral implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators: effect on high voltage pathway impedance and defibrillation efficacy.

    PubMed

    Iskos, D; Lock, K; Lurie, K G; Fahy, G J; Petersen-Stejskal, S; Benditt, D G

    1998-03-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) pulse generators are now routinely positioned in a pectoral location, either submuscularly (under the pectoralis muscles) or subcutaneously (over the pectoralis muscles). Furthermore, in current ICDs, the generator shield usually participates in the defibrillation energy pathway ("hot can"). Consequently, the precise generator location could affect defibrillation system efficacy. To assess this issue, we compared high voltage pathway impedance and defibrillation threshold (DFT) in 20 patients undergoing submuscular and 46 patients undergoing subcutaneous pectoral implantation of an Angeion Sentinel ICD and an AngeFlex dual-coil defibrillation lead. Measurements were performed at time of ICD implant, pre-hospital discharge, and 1, 3 and/or 6 months later. Following induction of ventricular fibrillation, 569 biphasic waveform shocks were delivered between the generator shield and either the distal defibrillation coil (RV/can configuration) or both proximal and distal coils (RV/SVC/can configuration). Impedance differences between submuscular and subcutaneous implants were approximately 3-4 Ohms (p value of 0.132 to < 0.001 depending on time of follow-up and lead configuration). A significant increase in impedance over time was noted independent of implant location and lead configuration. The DFT at implant or pre-discharge was assessed in 27 individuals, and was 9.9 +/- 3.8 J in 8 patients in the submuscular group, and 7.4 +/- 3.3 J in 19 patients in the subcutaneous group (p = 0.057). In conclusion, anatomic location of a "hot can" ICD generator (submuscular versus subcutaneous) influences impedance to defibrillation current, but the impact is of small magnitude and does not appear to result in clinically important differences in DFT. PMID:9869996

  20. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Mycobacterium mageritense.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masato; Goya, Masahiko; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are usually detected in blood cultures after 4-5 days of incubation, so it is important to differentiate RGM from contamination of commensal organisms on human skin. We report an unusual case of Mycobacterium mageritense bacteremia and infection of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator originally misidentified as Corynebacterium spp. or Nocardia spp. in gram-stained smears. 16S rRNA gene sequencing had utility in the definitive identification of isolates. We should be aware that RGM infection may exist in repeated implantable device infections. PMID:26719132

  1. Removal of the broken part of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator's electrode causing pulmonary embolism via femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Cemil; Selvi, Mithat; Elbi, Huseyin; Cetin, Mustafa; Gungor, Hasan; Akgullu, Cagdas; Badak, Muharrem Ismail

    2015-12-01

    A 66-year-old patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent transvenous extraction of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The distal part of the electrode was broken during manual traction through the left subclavian vein. In the present case, we showed a rare complication of transvenous lead extraction and its management. PMID:26995444

  2. Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a comparison among manufacturers and over time

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Simon; Schaer, Beat A.; Yap, Sing-Chien; Szili-Torok, Tamas; Kühne, Michael; Sticherling, Christian; Osswald, Stefan; Theuns, Dominic A.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is crucial for patients and healthcare systems as replacements impact on infection rates and cost-effectiveness. Aim was to determine longevity using very large databases of two teaching hospitals with a high number of replacements and a rather homogeneous distribution among manufacturers. Methods and results The study population consists of all patients in whom an ICD was inserted in. All ICD manufacturers operating in Switzerland and the Netherlands and all implanted ICDs were included. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator replacements due to normal battery depletion were considered events, and other replacements were censored. Longevity was assessed depending on manufacturers, pacing mode, implant before/after 2006, and all parameters combined. We analysed data from 3436 patients in whom 4881 ICDs [44.2% VVI-ICDs, 27.4% DDD-ICDs, 26.3% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-ICDs, 2.0% subcutaneous ICDs] were implanted. The four major manufacturers had implant shares between 18.4 and 31.5%. Replacement due to battery depletion (27.4%) was performed for 1339 ICDs. Patient survival at 5 years was 80.1%. Longevity at 5 years improved in contemporary compared with elderly ICDs [63.9–80.6% across all ICDs, of 73.7–92.1% in VVIs, 58.2–76.1% in DDDs, and of 47.1–66.3% in CRT defibrillators, all P value < 0.05]. Remarkable differences were seen among manufacturers, and those with better performance in elderly ICDs were not those with better performance in contemporary ones. Conclusion Implantable cardioverter defibrillator longevity increased in contemporary models independent of manufacturer and pacing mode. Still, significant differences exist among manufacturers. These results might impact on device selection. PMID:26609076

  3. Long-term follow up of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and mild, moderate, or severe impairment of left ventricular function.

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, H. J.; Wenzlaff, P.; Pfitzner, P.; Fieguth, H. G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with life threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias, impaired left ventricular function, and severe heart failure will benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) treatment. DESIGN: 410 patients were followed up after ICD implant. Left ventricular function was assessed by the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class of heart failure: 50 patients (12%) were in NYHA I-II, 151 (37%) in NYHA II, 117 (29%) in NYHA II-III, and 92 (22%) in NYHA III. Epicardial ICD implantation was performed in 209 patients (51%) and 201 patients (49%) received non-thoracotomy ICDs. RESULTS: Perioperatively, 12 patients (3%) died, more often after epicardial ICD implant (11/209 patients, 5%) than after transvenous implant (1/201 patients, < 1%) (P < 0.05). During a mean (SD) follow up of 28 (24) months (range < 1 to 114 months), 90 patients (23%) died: nine (2%) died from sudden arrhythmia; five (1%) also died suddenly but probably not from arrhythmic causes; 55 (14%) died from cardiac causes (congestive heart failure, myocardial reinfarction); 21 (5%) died from non-cardiac causes. The three year, five year, and seven year survival was 92-96% for arrhythmic mortality in NYHA class I, II and III, compared to a three year survival of 94% and a five year and seven year survival of 84% for patients in NYHA class II-III. 338 patients (82%) received ICD shocks (21 (SD 43) shocks per patient); patients in NYHA class II (83%), class II-III (84%), and class III (90%) received ICD discharges more often than those in class I-II (64%) (P < 0.05). The mean (SD) time interval between ICD implant and the first ICD shock was shorter in NYHA class II (16 (17) months), class II-III (19 (27) months), and class III (16 (19) months) than in class 0-I (22 (24) months) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mild, moderate, and severe left ventricular dysfunction benefit from ICD treatment and these patients survive for a considerable time after the

  4. Use of the Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillator in High-Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Madhab; Safadi, Abdul; Surapaneni, Phani; Salehi, Negar; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2016-08-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved the wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) for use in patients who are at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and who do not yet have an established indication for an implantation cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or have contraindications for device implantation for various reasons. The WCD is typically used for primary prevention in (1) high-risk patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 % after recent acute myocardial infarction (MI) during the 40-day ICD waiting period, (2) before and after coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous coronary intervention during the 90-day ICD waiting period, (3) after recently diagnosed nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NICM) during the 3- to 9-month medical therapy optimization period, or (4) for those with inherited proarrhythmic conditions such as long QT syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Unlike the automatic external defibrillator, the WCD does not require assistance from bystanders for therapy and conscious patients can delay or avert therapy with the use of response buttons. The WCD exhibits a small risk of inappropriate shock, mostly due to supraventricular tachycardia and/or electrical noise. Multiple non-randomized observational studies have shown high efficacy in detection and appropriate shock therapy for sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias. This paper discusses the use of the WCD for prevention of SCA in patients with various cardiac substrates. PMID:27319008

  5. Prediction of Appropriate Shocks Using 24-Hour Holter Variables and T-Wave Alternans After First Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Patients With Ischemic or Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seegers, Joachim; Bergau, Leonard; Expósito, Pascal Muñoz; Bauer, Axel; Fischer, Thomas H; Lüthje, Lars; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Friede, Tim; Zabel, Markus

    2016-07-01

    In patients treated with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), prediction of both overall survival and occurrence of shocks is important if improved patient selection is desired. We prospectively studied the predictive value of biomarkers and indexes of cardiac and renal function and spectral microvolt T-wave alternans testing and 24-hour Holter variables in a population who underwent first ICD implantation. Consecutive patients in sinus rhythm with ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy scheduled for primary or secondary prophylactic ICD implantation were enrolled. Exercise microvolt T-wave alternans and 24-hour Holter for number of ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), deceleration capacity, heart rate variability, and heart rate turbulence were done. Death of any cause and first appropriate ICD shock were defined as end points. Over 33 ± 15 months of follow-up, 36 of 253 patients (14%) received appropriate shocks and 39 of 253 patients (15%) died. Only 3 of 253 patients (1%) died after receiving at least 1 appropriate shock. In univariate analyses, New York Heart Association class, ejection fraction, N-terminal pro brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), renal function, ICD indication, deceleration capacity, heart rate variability, and heart rate turbulence were predictive of all-cause mortality and VPC number and deceleration capacity predicted first appropriate shock. NT-proBNP (≥1,600 pg/ml) was identified as the only independent predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.0, confidence interval 1.3 to 7.3, p = 0.014). In contrast, VPC number predicted appropriate shocks (hazard ratio 2.3, confidence interval 1.0 to 5.5, p = 0.047) as the only independent risk marker. In conclusion, NT-proBNP is a strong independent predictor of mortality in a typical prospective cohort of newly implanted patients with ICD, among many electrocardiographic and clinical variables studied. Number of VPCs was identified as a predictor of appropriate shocks

  6. An Adverse Electrophysiological Interaction Between an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator and a Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Lovely; Hiendlmayr, Brett; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) as part of the management of advanced heart failure. With increasing use and coexistence of these devices in patients with advanced cardiomyopathy, adverse interactions between these devices have been recognized. We herewith describe a rare adverse interaction of electromagnetic interference (EMI) between a third-generation, continuous-flow device (The HeartWare HVAD) and an ICD which resulted in the delivery of inappropriate ICD therapies. A schematic approach for the prevention and treatment of electromagnetic interference has also been described. PMID:26263716

  7. Electromagnetic Interference with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Causing Inadvertent Shock: Case Report and Review of Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Bhat, Tariq; Tantray, Mohmad; Lafferty, Chris; Faisal, Saiful; Teli, Sumaya; Bhat, Hilal; Raza, Muhammad; Khalid, Mariam; Biekht, Soad

    2014-01-01

    As the number of patients having implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) devices is increasing, it is important for the physicians and patients to be aware of situations and conditions that can result in interference with normal functioning of these devices. There are multiple cases of malfunction of ICDs reported in literature and it may be of great significance to have an overview of these incidents for appropriate recognition and future prevention. Here we are reviewing the available literature as well as reporting an interesting case of electromagnetic interference (EMI) resulting from leak of current in pool water causing firing of ICD. PMID:25093004

  8. [Implantable cardioverter/defibrillator: long-term stability of the defibrillation threshold with a unipolar electrode configuration (active-can")].

    PubMed

    Knuefermann, P; Wolpert, C; Spehl, S; Korte, T; Manz, M; Lüderitz, B; Jung, W

    2000-09-01

    The majority of cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) implantations are currently performed with a non-thoracotomy approach. From November 1993 to January 1995, 46 patients underwent implantation of a PCD 7219C with an "active-can" lead configuration at our institution. While the chronic stability of the defibrillation threshold (DFT) for an epicardial lead system is well established, the results are still inconsistent for non-thoracotomy lead systems. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to compare the acute and chronic defibrillation thresholds of the ICDs implanted with an "active-can" lead system in order to assess the chronic stability of these systems. The defibrillation energy requirements were measured at implant, prior to hospital discharge, three, six and twelve months after implantation of the defibrillator. The patient group consisted of 8 females and 38 males with a mean age of 57.2 years. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 43.8%. The most frequent underlying heart disease was coronary artery disease in 31 of 46 patients. Eight patients had idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In 39 of 46 patients, the defibrillation threshold could be successfully determined at all 4 time points after implantation. The mean defibrillation energy requirement at the time of implantation was 9.2 +/- 5.9 Joules (J). The subsequent mean energy requirements were 7.6 +/- 4.8 J at pre-hospital discharge, 8.6 +/- 5.7 J at the 3 month, 8.1 +/- 6.0 J at the 6 month and 8.6 +/- 5.8 J at the 12 month follow-up visits. The mean defibrillation threshold was lowest at the time of prehospital discharge, significantly lower than at the time of initial implantation (p = 0.021). However, at all later time points up to one year, there was no significant difference in the DFT as compared with the time of initial implantation. Comparing the DFT at the time of implantation and the DFT at all other time points, there were no significant differences (9.23 vs. 8.56 J, p = 0

  9. Preliminary single center clinical experience of the use of a new implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J M; Roberts, P R; Allen, S; Kallok, M J

    1998-12-01

    We report a single center's preliminary clinical experience of the Sentinel (Angeion, Minneapolis, MN) implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), which employs novel technologies that offer the potential for significant reduction in ICD size. Thirty-three patients have received Sentinel ICDs with a mean follow-up of 450 (range 150-1023) days. Device shock therapy has been used to defibrillate/cardiovert 43 spontaneous episodes of malignant ventricular arrhythmia and 510 episodes of hemodynamically well tolerated ventricular arrhythmia have been pace-terminated (pace-termination failed in 6 episodes with subsequent delivery of appropriate shock therapy). There has been no arrhythmic death in this patient population. There have been 9 inappropriate shocks in 6 patients (in 2 patients for atrial fibrillation which had satisfied the algorithm detection criteria for high zone ventricular arrhythmia, in 3 for sinus tachycardia [rate greater than 180 beats per min] and in 1 due to device capacitor malfunction). Device replacement has been required for component malfunction in 3 patients. There have been no other major complications. Follow-up time to date is short and longterm device efficacy and performance remain unproven. However, our early clinical experience suggests that the innovations used to manufacture the Sentinel ICD have facilitated reduction in ICD size without compromising therapeutic efficacy. PMID:10027122

  10. [A 65-year-old man with wearable cardioverter/defibrillator early after acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Horlbeck, F W; Nickenig, G; Schwab, J O

    2015-09-01

    A 65-year-old man with severe coronary artery disease and coronary artery bypass graft presented with an acute posterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Immediate percutaneous coronary intervention resulted in successful revascularisation of the culprit lesion (RCx) with several remaining coronary stenoses. Despite the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, no primary prevention indication for an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator early after myocardial infarction existed. Due to the complex coronary anatomy with several remaining stenotic vessels we regarded the patient to be at a particularly high risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias and provided him with a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD). Twenty-six days later, he experienced spontaneous ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation which was successfully treated with high voltage therapy by the WCD. Subsequently, we decided to implant him an ICD following secondary prevention indication. Besides established indications for primary prevention ICD therapy, some patients early after myocardial infarction may be at a particularly high risk for sudden cardiac death. Temporary protection with a WCD in carefully selected patients can offer a safe opportunity for later reevaluation of permanent ICD implantation depending on the course of left ventricular ejection fraction and the occurrence of arrhythmia. PMID:26338064

  11. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R.; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  12. The implantable cardioverter defibrillator: technology, indications, and impact on cardiovascular survival.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Cooley, Ryan; Berger, Marcie; Blanck, Zalmen; Dhala, Anwer; Sra, Jasbir; Axtell-Mcbride, Kathleen; Vandervort, Cheryl; Akhtar, Masood

    2004-06-01

    Since the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for the management of patients with high risk of arrhythmic SCD, there has been increasing use of this device. Its basic promise to effectively terminate ventricular tachycardia (VT)-ventricular fibrillation (VF) has been repeatedly met. In several randomized trials, the ICD has been shown to be superior to conventional anti-arrhythmic therapy, both in patients with documented VT-VF (secondary prevention) and those with high risk such as left ventricular ejection fraction and no prior sustained VT-VF (primary prevention). In both groups, the ICD showed overall and cardiac mortality reduction. The device now can more accurately detect VT-VF and differentiate these from other arrhythmias through a series of algorithms and direct-chamber sensing. Therapy options include painless antitachycardia pacing, low-energy cardioversion, and high-energy defibrillation. The technique implant is now simple as a pacemaker with one lead attached to an active (hot) can functioning as the other electrode. Among other improvements is its weight, volume, multiprogrammability, and storage of information,dual-chamber pacing and sensing, dual-chamber defibrillation, and addition of biventricular pacing for cardiac synchronization. It is anticipated that further improvement in ICD technology will take place and the list of indications will grow. PMID:15159713

  13. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator clinic casualties: inadvertent reprogramming during routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ozahowski, T P; Greenberg, M L; Mock, P; Holzberger, P T; Gerling, B; Zalinger, C; Perry, C

    1996-10-01

    On one occasion during a busy ICD follow-up clinic, the preceding patient's parameters for rate, PDF, and delay were inadvertently programmed into the subsequent patient's generator using the CPI Programmer Model 2035. This occurred after capacitor reformation, without pressing the "Program" button. The source of this reprogramming error was failure to clear the programmer memory of the previous patient's data, usually achieved by turning the programmer off between patients (or selecting "New Patient" from the menu). At our next ICD follow-up clinic, we purposely did not turn off the programmer between two sets of patients. On both occasions the above finding was repeated and confirmed. These observations indicate the potential for serious reprogramming errors that can occur simply by not clearing the programmer's memory between clinic patients. PMID:8904549

  14. Current implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming in Europe: the results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Grazia Bongiorni, Maria; Etsner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to examine the current practice on the choice of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) type, use of defibrillation testing, and ICD programming for detection and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias. In accordance with recent guidelines and the results of observational studies, the majority of EHRA research network centres reported a high utilization rate of dual-chamber ICDs in the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic sinus node dysfunction, biventricular ICD in high-degree atrioventricular block and QRS duration <120 ms, and a limited use of defibrillation testing either in primary and secondary prevention settings. Activation of the long ventricular tachycardia (VT) detection window, slow VT zone, antitachycardia pacing before shock for slow and fast VT, and atrial tachyarrhythmia discrimination were considered useful in ICD programming for the majority of patients. PMID:24864305

  15. Legal and organizational aspects of remote cardiac monitoring: the example of implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Imgard; De Laet, Chris; Stroobandt, Serge; Van Brabandt, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The remote monitoring of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) recently emerged as an attractive technological innovation that proved to be reasonably safe in partially replacing the in-clinic follow-ups of ICD patients with no or only mild symptoms. Apart from the fact that strong evidence about any additional clinical benefits and/or cost-efficiency are still awaited, legal and organizational hurdles remain in place, hampering any possibility for adoption of remote cardiac monitoring. This paper identifies a number of legal and organizational constraints which urgently need to be addressed. An elaboration of the specific juridical guidance for the interpretation and application of the relevant legislation is called for. PMID:22345377

  16. Silicone Breast Implant and Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: Can They Coexist? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Zaretski

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a silicone breast implant rupture after insertion of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD). A 51-year-old woman presented to our plastic surgery clinic to exchange her silicone breast implants. The patient underwent cosmetic mastopexy and breast augmentation in 2008. Because of recurrent myocardial infarctions and chronic heart failure, she underwent an insertion of an AICD in 2014 in which the left breast implant was hit. In this report, we discuss the first case of an AICD insertion, disrupting a breast implant. This case report illustrates the rare but real possibility of breast implant rupture after even minor surgical manipulation of the breast area. PMID:27622117

  17. Transtelephonic monitoring and transmission of stored arrhythmia detection and therapy data from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Fetter, J G; Stanton, M S; Benditt, D G; Trusty, J; Collins, J

    1995-08-01

    A new transtelephonic monitoring device designed for use with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) was evaluated. It is capable of interrogating ICDs and transmitting the following data via telephone: programmed parameters (e.g., ventricular tachycardia [VT] and ventricular fibrillation [VF] detection, therapies), number of VT and VF episodes, identification of successful therapies, the 20 cycle lengths preceding the last episode detected, the 10 cycle lengths after the last delivered therapy, battery voltage, and real-time transmission of the patient's rhythm. Eighteen patients (mean age 64 +/- 17 years; 15 males) were implanted with an ICD and epicardial lead system. The patients who did not live near the primary hospital were provided with this transmitter and instructed to transmit monthly and whenever presyncope, syncope, or a shock were experienced. Five hundred ten episodes of spontaneous arrhythmia (495 VT, 15 VF) were detected in 14 of 18 patients in a 24-month period and the success of each therapy (antitachycardia pacing, cardioversion 0.4-34 J, defibrillation 34 J) was analyzed. The number of therapies delivered and their success (%) in terminating the arrhythmia were: 380 ramp/86%, 116 burst/84%, 119 cardioversion/57%, and 15 defibrillations/100%. Sixty-three (42%) of the 152 transmissions indicated an arrhythmia. Twenty-five (16%) of the 152 were transmitted because of symptoms. Sixteen (9.7%) of 165 VT episodes could not be terminated by the full set of programmed VT therapies. Analysis of the pre- and post-episode intervals along with the patient's transmitted rhythm indicated that sinus tachycardia or atrial fibrillation were likely responsible for these episodes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7479174

  18. Changing Views: Safety and Efficacy of Implantable Cardioverter- Defibrillator Therapy in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Pavlů, Luděk; Hutyra, Martin; Táborský, Miloš

    2015-11-01

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is highly effective in reducing sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmia among high-risk cardiac patients. Conventional advice given to patients with ICD is to avoid physical activity more strenuous than playing golf or bowling. This recommendation is given due to a theoretical risk of arrhythmia precipitation, and thus increased risk of death due to failure to defibrillate, injury resulting from loss of control caused by arrhythmia-related syncope or shock, and also due to sport related direct damage to the ICD system. Recent prospective data from an international registry involving 372 athletes with ICDs in situ and actively participating in sports has been published. This indicates that, although physical activity resulted in an increased number of shocks compared to rest, there was no significant difference between intensive physical activity and any other activity (10% vs. 8%, p=0.34) in frequency of shocks. Furthermore, over a median follow-up period of 31 months (21-46 months), in the period of sports activity and 2 hour rest directly after there were no occurrences of death, resuscitated arrest or arrhythmia, or shock-related injury. This data is likely to start a shift in every-day clinical decision-making leading to revision of the high level of precautions imposed on the rapidly enlarging ICD recipient population. PMID:26849548

  19. Use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in athletes: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liz Almeida, Ricardo; Providência, Rui; Gonçalves, Lino

    2015-06-01

    International guidelines exclude athletes with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) from participating in sports, except those of low intensity (category IA, such as golf, billiards or bowling). However, these guidelines are based on expert consensus, and thus the safety and risks of participating in sports in this population are still largely unknown in the medical community. We performed a systematic review of the literature in PubMed using the following search string: "((sudden cardiac death) AND (sport OR physical exercise)) AND defibrillator". After the application of pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 36 results were selected, which are explored in this paper. Preliminary results on ICD use in this population appear to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the device in this context. Further studies, with longer follow-up and with larger samples, may provide stronger evidence to support these findings. In the meantime, disqualifying almost all ICD patients from participating in sports, without taking into consideration their individual needs and characteristics, may be prejudicial to a considerable number of patients by preventing them from exercising their profession or engaging in recreational sport, for which their risk of sudden cardiac death may be low. PMID:26050225

  20. Surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia in the pre-implantable cardioverter defibrillator era: early and long term outcomes in 100 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, J; Campbell, R; McComb, J; Furniss, S; Doig, J; Hilton, C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report outcome following surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia undertaken in patients before the use of implantable defibrillators.
DESIGN—A retrospective review, with uniform patient selection criteria and surgical and mapping strategy throughout. Complete follow up. Long term death notification by OPCS (Office of Population Censuses and Statistics) registration.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre for arrhythmia management.
PATIENTS—100 consecutive postinfarction patients who underwent map guided endocardial resection at this hospital in the period 1981-91 for drug refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias.
RESULTS—Emergency surgery was required for intractable arrhythmias in 28 patients, and 32 had surgery within eight weeks of infarction ("early"). Surgery comprised endocardial resections in all, aneurysmectomy in 57, cryoablations in 26, and antiarrhythmic ventriculotomies in 11. Twenty five patients died < 30 days after surgery, 21 of cardiac failure. This high mortality reflects the type of patients included in the series. Only 12 received antiarrhythmic drugs after surgery. Perioperative mortality was related to preoperative left ventricular function and the context of surgery. Mortality rates for elective surgery more than eight weeks after infarction, early surgery, emergency surgery, and early emergency surgery were 18%, 31%, 46%, and 50%, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after surgery were 66%, 62%, 57%, and 35%.
CONCLUSIONS—Surgery offers arrhythmia abolition at a risk proportional to the patient's preoperative risk of death from ventricular arrhythmias. The long term follow up results suggest a continuing role for surgery in selected patients even in the era of catheter ablation and implantable defibrillators.


Keywords: arrhythmias; myocardial infarction; surgical management PMID:10409528

  1. Single lead catheter of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator with floating atrial sensing dipole implanted via persistent left superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Malagù, Michele; Toselli, Tiziano; Bertini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a congenital anomaly with 0.3%-1% prevalence in the general population. It is usually asymptomatic but in case of transvenous lead positioning, i.e., for pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), may be a cause for significant complications or unsuccessful implantation. Single lead ICD with atrial sensing dipole (ICD DX) is a safe and functional technology in patients without congenital abnormalities. We provide a review of the literature and a case report of successful implantation of an ICD DX in a patient with LSVC and its efficacy in treating ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:27152145

  2. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  3. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection due to Providencia rettgeri: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marull, Jorge Manuel; De Benedetti, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus are the commonest pathogens involved in infections of pacemaker-defibrillator systems. Among causative Gram-negative bacteria, infections due to Klebsiella, Serratia, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and other species have been reported. We report herein a unique case of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Providencia rettgeri in a 65-year-old male who was admitted to our service with bacteremia and infection of the generator and subcutaneous array in a recently implanted device. PMID:19918391

  4. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection due to Providencia rettgeri: a case report

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetti, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus are the commonest pathogens involved in infections of pacemaker-defibrillator systems. Among causative Gram-negative bacteria, infections due to Klebsiella, Serratia, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and other species have been reported. We report herein a unique case of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Providencia rettgeri in a 65-year-old male who was admitted to our service with bacteremia and infection of the generator and subcutaneous array in a recently implanted device. PMID:19918391

  5. Examination of the Effect of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators on Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Katia; Corona, Ethan; Veazie, Peter; Dick, Andrew W.; Zhao, Hongwei; Moss, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Background While implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve survival, their benefit in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is negligible. Objective To examine how shocks and congestive heart failure (CHF) mediate the effect of ICDs on HRQOL. Methods The US patients from the MADIT-II (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Trial-II) trial (n = 983) were randomized to receive an ICD or medical treatment only. HRQOL was assessed using the Health Utility Index 3 at baseline and 3, 12, 24, and 36 months following randomization. Logistic regressions were used to test for the effect of ICDs on the CHF indicator, and linear regressions were used to examine the effect of ICD shocks and CHF on HRQOL in living patients. We used a Monte Carlo simulation and a parametric Weibull distribution survival model to test for the effect of selective attrition. Observations were clustered by patients and robust standard errors (RSEs) were used to control for the non-independence of multiple observations provided by the same patient. Results Patients in the ICD arm had 41% higher odds of experiencing CHF since their last assessment compared with those in the control arm (RSE = 0.19, p = 0.01). Developing CHF reduced HRQOL at the subsequent visit by 0.07 (p < 0.01). Having ICD shocks reduced overall HRQOL by 0.04 (p = 0.04) at the subsequent assessment. The negative effect of ICD firing on HRQOL was an order of magnitude greater than the effect of CHF. Conclusions A higher prevalence of CHF and shocks among patients with ICDs and their negative effect on HRQOL may partially explain the lack of HRQOL benefit of ICD therapy. PMID:19929037

  6. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  7. Combined use of non-thoracotomy cardioverter defibrillators and endocardial pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, H. H.; Peralta, A. O.; John, R. M.; Venditti, F. J.; Martin, D. T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the potential interactions in patients with endocardial permanent pacemakers and non-thoracotomy implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) systems. DESIGN: Case series and cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Fifteen consecutive patients with both endocardial pacemakers (12 dual chamber and three single chamber) and non-thoracotomy ICD systems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection inhibition of induced ventricular fibrillation; double counting; and pacemaker function after shocks. In the evaluation of detection inhibition, 124 VF inductions were analysed for detection duration compared with induced VF episodes in controls with an ICD but without a pacemaker. RESULTS: Two patients (13%) showed detection inhibition of VF and required pacemaker system change at the time of the ICD implant. With the final lead position, despite frequent pacemaker undersensing of VF, ICD detection of VF was not inhibited during any induction, and neither initial detection nor redetection times for VF were different from controls. Double/triple counting of pacemaker artefact and evoked electrogram was noted in three patients (20%). In two, this was remedied during the implantation procedure, and in the other it was abolished when amiodarone treatment was discontinued. Pacemaker function was affected by ICD discharges in two patients, one who showed postshock atrial undersensing and loss of capture, and another whose pacemaker reverted to VVI mode. CONCLUSIONS: When careful testing is performed at implantation to detect and remedy device interactions, non-thoracotomy ICD treatment and endocardial pacemakers can be used safely in combination. Images PMID:9290402

  8. Downward delegation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator decision-making in a restricted-resource environment: the pitfalls of bedside rationing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Christopher S; Hoffmaster, Barry; Dorian, Paul

    2005-05-15

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators have been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in some patient populations at risk of sudden death. New Canadian guidelines recommend implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy for these patients. However, the need for these devices exceeds the funded volumes in many Canadian jurisdictions. As a result, rationing of this resource has been necessary. While rationing at the macro (Ministry of Health) and meso (hospital) levels has achieved some level of acceptance by society, the responsibility for the decisions taken at the micro (individual) patient level actually rests with the physician at the bedside. This 'bedside rationing' creates a moral dilemma for physicians, who are torn between their traditional fiduciary role as 'patient advocate' and the competing role of 'gatekeeper'. This 'downward delegation' of rationing decision-making obscures the reality that rationing occurs, and encourages covert, opaque and inconsistent approaches. The remedy is the development of fair, legitimate procedures for making rationing decisions that include guidelines that structure and constrain those decisions. Macro- and meso-level stakeholders must also recognize and take responsibility for their part in restricting resources in a broadly inclusive and transparent process. PMID:15940358

  9. Remote monitoring of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Problems and implications using a telemonitoring system.

    PubMed

    Siebermair, J; Clauss, S; Martens, E; Schuessler, F; Oversohl, N; Haserueck, N; Estner, H L; Kääb, S; Wakili, R

    2015-04-01

    The rising number of implantable devices has led to an increase in device-related workload, e.g., regular interrogation follow-up visits. Telemonitoring systems for implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) seem to be a promising tool for reducing workload and costs, and they have the potential of optimizing patient care. However, issues such as practical functionality of ICD telemonitoring in daily routine may affect its broad implementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential problems during the implementation of a telemonitoring system, Medtronic CareLink™ (CL™) with respect to the installation and data transmission process. A total of 159 patients with ICDs who were equipped with the CL™ system were evaluated and followed up for 16 months regarding the success rate of the first data transmission via the telemonitoring system. In this cohort, a high rate of nontransmission of 23.9 % was observed after the 16-month follow-up. A detailed interview of these patients (no transmission) revealed that the main reasons for failed transmissions were due to the patients' loss of interest in the concept (approximately 50 %) as well as technical problems (approximately 25 %) with setting up the system. These results indicate that telemonitoring systems bear potential problems and that the evaluation of patient motivation and technical support options seems to play an important role in establishing the functionality of these systems. PMID:24848864

  10. Iranian Patients’ Experiences of the Internal Cardioverter Defibrillator Device Shocks: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pasyar, Nilofar; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Nikoo, Mohammad; Navab, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a valuable treatment for the patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. In this method, after diagnosis of pathological cardiac rhythms, shock is automatically applied to normalize the rhythms. Shock is discharged when the patients are conscious, but the patients’ experiences of shock have remained unknown. Thus, this study aimed to identify and describe the patients’ experiences of shocks received from ICD. Methods: The present qualitative study was conducted through thematic analysis and semi-structured interviews on 9 patients mean age 41.55 (1.57) with ICD from November 2013 to July 2014. Data analysis was also performed simultaneously using constant comparative analysis. Results: In this study, two main themes, namely "with a parachute for life" and "Faced with nuisance", were obtained representing the patients’ experiences regarding ICD shock. With a parachute for life included subthemes, such as "Rebirth", "Comforter and healing", and "Life assurance". In addition, "Faced with nuisance" consisted of 2 subthemes of "Discomfort in moments of shock" and "Displeasure after shock". Conclusion: This study provided a basis for evaluation of patients nursing after discharge. By identification of the patients’ experiences regarding shock, the present study can help the professional health staff to efficiently play their roles and provide patients with holistic care. It can also be effective in designing behavioral and cognitive interventional programs to change the patients’ attitude and promote their adaptation with their conditions. PMID:26744727

  11. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gossman, Michael S.; Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  12. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker on mortality in heart failure patients: results of a high-volume, single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Geller, Laszlo; Bogyi, Peter; Zima, Endre; Aktas, Mehmet K; Ozcan, Emin Evren; Becker, David; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Kosztin, Annamaria; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Merkely, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are limited and contradictory data on the effects of CRT with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on mortality as compared with CRT with pacemaker (CRT-P). Methods and results We evaluated the long-term outcome of patients implanted with a CRT-D or CRT-P device in our high-volume single-centre experience. Data on all-cause mortality were derived from clinic visits and the Hungarian National Healthcare Fund Death Registry. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate all-cause mortality in patients with CRT-D vs. CRT-P, stratified by the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. From 2000 to 2011, 1122 CRT devices, 693 CRT-P (LVEF 28.2 ± 7.4%) and 429 CRT-D (LVEF 27.6 ± 6.4%), were implanted at our centre. During the median follow-up of 28 months, 379 patients died from any cause, 250 patients (36%) with an implanted CRT-P and 129 patients (30%) with an implanted CRT-D. There was no evidence of mortality benefit in patients implanted with a CRT-D compared with a CRT-P in the total cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.32, P = 0.884]. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D treatment was associated with a significant 30% risk reduction in all-cause mortality compared with an implanted CRT-P (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97, P = 0.03). In non-ischaemic patients, there was no mortality benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73–1.32, P = 0.894, interaction P-value = 0.15). Conclusions In heart failure patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D was associated with a mortality benefit compared with CRT-P, but no benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P in mortality was observed in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25379962

  13. The Gulf Implantable Cardioverter-defibrillator Registry: Rationale, Methodology, and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Hersi, Ahmad S.; Hamad, Adel K. S.; Al Fagih, Ahmed R.; Al-Samadi, Faisal M.; Almusaad, Abdulmohsen M.; Bokhari, Fayez A.; Al-Kandari, Fawzia; Al-Ghamdi, Bandar S.; Al Rawahi, Najib; Asaad, Nidal; Alkaabi, Salem; Daoulah, Amin; Zaky, Hosam A.; Elhag, Omer; Al Hebaishi, Yahya S.; Sweidan, Raed; Alanazi, Haitham; Chase, David; Sabbour, Hani; Al Meheiri, Mohammad; Al Abri, Ismail; Amin, Mohammad; Dagriri, Khaled; Ahmed, Adil O.; Shafquat, Azam; Khan, Shahul Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is effective in the prevention of sudden cardiac death in high-risk patients. Little is known about ICD use in the Arabian Gulf. We designed a study to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients receiving ICDs in the Arab Gulf region. Methods: Gulf ICD is a prospective, multi-center, multinational, and observational study. All adult patients 18 years or older, receiving a de novo ICD implant and willing to sign a consent form will be eligible. Data on baseline characteristics, ICD indication, procedure and programing, in-hospital, and 1-year outcomes will be collected. Target enrollment is 1500 patients, which will provide adequate precision across a wide range of expected event rates. Results: Fifteen centers in six countries are enrolling patients (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain, and Qatar). Two-thirds of the centers have dedicated electrophysiology laboratories, and in almost all centers ICDs are implanted exclusively by electrophysiologists. Nearly three-quarters of the centers reported annual ICD implant volumes of ≤150 devices, and pulse generator replacements constitute <30% of implants in the majority of centers. Enrollment started in December 2013, and accrual rate increased as more centers entered the study reaching an average of 98 patients per month. Conclusions: Gulf ICD is the first prospective, observational, multi-center, and multinational study of the characteristics and, the outcomes of patients receiving ICDs in the Arab Gulf region. The study will provide valuable insights into the utilization of and outcomes related to ICD therapy in the Gulf region. PMID:26900416

  14. Significance of intraoperative testing in right-sided implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Implantation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) from the left pectoral region is the standard therapeutical method. Increasing numbers of system revisions due to lead dysfunction and infections will consecutively increase the numbers of right-sided implantations. The reliability of devices implanted on the right pectoral side remains controversially discussed, and the question of testing these devices remains unanswered. Methods In a prospectively designed study all 870 patients (60.0±14 years, 689 male) who were treated with a first ICD from July 2005 until May 2012 and tested intraoperatively according to the testing protocol were analyzed. The indication for implantation was primary prophylactic in 71.5%. Underlying diseases included ischemic cardiomyopathy (50%), dilative cardiomyopathy (37%), and others (13%). Mean ejection faction was 27±12%. Implantation site was right in 4.5% and left in 95.5%. Results Five patients supplied with right-sided ICD (13%, p = 0.02 as compared to left-sided) failed initial intraoperative testing with 21 J. 3 patients were male. The age of the patients failing intraoperative testing with right-sided devices appeared higher than of patients with left-sided devices (p = 0.07). The ejection fraction was 28±8%. All patients reached a sufficient DFT ≤ 21 J after corrective procedures. Conclusion Implantation of ICDs on the right side results in significantly higher failure rate of successful termination of intraoperatively induced ventricular fibrillation. The data of our study suggest the necessity of intraoperative ICD testing in right-sided implanted ICDs. PMID:23577747

  15. Referring Physicians’ Discordance with the Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Guidelines: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Jorge M; Smith, Lisa M; Varosy, Paul D.; Dehlendorf, Christine; Marcus, Gregory M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The ACC/AHA/HRS Guidelines provide patient selection criteria for primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). For unknown reasons, guideline discordant practice is common. OBJECTIVE To determine referring physicians’ concordance with the primary prevention ICD guidelines. METHODS We mailed a survey regarding ICD guidelines and individual practice characteristics to a random national sample of 3,000 physicians, 1/3rd each specializing in family medicine, internal medicine, and general cardiology, selected from the American Medical Association Masterfile. RESULTS Sixty-four percent with correct contact information responded. Three hundred and ninety-five (28%, 95% CI 25–30%) respondents never refer patients with the intent of consideration for a primary prevention ICD, including 7% (95% CI 5–10%) of cardiologists. Two hundred and twelve (15%, 95% CI 13–17%) believe ventricular arrhythmias are required before a primary prevention ICD is indicated; 525 (36%, 95% CI 34–39%) believe an ejection fraction > 40% warrants a primary prevention ICD; and 361 (25%, 95% CI 23–27%) would refer a patient for a primary prevention ICD within 40 days of a myocardial infarction. In multivariate analyses, family practice physicians and physicians residing in the Western US most often provided guideline-discordant answers, while cardiologists and those that refer to an electrophysiologist most often provided guideline-concordant answers. Primary care physicians that manage heart failure patients without referral to a subspecialist were not more likely to provide guideline concordant answers. CONCLUSIONS Answers discordant with the primary prevention ICD guidelines were common, suggesting that referring physician beliefs are an important barrier to appropriate patient referrals for primary prevention ICD implantation. PMID:22306794

  16. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shock Caused by Uncommon Variety of Nonreentrant Atrioventricular Nodal Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Singh, David K; Badhwar, Nitish

    2016-03-01

    This article reports a typical case of incessant double-fire tachycardia resulting in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge caused by the device's misdiagnosis of ventricular tachycardia. At electrophysiology study, the presence of double-fire physiology was confirmed, and modification of the slow pathway resulted in elimination of repetitive double fires. Although this is an unusual entity, it is important to recognize, because it may be misdiagnosed as atrial fibrillation, resulting in inappropriate anticoagulation and/or antiarrhythmic therapy. Modification of the slow pathway and elimination of double-fire physiology can result in marked improvement in quality of life and reversal of tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26920170

  17. A new transvenous internal cardioverter-defibrillator: implantation technique, complications, and short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jordaens, L; Vertongen, P; Provenier, F; Trouerbach, J W; Poelaert, J; Herregods, L

    1995-02-01

    Twenty-four patients with ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachycardia underwent implantation of a new transvenous defibrillator. All patients had a device implanted without thoracotomy. High placement of a shock lead in the anonymous vein and inversion of the shock-wave polarity allowed avoidance of placement of subcutaneous patches. Implantation time decreased from 138 minutes for the first 12 patients to 82 minutes for the last 12 patients, with 4 and 11 subpectoral pockets, respectively. Three patients required a minor reintervention. No bleeding or infection occurred. One episode of pulmonary edema and one pulmonary embolism were seen in the postoperative course. No postoperative deaths were observed. During a mean follow-up period of 4.12 months, 58% of the 24 patients had symptomatic arrhythmic episodes, with shocks in 50% of the 24. Inappropriate shocks were delivered in three cases (atrial fibrillation and T-wave sensing). One episode was not terminated even with four internal shocks. One patient had ventricular fibrillation because of a sensing problem. By reprogramming of sensitivity, back-up pacing, and adjustment of drug therapy these arrhythmic complications could be prevented. Pectoral implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator is easy and can be performed by cardiologists experienced in pacemaker implantation. Careful postoperative observation, reprogramming after the first spontaneous event, and prehospital discharge induction of ventricular fibrillation will prevent arrhythmic complications. PMID:7832096

  18. Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators and Survival in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Emily P.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Hammill, Stephen C.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Mark, Daniel B.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to assess the benefit of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in women. BACKGROUND Clinical trials of primary prevention ICDs enrolled a limited number of women. METHODS Using a propensity score method, we matched 490 women ≥65 years of age who received an ICD during a hospitalization for heart failure in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry ICD Registry from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2007, to 490 ICD-eligible women without an ICD hospitalized for heart failure in the Get With The Guidelines for Heart Failure database from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2009. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality obtained from the Medicare Claims Database. An identical analysis was conducted in men. RESULTS Median follow-up for patients with an ICD was 4.6 years versus 3.2 years for patients with no ICD. Compared with women with no ICD, those with an ICD were younger and less frequently white. In the matched cohorts, the survival of women with an ICD was significantly longer than that of women without an ICD (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.79, 95% confidence interval: 0.66 to 0.95; p = 0.013). Similarly, men with an ICD had longer survival than men without an ICD (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.65 to 0.83; p < 0.0001). There was no interaction between sex and the presence of an ICD with respect to survival (p = 0.44). CONCLUSIONS Among older women with left ventricular dysfunction, a primary prevention ICD was associated with a significant survival benefit that was nearly identical to that seen in men. These findings support the use of primary prevention ICDs in eligible patients regardless of sex. PMID:25543969

  19. Long-Term Performance of the Riata/ST Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Lead.

    PubMed

    Ströker, Erwin; de Asmundis, Carlo; Vanduynhoven, Philippe; De Vadder, Katrien; De Vusser, Philip; Mullens, Wilfried; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Brugada, Pedro; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Wellens, Francis; Van Herendael, Hugo; Rivero-Ayerza, Maximo

    2016-03-01

    Riata and Riata ST implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads are prone to structural and electrical failure (EF). Our objective was to evaluate Riata/ST lead performance over a long-term follow-up. Of 184 patients having undergone Riata/ST and Riata ST Optim lead implantation from September 2003 to June 2008, 154 patients were evaluated for EF and radiographic conductor externalization (CE). Survival analysis for EF was performed for Riata/ST leads, both for failure-free lead survival and cumulative hazard. Subanalysis on 7Fr leads was performed to evaluate EF and CE rates both for different Riata ST lead management (monitoring vs proactive) and between Riata ST and Riata ST Optim leads. During a mean follow-up of 7 years, Riata/ST lead EF rate was 13% overall. Similar failure-free survival rate was noted for 7Fr as for 8Fr leads (log-rank, p = 0.63). Of all failed leads, 64% failed only after 5 years of follow-up. Compared with the absolute failure rate of 1.84% per device year, cumulative hazard analysis for leads surviving past 5 years revealed an estimated failure rate of 7% per year. No clinical or procedural predictors for EF were found. The subanalysis on 7Fr leads showed an excellent outcome both for a proactive lead management approach as for Optim leads. In conclusion, long-term survival of the Riata/ST lead is impaired with an accelerating EF risk over time. An initial exponential trend was followed by a linear lead failure pattern for leads surviving past 5 years, corresponding to an estimated 7% annual EF rate. These findings may have repercussions on the lead management strategy in patients currently surviving with a Riata/ST lead to prevent significant clinical events like inappropriate shocks or failed device interventions. PMID:26762730

  20. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators at End of Battery Life: Opportunities for Risk (Re)-Stratification in ICD Recipients.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Faisal M; Quest, Tammie; Leon, Angel R; El-Chami, Mikhael F

    2016-02-01

    Although implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are frequently viewed as a lifelong commitment in that patients are routinely scheduled for generator exchange (GE) at end of battery life, several considerations should prompt a reevaluation of risks and benefits before GE. Compared with initial ICD implant, patients receiving replacement devices are older, and have more comorbidities and shorter life expectancy, all of which may limit the benefit of ICD therapy following GE. Additionally, GE is associated with significant complications, including infection, which may increase the risk of mortality. In this paper, we review recent data regarding opportunities for risk stratification before GE, with a particular focus on those with improved left ventricular function and those who have not experienced ICD therapies during the first battery life. We also provide a broader perspective on ICD therapy, focusing on how decisions regarding GE may affect goals of care at the end of life. PMID:26821633

  1. Emergency Care of Patients with Pacemakers and Defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Mallemat, Haney A

    2015-08-01

    Devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are commonly inserted to treat unstable cardiac rhythm disturbances. Despite the benefits of these devices on mortality and morbidity rates, patients often present to the emergency department with complaints related to device insertion or malfunction. Emergency physicians must be able to rapidly identify potential life threats caused by pacemaker malfunction, ICD firing, and complications associated with implantation of the devices. PMID:26226872

  2. Influence of radiotherapy on the latest generation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W. . E-mail: Coen.Hurkmans@cze.nl; Scheepers, Egon; Springorum, Bob G.F.; Uiterwaal, Hans

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy can influence the functioning of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). ICDs offer the same functionality as pacemakers, but are also able to deliver a high-voltage shock to the heart if needed. Guidelines for radiotherapy treatment of patients with an implanted rhythm device have been published in 1994 by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and are based only on experience with pacemakers. Data on the influence of radiotherapy on ICDs are limited. The objective of our study is to determine the influence of radiotherapy on the latest generation of ICDs. Methods and Materials: Eleven modern ICDs have been irradiated in our department. The irradiation was performed with a 6-MV photon beam. The given dose was fractionated up to a cumulative dose of 120 Gy. Two to 5 days passed between consecutive irradiations. Frequency, output, sensing, telemetry, and shock energy were monitored. Results: Sensing interference by ionizing radiation on all ICDs has been demonstrated. For four ICDs, this would have caused the inappropriate delivery of a shock because of interference. At the end of the irradiation sessions, all devices had reached their point of failure. Complete loss of function was observed for four ICDs at dose levels between 0.5 Gy and 1.5 Gy. Conclusions: The effect of radiation therapy on the newest generation of ICDs varies widely. If tachycardia monitoring and therapy are functional (programmed on) during irradiation, the ICD might inappropriately give antitachycardia therapy, often resulting in a shock. Although most ICDs did not fail below 80 Gy, some devices had already failed at doses below 1.5 Gy. Guidelines are formulated for the treatment of patients with an ICD.

  3. Sustaining cyborgs: sensing and tuning agencies of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Oudshoorn, Nelly

    2015-02-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in cyborgs, and particularly in new and emerging fusions of humans and technologies related to the development of human enhancement technologies. These studies reflect a trend to follow new and emerging technologies. In this article, I argue that it is important to study 'older' and more familiar cyborgs as well. Studying 'the old' is important because it enables us to recognize hybrids' embodied experiences. This article addresses two of these older hybrids: pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators inserted in the bodies of people suffering from heart-rhythm disturbances. My concern with hybrid bodies is that internal devices seem to present a complex and neglected case if we wish to understand human agency. Their 'users' seem to be passive because they cannot exert any direct control over the working of their devices. Technologies inside bodies challenge a longstanding tradition of theorizing human-technology relations only in terms of technologies external to the body. Cyborg theory is problematic as well because most studies tend to conceptualize the cyborg merely as a discursive entity and silence the voices of people living as cyborgs. Inspired by feminist research that foregrounds the materiality of the lived and intimate relations between bodies and technologies, I argue that creating these intimate relations requires patients' active involvement in sustaining their hybrid bodies. Based on observations of these monitoring practices in a Dutch hospital and interviews with patients and technicians, the article shows that heart cyborgs are far from passive. On the contrary, their unique experience in sensing the entangled agencies of technologies and their own heart plays a crucial role in sustaining their hybrid bodies. PMID:25803917

  4. BAYESIAN META-ANALYSIS ON MEDICAL DEVICES: APPLICATION TO IMPLANTABLE CARDIOVERTER DEFIBRILLATORS

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ji-Hee; Lord, Joanne; Hemming, Karla; Girling, Alan; Buxton, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to describe and illustrate a method to obtain early estimates of the effectiveness of a new version of a medical device. Methods: In the absence of empirical data, expert opinion may be elicited on the expected difference between the conventional and modified devices. Bayesian Mixed Treatment Comparison (MTC) meta-analysis can then be used to combine this expert opinion with existing trial data on earlier versions of the device. We illustrate this approach for a new four-pole implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared with conventional ICDs, Class III anti-arrhythmic drugs, and conventional drug therapy for the prevention of sudden cardiac death in high risk patients. Existing RCTs were identified from a published systematic review, and we elicited opinion on the difference between four-pole and conventional ICDs from experts recruited at a cardiology conference. Results: Twelve randomized controlled trials were identified. Seven experts provided valid probability distributions for the new ICDs compared with current devices. The MTC model resulted in estimated relative risks of mortality of 0.74 (0.60–0.89) (predictive relative risk [RR] = 0.77 [0.41–1.26]) and 0.83 (0.70–0.97) (predictive RR = 0.84 [0.55–1.22]) with the new ICD therapy compared to Class III anti-arrhythmic drug therapy and conventional drug therapy, respectively. These results showed negligible differences from the preliminary results for the existing ICDs. Conclusions: The proposed method incorporating expert opinion to adjust for a modification made to an existing device may play a useful role in assisting decision makers to make early informed judgments on the effectiveness of frequently modified healthcare technologies. PMID:22559753

  5. Disparity in utilization of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in treatment of heart failure based on sex and race.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Hillel A; Miller, John M

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of: Hernandez AF, Fonarow GC, Lang L et al.:Sex and racial differences in the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators among patients hospitalized with heart failure.JAMA298(13), 1525-1532 (2007) [1] . Disparity of utilization of proven therapies for treatment of cardiac disease according to gender and ethnicity has been well documented in various aspects of cardiac care. Implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) are devices that have been proven to prevent sudden cardiac death. This retrospective study examined ICD use in heart-failure patients who had an indication for ICD implantation, from the "Get with the Guidelines" program. The patients were stratified by gender and ethnicity (Black vs White). The overall rate of utilization (or intention for utilization) of ICDs was 35%, while among women and Black people the rate was significantly lower, at 27 and 23%, respectively, with the lowest rate being for Black women (28%). These findings suggest a bias against implantation of such devices in women and Black people, which is not explained by clinical variables. PMID:19072448

  6. Outcomes After Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Generator Replacement for Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Malini; Waks, Jonathan W.; Friedman, Paul A.; Kramer, Daniel B.; Buxton, Alfred E.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Mehta, Ramila A.; Hodge, David O.; Higgins, Angela Y.; Webster, Tracy L.; Witt, Chance M.; Cha, Yong-Mei; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for primary prevention of sudden death in patients with an ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% and clinical heart failure is well established. However, outcomes after replacement of the ICD generator in patients with recovery of EF to >35% and no previous therapies are not well characterized. Methods and Results Between 2001 and 2011, generator replacement was performed at 2 tertiary medical centers in 253 patients (mean age, 68.3±12.7 years; 82% men) who had previously undergone ICD placement for primary prevention but subsequently never received appropriate ICD therapy. EF had recovered to >35% in 72 of 253 (28%) patients at generator replacement. During median (quartiles) follow-up of 3.3 (1.8–5.3) years after generator replacement, 68 of 253 (27%) experienced appropriate ICD therapy. Patients with EF ≤35% were more likely to experience ICD therapy compared with those with EF >35% (12% versus 5% per year; hazard ratio, 3.57; P=0.001). On multivariable analysis, low EF predicted appropriate ICD therapy after generator replacement (hazard ratio, 1.96 [1.35–2.87] per 10% decrement; P=0.001). Death occurred in 25% of patients 5 years after generator replacement. Mortality was similar in patients with EF ≤35% and >35% (7% versus 5% per year; hazard ratio, 1.10; P=0.68). Atrial fibrillation (3.24 [1.63–6.43]; P<0.001) and higher blood urea nitrogen (1.28 [1.14–1.45] per increase of 10 mg/dL; P<0.001) were associated with mortality. Conclusions Although approximately one fourth of patients with a primary prevention ICD and no previous therapy have EF >35% at the time of generator replacement, these patients continue to be at significant risk for appropriate ICD therapy (5% per year). These data may inform decisions on ICD replacement. PMID:26921377

  7. Programming implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in primary prevention: higher or later.

    PubMed

    Clementy, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Simeon, Edouard; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Defibrillator shocks, appropriate or not, are associated with significant morbidity, as they decrease quality of life, can be involved in depression and anxiety, and are known to be proarrhythmic. Most recent data have even shown an association between shocks and overall mortality. As opposed to other defibrillator-related complications, the rate of inappropriate and unnecessary shocks can (and should) be decreased with adequate programming. This review focuses on the different programming strategies and tips available to reduce the rate of shocks in primary prevention patients with left ventricular dysfunction implanted with a defibrillator, as well as some of the manufacturers' device specificities. PMID:24834904

  8. Correlation of Geomagnetic Activity with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks and Antitachycardia Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ebrille, Elisa; Konecny, Tomas; Konecny, Dana; Spacek, Radim; Jones, Paul; Ambroz, Pavel; DeSimone, Christopher V; Powell, Brian D; Hayes, David L; Friedman, Paul A; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Small-scale observational studies have suggested that geomagnetic activity (GMA) may negatively correlate with the frequency of life-threatening arrhythmias. We investigated a potential relationship between implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies and daily GMA recorded in a large database. Patients and Methods The ALTITUDE database, derived from the Boston Scientific LATITUDE remote monitoring system, was retrospectively analyzed for the frequency of ICD therapies. Daily GMA was expressed as the planetary K-index and the integrated A-index and graded as Levels I – quiet, II – unsettled, III – active, and IV – storm. Results A daily mean of 59,468 ± 11,397 patients were monitored between 2009 and 2012. The distribution of days according to GMA was: Level I 75%, Level II 18%, Level III 5%, Level IV 2%. The daily number of ICD shocks received per 1000 active patients in the database was 1.29 ± 0.47, 1.17 ± 0.46, 1.03 ± 0.37, and 0.94 ± 0.29 on Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV days respectively; the daily sum of shocks and antitachycardia pacing (ATP) therapies was 9.29 ± 2.86, 8.46 ± 2.45, 7.92 ± 1.80, and 7.83 ± 2.28 on quiet, unsettled, active and storm days respectively. A statistically significant inverse relationship between GMA and the frequency of ICD therapies was identified, with the most pronounced difference between Level I and Level IV days (p < .001 for shocks, p = .008 for shocks + ATP). Conclusion In a large scale cohort analysis, ICD therapies were delivered less frequently on days of higher GMA, confirming the previous pilot data and suggesting that higher GMA does not pose an increased risk of arrhythmias using ICD therapies as a surrogate marker. Further studies are needed to gain an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25659238

  9. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator dysfunction during and after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar; Berntsen, Rolf Franck; Aass, Halfdan; Kongsgaard, Erik; Amlie, Jan Peder

    2002-09-01

    This report describes a patient in whom a MRI of the brain was performed without realizing that an ICD had been implanted 8 days previously. Electromagnetic noise induced during the MRI was detected as ventricular fibrillation and nearly caused inappropriate shocks. Charge time during MRI was prolonged. The battery indicator switched to "end of life," but this was reversed by capacitor reformation. These problems could have been avoided by inactivating the ICD prior to MRI. Three months later, the pacing threshold increased from 0.4 V per 0.5 ms at implantation to 2.8 V per 0.5. It is still uncertain whether radiofrequency current heating at the electrode tip caused the increased pacing threshold or if this would have occurred independently of the MRI. MRI of patients with an active ICD may cause life-threatening complications, and it is unknown if MRI may be safely performed if the ICD is inactivated. Therefore, MRI of patients with an ICD remains contraindicated. PMID:12380781

  10. Safety and Cost-Effectiveness of Same-Day Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Implantation.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Gavin; McAloon, Christopher James; Chohan, Bhaveek; Heining, Dominic; Anderson, Benjamin; Barker, Jethro; Randeva, Harpal; Osman, Faizel

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation improve morbidity and mortality in selected patients. Many centers still admit patients overnight. We evaluated the safety, feasibility, and cost savings of same-day CRT/ICD device implantation by performing a retrospective study of all consecutive elective CRT/ICD implants at a tertiary center from January 2009 to April 2013. All emergency and/or inpatient cases were excluded. Data were collected on baseline demographics, implantation indication, procedure details, complications (categorized as immediate [≤24 hours], short term [24 hours to 6 weeks], medium term [6 weeks to 4 months], and long term [>4 months]), and mortality (30 day and 1 year). Comparisons were made between those having planned same-day versus overnight stay procedures. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate cost savings of the same-day policy. A total of 491 devices were implanted during this period: 267 were elective (54 planned overnight, 213 planned same-day) of which 229 were CRT pacemakers or CRT defibrillators and 38 ICDs. There were 26 total overall complications (9.7%) with no significant differences between planned same-day versus planned overnight stay cohorts (9.4% vs 11.1%, p = 0.8) and specifically no differences in immediate, short-, medium-, and long-term complications at follow-up. The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates did not differ between the two groups. An overnight stay at our hospital costs $450 (£300); our cost saving during this period was $91,800 (£61,200). Same-day CRT/ICD implantation is safe, feasible, and associated with significant cost savings. It provides significant advantages for patients and health care providers, especially given the current financial climate. PMID:26993428

  11. Inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks in fractured Sprint Fidelis leads associated with 'appropriate' interrogation.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Redpath, Calum; Birnie, David; Gollob, Michael; Lemery, Robert; Posan, Emoke; Green, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We present two patients with fractures within the pace-sense circuit of their Medtronic Sprint Fidelis leads who received inappropriate shocks from their Medtronic defibrillators during device interrogation. This was not simply a coincidence, but due to electromagnetic interference induced within the Sprint Fidelis lead by the device programmer during two-way communication with the defibrillator. Our subsequent investigations have uncovered at least two other similar incidents in Canada. We have also discovered that the Medtronic 'Auto-resume' feature may leave future patients uniquely vulnerable to such inappropriate shocks in the future. PMID:18456645

  12. Home monitoring of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: interpretation reliability of the second-generation “IEGM Online” system

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Herbert; Lipoldová, Jolana; Oswald, Hanno; Klein, Gunnar; Elvan, Arif; Vester, Ernst; Bauer, Wolfgang; Bondke, Hansjürgen; Reif, Sebastian; Daub, Claudia; Menzel, Frank; Schrader, Jürgen; Zach, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Aims Intracardiac electrograms (IEGMs) are essential for the assessment of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) function. The Biotronik Home Monitoring systems transmit an ‘IEGM Online’ that is shorter than the full-length programmer IEGM due to technical constrains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the physician's classification of the underlying rhythm based on the second-generation IEGM Online. Methods and results In total, 1533 patients treated with single- and dual-chamber ICDs and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators were enrolled at 67 investigational sites and followed for 15 months. The investigators classified the rhythm shown in IEGM Online as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial fibrillation, other supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, oversensing due to lead failure, T-wave oversensing, or other rhythm. At the next in-office follow-up, the investigators classified independently the rhythm seen in the corresponding programmer IEGM. The two rhythm classifications were compared thereafter. Both IEGM Online and programmer IEGM were available in 2099 arrhythmic or oversensing events, of which 146 (7.0%) were classified as other rhythm or artefacts and were excluded as inconclusive or atypical. The remaining 1953 events, affecting 352 patients (23.0%), were classified correctly in 1803 cases (92.3%). The accuracy of rough rhythm classification as ventricular, supraventricular, or oversensing was 97.2%. Conclusion The Lumax and IEGM Online HD Evaluation study demonstrates that remote IEGM analysis is reasonably accurate in a remote monitoring system that transmits shorter IEGM than the full-length programmer IEGM for the sake of frequent, fully automatic data transmission. PMID:25567067

  13. Implantation of additional defibrillation lead into the coronary sinus: an effective method of decreasing defibrillation threshold.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Rajmund; Swiątkowski, Maciej; Czepiel, Aleksandra; Sterliński, Maciej; Makowska, Ewa; Kułakowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of successful implantation of an additional defibrillation lead into the coronary sinus due to high defibrillation threshold (DFT) in a seriously ill patient with a history of extensive myocardial infarction referred for implantable cardioverter- defibrillator implantation after an episode of unstable ventricular tachycardia. All previous attempts to reduce DFT, including subcutaneous electrode implantation, had been unsuccessful. PMID:22219117

  14. Psychological effects of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. A review of study methods

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Compare, Angelo; Pagnini, Francesco; Essebag, Vidal; Proietti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) saves lives but clinical experience suggests that it may have detrimental effects on mental health. The ICD shock has been largely blamed as the main offender but empirical evidence is not consistent, perhaps because of methodological differences across studies. Objective: To appraise methodologies of studies that assessed the psychological effects of ICD shock and explore associations between methods and results. Data Sources: A comprehensive search of English articles that were published between 1980 and 30 June 2013 was applied to the following electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, NHS HTA database, PsycINFO, Sciencedirect and CINAHL. Review Methods: Only studies testing the effects of ICD shock on psychological and quality of life outcomes were included. Data were extracted according to a PICOS pre-defined sheet including methods and study quality indicators. Results: Fifty-four observational studies and six randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Multiple differences in methods that were used to test the psychological effects of ICD shock were found across them. No significant association with results was observed. Conclusions: Methodological heterogeneity of study methods is too wide and limits any quantitative attempt to account for the mixed findings. Well-built and standardized research is urgently needed. PMID:25698991

  15. Tachycardia detection in modern implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Thomas; Dahlke, Daniel; Chebbo, Amin; Neumann, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have to reliably sense, detect, and treat malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Inappropriate treatment of non life-threatening tachyarrhythmias should be avoided. This article outlines the functionality of ICDs developed and manufactured by BIOTRONIK. Proper sensing is achieved by an automatic sensitivity control which can be individually tailored to solve special under- and oversensing situations. The programming of detection zones for ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and zones to monitor other tachyarrhythmias is outlined. Dedicated single-chamber detection algorithms based on average heart rate, cycle length variability, sudden rate onset, and changes in QRS morphology as used in ICDs by BIOTRONIK are described in detail. Preconditions and confirmation algorithms for therapy deliveries as antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and high energy shocks are explained. Finally, a detailed description of the dual-chamber detection algorithm SMART is given. It comprises additional detection criteria as stability of atrial intervals, 1:1 conduction, atrial-ventricular (AV) multiplicity, AV trend, and AV regularity to differentiate between ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27576695

  16. Potential clinical impact of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of ejection fraction on eligibility for cardioverter defibrillator implantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death, guidelines provide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) criteria for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) placement without specifying the technique by which it should be measured. We sought to investigate the potential impact of performing cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for EF on ICD eligibility. Methods The study population consisted of patients being considered for ICD implantation who were referred for EF assessment by CMR. Patients who underwent CMR within 30 days of echocardiography were included. Echocardiographic EF was determined by Simpson’s biplane method and CMR EF was measured by Simpson’s summation of discs method. Results Fifty-two patients (age 62±15 years, 81% male) had a mean EF of 38 ± 14% by echocardiography and 35 ± 14% by CMR. CMR had greater reproducibility than echocardiography for both intra-observer (ICC, 0.98 vs 0.94) and inter-observer comparisons (ICC 0.99 vs 0.93). The limits of agreement comparing CMR and echocardiographic EF were – 16 to +10 percentage points. CMR resulted in 11 of 52 (21%) and 5 of 52 (10%) of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility at the EF thresholds of 35 and 30% respectively. Among patients with an echocardiographic EF of between 25 and 40%, 9 of 22 (41%) were reclassified by CMR at either the 35 or 30% threshold. Echocardiography identified only 1 of the 6 patients with left ventricular thrombus noted incidentally on CMR. Conclusions CMR resulted in 21% of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility when strict EF criteria were used. In addition, CMR detected unexpected left ventricular thrombus in almost 10% of patients. Our findings suggest that the use of CMR for EF assessment may have a substantial impact on management in patients being considered for ICD implantation. PMID:23043729

  17. Costs of remote monitoring vs. ambulatory follow-ups of implanted cardioverter defibrillators in the randomized ECOST study

    PubMed Central

    Guédon-Moreau, Laurence; Lacroix, Dominique; Sadoul, Nicolas; Clémenty, Jacques; Kouakam, Claude; Hermida, Jean-Sylvain; Aliot, Etienne; Kacet, Salem

    2014-01-01

    Aims The Effectiveness and Cost of ICD follow-up Schedule with Telecardiology (ECOST) trial evaluated prospectively the economic impact of long-term remote monitoring (RM) of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods and results The analysis included 310 patients randomly assigned to RM (active group) vs. ambulatory follow-ups (control group). Patients in the active group were seen once a year unless the system reported an event mandating an ambulatory visit, while patients in the control group were seen in the ambulatory department every 6 months. The costs of each follow-up strategy were compared, using the actual billing documents issued by the French health insurance system, including costs of (i) (a) ICD-related ambulatory visits and transportation, (b) other ambulatory visits, (c) cardiovascular treatments and procedures, and (ii) hospitalizations for the management of cardiovascular events. The ICD and RM system costs were calculated on the basis of the device remaining longevity at the end of the study. The characteristics of the study groups were similar. Over a follow-up of 27 months, the mean non-hospital costs per patient-year were €1695 ± 1131 in the active, vs. €1952 ± 1023 in the control group (P = 0.04), a €257 difference mainly due to device management. The hospitalization costs per patient-year were €2829 ± 6382 and €3549 ± 9714 in the active and control groups, respectively (P = 0.46). Adding the ICD to the non-hospital costs, the savings were €494 (P = 0.005) or, when the monitoring system was included, €315 (P = 0.05) per patient-year. Conclusion From the French health insurance perspective, the remote management of ICD patients is cost saving. Clinical trials registration NCT00989417, www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:24614572

  18. The use of wearable cardioverter-defibrillators in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Lenarczyk, Radosław; Potpara, Tatjana S; Haugaa, Kristina H; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Sciaraffia, Elena; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to collect data on the use of wearable cardioverter-defibrillators (WCDs) among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. Of the 50 responding centres, 23 (47%) reported WCD use. Devices were fully reimbursed in 17 (43.6%) of 39 respondents, and partially reimbursed in 3 centres (7.7%). Eleven out of 20 centres (55%) reported acceptable patients' compliance (WCD worn for >90% of time). The most common indications for WCD (8 out of 10 centres; 80%) were covering the period until re-implantation of ICD explanted due to infection, in patients with left ventricular impairment due to myocarditis or recent myocardial infarction and those awaiting heart transplantation. Patient life expectancy of <12 months and poor compliance were the most commonly reported contraindications for WCD (24 of 46 centres, 52.2%). The major problems encountered by physicians managing patients with WCD were costs (8 of 18 centres, 44.4%), non-compliance, and incorrect use of WCD. Four of 17 centres (23.5%) reported inappropriate WCD activations in <5% of patients. The first shock success rate in terminating ventricular arrhythmias was 95-100% in 6 of 15 centres (40%), 85-95% in 4 (26.7%), 75-85% in 2 (13.3%), and <75% in 3 centres (20%). The survey has shown that the use of WCD in Europe is still restricted and depends on reimbursement. Patients' compliance remains low. Heterogeneity of indications for WCD among centres underscores the need for further research and a better definition of indications for WCD in specific patient groups. PMID:26842735

  19. Results of ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Programming to Reduce Therapies and Improve Quality of Life (from the ENHANCED-ICD Study).

    PubMed

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Pedersen, Susanne S; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Doevendans, Pieter A; Meine, Mathias

    2016-02-15

    Novel implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) discrimination algorithms and programming strategies have significantly reduced the incidence of inappropriate shocks, but there are still gains to be made with respect to reducing appropriate but unnecessary antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and shocks. We examined whether programming a number of intervals to detect (NID) of 60/80 for ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) detection was safe and the impact of this strategy on (1) adverse events related to ICD shocks and syncopal events; (2) ATPs/shocks; and (3) patient-reported outcomes. The "ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator programming to reduce therapies and improve quality of life" study (ENHANCED-ICD study) was a prospective, safety-monitoring study enrolling 60 primary and secondary prevention patients at the University Medical Center Utrecht. Patients implanted with any type of ICD with SmartShock technology and aged 18 to 80 years were eligible to participate. In all patients, a prolonged NID 60/80 was programmed. The cycle length for VT/fast VT/VF was 360/330/240 ms, respectively. Programming a NID 60/80 proved safe for ICD patients. Because of the new programming strategy, unnecessary ICD therapy was prevented in 10% of ENHANCED-ICD patients during a median follow-up period of 1.3 years. With respect to patient-reported outcomes, levels of distress were highest and perceived health status lowest at the time of implantation, which both gradually improved during follow-up. In conclusion, the ENHANCED-ICD study demonstrates that programming a NID 60/80 for VT/VF detection is safe for ICD patients and does not negatively impact their quality of life. PMID:26732419

  20. Home monitoring report from a single lead Lumax DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator: New observations in a new system.

    PubMed

    Konstantino, Yuval; Kleiman, Alex; Amit, Guy

    2016-06-01

    A 56-year-old man underwent a single lead Lumax 640 DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A DX system consists of a single lead, which provides atrial as well as ventricular electrograms, and enhances atrial arrhythmia detection. Three months after the implantation, high-frequency episodes were detected on the far field and the atrial channels, but not on the bipolar right ventricular channel; these were classified as atrial tachycardia. In the present report, we discussed the unusual pattern of the artifacts that was related to an electromagnetic interference detected by the novel DX system. PMID:27354868

  1. Replacement of implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Tilz, Roland; Boveda, Serge; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Dobreanu, Dan; Haugaa, Kristina H; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this EP Wire was to assess the management, indications, and techniques for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device replacement in Europe. A total of 24 centres in 14 European countries completed the questionnaire. All centres were members of the European Heart Rhythm Association Electrophysiology Research Network. Replacement procedures were performed by electrophysiologists in 52% of the centres, by cardiologists in 33%, and both in the remaining centres. In the majority of centres, the procedures were performed during a short hospitalization (<2 days; 61.2%), or on an outpatient basis (28%). The overwhelming majority of centres reported that they replaced ICDs at the end of battery life. Only in a small subset (<10%) of patients with ICD for primary prevention and without ventricular tachycardia (VT) since implantation, ICD was not replaced. In inherited primary arrhythmia syndromes, 80% of the centres always replaced the ICD at the end of battery life. After VT ablation, only few centres (9%) explanted or downgraded the device that was previously implanted for secondary prevention, but only in those patients without new VT episodes. Patient's life expectancy <1 year was the most commonly reported reason (61%) to downgrade from a CRT-D to a CRT-P device. While warfarin therapy was continued in 47% of the centres, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants were discontinued without bridging 24 h prior to replacement procedures in 60%. Finally, in 65% of the centres, VT induction and shock testing during ICD and CRT-D replacement were performed only in the case of leads with a warning or with borderline measurements. This survey provides a snapshot of the perioperative management, indications, and techniques of ICD and CRT device replacement in Europe. It demonstrates some variations between participating centres, probably related to local policies and to the heterogeneity of the ICD population. PMID

  2. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Cedars, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  3. A Young Man Presenting with Pleuritic Chest Pain and Fever after Electrophysiological Study and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement: Diagnostic Difficulties and Value of Bedside Thoracic Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old man presenting with recurrent pleuritic chest pain and prolonged fever after electrophysiology testing and placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator because of a suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. The clinical suspicion was initially directed toward pneumonia with pleural effusion and later toward an infection of the cardiac device complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. The definitive diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and infarction was suggested by a point-of-care thoracic sonography, performed at the bedside by a clinician caring for the patient, and then confirmed by contrast enhanced computed tomography, which also showed thrombosis of the left iliofemoral vein, site of percutaneous puncture for cardiac catheterization. Prolonged fever was attributable to a concomitant Epstein-Barr virus primary infection that acted as confounding factor. The present report confirms the value of bedside thoracic sonography in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. PMID:26576159

  4. Assessing the psychosocial impact of the ICD: a national survey of implantable cardioverter defibrillator health care providers.

    PubMed

    Sears, S F; Todaro, J F; Urizar, G; Lewis, T S; Sirois, B; Wallace, R; Sotile, W; Curtis, A B; Conti, J B

    2000-06-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) provides a survival advantage over antiarrhythmic medications for patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. However, the effect of ICD therapy on quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning are not as well understood. Health care providers (e.g., physicians, nurses) can serve as a valuable source of information related to these ICD outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate health care provider perceptions regarding: (1) the quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning of their ICD recipients, (2) the concerns or problems reported by ICD recipients, and (3) the degree of provider comfort in managing these concerns. The final sample of health care providers (n = 261) rated ICD recipients' global quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning, and specific concerns about health care, lifestyle, special population adjustment, marital and family adjustment, and emotional well-being. With regard to quality-of-life, health care providers reported that the majority of ICD recipients were functioning better (38%) or about the same (47%) than before implantation. However, health care providers reported that 15% of recipients experienced worse quality-of-life postimplantation. Similarly, health care providers indicated that 10%-20% of ICD recipients experienced worse emotional functioning and strained family relationships. Moreover, issues related to driving, dealing with ICD shocks, and depression were the most common ICD recipient concerns. Significant differences were noted between physicians and nurses/other health care professionals on a wide range of psychosocial issues. Health care providers generally reported the most comfort dealing with traditional medical issues (i.e., patient adherence), and the least comfort in managing emotional well-being issues (e.g., depression and anxiety). These results suggest that routine attention to ICD quality-of-life and psychosocial outcomes is indicated for

  5. Safety Of Mris In Patients With Pacemakers And Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Baher, Alex; Shah, Dipan

    2013-01-01

    With a burgeoning population, increases in life expectancy, and expanding indications, the number of patients with cardiac devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators continues to increase each year. A majority of these patients will develop an indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in their lifetime. MRIs have established themselves as one of the most powerful imaging tools for a variety of conditions. However, given the historic safety concerns, many physicians are reluctant to use MRIs in this patient population. In this paper, we discuss the potential adverse effects of MRIs in patients with cardiac devices, review key studies that have addressed strategies to limit adverse effects, and provide our cardiovascular MRI laboratory’s protocol for imaging patients with implanted cardiac devices. PMID:24066196

  6. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shock after Stenting Across the Device Leads.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Sanjay; Chelu, Mihail Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    A 45-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease had lived uneventfully with a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) for 5 years. Less than a month before presenting at our institution, he had undergone stenting of his partially occluded subclavian vein, to relieve stenosis of the ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula that was used for his hemodialysis. The CRT-D subsequently discharged. Device interrogation revealed that electrical noise originating from leads damaged by the stent had caused the inappropriate shock and intermittent electrical discharges thereafter. The patient was highly traumatized by these events and insisted upon device removal, which deprived him of a potentially life-saving intervention. He later had a cardiac arrest that resulted in sustained profound hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with minimal neurologic recovery: his family placed him in a long-term care facility on ventilator support, with a tracheostomy and feeding tube. This situation might have been avoided through collaboration between the interventional radiologist and the electrophysiologist. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease who presented with inappropriate defibrillator discharge caused by lead damage secondary to stenting across the leads. PMID:27047295

  7. [Practical questions around individual with a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Fantoni, Sophie; Montpellier, Dominique; Tordjman, Eric; Jarde, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    An individual with a pacemaker can ask his GP for information about potential problems associated with the device. Should a pacemaker continue to be used by end-of-life patients? Should a pacemaker be stopped in a limited care situation? What precautions should be taken when treating a patient with a pacemaker? Pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Medically, MRIs are theoretically contraindicated, even though examinations could be performed without a major problem, and special precautions should be taken when using an electrosurgical cutter or radiotherapy. In case of death, a doctor or embalmer must remove the patient's pacemaker due to its risk of explosion during cremation. Doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. It may affect an employee's ability to work. Are there some professions that are not well suited for individuals with a pacemaker? PMID:22138293

  8. Remote monitoring and follow-up of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Haran; Senouf, David

    2009-01-01

    In the era of communication technology, new options are now available for following-up patients implanted with pacemakers (PMs) and defibrillators (ICDs). Most major companies offer devices with wireless capabilities that communicate automatically with home transmitters, which then relay data to the physician, thereby allowing remote patient follow-up and monitoring. These systems are being widely used in the USA for remote follow-up, and have been more recently introduced in Europe, where their adoption is increasing. In this article, we describe the currently existing systems, review the available evidence in the literature regarding remote follow-up and monitoring of PMs and ICDs, and finally discuss some unresolved issues. PMID:19470595

  9. [Implanted automatic defibrillator after ventricular fibrillation treated with semi-automatic defibrillation].

    PubMed

    Ould-Ahmed, M; Bordier, E; Leenhardt, A; Frank, R; Michel, A

    1998-01-01

    We report two cases of out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation treated without delay, with basic life support practiced by the witness, followed by a successful defibrillation by paramedics with a semi-automatic defibrillator. In the subsequent month, a cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted. In one patient, a ventricular tachycardia occurring 10 months later and a ventricular fibrillation 9 months later in the other respectively, were successfully reversed by the implanted defibrillator. These two cases illustrate the value of the "survival chain" concept (undelayed alert, basic life support by witness, early defibrillation by paramedics with a semi-automatic defibrillator, advanced life support by a physician) as well as the benefit of the implanted cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:9750683

  10. Effect of age on survival and causes of death after primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, Laurent; Marijon, Eloi; Defaye, Pascal; Piot, Olivier; Sadoul, Nicolas; Perier, Marie-Cecile; Gras, Daniel; Klug, Didier; Algalarrondo, Vincent; Bordachar, Pierre; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Leclercq, Christophe; Babuty, Dominique; Boveda, Serge

    2015-05-15

    The benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) remains controversial in elderly patients and may be attenuated by a greater risk of nonarrhythmic death. We examined the effect of age on outcomes after prophylactic ICD implantation. All patients with coronary artery disease or dilated cardiomyopathy implanted with an ICD for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in 12 French medical centers were included in a retrospective observational study. The 5,534 ICD recipients were divided according to age: 18 to 59 years (n = 2,139), 60 to 74 years (n = 2,693), and ≥75 years (n = 702). Greater prevalences of coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation at the time of implant were observed with increasing age (both p <0.0001). During a mean follow-up of 3.1 ± 2.0 years, the annual mortality rate increased with age: 3.1% per year for age 18 to 59 years, 5.7% per year for age 60 to 74 years, and 7.5% per year for age ≥75 years (p <0.001). Older age was independently associated with a greater risk of death (adjusted odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.80 for age 60 to 74 years; and adjusted odds ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.22 for age >75 years). Proportions of cardiac deaths (55.2%, 57.6%, and 57.0%, p = 0.84), including ICD-unresponsive sudden death (9.9%, 6.0%, and 10.6%, p = 0.08), and rates of appropriate ICD therapies were similar in the 3 age groups. Older age was independently associated with a higher rate of early complications and a lower rate of inappropriate therapies. In conclusion, older patients exhibited higher global mortality after ICD implantation for primary prevention, whereas rates of sudden deaths and of appropriate device therapies were similar across age groups. PMID:25784518

  11. Construction of intracardiac vectorcardiogram from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator intracardiac electrograms.

    PubMed

    Ghafoori, Elyar; Kabir, Muammar M; Cao, Jian; Shvilkin, Alexei; Tereshchenko, Larisa G

    2015-01-01

    We constructed an intracardiac vectorcardiogram from 3 configurations of intracardiac cardiovertor defibrilator (ICD) electrograms (EGMs). Six distinctive 3 lead combinations were selected out of five leads: can to right ventricular coil (RVC); RVC to superior vena cava coil (SVC); atrial lead tip (A-tip) to right ventricular (RV)-ring; can to RV-ring; RV-tip to RVC, in a patient with dual chamber ICD. Surface spatial QRS-T angle (119.8°) was similar to intracardiac spatial QRS-T angle derived from ICD EGMs combination A (101.3°), B (96.1°), C (92.8°), D (95.2), E (99.0), F (96.2) and median (101.5). Future validation of the novel method is needed. PMID:25987408

  12. Sleeping with the fishes: electromagnetic interference causing an inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Hui Min; Cakebread, Holly Elizabeth; Gajendragadkar, Parag Ravindra; Duehmke, Rudolf Martin

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with a cardiac defibrillator implanted due to previous ventricular fibrillation arrest and ischaemic cardiomyopathy received a shock while cleaning his fish pond. At the time, his immersed arm was close to a submersed water pump, but the patient was asymptomatic. As a result of the shock he lost consciousness, but collapsed backwards, away from the pond. Interrogation of the device revealed a high-frequency artefact that was sensed by the device and triggered a shock. Device parameters were otherwise normal. Subsequently, the submersed water pump was found to be the source of an external alternating current leak and was identified as the likely cause of the inappropriate shock due to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Awareness of potential sources of EMI along with evaluation of data with a detailed clinical history is warranted in all cases. PMID:24879728

  13. Battery drain in daily practice and medium-term projections on longevity of cardioverter-defibrillators: an analysis from a remote monitoring database

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Ritter, Philippe; Biffi, Mauro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Valzania, Cinzia; Valsecchi, Sergio; Padeletti, Luigi; Gadler, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Aims The longevity of generators is a crucial determinant of the cost-effectiveness of therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D). We evaluated the trend of device-measured residual battery capacity and longevity projections over 5-year follow-up. We also investigated possible factors associated with battery drain. Methods and results Data from 4851 patients in the European LATITUDE® database who were followed up for a minimum of 3 years were analysed. The factors associated with battery drain (i.e. year-to-year decrease in residual battery capacity), and thus potentially impacting on device longevity, were mainly the pacing parameters in CRT-D devices and the number of shocks delivered and diverted in both ICD and CRT-D (all P < 0.01 on linear regression analysis). Over the first 5 years, the longevity estimates provided by devices showed low intra-patient variability and increased with time. The estimates exceeded 10 years for CRT-D and 13 and 12 years for single- and dual-chamber ICDs, respectively. In CRT-D patients, the expected patient age on replacement was 80 ± 12 years, and the expected probability of undergoing device replacement was 63 ± 13% for New York Heart Association (NYHA) II patients and 37 ± 16% for NYHA III patients. For comparison, the probabilities of replacing a CRT-D lasting 5 years were 78 ± 8 and 59 ± 13%, respectively (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Battery drain was mainly associated with pacing output in CRT-D devices and with the number of capacitor charges in both ICD and CRT-D devices. The longevity estimates provided by the devices were consistent and conservative. According to these estimates, among CRT-D recipients a low proportion of patients should require device replacement. PMID:26847076

  14. Cost-effectiveness of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in Brugada syndrome treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Yamauchi, Kazunobu; Li, Ping; Kato, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kato, Ken; Shimizu, Yoshiyuki

    2008-02-01

    Brugada syndrome is characterized by an ST-segment elevation in the right precordial ECG leads and a high incidence of sudden death in patients with structurally normal hearts. Some trials have demonstrated that the cost-effectiveness of ICD implantation treatment in patients with structurally abnormal hearts is more favorable than that of control treatment. We used Treeage pro 2005 to estimate costs and survival among the Brugada syndrome patients who received either an ICD or were treated by control therapy of Ito-blocking properties (quinidine) or beta-blockers (propranolol). In conclusion, our analysis suggests that prophylactic implantation of an ICD has good cost-effectiveness in patients with Brugada syndrome who are at high risk of sudden death. ICD treatment has shown a cost-effectiveness ratio below $9591 per QALY gained from trials of defibrillator vs beta-blockers for Unexplained Death in Thailand (DEBUT). The control therapy of quinidine may be a good choice for patients who are infants or living in developing countries. PMID:18333406

  15. Gender, Racial, and Health Insurance Differences in the Trend of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Utilization: A United States Experience Over the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nileshkumar J; Edla, Sushruth; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Nalluri, Nikhil; Patel, Nilay; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Patel, Nish; Bhimani, Ronak; Thakkar, Badal; Arora, Shilpkumar; Asti, Deepak; Badheka, Apurva O; Parikh, Valay; Mitrani, Raul D; Noseworthy, Peter; Paydak, Hakan; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Friedman, Paul A; Kowalski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    Prior studies have highlighted disparities in cardiac lifesaving procedure utilization, particularly among women and in minorities. Although there has been a significant increase in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) insertion, socioeconomic disparities still exist in the trend of ICD utilization. With the use of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2003 through 2011, we identified subjects with ICD insertion (procedure code 37.94) and cardiac resynchronization defibrillator (procedure code 00.50, 00.51) as codified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Overall, 1 020 076 ICDs were implanted in the United States from 2003 to 2011. We observed an initial increase in ICD utilization by 51%, from 95 062 in 2003 to 143 262 in 2006, followed by a more recent decline. The majority of ICDs were implanted in men age ≥65 years. Implantation of ICDs was 2.5× more common in men than in women (402 per million vs 163 per million). Approximately 95% of the ICDs were implanted in insured patients, and 5% were used in the uninsured population. There has been a significant increase in ICD implantation in blacks, from 162 per million in 2003 to 291 per million in 2011. We found a significant difference in the volume of ICD implants between the insured and the uninsured patient populations. Racial disparities have narrowed significantly in comparison with those noted in earlier studies and are now more reflective of the population demographics at large. On the other hand, significant gender disparities continue to exist. PMID:26799597

  16. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Octogenarians: Clinical Outcomes From a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D.G.; Ahmed, N.; Nolan, R.; Frontera, A.; Thomas, G.; Duncan, E.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Limited data exist on outcomes in very elderly ICD recipients. We describe outcomes in new ICD and Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy with Defibrillator (CRT-D) implants in octogenarians at our institution. Methods Patients aged 80 years and above who underwent de novo ICD or CRT-D implantation from January 2006 to July 2012 were identified. Clinical data were collected from the procedural record, medical and ICD notes. Baseline characteristics were compared using independent sample t test for continuous variables and Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed. Results Ten per cent of all new ICD/CRT-D implants were aged 80 years and over. Median age was 83.0 years. Median follow-up was 29 months. Death occurred in 17 (34%). Median time to death was 23 months. Three deaths (6%) occurred within 12 months of ICD implantation. Appropriate therapy (ATP or shock) occurred in 19 (38%). Inappropriate therapy occurred in 6 (12%). Rates of appropriate shocks and inappropriate therapy (shocks and ATP) and significant valvular incompetence were higher amongst deceased patients (P=0.03 OR 5.9 95% CI 1.3-27) and (P=0.02 OR 12 95% CI 1.3-112). Univariate analysis identified diuretic use (P=0.008 95% C.I. 0.05 to 0.63) and appropriate shock (P= 0.025 95% C.I. 1.25 to 26.3) as predictors of mortality. Conclusion Octogenarians make up a small but increasing number of ICD recipients. This study highlights high survival rates at one year with acceptable rates of appropriate and inappropriate device therapy. Ongoing debate regarding the appropriateness of ICD in very elderly patients is warranted. PMID:25852237

  17. Implantation of a defibrillator in a patient with an upper airway stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Ong, Adrian A; O'Brien, Terrence X; Nguyen, Shaun A; Gillespie, M Boyd

    2016-02-01

    The patient is a 62-year-old man with continuous positive airway pressure-intolerant obstructive sleep apnea who was enrolled in a study for a hypoglossal nerve upper airway stimulation device (UAS). Nearly 2.5 years later, he was admitted to the hospital for unstable angina. Diagnostic workup revealed a prior myocardial infarction, an ejection fraction of 30% on maximal medical therapy, and episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. During hospitalization, the patient received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This is the first reported case of simultaneous use of a UAS and an ICD, and we report no untoward device interference between the two implantable devices. PMID:26403681

  18. Integrated approach for smart implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) device with real time ECG monitoring: use of flexible sensors for localized arrhythmia sensing and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Munish; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Miranda, Aimon C.; Gelot, Shyam; Moreno, Wilfrido; Adithya, Prashanth C.; Law, Catherine; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2013-01-01

    Arrhythmias are the most common cause of death associated with sudden death and are common in US and worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), evolving from pacemakers and development of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), has been adopted for therapeutic use and demonstrated benefits in patients over the years due to its design and intricate functionality. Recent research has been focused on significant design improvement and efforts are dedicated toward device size reduction, weight and functionality in commercially available ICD's since its invention in the 1960's. Commercially available CRT-D has shown advancement on both clinical and technical side. However, improved focus is required on the device miniaturization, technologically supported and integrated wireless based system for real time heart monitoring electrocardiogram (ECG). In the present report a concise overview for the state-of-the art technology in ICDs and avenues for future development are presented. A unique perspective is also included for ICD device miniaturization and integration of flexible sensing array. Sensor array integration along with its capabilities for identifying localized arrhythmia detection and targeted stimulation for enhancing ICD device capabilities is reviewed. PMID:24167492

  19. Perceptions of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator: A qualitative study of families with a history of sudden life-threatening cardiac events and recommendations to improve care

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Jarrett; Hidayatallah, Nadia; Stolerman, Marina; McDonald, Thomas V.; Marion, Robert; Walsh, Christine; Dolan, Siobhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify major concerns associated with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and to provide recommendations to adult and pediatric physicians involved in the care of patients with ICDs. Background Cardiac ion channelopathies are a well-recognized cause of sudden cardiac death in infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. ICDs are effective in preventing sudden death from fatal arrhythmias in patients with known cardiac channelopathies. There is a paucity of research on the effect of ICDs on quality of life in patients with cardiac channelopathy diagnoses, especially young patients. Methods A qualitative study interviewing patients and families affected by inherited arrhythmias was conducted. Fifty participants with personal or family histories of cardiac events or sudden death were interviewed individually or in focus groups by clinical psychologists. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analyzed and coded based on current qualitative research theory to identify themes related to the research question. Twenty-four participants discussed ICDs in their interviews. Results Participants reported concerns about ICDs, and these concerns were categorized into six themes: (1) comprehension and physician-patient communication; (2) anxiety; (3) restrictions and fallacies; (4) complications; (5) utility; and (6) alternative therapy. Participants noted communication breakdowns between providers and their colleagues, and between providers and their patients. Participants and their families experienced many different forms of anxiety, including worry about the aesthetics of the ICDs and fears of being shocked. Multiple restrictions, fallacies, and complications were also cited. Conclusion Interview themes were used to formulate recommendations for counseling and educating patients with ICDs. PMID:25383067

  20. Usefulness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the treatment of heart failure due to severe systolic dysfunction: systematic review of clinical trials and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    García García, M A; Rosero Arenas, M A; Ruiz Granell, R; Chorro Gascó, F J; Martínez Cornejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, and the combination of these devices (CRT+ICD) in adult patients with left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure. Methods A comprehensive systematic review of randomised clinical trials was conducted. Several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov) were reviewed. The mortality rates between treatments were compared. A network was established comparing the various options, and direct, indirect and mixed comparisons were made using multivariate meta-regression. The degree of clinical and statistical homogeneity was assessed. Results 43 trials involving 13 017 patients were reviewed. Resynchronisation therapy, defibrillators, and combined devices (CRT+ICD) are clearly beneficial compared to optimal medical treatment, showing clear benefit in all of these cases. In a theoretical order of efficiency, the first option is combined therapy (CRT+ICD), the second is CRT, and the third is defibrillator implantation (ICD). Given the observational nature of these comparisons, and the importance of the overlapping CIs, we cannot state that the combined option (CRT+ICD) offers superior survival benefit compared to the other two options. Conclusions The combined option of CRT+ICD seems to be better than the option of CRT alone, although no clear improvement in survival was found for the combined option. It would be advisable to perform a direct comparative study of these two options. PMID:27326223

  1. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator - an analysis from the OPTION trial.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥170 bpm than at rates ≥200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170-200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  2. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator – an analysis from the OPTION trial

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif , Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥170 bpm than at rates ≥200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170–200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  3. Failure of a novel silicone–polyurethane copolymer (Optim™) to prevent implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead insulation abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert G.; Abdelhadi, Raed H.; McGriff, Deepa M.; Kallinen Retel, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to determine if Optim™, a unique copolymer of silicone and polyurethane, protects Riata ST Optim and Durata implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads (SJM, St Jude Medical Inc., Sylmar, CA, USA) from abrasions that cause lead failure. Methods and results We searched the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturers and User Device Experience (MAUDE) database on 13 April 2012 using the simple search terms ‘Riata ST Optim™ abrasion analysis’ and ‘Durata abrasion analysis’. Lead implant time was estimated by subtracting 3 months from the reported lead age. The MAUDE search returned 15 reports for Riata ST Optim™ and 37 reports for Durata leads, which were submitted by SJM based on its analyses of returned leads for clinical events that occurred between December 2007 and January 2012. Riata ST Optim™ leads had been implanted 29.1 ± 11.7 months. Eight of 15 leads had can abrasions and three abrasions were caused by friction with another device, most likely another lead. Four of these abrasions resulted in high-voltage failures and one death. One failure was caused by an internal insulation defect. Durata leads had been implanted 22.2 ± 10.6 months. Twelve Durata leads had can abrasions, and six leads had abrasions caused by friction with another device. Of these 18 can and other device abrasions, 13 (72%) had electrical abnormalities. Low impedances identified three internal insulation abrasions. Conclusions Riata ST Optim™ and Durata ICD leads have failed due to insulation abrasions. Optim™ did not prevent these abrasions, which developed ≤4 years after implant. Studies are needed to determine the incidence of these failures and their clinical implications. PMID:22915789

  4. A pilot study of a mindfulness based stress reduction program in adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators or pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Thomas, Sue A; Friedmann, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or pacemakers (PMs) face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. Psychosocial interventions are effective for adults with cardiac devices and could potentially impact adolescents' adjustment to these devices. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured psycho-educational program that includes meditation, yoga, and group support and has been studied extensively among adults. This study examined the feasibility of the MBSR program for adolescents with ICDs/PMs, a population previously unexamined in the research literature. The participants completed measures of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and coping (Responses to Stress Questionnaire) at baseline and after the six-session MBSR intervention. Mean age of the cohort (n = 10) was 15 ± 3 years, 6 were male, 6 had a PM, and 4 had an ICD. Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment of 10 participants, 100 % participation and completion. Anxiety decreased significantly following the intervention, with a large effect size, t[9] = 3.67, p < .01, ŋ (2) = .59. Anxiety frequency decreased from baseline to post-intervention (Fisher's exact test p = .024), and 90 % of participants reported decreased anxiety scores post-intervention. Coping skills related negatively to anxiety (r = -.65, p = .04) and depression (r = -.88, p = .001). Post-intervention, the group independently formed their own Facebook group and requested to continue meeting monthly. Although generalizability is limited due to the small sample size, this successful pilot study paves the way for larger studies to examine the efficacy of MBSR interventions in adolescents with high-risk cardiac diagnoses. PMID:25519914

  5. Longevity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for cardiac resynchronization therapy in current clinical practice: an analysis according to influencing factors, device generation, and manufacturer

    PubMed Central

    Landolina, Maurizio; Curnis, Antonio; Morani, Giovanni; Vado, Antonello; Ammendola, Ernesto; D'onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Crosato, Martino; Petracci, Barbara; Ceriotti, Carlo; Bontempi, Luca; Morosato, Martina; Ballari, Gian Paolo; Gasparini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims Device replacement at the time of battery depletion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may carry a considerable risk of complications and engenders costs for healthcare systems. Therefore, ICD device longevity is extremely important both from a clinical and economic standpoint. Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) battery longevity is shorter than ICDs. We determined the rate of replacements for battery depletion and we identified possible determinants of early depletion in a series of patients who had undergone implantation of CRT-D devices. Methods and results We retrieved data on 1726 consecutive CRT-D systems implanted from January 2008 to March 2010 in nine centres. Five years after a successful CRT-D implantation procedure, 46% of devices were replaced due to battery depletion. The time to device replacement for battery depletion differed considerably among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers, with rates of batteries still in service at 5 years ranging from 52 to 88% (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were independent determinants of early depletion [hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57–2.46; P < 0.001 and HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01; P < 0.001, respectively]. The implantation of a recent-generation device (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45–0.72; P < 0.001), the battery chemistry and the CRT-D manufacturer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47–0.89; P = 0.008) were additional factors associated with replacement for battery depletion. Conclusion The device longevity at 5 years was 54%. High left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were associated with early battery depletion, while recent-generation CRT-Ds displayed better longevity. Significant differences emerged among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers. PMID:25976906

  6. Comparison of the Effects of High-Energy Photon Beam Irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 Types of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. Methods and Materials: ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Results: Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. Conclusions: ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field.

  7. Sexual Health for Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Cover Doodle → Blip the Doodle Go Red For Women's Issue Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  8. Combined etiology of anaphylactic cardiogenic shock: Amiodarone, epinephrine, cardioverter defibrillator, left ventricular assist devices and the Kounis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G.; Soufras, George D.; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition which needs detailed and mediculous clinical assessment and thoughtful treatment. Several causes can join forces in order to degranulate mast cells. Amiodarone which is an iodine-containing highly lipophilic benzofuran can induce allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock in sensitized patients. Epinephrine is a life saving drug, but in sulfite allergic patients it should be given with caution due its metabisulfite preservative. Metals covering cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers can act as antigens attached to serum proteins and induce allergic reactions. In anaphylactic shock, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Clinically, combined treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance. PMID:25849705

  9. Performance of re-used pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators compared with new devices at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jama, Zimasa V; Chin, Ashley; Mayosi, Bongani M; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the performance of re-used pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in Africa. We sought to compare the risk of infection and the rate of malfunction of re-used pacemakers and ICDs with new devices implanted at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods This was a retrospective case comparison study of the performance of re-used pacemakers and ICDs in comparison with new devices implanted at Groote Schuur Hospital over a 10-year period. The outcomes were incidence of device infection, device malfunction, early battery depletion, and device removal due to infection, malfunction, or early battery depletion. Results Data for 126 devices implanted in 126 patients between 2003 and 2013 were analysed, of which 102 (81%) were pacemakers (51 re-used and 51 new) and 24 (19%) were ICDs (12 re-used and 12 new). There was no device infection, malfunction, early battery depletion or device removal in either the re-used or new pacemaker groups over the median follow up of 15.1 months [interquartile range (IQR), 1.3–36.24 months] for the re-used pacemakers, and 55.8 months (IQR, 20.3–77.8 months) for the new pacemakers. In the ICD group, no device infection occurred over a median follow up of 35.9 months (IQR, 17.0–70.9 months) for the re-used ICDs and 45.7 months (IQR, 37.6–53.7 months) for the new ICDs. One device delivered inappropriate shocks, which resolved without intervention and with no harm to the patient. This re-used ICD subsequently needed generator replacement 14 months later. In both the pacemaker and ICD groups, there were no procedure-non-related infections documented for the respective follow-up periods. Conclusion No significant differences were found in performance between re-used and new pacemakers and ICDs with regard to infection rates, device malfunction, battery life and device removal for complications. Pacemaker and ICD re-use is feasible and safe and is a viable option for

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging, pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: current situation and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Götte, M.J.W.; Rüssel, I.K.; de Roest, G.J.; Germans, T.; Veldkamp, R.F.; Knaapen, P.; Allaart, C.P.; van Rossum, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    New developments and expanding indications have resulted in a significant increase in the number of patients with pacemakers and internal cardioverterdefibrillators (ICDs). Because of its unique capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important imaging modalities for evaluation of the central nervous system, tumours, musculoskeletal disorders and some cardiovascular diseases. As a consequence of these developments, an increasing number of patients with implanted devices meet the standard indications for MRI examination. Due to the presence of potential life-threatening risks and interactions, however, pacemakers and ICDs are currently not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in an MRI scanner. Despite these limitations and restrictions, a limited but still growing number of studies reporting on the effects and safety issues of MRI and implanted devices have been published. Because physicians will be increasingly confronted with the issue of MRI in patients with implanted devices, this overview is given. The effects of MRI on an implanted pacemaker and/or ICDs and vice versa are described and, based on the current literature, a strategy for safe performance of MRI in these patients is proposed. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:31-7.) PMID:20111641

  11. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  12. An updated review of implantable cardioverter/defibrillators, induced anxiety, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael; Sola, Christopher L

    2007-12-01

    During the past 2 years the number of studies examining psychopathology and quality of life after ICD implantation has increased dramatically. Variables assessed have included recipient age, gender, and social support network. How recipients respond to having the device, particularly after experiencing firing, has been evaluated in light of new depression and anxiety disorder diagnoses as well as premorbid personality structure. Now the picture of what is known is, if anything, cloudier than it was 2 years ago, with little definitive and much contradictory data emerging in most of these categories. It still seems clear that in a significant minority of ICD recipients the device negatively affects quality of life, probably more so if it fires. Education about life with the device before receiving it remains paramount. Reports continue to appear of patients developing new-onset diagnosable anxiety disorders such as panic and posttraumatic stress disorder. Until recently the strongest predictors of induced psychopathology were considered to be the frequency and recency of device firing. It now seems that preimplantation psychologic variables such as degree of optimism or pessimism and an anxious personality style may confer an even greater risk than previously thought. Certainly many variables factor into the induction of psychopathology in these patients. Among these factors are age, gender, and perception of control of shocks, as well as the predictability of shocks and psychologic attributions made by the patient regarding the device. Another source of variability is this population's medical heterogeneity. Some patients receive ICDs after near-death experiences; others get them as anticipatory prophylaxis. Some have longstanding and entrenched heart disease; others were apparently healthy before sudden dangerous arrhythmias. Diagnoses as diverse as myocardial infarction in the context of advanced coronary artery disease and dilated cardiomyopathy after acute viral

  13. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  14. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Does an ICD Work During ICD Surgery After ICD Surgery What Are the Risks Lifestyle Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Heart Attack How the Heart Works Pacemakers Sudden Cardiac Arrest Send a link to NHLBI to ...

  15. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... leave the hospital, you will be given a card to keep in your wallet. This card lists the details of your ICD and has contact information for emergencies. Carry your ICD identification card with you AT ALL TIMES. The information it ...

  16. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart failure ... Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  17. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin. Like pacemakers , ICDs contain a generator containing a computer, battery, and wires called “leads” ... while the other end is connected to the generator. The battery in the generator lasts 5-8 ...

  18. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Be careful around metal detectors and security wands. Handheld security wands may interfere with your ICD. Show your ... card and ask to be hand searched. Most security gates at airports and stores are okay. But ...

  19. Manual for the psychotherapeutic treatment of acute and post-traumatic stress disorders following multiple shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jochen; Titscher, Georg; Peregrinova, Ludmila; Kirsch, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), the number of people suffering from so-called “multiple ICD shocks” is also increasing. The delivery of more than five shocks (appropriate or inappropriate) in 12 months or three or more shocks (so called multiple shocks) in a short time period (24 hours) leads to an increasing number of patients suffering from severe psychological distress (anxiety disorder, panic disorder, adjustment disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder). Untreated persons show chronic disease processes and a low rate of spontaneous remission and have an increased morbidity and mortality. Few papers have been published concerning the psychotherapeutic treatment for these patients. Objective: The aim of this study is to develop a psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder or adjustment disorder after multiple ICD shocks. Design: Explorative feasibility study: Treatment of 22 patients as a natural design without randomisation and without control group. The period of recruitment was three years, from March 2007 to March 2010. The study consisted of two phases: in the first phase (pilot study) we tested different components and dosages of psychotherapeutic treatments. The final intervention programme is presented in this paper. In the second phase (follow-up study) we assessed the residual post-traumatic stress symptoms in these ICD patients. The time between treatment and follow-up measurement was 12 to 30 months. Population: Thirty-one patients were assigned to the Department of Psychocardiology after multiple shocks. The sample consisted of 22 patients who had a post-traumatic stress disorder or an adjustment disorder and were willing and able to participate. They were invited for psychological treatment. 18 of them could be included into the follow-up study. Methods: After the clinical assessment at the beginning and at the end of the inpatient treatment a post

  20. Development of a hybrid battery system for an implantable biomedical device, especially a defibrillator/cardioverter (ICD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Jürgen; Wolf, R.; Fehrmann, G.; Staub, R.

    An implantable defibrillator battery has to provide pulse power capabilities as well as high energy density. Low self-discharge rates are mandatory and a way to check the remaining available capacity is necessary. These requirements are accomplished by a system consisting of a lithium/manganese dioxide 6 V battery, plus a lithium/iodine-cell. The use of a high rate 6 V double-cell design in combination with a high energy density cell reduces the total volume required by the power source within an implantable defibrillator. The design features and performance data of the hybrid system are described.

  1. Elderly Benefit from Using Implantable Defibrillators

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Learn More Elderly benefit from using implantable defibrillators June 17, 2013 Categories: Heart News Study Highlights: Older people may benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) as much as younger people. Overall health, ...

  2. Rationale and design of a prospective study of the efficacy of a remote monitoring system used in implantable cardioverter defibrillator follow-up: the Lumos-T Reduces Routine Office Device Follow-Up Study (TRUST) study.

    PubMed

    Varma, Niraj

    2007-12-01

    Increased implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant volumes (and product advisories/recalls) pose management challenges. Most device interrogations at 3- to 6-month routine follow-up visits are "nonactionable," that is, require no clinically significant reprogramming, lead revision, or initiation or up-titration of antiarrhythmic medications. Conversely, implanted devices collect important diagnostic data (eg, atrial fibrillation onset, system integrity) that remain concealed between device interrogations. Remote monitoring may resolve some of these challenges, but has not been studied in a large-scale clinical trial. Home Monitoring (HM) uses automatic (without patient intervention) data and electrogram transmissions with rapid (<24 hours) event notification of significant (including silent) events. The Lumos-T Reduces Routine Office Device Follow-Up Study (TRUST) is a multicenter, prospective, randomized study enrolling 1000 ICD patients designed to test whether HM can safely reduce the number of scheduled nonactionable office device interrogations by 50% and provide early detection and notification of cardiac and/or device problems. After enrollment, TRUST patients are randomized 2:1 to either HM or to control (ie, HM off) arms and are seen for an in-office follow-up 3 months postimplant. At subsequent 3-month intervals, control patients have conventional office visits, whereas in HM, patient data are remotely retrieved and evaluated. In HM patients, early notification may automatically occur between periodic checks for compromised system integrity (battery, lead parameters, high-voltage circuitry) or arrhythmia occurrence (eg, atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmia). All study patients will have a final office visit 15 months after implant. The results of TRUST may confirm the role of remote monitoring as an intensive surveillance mechanism for device management. PMID:18035071

  3. Utilization and likelihood of radiologic diagnostic imaging in patients with implantable cardiac defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ryan, Michael P.; Wolff, Steven D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah A.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine imaging utilization in a matched cohort of patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and to project magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilization over a 10‐year period. Materials and Methods The Truven Health MarketScan Commercial claims and Medicare Supplemental health insurance claims data were used to identify patients with continuous health plan enrollment in 2009–2012. Patients with ICDs were identified using ICD‐9 and CPT codes, and matched to patients with the same demographic and comorbidity profile, but no record of device implantation. Diagnostic imaging utilization was compared across the matched cohorts, in total, by imaging categories, and in subpopulations of stroke, back pain, and joint pain. MRI use in the nonimplant group over the 4‐year period was extrapolated out to 10 years for ICD‐indicated patients. Results A cohort of 18,770 matched patients were identified; average age 65.5 ± 13.38 and 21.9% female. ICD patients had significantly less MRI imaging (0.23 0.70 SD vs. 0.00 0.08 SD, P < 0.0001) than nonimplant patients. Among patients with records of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) (ICD 5%, nonimplant 4%) and accompanying diagnostic imaging, 44% of nonimplant patients underwent MRI vs. 1% of ICD patients (P < 0.0001). Forecast models estimated that 53% to 64% of ICD‐eligible patients may require an MRI within 10 years. Conclusion MRI utilization is lower in ICD patients compared to nonimplant patients, yet the burden of incident stroke/TIA, back, and joint pain suggests an unmet need for MR‐conditional devices. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:115–127. PMID:26118943

  4. Inappropriate Shock Delivered By Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator - Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (ICD-CRT) Due To Myopotential Oversensing

    PubMed Central

    Barakpour, Hamid; Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of ICD-CRT therapy depends on accurate sensing of intracardiac signals and sensing algorithms. We report the occurrence of sensing abnormality in a patient with ICD-CRT. In this patient, oversensing of myopotentials during strenuous muscular activity resulted in an inappropriate ICD-CRT discharge. Although modern ICDs are highly effective in detecting and terminating malignant tachyarrhythmias, their detection specificity must be improved. It is possible to find the mechanism of arrhythmia by EGM. Simple device reprogramming make it possible to avoid the oversensing of myopotentials. PMID:19165363

  5. Runaway implantable defibrillator--a rare complication of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Jan

    2007-05-01

    A case of a patient with runaway implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) due to radiation therapy of a lung cancer is reported. This manifested as poorly tolerated wide complex tachycardia due to inappropriate rapid ventricular pacing, The event terminated with polymorphic VT, which inhibited pacing and ceased spontaneously before ICD discharge. The likely cause was corruption of device random access memory by ionizing radiation. PMID:17461884

  6. Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... discriminator functions and lacks antitachycardia pacing. Expanded Programmability Programming that allows lower shock energies and the ability ... the original device and placed in a new one. Postprocedural hospitalization is occasionally needed. Replacement procedures can ...

  7. Impact of expanding indications on the safety of pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Maisel, William H

    2003-01-01

    The number of patients living with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) increased markedly during the 1990's. Expanding device indications and increasing device sophistication has important implications for patient and device safety. While the FDA is responsible for assessing the safety and efficacy of medical devices, manufacturers, physicians, patients, medical professional societies, and legislators will all play a role in ensuring that medical device patients continue to receive safe, quality medical care. PMID:12766513

  8. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary. PMID:26706454

  9. A patient with commotio cordis successfully resuscitated by bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Ngai, K Y; Chan, H Y; Ng, F

    2010-10-01

    Sudden deaths of children and adolescents during competitive sports are usually due to congenital heart diseases. Ventricular fibrillation, however, may also occur in individuals with no underlying cardiac disease who have sustained a low-impact chest wall blow. This phenomenon is described as commotio cordis, and the overall survival rate is poor. Successful resuscitation can be achieved by prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation and early defibrillation. We report a teenager who sustained a chest wall blow that resulted in a cardiac arrest during a rugby competition. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was given by bystanders. The ambulance crew arrived with an automated external defibrillator. Ventricular fibrillation was detected and responded to defibrillation. Subsequent investigations including imaging and electrophysiological studies did not reveal any cardiac or brain abnormality, and the patient recovered well neurologically. Accessible cardiopulmonary resuscitation-trained personnel and automated external defibrillators should be present at all organised sporting events. PMID:20890008

  10. Coping with Trauma and Stressful Events As a Patient with an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... 29, 2013 Jessica Ford From the Departments of Psychology (J.F., S.F.S.) and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences (S. ... site Samuel F. Sears From the Departments of Psychology (J.F., S.F.S.) and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences (S. ...

  11. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiacimpedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  12. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50-300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz - 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  13. T-wave alternans negative coronary patients with low ejection and benefit from defibrillator implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Ikeda, T.; Bloomfield, D. M.; Dabbous, O. H.; Cohen, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    In a trial of prophylactic implantation of a defibrillator, a mortality benefit was seen among patients with previous myocardial infarction and a left-ventricular ejection fraction of 0.30 or less. We identified 129 similar patients from two previously published clinical trials in which microvolt T-wave alternans testing was prospectively assessed. At 24 months of follow-up, no sudden cardiac death or cardiac arrest was seen among patients who tested T-wave alternans negative, compared with an event rate of 15.6% among the remaining patients. Testing of T-wave alternans seems to identify patients who are at low risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmic event and who may not benefit from defibrillator therapy.

  14. Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Lead Failure and Management.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Charles D; Kalahasty, Gautham; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-03-22

    The implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead is the most vulnerable component of the ICD system. Despite advanced engineering design, sophisticated manufacturing techniques, and extensive bench, pre-clinical, and clinical testing, lead failure (LF) remains the Achilles' heel of the ICD system. ICD LF has a broad range of adverse outcomes, ranging from intermittent inappropriate pacing to proarrhythmia leading to patient mortality. ICD LF is often considered in the context of design or construction defects, but is more appropriately considered in the context of the finite service life of a mechanical component placed in chemically stressful environment and subjected to continuous mechanical stresses. This clinical review summarizes LF mechanisms, assessment, and differential diagnosis of LF, including lead diagnostics, recent prominent lead recalls, and management of LF and functioning, but recalled leads. Despite recent advances in lead technology, physicians will likely continue to need to understand how to manage patients with transvenous ICD leads. PMID:26988958

  15. A Study to Improve Communication Between Clinicians and Patients With Advanced Heart Failure: Methods and Challenges Behind the Working to Improve diScussions about DefibrillatOr Management (WISDOM) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Nathan E.; Kalman, Jill; Kutner, Jean S.; Fromme, Erik K.; Hutchinson, Mathew D.; Lipman, Hannah I.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Swetz, Keith M.; Lampert, Rachel; Herasme, Omarys; Morrison, R. Sean

    2014-01-01

    We report the challenges of the Working to Improve diScussions about DefibrillatOr Management (WISDOM) Trial, our novel, multicenter trial aimed at improving communication between cardiology clinicians and their patients with advanced heart failure (HF) who have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The study objectives are to: 1) increase ICD deactivation conversations; 2) increase the number of ICDs deactivated; and 3) improve psychological outcomes in bereaved caregivers. The unit of randomization is the hospital, the intervention is aimed at HF clinicians, and the patient and caregiver are the units of analysis. Three hospitals were randomized to usual care and three to intervention. The intervention consists of an interactive educational session, clinician reminders, and individualized feedback. We enroll patients with advanced HF and their caregivers, and then we regularly survey them to evaluate whether the intervention has improved communication between them and their heart failure providers. We encountered three implementation barriers. First, there were Institutional Review Board (IRB) concerns at two sites because of the palliative nature of the study. Second, we had difficulty in creating entry criteria that accurately identified a HF population at high risk of dying. Third, we had to adapt our entry criteria to the changing landscape of ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplant eligibility. Here we present our novel solutions to the difficulties we encountered. Our work has the ability to enhance conduct of future studies focusing on improving care for patients with advanced illness. PMID:24768595

  16. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of pacemaker and defibrillator implantation by axillary incision in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joselyn C R; Shannon, Kevin; Boyle, Noel G; Klitzner, Thomas S; Bersohn, Malcolm M

    2004-03-01

    We successfully implanted 11 pacemakers, 6 defibrillators, and 1 biventricular pacemaker in 18 pediatric patients (15 female; 4 to 15 years, average age: 9) using the retropectoral transvenous approach with a hidden axillary incision. The average follow-up period was 24 months (range 49 months). Eight patients had congenital structural heart conditions (d-transposition of great arteries S/P Mustard operation, d-transposition of great arteries S/P arterial switch operation, truncus arteriosus, right ventricular diverticula, ventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Four patients had acquired heart conditions (dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis). Excellent sensing and pacing thresholds were achieved in all attempted implantations. There was no pneumothorax. There was one lead dislodgement. One lead fracture distant from the subclavian vein occurred 4 months after implantation. Implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators via axillary incisions can be safe and effective in pediatric patients. This approach avoids skin erosion when implanting large devices such as defibrillators or biventricular devices in small patients with limited muscle mass while achieving superior aesthetic results. The axillary or extrathoracic venous entry site avoids subclavian crush syndrome. PMID:15009854

  17. [Semi-automatic defibrillators does not always interpret heart rhythms correctly. Five patients were defibrillated despite non-shockable rhythms].

    PubMed

    Wangenheim, Burkard; Israelsson, Johan; Lindstaedt, Michael; Carlsson, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AED) have become an important part of the »the chain of survival« in case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), where early defibrillation is lifesaving. The American Heart Association demands that AEDs have a specificity of >99 % to recognize normal sinus rhythm and >95 % for the other non-shockable rhythms. Reports on their performance in the field are scarce. We present five cases in which AED recommended shock for apparently non-shockable rhythms. This indicates the necessity to systematically reevaluate AED performance. PMID:26241809

  18. Interference from a hand held radiofrequency remote control causing discharge of an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Man, K C; Davidson, T; Langberg, J J; Morady, F; Kalbfleisch, S J

    1993-08-01

    A 46-year-old man with a history of sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia underwent an implantation of a third generation multiprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillator. One year post implant, while manipulating a remote control to a radiofrequency modulated toy car, the patient experienced a defibrillator discharge not preceded by an arrhythmia prodrome. Subsequent interrogation of the defibrillator revealed that a 34-joule shock had been delivered and had been preceded by RR intervals ranging from 141-406 msec, consistent with sensing lead noise. The remote control utilizes a 12-volt battery and has a carrier frequency of 75.95 MHz and a modulating frequency of 50 Hz. Evaluation of the remote control and defibrillator interaction revealed that the remote control was able to trigger tachyarrhythmia sensing and reproduce the clinical episode. Interference was present only when the remote control was within 8 cm of the pulse generator and at specific angles relative to the device and only when the antenna length was > 45 cm. Interference was eliminated when a ground wire was attached to the antenna and when an aluminium shield was placed between the pulse generator and the remote control. This case report suggests that patients with third generation multiprogrammable defibrillators should be cautioned against close contact with potential sources of electromagnetic interference, such as remote control units. PMID:7690947

  19. Who Needs an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator?

    MedlinePlus

    ... would make one likely) on the following tests. EKG (Electrocardiogram) An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects and ... beating and its rhythm (steady or irregular). An EKG also records the strength and timing of electrical ...

  20. Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Treatment for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... phone, and has two main parts: a pulse generator and one or more leads. The pulse generator constantly keeps track of your heartbeat. It’s like ... say: "leed") is a wire from the pulse generator to the inside of your heart. The lead ...

  1. Wearable 'Defibrillator-In-A-Vest' May Help Some Heart Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158001.html Wearable 'Defibrillator-in-a-Vest' May Help Some Heart ... what the relative benefit is," he added. The wearable defibrillator is worn under clothes looks like a " ...

  2. [Clinical development of the automatic implantable defibrillator over 35 years: A success story].

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, G

    2015-06-01

    After 12 years of development and experimental evaluation, the first automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was implanted in man on February 4, 1980. This overview describes the technical and functional developments over 35 years from a simple shock-box, weighing 292 g, to the sophisticated 80 g device of today, delivering graded therapy to sustained ventricular arrhythmias and biventricular stimulation to treat heart failure. Finally, a special tribute is given to Michel Mirowski, one of the inventors of the ICD, as scientist and physician dedicated to patient care. PMID:25990264

  3. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    2003-05-01

    Defibrillator/monitors allow operators to assess and monitor a patient's ECG and, when necessary, deliver a defibrillating shock to the heart. When integral noninvasive pacing is added, the device is called a defibrillator/monitor/pacemaker. In this Evaluation, we present our findings for two newly evaluated models, the Welch Allyn PIC 50 and the Zoll M Series CCT, and we summarize our findings for the previously evaluated models that are still on the market. We rate the models for the following applications: general crash-cart use, in-hospital transport use, and emergency medical service (EMS) use. PMID:12827940

  4. [Usage of a defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Inomata, Masahiko

    2011-04-01

    Guideline 2010 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation was released the other day. There is no big change in the use of a defibrillator. Asynchronous defibrillation is used as a therapy for VF and pulseless VT. When you find a patient, start CPR immediately and prepare a defibrillator. About the value of energy, comply a recommended value of defibrillator's manufacturer with biphasic waveform, on the other hand, deliver 360J shock with monophasic waveform. Cardioversion is used as a therapy for supraventricular arrhythmia like atrial fibrillation. It is important to synchronize with QRS complex on ECG surely and deliver a shock. If it is not synchronized surely, there is a possibility to occur VF. Transcutaneous pacing is used as a therapy for bradycardia. It produces a depolarization of myocardium by giving current stimulus from a surface of a body, and force a heart to contract. It is usually carried out at demand mode, and confirmed that a heart contracts certainly. Defibrillator is an only device to terminate VF and pulseless VT and it is important to test defibrillator usually so that it can be used any time it is necessary. PMID:21591425

  5. Development and feasibility testing of decision support for patients who are candidates for a prophylactic implantable defibrillator: a study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients, identified to be at risk for but who have never experienced a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia, have the option of receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as prophylaxis against sudden cardiac death - a primary prevention indication. In Canada, there is no clear framework to support patients’ decision-making for these devices. Decision support, using a decision aid, could moderate treatment-related uncertainty and prepare patients to make well-informed decisions. Patient decision aids provide information on treatment options, risks, and benefits, to help patients clarify their values for outcomes of treatment options. The objectives of this research are: 1) develop a decision aid, 2) evaluate the decision aid, and 3) determine the feasibility of conducting a trial. Methods/design A development panel comprised of the core investigative team, health service researchers, decision science experts, cardiovascular healthcare practitioners, and ICD patient representatives will collaborate to provide input on the content and format of the aid. To generate probabilities to include in the aid, we will synthesize primary prevention ICD evidence. To obtain anonymous input about the facts and content, we will employ a modified Delphi process. To evaluate the draft decision aid will invite ICD patients and their families (n = 30) to rate its acceptability. After we evaluate the aid, to determine the feasibility, we will conduct a feasibility pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) in new ICD candidates (n = 80). Participants will be randomized to receive a decision aid prior to specialist consultation versus usual care. Results from the pilot RCT will determine the feasibility of research processes; inform sample size calculation, measure decision quality (knowledge, values, decision conflict) and the influence of health related quality of life on decision-making. Discussion Our study seeks to develop a decision aid, for patients

  6. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  7. Frequent Home Monitoring of ICD Is Effective to Prevent Inappropriate Defibrillator Shock Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Paolo; Argenziano, Luigi; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario; Sansone, Mario; Casella, Stefano; Nardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Recently, in the context of telemedicine, telemonitoring services are gaining attention. They are offered, for example, to patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. The telemonitoring can provide a valid support to intensify followup visits, in order to improve the prevention of inappropriate defibrillator shock, thus enhancing patient safety. Inappropriate shock generally depends on atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, and abnormal sensing (such as those caused by electromagnetic interferences). As a practical example, an unusual case of an ICD patient who risked an inappropriate shock while taking a shower is reported. Continuous remote telemonitoring was able to timely warn cardiologist via GSM-SMS, who were able to detect improper sensing examining the intracardiac electrogram via Web. Patient was promptly contacted and warned to not further come in contact with the hydraulic system and any electrical appliance to prevent an inappropriate defibrillator shock. This demonstrates the effectiveness and usefulness of continuous remote telemonitoring in supporting ICD patients. PMID:24592279

  8. An unusual etiological agent of implantable cardioverter device endocarditis: Corynebacterium mucifaciens.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Adnan; Tekkesin, Ahmet Ilker; Kalenderoglu, Koray; Alper, Ahmet Taha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac pacing devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are becoming the mainstay of therapy in cardiology and infective endocarditis (IE) and pocket infection; however, these devices require careful monitoring. Here, we describe a case of a 68-year-old female with an ICD presenting with a previously unknown etiological agent of IE, Corynebacterium mucifaciens. PMID:27133333

  9. ANTIARRHYTHMICS VERSUS IMPLANTABLE DEFIBRILLATORS (AVID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluates whether use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) results in reduction in total mortality, when compared with conventional pharmacological therapy, in patients resuscitated from sudden cardiac death who are otherwise at very high risk of mortality from arrhythmi...

  10. Increased defibrillator therapies during influenza season in patients without influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sheldon M.; de Souza, Russell J.; Kumareswaran, Ramanan

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between influenza vaccination and implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) therapies during influenza season is not known and is described in this study. Understanding this association is important since reduction in ICD therapies during influenza season via use of influenza vaccination would benefit patients physically and psychologically. Methods Patients presenting to the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center ICD clinic between September 1st, 2011 and November 31st, 2011 were asked to complete a survey evaluating their use of the influenza vaccine. The number of patients with any ICD therapy and the total number of ICD therapies in the six months before and the three months during the 2010–2011 influenza season were determined. Poisson regression analysis was employed to assess differences in the average number of ICD therapies received during the influenza season based on vaccine status (vaccinated vs. unvaccinated). The analysis was repeated after limiting the cohort to patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%. Results A total of 229 patients completed the survey, 78% of whom received the influenza vaccine. Four patients had more than one ICD shock during the study period. Electrical storm was rare (n=2). A trend toward more ICD therapies (unadjusted incident rate ratio (IRR)=3.2; P=0.07) and appropriate ICD shocks (unadjusted IRR=9.0; P=0.17) was noted for unvaccinated compared to vaccinated patients. This association persisted when analysis was limited to patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% (all ICD therapies: unadjusted IRR=5.8; P=0.045; adjusted IRR=2.6; P=0.33). No patient who received the influenza vaccine, and had a reduced ejection fraction, received an approprite ICD shock during influenza season (unadjusted P<0.002). Conclusion A trend toward more ICD therapies during influenza season was observed in patients who did not receive the influenza vaccine compared to those who did. The

  11. Recurrent ventricular fibrillation under sufficient medical treatment in patient with coronary artery spasm

    PubMed Central

    Hiki, Masaru; Tokano, Takashi; Nakazato, Yuji; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In cases of coronary artery spasm, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias are possible and can lead to sudden cardiac death. Treatment for this condition includes implantable cardioverter defibrillators, but their effectiveness in patients who present with ventricular fibrillation is debated. Our patient presented with intractable ventricular fibrillation episodes that triggered shocks from her implanted defibrillator. At 2 years of follow-up, we placed her on 200 mg/day of oral amiodarone, after identifying short-coupled premature contractions as the trigger for the ventricular fibrillation. In the 2 years following initiation of this drug therapy, the patient had no further fibrillation episodes. PMID:23821622

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  13. Exchange of pacing or defibrillator leads following laser sheath extraction of non-functional leads in patients with ipsilateral obstructed venous access

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, F; van Gelder, L M; Sreeram, N; Meijer, A

    2000-01-01

    Occlusion of the subclavian or brachiocephalic vein in pacemaker or defibrillator patients prohibits ipsilateral implantation of new leads with standard techniques in the event of lead malfunction. Three patients are presented in whom laser sheath extraction of a non-functional lead was performed in order to recanalise the occluded vein and to secure a route for implantation of new leads. This technique avoids abandoning a useful subpectoral site for pacing or defibrillator therapy. The laser sheath does not affect normally functioning leads at the same site.


Keywords: laser sheath; venous occlusion; pacemaker; lead extraction PMID:10814646

  14. [Implantation of a biventricular ICD in a patient with dextrocardia with situs inversus].

    PubMed

    Vurgun, Veysel Kutay; Gerede, Menekşe; Altın, Ali Timuçin; Candemir, Başar; Akyürek, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce sudden cardiac death and heart failure symptoms, biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is a treatment method commonly used in selected patients with cardiomyopathy. The frequency of dextrocardia in congenital heart defects is approximately 0.4/10000. In this group, the frequency of cardiomyopathy development is rare. In this case report we present a patient with dextrocardia undergoing implantation of biventricular ICD. PMID:25655858

  15. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy: Risk Stratification and Indications for Defibrillator Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Rigato, Ilaria; Bauce, Barbara; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a genetically determined disease which predisposes to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The main goal of ARVC therapy is prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the most effective therapy for interruption of potentially lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Despite its life-saving potential, ICD implantation is associated with a high rate of complications and significant impact on quality of life. Accurate risk stratification is needed to identify individuals who most benefit from the therapy. While there is general agreement that patients with a history of cardiac arrest or hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia are at high risk of SCD and needs an ICD, indications for primary prevention remain a matter of debate. The article reviews the available scientific evidence and guidelines that may help to stratify the arrhythmic risk of ARVC patients and guide ICD implantation. Other therapeutic strategies, either alternative or additional to ICD, will be also addressed. PMID:27147509

  16. Considerations in Patients With Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices at End of Life.

    PubMed

    Gura, Melanie T

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of implantable cardiac pacemakers in 1958 and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in 1980, these devices have been proven to save and prolong lives. Pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy are deemed life-sustaining therapies. Despite these life-saving technologies, all patients ultimately will reach the end of their lives from either their heart disease or development of a terminal illness. Clinicians may be faced with patient and family requests to withdraw these life-sustaining therapies. The purpose of this article is to educate clinicians about the legal and ethical principles that underlie withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies such as device deactivation and to highlight the importance of proactive communication with patients and families in these situations. PMID:26484996

  17. Comparative reproducibility of defibrillation threshold and upper limit of vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, C D; Davie, S; Ahern, T; Chen, P S

    1996-12-01

    The upper limit of vulnerability (ULV) is the strength at or above which VF is not induced when a stimulus is delivered during the vulnerable phase of the cardiac cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between the ULV and the defibrillation threshold (DFT) in groups of patients. However, the correlation between ULV and DFT may not be close in individual patients. This imperfect correlation may be due to physiological factors or to limitations of the measurement methods. The reproducibility of either DFT or ULV has not been studied critically. The purpose of this study was to compare the reproducibility of clinically applicable methods for determination of DFT and ULV. We prospectively studied 25 patients with a transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (Medtronic 7219D) at postoperative electrophysiological study. DFT was defined as the lowest energy that defibrillated after 10 seconds of VF. The ULV was defined as the lowest energy that did not induce VF with three shocks at 0, 20, and 40 ms before the peak of the T wave in ventricular paced rhythm at a cycle length of 500 ms. Both the DFT and the ULV were determined twice for biphasic pulses using a three-step, midpoint protocol. There was no significant difference between the two determinations of DFT (10.1 +/- 5.9 J vs 10.4 +/- 5.8 J), the two determinations of ULV (13.4 +/- 6.8 J vs 13.8 +/- 6.6) or the DFT-ULV Pearson correlation coefficients for each determination (0.84, P < 0.001 vs 0.75, P < 0.001). To analyze reproducibility, Lin concordance coefficients for second determination versus first determination were constructed for both ULV and DFT. This coefficient is similar to the Pearson correlation coefficient, but measures closeness to the line of identity rather than the line of regression. The Lin concordance coefficient for ULV was higher than that for DFT (0.93, 95% CI 0.85-0.97 vs 0.64, 95% CI 0.33-0.82; P < 0.01). For paired comparison of

  18. Defibrillation safety in emergency helicopter transport.

    PubMed

    Dedrick, D K; Darga, A; Landis, D; Burney, R E

    1989-01-01

    Rotary aircraft play a growing role in the transport of critically ill patients who may require emergency treatment, including defibrillation, during transport. The close quarters and proximity of vital electronic equipment have generated concern among personnel carrying out defibrillation in the air. We address the chief safety issues in helicopter defibrillation by providing measurements of the transient leakage current resulting from contact with a paddle and tested in-flight electronic interference and survey the defibrillation experience of helicopter programs. Our data show that airborne defibrillation is safe. A maximum of 1.5 mA of transient leakage current was measured from a standard battery-powered defibrillator, well within the accepted safety standard of 50 mA. In flight, there was no interference with the avionics or medical equipment, and adequate clearance was available for personnel. Of the helicopter programs surveyed, 69 (87%) had defibrillated in flight without incident. We conclude that defibrillation can be performed in the helicopter without hesitation whether on the ground or in the air, provided standard defibrillation precautions are observed. PMID:2910165

  19. Atrial sensor, remote monitoring and new anticoagulant drugs: Identification and treatment of a patient with unknown and asymptomatic atrial flutter

    PubMed Central

    Quartieri, Fabio; Giacopelli, Daniele; Iori, Matteo; Bottoni, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes how new tools and technologies can drive a different approach in the management of arrhythmic patients. An unknown and asymptomatic atrial flutter was detected by the atrial sensor mounted in a single lead implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Moreover daily remote monitoring of the device allowed early notification and prompt clinical reaction. Anticoagulant therapy onset, radiofrequency ablation and the following anticoagulant therapy removal were driven by the device data transmissions. PMID:26937114

  20. A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Patients With an Entirely Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator System Versus a Transvenous System (from the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Quality of Life Substudy).

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Carter, Nathan; Barr, Craig; Neuzil, Petr; Scholten, Marcoen; Lambiase, Pier D; Boersma, Lucas; Johansen, Jens B; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2016-08-15

    The first clinical results from the Evaluation of Factors Impacting Clinical Outcome and Cost Effectiveness of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (EFFORTLESS S-ICD) Registry on the entirely S-ICD system are promising, but the impact of the S-ICD system on patients' quality of life (QoL) is not known. We evaluated the QoL of patients with an S-ICD against an unrelated cohort with a transvenous (TV)-ICD system during 6 months of follow-up. Consecutively implanted patients with an S-ICD system were matched with patients with a TV-ICD system on a priori selected variables including baseline QoL. QoL was measured with the Short-Form Health Survey at baseline, 3, and 6 months after implant and compared using multivariable modeling with repeated measures. Patients with an S-ICD (n = 167) versus a TV-ICD system (n = 167) did not differ significantly on physical (p = 0.8157) and mental QoL scores (p = 0.9080) across baseline, 3, and 6 months after implantation in adjusted analyses. The evolution in physical (p = 0.0503) and mental scores (p = 0.3772) during follow-up was similar for both cohorts, as indicated by the nonsignificant interaction effect for ICD system by time. Both patients with an S-ICD system and a TV-ICD system experienced significant improvements in physical and mental QoL between time of implant and 3 months (both p's <0.0001) and between time of implant and 6 months (both p's <0.0001) but not between 3 and 6 months (both p's >0.05). In conclusion, these first results show that the QoL of patients with an S-ICD versus TV-ICD system is similar and that patients with either system experience improvements in QoL on the short term. PMID:27353211

  1. Frozen shoulder syndrome associated with subpectoral defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Burke, M C; Drinan, K; Kopp, D E; Kall, J G; Verdino, R J; Paydak, H; Wilber, D J

    1999-10-01

    Pectoral implantation of transvenous non-thoracotomy internal cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) has resulted in very few complications whether placed subpectorally or subcutaneously. We report the case of a 68 year old man with a subpectorally implanted MINI-plus (Cardiac Pacemakers, Incorporated, St. Paul, Mn.) transvenous ICD who developed nearly instantaneous severe ipsilateral shoulder pain and immobilization. The symptoms progressed despite aggressive physical therapy. We elected to remove the device from the pectoral site and place it in a traditional abdominal position due to the severity, duration and refractoriness of his symptoms. This procedure utilized the chronic Endotak DSP (Model 0125, Cardiac Pacemakers, Incorporated) transvenous lead, a compatible Endotak DSP lead extender (Model 6952, Cardiac Pacemakers, Incorporated) and the above described ICD. Immediate relief of symptoms was accomplished by relocation of the device to an abdominal site. This intervention should be reserved for patients with severely debilitating symptoms. Prospective comparison of subpectoral and subcutaneous surgical approaches with respect to patient comfort and acceptance and complications may be warranted. PMID:10490482

  2. Automated External Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Automated External Defibrillator? An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that ... Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  3. Cost-Utility Analysis of the EVOLVO Study on Remote Monitoring for Heart Failure Patients With Implantable Defibrillators: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Landolina, Maurizio; Marzegalli, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio; Perego, Giovanni B; Guenzati, Giuseppe; Curnis, Antonio; Valsecchi, Sergio; Borghetti, Francesca; Borghi, Gabriella; Masella, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure patients with implantable defibrillators place a significant burden on health care systems. Remote monitoring allows assessment of device function and heart failure parameters, and may represent a safe, effective, and cost-saving method compared to conventional in-office follow-up. Objective We hypothesized that remote device monitoring represents a cost-effective approach. This paper summarizes the economic evaluation of the Evolution of Management Strategies of Heart Failure Patients With Implantable Defibrillators (EVOLVO) study, a multicenter clinical trial aimed at measuring the benefits of remote monitoring for heart failure patients with implantable defibrillators. Methods Two hundred patients implanted with a wireless transmission–enabled implantable defibrillator were randomized to receive either remote monitoring or the conventional method of in-person evaluations. Patients were followed for 16 months with a protocol of scheduled in-office and remote follow-ups. The economic evaluation of the intervention was conducted from the perspectives of the health care system and the patient. A cost-utility analysis was performed to measure whether the intervention was cost-effective in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Overall, remote monitoring did not show significant annual cost savings for the health care system (€1962.78 versus €2130.01; P=.80). There was a significant reduction of the annual cost for the patients in the remote arm in comparison to the standard arm (€291.36 versus €381.34; P=.01). Cost-utility analysis was performed for 180 patients for whom QALYs were available. The patients in the remote arm gained 0.065 QALYs more than those in the standard arm over 16 months, with a cost savings of €888.10 per patient. Results from the cost-utility analysis of the EVOLVO study show that remote monitoring is a cost-effective and dominant solution. Conclusions Remote management of heart

  4. Questions to Ask Your Doctor--Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... implanted to restore normal heart rhythm and prevent sudden cardiac death. To help you understand what it does and how it may affect you or your family member before and after implantation, ask your doctor or healthcare team any ...

  5. How to Respond to an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Recall

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart Association Facebook Twitter Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY ... Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Facebook Twitter Home About this ...

  6. How Will Having an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders or electrical generators. Rarely, ICDs have caused unnecessary shocks during long, ...

  7. Combining Amplitude Spectrum Area with Previous Shock Information Using Neural Networks Improves Prediction Performance of Defibrillation Outcome for Subsequent Shocks in Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Mi; Lu, Yubao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hehua; Gong, Yushun; Li, Yongqin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Quantitative ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveform analysis is a potentially powerful tool to optimize defibrillation. However, whether combining VF features with additional attributes that related to the previous shock could enhance the prediction performance for subsequent shocks is still uncertain. Methods A total of 528 defibrillation shocks from 199 patients experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed in this study. VF waveform was quantified using amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) from defibrillator's ECG recordings prior to each shock. Combinations of AMSA with previous shock index (PSI) or/and change of AMSA (ΔAMSA) between successive shocks were exercised through a training dataset including 255shocks from 99patientswith neural networks. Performance of the combination methods were compared with AMSA based single feature prediction by area under receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC), sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and prediction accuracy (PA) through a validation dataset that was consisted of 273 shocks from 100patients. Results A total of61 (61.0%) patients required subsequent shocks (N = 173) in the validation dataset. Combining AMSA with PSI and ΔAMSA obtained highest AUC (0.904 vs. 0.819, p<0.001) among different combination approaches for subsequent shocks. Sensitivity (76.5% vs. 35.3%, p<0.001), NPV (90.2% vs. 76.9%, p = 0.007) and PA (86.1% vs. 74.0%, p = 0.005)were greatly improved compared with AMSA based single feature prediction with a threshold of 90% specificity. Conclusion In this retrospective study, combining AMSA with previous shock information using neural networks greatly improves prediction performance of defibrillation outcome for subsequent shocks. PMID:26863222

  8. Efficacy of cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator insertion in patients undergone coronary artery bypass graft: A cohort study of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Saburi, Amin; Ajudani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven therapeutic method in selected patients with heart failure and systolic dysfunction which increases left ventricular function and patient survival. We designed a study that included patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), with and without CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D) inserting and then measured its effects on these two groups. Patients and Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, we conducted a prospective cohort study on 100 coronary artery disease patients where candidate for CABG. Then based on the receiving CRT-D, the patients were categorized in two groups; Group 1 (n = 48, with CRT-D insertion before CABG) and Group 2 (n = 52 without receiving CRT-D). Thereafter both of these groups were followed-up at 1–3 months after CABG for mortality, hospitalization, atrial fibrillation (AF), echocardiographic assessment, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class level. Results: The mean age of participants in Group 1 (48 male) and in Group 2 (52 male) was 58 ± 13 and 57 ± 12 respectively. Difference between Groups 1 and 2 in cases of mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) changes and NYHA class level was significant (P > 0.05). Hospitalization (P = 0.008), mortality rate (P = 0.007), and AF were significantly different between these two groups. Conclusions: The results showed that the increase in LVEF and patient's improvement according to NYHA-class was significant in the first group, and readmission, mortality rate and AF was increased significantly in the second group. PMID:25566709

  9. Comparison of five different defibrillators using recommended energy protocols.

    PubMed

    Zelinka, M; Buić, D; Zelinka, I

    2007-09-01

    Biphasic defibrillators represent a great step ahead in defibrillation. The manufacturers claim that biphasic defibrillators are able to compensate for differences in transthoracic impedance. That should mean that all patients should be defibrillated with approximately the same amount of current, regardless of their transthoracic impedance. We assessed one monophasic and four biphasic defibrillators. The defibrillators were discharged into resistive loads of 50, 90 and 130 Omega, simulating transthoracic impedance. For each waveform we used energy protocols recommended by the manufacturers and guidelines 2005. Waveforms were observed with on a digitising oscilloscope on a current sensing resistor. We compared the electrical properties of different waveforms and two defibrillators with the same type of waveform. The influence of different impedance on shape, duration and amplitude of current flow were also observed for each waveform. Measurements showed a significant difference in current flow at different impedance loads. At low impedance the mean current is well above expectations for all the defibrillators studied and at high impedance load we observed a big reduction of current amplitude. We can conclude that the compensating mechanisms of biphasic defibrillators are, from electrical point of view, negligible. From the laws of physics it is practically impossible to keep same level of current at given time with same energy at higher impedance. That is why we should reconsider the use of different energy equivalents between patients with different transthoracic impedance and not between different defibrillation impulses. PMID:17466431

  10. “That’s Like an Act of Suicide” Patients’ Attitudes Toward Deactivation of Implantable Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Davendra; Siddiqui, Saima; Teitelbaum, Ezra; Zeidman, Jessica; Singson, Magdelena; Pe, Elena; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Morrison, R. Sean

    2007-01-01

    Objective To understand potential patient barriers to discussions about implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) deactivation in patients with advanced illness. Design Qualitative focus groups. Participants Fifteen community-dwelling, ambulatory patients with ICDs assigned to focus groups based on duration of time since implantation and whether they had ever received a shock from their device. Approach A physician and a social worker used a predetermined discussion guide to moderate the groups, and each session was audiotaped and subsequently transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using the method of constant comparison. Results No participant had ever discussed deactivation with their physician nor knew that deactivation was an option. Patients expressed a great deal of anxiety about receiving shocks from their device. Participants discussed why they needed the device and expressed desire for more information about the device; however, they would not engage in conversations about deactivating the ICD. One patient described deactivation “like an act of suicide” and all patients believed that the device was exclusively beneficial. Patients also expressed a desire to have their physician make the decision about deactivation. Conclusions None of the patients in our study knew that they might need to deactivate their ICD as their health worsens. These community-dwelling outpatients were not willing to discuss the issue of ICD deactivation and their attitudes about deactivation might impede patients from engaging in these conversations. These findings are in contrast to findings in other advance care planning research and may be related to the unique nature of the ICD. PMID:18095037