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Sample records for care alpha-1 antitrypsin

  1. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  4. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  5. Detecting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a widely underrecognized condition, with evidence of persisting long diagnostic delays and patients' frequent need to see multiple physicians before initial diagnosis. Reasons for underrecognition include inadequate understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency by physicians and allied health care providers; failure to implement available, guideline-based practice recommendations; and the belief that effective therapy is unavailable. Multiple studies have described both the results of screening and targeted detection of individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with both varying strategies employed to identify at-risk individuals and varying results of testing. Also, various strategies to enhance detection of affected individuals have been examined, including use of the electronic medical record to prompt testing and empowerment of allied health providers, especially respiratory therapists, to promote testing for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Such efforts are likely to enhance detection with the expected result that the harmful effects of delayed diagnosis can be mitigated. PMID:27564667

  6. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  7. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its ... of these treatments are the same as the ones used for a lung disease called COPD (chronic ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetic modifiers of emphysema risk. Thorax. 2004 Mar;59(3):259-64. Review. Citation on PubMed ... alpha}1-antitrypsin deficiency. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):546-50. doi: 10.1001/ ...

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Inherited Emphysema)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 protein in the blood with normal alpha-1 antitrypsin from healthy plasma donors. It is given in a vein (IV). The dose is adjusted based on body weight. This treatment is often given once a week. There are three ... the management of Alpha-1 related emphysema includes: • Exercise and a healthy lifestyle ...

  10. [Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Camelier, Aquiles A; Winter, Daniel Hugo; Jardim, José Roberto; Barboza, Carlos Eduardo Galvão; Cukier, Alberto; Miravitlles, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues. PMID:18695797

  11. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. ... it doesn't mean that you'll develop one of the diseases related to the condition. Some ...

  12. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    PubMed

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  13. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin and Lung Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Serban, Karina A; Petrache, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) as the principal circulating inhibitor of neutrophil elastase was critical to the appreciation of protease/antiprotease imbalance involvement in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Additional targets of A1AT have been uncovered, along with their contribution to alveolar wall destruction induced by cigarette smoke exposure. We highlight in this report mechanisms of A1AT antiapoptotic effects on structural lung endothelial cells. This function was largely dependent on uptake of the protein from the circulation via clathrin- and, in part, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and on specific interactions with cysteine proteases such as capsase-3, -6, and -7. Exposures to cigarette smoke diminished A1AT intracellular uptake and its anticaspase action, suggesting that even in A1AT-suficient individuals, cigarette smoke may weaken the serpin's endothelial prosurvival effect. In addition, cigarette smoke exposure or genetic mutations known to induce posttranslational modifications such as oxidation or polymerization may alter A1AT bidirectional intracellular traffic in endothelial cells and thus determine its functional bioavailability in certain lung compartments. Uncovering and harnessing the A1AT canonical and noncanonical mechanisms will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of emphysema and may provide means to improve the effectiveness of therapies in both A1AT-sufficient and A1AT-deficient individuals. PMID:27115949

  14. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy. PMID:26238635

  15. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevented? You can't prevent alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency because the condition is inherited (passed from ... children through genes). If you inherit two faulty AAT genes, you'll have AAT deficiency. Even so, ...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866....5130 Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-antitrypsin... the alpha-1-antitrypsin (a plasma protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. The...

  17. The Role of Neutrophils in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is characterized by low levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin and an increased risk for emphysema, liver disease, and panniculitis. The reduced levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin in AATD predispose the lung to unopposed proteolytic activity, predominantly from neutrophil-derived proteases, chiefly neutrophil elastase. This leads to emphysema. The mechanisms subtending the liver disease are less well understood, but are probably due to a "gain-of function" inflammatory process in the liver, stoked by intracellular retention of aberrantly folded alpha-1 antitrypsin. The panniculitis associated with AATD is most likely due to unopposed proteolytic activity in the skin. Although AATD has been traditionally viewed as a condition arising from a protease-antiprotease imbalance in the lung, it is increasingly recognized that AATD is an inflammatory disorder, both in the lung and in the extrapulmonary manifestations associated with the condition. This inflammation is predominantly neutrophil driven, and there are several alpha-1 antitrypsin-related mechanisms involved in potentiating this neutrophilic response. The rationale for AAT augmentation therapy in AATD is classically based on restoring the antiprotease balance in the lung, but its beneficial effects may also be exerted systemically, further exposing the pathogenesis of AATD-related disease and indicating a potential usage for alpha-1 antitrypsin in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:27564664

  18. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Imran; Saleh, Aarash D.; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R.; Gooptu, Bibek

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate—and therefore polymerize—more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the “breach” region and “shutter” region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care. PMID:26091018

  19. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Saleh, Aarash D; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate-and therefore polymerize-more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the "breach" region and "shutter" region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care. PMID:26091018

  20. Neutrophil Fates in Bronchiectasis and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Derek W; Gaggar, Amit; Solomon, George M

    2016-04-01

    The neutrophil is a powerful cellular defender of the vulnerable interface between the environment and pulmonary tissues. This cell's potent weapons are carefully calibrated in the healthy state to maximize effectiveness in fighting pathogens while minimizing tissue damage and allowing for repair of what damage does occur. The three related chronic airway disorders of cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency all demonstrate significant derangements of this homeostatic system that result in their respective pathologies. An important shared feature among them is the inefficient resolution of chronic inflammation that serves as a central means for neutrophil-driven lung damage resulting in disease progression. Examining the commonalities and divergences between these diseases in the light of their immunopathology is informative and may help guide us toward future therapeutics designed to modulate the neutrophil's interplay with the pulmonary environment. PMID:27115946

  1. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  2. New Concepts in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Disease Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stefan J; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer A; Chambers, Joseph E; Patel, Vruti; Dominicus, Caia S; Malzer, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is predominantly caused by point mutations that alter the protein's folding. These mutations fall into two broad categories: those that destabilize the protein dramatically and lead to its post-translational degradation and those that affect protein structure more subtly to promote protein polymerization within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This distinction is important because it determines the cell's response to each mutant. The severely misfolded mutants trigger an unfolded protein response (UPR) that promotes improved protein folding but can kill the cell in the chronic setting. In contrast, mutations that permit polymer formation fail to activate the UPR but instead promote a nuclear factor-κB-mediated ER overload response. The ability of polymers to increase a cell's sensitivity to ER stress likely explains apparent inconsistencies in the alpha-1 antitrypsin-signaling literature that have linked polymers with the UPR. In this review we discuss the use of mutant serpins to dissect each signaling pathway. PMID:27564663

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  4. Biomarkers in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Turino, Gerard M; Ma, Shuren; Cantor, Jerome O; Lin, Yong Y

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers of pathogenesis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly accelerate drug development. In COPD related to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the role of neutrophil elastase and its inhibition by alpha-1 antitrypsin protein focused interest on elastin degradation and the development of pulmonary emphysema. Amino acids desmosine and isodesmosine are unique cross-links in mature elastin fibers and can serve as biomarkers of elastin degradation when measured in body fluids. This review gives a perspective on what has been learned by the earliest measurements of desmosine and isodesmosine followed by later studies using methods of increased sensitivity and specificity and the meaning for developing new therapies. Also included are brief statements on the biomarkers fibrinogen, CC-16, and Aa-Val-360 in COPD. PMID:27564670

  5. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education ... Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual ...

  6. [The interaction of human alpha 1-antitrypsin with human plasmin].

    PubMed

    Sakurama, S

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) with plasmin was investigated, and the molecular weight of the inhibitor was also re-evaluated. The value of molecular weight of alpha 1-AT determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) method showed a difference depending on the presence or absence of the reducing agent, resulting in 72,000 dalton before reduction and 59,000 dalton after reduction. Conclusively, the molecular weight of alpha 1-AT was appropriate to be 59,000 dalton from considering the molecular shape of the protein. The interaction of alpha 1-AT with plasmin was analysed by SDS-PAGE method. Unreduced analysis revealed that two kinds of complexes with different molecular weight (the major of 155,000 dalton and the minor of 140,000 dalton) were formed time dependently, suggesting that the former was a native complex and the latter was a degraded product. Reduced analysis disclosed that the light chain of plasmin involved the complex formation with the inhibitor, and a peptide of 16,000 dalton appeared during the reaction. From these observations, the mechanism of action was summarized as follows. First, alpha 1-AT inhibited all of the plasmin activities by forming a 1: 1 stoichiometric complex with the enzyme, presumably with the active center of the enzyme, whose complex is undissociable in the presence of denaturing or reducing agents or both. Secondly, the native complex broke into a degraded product and a released peptide by limited proteolysis with the free plasmin which existed in the reaction mixture even with an excess of alpha 1-AT due to the reaction of complex formation being time consuming. The clinical significance of alpha 1-AT on fibrinolysis was also subject for discussion. PMID:6232193

  7. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  8. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandhaus, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a condition caused by the inheritance of two mutated SERPINA1 gene alleles. Individuals with AATD are at increased risk of injury to the liver and lungs. The pulmonary manifestations include precocious onset of pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis. For nearly three decades, treatment has been available to individuals with emphysema caused by AATD, but this therapy-augmentation of plasma and tissue alpha-1 antitrypsin levels by intravenous administration of human plasma-derived protein-was approved by regulatory authorities based on its biochemical efficacy. This therapy appears to slow the progression of emphysema in patients with AATD. The medical, patient, and regulatory communities have sought assurance that this expensive therapy provides measurable clinical benefit. Documenting such benefit has been difficult because of the slow progression of the underlying lung disease in AATD, the rarity of this genetic condition, and the lack of direct quantitative measurements of emphysema progression. Over the past decade, quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry of the lungs has been found to correlate with severity and progression of emphysema. The recent publication of a well-powered, masked, placebo-controlled study using CT densitometry to evaluate the effectiveness of augmentation therapy at slowing the progression of emphysema has provided some assurance of the clinical efficacy of this therapy. PMID:27564674

  9. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  10. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the alpha-1-antitrypsin (a plasma protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. The...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the alpha-1-antitrypsin (a plasma protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. The...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the alpha-1-antitrypsin (a plasma protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. The...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the alpha-1-antitrypsin (a plasma protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. The...

  14. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside. PMID:27564673

  15. An ECLIPSE View of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lomas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent condition that is estimated to become the third leading cause of death in 2020. The ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) study, funded by GlaxoSmithKline, is an observational study designed to define outcomes that can be used as endpoints in clinical trials in individuals with COPD. It allowed us to describe the heterogeneity of COPD, the stability of the exacerbation phenotype, and the factors associated with a progressive decline in lung function and the progression of emphysema on computed tomography scans. The cohort was also used to define genetic factors and biomarkers associated with COPD and disease progression. This review considers how the results from ECLIPSE can inform our understanding of the lung disease associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27564668

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: increasing awareness and improving diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus F

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary disorder that is characterized by a low serum level of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT). The loss of anti-inflammatory and antiproteolytic functions, together with pro-inflammatory effects of polymerized AAT contribute to protein degradation and increased inflammation resulting in an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema, especially in smokers. AATD is a rare disease that is significantly underdiagnosed. According to recent data that are based on extrapolations, in many countries only 5-15% of homozygous individuals have been identified. Furthermore, the diagnostic delay typically exceeds 5 years, resulting in an average age at diagnosis of about 45 years. Although the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society recommendations state that all symptomatic adults with persistent airway obstruction should be screened, these recommendations are not being followed. Potential reasons for that include missing knowledge about the disease and the appropriate tests, and the low awareness of physicians with regard to the disorder. Once the decision to initiate testing has been made, a screening test (AAT serum level or other) should be performed. Further diagnostic evaluation is based on the following techniques: polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for frequent and clinically important mutations, isoelectric focusing (IEF) with or without immunoblotting, and sequencing of the gene locus coding for AAT. Various diagnostic algorithms have been published for AATD detection (severe deficiency or carrier status). Modern laboratory approaches like the use of serum separator cards, a lateral flow assay to detect the Z-protein, and a broader availability of next-generation sequencing are recent advances, likely to alter existing algorithms. PMID:26341117

  17. Active Trafficking of Alpha 1 Antitrypsin across the Lung Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Angelia D.; Brown, Mary Beth; Santos-Falcon, Nieves; Rush, Natalia I.; Oueini, Houssam; Oberle, Amber J.; Bolanis, Esther; Fragoso, Miryam A.; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Serban, Karina A.; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Presson Jr., Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The homeostatic lung protective effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) may require the transport of circulating proteinase inhibitor across an intact lung endothelial barrier. We hypothesized that uninjured pulmonary endothelial cells transport A1AT to lung epithelial cells. Purified human A1AT was rapidly taken up by confluent primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers, was secreted extracellularly, both apically and basolaterally, and was taken up by adjacent rat lung epithelial cells co-cultured on polarized transwells. Similarly, polarized primary human lung epithelial cells took up basolaterally-, but not apically-supplied A1AT, followed by apical secretion. Evidence of A1AT transcytosis across lung microcirculation was confirmed in vivo by two-photon intravital microscopy in mice. Time-lapse confocal microscopy indicated that A1AT co-localized with Golgi in the endothelium whilst inhibition of the classical secretory pathway with tunicamycin significantly increased intracellular retention of A1AT. However, inhibition of Golgi secretion promoted non-classical A1AT secretion, associated with microparticle release. Polymerized A1AT or A1AT supplied to endothelial cells exposed to soluble cigarette smoke extract had decreased transcytosis. These results suggest previously unappreciated pathways of A1AT bidirectional uptake and secretion from lung endothelial cells towards the alveolar epithelium and airspaces. A1AT trafficking may determine its functional bioavailablity in the lung, which could be impaired in individuals exposed to smoking or in those with A1AT deficiency. PMID:24743137

  18. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Investigations Using Animal Models of Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kevin; Serban, Karina A; Batra, Chanan; Petrache, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Animal models of disease help accelerate the translation of basic science discoveries to the bedside, because they permit experimental interrogation of mechanisms at relatively high throughput, while accounting for the complexity of an intact organism. From the groundbreaking observation of emphysema-like alveolar destruction after direct instillation of elastase in the lungs to the more clinically relevant model of airspace enlargement induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, animal models have advanced our understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) function. Experimental in vivo models that, at least in part, replicate clinical human phenotypes facilitate the translation of mechanistic findings into individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and with AAT deficiency. In addition, unexpected findings of alveolar enlargement in various transgenic mice have led to novel hypotheses of emphysema development. Previous challenges in manipulating the AAT genes in mice can now be overcome with new transgenic approaches that will likely advance our understanding of functions of this essential, lung-protective serine protease inhibitor (serpin). PMID:27564666

  19. [Pathogenesis of liver disease in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Vogel, W; Braunsteiner, T; Dietze, O; Braunsteiner, H

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is one of the most common lethal hereditary disorders. Approximately 5 to 10% of the general population carry an "at risk" gene for the development of liver disease or emphysema of the lung. Patients with A1ATD associated liver disease constitute a histologically and clinically heterogeneous group. The pathogenesis of the disease still remains to be elucidated. Recent experimental evidence produced in the transgenic mouse model is in favour of the engorgement hypothesis considering the deposition of amorphous A1AT in the hepatocytes the prime event causing liver disease. This theory, however, fails to explain the clinical observation of the presence of a number of other factors known to cause chronic liver disease in A1ATD patients. The latter observation is in support of the deficiency theory, which explains the pathogenesis of emphysema of the lung, and would point to A1ATD as a predisposition to acquire chronic disease. The meaning of the increased synthesis of stress proteins in patients with liver disease is still speculative. PMID:2092568

  20. Cefoperazone prevents the inactivation of alpha(1)-antitrypsin by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Arduino, N; Bertolotto, M; Ottonello, L

    1999-09-01

    At sites of neutrophilic inflammation, tissue injury by neutrophil elastase is favored by phagocyte-induced hypochlorous acid-dependent inactivation of the natural elastase inhibitor alpha(1)-antitrypsin. In the present study, cefoperazone prevented alpha(1)-antitrypsin inactivation by neutrophils and reduced the recovery of hypochlorous acid from these cells. Moreover, the antibiotic reduced the free elastase activity in a neutrophil suspension supplemented with alpha(1)-antitrypsin without affecting the cells' ability to release elastase. These data suggest that the drug inactivates hypochlorous acid before its reaction with alpha(1)-antitrypsin, thereby permitting the antiprotease-mediated blockade of released elastase. In conclusion, cefoperazone appears to have the potential for limiting elastase-antielastase imbalances, attenuating the related tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:10471586

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? The ... ability to be physically active, and wheezing. These signs and symptoms most often begin between the ages ...

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis and the Lung Disease Associated with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two of the commonest lethal hereditary lung diseases affecting white individuals. Although having quite different phenotypic extrapulmonary presentations, the lung disease associated with these conditions is exemplified by a neutrophil-dominated inflammation in which neutrophil elastase plays a major role. In AAT deficiency the diminution of the anti-neutrophil elastase protection, due to diminished AAT levels in the lung, predisposes the lung to an unopposed neutrophil elastase attack, whereas, in cystic fibrosis, the levels of AAT and other antiproteases are normal, but the neutrophil elastase burden is so large that it overwhelms the normal anti-neutrophil elastase protection. With this as background, it seems logical to augment the anti-neutrophil elastase defenses of the lung in both conditions using exogenous AAT. The type of AAT, the route of administration, and the physiologic, radiologic, and clinical readouts for this type of therapy are discussed, along with the similarities and differences between the two conditions and their responses to AAT therapy. PMID:27115956

  3. Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Blanco, I; Lipsker, D; Lara, B; Janciauskiene, S

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a very rare disease. Its estimated prevalence is 1 in 1000 subjects with severe AATD (usually white individuals with a Pi*ZZ genotype). It is manifested clinically by painful recurrent ulcerating subcutaneous nodules, and characterized histologically by dense infiltrates of neutrophils in the deep dermis and connective-tissue septae, with secondary lobular panniculitis. It may be the only clinical manifestation of AATD, although it can also occur together with the classical pulmonary or hepatic manifestations of the disease. AATD-associated panniculitis is not only very rare but may also be significantly underdiagnosed. The physician managing a case of panniculitis with a clinical presentation suggestive of AATD and a compatible skin biopsy should measure serum AAT concentration and, if low, determine the AAT phenotype by isoelectric focusing. If uncertainty remains, the SERPINA1 gene should be sequenced to identify the genotype. If AATD is diagnosed, AATD testing of first-degree family members should be performed in order to take appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures, including genetic counselling, education on inheritance, risk arising from tobacco smoke, occupational exposure to pollutants and hepatotoxic substances, and the provision of information on clinical management. Cases of panniculitis in which conventional therapy with dapsone has failed may be managed with intravenous augmentative therapy using human AAT. The current manuscript addresses the fundamental concepts of the pathogenesis of AATD-associated panniculitis and describes the clinical presentation and management of cases in order to reduce underdiagnosis and improve outcomes. PMID:26595240

  4. Update on alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: New therapies.

    PubMed

    Lomas, David A; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek

    2016-08-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is characterised by the misfolding and intracellular polymerisation of mutant α1-antitrypsin within the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes. The retention of mutant protein causes hepatic damage and cirrhosis whilst the lack of an important circulating protease inhibitor predisposes the individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency to early onset emphysema. Our work over the past 25years has led to new paradigms for the liver and lung disease associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency. We review here the molecular pathology of the cirrhosis and emphysema associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency and show how an understanding of this condition provided the paradigm for a wider group of disorders that we have termed the serpinopathies. The detailed understanding of the pathobiology of α1-antitrypsin deficiency has identified important disease mechanisms to target. As a result, several novel parallel and complementary therapeutic approaches are in development with some now in clinical trials. We provide an overview of these new therapies for the liver and lung disease associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27034252

  5. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis Study. Alpha-1 Protocol.

    PubMed

    Strange, Charlie; Senior, Robert M; Sciurba, Frank; O'Neal, Scott; Morris, Alison; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Bowler, Russell; Hochheiser, Harry S; Becich, Michael J; Zhang, Yingze; Leader, Joseph K; Methé, Barbara A; Kaminski, Naftali; Sandhaus, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Severe deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin has a highly variable clinical presentation. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis α1 Study is a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional study of adults older than age 35 years with PiZZ or PiMZ alpha-1 antitrypsin genotypes. It is designed to better understand if microbial factors influence this heterogeneity. Clinical symptoms, pulmonary function testing, computed chest tomography, exercise capacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) will be used to define chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) phenotypes that can be studied with an integrated systems biology approach that includes plasma proteomics; mouth, BAL, and stool microbiome and virome analysis; and blood microRNA and blood mononuclear cell RNA and DNA profiling. We will rely on global genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome datasets. Matched cohorts of PiZZ participants on or off alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy, PiMZ participants not on augmentation therapy, and control participants from the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study who match on FEV1 and age will be compared. In the primary analysis, we will determine if the PiZZ individuals on augmentation therapy have a difference in lower respiratory tract microbes identified compared with matched PiZZ individuals who are not on augmentation therapy. By characterizing the microbiome in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), we hope to define new phenotypes of COPD that explain some of the diversity of clinical presentations. As a unique genetic cause of COPD, AATD may inform typical COPD pathogenesis, and better understanding of it may illuminate the complex interplay between environment and genetics. Although the biologic approaches are hypothesis generating, the results may lead to development of novel biomarkers, better understanding of COPD phenotypes, and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic trials in AATD and COPD

  6. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  7. Faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin as a marker of gastrointestinal disease in HIV antibody positive individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpstone, D; Rowbottom, A; Nelson, M; Gazzard, B

    1996-01-01

    Hypoalbuminaemia and diarrhoea are common complications of HIV infection and substantial causes of morbidity, but the specific intestinal pathologies that cause enteric protein loss have not been clearly defined. Two hundred and twenty stool samples from patients with a variety of HIV related conditions were analysed for faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin. Patients with intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma had a significantly raised faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin value and hypoalbuminaemia. A faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin value of greater than 0.3 mg/g wet stool has a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 76% for the diagnosis of intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV positive individuals. Patients with cytomegalovirus and bacterial enteritis had raised faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin values but levels were normal for all other intestinal pathologies compared with pathogen negative stool. The combination of faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin concentration greater than 0.2 mg/g, a negative stool culture for enteric bacteria, and the absence of palatal Kaposi's sarcoma has a sensitivity of 55% and specificity of 88% for the diagnosis of enteric cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:8801198

  8. Neonatal alpha1-antitrypsin screening: parents' views and reactions 20 years after the identification of the deficiency state.

    PubMed

    Sveger, T; Thelin, T; McNeil, T F

    1999-03-01

    During 1972-74, 200000 Swedish neonates were screened for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (alpha1ATD). The parents of the 22-23-y-old alpha1ATD children were asked about their views on the screening study, information and follow-up of their children as well as physical and psychosomatic problems, which were compared with a matched control (MC) group. Of the original 122 alpha1ATD and MC parents, 85 alpha1ATD and 89 MC parents decided to participate. The neonatal period was considered the best time for screening by 88% of the responding parents. The care of the alpha1ATD individuals was assessed as positive or very positive by 84% of the parents. About 70% of the parents thought that the awareness of their child's alpha1ATD had affected their lives, the most common comment being an increased consciousness of smoky and dusty environments. No significant difference between alpha1ATD and control parents was found concerning worry about the child's health and future. When asked about symptoms related to their mental health, no difference was found concerning headache, sleep problems, stomach troubles or tiredness. Alpha1ATD mothers had statistically significantly more anxiety than control mothers (chi2 p<0.01, Wilcoxon p<0.02). The knowledge derived from the present and previous parts of the alpha1AT screening study is important with regard to presymptomatic testing for adult-onset disease in children. PMID:10229044

  9. Inhibitory capacity of alpha 1 antitrypsin in lung secretions: variability and the effect of drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, H M; Afford, S C; Stockley, R A

    1984-01-01

    The inhibitory function of alpha 1 antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) has been studied in the lung secretions of 31 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis. The inhibitory capacity for a single sample showed a wide range (median 0.13 micrograms porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) inhibited per microgram alpha 1 antitrypsin; range 0-0.55 micrograms), and all but five of 86 samples studied were capable of inhibiting some porcine pancreatic elastase. No sample showed free elastase activity, however. The inhibitory capacity, studied in six patients over five consecutive days, varied daily within the same individual (coefficient of variation 9.0-108.9%). Corticosteroid treatment (40 mg prednisone daily) increased the inhibitory capacity of sputum alpha 1 antitrypsin in 10 patients (2p less than 0.05) from a median value of 0.13 micrograms PPE inhibited per microgram alpha 1AT (range 0.06-0.36) before treatment to 0.22 micrograms PPE inhibited per microgram alpha 1AT (range 0.09-0.65) after treatment. The inhibitory capacity of sputum was higher than in the corresponding bronchoalveolar lavage sample from the same patient (2p less than 0.05; n = 10). The median value for sputum was 0.22 micrograms PPE inhibited per microgram alpha 1AT (range 0-0.55) and the value for lavage fluid was 0.07 micrograms PPE inhibited per microgram alpha 1AT (range 0-0.27). PMID:6611602

  10. Trials and Tribulations: An Industry Perspective on Conducting Registrational Trials in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Forshag, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Registrational trials in rare and orphan diseases present complexities related to the identification of subjects, recruitment, logistical hurdles incumbent with far-flung study sites, and end points that are often less well defined than are those used in more common illnesses. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an orphan disease of genetic origin that carries the additional challenges of variable penetration and slow disease progression. Registrational trials of augmentation therapy using plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin carry all of the above-noted burdens, as well as competition from commercially available augmentation therapy in many countries. PMID:27564675

  11. Smoking and intermediate alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and lung function in middle-aged men.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, C; Eriksson, S; Dirksen, H

    1977-01-01

    Lung function was evaluated in a representative population sample of 50-year-0ld men living in one Swedish city. Twenty-four smoking and 15 non-smoking men heterozygous for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency--that is, with the protease-inhibitor (Pi1 phenotype MZ--were carefully matched for weight and smoking habit with Pi M controls. The pulmonary function of non-smoking Pi MZ subjects did not differ from that of non-smoking Pi M controls. In contrast, smoking heterozygotes showed a significant loss of elastic recoil, enlarged residual volumes, and increased closing capacity but no signs of obstructive ventilatory impairment. Most smoking Pi MZ individuals reported mild exertional dyspnoea. PMID:303135

  12. Diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Barrecheguren, Miriam; Monteagudo, Mónica; Simonet, Pere; Llor, Carl; Rodriguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Esquinas, Cristina; Miravitlles, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) remains an underdiagnosed condition despite initiatives developed to increase awareness. The objective was to describe the current situation of the diagnosis of AATD in primary care (PC) in Catalonia, Spain. Methods We performed a population-based study with data from the Information System for Development in Research in Primary Care, a population database that contains information of 5.8 million inhabitants (80% of the population of Catalonia). We collected the number of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) determinations performed in the PC in two periods (2007–2008 and 2010–2011) and described the characteristics of the individuals tested. Results A total of 12,409 AAT determinations were performed (5,559 in 2007–2008 and 6,850 in 2010–2011), with 10.7% of them in children. As a possible indication for AAT determination, 28.9% adults and 29.4% children had a previous diagnosis of a disease related to AATD; transaminase levels were above normal in 17.7% of children and 47.1% of adults. In total, 663 (5.3%) individuals had intermediate AATD (50–100 mg/dL), 24 (0.2%) individuals had a severe deficiency (<50 mg/dL), with a prevalence of 0.19 cases of severe deficiency per 100 determinations. Nine (41%) of the adults with severe deficiency had a previous diagnosis of COPD/emphysema, and four (16.7%) were diagnosed with COPD within 6 months. Conclusion The number of AAT determinations in the PC is low in relation to the prevalence of COPD but increased slightly along the study period. The indication to perform the test is not always clear, and patients detected with deficiency are not always referred to a specialist. PMID:27274221

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  14. Analysis of the endoplasmic reticular Ca2+ requirement for alpha1-antitrypsin processing and transport competence.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G R; Brostrom, C O; Brostrom, M A

    1997-01-01

    Depletion of Ca2+ sequestered within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of HepG2 hepatoma cells results in the luminal accumulation of immature alpha1-antitrypsin possessing Man8-9 GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide side chains. This study explores the basis for this arrest and describes consequent alterations in the size and rate of secretion of the complex endoglycosidase H-resistant form of the protein. Inhibition of glucosidase I and II with castanospermine or alpha-1,2-mannosidase with 1-deoxymannojirimycin produced altered ER processing intermediates that were rapidly secreted. Subsequent mobilization of ER Ca2+ stores resulted in the appearance and retention of slightly larger related forms of these intermediates. Retention of glycosylated intermediates was not ascribable to an association with alpha1,2-mannosidase or lectin-like chaperones, the intermediates were not degraded and all evidence of ER retention or size alterations produced by Ca2+ depletion was quickly reversed by Ca2+ restoration. Cells that were Ca2+ depleted for 2 h slowly secreted an abnormal slightly smaller complex oligosaccharide form of alpha1-antitrypsin at approximately the same rate as the non-glycosylated protein generated by treatment with tunicamycin. The hypothesis that Ca2+ affects the folding and ER transport competence of glycosylated forms of alpha1-antitrypsin is discussed. PMID:9271078

  15. Suspecting and Testing for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-An Allergist's and/or Immunologist's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Craig, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary, monogenic disorder with no unique clinical features. AATD can be difficult to diagnose as patients commonly present with respiratory symptoms often mistaken for other respiratory syndromes such as asthma or smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In addition, symptoms related to AATD may also affect other organs, including the liver, vasculature, and skin. The severity of AATD varies between individuals, and in severe cases, the irreversible lung damage can develop into emphysema. Early diagnosis is critical to enable the implementation of lifestyle changes and therapeutic options that can slow further deterioration of pulmonary tissue. Once AATD is suspected, a range of tests are available (serum alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor [A1-PI] level measurement, phenotyping, genotyping, gene sequencing) for confirming AATD. Currently, intravenous infusion of A1-PI is the only therapy that directly addresses the underlying cause of AATD, and has demonstrated efficacy in a recent randomized, placebo-controlled trial. This review discusses the etiology, testing, and management of AATD from the allergist's and/or immunologist's perspective. It aims to raise awareness of the condition among physicians who care for people with obstructive lung disorders and are therefore likely to see patients with obstructive lung disease that may, in fact, prove to be AATD. PMID:26032475

  16. Alpha-1-Antitrypsin: A Novel Human High Temperature Requirement Protease A1 (HTRA1) Substrate in Human Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Frochaux, Violette; Hildebrand, Diana; Talke, Anja; Linscheid, Michael W.; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    The human serine protease high temperature requirement A1 (HTRA1) is highly expressed in the placental tissue, especially in the last trimester of gestation. This suggests that HTRA1 is involved in placental formation and function. With the aim of a better understanding of the role of HTRA1 in the placenta, candidate substrates were screened in a placenta protein extract using a gel-based mass spectrometric approach. Protease inhibitor alpha-1-antitrypsin, actin cytoplasmic 1, tropomyosin beta chain and ten further proteins were identified as candidate substrates of HTRA1. Among the identified candidate substrates, alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) was considered to be of particular interest because of its important role as protease inhibitor. For investigation of alpha-1-antitrypsin as substrate of HTRA1 synthetic peptides covering parts of the sequence of alpha-1-antitrypsin were incubated with HTRA1. By mass spectrometry a specific cleavage site was identified after met-382 (AIPM382↓383SIPP) within the reactive centre loop of alpha-1-antitrypsin, resulting in a C-terminal peptide comprising 36 amino acids. Proteolytic removal of this peptide from alpha-1-antitrypsin results in a loss of its inhibitor function. Beside placental alpha-1-antitrypsin the circulating form in human plasma was also significantly degraded by HTRA1. Taken together, our data suggest a link between the candidate substrates alpha-1-antitrypsin and the function of HTRA1 in the placenta in the syncytiotrophoblast, the cell layer attending to maternal blood in the villous tree of the human placenta. Data deposition: Mass spectrometry (MS) data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000473. PMID:25329061

  17. Alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and phenotypes and hepatitis B serology in liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sparos, L.; Tountas, Y.; Chapuis-Cellier, C.; Theodoropoulos, G.; Trichopoulos, D.

    1984-01-01

    Serum levels of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) were measured by radial immunodiffusion and phenotypes were determined by electrofocusing in acrylamide gel in 39 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) positive for serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), 41 patients with HCC negative for serum HBsAg, and 160 age- and sex-matched hospital controls. There was no difference between the control series and either of the two HCC groups with respect to alpha 1 AT phenotype pattern; also, there was no evidence of association between HCC and either the M2 allele or any of the alpha 1 AT deficiency phenotypes. However, HCC cases negative for HBsAg had significantly higher serum alpha 1 AT values (mean 665 +/- 26 mg 100 ml-1) than HCC cases positive for HBsAg (mean 571 +/- 23 mg 100 ml-1), who in turn, had significantly higher alpha 1 AT values than hospital controls (mean 434 +/- 13 mg 100 ml-1). These results indicate that in Greece, as in other high HCC incidence countries, genetically determined alpha 1 AT deficiency is not aetiologically important; the increase of serum alpha 1 AT is an important correlate of HCC with possible aetiologic significance and diagnostic potential and HBsAg-positive HCC and HBsAg-negative HCC are manifest differently as well as being aetiologically distinct. PMID:6326791

  18. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    PubMed Central

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  19. [Role of alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha-2 macroglobulin in hepatopathies].

    PubMed

    Triolo, L; Mian, G; Magris, D; Novello, E; D'Agnolo, B

    1979-02-18

    Two pictures of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, one associated with alpha 2-macroglobulin deficiency and one isolated case of the latter deficiency have been observed in three patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver and/or hepatoma. On the basis of these cases, the literature on the subject is reviewed. The unusually high incidence of such anti-enzymatic deficiencies (three cases in the first eleven patients studied) in severe liver pathology, calls for a reassessment of such research and suggests that these tests should be carried out on a routine basis in cases of cryptogenetic cirrhosis and probably for long-term prognosis in cases of viral hepatitis. PMID:86175

  20. Replacement therapy of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. Reversal of protease-antiprotease imbalance within the alveolar structures of PiZ subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gadek, J E; Klein, H G; Holland, P V; Crystal, R G

    1981-01-01

    The emphysema associated with the inherited serum deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin appears to result from an imbalance between neutrophil elastase and its major inhibitor within the alveolar structures. In the present study we assessed the feasibility of reversing this biochemical defect within the lung via parenteral replacement therapy with an alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrate of normal plasma. A 20--40% polyethylene glycol precipitate of pooled human donor plasma was used to obtain an enriched alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrate devoid of hepatitis B antigen and immunoglobulins. Using this material, five individuals with severe serum alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ phenotype) and advanced emphysema received 4 g of alpha 1-antitrypsin intravenously at weekly intervals for four doses. During this period of weekly replacement therapy alpha 1-antitrypsin serum levels were maintained at greater than or equal to 70 mg/dl, the level likely required for effective antielastase protection of the lung. In addition, assessment of lower respiratory tract antielastase activity by bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated that parenteral replacement of alpha 1-antitrypsin resulted in establishment of effective antielastase activity within the alveolar structures. There were no untoward side effects consequent to this approach to the replacement therapy of alpha 1-antitrypsin. These results demonstrate that the parenteral replacement of alpha 1-antitrypsin provides a means of obtaining elastase-antielastase balance within the lung of individuals with this serum protease inhibitor deficiency. PMID:7028785

  1. Familial alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency cases that are diagnosed in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Atayan, Y; Çağın, Y F; Erdoğan, M A; Bestas, R; Aladag, M

    2016-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder leading to severe lung and liver diseases worldwide. An accumulation of insoluble heterodimer AAT molecules in hepatocytes is the main cause of liver disorders. The most commonly detected allele worldwide is the PIMM allele, which fulfills the AAT function. The most common missing variant is PiZZ. Serum AAT level is a beneficial but not a reliable determinant for diagnosis. Liver biopsy yields more reliable results. AAT deficiency has no specific treatment. The only treatment modality in children with end stage liver disease is the hepatic transplant. We wanted to present in our article four cases from same family, diagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsindeficiency in adulthood. PMID:26852765

  2. Chlorhexidine prevents hypochlorous acid-induced inactivation of alpha1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Bertolotto, M; Ottonello, L; Pende, A; Dapino, P; Quercioli, A; Mach, F; Dallegri, F

    2009-11-01

    1. Chlorhexidine digluconate has been used as a topical antiseptic in the treatment of acne vulgaris and periodontitis. The acute phase of these diseases involves neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophil activation and recruitment to inflammatory sites are crucial in both protection against bacterial infection and the induction of hystotoxic damage. Activated neutrophils release several enzymes, including elastase and myeloperoxidase (MPO), which contribute to tissue injury via direct toxic actions, the generation of oxidants and inactivation of protective factors, such as alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT). In the present study, we investigated whether chlorhexidine can modulate neutrophil-mediated histotoxicity. 2. Human primary neutrophils were isolated from healthy donors. Inactivation of alpha1-AT by neutrophils or hypochlorous acid (HOCl) was evaluated by spectrophotometry and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of its capacity to complex with porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Neutrophil generation of HOCl, superoxide anion and MPO release were assessed spectrophometrically. 3. Chlorhexidine (0, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 micromol/L) dose-dependently prevented HOCl-induced inactivation of alpha1-AT and reduced HOCl recovery from phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-treated human neutrophils, but did not inhibit superoxide anion and MPO release. Chlorhexidine directly inhibited HOCl recovery from neutrophils and HOCl-induced inactivation of alpha1-AT in a cell-free assay. Accordingly, chlorhexidine reversed HOCl-mediated inhibition of alpha1-AT capacity to complex with PPE. 4. These data suggest that chlorhexidine prevents neutrophil-induced alpha1-AT inactivation via a direct inhibitory action on HOCl. Although highly speculative, the present study indicates that chlorhexidine may protect inflamed tissues not only through its antimicrobial properties, but also via a direct anti-inflammatory effect on neutrophil toxic products. PMID:19671069

  3. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  4. alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles as markers of Westeuropean influence in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Beckman, L; Sikström, C; Mikelsaar, A; Krumina, A; Kucinskas, V; Beckman, G

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles was studied in an attempt to elucidate migrations and admixture between populations in the Baltic Sea region. The frequency of the PI Z allele, a typically Northwesteuropean marker gene, showed a highly significant regional variation in the Baltic Sea region. The highest frequency (4.5%) was found in the western part of Latvia (Courland). The PI S allele, another marker of Westeuropean influence, also showed an increased frequency in the Courland population. These results indicate that among the populations east of the Baltic Sea the Curonian population has the most pronounced Westeuropean influence. Archaeological data have shown that from the 7th century and for several hundreds of years Courland received immigrations from mainland Sweden and the island of Gotland. We speculate that the increased frequencies of the PI Z alleles and S alleles in Courland may have been caused by these migrations. PMID:9858859

  5. Lung distensibility and airway function in intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (Pi MZ).

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, S F; Pereira, R P; Hunter, D; Blundell, G; Pride, N B

    1979-01-01

    We examined the role of intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in predisposing to abnormalities of lung distensibility and airway function in 20 heterozygotes (Pi MZ) who were individually matched with a control Pi M subject of similar age, height, and smoking habits drawn from the same male, working population. There were no significant differences between the heterozygotes and their controls in the results of spirometry, maximum expiratory flow-volume curves (breathing air), single breath nitrogen test, arterialised capillary blood oxygen pressure, or single breath carbon monoxide transfer. Additional studies were made in 12 of the pairs of Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Comparison of maximum expiratory flow-volume curves breathing air and 80% helium-20% oxygen showed no differences between the Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Although airway function was similar in the two groups, four of 12 Pi MZ subjects showed abnormalities of the pressure-volume curve of the lung (reduction in lung recoil pressure, abnormal shape factor, increase in functional residual capacity). Abnormalities of washout of a helium-sulphur hexafluoride gas mixture, of a type previously described as characteristic of emphysema, were found in two of the men with abnormal pressure-volume curves. The results suggest that Pi MZ subjects have an increased susceptibility to alveolar abnormalities without increased abnormalities of airway function; this may explain the increased frequency of emphysema at necropsy despite many studies showing no predisposition to abnormal airway function in life. The functional changes we observed would be unlikely to cause symptoms. The risk of disablement from chronic lung disease appears to be only slightly enhanced by intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:316207

  6. Impaired hepcidin expression in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with iron overload and progressive liver disease.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Benedikt; Haschka, David; Finkenstedt, Armin; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Theurl, Igor; Henninger, Benjamin; Janecke, Andreas R; Wang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Herbert Y; Veits, Lothar; Vogel, Wolfgang; Weiss, Günter; Franke, Andre; Zoller, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    Liver disease due to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is associated with hepatic iron overload in a subgroup of patients. The underlying cause for this association is unknown. The aim of the present study was to define the genetics of this correlation and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) on the expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Full exome and candidate gene sequencing were carried out in a family with A1ATD and hepatic iron overload. Regulation of hepcidin expression by A1AT was studied in primary murine hepatocytes. Cells co-transfected with hemojuvelin (HJV) and matriptase-2 (MT-2) were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Observed familial clustering of hepatic iron overload with A1ATD suggests a genetic cause, but genotypes known to be associated with hemochromatosis were absent. Individuals homozygous for the A1AT Z-allele with environmental or genetic risk factors such as steatosis or heterozygosity for the HAMP non-sense mutation p.Arg59* presented with severe hepatic siderosis. In hepatocytes, A1AT induced hepcidin mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments in overexpressing cells show that A1AT reduces cleavage of the hepcidin inducing bone morphogenetic protein co-receptor HJV via inhibition of the membrane-bound serine protease MT-2. The acute-phase protein A1AT is an inducer of hepcidin expression. Through this mechanism, A1ATD could be a trigger of hepatic iron overload in genetically predisposed individuals or patients with environmental risk factors for hepatic siderosis. PMID:26310624

  7. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  8. A protein structural approach to the solution of biological problems: alpha 1-antitrypsin as a recent example.

    PubMed

    Lomas, D A; Carrell, R W

    1993-09-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin is a circulating serine proteinase inhibitor that protects the lungs against proteolysis by the enzyme neutrophil elastase. Most northern Europeans have only the normal M form, but some 4% are heterozygotes for the Z deficiency mutant. This mutant is characterized by the substitution of a positively charged lysine residue for a negatively charged glutamic acid at position 342 and results in normal gene translation but reduced protein secretion into the plasma. The plasma levels of antitrypsin in homozygotes are only 15% of normal, the other 85% being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. This review describes the effect of the Z mutation on the structure and function of antitrypsin and illustrates the importance of understanding protein structure in solving the mechanism of Z antitrypsin retention within the liver. We demonstrate that antitrypsin accumulation in the liver results from a unique interaction between antitrypsin molecules. The Z mutation perturbs the gap between the third and fifth strands of the A sheet, allowing the reactive center loop of one molecule to insert into the A sheet of a second. This loop-sheet polymerization results in the formation of chains of protein which form insoluble inclusions in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in hepatocellular damage and cirrhosis. In addition, the Z mutation results in a distortion of the circular dichroic spectrum, a rearrangement of the reactive center loop with respect to the A sheet, and a reduction in association rate constant with the cognate proteinase neutrophil elastase. PMID:8214081

  9. How Can We Improve the Detection of Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Dresel, Marc; Koczulla, Rembert; Ottaviani, Stefania; Baldo, Raffaele; Gorrini, Marina; Sala, Giorgia; Cavallon, Luana; Welte, Tobias; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Luisetti, Maurizio; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    The Z deficiency in α1-antitrypsin (A1ATD) is an under-recognized condition. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the main protein in the α1-globulin fraction of serum protein electrophoresis (SPE); however, evaluation of the α1-globulin protein fraction has received very little attention. Serum Z-type A1AT manifests in polymeric forms, but their interference with quantitative immunoassays has not been reported. Here, 214 894 samples were evaluated by SPE at the G. Fracastoro Hospital of Verona, Italy. Patients with an A1AT level ≤ 0.92 g/L were recalled to complete A1ATD diagnosis. In parallel, to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize A1AT, sera samples from 10 PiZZ and 10 PiMM subjects obtained at the National Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Warsaw, Poland, were subjected to non-denaturing 7.5% PAGE and 7.5% SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot. Moreover, purified A1AT was heated at 60°C and analyzed by a non-denaturing PAGE and 4–15% gradient SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot as well as by isolelectrofocusing and nephelometry. A total of 966 samples manifested percentages ≤ 2.8 or a double band in the alpha1-zone. According to the nephelometry data, 23 samples were classified as severe (A1AT ≤ 0.49 g/L) and 462 as intermediate (A1AT >0.49≤ 1.0 g/L) A1ATD. Twenty subjects agreed to complete the diagnosis and an additional 21 subjects agreed to family screening. We detected 9 cases with severe and 26 with intermediate A1ATD. Parallel experiments revealed that polymerization of M-type A1AT, when measured by nephelometry or isolelectrofocusing, yields inaccurate results, leading to the erroneous impression that it was Z type and not M-type A1AT. We illustrate the need for confirmation of Z A1AT values by “state of the art” method. Clinicians should consider a more in-depth investigation of A1ATD in patients when they exhibit serum polymers and low α1-globulin protein levels by SPE. PMID:26270547

  10. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  11. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Elshikha, Ahmed S.; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A.; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  12. Historical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in respiratory and hepatic complications.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen

    2016-09-10

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a heritable disease that is commonly associated with complications in the respiratory and hepatic systems. AAT acts as a regulatory enzyme that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase activity thus protecting tissues from proteolytic damage after inflammation. This paper provides a historical review of the discovery, classification, phenotypic expression, and treatment of AAT deficiency. While its pattern of inheritance has been long understood, the underlying mechanism between AAT deficiency and related diseases remains to be elucidated. Most commonly, AAT deficiency is associated with the development of emphysema in the lungs as well as various liver injuries. Cigarette smoke has been shown to be particularly detrimental in AAT deficient individuals during the development of lung disease. Therefore, understanding familial history may be beneficial when educating patients regarding lifestyle choices. While numerous AAT deficient phenotypes exist in the human populations, only specific variants have been proven to markedly predispose individuals to lung and liver disorders. The exact relationship between AAT levels and the aforementioned diseases is an essential area of further research. It is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike strive to standardize diagnostic criteria and develop safe and effective therapies for this genetic disease. PMID:26768576

  13. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes are associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin levels

    PubMed Central

    Setoh, Kazuya; Terao, Chikashi; Muro, Shigeo; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Meiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) encoded by SERPINA1 is an acute-phase inflammation marker, and AAT deficiency (AATD) is known as one of the common genetic disorders in European populations. However, no genetic determinants to AAT levels apart from the SERPINA gene clusters have been identified to date. Here we perform a genome-wide association study of serum AAT levels followed by a two-staged replication study recruiting a total of 9,359 Japanese community-dwelling population. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes, namely, rs671 in ALDH2, rs1169288 in HNF1A and rs1260326 in GCKR, significantly associate with AAT levels (P≤1.5 × 10−12). Previous reports have shown the functional relevance of ALDH2 and HNF1A to AAT. We observe a significant interaction of rs671 and alcohol consumption on AAT levels. We confirm the association between AAT and rs2896268 in SERPINA1, which is independent of known causative variants of AATD. These findings would support various AAT functions including metabolic processes. PMID:26174136

  14. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy. PMID:27303303

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy. PMID:27303303

  16. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  17. Alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes and lung function in a moderately polluted northern Ontario community.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, D. N.; Manfreda, J.; Dorman, T.; Cherniack, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether persons with intermediate value alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes living in a polluted environment manifest significant abnormalities in lung function, a study was undertaken of an age-, sex- and smoking-stratified sample of 391 persons from the town of Fort Frances, Ont., which has elevated values of total dustfall, suspended particulates and hydrogen sulfide. Indices of pulmonary function were derived from the maximum expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory nitrogen washout curves. The percentage frequency of the M, MS and MZ pheontypes was 91.7, 7.3 and 0.8, respectively. There was no significant difference between the M and MS groups as indicated by the nitrogen washout curve and maximum expiratory flow curve. There was no significant difference between the three MZ subjects and the M group. In both M and MS groups smokers displayed evidence of airflow obstruction when compared with nonsmokers. It would appear that, when compared with M subjects, persons with the MS phenotype living in a moderately polluted area show no changes in indicators of pulmonary function, including tests of early airway disease, that cannot be attributed to their smoking habit. PMID:306869

  18. Aberrant disulphide bonding contributes to the ER retention of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants.

    PubMed

    Ronzoni, Riccardo; Berardelli, Romina; Medicina, Daniela; Sitia, Roberto; Gooptu, Bibek; Fra, Anna Maria

    2016-02-15

    Mutations in alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) can cause the protein to polymerise and be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. The ensuing systemic AAT deficiency leads to pulmonary emphysema, while intracellular polymers are toxic and cause chronic liver disease. The severity of this process varies considerably between individuals, suggesting the involvement of mechanistic co-factors and potential for therapeutically beneficial interventions. We show in Hepa1.6 cells that the mildly polymerogenic I (Arg39Cys) AAT mutant forms aberrant inter- and intra-molecular disulphide bonds involving the acquired Cys39 and the only cysteine residue in the wild-type (M) sequence (Cys232). Substitution of Cys39 to serine partially restores secretion, showing that disulphide bonding contributes to the intracellular retention of I AAT. Covalent homodimers mediated by inter-Cys232 bonding alone are also observed in cells expressing the common Z and other polymerising AAT variants where conformational behaviour is abnormal, but not in those expressing M AAT. Prevention of such disulphide linkage through the introduction of the Cys232Ser mutation or by treatment of cells with reducing agents increases Z AAT secretion. Our results reveal that disulphide interactions enhance intracellular accumulation of AAT mutants and implicate the oxidative ER state as a pathogenic co-factor. Redox modulation, e.g. by anti-oxidant strategies, may therefore be beneficial in AAT deficiency-associated liver disease. PMID:26647313

  19. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27028823

  20. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad H.; Baharuddin, NorAdinar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Arkilla, Magaji B.; ALBayaty, Mustafa F.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α ≤ 0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39 ± 5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03 ± 8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05 ± 1.48) and moderate plaque indexes (51.35 ± 11.27) were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9 ± 30.71 ng/dL), haptoglobin (76.04 ± 52.48 mg/dL), and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90 ± 18.40 mg/dL) were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years) and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers. PMID:24286083

  1. The influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of haptoglobin and alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad H; Baharuddin, Noradinar; Abdulla, Mahmood A; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Arkilla, Magaji B; ALBayaty, Mustafa F

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α ≤ 0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39 ± 5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03 ± 8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05 ± 1.48) and moderate plaque indexes (51.35 ± 11.27) were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9 ± 30.71 ng/dL), haptoglobin (76.04 ± 52.48 mg/dL), and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90 ± 18.40 mg/dL) were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years) and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers. PMID:24286083

  2. Gastric clearance of alpha-1-antitrypsin under cimetidine perfusion. New test to detect protein-losing gastropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Florent, C.; Vidon, N.; Flourie, B.; Carmantrand, A.; Zerbani, A.; Maurel, M.; Bernier, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric losses of plasma are usually measured with radiolabeled macromolecules. This method is expensive and cumbersome. Direct measurement of exudated plasma proteins are ineffective since proteins are denaturated by acidic gastric juice and pepsin. It was recently shown that albumin measurement after immediate neutralization allowed detection of gastric protein losses, but this method is quite complex and time consuming. We studied alpha 1-antitrypsin and 51Cr-labeled protein clearance in gastric juice during normal saline and cimetidine (1.5 mg/kg/hr) infusion in six healthy volunteers and six patients with exudative gastropathy. alpha 1-Antitrypsin was measurable in all samples during cimetidine infusion: alpha 1-AT and 51Cr losses were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001). The upper limit of gastric alpha 1-AT clearance in controls was 0.86 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD). Using this value, there was no overlapping between patients and controls. The upper limit of 51Cr test was 1.87 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD) in controls but gastric clearance of 51Cr was below this value in one patient. This suggests that the measurement of alpha 1-AT gastric clearance during cimetidine perfusion is a good test to detect an exudative gastropathy. This test is inexpensive and lasts only 3 hr.

  3. Reduction of the elastase inhibitory capacity of alpha 1-antitrypsin by peroxides in cigarette smoke: an analysis of brands and filters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; James, H.L.

    1982-07-01

    A procedure for measuring the oxidant content of aqueous condensates of tobacco cigarette smoke is described. The procedure was used in conjunction with analysis of the ability of the smoke solutions to inactivate the elastase inhibitory capacity (EIC) of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The ability of the smoke of a brand to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin correlates well with the known tar and nicotine and with the amount of oxidants as measured using o-dianisidine. Filters were found to remove about 73% of the oxidants from smoke. Smoke from a commercial nontobacco cigarette was also found to contain a significant amount of oxidants and to also destroy alpha 1-antitrypsin. Catalase and superoxide dismutase reduce the effect of solutions containing smoke on the EIC of alpha 1-antitrypsin, suggesting that peroxides and superoxide anions in smoke contribute to the oxidant capacity of the smoke. The extent of apparent oxidation by a given quantity of smoke condensate increases for as long as an hour from the time the condensate is collected. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the smoke solution increases both its oxidant content and its ability to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin. These data suggest that occurrence of hydrogen peroxide caused by secretion from macrophages found in the small airways of smokers may contribute to a locally damaging environment for alpha 1-antitrypsin in the presence of cigarette smoke that could promote the development of centrilobular emphysema.

  4. Chitosan-genipin nanohydrogel as a vehicle for sustained delivery of alpha-1 antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Mohtashami, Mahnaz; Sheijani, Samaneh Sotoudeh; Aliakbari, Kamelya

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency, an inherited disorder, has been shown to be the cause of lung diseases such as emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. One of the treatment strategies to provide appropriate and adequate concentrations of A1AT in the lungsis the application of nanoparticles (NPs) in pulmonary drug delivery. In the current study, biocompatible nanohydrogels were prepared using chemically cross-linked chitosan with ginepin, a natural cross linker reagent, and used as a carrier to deposit A1AT into the lung tissue. Colloidal and monodispersed NPs were synthesized through reverse microemulsion. Nanohydrogels were characterized with TEM, LLS, FTIR, ZTEA potential, UV spectrum, and swelling test. Encapsulation efficacy was determined at different concentrations of A1AT using Bradford assay. Effect of processing variables such as pH, loading efficiency, and release media components on drug release profile was determined in simulated lung fluids. To evaluate the inhibitory activity of the A1AT after release from NPs, trypsin inhibitory capacity assay was carried out. Results from FTIR and UV spectrum confirmed the development of chitosan cross linkage. Spherical chitosan-genipin NPs were sized from 30-100 nm. NPs exhibited the ability to release 49% of the drug within 12-dayperiodatpH 7. However, there were variations with the drug release profile due to pH variations and loading efficacy. Drug release was higher in pseudo alveolar fluid in comparison with saline solution. These data indicate that application of chitosan nanohydrogels can be a useful tool for sustained release of A1AT in the lung tissue. PMID:26779272

  5. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Attenuates Renal Fibrosis by Inhibiting TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jang-Hee; Ryu, Hye-Myung; Oh, Eun-Joo; Yook, Ju-Min; Ahn, Ji-Sun; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, Chan-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through regulating the activity of serine proteinases. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of AAT against the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) mice and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C57BL/6 mice with induced UUO were injected intraperitoneally with AAT (80 mg/Kg) or vehicle for 7 days. MDCK cells were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/mL) for 48 hours to induce EMT, and co-treated with AAT (10 mg/mL) to inhibit the EMT. Masson's trichrome and Sirius red staining was used to estimate the extent of renal fibrosis in UUO mice. The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin in MDCK cells and kidney tissue were evaluated. Masson's and Sirius red staining revealed that the area of renal fibrosis was significantly smaller in AAT treated UUO group compared with that of UUO and vehicle treated UUO groups. AAT treatment attenuated upregulation of Smad2/3 phosphorylation in UUO mouse model. Co-treatment of MDCK cells with TGF-β1 and AAT significantly attenuated the changes in the expression of α-SMA, vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin. AAT also decreased the phosphorylated Smad3 expression and the phosphorylated Smad3/Smad3 ratio in MDCK cells. AAT treatment inhibited EMT induced by TGF-β1 in MDCK cells and attenuated renal fibrosis in the UUO mouse model. The results of this work suggest that AAT could inhibit the process of EMT through the suppression of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. PMID:27607429

  6. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Mitigates the Inhibition of Airway Epithelial Cell Repair by Neutrophil Elastase.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Luke W; Sutanto, Erika N; Ling, Kak-Ming; Looi, Kevin; Iosifidis, Thomas; Martinovich, Kelly M; Shaw, Nicole C; Buckley, Alysia G; Kicic-Starcevich, Elizabeth; Lannigan, Francis J; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity is associated with many destructive lung diseases and is a predictor for structural lung damage in early cystic fibrosis (CF), which suggests normal maintenance of airway epithelium is prevented by uninhibited NE. However, limited data exist on how the NE activity in airways of very young children with CF affects function of the epithelia. The aim of this study was to determine if NE activity could inhibit epithelial homeostasis and repair and whether any functional effect was reversible by antiprotease alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1AT) treatment. Viability, inflammation, apoptosis, and proliferation were assessed in healthy non-CF and CF pediatric primary airway epithelial cells (pAECnon-CF and pAECCF, respectively) during exposure to physiologically relevant NE. The effect of NE activity on pAECCF wound repair was also assessed. We report that viability after 48 hours was significantly decreased by 100 nM NE in pAECnon-CF and pAECCF owing to rapid cellular detachment that was accompanied by inflammatory cytokine release. Furthermore, both phenotypes initiated an apoptotic response to 100 nM NE, whereas ≥ 50 nM NE activity significantly inhibited the proliferative capacity of cultures. Similar concentrations of NE also significantly inhibited wound repair of pAECCF, but this effect was reversed by the addition of α1AT. Collectively, our results demonstrate free NE activity is deleterious for epithelial homeostasis and support the hypothesis that proteases in the airway contribute directly to CF structural lung disease. Our results also highlight the need to investigate antiprotease therapies in early CF disease in more detail. PMID:26221769

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is markedly decreased following pulmonary F. tularensis challenge.

    PubMed

    Chambers, James P; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Jupelli, Madhulika; Weintraub, Susan T; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Valdes, James J; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense during infection and are indispensable in this function. The neutrophil elastase is a key effector molecule of the innate immune system with potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, spirochaetes, and fungi. However, the release of neutrophil elastase during bacterial infection must be checked otherwise its release in the extracellular milieu will result in damage to surrounding tissues. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor and has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Type A strains are the most virulent with an infectious dose as low as 10 colony forming units and a mortality rate of 30-60% among untreated cases of pneumonic tularemia. We report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of the neutrophil elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 infected animals following pulmonary challenge. Associated with an imbalance of protease-antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresivity. Consistent with a competent acute phase response following F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 pulmonary challenge and proposed up-regulation of plasma haptoglobin during the course of the acute phase reaction, haptoglobin was observed significantly increased. These data suggest that unchecked neutrophil serine protease activity may arise from F. tularensis targeted reduction of plasma α(1)-antitrysin promoting lung tissue damage facilitating increased dissemination of this bacterium in infected animals. PMID:22919586

  8. Faecal alpha-1-antitrypsin and excretion of 111indium granulocytes in assessment of disease activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, W; Becker, W; Mössner, J; Koch, W; Reiners, C

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal protein loss in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases may be easily determined by measurement of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) stool concentration and alpha 1-AT clearance. Both parameters were significantly raised in 36 and 34 patients respectively with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, compared with eight patients with non-inflammatory bowel diseases, or 19 healthy volunteers. There was wide range of overlap between active and inactive inflammatory disease. Contrary to serum alpha 1-AT, faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT did not correlate with ESR, serum-albumin, orosomucoid, and two indices of disease activity. A comparison of alpha 1-AT faecal excretion and clearance with the faecal excretion of 111In labelled granulocytes in 27 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, showed no correlation between the intestinal protein loss and this highly specific marker of intestinal inflammation. Enteric protein loss expressed by faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT does not depend on mucosal inflammation only, but may be influenced by other factors. PMID:3495470

  9. Individualized lung function trends in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: a need for patience in order to provide patient centered management?

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Robert A; Edgar, Ross G; Pillai, Anilkumar; Turner, Alice M

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by fixed airflow obstruction and accelerated decline of forced expired volume in 1 second (FEV1). Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic cause of COPD and associated with more rapid decline in lung function, even in some never smokers (NS) but the potential for individualized assessment to reveal differences when compared to group analyses has rarely been considered. Methods We analyzed decline in post-bronchodilator FEV1 and gas transfer (% predicted) over at least 3 years (mean= 6.11, 95% CI 5.80–6.41) in our unique data set of 482 patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ) to determine individual rates of decline, implications for prognosis, and potential clinical management. Findings There was a marked variation in individual rates of FEV1 decline from levels consistent with normal aging (observed in 23.5% of patients with established COPD, 57.5% of those without) to those of rapidly declining COPD. Gas transfer did not decline in 12.8% of NS and 20.7% of ex-smokers with established COPD (33.3% and 25.0%, respectively, for those without COPD). There was no correlation between decline in gas transfer and FEV1 for those with COPD, although a weak relationship existed for those without (r=0.218; P<0.025). Conclusion These data confirm differing individual rates of lung function decline in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, indicating the importance of comprehensive physiological assessment and a personalized approach to patient management. PMID:27536086

  10. Quantitative airway assessment on computed tomography in patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Matsuoka, Shin; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro; Newell, John D; Sandhaus, Robert A; Mergo, Patricia J; Brantly, Mark L; Murayama, Sadayuki; Reilly, John J; Hatabu, Hiroto; Silverman, Edwin K; Washko, George R

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between quantitative airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) and airflow limitation in individuals with severe alpha (1)-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is undefined. Thus, we planned to clarify the relationship between CT-based airway indices and airflow limitation in AATD. 52 patients with AATD underwent chest CT and pre-bronchodilator spirometry at three institutions. In the right upper (RUL) and lower (RLL) lobes, wall area percent (WA%) and luminal area (Ai) were measured in the third, fourth, and fifth generations of the bronchi. The severity of emphysema was also calculated in each lobe and expressed as low attenuation area percent (LAA%). Correlations between obtained measurements and FEV(1)% predicted (FEV(1)%P) were evaluated by the Spearman rank correlation test. In RUL, WA% of all generations was significantly correlated with FEV(1)%P (3rd, R = -0.33, p = 0.02; 4th, R = -0.39, p = 0.004; 5th, R = -0.57, p < 0.001; respectively). Ai also showed significant correlations (3rd, R = 0.32, p = 0.02; 4th, R = 0.34, p = 0.01; 5th, R = 0.56, p < 0.001; respectively). Measured correlation coefficients improved when the airway progressed distally from the third to fifth generations. LAA% also correlated with FEV(1)%P (R = -0.51, p < 0.001). In RLL, WA% showed weak correlations with FEV(1)%P in all generations (3rd, R = -0.34, p = 0.01; 4th, R = -0.30, p = 0.03; 5th, R = -0.31, p = 0.03; respectively). Only Ai from the fifth generation significantly correlated with FEV(1)%P in this lobe (R = 0.34, p = 0.01). LAA% strongly correlated with FEV(1)%P (R = -0.71, p < 0.001). We conclude therefore that quantitative airway measurements are significantly correlated with airflow limitation in AATD, particularly in the distal airways of RUL. Emphysema of the lower lung is the predominant component; however, airway disease also has a significant impact on airflow limitation in AATD. PMID:19938971

  11. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-α1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. A subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, was used to evaluate the assay’s capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. To further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate α1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of β-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent β-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Altogether, our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization. PMID:25961288

  12. Multiple hepatocyte-enriched nuclear factors function in the regulation of transthyretin and. alpha. 1-antitrypsin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R.H. ); Grayson, D.R. ); Darnell, J.E. Jr. )

    1989-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) and {alpha}1-antitrypsin ({alpha}1-AT) are expressed at high levels in the liver and also in at least one other cell type. The authors report here a detailed analysis of the proximal regulatory region of the TTR gene, which has uncovered two new DNA-binding factors that are present mainly (or only) in hepatocytes. One of these new factors, hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF-3), binds to two sites that are crucial in TTR expression as well as to two additional sites in the {alpha}1-AT proximal enhancer region. The second new factor, HNF-4, binds to two sites in TTR that are required for gene activity. The authors had previously identified binding sites for another hepatocyte-enriched DNA-binding protein (C/EBP or a relative thereof), and additional promoter-proximal sites for that protein in both TTR and {alpha}1-AT are also reported here. From these results it seems clear that cell-specific expression is not simply the result of a single cell-specific factor for each gene but the results of a combination of such factors. The variation and distribution of such factors among different cell types could be an important basis for the coordinate expression of the TTR and {alpha}1-AT genes in the liver or the discordant transcriptional activation of these genes in a few other cell types. The identification of such cell-enriched factors is a necessary prelude to understanding the basis for cell specificity.

  13. Art, alpha-1-antitrypsin polymorphisms and intense creative energy: blessing or curse?

    PubMed

    Schmechel, Donald Everett

    2007-09-01

    Persons heterozygous for Z, S and rare alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, SERPIN1A) polymorphisms (ca. 9% of population) are often considered 'silent' carriers with increased vulnerability to environmentally modulated liver and lung disease. They may have significantly more anxiety and bipolar spectrum disorders, nutritional compromise, and white matter disease [Schmechel DE, Browndyke J, Ghio A. Strategies for the dissection of genetic-environmental interactions in neurodegenerative disorders. Neurotoxicology 2006;27:637-57]. Given association of art and mood disorders, we examined occupation and artistic vocation from this same series. One thousand five hundred and thirty-seven consecutive persons aged 16-90 years old received comprehensive work-up including testing for AAT 'phenotype' and level, nutritional factors, and inflammatory, iron and copper indices. Occupations were grouped by Bureau of Labor Standards classification and information gathered on artistic activities. Proportion of reactive airway disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, and pre-existing anxiety disorder or bipolar disorder were significantly increased in persons carrying AAT non-M polymorphisms compared to normal MM genotype (respectively, 10, 20, 21, and 33% compared to 8, 12, 11, and 9%; contingency table, pulmonary: chi2 37, p=0.0001; affective disorder: chi2=171, p=0.0001). In persons with artistic avocation (n=189) or occupation (n=57), AAT non-M polymorphisms are significantly increased (respectively, proportions of 44 and 40% compared to background rate of 9%; contingency table, avocation: chi2=172, p=0.0001; occupation: chi2=57, p=0.0007). Artistic ability and 'anxiety/bipolar spectrum' mood disorders may represent phenotypic attributes that had selective advantage during recent human evolution, an 'intensive creative energy' (ICE) behavioral phenotype. Background proportion of ICE of 7% consists of 49 of 1312 persons with AAT MM genotype (4%), and 58 of 225 persons with non-MM genotypes

  14. Inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by aqueous coal solutions: Possible relation to the emphysema of coal workers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Laurent, P.A.; Zalma, R.; Pezerat, H. )

    1993-07-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that emphysema in coal workers may be related to their exposure to coal dusts. The hypothesis that emphysema could be related to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by inhaled coal dusts was examined in the present study. Using ESR, we investigated whether the interaction of different coals with dissolved oxygen in aqueous medium could generate ROS. Indeed, we found that one of the five examined French coal samples, Vouters coal, was effective in oxidizing formate anions or ethanol by a radical pathway. Inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) in vitro was then examined for all five coal filtrates. The Vouters coal filtrate, which exhibits oxidative activity, can also inactivate alpha 1-AT. When this coal filtrate was crystallized and redissolved, its oxidative activity was found to be conserved. By use of various analytical techniques, the active component of this coal filtrate was identified to be primarily ferrous sulfate. We confirmed that pure ferrous sulfate can effectively reduce oxygen to produce ROS in aqueous medium in vitro and can also inactivate alpha 1-AT. In this report, the nature of the coal-generated oxidative species, the origin of ferrous sulfate, and the stability of ferrous sulfate in the different coal samples are discussed. These results offer evidence that some inhaled coal dusts are capable of producing ROS, which may play an important role in the development of coal workers' emphysema.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α driven inflammation in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a new model of pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Killian; Reeves, Emer P; Carroll, Tomás P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has traditionally been thought of as a genetic disorder characterized by lung destruction and early emphysema in a low AAT, and high neutrophil elastase (NE) environment in the lungs of affected individuals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has emerged to support the hypothesis that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is essential in the pathogenesis of both genetic AATD and non-genetic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reports have highlighted the importance of TNF-α driven immune cell dysfunction in the development of lung disease in AATD. The authors discuss the role of AAT as a key modulator of TNF-α signaling firstly in the setting of AATD and secondly in other conditions where AAT augmentation therapy has potential utility as a novel therapy. PMID:26634397

  16. Gene transfer of master autophagy regulator TFEB results in clearance of toxic protein and correction of hepatic disease in alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Nunzia; Blomenkamp, Keith; Annunziata, Fabio; Piccolo, Pasquale; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Maria Sepe, Rosa; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Polishchuk, Elena; Iacobacci, Simona; Polishchuk, Roman; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ballabio, Andrea; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency is the most common genetic cause of liver disease in children and liver transplantation is currently the only available treatment. Enhancement of liver autophagy increases degradation of mutant, hepatotoxic alpha-1-anti-trypsin (ATZ). We investigated the therapeutic potential of liver-directed gene transfer of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master gene that regulates lysosomal function and autophagy, in PiZ transgenic mice, recapitulating the human hepatic disease. Hepatocyte TFEB gene transfer resulted in dramatic reduction of hepatic ATZ, liver apoptosis and fibrosis, which are key features of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. Correction of the liver phenotype resulted from increased ATZ polymer degradation mediated by enhancement of autophagy flux and reduced ATZ monomer by decreased hepatic NFκB activation and IL-6 that drives ATZ gene expression. In conclusion, TFEB gene transfer is a novel strategy for treatment of liver disease of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. This study may pave the way towards applications of TFEB gene transfer for treatment of a wide spectrum of human disorders due to intracellular accumulation of toxic proteins. PMID:23381957

  17. Convective gas mixing, airway dimensions and lung function parameters in patients homo- or heterozygote for hereditary alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Siekmeier, R; Schiller-Scotland, C F

    1998-08-01

    Informations about convective gas transport and airway morphometry as a function of volumetric lung depth (V(LD)) can be evaluated by means of two methods based on aerosol inhalation and determination of aerosol pulse parameters (APP) and effective airway dimensions (EAD). APP, EAD and conventional pulmonary function tests (PFT) were measured in patients homo- and heterozygote for alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency. Thirteen homozygote subjects (ZZ allele), 21 heterozygote subjects (MZ allele) and 20 healthy controls were included. Anthropometric data were similar in all groups. APP but not PFT and EAD showed slight significant differences between controls and heterozygotes. However, PFT, APP and EAD from ZZ-homozygotes were strongly different from those of the other groups. Differences were also observed for APP between control smokers and nonsmokers and for APP, PFT and EAD between control nonsmokers and heterozygote smokers but not between heterozygote smokers and heterozygote nonsmokers and control nonsmokers and heterozygote nonsmokers, respectively. The data suggest that lung emphysema causes variations of pulmonary convective gas mixing detectable by measurement of APP which obviously precede variations of PFT. Our data further suggest that heterozygotes are not automatically at risk for the development of lung emphysema. Therefore we also regarded the results with request to individual smoking habits and found an increased risk in heterozygote smokers when compared to control nonsmokers. PMID:9820684

  18. Alpha1-antitrypsin polymorphism and systematics of eastern North American wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Federoff, N.E.; Kueppers, F.

    2002-01-01

    We used data on the polymorphic status of 1-antitrypsin (1AT) to study the relationship of Minnesota wolves to the gray wolf (Canis lupus), which was thought to have evolved in Eurasia, and to red wolves (Canis rufus) and coyotes (Canis latrans), which putatively evolved in North America. Recent evidence had indicated that Minnesota wolves might be more closely related to red wolves and coyotes. Samples from wild-caught Minnesota wolves and from captive wolves, at least some of which originated in Alaska and western Canada, were similarly polymorphic for 1AT, whereas coyote and red wolf samples were all monomorphic. Our findings, in conjunction with earlier results, are consistent with the Minnesota wolf being a gray wolf of Eurasian origin or possibly a hybrid between the gray wolf of Eurasian origin and the proposed North American wolf.

  19. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  20. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = -0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  1. Mechanistic Evidence in Support of Alpha1-Antitrypsin as a Therapeutic Approach for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fleixo-Lima, Gabriella; Ventura, Hilla; Medini, Michal; Bar, Liliana; Strauss, Pnina

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing endogenous molecules as a therapeutic approach is almost unequivocally superior to engineered or synthetic molecules. However, one rarely encounters an anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, immunomodulatory and wound-healing molecule that has been available for use for decades. α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating protein that rises more than 4-fold during acute-phase responses, has been administered for a rare genetic deficiency at large doses, for life. Aside from advances in insulin therapy, medical research in type 1 diabetes (T1D) has predominantly focused on autoimmunity—controlling the adaptive immune response. However, it is now appreciated that one may need to extend therapeutic targets to incorporate immune responses to cellular injury, as well as promote selective control over excessive inflammation and early tissue repair. Recent data suggest that tissue damage related to lung and renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, stroke, and ischemic heart disease is markedly reduced by AAT. AAT was also shown to protect pancreatic islet β cells at multiple levels. Unlike classic immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory approaches, AAT exerts some antiviral and antibacterial activities. Based on these and other reports, AAT is under evaluation for treatment of T1D patients in multiple clinical trials. Initial results suggest that AAT therapy could potentially improve insulin production without adverse effects. Up to 50% of individuals displayed improved islet function. It is a rare occurrence in T1D research that a therapy is offered that holds a safety profile equal or superior to that of insulin alone. While placebo-controlled trials are ongoing, the mechanism(s) behind these favorable activities of AAT are still being explored. PMID:25155845

  2. Polymorphism of alpha 1 antitrypsin in North American species of Canis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Federoff, N.E.; Kueppers, F.

    2000-01-01

    a1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) is a major protease inhibitor present in all mammalian sera that have thus far been investigated. A1AT is also highly polymorphic and is therefore a useful genetic marker. Previously reported A1AT polymorphism in domestic dogs consisted of two alleles designated as PiM and PiS which exhibited frequencies of 0.72 and 0.28, respectively, in a group of randomly collected mongrel dogs. North American species of Canis, which included gray wolves (n=29), Mexican wolves (n=20), coyotes (n=24), wolfdog crosses (n=9), and red wolves (n=27) were tested for A1AT polymorphism. A1AT phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing, followed by direct immunoblotting using a specific antiserum. A1AT concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Concentrations of A1AT were similar to those found in domestic dogs (2.26 + 0.3 mg/ml SD) and tended to be higher in females than in males, possibly indicating that A1AT may be hormonally influenced in females. Three phenotypic band patterns were observed (M, MS, S). The allele frequencies for domestic dogs and gray wolves were very similar, 0.72 and 0.69 for PiM and 0.28 and 0.31 for PiS, respectively. The Mexican wolves had a significantly lower frequency of PiS= 0.10. Coyotes and red wolves were all found to be monomorphic for the PiS allele and were indistinguishable from each other in that respect.

  3. Oncostatin M induced alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) gene expression in Hep G2 cells is mediated by a 3' enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kevin; Marsters, Peter; Morley, Stephen; van Gent, Diana; Hejazi, Ala; Backx, Matt; Thorpe, Emma R K; Kalsheker, Noor

    2002-01-01

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the major serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN A1) in human plasma. Its target proteinase is neutrophil elastase and its main physiological function is protection of the lower respiratory tract from the destructive effects of neutrophil elastase during an inflammatory response. Circulating levels of AAT rise 2-3-fold during inflammation and the liver produces most of this increase. The cytokines oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-6 have been shown to be mainly responsible for this effect, which is mediated via the interaction of cytokine-inducible transcription factors with regulatory elements within the gene. In the present study, we report for the first time that OSM stimulation of hepatocyte AAT occurs via an interaction between the hepatocyte promoter and an OSM-responsive element at the 3'-end of the AAT gene. This effect is mediated by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 ('STAT 3') binding to an OSM-responsive element (sequence TTCTCTTAA), and this site is distinct from, but close to, a previously reported interleukin-6-responsive element. PMID:11936950

  4. Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with Atypical Cutaneous Involvement and Diagnosis of ZZ Phenotype Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khawandanah, Mohamad; Kraus, Teresa; Cherry, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare condition. Specific neoplastic involvement can be primary (confined to the skin) or secondary to systemic involvement (metastatic). Cutaneous involvement by HL usually occurs late in the course and is associated with poor prognosis; however in some cases it can exhibit indolent behavior. Skin involvement with nonspecific cutaneous findings may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. We describe a case of 46-year-old white male patient presented with rash and lymphadenopathy which led to the diagnosis of stage IVE mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma with skin involvement. His disease was refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy including (1) AVD (doxorubicin/bleomycin/dacarbazine), (2) brentuximab, and (3) bendamustine, he later achieved complete remission with (4) GCD (gemcitabine/carboplatin/dexamethasone) salvage regimen. Bleomycin was not given secondary to poor pulmonary function tests. His treatment was complicated after AVD with multiple pneumothoraces which unmasked the diagnosis of ZZ phenotype alpha-1 antitrypsin (ATT) deficiency. Simultaneous existence of Hodgkin lymphoma and ATT is rarely reported. PMID:24955265

  5. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  6. Young adults with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency identified neonatally: their health, knowledge about and adaptation to the high-risk condition.

    PubMed

    Sveger, T; Thelin, T; McNeil, T F

    1997-01-01

    The psychological and psychosocial consequences of screening for alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (alpha 1 ATD) were investigated when the subjects were 5-7 years old. The present study was conducted when the subjects were 18-20 years old, the foci of interest being their health, psychosomatic problems, knowledge about alpha 1 ATD and the potential effect of that knowledge on their lives and future family planning. Samples of 61 PiZ and 61 demographically matched control subjects, 18-20 years old, were asked to participate. Written, structured questionnaires covered the following items: basic familial characteristics, psychosomatic symptoms, opinions on medical check-ups, information and views on future alpha 1 ATD screening, whether the knowledge about alpha 1 ATD had affected the life and family planning of alpha 1 ATD individuals. Items concerning the "alpha 1 ATD matter" were excluded in the questionnaires given to the controls. Questionnaire data were obtained from 50 alpha 1 ATD and 48 control individuals, 41 of each being matched alpha 1 ATD-control pairs. No significant differences were found in demographic or educational backgrounds, psychosomatic complaints such as headache, sleep difficulties, stomach ache, tiredness or anxiety. Lung symptoms occurred more frequently in alpha 1 ATD subjects (p = 0.05). Six per cent of the alpha 1 ATD individuals planned working careers with a high risk of air pollution. The majority (86%) of the alpha 1 ATD subjects perceived the contact with the medical services as positive; 14% as both positive and negative. The information concerning alpha 1 ATD was assessed as satisfactory by 73%, as both good and bad by 17% and as unsatisfactory by 10%. All alpha 1 ATD subjects advocated general screening for alpha 1 ATD, the neonatal period being chosen as optimal by 94%. Half of the alpha 1 ATD individuals thought that the knowledge of their high-risk condition had affected their lives, particularly their awareness of the dangers of

  7. Alpha1-antitrypsin suppresses TNF-alpha and MMP-12 production by cigarette smoke-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Rong D; Meixner, Scott C; Pryzdial, Edward L G; Wright, Joanne L

    2007-08-01

    We have previously observed that mice exposed to cigarette smoke and treated with exogenous alpha(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) were protected against the development of emphysema and against smoke-induced increases in serum TNF-alpha. To investigate possible mechanisms behind this latter observation, we cultured alveolar macrophages lavaged from C57 mice. Smoke-conditioned medium caused alveolar macrophages to increase secretion of macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12) and TNF-alpha, and this effect was suppressed in a dose-response fashion by addition of A1AT. Macrophages from animals exposed to smoke in vivo and then lavaged also failed to increase MMP-12 and TNF-alpha secretion when the animals were pretreated with A1AT. Because proteinase activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is known to control MMP-12 release, macrophages were treated with the G protein-coupled receptor inhibitor, pertussis toxin; this suppressed both TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release, while a PAR-1 agonist (TRAP) increased TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release. Smoke-conditioned medium caused increased release of the prothrombin activator, tissue factor, from macrophages. Hirudin, a thrombin inhibitor, and aprotinin, an inhibitor of plasmin, reduced smoke-mediated TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release, and A1AT inhibited both plasmin and thrombin activity in a cell-free functional assay. These findings extend our previous suggestion that TNF-alpha production by alveolar macrophages is related to MMP-12 secretion. They also suggest that A1AT can inhibit thrombin and plasmin in blood constituents that leak into the lung after smoke exposure, thereby preventing PAR-1 activation and MMP-12/TNF-alpha release, and decreasing smoke-mediated inflammatory cell influx. PMID:17395890

  8. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 increases solubility and facilitates degradation of the Z variant of {alpha}-1-antitrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuxian; Ballar, Petek; Fang, Shengyun . E-mail: fangs@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-11-03

    Deficiency of circulating {alpha}-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is the most widely recognized abnormality of a proteinase inhibitor that causes lung disease. AAT-deficiency is caused by mutations of the AAT gene that lead to AAT protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the mutant AAT accumulated in the ER predisposes the homozygote to severe liver injuries, such as neonatal hepatitis, juvenile cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the fact that mutant AAT protein is subject to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), yeast genetic studies have determined that the ubiquitination machinery, Hrd1/Der3p-cue1p-Ubc7/6p, which plays a prominent role in ERAD, is not involved in degradation of mutant AAT. Here we report that gp78, a ubiquitin ligase (E3) pairing with mammalian Ubc7 for ERAD, ubiquitinates and facilitates degradation of ATZ, the classic deficiency variant of AAT having a Z mutation (Glu 342 Lys). Unexpectedly, gp78 over-expression also significantly increases ATZ solubility. p97/VCP, an AAA ATPase essential for retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER during ERAD, is involved in gp78-mediated degradation of ATZ. Surprisingly, unlike other ERAD substrates that cause ER stress leading to apoptosis when accumulated in the ER, ATZ, in fact, increases cell proliferation when over-expressed in cells. This effect can be partially inhibited by gp78 over-expression. These data indicate that gp78 assumes multiple unique quality control roles over ATZ, including the facilitation of degradation and inhibition of aggregation of ATZ.

  9. Proteolytic inactivation of alpha-1-antitrypsin by human neutrophils: involvement of multiple and interlinked cell responses to phagocytosable targets.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Scirocco, M; Dallegri, F; Sacchetti, C

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) can inactivate the PMN-elastase inhibitor alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) proteolytically, by using metalloproteinases normally stored as zymogens in myeloperoxidase (MPO)-negative granules. Supernatants from opsonized zymosan (OPZ)-triggered human PMN cleaved and inactivated human A1AT through a process inhibitable by metal-chelators, suggesting that the interaction of PMN with OPZ leads to the extracellular availability of active metalloenzymes. During OPZ-triggering, PMN used approximately 80% of the generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce HOCl by means of the MPO pathway, while the remainder was catabolized by PMN themselves. No H2O2 was available as free compound in the extracellular environment and hydroxyl (.OH) or .OH-like radicals were not generated. The selective deletion of single components of the HOCl-generating MPO pathway resulted in the generation of PMN supernatants free of active metalloenzymes but rich of the corresponding zymogens. Similar results were obtained by replacing normal PMN with cells from a patient with hereditary MPO deficiency. No evidence was obtained for the intervention or contribution of .OH-like radicals, serine-proteinases and oxidized glutathione in the transformation of the zymogens into enzymes able to inactivate A1AT. On concluding, PMN undergoing phagocytosis release MPO in amount sufficient to handle the extracellular pool of the generated H2O2 entirely, leading to the generation of equimolar amounts of HOCl. In turn, HOCl or a similar compound derived from it interacts with concomitantly released metallozymogens, switching on their A1AT inactivating potential without the apparent contribution of other PMN-derived molecules.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8187807

  10. Serum concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin is significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently controversial. The present study compares AAT serum concentrations and gene frequencies between a group of CRC patients and a control group of healthy unrelated people (HUP). Methods 267 CRC subjects (63% males, 72 ± 10 years old) were enlisted from a Hospital Clinic setting in Asturias, Spain. The HUP group comprised 327 subjects (67% males, mean age 70 ± 7.5 years old) from the same geographical region. Outcome measures were AAT serum concentrations measured by nephelometry, and AAT phenotyping characterization by isoelectric focusing. Results Significantly higher serum concentrations were found among CRC (208 ± 60) than in HUP individuals (144 ± 20.5) (p = 0.0001). No differences were found in the phenotypic distribution of the Pi*S and Pi*Z allelic frequencies (p = 0.639), although the frequency of Pi*Z was higher in CRC (21%) than in HUP subjects (15%). Conclusions The only statistically significant finding in this study was the markedly higher AAT serum concentrations found in CRC subjects compared with HUP controls, irrespective of whether their Pi* phenotype was normal (Pi*MM) or deficient (Pi*MS, Pi*MZ and Pi*SZ). Although there was a trend towards the more deficient Pi* phenotype the more advanced the tumor, the results were inconclusive due to the small sample size. Consequently, more powerful studies are needed to reach firmer conclusions on this matter. PMID:24886427

  11. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol.

    PubMed

    Moller, David R; Koth, Laura L; Maier, Lisa A; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K; Collman, Ronald G; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J; Zhang, Yingze; O'Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gibson, Kevin F

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant's clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis. PMID:26193069

  12. Is severe progressive liver disease caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency more common in children or adults?

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew S; Chopra, Kapil B; Perlmutter, David H

    2016-07-01

    The classical form of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is known to cause liver disease in children and adults, but there is relatively little information about the risk of severe, progressive liver disease and the need for liver transplantation. To better understand how newly evolving pharmacological, genetic, and cellular therapies may be targeted according to risk for progressive liver disease, we sought to determine the age distribution of A1ATD as a cause of severe liver disease, as defined by the need for liver transplantation. Using 3 US liver transplantation databases for the period 1991-2012, we found 77.2% of 1677 liver transplants with a reported diagnosis of A1ATD were adults. The peak age range was 50-64 years. Using 2 of the databases which included specific A1AT phenotypes, we found that many of these adults who undergo liver transplantation with A1ATD as the diagnosis are heterozygotes and have other potential causes of liver disease, most notably obesity and ethanol abuse. However, even when these cases are excluded and only ZZ and SZ phenotypes are considered, severe liver disease requiring transplantation is more than 2.5 times as likely in adults. The analysis also showed a markedly increased risk for males. In the pediatric group, almost all of the transplants are done in children less than 5 years of age. In conclusion, A1ATD causes progressive liver disease most commonly in adults with males in the highest risk category. In the pediatric group, children less than 5 years of age are highest in risk. These results suggest that A1ATD most commonly causes liver disease by mechanisms similar to age-dependent degenerative diseases and more rarely in children by powerful modifiers. Liver Transplantation 22 886-894 2016 AASLD. PMID:26946192

  13. Linkage Specific Fucosylation of Alpha-1-Antitrypsin in Liver Cirrhosis and Cancer Patients: Implications for a Biomarker of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Comunale, Mary Ann; Rodemich-Betesh, Lucy; Hafner, Julie; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported increased levels of protein-linked fucosylation with the development of liver cancer and identified many of the proteins containing the altered glycan structures. One such protein is alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT). To advance these studies, we performed N-linked glycan analysis on the five major isoforms of A1AT and completed a comprehensive study of the glycosylation of A1AT found in healthy controls, patients with hepatitis C- (HCV) induced liver cirrhosis, and in patients infected with HCV with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methodology/Principal Findings Patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer had increased levels of triantennary glycan-containing outer arm (α-1,3) fucosylation. Increases in core (α-1,6) fucosylation were observed only on A1AT from patients with cancer. We performed a lectin fluorophore-linked immunosorbent assay using Aleuria Aurantia lectin (AAL), specific for core and outer arm fucosylation in over 400 patients with liver disease. AAL-reactive A1AT was able to detect HCC with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 86%, which was greater than that observed with the current marker of HCC, alpha-fetoprotein. Glycosylation analysis of the false positives was performed; results indicated that these patients had increases in outer arm fucosylation but not in core fucosylation, suggesting that core fucosylation is cancer specific. Conclusions/Significance This report details the stepwise change in the glycosylation of A1AT with the progression from liver cirrhosis to cancer and identifies core fucosylation on A1AT as an HCC specific modification. PMID:20811639

  14. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; P<0.005, and laCBG lower; 174 [68-229] vs. 220 [119-348] nmol/L; P=0.016 in the AATD group, compared with controls. The ratio of haCBG:total CBG was also higher in AATD; 72 [53-83] vs. 54 [41-72] %; P=0.0001). There was a negative correlation between haCBG:total CBG and AAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD. PMID:26522656

  15. [Update: Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. Summary of a scientific symposium at the conference of the Swiss Pneumologic Society on April 16th, 2009].

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, C; Hamacher, J; Steveling, H; Steinkamp, G

    2009-12-01

    The time delay between the start of respiratory symptoms and the correct diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is often 6 to 8 years. Most patients are misdiagnosed as having COPD or asthma. Recent estimates suggest that only 15 % of patients have already been identified. The PiZZ genotype leads to severely decreased AAT serum concentrations, and is associated with a high risk of pulmonary emphysema. Disease manifestation is earlier in smokers than in non-smokers. Since cigarette smoke is able to reduce AAT activity by a factor of 2000, it can accelerate the progression of emphysema. Patients are therefore recommended to stop smoking. The EXACTLE study assessed the development of emphysema by means of CT densitometry in 77 patients with severe AAT deficiency over a period of 2.5 years. CT densitometry was able to detect the progressive loss of lung tissue, and it was found to be more sensitive than pulmonary function or quality of life variables. With weekly intravenous supplementation of alpha-1-antitrypsin, emphysema progressed more slowly compared to placebo (albumin) infusions. In Germany, of about 900 patients are currently receiving supplementation therapy with human AAT. The treatment is well tolerated and well accepted by the patients. Symptomatic treatment consists of long- and short-acting beta-agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, and inhaled corticosteroids. Alpha-1 centres provide particular expertise, and it is recommended that every patient should be seen in one of these specialised outpatient clinics. PMID:19941265

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and metabolic hepatic disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  17. Cause-specific mortality in individuals with severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in comparison with the general population in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ekström, Magnus; Wagner, Philippe; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZZ) predisposes to morbidity and mortality due to early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The risk of death from other causes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer, has not been well investigated. We aimed to analyze cause-specific mortality in PiZZ individuals compared with the general Swedish population. Methods Data on 1,561 PiZZ individuals from the Swedish National AAT Deficiency Register, prospectively followed from 1991 to 2014, were analyzed. Causes of death according to the Swedish National Causes of Death Register for the study group were compared with those for the general Swedish population matched for age, sex, and calendar year, with the excess mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results There were 524 deaths during the follow-up period. PiZZ individuals had excess all-cause mortality compared with the Swedish general population (SMR 3.6, 95% CI 3.3–3.9). SMR for ischemic heart disease (IHD) was 0.5 (95% CI 0.3–0.8) and was similar for never and ever-smokers, and in males and females. SMR for lung cancer was 0.9 (95% CI 0.4–1.7). PiZZ individuals had increased mortality compared with the general population for the following diseases: respiratory disease, SMR 48.4 (95% CI 43.0–54.5); primary liver carcinoma, SMR 90.0 (95% CI 59.3–130.9); complicated colon diverticulitis, SMR 20.8 (95% CI 6.7–48.6); and pulmonary embolism, SMR 6.9 (95% CI 3.3–12.7). Conclusion PiZZ individuals had a reduced mortality risk of IHD. Mortality due to respiratory, hepatic disease, diverticulitis, and pulmonary embolism was markedly increased compared with the age- and sex-matched Swedish population. PMID:27555756

  18. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thun, Gian Andri; Kumar, Ashish; Obeidat, Ma'en; Zorzetto, Michele; Haun, Margot; Curjuric, Ivan; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Jackson, Victoria E.; Albrecht, Eva; Ried, Janina S.; Teumer, Alexander; Lopez, Lorna M.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Enroth, Stefan; Bossé, Yohan; Hao, Ke; Timens, Wim; Gyllensten, Ulf; Polasek, Ozren; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Sandford, Andrew J.; Deary, Ian J.; Koch, Beate; Reischl, Eva; Schulz, Holger; Hui, Jennie; James, Alan L.; Rochat, Thierry; Russi, Erich W.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.; Dahl, Morten; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Kronenberg, Florian; Luisetti, Maurizio; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = −0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10−12). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1%) and low-frequent (MAF 1–5%) variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z) variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273) was successful (P<0.0001), as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57). Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397), associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in

  19. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT) belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release %60 of the drug within 8

  20. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficient man presenting with lung function decline associated with dust exposure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction People with α1-antitrypsin deficiency are at increased risk for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Previous retrospective epidemiologic studies have found that exposure to occupational dust among those with α1-antitrypsin deficiency is a risk factor at the group level for poorer lung function, but on an individual clinical basis, a causal attribution can be difficult to establish. Case presentation We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian man with a 25 pack-year smoking history who presented with new-onset dyspnea on exertion in the setting of workplace dust exposure. During his evaluation, he was found to have α1-antitrypsin deficiency with evidence of development of pulmonary emphysema. Workplace spirometric monitoring over 10 years of surveillance for an on-the-job respirator fit program demonstrated a sharp downward slope in forced expiratory volume in one second, or FEV1, during his periods of most significant dust exposure, which was attenuated after discontinuation of his workplace exposure. Conclusion Patients with α1-antitrypsin disease should be assessed for occupational exposures and closely monitored for work-accelerated progression of lung function decline. More generally, this case report supports the biological plausibility of occupationally associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, underscoring that work-associated pulmonary disease can be multi-factorial. PMID:21504560

  1. Effects of Prolastin C (Plasma-Derived Alpha-1 Antitrypsin) on the acute inflammatory response in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (from the VCU-alpha 1-RT pilot study).

    PubMed

    Abbate, Antonio; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Christopher, Sanah; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Sonnino, Chiara; Oddi, Claudia; Carbone, Salvatore; Melchior, Ryan David; Gambill, Michael Lucas; Roberts, Charlotte Susan; Kontos, Michael Christopher; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Toldo, Stefano; Vetrovec, George Wayne; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Dinarello, Charles Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has broad anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties in addition to inhibiting serine proteases. Administration of human plasma-derived AAT is protective in models of acute myocardial infarction in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and tolerability of human plasma-derived AAT and its effects on the acute inflammatory response in non-AAT deficient patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Ten patients with acute STEMI were enrolled in an open-label, single-arm treatment study of AAT at 60 mg/kg infused intravenously within 12 hours of admission and following standard of care treatment. C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma AAT levels were determined at admission, 72 hours, and 14 days, and patients were followed clinically for 12 weeks for the occurrence of new onset heart failure, recurrent myocardial infarction, or death. Twenty patients with STEMI enrolled in previous randomized trials with identical inclusion and/or exclusion criteria, but who received placebo, served as historical controls. Prolastin C was well tolerated and there were no in-hospital adverse events. Compared with historical controls, the area under the curve of CRP levels was significantly lower 14 days after admission in the Prolastin C group (75.9 [31.4 to 147.8] vs 205.6 [78.8 to 410.9] mg/l, p = 0.048), primarily due to a significant blunting of the increase occurring between admission and 72 hours (delta CRP +1.7 [0.2 to 9.4] vs +21.1 [3.1 to 38.0] mg/l, p = 0.007). Plasma AAT levels increased from admission (149 [116 to 189]) to 203 ([185 to 225] mg/dl) to 72 hours (p = 0.005). In conclusion, a single administration of Prolastin C in patients with STEMI is well tolerated and is associated with a blunted acute inflammatory response. PMID:25456867

  2. A study of common Mendelian disease carriers across ageing British cohorts: meta-analyses reveal heterozygosity for alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency increases respiratory capacity and height

    PubMed Central

    North, Teri-Louise; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Cyrus; Deary, Ian J; Gallacher, John; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Martin, Richard M; Pattie, Alison; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Starr, John M; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Rodriguez, Santiago; Day, Ian N M

    2016-01-01

    Background Several recessive Mendelian disorders are common in Europeans, including cystic fibrosis (CFTR), medium-chain-acyl-Co-A-dehydrogenase deficiency (ACADM), phenylketonuria (PAH) and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (SERPINA1). Methods In a multicohort study of >19 000 older individuals, we investigated the relevant phenotypes in heterozygotes for these genes: lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC)) for CFTR and SERPINA1; cognitive measures for ACADM and PAH; and physical capability for ACADM, PAH and SERPINA1. Results Findings were mostly negative but lung function in SERPINA1 (protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, rs28929474) showed enhanced FEV1 and FVC (0.13 z-score increase in FEV1 (p=1.7×10−5) and 0.16 z-score increase in FVC (p=5.2×10−8)) in PI-MZ individuals. Height adjustment (a known, strong correlate of FEV1 and FVC) revealed strong positive height associations of the Z allele (1.50 cm increase in height (p=3.6×10−10)). Conclusions The PI-MZ rare (2%) SNP effect is nearly four times greater than the ‘top’ common height SNP in HMGA2. However, height only partially attenuates the SERPINA1-FEV1 or FVC association (around 50%) and vice versa. Height SNP variants have recently been shown to be positively selected collectively in North versus South Europeans, while the Z allele high frequency is localised to North Europe. Although PI-ZZ is clinically disadvantageous to lung function, PI-MZ increases both height and respiratory function; potentially a balanced polymorphism. Partial blockade of PI could conceivably form part of a future poly-therapeutic approach in very short children. The notion that elastase inhibition should benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may also merit re-evaluation. PI is already a therapeutic target: our findings invite a reconsideration of the optimum level in respiratory care and novel pathway potential for development of agents for the

  3. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Jan; Veldhuisen, Barbara; Annovazzi, Laura; Zanone, Chiara; Versteeg, Elly M; van Kuppevelt, Toine H; Nieuwenhuizen, Willem; Iadarola, Paolo; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longitudinal variability of these biomarkers is unknown but desirable for clinical studies with proteinase inhibitors. Methods We measured three different types of biomarkers, including desmosines, elastase-formed fibrinogen fragments and heparan sulfate epitope JM403, in plasma and urine for a period of 7 weeks in a group of 12 patients who participated in a placebo-controlled study to assess the safety of a single inhalation of hyaluronic acid. Results Effect of study medication on any of the biomarkers was not seen. Baseline desmosines in plasma and urine correlated with baseline CO diffusion capacity (R = 0.81, p = 0.01 and R = 0.65, p = 0.05). Mean coefficient of variation within patients (CVi) for plasma and urine desmosines was 18.7 to 13.5%, respectively. Change in urinary desmosine levels correlated significantly with change in plasma desmosine levels (R = 0.84, p < 0.01). Mean CVi for fibrinogen fragments in plasma was 20.5% and for JM403 in urine was 27.8%. No correlations were found between fibrinogen fragments or JM403 epitope and desmosines. Conclusion We found acceptable variability in our study parameters, indicating the feasibility of their use in an evaluation of biochemical efficacy of alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in Pi Z subjects. PMID:15927063

  4. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Milger, Katrin; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Teupser, Daniel; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Behr, Jürgen; Kneidinger, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL). No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA) insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null). This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency. PMID:26005342

  5. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Russo, Rodrigo; Manzano, Beatriz Martins; Ivanaga, Ivan; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Santos, Gildo; Rodriguez, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm) was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency. PMID:24310627

  6. Well-Known and Less Well-Known Functions of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Its Role in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Other Disease Developments.

    PubMed

    Janciauskiene, Sabina; Welte, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is an acute-phase protein, and is best known as an inhibitor of the serine proteases, specifically, neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G. The discovery of the connection between inherited A1AT deficiency and emphysema resulted in the concept of a proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance to explain the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as the concomitant development of augmentation therapy with plasma-purified human A1AT. This proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance concept has been difficult to prove, as no single mechanism can account for the complex pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New studies have begun to characterize A1AT as an antiinflammatory and an immunoregulatory protein, independent of its antiprotease activity. We recently found that A1AT binds to free fatty acids, and it is this form of A1AT that induces the expression and release of angiopoietin-like protein 4, a protein associated with dyslipidemia and inflammation. This latter finding further strengthens the idea that describing A1AT therapy as antiserine protease is perhaps an oversimplification. The preliminary findings suggest that A1AT could be used for the management of diseases not necessarily related to inherited A1ATD, and points toward a need for more detailed investigations into the relationships between the concentration, structure, and function of A1AT protein. PMID:27564662

  7. Prospective study of the clinical value of determining circulating IgA-alpha 1-antitrypsin complex using a prototype ELISA kit in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Iwana, K; Aotsuka, S; Nishioka, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical value of determining circulating IgA-alpha 1-antitrypsin (IgA-AT) complex in rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: The IgA-AT complex was assayed by a prototype ELISA kit using a specific monoclonal antibody against the complex. RESULTS: The median level of serum IgA-AT complex in rheumatoid patients (2.26 AU ml-1) was significantly higher than in osteoarthritis patients (1.37 AU ml-1, P < 0.05) and healthy volunteers (1.03 AU ml-1, P < 0.001). The concentration of IgA-AT complex in rheumatoid arthritis patients at baseline was correlated with the number of painful joints (P < 0.05), number of swollen joints (P < 0.01), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P < 0.05), and modified Lansbury index (P < 0.01). The median serum level of IgA-AT complex in rheumatoid patients at baseline was higher than that at three months (P < 0.01), six months (P < 0.01), and 12 months (P < 0.01) after the start of treatment. The difference and ratio of IgA-AT complex levels before and after treatment were significantly associated with radiographic progression. CONCLUSIONS: The findings validate the usefulness of determining IgA-AT complex using ELISA in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8976645

  8. Polymorphisms in the HPC/ELAC-2 and alpha 1-antitrypsin genes that correlate with human diseases in a North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir C; Thakur, Hitender; Gupta, Lipsy; Janmeja, Ashok K; Seth, Amlesh; Singh, Sharwan K

    2011-06-01

    Two genes HPC/ELAC-2 and AAT were studied in north Indian population. HPC/ELAC-2 was studied in prostate cancer cases and AAT was studied in COPD patients. HPC/ELAC-2 is considered as an important cancer-susceptibility gene in prostate cancer. There are two common polymorphisms of this gene, i.e., Ser217Leu and Ala541Thr. Alpha 1 antitrypsin is a highly polymorphic anti-elastase enzyme, especially active in the protection of alveoli and liver. In the present study, we observed the distribution of two deficient alleles PiZ and Pi S in COPD patients. We extracted the DNA from 157 prostate cancer cases, 200 COPD patients, 170 BPH and 370 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were studied by PCR-RFLP technique. The mutant genotype (Leu/Leu) of HPC/ELAC-2 was present in 9.6, 7.6 and 5.9% of BPH, cancer cases and healthy controls, respectively. Higher risk of Ser/Leu as well as Leu/Leu had shown when compared to healthy controls. That was about 1.5 and 1.7-fold (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 0.96-2.51; OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 0.74-3.92), respectively. Risk was found to be increased in smokers and those consuming non-vegetarian diet. Our results suggest that the HPC/ELAC-2 polymorphisms, especially in localized cases, could help to predict prostate cancer risk and confirm its high prevalence of the leu/leu allele in north Indian population. Considering heterozygous PiZ genotype, we obtained an OR of 3.82 (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis adjusted by age sex and drinking habit showed 4.15-fold increased risk for COPD in PiZ heterozygous individuals. No increased risk was observed in the individuals carrying PiS alleles. PMID:20119870

  9. Altered glycosylation, expression of serum haptoglobin and alpha-1-antitrypsin in chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis C induced liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Gautam; Saroha, Ashish; Bose, Partha Pratim; Chatterjee, B P

    2016-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis with hepatitis C viral infection (HCV-LC) causes high risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Besides diagnosis of liver cirrhosis by biochemical test, imaging techniques, assessment of structural liver damage by biopsy shows several disadvantages. Our aim was to monitor the changes in the expression level of serum proteins and their glycosylation pattern among chronic hepatitis C (HCV-CH), HCV-LC and HCC patients with respect to controls. 2D gel electrophoresis of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC patients' sera showed several protein spots, which were identified by LC-MS. The change in the expression of two prominent protein spots, haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) was evaluated by western blot and ELISA. The changes in glycosylation pattern of these serum proteins were assayed using different lectins. Increased level of Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group whereas those were found to be present less in HCV-CH patient groups with respect to control as determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies. Decreased level of sialylation in both Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCV-CH patients' group whereas increased level of sialylation was observed in HCC patient groups by ELISA using Sambucus nigra agglutinin. On the other hand increased level of fucosylation in two serum glycoproteins was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group using Lens culinarris agglutinin. High glycan branching was found in HCV-LC and HCC patient groups in Hp but not in HCV-CH as determined by Datura stramonium agglutinin. However, there was no such change observed in glycan branching in AAT of HCV-CH and HCV-LC patients' groups, to the contrary high glycan branching was observed in HCC patients' group. Increased level of exposed galactose in both serum proteins was observed in both HCC patients' group as determined by Ricinus communis agglutinin. The present glycoproteomics study could predict the progression of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC

  10. Usefulness of the CAT, LCOPD, EQ-5D and COPDSS scales in understanding the impact of lung disease in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Manca, Sandra; Rodriguez, Esther; Huerta, Arturo; Torres, Maria; Lazaro, Lourdes; Curi, Sergio; Pirina, Pietro; Miravitlles, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an inherited disorder responsible for early onset emphysema associated with a significant impairment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Our aim was to assess the usefulness of different instruments to evaluate the HRQoL in patients with AATD compared to non-AATD COPD. Observational, cross-sectional study in which all patients filled out a series of questionnaires: the COPD severity score (COPDSS), the EuroQoL 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D), the Living with COPD (LCOPD) and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT). A total of 96 patients were included, 35 with AATD (mean age 56.5 yrs, 57.1% male and mean FEV1(%) 48.7% and 61 non-AATD COPD (70.3 yrs, 80.3% men and FEV1(%) 47%. The questionnaire scores were similar, with a tendency towards worse scores in AATD for the EQ-5D (VAS) (64.8 (20.2) vs. 71.6 (17.1); p = 0.08). The correlations between the different scores and FEV1(%) were significant in both groups for COPDSS and LCOPD, but not for CAT and EQ-5D. In general, the correlations of scores with FEV1(%) were stronger for AATD compared with non-AATD COPD patients: COPDSS r = -0.570, p < 0.01 for AATD and r = -0.260, p < 0.05 for COPD; LCOPD r = -0.502, p < 0.001 for AATD and r = -0.304, p < 0.05 for non-AATD COPD. Patients with AATD have a similar degree of HRQoL impairment as older subjects with non-AATD COPD and showed a stronger correlation between HRQoL measurements and lung function impairment compared with non-AATD COPD. This may be related to the characteristics of the disease in these patients who are usually younger, with less co-morbidity and lower smoking consumption. PMID:24832005

  11. Plasma levels of alpha1-antichymotrypsin and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subjects with and without severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Westin, Ulla; Wallmark, Anders; Piitulainen, Eeva; Sveger, Tomas; Janciauskiene, Sabina M

    2007-01-01

    Background Individuals with severe Z α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency have a considerably increased risk of developing chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). It has been hypothesized that compensatory increases in levels of other protease inhibitors mitigate the effects of this AAT deficiency. We analysed plasma levels of AAT, α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in healthy (asymptomatic) and COPD subjects with and without AAT deficiency. Methods Studied groups included: 71 asymptomatic AAT-deficient subjects (ZZ, n = 48 and SZ, n = 23, age 31 ± 0.5) identified during Swedish neonatal screening for AAT deficiency between 1972 and 1974; age-matched controls (MM, n = 57, age 30.7 ± 0.6); older asymptomatic ZZ (n = 10); healthy MM (n = 20, age 53 ± 9.6); and COPD patients (ZZ, n = 10, age 47.4 ± 11 and MM, n = 10, age 59.4 ± 6.7). Plasma levels of SLPI, AAT and ACT were analysed using ELISA and immunoelectrophoresis. Results No significant difference was found in plasma ACT and SLPI levels between the healthy MM and the ZZ or SZ subjects in the studied groups. Independent of the genetic variant, subjects with COPD (n = 19) had elevated plasma levels of SLPI and ACT relative to controls (n = 153) (49.5 ± 7.2 vs 40.7 ± 9.1 ng/ml, p < 0.001 and 0.52 ± 0.19 vs 0.40 ± 0.1 mg/ml, p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion Our findings show that plasma levels of ACT and SLPI are not elevated in subjects with genetic AAT deficiency compared MM controls and do not appear to compensate for the deficiency of plasma AAT. PMID:17261175

  12. Low Serum Levels of Alpha1 Anti-trypsin (α1-AT) and Risk of Airflow Obstruction in Non-Primary α1-AT-Deficient Patients with Compensated Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Romero, Elizabeth; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Elizalde-Barrera, César Iván; Mondragón-Terán, Paul; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Gómez-Cortés, Eduardo; de Vaca, Rebeca Pérez-Cabeza; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando E.; Melchor-López, Alberto; Jiménez-Saab, Nayeli Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha1 anti-trypsin (α1-AT), a serine protease inhibitor synthesized in the liver, is a major circulating antiprotease that provides defense against proteolytic damage in several tissues. Its deficiency is associated with airflow obstruction. The present study aimed to explore the role of α1-AT as a biomarker of airflow performance in chronic liver disease (CLD). Material/Methods Serum α1-AT levels and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated in non-primary α1-AT-deficient, alcoholic CLD patients without evident respiratory limitations. Results Thirty-four patients with airflow obstruction (n=11), airflow restriction (n=12), and normal airflow (n=11, age-matched controls) were eligible. α1-AT was decreased in the airflow obstruction group. ROC-cutoff α1-AT=24 mg/dL effectively discriminated airflow obstruction (AUC=0.687) and was associated with a 10-fold higher risk (p=0.0007). Conclusions Lower α1-AT increased the risk of airflow obstruction in CLD patients without primary α1-AT deficiency. PMID:25913248

  13. HIV Replication in CD4+ T Lymphocytes in the Presence and Absence of Follicular Dendritic Cells: Inhibition of Replication mediated by Alpha-1-Antitrypsin through Altered IκBα Ubiquitination1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xueyuan; Shapiro, Leland; Fellingham, Gilbert; Willardson, Barry M.; Burton, Gregory F.

    2011-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) increase HIV replication and virus production in lymphocytes by increasing the activation of NF-κB in infected cells. Because alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) decreases HIV replication in PBMCs and monocytic cells and decreases NF-κB activity, we postulated that AAT might also block FDC-mediated HIV replication. Primary CD4+ T cells were infected with HIV and cultured with FDCs or their supernatant with or without AAT, and ensuing viral RNA and p24 production were monitored. NF-κB activation in the infected cells was also assessed. Virus production was increased in the presence of FDC supernatant but the addition of AAT at concentrations above 0.5 mg/ml inhibited virus replication. AAT blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 despite an unexpected elevation in associated phosphorylated and ubiquitinated IκBα (Ub-IκBα). In the presence of AAT, degradation of cytoplasmic IκBα was dramatically inhibited compared to control cultures. AAT did not inhibit the proteasome; however, it altered the pattern of ubiquitination of IκBα. AAT decreased IκBα polyubiquitination linked through ubiquitin lysine residue 48 (K48) and increased ubiquitination linked through lysine residue 63 (K63). Moreover, K63 linked Ub-IκBα degradation was substantially slower than K48 linked Ub-IκBα in the presence of AAT, correlating altered ubiquitination with a prolonged IκBα half-life. Because AAT is naturally occurring and is available clinically, examination of its use as an inhibitory agent in HIV-infected subjects may be informative and lead to the development of similar agents that inhibit HIV replication using a novel mechanism. PMID:21263074

  14. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or symptoms of a serious lung condition, especially emphysema , without any obvious cause. He or she also may suspect AAT deficiency if you develop emphysema when you're 45 years old or younger. ...

  15. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Living with AAT deficiency may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel ... and friends also can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel ...

  16. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  17. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  18. Effect of cigarette smoke on human serum trypsin inhibitory capacity and antitrypsin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Bone, R.C.; Louria, D.B.; Rayford, P.L.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of cigarette smoke on the serum trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) and antitrypsin content in 89 smokers compared with 37 nonsmokers revealed that cigarette smoking is associated with a significantly lower level of TIC. No alteration in serum antitrypsin content was found because of cigarette smoking. Further analysis of the data indicated a correlation between the magnitude of smoking and the reduction in serum TIC. The reduction of TIC in cigarette smokers is consistent with the recent findings of decreased alpha 1-antitrypsin activity in rat lung and the reduced elastase inhibitory capacity per mg of alpha 1-antitrypsin found in the serum of smokers. The decrease in TIC in the serum of smokers, in addition to the reported decrease in elastolytic activity, may be useful in explaining the pathogenesis of emphysema frequently found in smokers.

  19. [Alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes and alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Morishima, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    Alpha(1)-adrenoceptors are widely distributed in the human body and play important physiologic roles. Three alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D)) have been cloned and show different pharmacologic profiles. In addition, a putative alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (alpha(1L) subtype) has also been proposed. Recently, three drugs (tamsulosin, naftopidil, and silodosin) have been developed in Japan for the treatment of urinary obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this review, we describe recent alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subclassifications and the pharmacologic characteristics (subtype selectivity and clinical relevance) of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists. PMID:16518082

  20. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  1. Appropriateness of Newborn Screening for α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Teckman, Jeffrey; Pardee, Erin; Howell, R. Rodney; Mannino, David; Sharp, Richard R.; Brantly, Mark; Wanner, Adam; Lamson, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The Alpha-1 Foundation convened a workshop to consider the appropriateness of newborn screening for α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. Methods: A review of natural history and technical data was conducted. Results: Homozygous ZZ AAT deficiency is a common genetic disease occurring in 1 in 2000 to 3500 births; however, it is underrecognized and most patients are undiagnosed. AAT deficiency can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver failure in children and adults, and lung disease in adults. The clinical course is highly variable. Some neonates present with cholestatic hepatitis and some children require liver transplantation, but many patients remain well into adulthood. Some adults develop emphysema. There is no treatment for AAT liver disease, other than supportive care and liver transplant. There are no data on the effect of early diagnosis on liver disease. Avoidance of smoking is of proven benefit to reduce future lung disease, as is protein replacement therapy. Justifying newborn screening with the aim of reducing smoking and reducing adult lung disease-years in the future would be a significant paradigm shift for the screening field. Recent passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and the Affordable Care Act may have a major effect on reducing the psychosocial and financial risks of newborn screening because many asymptomatic children would be identified. Data on the risk–benefit ratio of screening in the new legal climate are lacking. Conclusions: Workshop participants recommended a series of pilot studies focused on generating new data on the risks and benefits of newborn screening. PMID:24121147

  2. Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry. The REPAIR study: study design, methodology and quality control of study assessments.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Jan; Cooper, Brendan G; Stoel, Berend; Rames, Alexis; Rutman, Olga; Soliman, Sherif; Stockley, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction of alveolar wall and enlargement of alveolar airspaces, resulting in a reduction of the total lung gas exchange area, loss of lung elastic recoil and hyperinflation. The REPAIR study (Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry) is the first proof-of-concept study of a new potential disease-modifying drug, Palovarotene©, an orally active, gamma selective retinoid agonist in patients with emphysema secondary to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) as a model population for the general smoke-induced emphysema population. This article describes the study design as well as the effectiveness of the quality control that was implemented on the key efficacy endpoints, based on data derived from the placebo-treated subjects. In this multicentre, multinational study the implementation of standardized procedures included: careful site selection, use of trained staff, regular monitoring and machine calibration, use of biological controls and regular feedback to sites by an independent quality control centre. All of these procedures resulted in high-quality measurements of lung density, spirometry, static lung volumes and gas transfer. It was also confirmed that CT lung density was the most sensitive endpoint followed by TLco, FEV(1) and RV measured by body box. PMID:20926506

  3. Maternal care associated with methylation of the estrogen receptor-alpha1b promoter and estrogen receptor-alpha expression in the medial preoptic area of female offspring.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Frances A; Weaver, Ian C G; Diorio, Josie; Dymov, Sergiy; Szyf, Moshe; Meaney, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Variations in maternal behavior are associated with differences in estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha expression in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and are transmitted across generations such that, as adults, the female offspring of mothers that exhibit increased pup licking/grooming (LG) over the first week postpartum (i.e. high LG mothers) show increased ERalpha expression in the MPOA and are themselves high LG mothers. In the present studies, cross-fostering confirmed an association between maternal care and ERalpha expression in the MPOA; the biological offspring of low LG mothers fostered at birth to high LG dams show increased ERalpha expression in the MPOA. Cross-fostering the biological offspring of high LG mothers to low LG dams produces the opposite effect. We examined whether the maternal programing of ERalpha expression is associated with differences in methylation of the relevant ERalpha promoter. Levels of cytosine methylation across the ERalpha1b promoter were significantly elevated in the adult offspring of low, compared with high, LG mothers. Differentially methylated regions included a signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)5 binding site and the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed decreased Stat5b binding to the ERalpha1b promoter in the adult offspring of low, compared with high, LG mothers. Finally, we found increased Stat5b levels in the MPOA of neonates reared by high, compared with low, LG mothers. These findings suggest that maternal care is associated with cytosine methylation of the ERalpha1b promoter, providing a potential mechanism for the programming of individual differences in ERalpha expression and maternal behavior in the female offspring. PMID:16513834

  4. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  5. Preclinical pharmacology of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Martin, D J

    1999-01-01

    The implication of a single adrenoceptor subtype in the contractility of prostatic and urethral smooth muscle cells led to the concept that drugs with selectivity for this subtype may exhibit functional uroselectivity. Comparison of the affinities of the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists revealed that few compounds show selectivity for one of the three cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha1a/A, alpha1b/B, alpha1d/D) whereas most of them had a similar affinity for the three subtypes. Moreover, data supporting a relationship between selectivity for the alpha1a/A-adrenoceptor subtype and functional uroselectivity are still lacking and recent data challenged the relevance of the selectivity for a given cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype in predicting functional uroselectivity. In vivo data showed that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists without adrenoceptor subtype selectivity, like alfuzosin or to a minor extent doxazosin, showed functional uroselectivity whereas prazosin and terazosin were not shown to be uroselective. Compounds considered to be selective for the alpha1a/A-adrenoceptor, like tamsulosin or 5-Me-urapidil, did not show functional uroselectivity since they modified urethral and blood pressures in a manner which was not correlated to their selectivity for the cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. Meanwhile, the identification in prostatic tissue, of a new sub-family of alpha1-adrenoceptors with low affinity for prazosin and denominated alpha1L gave rise to numerous studies. However, its functional role as well as the affinity of the known antagonists for this receptor subtype remains to be clarified. In conclusion, the existing alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists have different pharmacological profiles in vivo which are yet not predictable from their receptor pharmacology based on the actual state of knowledge of the alpha1-adrenoceptor classification. PMID:10393471

  6. Alpha-1 couples: interpersonal and intrapersonal predictors of spousal communication and stress.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; Wienke, Sara; Coffman, Donna L

    2014-04-01

    Couples often discuss genetic test results, and then manage their implications together. This interdependence can lead to common, shared experiences, similar intrapersonal processes to manage shared stressors, or interpersonal influences between spouses, leading to different outcomes. This study sought to reveal the intracouple, intrapersonal, and interpersonal influences of genetic stigma and negative feelings on spousal communication and perceived stress with 50 couples in which one spouse is a member of a genetic disease registry. The results were analyzed with dyadic analysis, including multilevel modeling. The findings showed that registered members and their spouses were not statistically different in their mean levels of perceived genetic stigma, negative feelings about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), conversations with each other about the AATD test results, and their perceived stress. The findings also showed that their intracouple consistencies were not high, and their intrapersonal and interpersonal influences on communication and stress differed. The social implications of genetic research at the interpersonal level are discussed. PMID:23934327

  7. Alpha 1D- and alpha 1A-adrenoceptors mediate contraction in rat renal artery.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Ibarra, M

    1997-03-19

    To investigate the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype(s) mediating contraction in rat renal artery, we have compared the effect of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists, 5-methylurapidil, BMY 7378 (8-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethyl) 8-azaspiro (4.5) decane-7,9-dione 2HCl) and chloroethylclonidine on functional responses to noradrenaline. A clear blockade by chloroethylclonidine (10(-4) M) of noradrenaline-induced contraction was observed and, along with this effect. pKB values of 9.12 and 8.40 for BMY 7378 and 9.75 and 10.06 for 5-methylurapidil were obtained, indicating that the renal artery expresses the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype as the one involved in contraction and not only the alpha 1A subtype as has been reported. PMID:9098691

  8. Rosuvastatin Alters the Proteome of High Density Lipoproteins: Generation of alpha-1-antitrypsin Enriched Particles with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Scott M; McKenzie, Benjamin; Kemeh, Georgina; Sampson, Maureen; Perl, Shira; Young, Neal S; Fessler, Michael B; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-12-01

    Statins lower plasma cholesterol by as much as 50%, thus reducing future cardiovascular events. However, the physiological effects of statins are diverse and not all are related to low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. We performed a small clinical pilot study to assess the impact of statins on lipoprotein-associated proteins in healthy individuals (n = 10) with normal LDL-C (<130 mg/dL), who were treated with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day) for 28 days. Proteomic analysis of size-exclusion chromatography isolated LDL, large high density lipoprotein (HDL-L), and small HDL (HDL-S) fractions and spectral counting was used to compare relative protein detection before and after statin therapy. Significant protein changes were found in each lipoprotein pool and included both increases and decreases in several proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism, complement regulation and acute phase response. The most dramatic effect of the rosuvastatin treatment was an increase in α-1-antirypsin (A1AT) spectral counts associated with HDL-L particles. Quantitative measurement by ELISA confirmed an average 5.7-fold increase in HDL-L associated A1AT. Molecular modeling predictions indicated that the hydrophobic reactive center loop of A1AT, the functional domain responsible for its protease inhibitor activity, is likely involved in lipid binding and association with HDL was found to protect A1AT against oxidative inactivation. Cell culture experiments, using J774 macrophages, demonstrated that the association of A1AT with HDL enhances its antiprotease activity, preventing elastase induced production of tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, we show that statins can significantly alter the protein composition of both LDL and HDL and our studies reveal a novel functional relationship between A1AT and HDL. The up-regulation of A1AT on HDL enhances its anti-inflammatory functionality, which may contribute to the non-lipid lowering beneficial effects of statins. PMID:26483418

  9. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  10. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  11. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  12. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors mediating contraction in arteries of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats are of the alpha 1D or alpha 1A subtypes.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; Ibarra, M

    1996-03-18

    Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor subtypes mediating contraction in carotid, aorta, mesenteric and caudal arteries from both Wistar Kyoto (WKY) normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats were investigated by using the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine and antagonized with selective, competitive antagonists WB-4101, 5-methyl urapidil or BMY 7378 (8-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-8-azaspiro(4,5)decane -7,9-dione dihydrochloride). Isometric tension changes were recorded after methoxamine addition to the arterial rings, and the effects of the antagonists determined. All the antagonists shifted to the right the concentration-response curve to methoxamine. pA2 values indicate that all arteries but caudal express the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype, since BMY 7378 values were high in these arteries. Due to the high pA2 values for 5-methyl urapidil and WB-4101 and the low values for BMY 7378 we conclude that the tail artery expresses the alpha 1A and not the alpha 1B subtype. No differences were found between both strains of rats, suggesting that hypertension does not modify the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries. PMID:8846824

  13. Thymosin alpha1. SciClone Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Billich, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    Thymosin alpha1 (Talpha1), a synthetic 28-amino acid peptide with multiple biological activities primarily directed towards immune response enhancement, was originally developed by Alpha 1 Biomedicals for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. SciClone developed and launched Talpha1, under the trade name Zadaxin, for the treatment of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. The drug is also being developed for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), hepatocellular carcinoma, AIDS and malignant melanoma. Talpha1 is able to potentiate the action of cytokines and also reduce the hematological toxicity of cytotoxic drug therapy (cyclophosphamide-, 5-fluorouracil-, dacarbazine- or ifosfamide-based regimens). These studies also demonstrated the mechanism of action of Talpha1 and its role as an immune system enhancer. By July 2001, it was in phase III trials in the US in combination with PEGylated interferon-alpha, and later the same month it was approved in the Philippines. SciClone received expanded approval for HBV and HCV infection in Mexico in July 2001. Talpha1 has been launched in Argentina, China, Peru, the Philippines and Singapore for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. The product subsequently received expanded approval for the treatment of both HBV and HCV infection in Argentina. Marketing approval was granted in India for HBV infection in February 2001. The company was working to expand this approval to include HCV infection. In March 2000, approval for treatment of HBV infection was granted in Thailand, Laos and Malta. Approval was also granted in Sri Lanka and Brunei in August 1999. In September 2000, SciClone announced that approval had been expanded to include the treatment of HCV infection as well as the previously approved HBV indication in both Peru and Sri Lanka. In January 1999, SciClone received approval for Talpha1 in Venezuela for the treatment of HBV and HCV infection. The company also filed a marketing

  14. Phosphorylation and desensitization of alpha1d-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Vázquez-Cuevas, F G; Romero-Avila, M T

    2001-01-01

    In rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing rat alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors, noradrenaline and PMA markedly decreased alpha(1d)-adrenoceptor function (noradrenaline-elicited increases in calcium in whole cells and [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate binding in membranes), suggesting homologous and heterologous desensitizations. Photoaffinity labelling, Western blotting and immunoprecipitation identified alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors as a broad band of 70-80 kDa. alpha(1d)-Adrenoceptors were phosphorylated in the basal state and noradrenaline and PMA increased it. The effect of noradrenaline was concentration-dependent (EC(50) 75 nM), rapid (maximum at 1 min) and transient. Phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation was concentration-dependent (EC(50) 25 nM), slightly slower (maximum at 5 min) and stable for at least 60 min. Inhibitors of protein kinase C decreased the effect of phorbol esters but not that of noradrenaline. Evidence of cross-talk of alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors with receptors endogenously expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts was given by the ability of endothelin, lysophosphatidic acid and bradykinin to induce alpha(1d)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation. In summary, it is shown for the first time here that alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors are phosphoproteins and that receptor phosphorylation is increased by the natural ligand, noradrenaline, by direct activation of protein kinase C and via cross-talk with other receptors endogenously expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. Receptor phosphorylation has functional repercussions. PMID:11171057

  15. Recombinant α1-Antitrypsin Pittsburgh Attenuates Experimental Gram-Negative Septicemia

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Robert W.; Flores, Daniel N.; De La Cadena, Raul A.; Scott, Cheryl F.; Cousens, Laurence; Barr, Philip J.; Hoffman, Ian B.; Kueppers, Friedrich; Fisher, Donald; Idell, Steven; Pisarello, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin-Pittsburgh (AT-P), a naturally occurring lethal mutation (358Met → Arg), has been genetically engineered (rAT-P). The protein has been shown to be a potent active site-directed inhibitor of thrombin and the contact enzymes Factor XIIf, Factor XIa, and kallikrein. Because activation of the contact system is known to occur in gram-negative septicemia, the authors have hypothesized that the administration of rAT-P might modulate the course of this syndrome. Yorkshire piglets anesthetized with pentobarbital and infused with viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2 X 108 CFU) were untreated (Group I) or treated with rAT-P (Group II) and studied in a 6-hour protocol. Coagulation studies revealed that rAT-P significantly inhibited the rapid decrease in the functional concentrations of Antithrombin III, Factor XI, and fibrinogen. In addition, rAT-P markedly reduced the serum levels of fibrinogen degradation products. Survival in Group II was significantly increased during 2-5 hours but not at 6 hours when the functional levels of rAT-P in plasma were the lowest. These results indicate that this recombinant inhibitor, even at low concentrations, affords protection in experimental gram-negative septicemia. PMID:3257651

  16. [Place of genotyping in addition to the phenotype and the assay of serum α-1 antitrypsin].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Francina, Alain; Lacan, Philippe; Heraut, Jessica; Chapuis-Cellier, Colette

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is based on isoelectric focusing of serum proteins and the extent of serum. However, the focusing is technically difficult and a greatly reduced concentration in abnormal A1AT tapeless does not differentiate an unstable variant of a variant called 'null' (that is to say without any phenotypic expression) to 'heterozygous' state. In this study, we compared the results of the assay, the phenotype and genotype of A1AT in 50 patients. Normal A1AT alleles (Pi*M1 to Pi*M4) or loss of the most common (Pi*S and Pi*Z) were clearly identified in phenotyping. However, genotyping was necessary to characterize: (i) certain alleles rarer A1AT (S-Munich, X-Christchurch); (ii) a null allele and; (iii) two new alleles A1AT not yet described in the literature. In conclusion, although the A1AT genotyping is generally not necessary, it is necessary to resolve complex cases and to obtain witnesses validated for isoelectric focusing. PMID:22008137

  17. Alpha(1) adrenoceptor subtype selectivity. 3D-QSAR models for a new class of alpha(1) adrenoceptor antagonists derived from the novel antipsychotic sertindole.

    PubMed

    Balle, Thomas; Andersen, Kim; Søby, Karina Krøjer; Liljefors, Tommy

    2003-06-01

    Receptor-binding affinities for the alpha(1) adrenoceptor subtypes alpha(1a), alpha(1b) and alpha(1d) for a series of 39 alpha(1) adrenoceptor antagonists derived from the antipsychotic sertindole are reported. The SAR of the compounds with respect to affinity for the alpha(1a), alpha(1b) and alpha(1d) adrenoceptor subtypes as well as affinity obtained by an alpha(1) assay (rat brain membranes) were investigated using a 3D-QSAR approach based on the GRID/GOLPE methodology. Good statistics (r(2)=0.91-0.96; q(2)=0.65-0.73) were obtained with the combination of the water (OH2) and methyl (C3) probes. The combination of steric repulsion and electrostatic attractions explain the affinities of the included molecules. The adrenergic alpha(1a) receptor seems to be more tolerant to large substituents in the area between the indole 5- and 6-positions compared to the adrenergic alpha(1b) and alpha(1d) receptor subtypes. There seems to be minor differences in the position of areas in the alpha(1b) receptor compared to alpha(1a) and alpha(1d) receptors where electrostatic interaction between the molecules and the receptor (OH2 probe) contribute to increased affinity. These observations may be used in the design of new subtype selective compounds. In addition, the model based on biological data from an alpha(1) assay (rat brain membranes) resembles the model for the alpha(1b) adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:12676239

  18. Quinazoline-derived alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists induce prostate cancer cell apoptosis via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action.

    PubMed

    Benning, Cynthia M; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2002-01-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin, exhibit a potent apoptotic effect against prostate tumor epithelial cells, whereas tamsulosin, a sulfonamide-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, was ineffective in inducing a similar apoptotic effect against prostate cells (Cancer Res., 60: 4550-4555, 2000). In this study, to identify the precise molecular mechanism underlying this apoptosis induction, we examined whether doxazosin and terazosin (both piperazinyl quinazolines) affect prostate growth via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action. Transfection-mediated overexpression of alpha1-adrenoceptor in human prostate cancer cells, DU-145 (that lack alpha1-adrenoceptor), did not alter the ability of prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis in response to quinazolines. Significantly enough, there was no modification of the apoptotic threshold of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, to either quinazoline-based alpha1-agonist by androgens. Furthermore, human normal prostate epithelial cells exhibited a very low sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of doxazosin compared with that observed for the malignant prostate cells. These findings provide the first evidence that the apoptotic activity of the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (doxazosin and terazosin) against prostate cancer cells is independent of: (a) their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors; and (b) the hormone sensitivity status of the cells. This may have potential therapeutic significance in the use of quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (already in clinical use for the treatment of hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia) for the treatment of androgen-independent human prostate cancer. PMID:11809715

  19. Effect of alpha1-blockers on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Liang, Yuxiang; Chen, Weihong; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Yuanlin; Hu, Jianxing; He, Hui-chan; Zhong, Wei-de; Sun, Zhaolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the clinical efficiency of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods From January 2007 to January 2013, 84 patients who have uncomplicated lower ureteral stones treated by ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (44 patients received indwelled double-J stents) and group B (40 patients were treated by alpha1-adrenergic antagonists without stents). All cases of group B were treated with alpha1 blocker for 1 week. Results The mean operative time of group A was significantly longer than group B. The incidences of hematuria, flank/abdominal pain, frequency/urgency after surgery were statistically different between both groups. The stone-free rate of each group was 100%. Conclusions The effect of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists is more significant than indwelling stent after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. PMID:27136474

  20. alpha(1)-blockers for BPH: are there differences?

    PubMed

    de Mey, C

    1999-01-01

    alpha(1)-blockers are well established for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO), previously referred to as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The various available alpha(1)-blockers do not differ in terms of their clinical efficacy, but there are several indications that alpha(1)-blockers differ qualitatively with regard to their cardiovascular safety and tolerability, albeit the quantification of these differences is subject to several constraints and pitfalls. Clinical selectivity, i.e. the capacity of separating between desired urological and undesired (actually redundant) cardiovascular alpha(1)-blockade is not unlikely to relate to pharmacological selectivity (the relative preference to block the alpha(1A)- and alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor subtypes in vitro, whilst hardly blocking alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors). On the other hand, both clinical and pharmacological selectivity are not unequivocally reflected by experiments on so-called functional selectivity (in vivo experiments that differentiate urological and cardiovascular effects). Generally, alpha(1)-blockers that are efficacious in hypertension (doxazosin, terazosin, alfuzosin) are more likely to impair safety-relevant, physiological blood pressure control in normotensives with LUTS than tamsulosin, which does not reduce elevated blood pressure in comparison with placebo and has little effect on orthostatic blood pressure control. However, clinical selectivity and cardiovascular safety are also defined by the treatment regimen (dose, dosage interval, formulation, step-up dose-increments for treatment initiation, etc.) and by relevant patient-treatment interactions (co-morbidity and co-medication in particular). On the basis of the available information, tamsulosin administered once daily at a dose of 0.4 mg after breakfast (without step-up increments) can be accepted as a highly convenient and efficacious way to treat LUTS with a low cardiovascular

  1. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  3. Changes in tissue distribution of rat alpha 1-macroglobulin and pregnancy-associated alpha 1-glycoprotein after inflammatory injury.

    PubMed Central

    Zorin, N. A.; Zhabin, S. G.; Belogorlova, T. I.; Chirikova, T. S.; Krayushkina, N. A.; Lykova, O. F.

    1994-01-01

    Antiserum against rat alpha 1-macroglobulin (alpha 1MG) was produced in rabbits. Antiserum against rat pregnancy-associated alpha 1-glycoprotein (PAG) was obtained by immunization with a partly purified PAG preparation and absorption of the serum with male rat serum. Acute inflammation was produced in non-pregnant female rats by a single intramuscular injection of turpentine. The concentrations of both macroglobulins in the serum and in tissue extracts were measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis at various times up to 7 days after injury. Inflammation produced in the rats resulted in moderately elevated serum levels of these proteins soon after injury. At first, alpha 1MG levels in a number of tissues (heart, lung, kidney, spleen, pancreas, uterus and ovary) were depressed markedly; they then stabilized. The elevated serum concentrations of alpha 1MG remained unchanged during inflammation. The store of PAG in the tissues was rapidly depleted and its serum level decreased to a normal value 7 days after injury. Our findings indicate that alpha 1MG plays a more important role in maintenance of the proteinase inhibitory potential in the rat than does PAG. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7537521

  4. Alpha1-adrenoceptors in the guinea pig thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Koike, K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we tried to determine which alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes are involved in the guinea pig thoracic aorta by using in vitro functional analysis. In first, we tried to estimate the pA2 values of some key alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin, 5-methylurapidil, WB4101, BMY7378 and tamsulosin) against responses to norepinephrine in the thoracic aorta of guinea pigs. The concentration-response curves of norepinephrine were rightward shifted by the presence of prazosin, 5 methylurapidil, WB4101, BMY7378 and tamsulosin. The pA2 values for these antagonists against norepinephrine were 7.83, 7.78, 8.20, 5.73 and 9.57, respectively. In second, we tried to compare the estimated pA2 values obtained in the present study with reported pKi and pA2 values for cloned and native alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. In rabbit mesenteric artery, trigone, urethra, prostate and human lower urinary tract which were proposed to contain the putative alpha1L-adenoceptor, we obtained the good correlation for the pA2 values reported in these tissues with pA2 values estimated in guinea pig thoracic aorta. Moreover, regression lines were close to the line of identity. These results suggest that the alpha1-adenoceptors mediating contraction of guinea pig thoracic aorta are similar pharmacologically to the putative alpha1L-adenoceptor subtype in rabbit mesenteric artery, trigone, urethra, prostate and human lower urinary tract. As a final point, guinea pig thoracic aorta may be able to use as a tool to develop the new alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist which is therapeutically advantageous in the treatment of urinary tract obstruction (e. g., in benign prostatic hyperplasia). PMID:10733154

  5. The effects of SB 216469, an antagonist which discriminates between the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor and the human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chess-Williams, R.; Chapple, C. R.; Verfurth, F.; Noble, A. J.; Couldwell, C. J.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The affinity of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist SB 216469 (also known as REC 15/2739) has been determined at native and cloned alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes by radioligand binding and at functional alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in isolated tissues. 2. In radioligand binding studies with [3H]-prazosin, SB 216469 had a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat cerebral cortex and kidney (9.5-9.8) but a lower affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen and liver (7.7-8.2). 3. At cloned rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes transiently expressed in COS-1 cells and also at cloned human alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes stably transfected in Rat-1 cells, SB 216469 exhibited a high affinity at the alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (9.6-10.4) with a significantly lower affinity at the alpha 1b-adrenoceptor (8.0-8.4) and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1d-adrenoceptor (8.7-9.2). 4. At functional alpha 1-adrenoceptors, SB 216469 had a similar pharmacological profile, with a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat vas deferens and anococcygeus muscle (pA2 = 9.5-10.0), a low affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen (6.7) and guinea-pig aorta (8.0), and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1D-adrenoceptors of the rat aorta (8.8). 5. Several recent studies have concluded that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor present in the human prostate has the pharmacological characteristics of the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype. However, the affinity of SB 216469 at human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pA2 = 8.1) determined in isolated tissue strips, was significantly lower than the values obtained at either the cloned alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (human, rat, bovine) or the native alpha 1A-adrenoceptors in radioligand binding and functional studies in the rat. 6. Our results with SB 216469, therefore, suggest that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractile responses of the human prostate has properties which distinguish it from the cloned alpha 1a

  6. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-01-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF. PMID:8668203

  7. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin helps protect tissues against proteolytic (protein-splitting) enzymes released during...

  8. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  9. Preventing serpin aggregation: The molecular mechanism of citrate action upon antitrypsin unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Mary C.; Morton, Craig J.; Feil, Susanne C.; Hansen, Guido; Adams, Julian J.; Parker, Michael W.; Bottomley, Stephen P.

    2008-11-21

    The aggregation of antitrypsin into polymers is one of the causes of neonatal hepatitis, cirrhosis, and emphysema. A similar reaction resulting in disease can occur in other human serpins, and collectively they are known as the serpinopathies. One possible therapeutic strategy involves inhibiting the conformational changes involved in antitrypsin aggregation. The citrate ion has previously been shown to prevent antitrypsin aggregation and maintain the protein in an active conformation; its mechanism of action, however, is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the citrate ion prevents the initial misfolding of the native state to a polymerogenic intermediate in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have solved the crystal structure of citrate bound to antitrypsin and show that a single citrate molecule binds in a pocket between the A and B beta-sheets, a region known to be important in maintaining antitrypsin stability.

  10. Correlation between mRNA levels and functional role of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in arteries: evidence of alpha1L as a functional isoform of the alpha1A-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Martí, Daniel; Miquel, Raquel; Ziani, Khalid; Gisbert, Regina; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; Moreno, Lucrecia; Villagrasa, Victoria; Barettino, Domingo; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2005-11-01

    The mRNA levels for the three alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes, alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D, were quantified by real-time RT-PCR in arteries from Wistar rats. The alpha1D-adrenoceptor was prominent in both aorta (79.0%) and mesenteric artery (68.7%), alpha1A predominated in tail (61.7%) and small mesenteric artery (73.3%), and both alpha1A- and alpha1D-subtypes were expressed at similar levels in iliac artery. The mRNA levels of the alpha1B-subtype were a minority in all vessels (1.7-11.1%). Concentration-response curves of contraction in response to phenylephrine or relaxation in response to alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists on maximal sustained contraction induced by phenylephrine were constructed from control vessels and vessels pretreated with 100 micromol/l chloroethylclonidine (CEC) for 30 min. The significant decrease in the phenylephrine potency observed after CEC treatment together with the inhibitory potency displayed by 8-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-8-azaspiro (4,5) decane-7-dionedihydrochloride} (BMY-7378, an alpha1D-adrenoceptor antagonist) confirm the relevant role of alpha1D-adrenoceptors in aorta and iliac and proximal mesenteric arteries. The potency of 5-methylurapidil (an alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist) and the changes in the potency of both BMY-7378 and 5-methylurapidil after CEC treatment provided evidence of a mixed population of alpha1A- and alpha1D-adrenoceptors in iliac and distal mesenteric arteries. The low potency of prazosin (pIC50 < 9) as well as the high 5-methylurapidil potency in tail and small mesenteric arteries suggest the main role of alpha1A/alpha1L-adrenoceptors with minor participation of the alpha1D-subtype. The mRNA levels and CEC treatment corroborated this pattern and confirmed that the alpha1L-adrenoceptor could be a functional isoform of the alpha1A-subtype. PMID:15951348

  11. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  14. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  15. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T

    2016-07-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  16. Characterising the association of latency with α(1)-antitrypsin polymerisation using a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Perez, Juan; Mela, Marianna; Miranda, Elena; Burling, Keith A; Rouhani, Farshid N; DeMeo, Dawn L; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer A; Brantly, Mark; Marciniak, Stefan J; Alexander, Graeme J M; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2015-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is primarily synthesised in the liver, circulates to the lung and protects pulmonary tissues from proteolytic damage. The Z mutant (Glu342Lys) undergoes inactivating conformational change and polymerises. Polymers are retained within the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in homozygous (PiZZ) individuals, predisposing the individuals to hepatic cirrhosis and emphysema. Latency is an analogous process of inactivating, intra-molecular conformational change and may co-occur with polymerisation. However, the relationship between latency and polymerisation remained unexplored in the absence of a suitable probe. We have developed a novel monoclonal antibody specific for latent α1-antitrypsin and used it in combination with a polymer-specific antibody, to assess the association of both conformers in vitro, in disease and during augmentation therapy. In vitro kinetics analysis showed polymerisation dominated the pathway but latency could be promoted by stabilising monomeric α1-antitrypsin. Polymers were extensively produced in hepatocytes and a cell line expressing Z α1-antitrypsin but the latent protein was not detected despite manipulation of the secretory pathway. However, α1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy contains latent α1-antitrypsin, as did the plasma of 63/274 PiZZ individuals treated with augmentation therapy but 0/264 who were not receiving this medication (p<10(-14)). We conclude that latent α1-antitrypsin is a by-product of the polymerisation pathway, that the intracellular folding environment is resistant to formation of the latent conformer but that augmentation therapy introduces latent α1-antitrypsin into the circulation. A suite of monoclonal antibodies and methodologies developed in this study can characterise α1-antitrypsin folding and conformational transitions, and screen methods to improve augmentation therapy. PMID:25462157

  17. Characterising the association of latency with α1-antitrypsin polymerisation using a novel monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lu; Perez, Juan; Mela, Marianna; Miranda, Elena; Burling, Keith A; Rouhani, Farshid N; DeMeo, Dawn L; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer A; Brantly, Mark; Marciniak, Stefan J; Alexander, Graeme J M; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2015-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is primarily synthesised in the liver, circulates to the lung and protects pulmonary tissues from proteolytic damage. The Z mutant (Glu342Lys) undergoes inactivating conformational change and polymerises. Polymers are retained within the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in homozygous (PiZZ) individuals, predisposing the individuals to hepatic cirrhosis and emphysema. Latency is an analogous process of inactivating, intra-molecular conformational change and may co-occur with polymerisation. However, the relationship between latency and polymerisation remained unexplored in the absence of a suitable probe. We have developed a novel monoclonal antibody specific for latent α1-antitrypsin and used it in combination with a polymer-specific antibody, to assess the association of both conformers in vitro, in disease and during augmentation therapy. In vitro kinetics analysis showed polymerisation dominated the pathway but latency could be promoted by stabilising monomeric α1-antitrypsin. Polymers were extensively produced in hepatocytes and a cell line expressing Z α1-antitrypsin but the latent protein was not detected despite manipulation of the secretory pathway. However, α1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy contains latent α1-antitrypsin, as did the plasma of 63/274 PiZZ individuals treated with augmentation therapy but 0/264 who were not receiving this medication (p < 10−14). We conclude that latent α1-antitrypsin is a by-product of the polymerisation pathway, that the intracellular folding environment is resistant to formation of the latent conformer but that augmentation therapy introduces latent α1-antitrypsin into the circulation. A suite of monoclonal antibodies and methodologies developed in this study can characterise α1-antitrypsin folding and conformational transitions, and screen methods to improve augmentation therapy. PMID:25462157

  18. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  19. Low Serum Alpha-Antitrypsin Associated with Anti-PR-3 ANCA in Autistic Children with GI Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, AJ; Krigsman, A; Jepson, B; Wakefield, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Aim To assess the possible relationship between serum alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in autistic children with severe GI disease and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between low serum AAT levels, the presence of ANCA and inflammatory GI disease seen in some autistic children. Subjects and Methods Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (many with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 41 controls (21 age matched autistic children with no GI disease and 20 age matched children without autism or GI disease) were tested using ELISAs designed to quantitate ANCA (anti-PR3), AAT and PR3 levels. Results We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had anti-PR3 ANCA, high serum PR3 and high severity of disease when compared to controls. This same group of autistic children had low serum levels of AAT compared to controls, which also correlated with the presence of anti-PR3 ANCA, high serum PR3, as well as the severity of intestinal disease, particularly LNH and severe erythema. Discussion These results suggest a relationship between low AAT levels, ANCA and severity of GI disease seen in a subpopulation of ASD individuals. We suggest that low AAT levels may result in high levels of PR3, which may, in turn be associated with the presence of ANCA. PMID:26244018

  20. Alpha1-adrenoreceptor in human hippocampus: binding and receptor subtype mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; White, Sylvia S; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2005-10-01

    Alpha1-adrenoreceptors (AR), of which three subtypes exist (alpha1A-, alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of norepinephrine and epinephrine both peripherally and centrally. In the CNS, alpha1-ARs are found in the hippocampus where animal studies have shown the ability of alpha1-AR agents to modulate long-term potentiation and memory; however, the precise distribution of alpha1-AR expression and its subtypes in the human brain is unknown making functional comparisons difficult. In the human hippocampus, 3H-prazosin (alpha1-AR antagonist) labels only the dentate gyrus (molecular, granule and polymorphic layers) and the stratum lucidum of the CA3 homogeneously. Human alpha1A-AR mRNA in the hippocampus is observed only in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, while alpha1D-AR mRNA expression is observed only in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1, CA2 and CA3, regions where 3H-prazosin did not bind. alpha1B-AR mRNA is not expressed at detectable levels in the human hippocampus. These results confirm a difference in hippocampal alpha1-AR localization between rat and humans and further describe a difference in the localization of the alpha1A- and alpha1D-AR mRNA subtype between rats and humans. PMID:16039007

  1. Evaluation of the pharmacological selectivity profile of alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists at prostatic alpha 1 adrenoceptors: binding, functional and in vivo studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, B. A.; Miller, A. M.; Williamson, I. J.; O'Connell, J.; Chalmers, D. H.; Naylor, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The profile of a range of alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists was determined in vitro against cloned human alpha 1A, alpha 1B and alpha 1D adrenoceptors and against noradrenaline-mediated contractions of rat aorta and human prostate. The in vivo profile of compounds was determined in an anaesthetized dog model which allowed the simultaneous assessment of antagonist potency against phenylephrine-mediated increases in blood pressure and prostatic pressure. 2. The quinazoline antagonists, prazosin, doxazosin and alfuzosin displayed high affinity but were non selective for the three cloned human alpha 1 adrenoceptors. Indoramin and SNAP 1069 showed selectivity for alpha 1A and alpha 1B adrenoceptors relative to the alpha 1D subtype. Rec 15/2739, WB 4101, SL 89,0591, (+)- and (-)- tamsulosin showed selectivity for alpha 1A and alpha 1D adrenoceptors relative to the alpha 1B subtype. RS 17053 showed high affinity and selectivity for alpha 1A adrenoceptors (pKi 8.6) relative to alpha 1B (pKi = 7.3) and alpha 1D (pKi = 7.1) subtypes. 3. (+)-Tamsulosin, (-)-tamsulosin, SL 89,0591, Rec 15/2739, SNAP 1069 and RS 17053 appeared to act as competitive antagonists of noradrenaline-mediated contractions of rat aorta yielding pA2 affinity estimates which were similar to binding affinities at cloned human alpha 1D adrenoceptors. The following rank order was obtained: prazosin = (-)-tamsulosin > doxazosin > SL 89,0591 = (+)-tamsulosin > Rec 15/2739 > RS 17053 = SNAP 1069. 4. (-)-Tamsulosin was a very potent, insurmountable antagonist of noradrenaline-mediated contractions of human prostate, yielding an approximate pA2 estimate of 9.8 at 1 nM. The corresponding (+)-enantiomer was 30 fold weaker. SL 89,0591, SNAP 1069 and Rec 15/2739 yielded pA2 estimates which compared well with their alpha 1A binding affinities. The affinity estimate for prazosin on human prostate was lower than the corresponding binding affinity determined at alpha 1A adrenoceptors and RS 17053 was a very weak

  2. Cefoperazone Prevents the Inactivation of α1-Antitrypsin by Activated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Dallegri, Franco; Dapino, Patrizia; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Ottonello, Luciano

    1999-01-01

    At sites of neutrophilic inflammation, tissue injury by neutrophil elastase is favored by phagocyte-induced hypochlorous acid-dependent inactivation of the natural elastase inhibitor α1-antitrypsin. In the present study, cefoperazone prevented α1-antitrypsin inactivation by neutrophils and reduced the recovery of hypochlorous acid from these cells. Moreover, the antibiotic reduced the free elastase activity in a neutrophil suspension supplemented with α1-antitrypsin without affecting the cells’ ability to release elastase. These data suggest that the drug inactivates hypochlorous acid before its reaction with α1-antitrypsin, thereby permitting the antiprotease-mediated blockade of released elastase. In conclusion, cefoperazone appears to have the potential for limiting elastase-antielastase imbalances, attenuating the related tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:10471586

  3. Modeling the interactions between alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2010-09-01

    As crucial members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, alpha (1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) are recognized to intervene the actions of endogenous catecholamines such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. So far three distinct alpha(1)-AR subtypes, alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D), have been characterized by functional analysis, radio-ligand binding and molecular biology studies. The alpha(1)-ARs are of therapeutic interest because of their distinct and critical roles in many physiological processes, containing hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia, smooth muscle contraction, myocardial inotropy and chronotropy, and hepatic glucose metabolism. Accordingly, designing subtype-selective antagonists for each of the three alpha(1)-AR subtypes has been an enthusiastic region of medicinal research. Even though a large number of studies on GPCRs have been conducted, understanding of how known antagonists bind to alpha(1)-ARs still remains sketchy and has been a serious impediment to search for potent and subtype-selective alpha(1)-AR antagonists because of the lack of detailed experimental structural knowledge. This review deliberates the simulation of alpha(1)-ARs and their interactions with antagonists by using ligand-based (pharmacophore identification and QSAR modeling) and structure-based (comparative modeling and molecular docking) approaches. Combined with experimental data, these computational attempts could improve our understanding of the structural basis of antagonist binding and the molecular basis of receptor activation, thus offering a more reasonable approach in the design of drugs targeting alpha(1)-ARs. PMID:20412040

  4. '1-Antitrypsin polymorphism and systematics of eastern North American wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    We used data on the polymorphic status of '1-antitrypsin ('1AT) to study the relationship of Minnesota wolves to the gray wolf (Canis lupus), which was thought to have evolved in Eurasia, and to red wolves (Canis rufus) and coyotes (Canis latrans), which putatively evolved in North America. Recent evidence had indicated that Minnesota wolves might be more closely related to red wolves and coyotes. Samples from wild-caught Minnesota wolves and from captive wolves, at least some of which originated in Alaska and western Canada, were similarly polymorphic for '1AT, whereas coyote and red wolf samples were all monomorphic. Our findings, in conjunction with earlier results, are consistent with the Minnesota wolf being a gray wolf of Eurasian origin or possibly a hybrid between the gray wolf of Eurasian origin and the proposed North American wolf.

  5. Mechanism of α-1 antitrypsin endocytosis by lung endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Sohrab, Sadaf; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Lockett, Angelia D.; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Rush, Natalia I.; Gu, Yuan; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Garrison, Jana; Petrache, Irina

    2009-01-01

    The integrity of lung alveoli is maintained by proper circulating levels of α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT). Next to cigarette smoking, A1AT deficiency is a major risk factor for lung emphysema development. We recently reported that in addition to neutralizing neutrophil elastases in the extracellular compartment, A1AT is internalized by lung endothelial cells and inhibits apoptosis. We hypothesized that the intracellular uptake of A1AT by endothelial cells may be required for its protective function; therefore, we studied the mechanisms of A1AT internalization by primary rat lung microvascular endothelial cells and the effect of cigarette smoke on this process both in vitro and in vivo (in mice). Purified A1AT was taken up intracellularly by endothelial cells in a time-dependent, dose-dependent, and conformer-specific manner and was detected in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells of nondiseased human lung sections. Despite a critical role for caveoli in endothelial cell endocytosis in general, specific inhibition of clathrin-mediated, but not caveoli-mediated, endocytosis profoundly decreased A1AT internalization and reversed the A1AT’s antiapoptotic action. Further more, A1AT associated with clathrin heavy chains, but not with caveolin-1 in the plasma membrane fraction of endothelial cells. Interestingly, cigarette smoke exposure significantly inhibited A1AT uptake both in endothelial cells and in the mouse lung and altered the intracellular distribution of clathrin heavy chains. Our results suggest that clathrin-mediated endocytosis regulates A1AT intracellular function in the lung endothelium and may be an important determinant of the serpin’s protection against developing cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. Sohrab, S., Petrusca, D. N., Lockett, A. D., Schweitzer, K. S., Rush, N. I., Gu, Y., Kamocki, K., Garrison, J., Petrache, I. Mechanism of α-1 antitrypsin endocytosis by lung endothelium. PMID:19423638

  6. α1-antitrypsin increases interleukin-1 receptor antagonist production during pancreatic islet graft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abecassis, Avishag; Schuster, Ronen; Shahaf, Galit; Ozeri, Eyal; Green, Ross; Ochayon, David E; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-07-01

    Although islet transplantation for individuals with type 1 diabetes has been shown to yield superior blood glucose control, it remains inadequate for long-term control. This is partly due to islet injuries and stresses that can lead to beta cell loss. Inhibition of excess IL-1β activity might minimize islet injuries, thus preserving function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1β, protects islets from cytokine-induced necrosis and apoptosis. Therefore, an imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1Ra might influence the courses of allogeneic and autoimmune responses to islets. Our group previously demonstrated that the circulating serine-protease inhibitor human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the levels of which increase in circulation during acute-phase immune responses, exhibits anti-inflammatory and islet-protective properties, as well as immunomodulatory activity. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the pancreatic islet allograft-protective activity of hAAT was mediated by IL-1Ra induction. Our results demonstrated that hAAT led to a 2.04-fold increase in IL-1Ra expression in stimulated macrophages and that hAAT-pre-treated islet grafts exhibited a 4.851-fold increase in IL-1Ra transcript levels, which were associated with a moderate inflammatory profile. Unexpectedly, islets that were isolated from IL-1Ra-knockout mice and pre-treated with hAAT before grafting into wild-type mice yielded an increase in intragraft IL-1Ra expression that was presumably derived from infiltrating host cells, albeit in the absence of hAAT treatment of the host. Indeed, hAAT-pre-treated islets generated hAAT-free conditioned medium that could induce IL-1Ra production in cultured macrophages. Finally, we demonstrated that hAAT promoted a distinct phosphorylation and nuclear translocation pattern for p65, a key transcription factor required for IL-1Ra expression. PMID:25000533

  7. Functional analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of the integrin {alpha}1 subunit in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abair, Tristin D; Bulus, Nada; Borza, Corina; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-10-15

    Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen type IV receptor, is expressed by endothelial cells and plays a role in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Because the molecular mechanisms whereby this collagen IV receptor mediates endothelial cell functions are poorly understood, truncation and point mutants of the integrin alpha1 subunit cytoplasmic tail (amino acids 1137-1151) were generated and expressed into alpha1-null endothelial cells. We show that alpha1-null endothelial cells expressing the alpha1 subunit, which lacks the entire cytoplasmic tail (mutant alpha1-1136) or expresses all the amino acids up to the highly conserved GFFKR motif (mutant alpha1-1143), have a similar phenotype to parental alpha1-null cells. Pro(1144) and Leu(1145) were shown to be necessary for alpha1beta1-mediated endothelial cell proliferation; Lys(1146) for adhesion, migration, and tubulogenesis and Lys(1147) for tubulogenesis. Integrin alpha1beta1-dependent endothelial cell proliferation is primarily mediated by ERK activation, whereas migration and tubulogenesis require both p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation. Thus, distinct amino acids distal to the GFFKR motif of the alpha1 integrin cytoplasmic tail mediate activation of selective downstream signaling pathways and specific endothelial cell functions. PMID:18647959

  8. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  9. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel alpha1-subunits.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Buryi, V; Feron, O; Gomez, J P; Christen, M O; Godfraind, T

    1998-11-01

    1. CHO cells expressing the alpha(1C-a) subunit (cardiac isoform) and the alpha(1C-b) subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for alpha1C isoforms. 2. Inward current evoked by the transfected alpha1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 3. Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of alpha(1C-)b-subunit than of alpha(1C-a)-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of -100 mV than at -50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms. 4. Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on alpha(1C-a) than on alpha(1C-b) subunit at Vh of -100 mV and -50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages. 5. [3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-b) than for the alpha(1C-a) subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-a) subunit than for the alpha(1C-b) subunit. 6. These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the alpha(1C-a) and alpha(1C-b) subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  10. [Alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype selectivity and organ specificity of silodosin (KMD-3213)].

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kumi; Maezawa, Ayaka; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Yoshinobu; Shibata, Nobuo

    2006-03-01

    The selectivity of silodosin (KMD-3213), an antagonist of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (AR), to the subtypes (alpha(1A)-, alpha(1B)- and alpha(1D)-ARs) was examined by a receptor-binding study and a functional pharmacological study, and we compared its subtype-selectivity with those of other alpha(1)-AR antagonists. In the receptor-binding study, a replacement experiment using [(3)H]-prazosin was conducted using the membrane fraction of mouse-derived LM (tk-) cells in which each of three human alpha(1)-AR subtypes was expressed. In the functional pharmacological study, the following isolated tissues were used as representative organs with high distribution densities of alpha(1)-AR subtypes (alpha(1A)-AR: rabbit prostate, urethra and bladder trigone; alpha(1B)-AR: rat spleen; alpha(1D)-AR: rat thoracic aorta). Using the Magnus method, we studied the inhibitory effect of silodosin on noradrenaline-induced contraction, and compared it with those of tamsulosin hydrochloride, naftopidil and prazosin hydrochloride. Silodosin showed higher selectivity for the alpha(1A)-AR subtype than tamsulosin hydrochloride, naftopidil or prazosin hydrochloride (affinity was highest for tamsulosin hydrochloride, followed by silodosin, prazosin hydrochloride and naftopidil in that order). Silodosin strongly antagonized noradrenaline-induced contractions in rabbit lower urinary tract tissues (including prostate, urethra and bladder trigone, with pA(2) or pKb values of 9.60, 8.71 and 9.35, respectively). On the other hand, the pA(2) values for antagonism of noradrenaline-induced contractions in rat isolated spleen and rat isolated thoracic aorta were 7.15 and 7.88, respectively. Selectivity for lower urinary tract was higher for silodosin than for the other alpha(1)-AR antagonists. Our data suggest that silodosin has a high selectivity for the alpha(1A)-AR subtype and for the lower urinary tract. PMID:16518085

  11. Role of alpha-1 adrenoceptor subtypes mediating constriction of the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Silver, W P; Koman, L A; Strandhoy, J W; Rosencrance, E; Gordon, S; Smith, T L

    2000-01-01

    An acute in vivo preparation of the microvasculature of the rabbit ear was used to evaluate the functional role of alpha1 (alpha1)-adrenoceptor subtypes in thermoregulatory microcirculation. The effect of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype blockade on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was assessed with the alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D-adrenoceptor-selective antagonists 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-8) M), chloroethylclonidine (10(-5) M), and 8-[2-[4(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspirol[4.5]deca ne-7,9-dione dihydrochloride (BMY7378) (10(-6) M), respectively. The results demonstrated that pretreatment of the ear microvasculature with 5-methyl-urapidil or BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve rightward and significantly changed the log of the phenylephrine concentration, causing half-maximum stimulation (EC50) in arterioles (p < 0.05). BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve of the arteriovenous anastomoses about 100-fold rightward (p < 0.05). All three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists eliminated the vasoconstrictive effects of phenylephrine on venules. The results indicate that the ear microvasculature has a heterogenous distribution of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. The alpha1A and alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtypes appear to have a greater influence on constrictive function in arterioles, whereas the alpha1D-adrenoceptor is the dominant constrictor of arteriovenous anastomoses. In general, the alpha1-adrenoceptor does not play a major vasoconstrictor role in venules. Chloroethylclonidine, an irreversible alpha1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, induced contractile responses in the ear microvasculature, probably due to its alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist effects. This study extended our understanding of the adrenergic receptor control mechanisms of a cutaneous thermoregulatory end organ characterized by two parallel perfusion circuits providing nutritional and thermoregulatory functions. PMID:10716292

  12. Naftopidil, a novel alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, displays selective inhibition of canine prostatic pressure and high affinity binding to cloned human alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Takei, R; Ikegaki, I; Shibata, K; Tsujimoto, G; Asano, T

    1999-04-01

    The pharmacological profiles of the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists naftopidil, tamsulosin and prazosin were studied in an anesthetized dog model that allowed the simultaneous assessment of their antagonist potency against phenylephrine-mediated increases in prostatic pressure and mean blood pressure. The intravenous administration of each of these compounds dose-dependently inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in prostatic pressure and mean blood pressure. To further assess the ability of the three compounds to inhibit phenylephrine-induced responses, the doses required to produce a 50% inhibition of the phenylephrine-induced increases in prostatic and mean blood pressure and the selectivity index obtained from the ratio of those two doses were determined for each test compound. Forty minutes after the intravenous administration of naftopidil, the selectivity index was 3.76, and those of tamsulosin and prazosin were 1.23 and 0.61, respectively. These findings demonstrated that naftopidil selectively inhibited the phenylephrine-induced increase in prostatic pressure compared with mean blood pressure in the anesthetized dog model. The selectivity of naftopidil for prostatic pressure was the most potent among the test compounds. In addition, using cloned human alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes, naftopidil was selective for the alpha1d-adrenoceptor with approximately 3- and 17-fold higher affinity than for the alpha1a- and alpha1b-adrenoceptor subtypes, respectively. The selectivity of naftopidil for prostatic pressure may be attributable to its high binding affinity for alpha1a- and alpha1d-adrenoceptor subtypes. PMID:10361884

  13. In vitro alpha1-adrenoceptor pharmacology of Ro 70-0004 and RS-100329, novel alpha1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Blue, D R; Daniels, D V; Davis, B; Elworthy, T; Gever, J R; Kava, M S; Morgans, D; Padilla, F; Tassa, S; Vimont, R L; Chapple, C R; Chess-Williams, R; Eglen, R M; Clarke, D E; Ford, A P

    1999-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, selective antagonism of the alpha1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of lower urinary tract tissues may, via a selective relief of outlet obstruction, lead to an improvement in symptoms. The present study describes the alpha1-adrenoceptor (alpha1-AR) subtype selectivities of two novel alpha1-AR antagonists, Ro 70-0004 (aka RS-100975) and a structurally-related compound RS-100329, and compares them with those of prazosin and tamsulosin. Radioligand binding and second-messenger studies in intact CHO-K1 cells expressing human cloned alpha1A-, alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR showed nanomolar affinity and significant alpha1A-AR subtype selectivity for both Ro 70-0004 (pKi 8.9: 60 and 50 fold selectivity) and RS-100329 (pKi 9.6: 126 and 50 fold selectivity) over the alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR subtypes respectively. In contrast, prazosin and tamsulosin showed little subtype selectivity. Noradrenaline-induced contractions of human lower urinary tract (LUT) tissues or rabbit bladder neck were competitively antagonized by Ro 70-0004 (pA2 8.8 and 8.9), RS-100329 (pA2 9.2 and 9.2), tamsulosin (pA2 10.4 and 9.8) and prazosin (pA2 8.7 and 8.3 respectively). Affinity estimates for tamsulosin and prazosin in antagonizing alpha1-AR-mediated contractions of human renal artery (HRA) and rat aorta (RA) were similar to those observed in LUT tissues, whereas Ro 70-0004 and RS-100329 were approximately 100 fold less potent (pA2 values of 6.8/6.8 and 7.3/7.9 in HRA/RA respectively). The alpha1A-AR subtype selectivity of Ro 70-0004 and RS-100329, demonstrated in both cloned and native systems, should allow for an evaluation of the clinical utility of a 'uroselective' agent for the treatment of symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:10369480

  14. Subtype selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Forray; Noble

    1999-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is highly prevalent in the male population beyond the age of 60. Impairment of urinary flow due to prostate enlargement gives rise to symptoms of 'prostatism' that have a detrimental impact on the quality of life. The current trend in the management of symptomatic BPH favours pharmacotherapy as a first line option, while the number of surgical procedures being performed has experienced a steady decline during the last ten years. Among the pharmacological treatments, the use of alpha1-adrenoceptor blockers has demonstrated to be an effective treatment option for BPH. These agents reduce the adrenergic tone to the prostate and increase urinary flow, with a concomitant reduction of lower urinary tract symptoms. The alpha1-blockers currently approved include compounds such as alfuzosin, terazosin and doxazosin, originally developed for the treatment of hypertension, and more recently tamsulosin, an alpha1-subtype selective drug. The blockade of alpha1-adrenoceptors present in vascular smooth muscle is largely responsible for the most prominent side effects of current drugs, which can be severe and require patients dose titration. The limitation imposed by side effects naturally raises the possibility that complete blockade of prostatic alpha1 receptors is not attained at the maximum tolerated dose. The extensive efforts by the pharmaceutical industry towards the development of uroselective alpha1-blockers, is the subject of this review. Advances in the molecular cloning of genes encoding three alpha1-adrenoceptors led to the identification of the alpha1A-subtype as the predominant receptor responsible for the contraction of prostate smooth muscle. In preclinical animal models, selective alpha1A-antagonists have consistently been found to have minimal cardiovascular effects, thus providing a pharmacological rationale for uroselectivity. It has also become apparent, however, that uroselectivity can emerge in a poorly understood manner

  15. Effect of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Richard; Chaudhry, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    Compelling evidence now exists that proves adrenergic blockade is at the center of neurohormonal antagonism in heart failure (HF). Catecholamines are well known to act through both beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptors (ARs), which mediate their effects through distinct receptor pathways. Beta-AR blockers are commonly used in the treatment of HF and have distinct receptor affinity profiles. The recent COMET trial comparing 2 important beta-blocking drugs showed a distinct advantage for carvedilol in decreasing the risk of mortality from HF. The mechanism of action for carvedilol differs from metoprolol tartrate in its ability to block both alpha- and beta-ARs, leading to renewed interest in the potential role of alpha-ARs in the progression of HF. In contrast, however, the ALLHAT study discontinued use of doxazosin, an alpha1-receptor blocker because of an increase in cardiovascular events among patients using this drug. The results of these studies appear to be in contrast with respect to the role of alpha-ARs in regards to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Further study of the alpha-receptor and understanding the role of alpha-ARs in HF is necessary to understand the therapeutic effect of alpha-blockade. This article reviews our understanding of the alpha-AR in HF. PMID:17070143

  16. Identification and characterization of the Trichoderma harzianum gene encoding alpha-1,3-glucanase involved in streptococcal mutan degradation.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Adrian; Janczarek, Monika; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    alpha-1,3-Glucanases (mutanases) are currently of great interest due to their potential use in the field of dental care. These enzymes have been reported in several bacteria, yeasts and fungi, but up to now, characterization of this family of proteins has been relatively poor. In this study, we identify and characterize a mutanase gene from Trichoderma harzianum CCM F-340. Sequence analysis, on the nucleotide and amino acid levels reveals that this alpha-1,3-glucanase is highly homologous to alpha-1,3-glucanases from T harzianum isolate CBS 243.71 and T asperellum CECT 20539. T. harzianum CCM F-340 mutanase is a 634-aa residue protein with a calculated molecular mass of 67.65 kDa, composed of two distinct, highly conserved domains (a long N-terminal catalytic domain and a short C-terminal polysaccharide-binding domain) separated by a less conserved Pro-Ser-Thr-rich linker region. The mutanase gene was expressed in an E. coli BL21 (DE3) host, under the transcriptional control of T7 promoter. The purified enzyme migrated as a band of about 68 kDa after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which coincided with the predicted size based on the amino acid sequence. Our data indicate that this enzyme is highly conserved in Trichoderma and can be produced in active form in such heterologous expression system. PMID:22390063

  17. Increase of mouse resistance to Candida albicans infection by thymosin alpha 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Marconi, P; Frati, L; Bonmassar, E; Garaci, E

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the ability of thymosin alpha 1 to prolong the survival of mice challenged with Candida albicans. Two- to four-month-old mice were treated with graded doses of thymosin alpha 1 before, after, or before and after intravenous challenge with C. albicans. Significant resistance ot lethal infection was afforded by 100 micrograms of thymosin alpha 1 per kg given before or before and after challenge, whereas no protection was found in mice treated with thymosin alpha 1 administered at any dose level after inoculation. Pretreatment with thymosin alpha 1 also prevented the increased susceptibility to C. albicans infection of mice pretreated with cyclophosphamide on day -6. The results showed that thymosin alpha 1 was capable of protecting untreated or cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice from C. albicans infection at an optimal dose and schedule of administration. PMID:7085074

  18. A nuclear pathway for alpha 1-adrenergic receptor signaling in cardiac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ardati, A; Nemer, M

    1993-01-01

    alpha 1-Adrenergic agonists and antagonists constitute an important class of therapeutic agents commonly used for the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases like hypertension, congestive heart failure and supraventricular tachycardia. At the heart level, activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors is associated with marked morphological and genetic changes. These include enhancement of contractility, myocardial growth (hypertrophy) and release of the heart major secretory product, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). However, the signal transduction pathways which link extracellular activation of the receptors to cellular and genetic changes are not well understood. Using primary cardiocyte cultures from neonate rat hearts, an alpha 1-adrenergic regulatory sequence has been identified in the 5' flanking region of the ANF gene. This sequence, which is necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation in response to the alpha 1-specific agonist phenylephrine, interacts with novel zinc-dependent proteins which are induced by alpha 1-adrenergic stimulation. Consistent with a conserved regulatory mechanism, the alpha 1 response element is highly conserved between rodent, bovine and human ANF genes, and is also present in the promoter region of other alpha 1-responsive cardiac genes. The identification of a nuclear pathway for alpha 1-receptor signaling will be useful for elucidating the intracellular effectors of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Images PMID:8262057

  19. Comparison of guinea-pig, bovine and rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, R.; Heeks, C.; Taguchi, K.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. To elucidate a possible role of species differences in the classification of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, we have characterized the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen, kidney and cerebral cortex and in bovine cerebral cortex using concentration-dependent alkylation by chloroethylclonidine and competitive binding with 5-methlurapidil, methoxamine, (+)-niguldipine, noradrenaline, oxymetazoline, phentolamine, SDZ NVI-085, tamsulosin and (+)-tamsulosin. Rat liver alpha 1B-adrenoceptors were studied for comparison. Chloroethylclonidine-sensitivity and (+)-niguldipine affinity were also compared at cloned rat and bovine alpha 1a-adrenoceptors. 2. Chloroethylclonidine concentration-dependently inactivated alpha 1-adrenoceptors in all five tissues. While chloroethylclonidine inactivated almost all alpha 1-adrenoceptors in rat liver and guinea-pig kidney and brain, 20-30% of alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen and bovine brain were resistant to alkylation by 10 microM chloroethylclonidine. With regard to concentration-dependency guinea-pig kidney and brain were approximately 10 fold less sensitive than guinea-pig spleen or rat liver. 3. In rat liver, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 4. In guinea-pig spleen, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 5. In guinea-pig kidney most drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves and had relatively low drug affinities close to those of cloned rat alpha 1b- and alpha 1d-adrenoceptors. However, noradrenaline and tamsulosin had consistently biphasic competition curves recognizing 36-39% high and 61-64% low affinity sites. 6. In guinea-pig cerebral cortex, all drugs tested

  20. The Alpha-1D Is the Predominant Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptor Subtype in Human Epicardial Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; Swigart, Philip M.; Laden, Marie-Eve; DeMarco, Teresa; Hoopes, Charles; Simpson, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The goal was to identify alpha-1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) subtypes in human coronary arteries. Background The α1-ARs regulate human coronary blood flow. α1-ARs exist as three molecular subtypes, α1A, α1B, and α1D, and the α1D subtype mediates coronary vasoconstriction in the mouse. However, the α1A is thought to be the only subtype in human coronary arteries. Methods We obtained human epicardial coronary arteries and left ventricular (LV) myocardium from 19 transplant recipients and 6 unused donors (age 19–70 years; 68% male; 32% with coronary artery disease). We cultured coronary rings and human coronary smooth muscle cells. We assayed α1- and β-AR subtype mRNAs by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR; and subtype proteins, by radioligand binding and ERK activation. Results The α1D subtype was 85% of total coronary α1-AR mRNA and 75% of total α1-AR protein, and α1D stimulation activated ERK. In contrast, the α1D was low in LV myocardium. Total coronary α1-AR levels were one-third of β-ARs, which were 99% the β2 subtype. Conclusions The α1D subtype is predominant and functional in human epicardial coronary arteries, whereas the α1A and α1B are present at very low levels. This distribution is similar to the mouse, where myocardial α1A and α1B-ARs mediate beneficial functional responses, and coronary α1Ds mediate vasoconstriction. Thus, α1D-selective antagonists might mediate coronary vasodilation, without the negative cardiac effects of non-selective α1-AR antagonists in current use. Furthermore, it could be possible to selectively activate beneficial myocardial α1A and/or α1B-AR signaling without causing coronary vasoconstriction. PMID:19761933

  1. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  2. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrophoresis) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of specific alpha-1-glycoproteins may aid in...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues....

  4. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrophoresis) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of specific alpha-1-glycoproteins may aid in...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrophoresis) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of specific alpha-1-glycoproteins may aid in...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrophoresis) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of specific alpha-1-glycoproteins may aid in...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues....

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Z α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Fei; Wei, Zhenquan; Wang, Yugang; Carrell, Robin W; Read, Randy J; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Zhou, Aiwu

    2016-07-22

    The Z mutation (E342K) of α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), carried by 4% of Northern Europeans, predisposes to early onset of emphysema due to decreased functional α1-AT in the lung and to liver cirrhosis due to accumulation of polymers in hepatocytes. However, it remains unclear why the Z mutation causes intracellular polymerization of nascent Z α1-AT and why 15% of the expressed Z α1-AT is secreted into circulation as functional, but polymerogenic, monomers. Here, we solve the crystal structure of the Z-monomer and have engineered replacements to assess the conformational role of residue Glu-342 in α1-AT. The results reveal that Z α1-AT has a labile strand 5 of the central β-sheet A (s5A) with a consequent equilibrium between a native inhibitory conformation, as in its crystal structure here, and an aberrant conformation with s5A only partially incorporated into the central β-sheet. This aberrant conformation, induced by the loss of interactions from the Glu-342 side chain, explains why Z α1-AT is prone to polymerization and readily binds to a 6-mer peptide, and it supports that annealing of s5A into the central β-sheet is a crucial step in the serpins' metastable conformational formation. The demonstration that the aberrant conformation can be rectified through stabilization of the labile s5A by binding of a small molecule opens a potential therapeutic approach for Z α1-AT deficiency. PMID:27246852

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Z α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Fei; Wei, Zhenquan; Wang, Yugang; Carrell, Robin W.; Read, Randy J.; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Zhou, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    The Z mutation (E342K) of α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), carried by 4% of Northern Europeans, predisposes to early onset of emphysema due to decreased functional α1-AT in the lung and to liver cirrhosis due to accumulation of polymers in hepatocytes. However, it remains unclear why the Z mutation causes intracellular polymerization of nascent Z α1-AT and why 15% of the expressed Z α1-AT is secreted into circulation as functional, but polymerogenic, monomers. Here, we solve the crystal structure of the Z-monomer and have engineered replacements to assess the conformational role of residue Glu-342 in α1-AT. The results reveal that Z α1-AT has a labile strand 5 of the central β-sheet A (s5A) with a consequent equilibrium between a native inhibitory conformation, as in its crystal structure here, and an aberrant conformation with s5A only partially incorporated into the central β-sheet. This aberrant conformation, induced by the loss of interactions from the Glu-342 side chain, explains why Z α1-AT is prone to polymerization and readily binds to a 6-mer peptide, and it supports that annealing of s5A into the central β-sheet is a crucial step in the serpins' metastable conformational formation. The demonstration that the aberrant conformation can be rectified through stabilization of the labile s5A by binding of a small molecule opens a potential therapeutic approach for Z α1-AT deficiency. PMID:27246852

  12. Radioligand binding studies of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, M. C.; Hanft, G.; Gross, G.

    1994-01-01

    1. In order to characterize the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating positive inotropic effects of adrenaline (in the presence of propranolol) in rat right ventricular strips and the Ca2+ sources used to elicit them, we have used radioligand binding to identify the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes present in rat heart and the alpha 1-adrenoceptor affinity and subtype-selectivity of various pharmacological tools. 2. Amitryptiline, mianserin, trimipramine, oxaprotiline, clonidine, chloroethylclonidine, phenoxybenzamine, BE 2254 and 8-OH-DPAT competed for [3H]-prazosin binding in rat heart, vas deferens, liver, spleen, cerebral cortex and hippocampus but none of them displayed detectable alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype-selectivity; nitrendipine did not compete for [3H]-prazosin binding in concentrations up to 5 mumol 1(-1). 3. The alpha 1 A-adrenoceptor-selective, 5-methyl-urapidil, (+)-niguldipine, and to a lesser extent (-)-niguldipine competed for [3H]-prazosin binding in rat heart, vas deferens, cerebral cortex and hippocampus with shallow and biphasic curves; analysis of these curves demonstrated that rat heart contains alpha 1A-and alpha 1B-adrenoceptors in a 20:80 ratio. 4. Treatment of rat right ventricular strips with 100 mumol l-1 chloroethylclonidine for 30 min at 30 degrees C followed by 60 min washout reduced the number of alpha 1-adrenoceptors, as assessed by [3H]-prazosin saturation experiments, by 74%. Treatment with 100 mumol l(-1) CdCl2 did not affect number or affinity of cardiac alpha 1-adrenoceptors and combined treatment with chlorethylclonidine and CdCl2 reduced alpha 1-adrenoceptor number by 90%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7911718

  13. Loss of integrin alpha1beta1 ameliorates Kras-induced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Macias-Perez, Ines; Borza, Corina; Chen, Xiwu; Yan, Xuexian; Ibanez, Raquel; Mernaugh, Glenda; Matrisian, Lynn M; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-08-01

    The collagen IV binding receptor integrin alpha1beta1 has been shown to regulate lung cancer due to its proangiogenic properties; however, it is unclear whether this receptor also plays a direct role in promoting primary lung tumors. To investigate this possibility, integrin alpha1-null mice were crossed with KrasLA2 mice that carry an oncogenic mutation of the Kras gene (G12D) and develop spontaneous primary tumors with features of non-small cell lung cancer. We provide evidence that KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice have a decreased incidence of primary lung tumors and longer survival compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type controls. Tumors from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice were also smaller, less vascularized, and exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end staining, respectively. Moreover, tumors from the KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed diminished extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Primary lung tumor epithelial cells isolated from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed a significant decrease in anchorage-independent colony formation, collagen-mediated cell proliferation, ERK activation, and, most importantly, tumorigenicity when injected into nude mice compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type tumor cells. These results indicate that loss of the integrin alpha1 subunit decreases the incidence and growth of lung epithelial tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras, suggesting that both Kras and integrin alpha1beta1 cooperate to drive the growth of non-small cell lung cancer in vivo. PMID:18676835

  14. α-1-Antitrypsin variants and the proteinase/antiproteinase imbalance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinden, Nicola J.; Baker, Michael J.; Smith, David J.; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; Dafforn, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The excessive activities of the serine proteinases neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 are associated with tissue damage in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Reduced concentrations and/or inhibitory efficiency of the main circulating serine proteinase inhibitor α-1-antitrypsin result from point mutations in its gene. In addition, α-2-macroglobulin competes with α-1-antitrypsin for proteinases, and the α-2-macroglobulin-sequestered enzyme can retain its catalytic activity. We have studied how serine proteinases partition between these inhibitors and the effects of α-1-antitrypsin mutations on this partitioning. Subsequently, we have developed a three-dimensional reaction-diffusion model to describe events occurring in the lung interstitium when serine proteinases diffuse from the neutrophil azurophil granule following degranulation and subsequently bind to either α-1-antitrypsin or α-2-macroglobulin. We found that the proteinases remained uninhibited on the order of 0.1 s after release and diffused on the order of 10 μm into the tissue before becoming sequestered. We have shown that proteinases sequestered to α-2-macroglobulin retain their proteolytic activity and that neutrophil elastase complexes with α-2-macroglobulin are able to degrade elastin. Although neutrophil elastase is implicated in the pathophysiology of emphysema, our results highlight a potentially important role for proteinase 3 because of its greater concentration in azurophil granules, its reduced association rate constant with all α-1-antitrypsin variants studied here, its greater diffusion distance, time spent uninhibited following degranulation, and its greater propensity to partition to α-2-macroglobulin where it retains proteolytic activity. PMID:25416382

  15. Physical mapping of four serpin genes: [alpha][sub 1]-antitrypsin, [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin, corticosteroid-binding globulin, and protein C inhibitor, within a 280-kb region on chromosome 14q32. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W. Univ. of Toronto, Ontario ); Walter, M.A. ); Hammond, G.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Alpha[sub 1]-antitrypsin ([alpha]1AT; protease inhibitor [PI] locus), [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin ([alpha]1ACT; AACT locus), corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG; CBG locus), and protein C inhibitor (PCI; PCI locus) are members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. A noncoding PI-like (PIL) gene has been located 12 kb 3[prime] of the PI gene. The PI, PIL, and AACT loci have been localized to 14q32.1, the CBG locus has been localized to 14q31-14q32.1, and PCI has been mapped to chromosome 14. Genetic linkage analysis suggests tight linkage between PI and AACT. The authors have used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to generate a physical map linking these five serpin genes. The order of the genetic loci is AACT/PCI-PI-PIL-CBG, with a maximum distance of about 220 kb between the AACT/PCI and PI genes. These genes form a PI cluster at 14q32.1, similar to that of the homologous genes on murine chromosome 12. The close proximity of these genes has implications for disease-association studies. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. INHALED ALPHA1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Gaggar, Amit; Chen, Junliang; Chmiel, James F; Dorkin, Henry L; Flume, Patrick A; Griffin, Rhonda; Nichols, David; Donaldson, Scott H

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) is known to reduce neutrophil elastase burden in some patients with CF. This phase 2a study was designed to test inhaled Alpha-1 HC, a new aerosolized alpha1-PI formulation, in CF patients. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and evaluated the safety of 100 or 200 mg of inhaled Alpha-1 HC once daily for 3 weeks in subjects with CF. Thirty adult subjects were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive Alpha-1 HC or placebo. Results Drug delivery was confirmed by a dose-dependent increase in the sputum alpha1-PI. Seven (20.0%) of the 35 adverse events in the 100-mg dose group, 3 (13.0%) of 23 in the 200-mg dose group, and 4 (14.3%) of 28 in the placebo group were drug-related in these subjects. One serious adverse event occurred in 1 subject within each group. Conclusions Alpha-1 HC inhalation was safe and well tolerated. PMID:26321218

  17. Impact of physicochemical and structural properties on the pharmacokinetics of a series of alpha1L-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Betts, Alison; Atkinson, Fidelma; Gardner, Iain; Fox, David; Webster, Rob; Beaumont, Kevin; Morgan, Paul

    2007-08-01

    A rational drug discovery process was initiated to design a potent and prostate-selective alpha1(L)-adrenoceptor antagonist with pharmacokinetic properties suitable for once a day administration after oral dosing, for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two series of compounds based on a quinoline or quinazoline template were identified with appropriate pharmacology. A series of high molecular weight cations with high hydrogen-bonding potential had extensive in vivo clearance, despite demonstrating metabolic stability. Studies in the isolated perfused rat liver and fresh rat hepatocytes indicated that active transport protein-mediated hepatobiliary elimination is an efficient clearance process for these compounds. A reduction in molecular weight and hydrogen-bonding potential resulted in a second series of compounds with in vivo hepatic clearance predictable from in vitro metabolic clearance. Initially, lipophilicity was reduced within this second series to reduce metabolic clearance and increase elimination half-life. However, this strategy also resulted in a concomitant reduction in volume of distribution and a negligible effect on prolonging half-life. An alternative strategy was to increase the intrinsic metabolic stability of the molecule by careful structural modifications while maintaining lipophilicity. Replacement of the metabolically vulnerable morpholine side chain resulted in identification of UK-338,003, (N-[2-(4-amino-6,7-dimethoxy-5-pyridin-2-yl-quinazolin-2-yl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-5-yl]-methanesulfonamide), which fulfilled the objectives of the discovery program with suitable pharmacology (human prostate alpha1(L) pA(2) of 9.2 with 25-fold selectivity over rat aorta alpha1(D)) and sufficiently long elimination half-life in human volunteers (11-17 h) for once a day administration. PMID:17502340

  18. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A.; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutant Z α1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12) that blocked α1-antitrypsin polymerization in vitro at a 1:1 molar ratio, causing a small increase of the stoichiometry of inhibition for neutrophil elastase. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) intrabody was generated based on the sequence of mAb4B12. The expression of scFv4B12 within the ER (scFv4B12KDEL) and along the secretory pathway (scFv4B12) reduced the intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin by 60%. The scFv4B12 intrabody also increased the secretion of Z α1-antitrypsin that retained inhibitory activity against neutrophil elastase. MAb4B12 recognized a discontinuous epitope probably located in the region of helices A/C/G/H/I and seems to act by altering protein dynamics rather than binding preferentially to the native state. This novel approach could reveal new target sites for small-molecule intervention that may block the transition to aberrant polymers without compromising the inhibitory activity of Z α1-antitrypsin.—Ordóñez, A., Pérez, J., Tan, L., Dickens, J. A., Motamedi-Shad, N., Irving, J. A., Haq, I., Ekeowa, U., Marciniak, S. J., Miranda, E., Lomas, D. A. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity. PMID:25757566

  19. Separation of functional domains for the alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 hydrolytic activities of a Bacillus amylopullulanase by limited proteolysis with papain.

    PubMed

    Ara, K; Igarashi, K; Hagihara, H; Sawada, K; Kobayashi, T; Ito, S

    1996-04-01

    An amylopullulanase (APase) from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. KSM-1378 hydrolyzes both alpha-1,6 linkages in pullulan and alpha-1,4 linkages in other polysaccharides, each maximally active at an alkaline pH, to generate oligosaccharides. We analyzed proteolytic fragments that were produced by exposing pure APase to various proteases, to identify its catalytic domain(s). The intact, pure 210-kDa APase was partially digested with papain for a short time, yielding simultaneously two smaller non-overlapping active fragments, designated amylose-hydrolyzing fragment (AHF114, 114 kDa) and pullulan-hydrolyzing fragment (PHF102, 102 kda). The two truncated protein fragments, each containing a single catalytic domain, were purified to homogeneity. The purified AHF114 and PHF102 had similar enzymatic properties to the amylase and pullulanase activities, respectively, of intact APase. The partial amino-terminal sequences of APase and AHF114 were both Glu-Thr-Gly-Asp-Lys-Arg-Ile-Glu-Phe-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Arg-Pro and that of PHF102 was Thr-Val-Pro-Leu-Ala-Leu-Val-Ser-Gly-Glu-Val-Leu-Ser-Asp-Lsy-Leu. These results were direct evidence that the alpha-1,6 and alpha-1,4 hydrolytic activities were associated with two different active sites in this novel enzyme. Our alkaline APase is obviously a "biheaded enzyme". PMID:8829530

  20. Induction of prostate apoptosis by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists: mechanistic significance of the quinazoline component.

    PubMed

    Anglin, I E; Glassman, D T; Kyprianou, N

    2002-01-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor antagonists, have been documented to induce apoptosis and reduce prostate tumor vascularity in benign and malignant prostate cells. The quinazoline based alpha(1)-antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin but not tamsulosin (a sulphonamide derivative) suppress prostate growth without affecting cell proliferation. These quinazoline-mediated apoptotic effects occur via an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor independent mechanism potentially involving activation of the TGF-beta signal transduction pathway. This review discusses the current knowledge of the action of quinazoline-derived alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in the benign and malignant prostate and their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Finally, a molecular pathway is proposed for their observed apoptotic function against prostate cells. Increased understanding of the action of these established and clinically accepted agents would provide a basis for the design of safe, effective therapeutic regimens in the treatment of prostatic diseases. PMID:12496995

  1. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  2. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  3. RBx 6198: a novel alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kamna; Naruganahalli, Krishna S; Gupta, Suman; Malhotra, Shivani; Tiwari, Atul; Hegde, Laxminarayan G; Jain, Sanjay; Sinha, Neelima; Gupta, Jung B; Chugh, Anita; Anand, Nitya; Ray, Abhijit

    2009-04-01

    The present study, investigates the effect of RBx 6198, 2-{3-[4-(2-Isopropoxy-phenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-propyl}-3a, 4, 7, 7a-tetrahydro-isoindole-1, 3,-dione, a novel alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, in both in vitro and in vivo test systems. RBx 6198 is a potent (nanomolar affinity) alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor antagonist with demonstrable uroselectivity in anaesthesized dog model. In radioligand binding studies using human recombinant receptors, RBx 6198 exhibited high selectivity (approximately 50 fold) for the alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor subtype as compared to alpha(1B)-adrenoceptor subtype. In order to assess tissue selectivity, the antagonistic effect of RBx 6198 on the phenylephrine induced contractile response of isolated rat prostate, spleen and aorta was characterized. RBx 6198 was 8 fold more potent in inhibiting phenylephrine-evoked contractions of isolated tissues compared to tamsulosin. However, the compound was non-selective for alpha(1A) vs. alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor like tamsulosin. In anaesthetized beagle dogs RBx 6198 suppressed the intraurethral pressure response to phenylephrine to a greater extent than the mean arterial pressure response thereby demonstrating uroselectivity consistent with in vitro binding and functional data. RBx 6198 was 6.4 fold more uroselective as compared to tamsulosin after i.v. route dose administration. Taken together all results from preclinical studies, it is suggested that RBx 6198 is a novel alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that exhibited improved pharmacological profile over tamsulosin in both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19239913

  4. Binding and functional characterization of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Y; Ohmura, T; Oshita, M; Watanabe, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Taniguchi, T; Muramatsu, I

    1999-01-29

    The alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes of rat prostate were characterized in binding and functional experiments. In binding experiments, [3H]tamsulosin bound to a single class of binding sites with an affinity (pKD) of 10.79+/-0.04 and Bmax of 87+/-2 fmol mg(-1) protein. This binding was inhibited by prazosin, 2-(2,6-dimethoxy-phenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane hydrochloride (WB4101), 5-methylurapidil, alpha-ethyl-3,4,5,-trimethoxy-alpha-(3-((2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)ethyl)-amin o)-propyl)benzeneacetonitrile fumarate (HV723) and oxymetazoline with high efficacy, resulting in a good correlation with the binding characteristics of cloned alpha1a but not alpha1b and alpha1d-adrenoceptor subtypes. In functional studies, noradrenaline and oxymetazoline produced concentration-dependent contractions. These contractions were antagonized by tamsulosin, prazosin, WB4101 and 5-methylurapidil with an efficacy lower than that exhibited by these agents for inhibition of [3H]tamsulosin binding. The relationship between receptor occupancy and contractile amplitude revealed the presence of receptor reserve for noradrenaline, but the contraction induced by oxymetazoline was not in parallel with receptor occupation and developed after predicted receptor saturation. From these results, it is suggested that alpha1A-adrenoceptors are the dominant subtype in the rat prostate which can be detected with [3H]tamsulosin, but that the functional subtype mediating adrenergic contractions has the characteristics of the alpha1L-adrenoceptor subtype, having a lower affinity for prazosin and some other drugs than the alpha1A-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:10064160

  5. Accelerated telomere attrition in children and teenagers with α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Amparo; Pastor, Sara; Reula, Ana; Castillo, Silvia; Vicente, Silvia; Sanz, Francisco; Casas, Francisco; Torres, María; Fernández-Fabrellas, Estrella; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that oxidative stress accelerates telomere shortening in several lung pathologies. Since oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), we hypothesised that telomere shortening would be accelerated in AATD patients. This study aimed to assess telomere length in AATD patients and to study its association with α1-antitrypsin phenotypes.Telomere length, telomerase activity, telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression and biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in 62 children and teenagers (aged 2-18 years) diagnosed with AATD and 18 controls (aged 3-16 years).Our results show that intermediate-risk (MZ; SZ) and high-risk (ZZ) AATD patients have significantly shorter telomeres and increased oxidative stress than controls. Correlation studies indicate that telomere length was related to oxidative stress markers in AATD patients. Multiple hypothesis testing revealed an association between telomere length, telomerase activity, hTERT expression and AATD phenotypes; high-risk patients showed shorter telomeres, lower hTERT expression and decreased telomerase activity than intermediate-risk and low-risk patients.AATD patients show evidence of increased oxidative stress leading to telomere attrition. An association between telomere and α1-antitrypsin phenotypes is observed suggesting that telomere length could be a promising biomarker for AATD disease progression. PMID:27390278

  6. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A

    2015-06-01

    Mutant Z α1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12) that blocked α1-antitrypsin polymerization in vitro at a 1:1 molar ratio, causing a small increase of the stoichiometry of inhibition for neutrophil elastase. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) intrabody was generated based on the sequence of mAb4B12. The expression of scFv4B12 within the ER (scFv4B12KDEL) and along the secretory pathway (scFv4B12) reduced the intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin by 60%. The scFv4B12 intrabody also increased the secretion of Z α1-antitrypsin that retained inhibitory activity against neutrophil elastase. MAb4B12 recognized a discontinuous epitope probably located in the region of helices A/C/G/H/I and seems to act by altering protein dynamics rather than binding preferentially to the native state. This novel approach could reveal new target sites for small-molecule intervention that may block the transition to aberrant polymers without compromising the inhibitory activity of Z α1-antitrypsin. PMID:25757566

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum polymers impair luminal protein mobility and sensitise to cellular stress in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Snapp, Erik L; Tan, Lu; Miranda, Elena; Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2013-01-01

    Point mutants of α1-antitrypsin form ordered polymers that are retained as inclusions within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes in association with neonatal hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. These inclusions cause cell damage and predispose to ER stress in the absence of the classical unfolded protein response (UPR). The pathophysiology underlying this ER stress was explored by generating cell models that conditionally express wildtype α1-antitrypsin, two mutants that cause polymer-mediated inclusions and liver disease (E342K [the Z allele] and H334D) and a truncated mutant (Null Hong Kong, NHK) that induces classical ER stress and is removed by ER associated degradation. Expression of the polymeric mutants resulted in gross changes in the ER luminal environment that recapitulated the changes seen in liver sections from individuals with PI*ZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency. In contrast expression of NHK α1-antitrypsin caused electron lucent dilatation and expansion of the ER throughout the cell. Photobleaching microscopy in live cells demonstrated a decrease in the mobility of soluble luminal proteins in cells that express E342K and H334D α1-antitrypsin when compared to those that express wildtype and NHK α1-antitrypsin (0.34±0.05, 0.22±0.03, 2.83±0.30 and 2.84±0.55 μm2/s respectively). There was no effect on protein mobility within ER membranes indicating that cisternal connectivity was not disrupted. Polymer expression alone was insufficient to induce the UPR but the resulting protein overload rendered cells hypersensitive to ER stress induced by either tunicamycin or glucose depletion. Conclusion Changes in protein diffusion provide an explanation for the cellular consequences of ER protein overload in mutants that cause inclusion body formation and α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:23197448

  8. Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of a cloned cardiac Ca2+ channel alpha 1 subunit (alpha 1C) expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A; Olcese, R; Wei, X; Birnbaumer, L; Stefani, E

    1994-01-01

    The alpha 1 subunit of cardiac Ca2+ channel, expressed alone or coexpressed with the corresponding beta subunit in Xenopus laevis oocytes, elicits rapidly inactivating Ca2+ currents. The inactivation has the following properties: 1) It is practically absent in external Ba2+; 2) it increases with Ca2+ current amplitudes; 3) it is faster at more negative potentials for comparable Ca2+ current amplitudes; 4) it is independent of channel density; and 5) it does not require the beta subunit. These findings indicate that the Ca2+ binding site responsible for inactivation is encoded in the alpha 1 subunit and suggest that it is located near the inner channel mouth but outside the membrane electric field. PMID:8075326

  9. Functional studies on alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating inotropic effects in rat right ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, M. C.; Hanft, G.; Gross, G.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have studied the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating inotropic effects of adrenaline in rat right ventricle and the Ca2+ sources used to elicit these effects. alpha 1A-Adrenoceptor-mediated contractile effects in rat vas deferens were studied for comparison in some cases. 2. Treatment with chloroethylclonidine did not affect the maximal beta-adrenoceptor-mediated inotropic effects in rat right ventricle or the maximal alpha 1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile effects in rat vas deferens; it did not alter the potency of isoprenaline in the ventricle and reduced the potency of the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists in vas deferens only slightly. Treatment of right ventricular strips with CdCl2 markedly reduced resting tension and enhanced maximal inotropic effects of isoprenaline but did not affect its potency. 3. Inactivation of cardiac alpha 1B-adrenoceptors by treatment with chloroethylclonidine slightly enhanced the maximal inotropic effects of the full agonist, adrenaline and of several partial agonists. 4. Schild analysis of inhibition experiments with the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor-selective antagonists, 5-methyl-urapidil and (+/-)-tamsulosin, demonstrated that adrenaline causes its inotropic effects mainly via the alpha 1B-adrenoceptor subtype. Schild analysis of 5-methyl-urapidil inhibition experiments in chloroethylclonidine-treated ventricles indicated that only alpha 1A-adrenoceptors mediate the inotropic effects of adrenaline following inactivation of the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. 5. In control ventricles the organic Ca2+ entry blocker, nitrendipine and treatment with the inorganic Ca2+ entry blocker, CdCl2 did not reduce inotropic effects of adrenaline whereas ryanodine treatment inhibited them. In contrast, nitrendipine and CdCl2 treatment had major inhibitory effects in chloroethylclonidine-treated but lacked inhibitory effects in phenoxybenzamine-treated ventricular strips. 6. We conclude that inotropic effects of adrenaline in rat heart are mediated

  10. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  11. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  12. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  13. Cross-talk between receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and alpha1b-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Medina, L; Vázquez-Prado, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the phosphorylation and function of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors transfected into Rat-1 fibroblasts was studied. EGF and PDGF increased the phosphorylation of these adrenoceptors. The effect of EGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1478 and that of PDGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1296, inhibitors of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of the receptors for these growth factors. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF but not that induced by PDGF. Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF and PDGF. The ability of noradrenaline to increase [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding in membrane preparations was used as an index of the functional coupling of the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors and G-proteins. Noradrenaline-stimulated [(35)S]GTP[S] binding was markedly decreased in membranes from cells pretreated with EGF or PDGF. Our data indicate that: (i) activation of EGF and PDGF receptors induces phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors, (ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in the EGF response, but does not seem to play a major role in the action of PDGF, (iii) protein kinase C mediates this action of both growth factors and (iv) the phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors induced by EGF and PDGF is associated with adrenoceptor desensitization. PMID:10947955

  14. Characterization of serine/cysteine protease inhibitor alpha1-antitripsin from meconium-instilled rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Zagariya, A M; Bhat, R; Zhabotynsky, E; Chari, G; Navale, S; Xu, Q; Keiderling, T A; Vidyasagar, D

    2005-09-01

    We have recently purified from meconium-instilled rabbit lungs a novel serine proteinase inhibitor, with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, which we assign to be alpha1-antitripsin. We hypothesize that serpin may attenuate pulmonary inflammation and improve surfactant function after meconium aspiration. Alpha1-antitripsin is a member of the proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily and inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, and it can be identified as a member of the family by its amino acid sequence due to the high degree of conserved residues. Alpha1-antitripsin is synthesized by epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes, and neutrophils. Deficiency in alpha1-antitripsin leads to exposure of lungs to uncontrolled proteolytic attack from neutrophil elastase or other damaging factors culminating in lung destruction and cell apoptosis. We hypothesize that accumulation of alpha1-antitripsin in the lungs serves as a predisposed protection against meconium-induced lung injury. In this paper, we show how this knowledge can lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of MAS. PMID:15962329

  15. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin activity correlates with and may modulate matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human acute wounds.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Matthew J; Han, Yuan-Ping; Garner, Warren L

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a central role in many physiologic processes including acute and the chronic wounds. MMP-9 is not routinely expressed in healthy tissues but is promptly expressed as a proenzyme and converted into active enzyme after tissue injury. The mechanisms involved, including the activators and inhibitors for this enzyme in human tissue remain largely obscure. We recently identified alpha1-antichymotrypsin (alpha1-ACT), an acute phase factor, as a potent inhibitor controlling activation of pro-MMP-9 by human skin. The aim of this study is to establish the clinical relevance of the inhibitor in cutaneous wound healing. Fluids from acute burn blisters and conditioned media from skin explants of burn patients were analyzed. We observed that the presence pro-MMP-9 and its activation correlated with the proximity to and degree of injury. Early after trauma, massive levels of wound alpha1-ACT were associated with an absence of pro-MMP-9 activation. Conversely, the active MMP-9 occurs simultaneously with inactivation of alpha1-ACT. Our results suggest a role for alpha1-ACT as a physiologic inhibitor of MMP-9 activation in human wound healing. PMID:19660051

  16. Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor: partnering alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor to combat pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Bingle, L.; Tetley, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight serine proteinase inhibitor, notably of neutrophil elastase (NE), which is synthesised and secreted by the pulmonary epithelium. SLPI plays an important role in limiting NE-induced pulmonary inflammation and, significantly, it also possesses anti-HIV activity. SLPI is a significant component of the anti-NE shield in the lung which has different reactivity from, and is therefore complementary to, the anti-NE action of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inhaled recombinant SLPI (rSLPI) could prove beneficial in partnership with alpha 1-PI in the treatment of a number of inflammatory lung disorders including emphysema, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:8994529

  17. Prazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, C F; Goldmuntz, E A; Cammer, W; Factor, S M; Bloom, B R; Norton, W T

    1985-01-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, has been found to suppress the clinical and histological expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. Suppression was more significant in females than in males and was a dose-dependent phenomenon. Analysis of the effect of other adrenergic receptor antagonists supports the conclusion that the suppressive effect of prazosin is a consequence of blockade of the alpha 1-receptor since treatment with either the alpha 2-antagonist yohimbine or the beta-antagonist propranolol exacerbated the disease, whereas treatment with the long-acting mixed alpha 1/alpha 2-antagonist phenoxybenzamine had some suppressive activity. Treatment with prazosin was also able to suppress clinical and histological signs of EAE in animals sensitized by adoptive transfer with activated spleen or lymph node cells. Whether prazosin acts through altering vascular permeability or the immune response, or both, remains to be determined. Images PMID:2994053

  18. Alpha 1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile responses of the human vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, K.; Rosario, D. J.; Smith, D. J.; Chapple, C. R.; Uchiyama, T.; Chess-Williams, R.

    1995-01-01

    1. The predominant alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractions of the human vas deferens has been characterised in vitro by use of subtype selective antagonists. 2. Responses of human epididymal vas deferens were obtained to phenylephrine in the presence of amine uptake inhibitors and propranolol. The effects of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists, 5-methylurapidil, oxymetazoline, WB4101, prazosin and chloroethylclonidine were examined and also the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine. 3. 5-Methylurapidil, WB4101, oxymetazoline and prazosin acted as competitive antagonists of the responses to phenylephrine, yielding pA2 values of 8.8, 9.2, 7.7 and 8.8 respectively. All four antagonists produced Schild plots with slopes similar to unity and maximum responses to phenylephrine were not altered in the presence of any of the antagonists. 4. Tamsulosin (1 nM) caused rightward shifts of phenylephrine concentration-response curves yielding an apparent pKB value of 10.0. However, maximum responses were also reduced by 51% with this concentration of antagonist. 5. Incubation of tissues with chloroethylclonidine (100 microM for 40 min) failed to alter responses significantly but the presence of nifedipine (1 microM) reduced maximum responses to phenylephrine by 32%. 6. The high affinity of 5-methylurapidil, oxymetazoline and WB4101, together with the failure of chloroethylclonidine to antagonize responses, indicate that the predominant alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contraction of the human vas deferens has the characteristics previously described for the pharmacologically-defined alpha 1A-adrenoceptor. The data are also consistent with those described for the cloned alpha 1c-adrenoceptor subtype thereby supporting the hypothesis that the two receptors are identical. The human vas deferens therefore represents a readily accessible preparation for functional studies of the human alpha 1A-adrenoceptor. PMID:8564226

  19. Glomerular injury is exacerbated in diabetic integrin alpha1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Zent, R; Yan, X; Su, Y; Hudson, B G; Borza, D-B; Moeckel, G W; Qi, Z; Sado, Y; Breyer, M D; Voziyan, P; Pozzi, A

    2006-08-01

    Excessive glomerular collagen IV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are key factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen IV receptor, dowregulates collagen IV and ROS production, suggesting this integrin might determine the severity of diabetic nephropathy. To test this possibility, wild-type and integrin alpha1-null mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ) (100 mg/kg single intraperitoneal injection), after which glomerular filtration rate (GFR), glomerular collagen deposition, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickening were evaluated. In addition, ROS and collagen IV production by mesangial cells as well as their proliferation was measured in vitro. Diabetic alpha1-null mice developed worse renal disease than diabetic wild-type mice. A significant increase in GFR was evident in the alpha1-null mice at 6 weeks after the STZ injection; it started to decrease by week 24 and reached levels of non-diabetic mice by week 36. In contrast, GFR only increased in wild-type mice at week 12 and its elevation persisted throughout the study. Diabetic mutant mice also showed increased glomerular deposition of collagen IV and GBM thickening compared to diabetic wild-type mice. Primary alpha1-null mesangial cells exposed to high glucose produced more ROS than wild-type cells, which led to decreased proliferation and increased collagen IV synthesis, thus mimicking the in vivo finding. In conclusion, this study suggests that lack of integrin alpha1beta1 exacerbates the glomerular injury in a mouse model of diabetes by modulating GFR, ROS production, cell proliferation, and collagen deposition. PMID:16775606

  20. Development and evaluation of an ELISA for quantification of human alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in complex biological mixtures.

    PubMed

    Karnaukhova, Elena; Golding, Basil; Ophir, Yakir

    2007-10-01

    Human alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor(1) (alpha(1)-PI) is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in plasma. Its major function is inhibition of neutrophil elastase in lungs. alpha(1)-PI deficiency may result in severe, ultimately fatal emphysema. Three plasma-derived (pd-) alpha(1)-PI products are licensed in the US for replacement therapy of deficient patients. The recombinant versions (r-alpha(1)-PI), proposed as alternatives to pd-alpha(1)-PI products, have been under intensive investigation. For accurate determination of alpha(1)-PI from different sources and in various forms, there is an obvious need for reliable standardized assays for alpha(1)-PI quantification and potency measurements. As a part of our multi-step research focused on alpha(1)-PI structure-function investigation, we have established a simple and reproducible double-sandwich ELISA based on commercially available polyclonal antibodies. The developed ELISA allows the quantification of both pd-alpha(1)-PI and r-alpha(1)-PI in various complex matrices. A validation of the ELISA was performed with the working range of the assay (3.1-50 ng/ml) established on the bases of the following parameters: linearity (3-100 ng/ml, r(2)=0.995); accuracy (87.3-114.6% recovery); intra-assay precision (%CV, 2.8%); inter-assay plate-to-plate precision (3.9% per day and 4.1% day-to-day); detection limit (1.10 ng/ml); and quantification limit (3.34 ng/ml). The analytical performance of the alpha(1)-PI ELISA indicates that this assay can be used for monitoring concentration levels of alpha(1)-PI in multi-component biological matrices, based on the following: (a) quantification of r-alpha(1)-PI in various fermentation mixtures (E. coli and A. niger); (b) investigation of alpha(1)-PI enzymatically digested in the conditions of harsh fungal proteolysis; (c) evaluation of thermally polymerized alpha(1)-PI; (d) quantification of alpha(1)-PI in human serum; and (e) comparative quantification of alpha(1)-PI in commercially

  1. The use of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists in lower urinary tract symptoms: beyond benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis

    2003-09-01

    The first empirical use of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in urology occurred about 25 years ago in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or LUTS/BPH. Today, many randomized, controlled trials have provided evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in LUTS/BPH, and they are the most frequently used initial treatment option for this cause of LUTS. For many years, alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists have also been used empirically in other types of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD), such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and neurogenic LUTD (NLUTD). Several investigators have shown that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists may be useful in patients with CP/CPPS. This was recently confirmed by a 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study evaluating the efficacy and safety of tamsulosin in 58 CP/CPPS patients. Further well-designed and -powered research into the use of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in patients with CP/CPPS is currently ongoing. Several small-scale predominantly open-label studies have suggested that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists may be of benefit in patients with NLUTD. Data from 2 recent large-scale studies with tamsulosin in patients with NLUTD caused by suprasacral spinal cord injury suggest that long-term tamsulosin treatment improves bladder storage and emptying and also reduces symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia. Tamsulosin has also shown promise in ameliorating (early) storage symptoms and urinary retention associated with transurethral microwave thermotherapy, external-beam radiotherapy, and brachytherapy. In BPH patients presenting with the ultimate form of LUTS-acute urinary retention-treatment with tamsulosin before catheter removal results in a higher success rate of catheter-free voiding. Finally, it seems that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists may reduce the occurrence of urinary retention

  2. The core-specific lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase activity depends on aspartamidohydrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Haeuw, J F; Grard, T; Alonso, C; Strecker, G; Michalski, J C

    1994-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the core-specific rat liver lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase was investigated using mannosylated oligosaccharides and glycoasparagines. Hydrolysis of Man(alpha 1-6) linkage hydrolysis was demonstrated to follow the action of endoglycosidases, namely aspartyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. The results are discussed with respect to the nature of the carbohydrate materials stored in the tissues and excreted in the urine from patients suffering from aspartylglucosaminuria and fucosidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8110182

  3. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  4. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    PubMed

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  5. Cross-talk between integrins {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}2{beta}1 in renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abair, Tristin D.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Chen, Dong; Heino, Jyrki; Ivaska, Johanna; Hudson, Billy G.; Sanders, Charles R.; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy

    2008-11-15

    The collagen-binding integrins {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}2{beta}1 have profoundly different functions, yet they are often co-expressed in epithelial cells. When both integrins are expressed in the same cell, it has been suggested that {alpha}1{beta}1 negatively regulates integrin {alpha}2{beta}1-dependent functions. In this study we utilized murine ureteric bud (UB) epithelial cells, which express no functionally detectable levels of endogenous integrins {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}2{beta}1, to determine the mechanism whereby this regulation occurs. We demonstrate that UB cells expressing integrin {alpha}2{beta}1, but not {alpha}1{beta}1 adhere, migrate and proliferate on collagen I as well as form cellular cords in 3D collagen I gels. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of the integrin {alpha}2 subunit with that of {alpha}1 results in decreased cell adhesion, migration and cord formation. In contrast, substitution of the integrin {alpha}2 cytoplasmic tail with that of {alpha}1, decreases cell migration and cord formation, but increases proliferation. When integrin {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 subunits are co-expressed in UB cells, the {alpha}1 subunit negatively regulates integrin {alpha}2{beta}1-dependent cord formation, adhesion and migration and this inhibition requires expression of both {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 tails. Thus, we provide evidence that the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the {alpha}2 integrin subunit, as well as the {alpha}1 integrin subunit, regulate integrin {alpha}2{beta}1 cell function.

  6. Evidence for an age-dependent functional expression of alpha 1D-adrenoceptors in the rat vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, M; Terrón, J A; López-Guerrero, J J; Villalobos-Molina, R

    1997-03-19

    The role of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, and their possible change with maturation, in alpha 1-adrenoceptor-induced pressor responses in the rat has not been established. Thus, the effects of the alpha 1D-, alpha 1A/1D- and alpha 1B/1D-adrenoceptor antagonists, BMY 7378 (8-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl) 8-azaspiro (4.5) decane-7,9-dione 2HCl), 5-methyl-urapidil and chloroethylclonidine, respectively, on the pressor responses induced by phenylephrine in 1- and 5-month-old pithed rats were investigated. The pressor responses induced by phenylephrine were competitively antagonized by both BMY 7378 and chloroethylclonidine in 5-month-old, but not in young immature animals; in marked contrast, 5-methylurapidil antagonized with similar potency the phenylephrine-induced pressor responses in animals of both ages. The present pharmacological data suggest that functional expression of alpha 1D-adrenoceptors in the rat resistance vessels increases with age; alpha 1A-, but not alpha 1B- or alpha 1D-adrenoceptors, seem to predominate in immature animals. These findings represent the first evidence that age-related changes in functional alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes occur in the systemic vasculature in vivo. PMID:9098690

  7. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretory product pyocyanin inactivates alpha1 protease inhibitor: implications for the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Britigan, B E; Railsback, M A; Cox, C D

    1999-03-01

    Alpha1 Protease inhibitor (alpha1PI) modulates serine protease activity in the lung. Reactive oxygen species inactivate alpha1PI, and this process has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of forms of lung injury. An imbalance of protease-antiprotease activity is also detected in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis-associated lung disease who are infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa secretes pyocyanin, which, through its ability to redox cycle, induces cells to generate reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that redox cycling of pyocyanin could lead to inactivation of alpha1PI. When alpha1PI was exposed to NADH and pyocyanin, a combination that results in superoxide production, alpha1PI lost its ability to form an inhibitory complex with both porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and trypsin. Similarly, addition of pyocyanin to cultures of human airway epithelial cells to which alpha1PI was also added resulted in a loss of the ability of alpha1PI to form a complex with PPE or trypsin. Neither superoxide dismutase, catalase, nor dimethylthiourea nor depletion of the media of O2 to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species blocked pyocyanin-mediated inactivation of alpha1PI. These data raise the possibility that a direct interaction between reduced pyocyanin and alpha1PI is involved in the process. Consistent with this possibility, pretreatment of alpha1PI with the reducing agent beta-mercaptoethanol also inhibited binding of trypsin to alpha1PI. These data suggest that pyocyanin could contribute to lung injury in the P. aeruginosa-infected airway of cystic fibrosis patients by decreasing the ability of alpha1PI to control the local activity of serine proteases. PMID:10024562

  8. Resistance of horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor to perchloric acid denaturation and a simplified purification procedure resulting therefrom.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, A; Hägeli, G; von Fellenberg, R

    1986-11-21

    Addition of perchloric acid (6.4% w/v final concentration) to horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or to horse plasma neither precipitated nor inactivated alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor. None of the isoinhibitors of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was altered by dilute perchloric acid. This unexpected behavior led to a simplified procedure for the purification of horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, consisting of removal of the bulk of plasma proteins, by perchloric acid precipitation and by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and G-200. The resulting preparations of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor were immunogenically pure. The simplified purification procedure permitted the immunochemical comparison of the isoinhibitors of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, which proved to be immunologically identical. PMID:3022814

  9. Alpha1L-adrenoceptors mediate contractions of the isolated mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Gray, Katherine T; Ventura, Sabatino

    2006-07-01

    The subtype of alpha1-adrenoceptor mediating noradrenaline-induced contractile responses in isolated mouse prostate glands was investigated. Adrenoceptor agonists were able to produce concentration-dependent contractions with the following rank order of potency: adrenaline > or = noradrenaline > or = clonidine = phenylephrine > dopamine > or = isoprenaline. Concentration-response curves to noradrenaline of the prostatic smooth muscle were antagonised by prazosin, N-[2-(2-cyclopropylmethoxyphenoxy)ethyl]-5-chloro-alpha, alpha-dimethyl-1H-indole-3-ethanamine (RS-17053), 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101), tamsulosin and yohimbine with mean antagonist affinity estimates (pA2 or apparent pKB) of 8.12+/-0.10, 6.56+/-0.11, 8.38+/-0.06, 10.14+/-0.19 and 7.38+/-1.36 respectively. Propranolol (1 microM) had no antagonist activity (P = 0.994, n = 6). Yohimbine (0.01, 0.1, 1 microM) had no antagonist activity in the presence of prazosin (0.1 microM) (P > or = 0.059). The results obtained indicate that alpha1-adrenoceptors mediate the contractile response in isolated preparations of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, the particular subtype of alpha1-adrenoceptor mediating the response to exogenously administered noradrenaline corresponds to the alpha1L-subtype, the same subtype as that which has been shown to mediate noradrenaline-induced contractile activity in the human prostate. PMID:16716294

  10. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute phase protein in this ...

  11. Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein has immunomodulatory effects in neonatal swine adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is the most abundant protein in serum of neonatal swine. This protein functions as an immunomodulator in the pig. Recent work has demonstrated that adipose tissue can express AGP mRNA, as well as numerous cytokine mRNA. The present study was designed to determine i...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  13. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  14. OZONE EFFECTS ON ALPHA-1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR IN VIVO: BLOOD PLASMA INHIBITORY ACTIVITY IS UNCHANGED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible oxidative inactivation of human blood plasma alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) by inhaled ozone was assessed. Eleven male volunteers (non-smokers) were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for four hours on two consecutive days and ten control subjects were exposed to air under ...

  15. Centaurin-alpha1 and KIF13B kinesin motor protein interaction in ARF6 signalling.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, V

    2005-12-01

    The ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) family of small GTPases regulate intracellular membrane trafficking by cycling between an inactive GDP- and an active GTP-bound form. Among the six known mammalian ARFs (ARF1-ARF6), ARF6 is the least conserved and plays critical roles in membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics near the cell surface. Since ARFs have undetectable levels of intrinsic GTP binding and hydrolysis, they are totally dependent on extrinsic GEFs (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors) for GTP binding and GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for GTP hydrolysis. We have recently isolated a novel KIF (kinesin) motor protein (KIF13B) that binds to centaurin-alpha1, an ARF6GAP that binds to the second messenger PIP3 [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3]. KIFs transport intracellular vesicles and recognize their cargo by binding to proteins (receptors) localized on the surface of the cargo vesicles. Identification of centaurin-alpha1 as a KIF13B interactor suggests that KIF13B may transport ARF6 and/or PIP3 using centaurin-alpha1 as its receptor. This paper reviews the studies carried out to assess the interaction and regulation of centaurin-alpha1 by KIF13B. PMID:16246098

  16. DHPR alpha1S subunit controls skeletal muscle mass and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piétri-Rouxel, France; Gentil, Christel; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Baas, Dominique; Mouisel, Etienne; Ferry, Arnaud; Vignaud, Alban; Hourdé, Christophe; Marty, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis

    2010-02-01

    The alpha1S subunit has a dual function in skeletal muscle: it forms the L-type Ca(2+) channel in T-tubules and is the voltage sensor of excitation-contraction coupling at the level of triads. It has been proposed that L-type Ca(2+) channels might also be voltage-gated sensors linked to transcriptional activity controlling differentiation. By using the U7-exon skipping strategy, we have achieved long-lasting downregulation of alpha1S in adult skeletal muscle. Treated muscles underwent massive atrophy while still displaying significant amounts of alpha1S in the tubular system and being not paralysed. This atrophy implicated the autophagy pathway, which was triggered by neuronal nitric oxide synthase redistribution, activation of FoxO3A, upregulation of autophagy-related genes and autophagosome formation. Subcellular investigations showed that this atrophy was correlated with the disappearance of a minor fraction of alpha1S located throughout the sarcolemma. Our results reveal for the first time that this sarcolemmal fraction could have a role in a signalling pathway determining muscle anabolic or catabolic state and might act as a molecular sensor of muscle activity. PMID:20033060

  17. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor: Binding and phosphoinositide breakdown in human myometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Breuiller-Fouche, M.; Doualla-Bell Kotto Maka, F.; Geny, B.; Ferre, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were examined in both inner and outer layers of human pregnant myometrium using radioligand binding of (3H)prazosin. (3H)prazosin bound rapidly and reversibly to a single class of high affinity binding sites in myometrial membrane preparations. Scatchard analysis gave similar values of equilibrium dissociation constants in both myometrial layers. In contrast, more alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were detected in the outer layer than in the inner layer. Antagonist inhibited (3H)prazosin binding with an order of potency of prazosin greater than phentolamine greater than idazoxan. Competition experiments have also revealed that a stable guanine nucleotide decreases the apparent affinity of norepinephrine for myometrial (3H)prazosin binding sites. The functional status of these alpha-1 adrenergic receptors was also assessed by measuring the norepinephrine-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates in myometrial tissue. Norepinephrine produced a concentration-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates in both myometrial layers. However, norepinephrine-induced increases in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate were only observed in the outer layer. These results indicate that alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in human myometrium at the end of pregnancy are linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and that this response occurs mainly in the outer layer.

  18. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  20. Cervical mucins carry alpha(1,2)fucosylated glycans that partly protect from experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domino, Steven E; Hurd, Elizabeth A; Thomsson, Kristina A; Karnak, David M; Holmén Larsson, Jessica M; Thomsson, Elisabeth; Bäckström, Malin; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2009-12-01

    Cervical mucins are glycosylated proteins that form a protective cervical mucus. To understand the role of mucin glycans in Candida albicans infection, oligosaccharides from mouse cervical mucins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cervical mucins carry multiple alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, but alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase Fut2-null mice are devoid of these epitopes. Epithelial cells in vaginal lavages from Fut2-null mice lacked Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-I) staining for alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans. Hysterectomy to remove cervical mucus eliminated UEA-I and acid mucin staining in vaginal epithelial cells from wild type mice indicating the cervix as the source of UEA-I positive epithelial cells. To assess binding of alpha(1-2) fucosylated glycans on C. albicans infection, an in vitro adhesion assay was performed with vaginal epithelial cells from wild type and Fut2-null mice. Vaginal epithelial cells from Fut2-null mice were found to bind increased numbers of C. albicans compared to vaginal epithelial cells obtained from wild type mice. Hysterectomy lessened the difference between Fut2-null and wild type mice in binding of C. ablicans in vitro and susceptibility to experimental C. albicans vaginitis in vivo. We generated a recombinant fucosylated MUC1 glycanpolymer to test whether the relative protection of wild type mice compared to Fut2-null mice could be mimicked with exogenous mucin. While a small portion of the recombinant MUC1 epitopes displayed alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, the predominant epitopes were sialylated due to endogenous sialyltransferases in the cultured cells. Intravaginal instillation of recombinant MUC1 glycanpolymer partially reduced experimental yeast vaginitis suggesting that a large glycanpolymer, with different glycan epitopes, may affect fungal burden. PMID:19326211

  1. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  2. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  3. Mediation of noradrenaline-induced contractions of rat aorta by the alpha 1B-adrenoceptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Testa, R; Guarneri, L; Poggesi, E; Simonazzi, I; Taddei, C; Leonardi, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The subtypes of alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractions to exogenous noradrenaline (NA) in rat aorta have been examined in both biochemical and functional studies. 2. Incubation of rat aortic membranes with the irreversible alpha 1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, chloroethylclonidine (CEC: 10 microM) did not change the KD of [3H]-prazosin binding in comparison to untreated membranes, but reduced by 88% the total number of binding sites (Bmax). 3. Contractions of rat aortic strips to NA after CEC (50 microM for 30 min) incubation followed by repetitive washing, showed a marked shift in the potency of NA and a partial reduction in the maximum response. The residual contractions to NA after CEC incubation were not affected by prazosin (10 nM). 4. The competitive antagonists prazosin, terazosin, (R)-YM-12617, phentolamine, 5-methylurapidil and spiperone inhibited contractions to NA with estimated pA2 values of 9.85, 8.54, 9.34, 7.71, 7.64 and 8.41, respectively. 5. The affinity of the same antagonists for the alpha 1A- and alpha 1B- adrenoceptors was evaluated by utilizing membranes from rat hippocampus pretreated with CEC, and rat liver, respectively. 5-Methylurapidil and phentolamine were confirmed as selective for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors, whereas spiperone was alpha 1B-selective. 6. A significant correlation was found between the pA2 values of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists tested and their affinity for the alpha 1B-adrenoceptor subtype, but not for the alpha 1A-subtype. 7. In conclusion, these findings indicate that in rat aorta most of the contraction is mediated by alpha 1B-adrenoceptors, and that the potency (pA2) of an antagonist in this tissue should be related to its antagonistic effect on this subtype of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor population. PMID:7773533

  4. A selective alpha1D-adrenoreceptor antagonist inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation and motility "in vitro".

    PubMed

    Colciago, Alessandra; Mornati, Ornella; Ferri, Nicola; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Fumagalli, Laura; Bolchi, Cristiano; Pallavicini, Marco; Valoti, Ermanno; Negri-Cesi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The progression of prostate cancer (PC) to a metastatic hormone refractory disease is the major contributor to the overall cancer mortality in men, mainly because the conventional therapies are generally ineffective at this stage. Thus, other therapeutic options are needed as alternatives or in addition to the classic approaches to prevent or delay tumor progression. Catecholamines participate to the control of prostate cell functions by the activation of alpha1-adrenoreceptors (alpha1-AR) and increased sympathetic activity has been linked to PC development and evolution. Molecular and pharmacological studies identified three alpha1-AR subtypes (A, B and D), which differ in tissue distribution, cell signaling, pharmacology and physiological role. Within the prostate, alpha1A-ARs mainly control stromal cell functions, while alpha1B- and alpha1D- subtypes seem to modulate glandular epithelial cell growth. The possible direct contribution of alpha1D-ARs in tumor biology is supported by their overexpression in PC. The studies here presented investigate the "in vitro" antitumor action of A175, a selective alpha1D-AR antagonist we have recently obtained by modifying the potent, but not subtype-selective alpha1-AR antagonist (S)-WB4101, in the hormone-refractory PC3 and DU145 PC cell lines. The results indicate that A175 has an alpha1D-AR-mediated significant and dose-dependent antiproliferative action that possibly involves the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, but not apoptosis. In addition, A175 reduces cell migration and adhesiveness to culture plates. In conclusion, our work clarified some cellular aspects promoted by alpha1D-AR activity modulation and supports a further pharmacological approach in the cure of hormone-refractory PC, by targeting specifically this AR subtype. PMID:26621245

  5. Activation of two new alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase activities in Chinese hamster ovary cells by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, B; Stanley, P

    1991-01-01

    Several mammalian alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases (alpha[1,3]Fuc-T) that synthesize carbohydrates containing alpha(1,3)fucosylated lactosamine units have been identified. Although Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells do not express alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity, the rare mutants LEC11 and LEC12, isolated after mutagenesis or DNA transfection, each express an alpha(1,3)Fuc-T that may be distinguished by several criteria. Two new CHO mutants possessing alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity (LEC29 and LEC30) have now been isolated after treatment of a CHO cell population with 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), ethylnitrosourea (ENU), or 5-AzaC followed by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Like LEC12, both mutants possess an N-ethylmaleimide-resistant alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity that can utilize a variety of acceptors and both express the Lewis X (Lex) determinant (Gal beta[1,4](Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta 1)) but not the sialyl alpha(2,3)Lex determinant on cell-surface carbohydrates. However, LEC29 and LEC30 may be distinguished from LEC11 and LEC12, as well as from each other, on the basis of their unique patterns of lectin resistance and their abilities to bind the VIM-2 monoclonal antibody that recognizes carbohydrates terminating in NeuNAc alpha(2,3)Gal beta(1,4)GlcNAc beta(1,3)Gal beta(1,4)(Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta and also by the different in vitro substrate specificities and kinetic properties of their respective alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activities. The combined data provide good evidence that the LEC29 and LEC30 alpha(1,3)Fuc-Ts are novel transferases encoded by distinct gene products. PMID:1724918

  6. IgE-tailpiece associates with α-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) to protect IgE from proteolysis without compromising its ability to interact with FcεRI

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Phyllis M.; Dunne, David W.; Moore, Shona C.; Pleass, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Several splice variants of IgE exist in human plasma, including a variant called IgE-tailpiece (IgE-tp) that differs from classical IgE by the replacement of two carboxy-terminal amino acids with eight novel residues that include an ultimate cysteine. To date, the role of the secreted IgE-tp isoform in human immunity is unknown. We show that levels of IgE-tp are raised in helminth-infected donors, and that both the classical form of IgE (IgE-c) and IgE-tp interact with polymers of the serine protease inhibitor alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT). The association of IgE-tp with A1AT polymers in plasma protects the antibody from serine protease-mediated degradation, without affecting the functional interaction of IgE-tp with important receptors, including FcεR1. That polymers of A1AT protect IgE from degradation by helminth proteases may explain why these common and normally non-disease causing polymorphic variants of A1AT have been retained by natural selection. The observation that IgE can be complexed with polymeric forms of A1AT may therefore have important consequences for our understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary diseases that arise either as a consequence of A1AT-deficiency or through IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity responses. PMID:26842628

  7. A role for alpha1 tubulin-expressing Müller glia in regeneration of the injured zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Fausett, Blake V; Goldman, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Alpha1 tubulin (alpha1T) is a neuron-specific microtubule protein whose expression is induced in the developing and regenerating CNS. In the adult CNS, alpha1T expression remains high in neural progenitors. Transgenic zebrafish harboring a 1.7 kb alpha1T promoter fragment along with the first exon and intron express the transgene in a manner that recapitulates expression of the endogenous gene. We recently showed that this promoter mediates gene induction in retinal ganglion cells during optic nerve regeneration and in a subset of Müller glia that proliferate after retinal injury (Senut et al., 2004). To further characterize these Müller glia, we generated transgenic fish harboring an alpha1T promoter fragment that is specifically induced in these cells after retinal damage. Transgene expression, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling, and stem cell marker expression suggested that alpha1T-expressing Müller glia dedifferentiate and become multipotent in response to injury. In addition, green fluorescent protein and BrdU-mediated lineage tracing combined with retinal gene expression analysis indicated that alpha1T-expressing Müller glia were capable of generating retinal neurons and glia. These data strongly suggest alpha1T-expressing Müller glia dedifferentiate and mediate regeneration of the injured zebrafish retina. PMID:16763038

  8. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  9. Autophagy master regulator TFEB induces clearance of toxic SERPINA1/α-1-antitrypsin polymers

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Nunzia; Ballabio, Andrea; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of SERPINA1/AAT [serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A (α-1 antiproteinase, antitrypsin), member 1/α 1-antitrypsin] results in polymerization and aggregation of mutant SERPINA1 molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes, triggering liver injury. SERPINA1 deficiency is the most common genetic cause of hepatic disease in children and is frequently responsible for chronic liver disease in adults. Liver transplantation is currently the only available treatment for the severe form of the disease. We found that liver-directed gene transfer of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis, results in marked reduction of toxic mutant SERPINA1 polymer, apoptosis and fibrosis in the liver of a mouse model of SERPINA1 deficiency. TFEB-mediated correction of hepatic disease is dependent upon increased degradation of SERPINA1 polymer in autolysosomes and decreased expression of SERPINA1 monomer. In conclusion, TFEB gene transfer is a novel strategy for treatment of liver disease in SERPINA1 deficiency. Moreover, this study suggests that TFEB-mediated cellular clearance may have broad applications for therapy of human disorders due to intracellular accumulation of toxic proteins. PMID:23584152

  10. Assembly of bioactive multilayered nanocoatings on pancreatic islet cells: incorporation of α1-antitrypsin into the coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Singh, Jashandeep; Austin, Amazon L F; Hope, David C D; King, Aileen J; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M

    2015-07-01

    A spontaneous multilayer deposition approach for presenting therapeutic proteins onto pancreatic islet surfaces, using a heparin polyaldehyde and glycol chitosan alternating layering scheme, has been developed to enable the nanoscale engineering of a microenvironment for transplanted cells. The nanocoating incorporating α1-antitrypsin, an anti-inflammatory protein, exhibited effective anti-coagulant activities in vitro. PMID:26051448

  11. Isoforms of alpha1E voltage-gated calcium channels in rat cerebellar granule cells--detection of major calcium channel alpha1-transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schramm, M; Vajna, R; Pereverzev, A; Tottene, A; Klöckner, U; Pietrobon, D; Hescheler, J; Schneider, T

    1999-01-01

    In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells, transcripts of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels have been amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and identified by sequencing of subcloned polymerase chain reaction products. In these neurons cultured for six to eight days in vitro, fragments of the three major transcripts alpha1C, alpha1A, and alpha1E are detected using degenerated oligonucleotide primer pairs under highly stringent conditions. Whole-cell Ca2+ current recordings from six to eight days in vitro granule cells show that most of the current is due to L-type (25%), P-type (33%) and R-type (30%) Ca2+ channels. These data support the correlation between alpha1A and P-type Ca2+ channels (G1) and between alpha1E and R-type channels (G2 and G3). By including specific primer pairs for alpha1E the complimentary DNA fragments of indicative regions of alpha1E isoforms are amplified corresponding to the three most variable regions of alpha1E, the 5'-end, the II/III-loop, and the central part of the 3'-end. Although the complementary DNA fragments of the 5'-end of rat alpha1E yield a uniform reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction product, its structure is unusual in the sense that it is longer than in the cloned rat alpha1E complementary DNA. It corresponds to the alpha1E isoform reported for mouse and human brain and is also expressed in cerebellum and cerebrum of rat brain as the major or maybe even the only variant of alpha1E. While fragments of a new rat alpha1E isoform are amplified from the 5'-end, three known fragments of the II/III-loop and two known isoforms homologue to the 3'-coding region are detected, which in the last case are discriminated by a 129 base pair insertion. The shift of the alpha1E expression from a pattern seen in cerebellum (alpha1Ee) to a pattern identified in other regions of the brain (alpha1E-3) is discussed. These data show that: (i) alpha1E is expressed in rat brain as a structural homologue to the

  12. Relationship between alpha-1 receptors and cations in rat liver plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of cations on binding of (/sup 3/H)-prazosin (PRZ), an alpha-1 specific antagonist, to alpha receptor sites in rat liver plasma membranes was examined. All cations tested were able to produce dose-dependent shifts to lower affinity binding sites for PRZ. The maximum number of binding sites was also observed to be altered. Inclusion of cations resulted in a slower observed rate constant for association as well as a delay in the dissociation of specifically bound PRZ following the addition of phentolamine. In contrast, the ability of (-)-norepinephrine to displace PRZ was enhanced by the addition of cations. The influence of alpha-1 receptor stimulation on Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity in rat liver was examined by two methods - rat liver plasma membrane Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity following liver perfusion in situ and /sup 86/Tb uptake in rat liver slices. The activity of the Na/sup +/ pump was found to be biphasic following exposure to phenylephrine (PE), an alpha-1 agonist. Stimulation (35%) was present over the first two minutes, while activity was inhibited over the interval of 5 to 10 minutes of continued PE exposure. Both phases were blocked by prazosin. The influence of DAG and protein kinase C (PKC) in alpha-1 receptor modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump was studied by employing 4-beta-phorbol (PMA), a phorbol ester which activates PKC. Perfusion of livers with PMA in situ or incubation with slices yielded inhibition of ATPase activity in membranes and /sup 86/Rb uptake in that was qualitatively and quantitatively similar to PE. These results suggest cations may influence receptor function in vivo and in vitro and the inhibitory effects of PE on the sodium pump may be mediated through PKC.

  13. Direct and remote modulation of L-channels in chromaffin cells: distinct actions on alpha1C and alpha1D subunits?

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Pietro; Hernández-Guijo, Jesus Miguel; Carabelli, Valentina; Novara, Monica; Cesetti, Tiziana; Andrés-Mateos, Eva; Montiel, Carmen; Carbone, Emilio

    2004-02-01

    Understanding precisely the functioning of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and their modulation by signaling molecules will help clarifying the Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms controlling exocytosis in chromaffin cells. In recent years, we have learned more about the various pathways through which Ca2+ channels can be up- or down-modulated by hormones and neurotransmitters and how these changes may condition chromaffin cell activity and catecolamine release. Recently, the attention has been focused on the modulation of L-channels (CaV 1), which represent the major Ca2+ current component in rat and human chromaffin cells. L-channels are effectively inhibited by the released content of secretory granules or by applying mixtures of exogenous ATP, opioids, and adrenaline through the activation of receptor-coupled G proteins. This unusual inhibition persists in a wide range of potentials and results from a direct (membrane-delimited) interaction of G protein subunits with the L-channels co-localized in membrane microareas. Inhibition of L-channels can be reversed when the cAMP/PKA pathway is activated by membrane permeable cAMP analog or when cells are exposed to isoprenaline (remote action), suggesting the existence of parallel and opposite effects on L-channel gating by distinctly activated membrane autoreceptors. Here, the authors review the molecular components underlying these two opposing signaling pathways and present new evidence supporting the presence of two L-channel types in rat chromaffin cells (alpha1C and alpha1D), which open new interesting issues concerning Ca(2+)-channel modulation. In light of recent findings on the regulation of exocytosis by Ca(2+)-channel modulation, the authors explore the possible role of L-channels in the autocontrol of catecholamine release. PMID:15034224

  14. Alternative splicing for the alpha1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, D; Taylor, J F; Hoffmann, J W; Carnaghi, L; Giddings, S J; Zakeri, H; Kwok, P Y

    2000-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the receptor for nitric oxide, is a heterodimer consisting of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated the mRNA species for the alpha(1) subunit in human brain, heart, artery and immortalized B-lymphocytes. Three mRNA species were identified in these tissues. The major mRNA species contained the full expression sequence of the alpha(1) subunit. Two other types of mRNA were detected in which 5' sequences were deleted by splicing (506-590 and 412-590). Each of these deletions included the predicted translation start site, indicating that translation of these two alternatively spliced RNA species does not result in the production of full-length alpha(1) subunits. The relative amounts of the two mRNA species with deletions of the translation start site differed significantly between cell lines of immortalized B-lymphocytes from different individuals. sGC enzymic activity was significantly decreased in cellular extracts from cell lines with high proportions of mRNA species containing the deletion 506-590 when compared with extracts from cell lines that contained mostly mRNA without this deletion. PMID:10698711

  15. The stereospecificity of LY253352 for alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites in the brain and prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1988-01-01

    1. The stereospecificity of the enantiomers of LY253352, a potent and selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, were studied in the human prostate and canine brain using radioligand receptor binding methods. 2. The mean equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the canine brain and human prostatic adenoma was 84.4 pM and 65.4 pM, respectively. 3. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor density in the canine brain was approximately eight fold greater than in the human prostatic adenoma. 4. The mean Ki values of (-)-LY253352 and (+)-LY253352 in the prostate were 0.19 nM and 5.79 nM, respectively. 5. The mean Ki values of (-)-LY253352 and (+)-LY253352 in the brain were 0.29 nM and 34.7 nM, respectively. 6. This study indicates that the stereochemical specificity of the optical isomers of LY253352 is a manifestation of differential affinities of the enantiomers for alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites. 7. The differential affinities of (+)-LY253352 in the brain and prostate are suggestive of subtle unique properties of adrenoceptor binding sites in these tissues. PMID:2851347

  16. A comparison of the antagonistic activities of tamsulosin and terazosin against human vascular alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Ohmori, M; Kitoh, Y; Sugimoto, K; Fujimura, A

    1999-07-01

    Tamsulosin, a selective alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist, and terazosin, a non-selective one, are effective for the treatment of urinary disturbance due to benign prostatic hypertrophy. In the present study, their alpha1-adrenoceptor-blocking effects on blood vessels, which may cause orthostatic hypotension, were investigated in 10 healthy males. After the subjects took orally 0.2 mg of tamsulosin, 1 mg of terazosin or a lactate capsule as the control in a randomized cross-over fashion, their finger tip vasoconstrictor response to cold stimulation and vasoconstrictor response of the dorsal hand vein to increasing doses of phenylephrine were examined. The finger tip vasoconstrictor response was significantly reduced and the infusion rate of phenylephrine producing a half-maximal constriction was significantly increased by terazosin, but tamsulosin had no significant effect on these parameters. These data suggest that the usual dose of tamsulosin exerts little alpha1-adrenoceptor-blocking activity on blood vessels, and orthostatic episodes might be mild, if any, during the treatment with tamsulosin. PMID:10461765

  17. Mannosidase 2, alpha 1 deficiency is associated with ricin resistance in embryonic stem (ES) cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hale, Christine; Goulding, Dave; Haslam, Stuart M; Tissot, Bérangère; Lindsay, Christopher; Michell, Stephen; Titball, Rick; Yu, Jun; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Rossi, Raffaella; Dell, Anne; Bradley, Allan; Dougan, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Host gene products required for mediating the action of toxins are potential targets for reversing or controlling their pathogenic impact following exposure. To identify such targets libraries of insertional gene-trap mutations generated with a PiggyBac transposon in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells were exposed to the plant toxin, ricin. Resistant clones were isolated and genetically characterised and one was found to be a homozygous mutant of the mannosidase 2, alpha 1 (Man2α1) locus with a matching defect in the homologous allele. The causality of the molecular lesion was confirmed by removal of the transposon following expression of PB-transposase. Comparative glycomic and lectin binding analysis of the Man2α1 (-/-) ricin resistant cells revealed an increase in the levels of hybrid glycan structures and a reduction in terminal β-galactose moieties, potential target receptors for ricin. Furthermore, naïve ES cells treated with inhibitors of the N-linked glycosylation pathway at the mannosidase 2, alpha 1 step exhibited either full or partial resistance to ricin. Therefore, we conclusively identified mannosidase 2, alpha 1 deficiency to be associated with ricin resistance. PMID:21886775

  18. Modulatory role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Gisbert, Regina; Noguera, Maria Antonia; Ivorra, Maria Dolores; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-02-01

    A constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in iliac and proximal, distal, and small mesenteric rat arteries was studied. The increase in resting tone (IRT) that evidences it was observed only in iliac and proximal mesenteric and was inhibited by prazosin (pIC(50) = 9.57), 5-methylurapidil (pIC(50) = 7.61), and BMY 7378 (pIC(50) = 8.77). Chloroethylchlonidine (100 micromol/l) did not affect IRT, but when added before the other antagonists it blocked their effect. The potency shown by BMY 7378 confirms the alpha(1D)-subtype as responsible for IRT. BMY 7378 displayed greater inhibition of adrenergic responses in iliac (pIC(50) = 7.57 +/- 0.11) and proximal mesenteric arteries (pIC(50) = 8.05 +/- 0.2) than in distal (pIC(50) = 6.94 +/- 0.13) or small mesenteric arteries (pIC(50) = 6.30 +/- 0.14), which confirms the functional role of the alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor in iliac and proximal mesenteric arteries. This subtype prevents abrupt changes in iliac and proximal mesenteric artery caliber when the agonist disappears, and this modulatory role is evidenced by the slower decay in the response to norepinephrine after removal. PMID:11788394

  19. Modification of certain pharmacological effects of ethanol by lipophilic alpha-1 adrenergic agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.K.; Dinovo, E.C.; Haddox, V.G.

    1987-09-28

    The influence of four centrally-acting alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, namely, 2(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethylphenylimino) imidazolidine (St 587), cirazoline, (-) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-8-methoxy-5-methylthio-2-naphthalenamine ((-)SKF 89748A) and 2-(2-methylindazol-4-imino)imidazolidine (Sgd 101/75) on the pharmacological effects of ethanol was investigated. All four drugs reduced the duration of ethanol-induced hypnosis in C57B1/6 mice, this effect being proportional to their relative potencies to exert central alpha-1 agonism. In prazosin-pretreated mice, St 587 failed to reduce the hypnotic effect of ethanol, which provided strong evidence for the role of alpha-1 agonism for the hypnosis reducing effect of St 587. Hyperactivity induced in C57B1/6 mice by a subhypnotic dose of ethanol and St 587 was reported earlier. In the present study, St 587, cirazoline and (-)SKF 89748A produced similar response, but no correlation between this effect and ethanol hypnosis blockade could be established. 19 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Issues in pharmaceutical development of thymosin alpha1 from preclinical studies through marketing.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Cynthia

    2007-09-01

    SciClone Pharmaceuticals licensed the commercial and patent rights to thymosin alpha1, for geographical regions of the world excluding the United States and Europe, in the early 1990s. With this license, SciClone embarked on global drug development, and the issues encountered for thymosin alpha1 are reflective of the roller coaster of modern approval of pharmaceuticals. Most of the required toxicology studies had been completed prior to licensure, but some newer studies had to be conducted to obtain approvals in certain countries. The recent development of the "International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use" (ICH) guidelines allows for a clearer definition of the required battery of toxicology studies, although some countries still have not adopted these guidelines, and the local regulations have had to be understood and followed. Other hurdles include the complications that manufacturing requirements can differ between countries, and certain countries require local clinical experience trials in addition to SciClone's cumulative clinical data. A further obstacle was the pleiotropic nature of the mechanism of action of thymosin alpha1, with the resulting difficulty in the unraveling of its pharmacologic effects. With close attention to these regulatory details, SciClone has obtained approvals in more than 30 countries and has successfully begun commercial sales. PMID:17947591

  1. Effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade on myocardial blood flow during exercise after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Herzog, C A; Dai, X Z; Bache, R J

    1991-08-01

    The effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin on myocardial blood flow at rest and during two levels of treadmill exercise was assessed in 16 chronically instrumented dogs 9-14 days after myocardial infarction had been produced by occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. During resting conditions prazosin did not alter mean myocardial blood flow or the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in either normally perfused or collateral-dependent myocardium. However, during exercise at comparable external work loads and comparable rate-pressure products, prazosin significantly increased blood flow to normally perfused (27% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) and collateral-dependent myocardium (35% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) compared with control. In addition, prazosin caused a small but significant decrease in the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in both normal (1.27 +/- 0.04 to 1.19 +/- 0.04; P less than 0.01) and collateral-dependent myocardium (0.57 +/- 0.11 to 0.52 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01) compared with control, reflecting a disproportionally greater increase in subepicardial flow in response to alpha 1-adrenergic blockade. These data demonstrate that alpha 1-adrenergic vasoconstriction inhibits coronary vasodilation during exercise, even in areas of collateral-dependent myocardium relatively early after coronary artery occlusion. PMID:1678929

  2. Centaurin-alpha 1, an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 GTPase activating protein, inhibits beta 2-adrenoceptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Joanna; Mundell, Stuart J; Yun, Hongruo; Kelly, Eamonn; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi

    2005-06-01

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) has recently been implicated in the internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. We have recently identified centaurin alpha(1) as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for ARF6. In the current study, we characterized the effects of centaurin alpha(1) on the agonist-induced internalization of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as confocal imaging of cells, we found that expression of centaurin alpha(1) strongly inhibited the isoproterenol-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor. On the other hand, expression of functionally inactive versions of centaurin alpha(1), including an R49C mutant, which has no catalytic activity, and a double pleckstrin homology (PH) mutant (DM; R148C/R273C), which has mutations in both the PH domains of centaurin alpha(1), rendering it unable to translocate to the cell membrane, were unable to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. In addition, a constitutively active version of ARF6, ARF6Q67L, reversed the ability of centaurin alpha(1) to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Finally, expression of centaurin alpha(1) also inhibited the agonist-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor endogenously expressed in HEK 293 cells, whereas the R49C and DM mutant versions of centaurin alpha(1) had no effect. Together, these data indicate that by acting as an ARF6 GAP, centaurin alpha(1) is able to switch off ARF6 and so inhibit its ability to mediate beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Thus, ARF6 GAPs, such as centaurin alpha(1), are likely to play a crucial role in GPCR trafficking by modulating the activity of ARF6. PMID:15778454

  3. Pharmacological analysis of the novel, selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, KMD-3213, and its suitability as a tritiated radioligand.

    PubMed

    Murata, S; Taniguchi, T; Muramatsu, I

    1999-05-01

    Pharmacological profiles of tritiated KMD-3213, a new antagonist of alpha1-adrenoceptor (AR), were examined in recombinant and native alpha1-AR, and compared with those of prazosin (PZ) and tamsulosin (YM-617). In saturation experiments, [3H]-KMD (10-2000 pM) showed high affinity for alpha1a-AR (pK(D) = 10.5). However, no significant binding to alpha1b-AR and insufficient/unsaturated binding to alpha1d-AR were observed at concentrations up to 2000 pM. In contrast, [3H]-PZ and [3H]-YM bound to all subtypes with high affinity (pK(D)>9). In competition experiments, KMD-3213 also had higher affinity for alpha1a-AR than for other two subtypes; pKi = 10.4, 8.1 and 8.6 for alpha1a-, alpha1b- and alpha1d-AR, respectively. [3H]-KMD also bound to the native alpha1A-AR (rat submaxillary gland) with high affinity, but not to alpha1B-AR (rat liver). In rat kidney which expresses alpha1A- and alpha1B-AR, [3H]-KMD and [3H]-PZ bound to a single high-affinity site (pK(D) = 10.8 and 10.1, respectively) with distinct amount of binding sites (Bmax = 159 and 267 fmol mg(-1) protein, respectively). [3H]-PZ binding sites consisted of low- and high-affinity sites for KMD-3213 (pKi = 7.6 and 10.7, respectively), for WB4101 (pK = 8.1 and 10.0) and for YM-617 (pKi = 8.7 and 10.8). The proportion of the high affinity site was approximately 60% in these drugs which was compatible to the ratio between Bmax of [3H]-KMD and [3H]-PZ. [3H]-KMD binding sites consisted of a single site for these drugs with affinities which were similar to those of the high affinity sites in [3H]-PZ binding. In functional experiments, KMD-3213 antagonized the contractile responses to NS-49 or noradrenaline (NA) with higher affinity in functional alpha1A- (rat caudal artery, pA2= 10.0 against NS-49) and alpha1L-AR (dog mesenteric artery, pA2 = 9.9 against NA) than in alpha1B- (dog carotid artery, pA2 = 7.7 against NA) and alpha1D-AR (rat thoracic aorta, pA2 = 8.3 against NA). These results confirm the alpha1A

  4. Analysis of the activity of alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study, the effect of seven alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists (tamsulosin, phentolamine, prazosin, WB-4101, 5-methylurapidil, spiperone and HV723) have been examined on the contractile response to noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (PE) in rat isolated aorta. 2. NA and PE, when administered using a cumulative dosing schedule, both produced concentration-dependent contraction of aortic rings. It was possible to fit the individual concentration-effect (E/[A]) curve data to the Hill equation to provide estimates of the curve midpoint location (p[A]50 = 7.74 +/- 0.10 and 7.14 +/- 0.18), midpoint slope (nH = 0.82 +/- 0.03 and 0.99 +/- 0.10) and upper asymptote (alpha = 3.2 +/- 0.3 and 3.1 +/- 0.2 g) parameters for NA and PE, respectively. However, the Hill equation provided a better fit to the E/[A] curve data obtained with another contractile agent, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (p[A50] = 6.09 +/- 0.08, nH = 1.49 +/- 0.09, alpha = 2.6 +/- 0.3 g), as judged by calculation of the mean sum of squares of the differences between the observed and predicted values. 3. All of the antagonists investigated produced concentration-dependent inhibition of the contractile responses of the aorta to NA and PE. Although no significant effects on the upper asymptotes of the E/[A] curves of any of the antagonists tested were detected, only tamsulosin and 5-methylurapidil did not have a significant effect on the slope (nH) of the NA and PE E/[A] curves. The other antagonists produced significant steepening of the curves obtained with NA and/or PE. 4. Notwithstanding the fact that one of the basic criteria for simple competitive antagonism at a single receptor class was not always satisfied, the individual log [A]50 values estimated in the absence and presence of antagonist within each experiment were fitted to the competitive model. The Schild plot slope parameters for the antagonism of NA and PE by phentolamine and HV723 were found to be significantly less than unity. The Schild

  5. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  6. Purification and properties of endo-alpha-1,3-glucanase from a Streptomyces chartreusis strain.

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, T; Inoue, M; Morioka, T; Yokogawa, K

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme hydrolyzing the water-insoluble glucans produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans was purified from the culture concentrate of Streptomyces chartreusis strain F2 by ion-exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose columns and gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-1.5m. The purification achieved was 6.4-fold, with an overall yield of 27.3%. Electrophoresis of the purified enzyme protein gave a single band on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel slab. Its molecular weight was estimated to be approximately 68,000, but there is a possibility that the native enzyme exists in an aggregated form or is an oligomer of the peptide subunits, have a molecular weight larger than 300,000. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.5 to 6.0, and its temperature optimum was 55 degrees C. The enzyme lost activity on heating at 65 degrees C for 10 min. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the presence of 1 mM Mn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+, or Merthiolate. The Km value for the water-insoluble glucan of S. mutans OMZ176 was an amount of glucan equivalent to 1.54 mM glucose, i.e., 0.89 mM in terms of the alpha-1,3-linked glucose residue. The purified enzyme was specific for glucans containing an alpha-1,3-glucosidic linkage as the major bond. The enzyme hydrolyzed the S. mutans water-insoluble glucans endolytically, and the products were oligosaccharides. These results indicate that the enzyme elaborated by S. chartreusis strain F2 is an endo-alpha-1,3-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.59). Images PMID:7462159

  7. Selective action of two aporphines at alpha 1-adrenoceptors and potential-operated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, M D; Chuliá, S; Lugnier, C; D'Ocon, M P

    1993-02-01

    Contractions evoked by noradrenaline (1 microM) or a depolarizing solution of 60 mM KCl were concentration dependently depressed by the aporphine alkaloids (S)-boldine and (R)-apomorphine in rat aorta. Both drugs had a greater inhibitory potency on the contraction elicited by noradrenaline. Dose-response curves for noradrenaline were shifted to the right in presence of (S)-boldine. (R)-Apomorphine acted by a complex mechanism at alpha 1-adrenoceptors and its inhibitory effect was irreversible. The conformational features of these alkaloids may explain their different behaviour at alpha 1-adrenoceptors. In Ca(2+)-free solution, the alkaloids inhibited the contraction evoked by noradrenaline but did not modify (apomorphine) or increase (boldine) the contractile response induced by caffeine. Both alkaloids interacted with [3H]prazosin binding and with the benzothiazepine binding site of the Ca2+ entry receptor complex but had no effect at the dihydropyridine binding site in the rat cerebral cortex. Both drugs showed some selectivity as inhibitors of [3H]prazosin binding as opposed to [3H]d-cis diltiazem binding. (R)-Apomorphine slightly inhibited one of the two forms of the Ca(2+)-independent, low Km cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (type IV), whereas it did not have a significant effect on the other phosphodiesterase forms. (S)-Boldine had negligible inhibitory effects on all phosphodiesterase forms. The present study provides evidence that (S)-boldine and (R)-apomorphine have interesting properties as Ca2+ entry blockers (through the benzothiazepine receptor site in the Ca2+ channel) and at alpha 1-adrenoceptors. PMID:8384112

  8. Integrins alpha1beta1 and alpha2beta1 are receptors for the rotavirus enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Neung-Seon; Zeng, Carl Q-Y; Hyser, Joseph M; Utama, Budi; Crawford, Sue E; Kim, Kate J; Höök, Magnus; Estes, Mary K

    2008-07-01

    Rotavirus NSP4 is a viral enterotoxin capable of causing diarrhea in neonatal mice. This process is initiated by the binding of extracellular NSP4 to target molecule(s) on the cell surface that triggers a signaling cascade leading to diarrhea. We now report that the integrins alpha1beta1 and alpha2beta1 are receptors for NSP4. NSP4 specifically binds to the alpha1 and alpha2 I domains with apparent K(d) = 1-2.7 muM. Binding is mediated by the I domain metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif, requires Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), is abolished with EDTA, and an NSP4 point mutant, E(120)A, fails to bind alpha2 integrin I domain. NSP4 has two distinct integrin interaction domains. NSP4 amino acids 114-130 are essential for binding to the I domain, and NSP4 peptide 114-135 blocks binding of the natural ligand, collagen I, to integrin alpha2. NSP4 amino acids 131-140 are not associated with the initial binding to the I domain, but elicit signaling that leads to the spreading of attached C2C12-alpha2 cells, mouse myoblast cells stably expressing the human alpha2 integrin. NSP4 colocalizes with integrin alpha2 on the basolateral surface of rotavirus-infected polarized intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells as well as surrounding noninfected cells. NSP4 mutants that fail to bind or signal through integrin alpha2 were attenuated in diarrhea induction in neonatal mice. These results indicate that NSP4 interaction with integrin alpha1 and alpha2 is an important component of enterotoxin function and rotavirus pathogenesis, further distinguishing this viral virulence factor from other microbial enterotoxins. PMID:18587047

  9. (/sup 125/Iodo)BE 2254, a new radioligand for alpha 1-adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, G.; Hoyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    (/sup 125/cIodo)2-(beta-(14-hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-aminomethyl)-tetralone((/sup 125/Iodo)BE 2254 or IBE 2254), a new iodinated radioligand of high specific radioactivity (2175 Ci/mmol), was synthesized and used to characterize alpha 1-adrenoceptors in rat lung and cerebral cortex membranes. The binding constants of IBE 2254, using rat lung and cortex membranes, were Kd . 53 +/- 10 pM, Bmax . 53 +/- 8 fmol/mg; and Kd . 78 +/- 14 pM, Bmas . 210 +/- 26 fmol/mg, respectively (Kd . dissociation constant of IBE 2254 determined in saturation experiments). In equilibrium binding experiments with IBE 2254, at concentrations of the free ligand up to 1.2 nM, only one class of binding sites could be detected. In kinetic experiments, the association and dissociation rate constants were 2.3 X 10(9) M-1 min-1 and 0.10 min-1, respectively. In rat cerebral cortex membranes, alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists competed for IBE 2254 binding in the following order: prazosin greater than BE 2254 greater than WB 4101 greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than rauwolscine, indicating strongly that IBE 2254 binds to alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The calculated affinities of different alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agents from inhibition of IBE 2254 binding were nearly identical in rat lung and cerebral cortex. The low dissociation constant of the ligand together with its high specific radioactivity allows binding studies to be carried out with tissue samples where only small densities of alpha 1-adrenoceptors are present.

  10. Complications of cataract surgery in patients with BPH treated with alpha 1A-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylegala, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract increases with age. Both diseases may develop concomitantly and may affect almost 50% of elderly men as comorbidities. Cataract is treated surgically and it has been reported that there may be an association between use of alpha-blockers for BPH, particularly alpha1A-adrenergic receptor selective drugs, and complications of cataract surgery known as Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS). The article reviews literature published on this topic and provides recommendations on how to reduce incidence of iatrogenic IFIS or its severity and outcomes in patients with BPH. PMID:24578865

  11. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the neutrophil promoted inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effect of some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (aspirin, naproxen and nimesulide) on the ability of neutrophils to oxidatively inactivate the alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Nimesulide prevented the inactivation of A1PI by effectively scavenging the hypochlorous acid released by neutrophils. Aspirin and naproxen were completely ineffective. We suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of nimesulide may be due at least in part to the rescue of A1PI from neutrophil oxidative attack. The rescue of A1PI may in fact alter the elastase-A1PI balance in favor of the inhibitor, with resulting tissue protection. PMID:1578457

  12. Targeted gene correction of α1-antitrypsin deficiency in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kosuke; Rashid, S. Tamir; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Varela, Ignacio; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Miranda, Elena; Ordóñez, Adriana; Hannan, Nick; Rouhani, Foad Jafari; Darche, Sylvie; Alexander, Graeme; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Fusaki, Noemi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Holmes, Michael C.; Di Santo, James P.; Lomas, David A.; Bradley, Allan; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) represent a unique opportunity for regenerative medicine since they offer the prospect of generating unlimited quantities of cells for autologous transplantation as a novel treatment for a broad range of disorders1,2,3,4. However, the use of hIPSCs in the context of genetically inherited human disease will require correction of disease-causing mutations in a manner that is fully compatible with clinical applications3,5. The methods currently available, such as homologous recombination, lack the necessary efficiency and also leave residual sequences in the targeted genome6. Therefore, the development of new approaches to edit the mammalian genome is a prerequisite to delivering the clinical promise of hIPSCs. Here, we show that a combination of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs)7 and piggyBac8,9 technology in hIPSCs can achieve bi-allelic correction of a point mutation (Glu342Lys) in the α1-antitrypsin (A1AT, also called SERPINA1) gene that is responsible for α1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD). Genetic correction of hIPSCs restored the structure and function of A1AT in subsequently derived liver cells in vitro and in vivo. This approach is significantly more efficient than any other gene targeting technology that is currently available and crucially prevents contamination of the host genome with residual non-human sequences. Our results provide the first proof of principle for the potential of combining hIPSCs with genetic correction to generate clinically relevant cells for autologous cell-based therapies. PMID:21993621

  13. Unusual Acute Sequelae of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Myriad of Symptoms With One Common Cure.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Alessandro N; McCarthy, Cormac; Carroll, Tomas P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-11-01

    Panniculitis associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is well documented but rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of successful induction of clinical remission of AATD-related panniculitis following a single 120-mg/kg dose administration of plasma-purified α1-antitrypsin (AAT). A 23-year-old man with known PiZZ AATD presented to the hospital with a diffusely swollen and tender right upper limb. This was associated with subcutaneous induration, and a discrepancy of 5 cm in upper limb circumference at the mid arm was noted. There was no convincing precipitant for cellulitis or an infectious cause, and inflammatory markers were raised, with a C-reactive protein (CRP) level of 93.9 mg/L and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 71 mm/h. Doppler ultrasonography ruled out DVT. No antimicrobials or antiinflammatory medications were administered during or prior to admission. Biopsy specimens of the right upper limb revealed extensive panniculitis with neutrophils, foamy macrophages, and fat necrosis. A diagnosis of AATD-associated panniculitis was made. Following this, a single IV dose of 120 mg/kg of plasma-purified AAT was administered. By day 7 post AAT infusion, CRP level had normalized to 4.6 mg/L and ESR had dropped to 22 mm/h. Limb circumference discrepancy on day 7 was 1 cm. There was no tenderness to palpation or induration, and a clinical remission of panniculitis was observed. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of clinical remission following a single treatment with IV AAT at a dose of 120 mg/kg. This opens avenues to more timely and effective treatment of the more severe presentations of AAT-associated panniculitis. PMID:26527439

  14. Method of using alpha-1 acid glycoprotein on T-cells as a marker for alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fudenberg, H.H.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described of diagnosing a dementia of the Alzheimer's type characterized by a change in the percentage of T-cells bearing surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein which comprises providing T-cells from a subject, determining the percentage of those T cells which bear surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, and comparing that percentage of the percentage of T cells which bear the glycoprotein in a control, whereby the dementia is diagnosed.

  15. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and the adrenergic receptors alpha 1C and alpha 2C.

    PubMed

    Barr, C L; Wigg, K; Zai, G; Roberts, W; Malone, M; Schachar, R; Tannock, R; Kennedy, J L

    2001-05-01

    The adrenergic system has been hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) based on pharmacological interventions and animal models. Noradrenergic neurons are implicated in the modulation of vigilance, improvement of visual attention, initiation of adaptive response, learning and memory. In this study we tested the genes for two adrenergic receptors, alpha 1C (ADRA1C) located on chromosome 8p11.2, and alpha 2C (ADRA2C) located on chromosome 4p16, as genetic susceptibility factors in ADHD. For the adrenergic receptor alpha 1C we used a C to T polymorphism that results in a change of Cys to Arg at codon 492 for the linkage study. For the adrenergic receptor alpha 2C gene we examined a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism located approximately 6 kb from the gene. We examined these polymorphisms in a sample of 103 families ascertained through an ADHD proband. Using the transmission disequilibrium test, we did not observe biased transmission of any of the alleles of these polymorphisms. We conclude that the alleles at the polymorphisms tested in these two genes are not linked to the ADHD phenotype in this sample of families. PMID:11326305

  16. Functional analysis of {alpha}1,3/4-fucosyltransferase VI in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qiya; Guo, Bin; Wang, Yingming; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Wenjun; Zhao, Shenan; Qiao, Shouyi; Wu, Yanhua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human FUT6 is up-regulated in HCC tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of FUT6 promotes G0/G1-S transition and cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FUT6 confers a growth advantage in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FUT6 suppresses p21 expression through modulating PI3K/Akt signaling. -- Abstract: The {alpha}1,3/4-fucosyltransferases (FUT) subfamily are key enzymes in cell surface antigen synthesis during various biological processes. A novel role of FUTs in tumorigenesis has been discovered recently, however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we characterized FUT6, a member of {alpha}1,3/4-FUT subfamily, in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In HCC tissues, the expression levels of FUT6 and its catalytic product SLe{sup x} were significantly up-regulated. Overexpression of FUT6 in HCC cells enhanced S-phase cell population, promoted cell growth and colony formation ability. Moreover, subcutaneously injection of FUT6-overexpressing cells in nude mice promoted cell growth in vivo. In addition, elevating FUT6 expression markedly induced intracellular Akt phosphorylation, and suppressed the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor p21. Bath application of the PI3K inhibitor blocked FUT6-induced Akt phosphorylation, p21 suppression and cell proliferation. Our results suggest that FUT6 plays an important role in HCC growth by regulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. alpha1-noradrenergic receptor antagonism blocks dependence-induced increases in responding for ethanol.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Rasmussen, Dennis D; Raskind, Murray A; Koob, George F

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blockade of alpha1-adrenergic receptors may suppress the excessive ethanol consumption associated with acute withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats. Following the acquisition and stabilization of operant ethanol self-administration in male Wistar rats, dependence was induced in half the animals by subjecting them to a 4-week intermittent vapor exposure period in which animals were exposed to ethanol vapor for 14h/day. Subsequent to dependence induction, the effect of alpha1-noradrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0mg/kg IP) was tested on operant responding for ethanol in vapor-exposed and control rats during acute withdrawal. In ethanol-dependent animals, prazosin significantly suppressed responding at the 1.5 and 2.0mg/kg doses, whereas only the 2.0mg/kg dose was effective in nondependent animals, identifying an increase in the sensitivity to prazosin in dependent animals. Conversely, at the lowest dose tested (0.25mg/kg), prazosin increased responding in nondependent animals, which is consistent with the effect of anxiolytics on ethanol self-administration in nondependent animals. None of the doses tested reliably affected concurrent water self-administration. These results suggest the involvement of the noradrenergic system in the excessive alcohol drinking seen during acute withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats. PMID:18358987

  18. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking regions of medaka fish soluble guanylate cyclase alpha1 and beta1 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suzuki, Norio

    2002-01-01

    We examined the spatial expression pattern of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) soluble guanylate cyclase alpha(1) and beta(1) subunit genes, OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1), and characterized the 5'-flanking region required for expression of both genes by introducing various promoter-luciferase fusion-gene constructs into COS-1 cells and medaka fish embryos. The OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) gene transcripts were detected in whole brain and kidney in 7-day and 9-day embryos. Primer-extension analysis demonstrated that there were no differences among various adult organs (brain, eye, kidney, ovary and testis) in the transcription start site of the OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) genes. Neither gene contained the functional TATA box within its 5'-flanking region, and the basal promoter activity was found between nucleotides +33 and +42 in the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene and between nucleotides +146 and +155 in the OlGCS-beta(1) gene. In the assay of medaka fish embryos, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene exhibited lower promoter activity than that of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene. In the experiments on dual-luciferase fusion-gene constructs, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene connected to the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene was introduced into medaka fish embryos, and the 5'-flanking regions of both subunit genes were shown to mutually influence each other's promoter activity. PMID:11772405

  19. Identification and characterization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the canine prostate using (/sup 125/I)-Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1987-11-01

    We have recently utilized radioligand receptor binding methods to characterize muscarinic cholinergic and alpha adrenergic receptors in human prostate adenomas. The primary advantages of radioligand receptor binding methods are that neurotransmitter receptor density is quantitated, the affinity of unlabelled drugs for receptor sites is determined, and receptors can be localized using autoradiography on slide-mounted tissue sections. Recently, (/sup 125/I)-Heat, a selective and high affinity ligand with high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmole) has been used to characterize alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the brain. In this study alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the dog prostate were characterized using (/sup 125/I)-Heat. The Scatchard plots were linear indicating homogeneity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding sites. The mean alpha 1 adrenergic receptor density determined from these Scatchard plots was 0.61 +/- 0.07 fmol/mg. wet wt. +/- S.E.M. The binding of (/sup 125/I)-Heat to canine prostate alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was of high affinity (Kd = 86 +/- 19 pM). Steady state conditions were reached following an incubation interval of 30 minutes and specific binding and tissue concentration were linear within the range of tissue concentrations assayed. The specificity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat for alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was confirmed by competitive displacement assays using unlabelled clonidine and prazosin. Retrospective analysis of the saturation experiments demonstrated that Bmax can be accurately calculated by determining specific (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding at a single ligand concentration. (/sup 125/I)-Heat is an ideal ligand for studying alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate and its favorable properties should facilitate the autoradiographic localization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate.

  20. The impact of splice isoforms on voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2004-02-01

    Semi-conserved exon boundaries in members of the CACNA1 gene family result in recurring pre-mRNA splicing patterns. The resulting variations in the encoded pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel affect functionally significant regions, such as the vicinity of the voltage-sensing S4 segments or the intracellular loops that are important for protein interaction. In addition to generating functional diversity, RNA splicing regulates the quantitative expression of other splice isoforms of the same gene by producing transcripts with premature stop codons which encode two-domain or three-domain channels. An overview of some of the known splice isoforms of the alpha(1) calcium channel subunits and their significance is given. PMID:14645450

  1. Alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor is more sensitive to inactivation by cigarette smoke than is leukocyte elastase

    SciTech Connect

    Janoff, A.; Dearing, R.

    1982-10-01

    Aqueous solutions of gas phase cigarette smoke were incubated with pure human leukocyte elastase or with crude human leukocyte granule extract, and the effects on enzyme activity were determined using a synthetic amide substrate. Simultaneously, the same smoke solutions were incubated with 10% human serum under identical conditions, and the effects on serum inhibition of purified or crude leukocyte elastase were similarly measured. In addition, aqueous solutions of unfractionated cigarette smoke were incubated with leukocyte elastase or serum, and the abilities of the smoke-treated enzyme to digest elastin and of the smoke-treated serum to inhibit elastin digestion were determined. Both experimental protocols showed that serum elastase-inhibiting capacity (primarily caused by alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor) is more susceptible to inactivation by aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke than is leukocyte elastase, suggesting that elastase inhibition (rather than elastase activity) may be predominantly suppressed by cigarette smoke inhalation in vivo.

  2. Glucocorticoid-mediated induction of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein: evidence for hormone-regulated RNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Vannice, J L; Taylor, J M; Ringold, G M

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the glucocorticoid-mediated accumulation of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in mRNA in HTC rat hepatoma cells. In contrast to the well-characterized primary response of mouse mammary tumor virus, in vitro transcription assays in isolated nuclei show that the rate of transcription of the AGP gene is high even in the absence of hormone. Despite the constitutive transcription of the AGP gene, no detectable AGP RNA can be found in either the cytoplasm or the nuclei of untreated cells. Previous experiments have shown that the glucocorticoid induction of AGP RNA requires ongoing protein synthesis. In conjunction with the present study, our data suggest that glucocorticoids stimulate accumulation of AGP RNA by inducing an RNA processing factor that allows production of stable transcripts. Images PMID:6205392

  3. Activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase in furazolidone-induced glycogenosis.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, C M; Salam, A; Caldwell, R; Jankus, E F

    1978-01-01

    Furazolidone (FZ) at 700 and 800 p.p.m. was added to feed mixtures fed turkey poults two and three weeks posthatching, respectively, to induce acute experimental cardiomyopathy. Poults in the control pen received the same ration but without FZ. From EKG data obtained at 2, 4, and 5 weeks of age, control unaffected and experimental affected poults were selected for sacrifice. Poults were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and appropriate samples of hepatic tissue were removed for assays of activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase. Results indicate that enzyme activity in affected FZ-treated poults is similar to that in unaffected control poults. Lack of significant differences in activity of this lysosomal enzyme suggests that FZ-induced glycogenosis may be related to the adult form of idiopathic generalized glucogenosis, the etiology of which remains unidentified. PMID:353772

  4. Relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and response in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Taylor, P.

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and the regulation of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin and correlated with agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) coordinately activated Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, reflecting a substantial mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/, as well as a smaller /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. The agonist concentration dependences for influx and efflux were similar, with the order of potency expected for alpha 1 receptors (E greater than or equal to NE greater than PE). To determine the relationship between receptor occupancy and response, the slowly dissociating antagonist prazosin was used to inactivate specified fractions of the receptor population. A linear relationship was observed between the remaining activatable receptors and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux elicited by E or NE, except at saturating agonist concentrations where some curvature was observed. Moreover, the concentration dependence for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was shifted toward slightly higher concentrations of E or NE following prazosin inactivation. These results suggest the presence of a modest receptor reserve which is revealed by E or NE, but not by PE. Agonist occupation was measured over the same interval as receptor activation by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. All three agonists exhibited the major fraction of receptor occupation over the same concentration ranges required for the functional response. Exposure of receptors to specified agonist concentrations for 30 min had little effect on the number of receptors or their ligand affinities, whereas a 2.5-hr exposure to agonist decreased apparent agonist affinity as well as the number of receptors recognized by (/sup 3/H)prazosin.

  5. Isolation and purification of a neutral alpha(1,2)-mannosidase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Fresno, M

    1999-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease in humans. Although a fair amount is known about the biochemistry of certain trypanosomes, very little is known about the enzymic complement of synthesis and processing of glycoproteins and/or functions of the subcellular organelles in this parasite. There have been very few reports on the presence of acid and neutral hydrolases in Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report the first purification and characterization of a neutral mannosidase from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. The neutral mannosidase was purified nearly 800-fold with an 8% recovery to apparent homogeneity from a CHAPS extract of epimastigotes by the following procedures: (1) metal affinity chromatography on Co+2-Sepharose, (2) anion exchange, and (3) hydroxylapatite. The purified enzyme has a native molecular weight of 150-160 kDa and is apparently composed of two subunits of 76 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibits a broad pH profile with a maximum at pH 5.9-6.3. It is inhibited by swainsonine (Ki, 0.1 microM), D-mannono-delta-lactam (Ki, 20 microM), kifunensine (Ki, 60 microM) but not significantly by deoxymannojirimycin. The enzyme is activated by Co2+and Ni2+and strongly inhibited by EDTA and Fe2+. The purified enzyme is active against p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside (km = 87 microM). High-mannose Man9GlcNAc substrate was hydrolyzed by the purified enzyme to Man7GlcNAc at pH 6.1. The purified enzyme does not show activity against alpha1,3- or alpha1,6-linked mannose residues. Antibodies against the recently purified lysosomal alpha-mannosidase from T.cruzi did not react with the neutral mannosidase reported here. PMID:10207175

  6. Renal vasodilatation by dopexamine and fenoldopam due to alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. W.; Broadley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The renal vascular responses of the rat isolated perfused kidney to the dopamine D1-receptor agonists, dopexamine and fenoldopam, were examined. 2. Both kidneys were perfused in situ at constant flow rate (11 ml min-1) with Krebs-bicarbonate solution at 37 degrees C. The perfusion pressure was monitored and to enable vasodilator responses to be measured, the resting perfusion pressure was raised by infusing noradrenaline (6 x 10(-9) M). 3. Dose-related vasodilator responses to bolus doses of dopexamine and fenoldopam were obtained. However, these were not antagonized by the D1-receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, indicating that D1-receptors were not involved. 4. Bolus doses of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin, caused similar dose-related vasodilator responses indicating the possibility that alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking properties of dopexamine and fenoldopam were responsible for the vasodilatation. 5. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade by dopexamine and fenoldopam was confirmed by the parallel displacement of dose-response curves for the vasopressor responses to noradrenaline. pA2 values were determined by Schild analysis for dopexamine, fenoldopam and prazosin antagonism of noradrenaline in the presence of neuronal (cocaine, 10(-5) M) and extraneuronal uptake blockade (metanephrine, 10(-5) M). The values were 6.23, 6.02 and 8.91, respectively. Schild plot slopes of unity were obtained for dopexamine and fenoldopam indicating competitive antagonism. A slope of greater than unity for prazosin may be explained by the lack of equilibrium conditions associated with bolus doses of noradrenaline, the responses of which are affected more by the high affinity antagonist, prazosin, than the two lower affinity antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7670737

  7. (3H)bunazosin, a novel selective radioligand of alpha 1 adrenoceptors in human prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kimura, R.; Maruyama, M.; Kawabe, K. )

    1991-09-01

    The binding properties of a new radioligand, (3H)bunazosin, were studied in membranes of human prostates with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Specific binding of (3H)bunazosin was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity (Kd = 0.55 {plus minus} 0.04 nM). The density of (3H)bunazosin binding sites (Bmax) was 676 {plus minus} 33 fmol/mg. protein. (3H)Bunazosin rapidly associated with its binding sites in membranes of human prostates and reached steady state by 20 min. at 25C. The rate constants for association and dissociation of (3H)bunazosin binding were calculated to be 0.11 {plus minus} 0.01/nM/min. and 0.05 {plus minus} 0.02/min. (n = 4), respectively. Seven alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists competed with (3H)bunazosin for the binding sites in the rank order: R-(-)-YM-12617 greater than prazosin greater than SGB-1534 greater than bunazosin greater than terazosin greater than naftopidil greater than urapidil. In parallel studies with (3H)bunazosin, the Kd and Bmax values for (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates were slightly lower. There was a similarity in the potency and rank order of seven alpha 1, adrenoceptor antagonists for the inhibition of (3H) bunazosin and (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates. The new (3H)bunazosin binding assay in human prostates is remarkable for its low degree of nonspecific binding as compared to (3H)prazosin, especially at high ligand concentrations. Thus, (3H)bunazosin may become a useful radioligand for the further analysis of the alph 1 adrenoceptor binding sites in human prostates.

  8. Combined effect of fluconazole and thymosin alpha 1 on systemic candidiasis in mice immunosuppressed by morphine treatments.

    PubMed Central

    di Francesco, P; Gaziano, R; Casalinuovo, I A; Belogi, L; Palamara, A T; Favalli, C; Garaci, E

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of systemic infection with Candida albicans with a combination of an antifungal agent (i.e. fluconazole) and a thymus-derived immunostimulant (i.e. thymosin alpha 1 (T alpha 1)) in mice immunosuppressed by morphine treatments was investigated. In normal mice, fluconazole given after infection with 10(6) C. albicans cells was more effective than in mice treated with morphine. Combination treatment with fluconazole and T alpha 1 prolonged survival and reduced the fungal burden in the kidneys of immunosuppressed mice. We also investigated the influence of this combined treatment on killing properties of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and natural killer (NK) cell activity, inhibited by morphine administrations. Treatment with T alpha 1 or fluconazole as single agents promoted a recovery of normal NK cell activity and intracellular killing of C. albicans by PMN, while the combination significantly increased both of these responses, probably through the modulation of lymphokine production. Our data suggest that the additive effect of T alpha 1 and fluconazole is due to a direct antifungal action and activation of the immunocompetence. PMID:8082290

  9. Expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor in human alcoholic brain.

    PubMed

    Lewohl, J M; Crane, D I; Dodd, P R

    1997-03-14

    The expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor was studied in the superior frontal and motor cortices of 10 control, 10 uncomplicated alcoholic and 7 cirrhotic alcoholic cases matched for age and post-mortem delay. The assay was based on competitive RT/PCR using a single set of primers specific to the alpha class of isoform mRNA species, and was normalized against a synthetic cRNA internal standard. The assay was shown to be quantitative for all three isoform mRNA species. Neither the patient's age nor the post-mortem interval significantly affected the expression of any isoform in either cortical area. The profile of expression was shown to be significantly different between the case groups, particularly because alpha 1 expression was raised in both groups of alcoholics of controls. The two groups of alcoholics could be differentiated on the basis of regional variations in alpha 1 expression. In frontal cortex, alpha 1 mRNA expression was significantly increased when uncomplicated alcoholics were compared with control cases whereas alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were not significantly different from either controls or uncomplicated alcoholic cases. In the motor cortex, alpha 1 expression was elevated only when alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were compared with control cases. There was no significant difference between case groups or areas for any other isoform. PMID:9098573

  10. The cellular expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit during spermatogenesis in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Kiyoto; Okamoto, Keiko; Nomura, Sakashi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2010-10-01

    GABA(A) receptors are pentamers in structure and are mainly composed of alpha, beta and gamma subunits. These receptors are known to function as chloride channels. We observed alpha5, beta1 and gamma3 subunit immunoreactivity in the mouse testes, specifically in the cytoplasm surrounding the nucleus in the spermatocytes and spermatids. In the current study, alpha1 subunit immunoreactivity was located in the nucleus of spermatogonia, spermatocytes and round spermatids. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the alpha1 subunit was localized within the nucleus of pachytene and diplotene spermatocytes in the area of condensed chromatin rather than extended chromatin. Protein sequence analysis revealed that the alpha1 subunit included DM DNA binding domains that were related to transcription factors involved in testicular differentiation in adult mice. These findings suggest that the alpha1 subunit may undertake a gene transcription function during the maturation of germ cells. a1 immunoreactivity was also detected within the mitochondria of spermatocytes and in the acrosome of round and elongated spermatids. Although the precise physiological role of the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit in mitochondria remains unknown, we hypothesize that its function in the acrosome may be related to the acrosome reaction during fertilization or during spermatogenesis. PMID:20712007

  11. Functional evidence of alpha1D-adrenoceptors in the vasculature of young and adult spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Ibarra, M

    1999-04-01

    The role of alpha1D-adrenoceptors in the vasculature of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), of different ages was assessed in pithed rats by the use of the selective alpha1D-adrenoceptor antagonist BMY 7378 (8-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-ethyl]-8-azaspiro [4.5]decane-7,9-dione dihydrochloride). BMY 7378 displaced the pressor effect of phenylephrine in young pre-hypertensive pithed SHR rats, but produced no effect in young WKY rats (dose ratio of 3.4 and 1.6, respectively), while in adult rats BMY 7378 produced a greater shift in the phenylephrine response curve than in younger animals (dose ratio of 3.2 and 6.2 in WKY and SHR, respectively). The presence of alpha1D-adrenoceptors in the vasculature of pre-hypertensive rats, suggests its role in the pathogenesis/maintenance of increased blood pressure. PMID:10323583

  12. Expression of GABA A receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein in rat neocortex following photothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Kharlamov, Elena A; Downey, Kathy L; Jukkola, Peter I; Grayson, Dennis R; Kelly, Kevin M

    2008-05-19

    Photothrombotic infarcts of the neocortex result in structural and functional alterations of cortical networks, including decreased GABAergic inhibition, and can generate epileptic seizures within 1 month of lesioning. In our study, we assessed the involvement and potential changes of cortical GABA A receptor (GABA AR) alpha1 subunits at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days after photothrombosis. Quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis were used to investigate GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein levels in proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex and in homotopic areas of young adult Sprague-Dawley rats. GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA levels were decreased ipsilateral and contralateral to the infarct at 7 days, but were increased bilaterally at 30 days. GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein levels revealed no significant change in neocortical areas of both hemispheres of lesioned animals compared with protein levels of sham-operated controls at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days. At 30 days, GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein expression was significantly increased in lesioned animals within proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex compared with distal neocortical areas contralaterally (Student's t-test, p<0.05). Short- and long-term alterations of mRNA and protein levels of the GABA AR alpha1 subunit ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion may influence alterations in cell surface receptor subtype expression and GABA AR function following ischemic infarction and may be associated with formative mechanisms of poststroke epileptogenesis. PMID:18407248

  13. Synthesis, alpha-adrenoceptors affinity and alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonistic properties of some 1,4-substituted piperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Marona, H; Kubacka, M; Filipek, B; Siwek, A; Dybała, M; Szneler, E; Pociecha, T; Gunia, A; Waszkielewicz, A M

    2011-10-01

    A series of different 1,4-substituted piperazine derivatives (1-11) was synthesized. It comprised 1-(substituted-phenoxyalkyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine derivatives (1-5); 1,4-bis(substituted-phenoxyethyl)piperazine derivatives (6-8) and 1-(substituted-phenoxy)-3-(substituted-phenoxyalkylpiperazin-1-yl)propan-2-ol derivatives (9-11). All compounds were evaluated for affinity toward alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors by radioligand binding assays on rat cerebral cortex using [3H]prazosin and [3H]clonidine as specific radioligand, respectively. Furthermore alpha 1-antagonistic properties were checked for most promising compounds (1-5 and 10) by means of inhibition of phenylephrine induced contraction in isolated rat aorta. Antagonistic potency stayed in agreement with radioligand binding results. The most active compounds (1-5) displaced [3H]prazosin from cortical binding sites in low nanomolar range (Ki = 2.1-13.1 nM). Compound 10 showed slightly lower affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptor (Ki = 781 nM). Compounds 2-5 displayed the strongest antagonistic activity with pA2 values ranging from 8.441 to 8.807. Compound 1 gave a pA2 value of 7.868, while compound 10 showed the weakest antagonistic potency, giving a pA2 value of 6.374. 1-[3-(2-Chloro-6-methylphenoxy)propyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (5) showed the best alpha 1- affinity properties with a Ki(alpha 1) value of 2.1 nM and it was 61.05 fold more selective toward alpha 1 than alpha 2-receptors. The best properties showed 1-[3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)propyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (4) with a Ki(alpha 1) value of 2.4 nM, a 142.13 fold better selectivity to alpha 1 - over alpha 2-adrenoceptors and the best antagonistic potency (pA2 = 8.807). It is worth to emphasized that all most promising compounds possessed an 1-(o-methoxyphenyl)piperazine moiety which probably plays an important role in the affinity to alpha-adrenoceptors. PMID:22026152

  14. A possible structural determinant of selectivity of boldine and derivatives for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Madrero, Y.; Elorriaga, M.; Martinez, S.; Noguera, M. A.; Cassels, B. K.; D'Ocon, P.; Ivorra, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. The selectivity of action of boldine and the related aporphine alkaloids, predicentrine (9-O-methylboldine) and glaucine (2,9-O-dimethylboldine) and alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied by examining [3H]-prazosin competition binding in rat cerebral cortex. WB 4101 and benoxathian were used as selective alpha 1A-adrenoceptor antagonists. 2. In the competition experiments [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding was inhibited by WB 4101 and benoxathian. The inhibition curves displayed shallow slopes which could be subdivided into high and low affinity components (pKi = 9.92 and 8.29 for WB 4101, 9.35 and 7.94 for benoxathian). The two antagonists recognized approximately 37% of the sites with high affinity from among the total [3H]-prazosin specific binding sites. 3. Boldine, predicentrine and glaucine also competed for [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding with shallow and biphasic curves recognizing 30-40% of the sites with high affinity. Drug affinities (pKi) at the high and low affinity sites were, 8.31 and 6.50, respectively, for boldine, 8.13 and 6.39 for predicentrine, and 7.12 and 5.92 for glaucine. The relative order of selectivity for alpha 1A-adrenoceptors was boldine (70 fold alpha 1A-selective) = predicentrine (60 fold, alpha 1A-selective) > glaucine (15 fold, alpha 1A-selective). 4. Pretreatment of rat cerebral cortex membranes with chloroethylclonidine (CEC, 10 microM) for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by thorough washing out reduced specific [3H]-prazosin binding by approximately 70%. The CEC-insensitive [3H]-prazosin binding was inhibited by boldine monophasically (Hill slope = 0.93) with a single pKi value (7.76). 5. These results suggest that whereas the aporphine structure shared by these alkaloids is responsible for their selectively of action for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype in rat cerebral cortex, defined functional groups, namely the 2-hydroxy function, induces a significant increase in alpha 1A-subtype selectivity and affinity. PMID:8982502

  15. A possible structural determinant of selectivity of boldine and derivatives for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Madrero, Y; Elorriaga, M; Martinez, S; Noguera, M A; Cassels, B K; D'Ocon, P; Ivorra, M D

    1996-12-01

    1. The selectivity of action of boldine and the related aporphine alkaloids, predicentrine (9-O-methylboldine) and glaucine (2,9-O-dimethylboldine) and alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied by examining [3H]-prazosin competition binding in rat cerebral cortex. WB 4101 and benoxathian were used as selective alpha 1A-adrenoceptor antagonists. 2. In the competition experiments [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding was inhibited by WB 4101 and benoxathian. The inhibition curves displayed shallow slopes which could be subdivided into high and low affinity components (pKi = 9.92 and 8.29 for WB 4101, 9.35 and 7.94 for benoxathian). The two antagonists recognized approximately 37% of the sites with high affinity from among the total [3H]-prazosin specific binding sites. 3. Boldine, predicentrine and glaucine also competed for [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding with shallow and biphasic curves recognizing 30-40% of the sites with high affinity. Drug affinities (pKi) at the high and low affinity sites were, 8.31 and 6.50, respectively, for boldine, 8.13 and 6.39 for predicentrine, and 7.12 and 5.92 for glaucine. The relative order of selectivity for alpha 1A-adrenoceptors was boldine (70 fold alpha 1A-selective) = predicentrine (60 fold, alpha 1A-selective) > glaucine (15 fold, alpha 1A-selective). 4. Pretreatment of rat cerebral cortex membranes with chloroethylclonidine (CEC, 10 microM) for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by thorough washing out reduced specific [3H]-prazosin binding by approximately 70%. The CEC-insensitive [3H]-prazosin binding was inhibited by boldine monophasically (Hill slope = 0.93) with a single pKi value (7.76). 5. These results suggest that whereas the aporphine structure shared by these alkaloids is responsible for their selectively of action for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype in rat cerebral cortex, defined functional groups, namely the 2-hydroxy function, induces a significant increase in alpha 1A-subtype selectivity and affinity. PMID:8982502

  16. Deletion of Serpina1a, a murine α1-antitrypsin ortholog, results in embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Weimin; Dawkins, Paul; Paterson, Trevor; Kalsheker, Noor; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Houghton, A McGarry

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States Approximately 1% to 2% of COPD patients suffer from α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency, the major inheritable predisposition to COPD/emphysema. To further study the role of A1AT deficiency in the pathogenesis of COPD/emphysema, the authors attempted to generate null-mutant mice for Serpina1a, 1 of 2 A1AT orthologs in mice. Here the authors show that targeted deletion of Serpina1a results in embryonic lethality prior to 8.5 days post conception (dpc). The results are surprising given that A1AT-null humans exist and therefore do not require this gene product for normal development. The Serpina1 gene cluster is substantially different between mouse and man. Through gene duplication, mice have 3 to 5 (depending on the strain) highly homologous proteinase inhibiting (Pi) genes, 2 of which inhibit neutrophil elastase. Despite the abundance of Pi genes in mice, Serpina1a serves a critical, nonredundant function during early mouse development. A1AT-deficient mice have been highly sought after to study emphysema, cancer, and liver disease, and as a model to perfect gene replacement therapy. These results highlight important differences between human and murine serpins and point to the difficulty inherent to using gene-targeted mice to study this common human genetic disease. PMID:21574874

  17. T Helper Subsets, Peripheral Plasticity, and the Acute Phase Protein, α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Baranovski, Boris M.; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S.; Lewis, Eli C.; Rider, Peleg

    2015-01-01

    The traditional model of T helper differentiation describes the naïve T cell as choosing one of several subsets upon stimulation and an added reciprocal inhibition aimed at maintaining the chosen subset. However, to date, evidence is mounting to support the presence of subset plasticity. This is, presumably, aimed at fine-tuning adaptive immune responses according to local signals. Reprograming of cell phenotype is made possible by changes in activation of master transcription factors, employing epigenetic modifications that preserve a flexible mode, permitting a shift between activation and silencing of genes. The acute phase response represents an example of peripheral changes that are critical in modulating T cell responses. α1-antitrypsin (AAT) belongs to the acute phase responses and has recently surfaced as a tolerogenic agent in the context of adaptive immune responses. Nonetheless, AAT does not inhibit T cell responses, nor does it shutdown inflammation per se; rather, it appears that AAT targets non-T cell immunocytes towards changing the cytokine environment of T cells, thus promoting a regulatory T cell profile. The present review focuses on this intriguing two-way communication between innate and adaptive entities, a crosstalk that holds important implications on potential therapies for a multitude of immune disorders. PMID:26583093

  18. Identification of ERGIC-53 as an intracellular transport receptor of α1-antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Nyfeler, Beat; Reiterer, Veronika; Wendeler, Markus W.; Stefan, Eduard; Zhang, Bin; Michnick, Stephen W.; Hauri, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Secretory proteins are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by bulk flow and/or receptor-mediated transport. Our understanding of this process is limited because of the low number of identified transport receptors and cognate cargo proteins. In mammalian cells, the lectin ER Golgi intermediate compartment 53-kD protein (ERGIC-53) represents the best characterized cargo receptor. It assists ER export of a subset of glycoproteins including coagulation factors V and VIII and cathepsin C and Z. Here, we report a novel screening strategy to identify protein interactions in the lumen of the secretory pathway using a yellow fluorescent protein–based protein fragment complementation assay. By screening a human liver complementary DNA library, we identify α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) as previously unrecognized cargo of ERGIC-53 and show that cargo capture is carbohydrate- and conformation-dependent. ERGIC-53 knockdown and knockout cells display a specific secretion defect of α1-AT that is corrected by reintroducing ERGIC-53. The results reveal ERGIC-53 to be an intracellular transport receptor of α1-AT and provide direct evidence for active receptor-mediated ER export of a soluble secretory protein in higher eukaryotes. PMID:18283111

  19. Directing membrane chromatography to manufacture α1-antitrypsin from human plasma fraction IV.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinxin; Luo, Jianquan; Song, Weijie; Chen, Xiangrong; Wan, Yinhua

    2015-12-01

    The surging demand for plasma proteins, mainly driven by the growing market and the development of new therapeutic indications, is promoting manufacturers to improve the throughput of plasma proteins. Due to the inherent convective mass transfer, membrane chromatography has been proved to be an efficient approach for extracting a small amount of target proteins from large-volume feed. In this study, α1-antitrypsin (AAT) was extracted from human plasma fraction IV by a two-step membrane chromatography. An anion-exchange membrane chromatography (AEMC) was used to capture the plasma proteins in bind/elute mode, and the obtained effluent was further polished by a hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (HIMC) in flow-through mode. Under optimal conditions, the recovery and purity of AAT achieved 87.0% and 0.58 AAT/protein (g/g) by AEMC, respectively. After the precise polishing by HIMC, the purity of AAT was 1.22 AAT/protein (g/g). The comparison results showed that membrane chromatography outperformed column chromatography in both steps because of its high throughput. This two-step membrane chromatography could obtain an AAT recovery of 83.3% and an activity recovery of 91.4%. The outcome of this work not only offers an alternative process for protein purification from plasma, but also provides guidelines for manufacturing product from a large-volume feed with multi-components by membrane chromatography. PMID:26518493

  20. Dysfunctional Glycogen Storage in a Mouse Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, Ralf H.; Leopold, Philip L.; Kiuru, Maija; De, Bishnu P.; Krause, Anja; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway that contributes to the degradation and recycling of unfolded proteins. Based on the knowledge that autophagy affects glycogen metabolism and that α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is associated with an autophagic response in the liver, we hypothesized that the conformational abnormalities of the Z-AAT protein interfere with hepatocyte glycogen storage and/or metabolism. Compared with wild-type mice (WT), the Z-AAT mice had lower liver glycogen stores (P < 0.001) and abnormal activities of glycogen-related enzymes, including acid α-glucosidase (P < 0.05) and the total glycogen synthase (P < 0.05). As metabolic consequences, PiZ mice demonstrated lower blood glucose levels (P < 0.05), lower body weights (P < 0.001), and lower fat pad weights (P < 0.001) compared with WT. After the stress of fasting or partial hepatectomy, PiZ mice had further reduced liver glycogen and lower blood glucose levels (both P < 0.05 compared WT). Finally, PiZ mice exhibited decreased survival after partial hepatectomy (P < 0.01 compared with WT), but this was normalized with postoperative dextrose supplementation. In conclusion, these observations are consistent with the general concept that abnormal protein conformation and degradation affects other cellular functions, suggesting that diseases in the liver might benefit from metabolic compensation if glycogen metabolism is affected. PMID:18688041

  1. Fecal calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin dynamics in gastrointestinal GvHD.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, A; Kapel, N; Xhaard, A; Sicre de Fontbrune, F; Manéné, D; Dhedin, N; de Latour, R P; Socié, G; Robin, M

    2015-08-01

    In a previous study, the fecal biomarkers calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) at symptom onset were reported to be significantly associated with the response to steroids in gastrointestinal GvHD (GI-GvHD). The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the dynamics of the fecal biomarkers calprotectin and α1-AT throughout the course of GvHD. Patients who were refractory to steroids had initially higher biomarker levels and in the course of GvHD demonstrated a continuous increase in fecal biomarkers. In contrast, the dynamics of calprotectin and α1-AT demonstrated low and decreasing levels in cortico-sensitive GvHD. In steroid-refractory patients who received a second line of treatment, the biomarker levels at the beginning of second-line treatment did not predict the subsequent response. Nevertheless, calprotectin levels progressively decreased in subsequent responders, whereas non-responders demonstrated continuously high levels of calprotectin. α1-AT values correlated to a lesser extent with the response to second-line treatment and remained elevated in both non-responders and responders. In conclusion, calprotectin monitoring can be of use in the management of immunosuppressive treatment in GI-GvHD. PMID:25961766

  2. Response of Steroid-Refractory Acute GVHD to α1-Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, A Mario; Hockenbery, David; Lesnikova, Marina; Dinarello, Charles A; Woolfrey, Ann; Gernsheimer, Terry; Loghman-Adham, Mahmoud; Gelmont, David; Storer, Barry; Hansen, John A; Deeg, H Joachim

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine protease inhibitor with anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulatory properties. It has therapeutic efficacy in animal models of autoimmune diseases, inflammatory disorders, and transplantation. In a phase I/II open-label single-center study, we administered AAT (Glassia; Baxalta/Kamada, New Ziona, Israel) as salvage therapy to 12 patients with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AAT was given i.v. at 2 dose levels over a 15-day course. All patients had grades III or IV GVHD with stage 4 gut involvement. After treatment, plasma AAT levels increased in both cohorts and remained within 2 to 4 mg/mL for the duration of treatment. No clinically relevant toxicities attributable to AAT were observed. GVHD manifestations improved in 8 of 12 patients, and 4 responses were complete. Six patients (50%) were alive at last follow-up (>104 to >820 days). These findings show that AAT is well tolerated and has efficacy in the treatment of steroid-refractory severe acute GVHD. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27223109

  3. Comparison of relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles from rabbits by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists; prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin.

    PubMed

    Seo, K K; Lee, M Y; Lim, S W; Kim, S C

    1999-02-01

    Alpha1a-adrenergic receptor (AR) primarily mediates the contraction of the prostatic and cavernous smooth muscles. Among clinically available alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), tamsulosin has a modest selectivity for alpha1A- and alpha1D- over alpha1B-ARs. To compare the effects of various alpha1-AR antagonists on relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles, isometric tension studies with relatively selective (tamsulosin) and non-selective (prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin) alpha1A-AR antagonists, were conducted in the cavernous and trigonal muscle strips of rabbits (n=10 each). Tamsulosin had the strongest inhibitory effect on contraction of trigonal smooth muscle among the various alpha1-AR antagonists, and the inhibitory activities of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin were not statistically different. All alpha1-AR antagonists caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the cavernous muscle strips. Tamsulosin was shown to have greater potency than prazosin (more than 100-fold), doxazosin (more than 1000-fold), and terazosin (more than 1000-fold), in relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle. In conclusion, tamsulosin might be the most effective drug among the four commonly used alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of BPH. Tamsulosin might be a potential substitute for phentolamine in combination with vasoactive agents as an intracavernous injection therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10102527

  4. Prediction of alpha1-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate from plasma concentrations of silodosin, tamsulosin and terazosin to treat urinary obstruction in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo; Kato, Yasuhiro; Okura, Takashi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Kazuki

    2007-07-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists are clinically useful for the improvement of urinary obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and their therapeutic effects are mediated through the blockade of prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. The present study was undertaken to predict the magnitude and duration of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate after oral alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists. Prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding parameters of silodosin were estimated by measuring specific [(3)H]prazosin binding in rat prostate after oral administration of this drug. The plasma concentration of silodosin after oral administration in rats and healthy volunteers was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding affinities (K(i)) of silodosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin in the human prostate and plasma concentrations of tamsulosin and terazosin were obtained from the literature. Using the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor binding parameters of silodosin in rat prostate, alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate was estimated to be around 60-70% at 1-6 h after oral administration of silodosin at doses of 3.0, 8.1, and 16.1 micromol. Thereafter, the receptor occupancy was periodically decreased, to 24% (8.1 micromol) and 54% (16.1 micromol) 24 h later. A similar magnitude and time course of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy by silodosin in the human prostate were estimated using alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding affinities (K(i)) in the human prostate. Despite about two orders of differences in the plasma unbound concentrations after clinically effective oral dosages of silodosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, there was a comparable magnitude of prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy by these drugs. In conclusion, the prediction of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate by alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists may provide the rationale for the optimum dosage regimen of these drugs in the

  5. Correlation between phosphatidylinositol labeling and contraction in rabbit aorta: effect of alpha-1 adrenergic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Uc, M.; Hong, E.; Garcia-Sainz, J.A.

    1982-07-01

    Activation of rabbit aortic strips with alpha adrenergic agonists increased the labeling (with (/sup 32/P)Pi) of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid and contracted the vascular preparations in dose-related fashion. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and methoxamine produced maximal effects, whereas clonidine behaved as partial agonist and B-HT 933 (2-amino-6-ethyl-4,5,7,8-tetrahydro-6H-oxazole-(5,4-d) azepin dihydrochloride) was almost without activity in the two experimental models used. Phenylephrine was a full agonist in producing contraction, but failed to elicit the maximal increase in PI labeling. The EC50 values to produce contraction of aortic strips were lower for all agonists than those required to increase the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into PI, but there was a good correlation between the two sets of data. The increased PI labeling and contraction of aortic strips induced by epinephrine were antagonized by prazosin and yohimbine in dose-related fashion, but the first alpha blocker was about three orders of magnitude more potent than the second in antagonizing the two effects. The present results indicate that both stimulation of PI labeling and contraction are mediated through activation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors in rabbit aorta.

  6. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; Powell, Caldwell; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN genes. Methods Genomic DNA samples derived from saliva were collected from all family members (six affected and four unaffected individuals). Complete sequencing of COL2A1 and VCAN was performed on two affected individuals. Direct sequencing of remaining family members was conducted if the discovered variants followed segregation. Results A base-pair substitution (c.258C>A) in exon 2 of COL2A1 cosegregated with familial disease status. This known mutation occurs in a highly conserved site that causes a premature stop codon (p.C86X). The mutation was not seen in 1,142 ethnically matched control DNA samples. Conclusions Premature stop codons in COL2A1 exon 2 lead to a Stickler syndrome type I ocular-only phenotype with few or no systemic manifestations. Mutation screening of COL2A1 exon 2 in families with autosomal dominant vitreoretinopathy is important for accurate clinical diagnosis. PMID:23592912

  7. An amino acid substitution (Gly853-->Glu) in the collagen alpha 1(II) chain produces hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, R; Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1992-11-01

    The spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia subclassification of bone dysplasias includes achondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The phenotypic expression of these disorders ranges from mild to perinatal lethal forms. We report the detection and partial characterization of a defect in type II collagen in a perinatal lethal form of hypochondrogenesis. Electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide of CB peptides (where CB represents cyanogen bromide) from type II collagen of the diseased cartilage showed a doublet band for peptide alpha 1(II)CB10 and evidence for post-translational overmodification of the major peptides (CB8, CB10, and CB11) seen as a retarded electrophoretic mobility. Peptide CB10 was digested by endoproteinase Asp-N; and on reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography, fragments of abnormal mobility were noted. Sequence analysis of a unique peptide D12 revealed a single amino acid substitution (Gly-->Glu) at position 853 of the triple helical domain. This was confirmed by sequence analysis of amplified COL2A1 cDNA, which revealed a single nucleotide substitution (GGA-->GAA) in 5 of 10 clones. Electron micrographs of the diseased cartilage showed a sparse extracellular matrix and chondrocytes containing dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, which suggested impaired assembly and secretion of the mutant protein. This case further documents the molecular basis of the spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia spectrum of chondrodysplasias as mutations in COL2A1. PMID:1429602

  8. Investigation of the alpha(1)-glycine receptor channel-opening kinetics in the submillisecond time domain.

    PubMed

    Grewer, C

    1999-08-01

    The activation and desensitization kinetics of the human alpha(1)-homooligomeric glycine receptor, which was transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, were studied with a 100-microseconds time resolution to determine the rate and equilibrium constants of individual receptor reaction steps. Concentration jumps of the activating ligands glycine and beta-alanine were initiated by photolysis of caged, inactive precursors and were followed by neurotransmitter binding, receptor-channel opening, and receptor desensitization steps that were separated along the time axis. Analysis of the ligand concentration-dependence of these processes allows the determination of 1) the rate constants of glycine binding, k(+1) approximately 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), and dissociation, k(-1) = 1900 s(-1); 2) the rates of receptor-channel opening, k(op) = 2200 s(-1), and closing, k(cl) = 38 s(-1); 3) the receptor desensitization rate, alpha = 0.45 s(-1); 4) the number of occupied ligand binding sites necessary for receptor-channel activation and desensitization, n >/= 3; and 5) the maximum receptor-channel open probability, p(0) > 0.95. The kinetics of receptor-channel activation are insensitive to the transmembrane potential. A general model for glycine receptor activation explaining the experimental data consists of a sequential mechanism based on rapid ligand-binding steps preceding a rate-limiting receptor-channel opening reaction and slow receptor desensitization. PMID:10423421

  9. alpha 1-Fetoprotein mRNA of rat yolk sac and hepatoma.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, J F; Decha-Umphai, W; Commer, P

    1979-01-01

    Rat alpha 1-fetoprotein mRNA was isolated and purified to apparent homogeneity by means of immunoadsorption and oligo (dT) cellulose affinity chromatography. Purified AFP mRNA migrated as a 21S peak in 2.5% SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The translation product of this mRNA in micrococcal nuclease treated reticulocyte lysate was identified as AFP by specific immunoprecipitation, SDS-gel electrophoresis and tryptic digestion analysis. DNA complimentary to AFP mRNA was synthesized with avian meyloblastosis virus RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. This AFP cDNA was used as a probe to quantitate AFP mRNA in the developing rat liver and to compare the complexity and diversity of AFP mRNA derived from the normal rat liver and Morris hepatoma 7777. We found that the amount of functional AFP mRNA is decreasing during liver development. There is very little, if any, AFP mRNA in the adult rat liver. A high degree of homology between the AFP mRNA sequences of yolk sac and hepatoma was also found. PMID:91159

  10. Thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 follows a cooperative CRM1/calreticulin-mediated nuclear export pathway.

    PubMed

    Grespin, Matthew E; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Roggero, Vincent R; Cameron, Nicole G; Adam, Lindsay E; Atchison, Andrew P; Fratto, Victoria M; Allison, Lizabeth A

    2008-09-12

    The thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 (TRalpha) exhibits a dual role as an activator or repressor of its target genes in response to thyroid hormone (T(3)). Previously, we have shown that TRalpha, formerly thought to reside solely in the nucleus bound to DNA, actually shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and cytoplasm. An important aspect of the shuttling activity of TRalpha is its ability to exit the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex. TRalpha export is not sensitive to treatment with the CRM1-specific inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) in heterokaryon assays, suggesting a role for an export receptor other than CRM1. Here, we have used a combined approach of in vivo fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments, in vitro permeabilized cell nuclear export assays, and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays to investigate the export pathway used by TRalpha. We show that, in addition to shuttling in heterokaryons, TRalpha shuttles rapidly in an unfused monokaryon system as well. Furthermore, our data show that TRalpha directly interacts with calreticulin, and point to the intriguing possibility that TRalpha follows a cooperative export pathway in which both calreticulin and CRM1 play a role in facilitating efficient translocation of TRalpha from the nucleus to cytoplasm. PMID:18641393

  11. Cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of the gene encoding importin-{alpha}1

    SciTech Connect

    Kamikawa, Yasunao; Yasuhara, Noriko; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University; JST, CREST, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871

    2011-08-15

    Importin-{alpha}1 belongs to a receptor family that recognizes classical nuclear localization signals. Encoded by Kpna2, this receptor subtype is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In this study, we identified a critical promoter region in Kpna2 and showed that the expression of this gene is differentially regulated in ES cells and NIH3T3 cells. Conserved CCAAT boxes are required for Kpna2 promoter activity in both ES and NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, deletion of the region from nucleotide position - 251 to - 179 bp resulted in a drastic reduction in Kpna2 transcriptional activity only in ES cells. This region contains Krueppel-like factor (Klf) binding sequences and is responsible for transactivation of the gene by Klf2 and Klf4. Accordingly, endogenous Kpna2 mRNA levels decreased in response to depletion of Klf2 and Klf4 in ES cells. Our results suggest that Klf2 and Klf4 function redundantly to drive high level of Kpna2 expression in ES cells. -- Research Highlights: {yields} We showed the cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of Kpna2 encoding importin-al. {yields} NF-Y binds the CCAAT boxes to activate Kpna2 transcription in NIH3T3 cells. {yields} Klf2 and Klf4 redundantly activate the expression of Kpna2 in ES cells.

  12. Cerebral Artery Alpha-1 AR Subtypes: High Altitude Long-Term Acclimatization Responses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ravi; Goyal, Dipali; Chu, Nina; Van Wickle, Jonathan; Longo, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    In response to hypoxia and other stress, the sympathetic (adrenergic) nervous system regulates arterial contractility and blood flow, partly through differential activities of the alpha1 (α1) - adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR). Thus, we tested the hypothesis that with acclimatization to long-term hypoxia (LTH), contractility of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) is regulated by changes in expression and activation of the specific α1-AR subtypes. We conducted experiments in MCA from adult normoxic sheep maintained near sea level (300 m) and those exposed to LTH (110 days at 3801 m). Following acclimatization to LTH, ovine MCA showed a 20% reduction (n = 5; P<0.05) in the maximum tension achieved by 10−5 M phenylephrine (PHE). LTH-acclimatized cerebral arteries also demonstrated a statistically significant (P<0.05) inhibition of PHE-induced contractility in the presence of specific α1-AR subtype antagonists. Importantly, compared to normoxic vessels, there was significantly greater (P<0.05) α1B-AR subtype mRNA and protein levels in LTH acclimatized MCA. Also, our results demonstrate that extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)-mediated negative feedback regulation of PHE-induced contractility is modulated by α1B-AR subtype. Overall, in ovine MCA, LTH produces profound effects on α1-AR subtype expression and function. PMID:25393740

  13. Collagen Type XI Alpha 1 Expression in Intraductal Papillomas Predicts Malignant Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Javier; García-Berbel, Lucia; García-Berbel, Pilar; Pereda, Saray; Azueta, Ainara; García-Arranz, Pilar; De Juan, Ana; Vega, Alfonso; Hens, Ángela; Enguita, Ana; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Gómez-Román, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress achieved in the treatment of breast cancer, there are still many unsolved clinical issues, being the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of papillary diseases, one of the highest challenges. Because of its unpredictable clinical behavior, treatment of intraductal papilloma has generated a great controversy. Even though considered as a benign lesion, it presents high rate of malignant recurrence. This is the reason why there are clinicians supporting a complete excision of the lesion, while others support an only expectant follow-up. Previous results of our group suggested that procollagen 11 alpha 1 (pro-COL11A1) expression correlates with infiltrating phenotype in breast lesions. We analyzed the correlation between expression of pro-COL11A1 in intraductal papilloma and their risk of malignant recurrence. Immunohistochemistry of pro-COL11A1 was performed in 62 samples of intraductal papilloma. Ten out 11 cases relapsed as carcinoma presents positive staining for COL11A1, while just 17 out of 51 cases with benign behaviour present immunostaining. There were significant differences (P < 0.0001) when comparing patients with malignant recurrence versus nonmalignant relapse patients. These data suggest that pro-COL11A1 expression is a highly sensitive biomarker to predict malignant relapse of intraductal papilloma and it can be used as indicative factor for prevention programs. PMID:26448946

  14. Mice deficient in LMAN1 exhibit FV and FVIII deficiencies and liver accumulation of α1-antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunlei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Baines, Andrea; Kim, Jinoh; Schekman, Randy; Kaufman, Randal J.; Ginsburg, David

    2011-01-01

    The type 1-transmembrane protein LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) forms a complex with the soluble protein MCFD2 and cycles between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). Mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2 cause the combined deficiency of factor V (FV) and factor VIII (FVIII; F5F8D), suggesting an ER-to-Golgi cargo receptor function for the LMAN1-MCFD2 complex. Here we report the analysis of LMAN1-deficient mice. Levels of plasma FV and FVIII, and platelet FV, are all reduced to ∼ 50% of wild-type in Lman1−/− mice, compared with the 5%-30% levels typically observed in human F5F8D patients. Despite previous reports identifying cathepsin C, cathepsin Z, and α1-antitrypsin as additional potential cargoes for LMAN1, no differences were observed between wild-type and Lman1−/− mice in the levels of cathepsin C and cathepsin Z in liver lysates or α1-antitrypsin levels in plasma. LMAN1 deficiency had no apparent effect on COPII-coated vesicle formation in an in vitro assay. However, the ER in Lman1−/− hepatocytes is slightly distended, with significant accumulation of α1-antitrypsin and GRP78. An unexpected, partially penetrant, perinatal lethality was observed for Lman1−/− mice, dependent on the specific inbred strain genetic background, suggesting a potential role for other, as yet unidentified LMAN1-dependent cargo proteins. PMID:21795745

  15. Enhanced Noradrenergic Activity Potentiates Fear Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation by Differentially Recruiting alpha1- and beta-Adrenergic Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazarini, Lucas; Stern, Cristina A. Jark; Carobrez, Antonio P.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2013-01-01

    Consolidation and reconsolidation are phases of memory stabilization that diverge slightly. Noradrenaline is known to influence both processes, but the relative contribution of alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptors is unclear. The present study sought to investigate this matter by comparing their recruitment to consolidate and/or reconsolidate a…

  16. Regulatory elements in the first intron contribute to transcriptional control of the human. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, P.; McKay, J.; Morishima, J.K.; Devarayalu, S.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the regulation of type I collagen gene transcription is complex and that important regulatory elements reside 5' to, and within, the first intron of the ..cap alpha..1(I) gene. The authors therefore sequenced a 2.3-kilobase HindIII fragment that encompasses 804 base pairs of 5' flanking sequence, the first exon, and most of the first intron of the ..cap alpha..1(I) human collagen gene. A 274-base-pair intronic sequence, flanked by Ava I sites (A274), contained a sequence identical to a high-affinity decanucleotide binding site for transcription factor Sp1 and a viral core enhancer sequence. DNase I protection experiments indicated zones of protection that corresponded to these motifs. When A274 was cloned 5' to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, driven by an ..cap alpha..1(I) collagen promoter sequence, and expression was assessed by transfection, significant orientation-specific inhibition of CAT activity was observed. This effect was most apparent in chicken tendon fibroblasts, which modulate their level of collagen synthesis in culture. They propose that normal regulation of ..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene transcription results from an interplay of positive and negative elements present in the promoter region and within the first intron.

  17. Triiodothyronine causes rapid reversal of alpha 1/cyclic adenosine monophosphate synergism on brown adipocyte respiration and type II deiodinase activity.

    PubMed

    Noronha, M; Raasmaja, A; Moolten, N; Larsen, P R

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that thyroid status affects the response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to the sympathetic nervous system. For example, hypothyroidism is associated with the development of a marked synergism between alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic pathways to stimulate type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase activity. Hypothyroidism also attenuates the respiratory response (thermogenesis) of isolated brown adipocytes to norepinephrine. To explore the interactions of the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid status in these cells, we compared the thermogenic and 5'-deiodinase responses to adrenergic agonists in isolated brown adipocytes from hypothyroid rats during treatment with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). The fivefold synergism of alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic catecholamines to increase the deiodinase activity was progressively reduced, reaching a control euthyroid value of unity after 5 days of T3 treatment. Hypothyroidism reduced both the O2max (twofold to threefold) and increased the concentration of agonist required for 50% stimulation (10-fold) for both norepinephrine and forskolin. In hypothyroid cells, there was a twofold synergism between the alpha 1-agonist cirazoline and forskolin to increase respiration, which was blocked by prazosin and reproduced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. This synergistic effect of the alpha 1-agonist was lost within 2 days of T3 administration. These studies identify a second Ca(2+)-dependent intra-adrenergic synergism, which functions to ameliorate the reduced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsiveness of the hypothyroid brown adipocyte. PMID:1683679

  18. Transcription factors nuclear factor I and Sp1 interact with the murine collagen alpha 1 (I) promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Nehls, M C; Rippe, R A; Veloz, L; Brenner, D A

    1991-01-01

    The collagen alpha 1(I) promoter, which is efficiently transcribed in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, contains four binding sites for trans-acting factors, as demonstrated by DNase I protection assays (D. A. Brenner, R. A. Rippe, and L. Veloz, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:6055-6064, 1989). This study characterizes the DNA-binding proteins that interact with the two proximal footprinted regions, both of which contain a reverse CCAAT box and a G + C-rich 12-bp direct repeat. Analysis by DNase I protection assays, mobility shift assays, competition with specific oligonucleotides, binding with recombinant proteins, and reactions with specific antisera showed that the transcriptional factors nuclear factor I (NF-I) and Sp1 bind to these two footprinted regions. Because of overlapping binding sites, NF-I binding and Sp1 binding appear to be mutually exclusive. Overexpression of NF-I in cotransfection experiments with the alpha 1(I) promoter in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts increased alpha 1(I) expression, while Sp1 overexpression reduced this effect, as well as basal promoter activity. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, which contains independent NF-I- and Sp1-binding sites, was stimulated by both factors. Therefore, expression of the collagen alpha 1(I) gene may depend on the relative activities of NF-I and Sp1. Images PMID:2072909

  19. Identification of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a potential marker of impaired growth in the newborn piglet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between the circulating levels of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin (HP) and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and growth potential in neonatal pigs. In runts, the circulating level of AGP, but not HP in serum of newborn piglets was higher...

  20. Suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, N; Benning, C M

    2000-08-15

    Recent evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial and smooth muscle cells in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; J. Urol., 159: 1810-1815, 1998; J. Urol., 161: 2002-2007, 1999). In this study, we investigated the biological action of three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin, against prostate cancer cell growth. The antigrowth effect of the three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists was examined in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, and a prostate smooth muscle cell primary culture, SMC-1, on the basis of: (a) cell viability assay; (b) rate of DNA synthesis; and (c) induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that treatment of prostate cancer cells with doxazosin or terazosin results in a significant loss of cell viability, via induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tamsulosin had no effect on prostate cell growth. Neither doxazosin nor terazosin exerted a significant effect on the rate of cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible inhibitor of alpha1-adrenoceptors, does not abrogate the apoptotic effect of doxazosin or terazosin against human prostate cancer or smooth muscle cells. This suggests that the apoptotic activity of doxazosin and terazosin against prostate cells is independent of their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, an in vivo efficacy trial demonstrated that doxazosin administration (at tolerated pharmacologically relevant doses) in SCID mice bearing PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin (but not tamsulosin) to suppress prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation. This evidence provides the rationale for targeting both

  1. Pathological role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Regina; Ziani, Khalid; Miquel, Raquel; Noguera, M Antonia; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-01-01

    1. The role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors was analysed in arteries obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and controls (WKY) divided into three groups: young prehypertensive, adult hypertensive, and adult animals chronically treated with captopril (50 mg kg(-1) per day orally) in order to prevent the hypertensive state. 2. In adult SHR, a significant increase in BMY 7378 potency (not in prazosin potency) was observed in aorta, mesenteric artery, and the first and second branches of the small mesenteric arteries with respect to WKY rats. This difference was not observed in iliac and tail arteries, which suggests an increased functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors only in some vessels of SHR. 3. The increase in the resting tone (IRT) observed in absence of agonist, inhibited by BMY 7378, that represents the constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors, was also significantly greater in aorta and mesenteric artery from adult SHR. 4. In young and captopril treated adult animals, no differences between strains with respect to BMY 7378 potency, or IRT were observed. 5. The increase in the functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors and their constitutive activity observed in hypertension is prevented by captopril treatment. The pathological consequence of this change is the slower rate of recovery of the basal tone after removal of an adrenergic stimulus, observed in vessels from hypertensive animals that had shown an increase in the functionality of constitutively active alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors. This change was not observed in prehypertensive or captopril treated animals. PMID:11786496

  2. Allosteric interactions between the antagonist prazosin and amiloride analogs at the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Mynett, A; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    2000-03-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that amilorides can interact with a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. In this study, the question was explored as to whether the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor also possesses an equivalent allosteric site. The six amilorides examined strongly increased the dissociation rate of the antagonist [(3)H]prazosin from the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. With the parent amiloride, the dissociation data were well fitted by an equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, compatible with amiloride acting at a defined allosteric site on the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor. In contrast, the dissociation data for [(3)H]prazosin in the presence of the amiloride analogs were not compatible with the equation derived from a one-allosteric-site model, but could be fitted well by an equation derived from a two-allosteric-site model. However, certain individual parameters could not be resolved. The observed dissociation rate constants increased steeply with increasing amiloride analog concentration, and in some cases the data could be fitted with a logistic equation. The slope factors calculated from such fits were 1.2 to 2.1. It is concluded that the structure-binding relationships of the amilorides at the alpha(1A)- and alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors are different. The interactions of the five amiloride analogs, but not the parent amiloride, with the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor are compatible with the presence of two (but not one) allosteric sites, and is thus more complex than that found for the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. PMID:10692482

  3. Structural investigation of the alpha-1-antichymotrypsin: prostate-specific antigen complex by comparative model building.

    PubMed Central

    Villoutreix, B. O.; Lilja, H.; Pettersson, K.; Lövgren, T.; Teleman, O.

    1996-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by prostate cells, provides an excellent serum marker for prostate cancer. It belongs to the human kallikrein family of enzymes, a second prostate-derived member of which is human glandular kallikrein-1 (hK2). Active PSA and hK2 are both 237-residue kallikrein-like proteases, based on sequence homology. An hK2 model structure based on the serine protease fold is presented and compared to PSA and six other serine proteases in order to analyze in depth the role of the surface-accessible loops surrounding the active site. The results show that PSA and hK2 share extensive structural similarity and that most amino acid replacements are centered on the loops surrounding the active site. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential surfaces are very similar for PSA and hK2. PSA interacts with at least two serine protease inhibitors (serpins): alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and protein C inhibitor (PCI). Three-dimensional model structures of the uncleaved ACT molecule were developed based upon the recent X-ray structure of uncleaved antithrombin. The serpin was docked both to PSA and hK2. Amino acid replacements and electrostatic complementarities indicate that the overall orientation of the proteins in these complexes is reasonable. In order to investigate PSA's heparin interaction sites, electrostatic computations were carried out on PSA, hK2, protein C, ACT, and PCI. Two heparin binding sites are suggested on the PSA surface and could explain the enhanced complex formation between PSA and PCI, while inhibiting the formation of the ACT-PSA complex, PSA, hK2, and their preliminary complexes with ACT should facilitate the understanding and prediction of structural and functional properties for these important proteins also with respect to prostate diseases. PMID:8732755

  4. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in Non-Failing and Failing Human Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; Swigart, Philip M; DeMarco, Teresa; Hoopes, Charles; Simpson, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) play adaptive roles in the heart and protect against the development of heart failure (HF). The three α1-AR subtypes,α1A, α1B, and α1D, have distinct physiological roles in mouse heart, but very little is known about α1-subtypes in human heart. Here we test the hypothesis that the α1A and α1B subtypes are present in human myocardium, similar to the mouse, and are not down-regulated in heart failure. Methods and Results Hearts from transplant recipients and unused donors were failing (n = 12; mean EF 24%) or non-failing (n = 9; mean EF 59%), and similar in age (~44 years) and sex (~70% male). We measured the α1-AR subtypes in multiple regions of both ventricles by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and radioligand binding. All three α1-AR subtype mRNAs were present, and α1A mRNA was most abundant (~65% of total α1-AR mRNA). However, only α1A and α1B binding were present, and the α1B was most abundant (60% of total). In failing hearts, α1A and α1B binding were not down-regulated, in contrast with β1-ARs. Conclusions Our data show for the first time that the α1A and α1B subtypes are both present in human myocardium, but α1D binding is not, and that the α1-subtypes are not down-regulated in HF. Since α1-subtypes in the human heart are similar to mouse, where adaptive and protective effects of α1-subtypes are most convincing, it might become feasible to treat HF with a drug targeting the α1A and/or α1B. PMID:19919991

  5. Induction of liver alpha-1 acid glycoprotein gene expression involves both positive and negative transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y M; Tsai, W H; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Lee, S C

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene is liver specific and acute phase responsive. Within the 180-bp region of the AGP promoter, at least five cis elements have been found to interact with trans-acting factors. Four of these elements (A, C, D, and E) interacted with AGP/EBP, a liver-enriched transcription factor, as shown by footprinting analysis and by an anti-AGP/EBP antibody-induced supershift in a gel retardation assay. Modification of these sites by site-directed mutagenesis coupled with transfection analysis indicated that AGP/EBP binding to all of these sites resulted in positive regulation of the promoter. Dose-response data suggest that AGP/EBP binding to these sites results in the cooperative activation of the promoter. In contrast, functional assays showed that element B is a negative regulatory element; this element is recognized by heat-stable DNA-binding factors which are found in many cells and tissues. The regulation of these binding proteins was studied in rat liver treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induced an acute-phase reaction. We found that LPS treatment resulted in a two- to threefold increase in AGP/EBP activity and a severalfold decrease in the activity of factors that bind to element B in the liver. These results indicate that expression of the AGP gene can be regulated by both positive and negative factors and that the modulation of these factors can account for the LPS induction of the AGP gene. Images PMID:8417341

  6. Solubilization and purification of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor using a novel affinity resin.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R M; Hess, H J; Homcy, C J

    1982-01-01

    The highly selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin was used to identify binding sites having alpha-adrenergic specificity in rat hepatic plasma membranes. Solubilization of the membrane-bound receptors was achieved by incubation with the nonionic detergent digitonin, and binding activity was assayed by using [3H]prazosin and a polyethylene glycol precipitation technique. Only 20-30% of the total receptor pool was released by the solubilization procedure. However, binding of [3H]prazosin was saturable [maximal value, 206 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein (membrane) vs. 74 +/- 4 fmol/mg of protein (soluble)] and of high affinity [Kd, 0.6 +/- 0.2 nM (membrane) vs. 0.8 +/- 0.2 nM (soluble)]. To aid in purification of the receptors, an affinity resin was developed using an analog of prazosin, 2-(4-succinoylpiperazin-1-yl)-4-amino-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (CP 57,609; Kd 2.7 X 10(-7) M) immobilized via an amide linkage to agarose. The resulting resin demonstrated high affinity (Kd 3.2 X 10(-7) M) for the solubilized receptors, as determined by competitive inhibition assay. The degree of substitution to the resin was determined by a direct radioimmunoassay using antibodies against albumin-complexed CP 57,609 and found to be 0.1 to 0.2 mumol/ml of agarose. Affinity chromatography using the resin resulted in 513-fold purification in a single step. Moreover, the specificity of the purified binding sites was similar to that of membrane-bound receptors. This novel affinity resin should thus provide a powerful tool for isolating the receptor protein in quantities sufficient for detailed biochemical characterization. PMID:6285370

  7. Enhancement of starch conversion efficiency with free and immobilized pullalanase and alpha-1,4 glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.R.; Venkatasubramanian, K.

    1982-02-01

    Glucoamylase and pullulanase were immobilized on reconstituted bovine-hide collagen membranes using the covalent azide linkage method. A pretanning step was incorporated into the immobilization procedure to enable the support matrix to resist proteolytic activity while accommodating an operating temperature of 50 degrees Celcius. The immobilized glucoamylase and pullulanase activities were 0.91 and 0.022 mg dextrose equivalent (DE) min-1 cm-2 of membrane, respectively. Immobilized glucoamylase had a half-life of 50 days while the immobilized pullulanase had a half-life of 7 days. This is a considerably improved stability over that reported by other researchers. The enzymes were studied in their free and immobilized forms on a variety of starch substrates including waxy maize, a material which contains 80% alpha-1-6-glucosidic linkages. Substrate concentrations ranged from 1% to a typical commercial concentration of 30%. Conversion efficiencies of 90-92% DE were obtained with free and immobilized glucoamylase preparations. Conversion enhancements of 4-5 mg of DE above this level were obtained by the use of pullulanase in its free or immobilized forms. Close examination of free pullulanase stability as a function of pH indicated improved thermal stability at higher pH values. At 50 degrees Celcius and pH 5.0, the free enzyme was inactivated after 24 hours. At pH 7.0, the enzyme still possessed one-half its activity after 72 hours. Studies were conducted in both batch and continuous total recycle reactors. All experiments were conducted at 50 degrees Celcius. Experiments conducted with coimmobilized enzymes proved quite promising. Levels of conversion equivalent to those obtained with the individually immobilized enzymes were realized. (Refs. 16).

  8. Distribution of primaquine in human blood: Drug-binding to alpha 1-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.; Frischer, H. )

    1990-12-01

    To clarify the distribution of the antimalarial primaquine in human blood, we measured the drug separately in the liquid, cellular, and ultrafiltrate phases. Washed red cells resuspended at a hematocrit of 0.4 were exposed to a submaximal therapeutic level of 250 ng/ml of carbon 14-labeled primaquine. The tracer was recovered quantitatively in separated plasma and red cells. Over 75% of the total labeled drug was found in red cells suspended in saline solution, but only 10% to 30% in red cells suspended in plasma. The plasma effect was not mediated by albumin. Studies with alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, an agent that displaces AGP-bound drugs, and cord blood known to have decreased AGP established that primaquine binds to physiologic amounts of the glycoprotein in plasma. Red cell primaquine concentration increased linearly as AGP level fell and as the free drug fraction rose. We suggest that clinical blood levels of primaquine include the red cell fraction or whole blood level because (1) erythrocytic primaquine is a sizable and highly variable component of the total drug in blood; (2) this component reflects directly the free drug in plasma, and inversely the extent of binding to AGP; (3) the amount of free primaquine may influence drug transport into specific tissues in vivo; and (4) fluctuations of AGP, an acute-phase reactant that increases greatly in patients with malaria and other infections, markedly affect the partition of primaquine in blood. Because AGP binds many basic drugs, unrecognized primaquine-drug interactions may exist.

  9. Transcriptional promoter of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Greenspan, D S

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1). The transcriptional promoter is shown to have a number of features characteristic of the promoters of 'housekeeping' and growth-control-related genes. It lacks obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, has multiple transcription start sites, has a high GC content, lies within a well-defined CpG island and has a number of consensus sites for the potential binding of transcription factor Sp1. This type of promoter structure, while unusual for a collagen gene, is consistent with the broad distribution of expression of COL5A1 and is reminiscent of the promoter structures of the genes encoding type VI collagen, which has a similarly broad distribution of expression. Stepwise deletion of COL5A1 5' sequences, placed upstream of a heterologous reporter gene, yielded a gradual decrease in promoter activity, indicating that the COL5A1 promoter is composed of an array of cis-acting elements. A minimal promoter region contained within the 212 bp immediately upstream of the major transcription start site contained no consensus sequences for the binding of known transcription factors, but gel mobility shift assays showed this region to bind nuclear factors, including Sp1, at a number of sites. The major transcription start site is flanked by an upstream 34-bp oligopurine/oligopyrimidine stretch, or 'GAGA' box, and a downstream 56-bp GAGA box which contains a 10-bp mirror repeat and is sensitive to cleavage with S1 nuclease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7646438

  10. Revascularization of pancreatic islet allografts is enhanced by α-1-antitrypsin under anti-inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bellacen, Keren; Kalay, Noa; Ozeri, Eyal; Shahaf, Galit; Lewis, Eli C

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are a highly vascularized entity, and their transplantation into diabetic individuals requires optimal revascularization. In addition, β-cells in islets are extremely sensitive to inflammation. α-1-Antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating serine-protease inhibitor that is available for clinical use as an affinity-purified human product, has been shown to protect islets from graft failure in mouse transplantation models and to achieve readily vascularized islet grafts. AAT is known to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and release, as well as protect from proteolytic cleavage of VEGF by elastase, promote viability of endothelial cells, and enhance migration of myocytes. Our aim was to examine whether AAT enhances vasculogenesis toward islet grafts. We employed Matrigel-islet plugs as means to introduce islets in an explantable isolated compartment and examined vessel formation, vessel maturation, and inflammatory profile of explants 9 days after implantation. Also, we examined primary epithelial cell grafts that were prepared from lungs of mice that are transgenic for human AAT. In addition, aortic ring sprouting assay was performed, and HUVEC tube formation assays were studied in the presence of AAT. Our findings indicate that islet grafts exhibit mature vessels in the presence of AAT, as demonstrated by morphology, as well as expression of endothelial CD31, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and von Willebrand factor (vWF). Epithelial cells that express human AAT achieved a similar positive outcome. Aortic ring sprouting was enhanced in AAT-treated cultures and also in cultures that contained primary epithelial cells from human AAT transgenic animals in the absence of added AAT. According to the tube formation assay, HUVECs exhibited superior responses in the presence of AAT. We conclude that vasculogenesis toward islet grafts is enhanced in the presence of AAT. Together with the remarkable safety profile of AAT, the study supports its

  11. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. PMID:27354786

  12. Rare deficiency {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin variants; current status and SSCP analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The serine protease inhibitor {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin ({alpha}{sub 1}AT) is an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. A deficiency of {alpha}{sub 1}AT (< 20% of the normal amount of {alpha}{sub 1}AT) is associated with early-onset emphysema and childhood liver disease. The most common deficiency allele, PI{sup *}Z, has a frequency of 1-2% in the North American white population. Several rare deficiency alleles (including null (QO) alleles; < 1% of normal) with a combined frequency of approximately 10{sup -4}, have been reported. Of 24 sequenced deficiency variants, the defect in 15 has been proven to be due to gene deletion (2), mRNA degradation (2), error in mRNA processing (1), intracellular protein accumulation (5) and intracellular protein degradation (5). We have determined conditions for detection of new mutations. We have screened DNA from 20 individuals carrying rare deficiency alleles. In some individuals, RFLP haplotype analysis suggested the presence of a new variant. The root alleles, M1 (Ala 213) or M1 (Val 213), and the presence of variants whose mutant sequence alters a restriction endonuclease site were determined by digestion of the amplified exon. Mutation detection was performed by SSCP analysis of each of the four coding exons followed by direct sequencing of the amplified exon. 12 of 14 known mutations (85%) were detected by SSCP analysis. We detected a new null allele in a patient that also carries the QO{sup *}hongkong allele. C to A transversion at the third nucleotide of codon 38 creates a stop codon on the M1(Val 213) root allele. This new variant allele has been named PI{sup *}QOkowloon. Characterization of the mutations leading to {alpha}{sub 1}AT deficiency allows delineation of amino acids critical for stability, for normal secretion and for normal function.

  13. α1-Antitrypsin Portland, a bioengineered serpin highly selective for furin: Application as an antipathogenic agent

    PubMed Central

    Jean, François; Stella, Kori; Thomas, Laurel; Liu, Gseping; Xiang, Yang; Reason, Andrew J.; Thomas, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The important role of furin in the proteolytic activation of many pathogenic molecules has made this endoprotease a target for the development of potent and selective antiproteolytic agents. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the protein-based inhibitor α1-antitrypsin Portland (α1-PDX) as an antipathogenic agent that can be used prophylactically to block furin-dependent cell killing by Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Biochemical analysis of the specificity of a bacterially expressed His- and FLAG-tagged α1-PDX (α1-PDX/hf) revealed the selectivity of the α1-PDX/hf reactive site loop for furin (Ki, 600 pM) but not for other proprotein convertase family members or other unrelated endoproteases. Kinetic studies show that α1-PDX/hf inhibits furin by a slow tight-binding mechanism characteristic of serpin molecules and functions as a suicide substrate inhibitor. Once bound to furin’s active site, α1-PDX/hf partitions with equal probability to undergo proteolysis by furin at the C-terminal side of the reactive center -Arg355-Ile-Pro-Arg358-↓ or to form a kinetically trapped SDS-stable complex with the enzyme. This partitioning between the complex-forming and proteolytic pathways contributes to the ability of α1-PDX/hf to differentially inhibit members of the proprotein convertase family. Finally, we propose a structural model of the α1-PDX-reactive site loop that explains the high degree of enzyme selectivity of this serpin and which can be used to generate small molecule furin inhibitors. PMID:9636142

  14. α1-antitrypsin production by proinflammatory and antiinflammatory macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; Savage, Nigel D L; Stolk, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2012-05-01

    α(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) acts as an important neutrophil elastase inhibitor in the lung. Although the hepatocyte is considered to be the primary source of AAT, local production by monocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells may contribute to the formation of an antielastase screen. Because monocytes can differentiate into a heterogeneous population of macrophages with subpopulations ranging from proinflammatory properties (MΦ-1) to antiinflammatory properties (ΜΦ-2) and into dendritic cells (DCs), we studied whether LPS, TNF-α, and oncostatin M (OSM) enhance AAT production differentially in cultured ΜΦ-1, ΜΦ-2, and DCs. Monocytes from healthy blood donors were cultured for 7 days in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor, or GM-CSF with IL-4 to obtain ΜΦ-1, ΜΦ-2, and immature (i)DCs, respectively. Cells were stimulated with LPS, TNF-α, or OSM, and AAT synthesis was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA. Spontaneous release of AAT was higher in ΜΦ-1 than in ΜΦ-2 and iDCs, and only LPS significantly increased AAT production in ΜΦ-1, ΜΦ-2, and DC. TNF-α and OSM did not affect AAT secretion. The secretion levels of the related protease inhibitors α-1 antichymotrypsin and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor were below the limits of detection by ELISA. In contrast to the protein data, analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed that 24-hour LPS exposure caused a maximal 2.1-fold AAT mRNA increase in ΜΦ-1, a 21-fold increase in ΜΦ-2, and an 11-fold increase in DCs. These data suggest that cellular differentiation is a regulator of local AAT production. PMID:22162908

  15. α-1-Antitrypsin is an endogenous inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Gregory B.; Chan, Edward D.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Shapiro, Leland

    2009-01-01

    Several observations suggest endogenous suppressors of inflammatory mediators are present in human blood. α-1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in blood, and AAT possesses anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that in vitro stimulation of whole blood from persons with a genetic AAT deficiency resulted in enhanced cytokine production compared with blood from healthy subjects. Using whole blood from healthy subjects, dilution of blood with RPMI tissue-culture medium, followed by incubation for 18 h, increased spontaneous production of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra) significantly, compared with undiluted blood. Dilution-induced cytokine production suggested the presence of one or more circulating inhibitors of cytokine synthesis present in blood. Serially diluting blood with tissue-culture medium in the presence of cytokine stimulation with heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epi) resulted in 1.2- to 55-fold increases in cytokine production compared with S. epi stimulation alone. Diluting blood with autologous plasma did not increase the production of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, or IL-1Ra, suggesting that the endogenous, inhibitory activity of blood resided in plasma. In whole blood, diluted and stimulated with S. epi, exogenous AAT inhibited IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β significantly but did not suppress induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1Ra and IL-10. These ex vivo and in vitro observations suggest that endogenous AAT in blood contributes to the suppression of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. PMID:19197072

  16. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition, there is

  17. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  18. α-1-Antitrypsin detected by MALDI imaging in the study of glomerulonephritis: Its relevance in chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; De Sio, Gabriele; Ferrario, Franco; Scalia, Carla; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Markoska, Katerina; Granata, Antonio; Spasovski, Goce; Jankowski, Joachim; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic glomerulonephritis (GN), such as membranous glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and IgA nephropathy (IgAN), represent the most frequent primary glomerular kidney diseases (GKDs) worldwide. Although the renal biopsy currently remains the gold standard for the routine diagnosis of idiopathic GN, the invasiveness and diagnostic difficulty related with this procedure highlight the strong need for new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to be translated into less invasive diagnostic tools. MALDI-MS imaging MALDI-MSI was applied to fresh-frozen bioptic renal tissue from patients with a histological diagnosis of FSGS (n = 6), IgAN, (n = 6) and membranous glomerulonephritis (n = 7), and from controls (n = 4) in order to detect specific molecular signatures of primary glomerulonephritis. MALDI-MSI was able to generate molecular signatures capable to distinguish between normal kidney and pathological GN, with specific signals (m/z 4025, 4048, and 4963) representing potential indicators of chronic kidney disease development. Moreover, specific disease-related signatures (m/z 4025 and 4048 for FSGS, m/z 4963 and 5072 for IgAN) were detected. Of these signals, m/z 4048 was identified as α-1-antitrypsin and was shown to be localized to the podocytes within sclerotic glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. α-1-Antitrypsin could be one of the markers of podocyte stress that is correlated with the development of FSGS due to both an excessive loss and a hypertrophy of podocytes. PMID:26749278

  19. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors and calcium sources in adrenergic neurogenic contractions of rat vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Bültmann, R.; Kurz, A. K.; Starke, K.

    1994-01-01

    1. The involvement of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in adrenergic neurogenic contractions of different type was studied in epididymal and prostatic portions of the rat vas deferens. 2. The adrenergic component of neurogenic contractions was isolated by suramin (300 microM). Twitch-like and tonic contractions were elicited by appropriate pulse patterns of electrical field stimulation, and contractions relying on intracellular calcium mobilization and calcium entry were isolated by means of nifedipine (10 microM) and ryanodine (20 microM), respectively. Increasing concentrations of 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101), alpha-ethyl-3,4,5-trimethoxy-alpha-(3-((2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)ethyl)- amino)-propyl)benzeneacetonitrile (HV 723), prazosin and 5-methylurapidil progressively, monophasically and with potency decreasing in that order reduced and finally abolished all types of contraction, with one exception: concentration-effect curves of 5-methylurapidil in epididymal segments in the presence of ryanodine levelled off at about 75% inhibition. In the presence of both nifedipine (10 microM) and ryanodine (20 microM), contractions were abolished. 3. Contractions elicited by exogenous noradrenaline were also studied in the presence of either nifedipine 10 microM (prostatic segments) or ryanodine 20 microM (epididymal segments). Increasing concentrations of tamsulosin, WB 4101, benoxathian, HV 723, prazosin, 5-methylurapidil and urapidil progressively, monophasically and with potency decreasing in that order reduced and eventually abolished both kinds of contraction, with two exceptions: in epididymal segments in the presence of ryanodine, the concentration-effect curve of 5-methylurapidil was biphasic and the curve of urapidil levelled off at only partial inhibition. 4. In slices prepared from the prostatic end and preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline, WB 4101, HV 723, prazosin and 5-methylurapidil, at the highest concentrations tested against

  20. Alpha-1 adrenoceptors in brown adipose tissue of lean and ob/ob mice

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens-Zaror, G.; Himms-Hagen, J.

    1986-03-01

    Obese (ob/ob) mice have a low capacity to increase thyroxine 5'-deiodinase (T4 5'-D) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) when exposed to cold. This effect is mediated by alpha-1 (A-1) adrenoceptors. The authors objective was to find out whether BAT of the ob/ob mouse has normal A-1 receptors. Saturation analysis of binding of (3H)-WB4101 at 0.05 nM to 10 ..mu..M to crude membrane preparations (100,000 g pellets from Polytron homogenates) using the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard, showed two populations of binding sites in BAT of lean (+/+, 11-15 wk old) mice. Acute exposure (12 h, 14/sup 0/C) or acclimation to cold (3 wk, 14/sup 0/C) did not alter affinity or concentration of sites. Displacement with yohimbine and prazosin indicated binding of WB4101 to A-1 receptors. Very young (5 wk) lean (+/.) and obese mice had similar affinity constants (lean 0.13 +/- 0.043 and 34.2 +/- 14.9; obese, 0.12 +/- 0.028 and 20.9 +/- 5.48 nM) and concentrations (lean 22.4 +/- 3.8 and 647 +/- 137; obese, 28.6 +/- 4.6 and 547 +/- 105 fmol/mg protein) of sites. Old (1 yr) mice had high affinity sites similar to those in younger animals (KD lean 0.19 +/- 0.028, obese, 0.25 +/- 0.075; Bmax lean, 60.2 +/- 12.1; obese, 63.1 +/- 13.5 fmol/mg protein). The authors conclude that the ob/ob mouse has normal high affinity A-1 receptors in BAT. Anomalous properties of low affinity binding in old ob/ob mice could not be characterized because of high nonspecific binding. BAT of the ob/ob mouse does not lack A-1 receptors but may have a post-receptor alteration in the A-1 adrenoceptor-mediated response.

  1. Comparative cleavage sites within the reactive-site loop of native and oxidized alpha1-proteinase inhibitor by selected bacterial proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, M; Potempa, J; Nelson, D; Kozik, A; Travis, J

    1999-10-01

    Human alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) is responsible for the tight control of neutrophil elastase activity which, if down regulated, may cause local excessive tissue degradation. Many bacterial proteinases can inactivate alpha1-PI by hydrolytic cleavage within its reactive site, resulting in the down regulation of elastase, and this mechanism is likely to contribute to the connective tissue damage often associated with bacterial infections. Another pathway of the inactivation of alpha1-PI is reversible and involves oxidation of a critical active-site methionine residue that may influence inhibitor susceptibility to proteolytic inactivation. Hence, the aim of this work was to determine whether this oxidation event might affectthe rate and pattern of the cleavage of the alpha1-PI reactive-site loop by selected bacterial proteinases, including thermolysin, aureolysin, serralysin, pseudolysin, Staphylococcus aureus serine proteinase, streptopain, and periodontain. A shift of cleavage specificity was observed after alpha1-PI oxidation, with a preference for the Glu354-Ala355 bond by most of the proteinases tested. Only aureolysin and serralysin cleave the oxidized form of alpha1-PI faster than the native inhibitor, suggesting that bacteria which secrete these metalloproteinases may specifically take advantage of the host defense oxidative mechanism to accelerate elimination of alpha1-PI and, consequently, tissue degradation by neutrophil elastase. PMID:10595584

  2. Sensitization of rhabdo-, lenti-, and spumaviruses to human serum by galactosyl(alpha1-3)galactosylation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Liong, S H; Bieniasz, P D; Jäger, U; Porter, C D; Friedman, T; McClure, M O; Weiss, R A

    1997-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 2, and human foamy virus, which were produced by cell lines expressing galactosyl(alpha1-3)galactosyl (alphaGal) sugars, were found to be less stable in human serum than those from alphaGal-negative cells, indicating that galactosyl(alpha1-3)galactosylation sensitizes these viruses as well as mammalian type C oncoviruses (Rother et al., J. Exp. Med. 182:1345-1355, 1995; Takeuchi et al., Nature (London) 379:85-88, 1996) to complement killing via natural anti-alphaGal antibodies. Thus, virus killing mediated by anti-alphaGal antibodies may play a role as a barrier to animal-to-human infection of various enveloped viruses. Virus vectors for human in vivo gene therapy based on the viruses mentioned above should be produced from alphaGal-negative cells. PMID:9223512

  3. Structural basis of carbohydrate recognition by a Man(alpha1-2)Man-specific lectin from Bowringia milbraedii.

    PubMed

    Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-07-01

    The crystal structure of the seed lectin from the tropical legume Bowringia milbraedii was determined in complex with the disaccharide ligand Man(alpha1-2)Man. In solution, the protein exhibits a dynamic dimer-tetramer equilibrium, consistent with the concanavalin A-type tetramer observed in the crystal. Contacts between the tetramers are mediated almost exclusively through the carbohydrate ligand, resulting in a crystal lattice virtually identical to that of the concanavalin-A:Man(alpha1-2)Man complex, even though both proteins have less than 50% sequence identity. The disaccharide binds exclusively in a "downstream" binding mode, with the non-reducing mannose occupying the monosaccharide-binding site. The reducing mannose is bound in a predominantly polar subsite involving Tyr131, Gln218, and Tyr219. PMID:16567368

  4. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; Guerra, G.C. Del; Glina, S.; Mazzurana, M.; Bernardo, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers as medical expulsive treatment in children with distal ureterolithiasis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and LILACS databases. We further searched manually the references of the primary studies. Searches were concluded on October 4th, 2014. Articles were selected, independently and in pairs, by the respective titles and summaries. Any divergence was resolved by consensus. Evidence Synthesis: Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists increased the probability of calculus expulsion by 27% (NNT=4). Calculi smaller than 5mm, increased by 33% (NNT=3). Larger than 5mm, increased by 34% (NNT=3). Conclusion: Alpha-1 adrenergic blocker use is related with a greater incidence of expulsion of ureteral calculi, smaller or greater than 5mm, and fewer episodes of pain when compared to ibuprofen. However it is necessary larger samples to enhance the power analysis of the expulsion of ureteral calculi larger than 5mm and the episodes of pain. Patient Summary: This review analyzed the outcome of alpha adrenergic antagonist in children with ureteral calculi. We conclude that it is the best medicine for use, since it helps the expulsion of the stone. PMID:26717117

  5. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  6. A Myocardial Slice Culture Model Reveals Alpha-1A-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. Croft; Singh, Abhishek; Cowley, Patrick; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Montgomery, Megan D.; Swigart, Philip M.; De Marco, Teresa; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translation of preclinical findings could benefit from a simple, reproducible, high throughput human model to study myocardial signaling. Alpha-1A-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are expressed at very low levels in the human heart, and it is unknown if they function. Objectives To develop a high throughput human myocardial slice culture model, and to test the hypothesis that alpha-1A- ARs are functional in the human heart. Methods Cores of LV free wall 8 mm diameter were taken from 52 hearts (18 failing and 34 nonfailing). Slices 250 μm thick were cut with a Krumdieck apparatus and cultured using a rotating incubation unit. Results About 60 slices were cut from each LV core, and a typical study could use 96 slices. Myocyte morphology was maintained, and diffusion into the slice center was rapid. Slice viability was stable for at least 3 days in culture by ATP and MTT assays. The beta-AR agonist isoproterenol stimulated phospholamban phosphorylation, and the alpha-1A-AR agonist A61603 stimulated ERK phosphorylation, with nanomolar EC50 values in slices from both failing and nonfailing hearts. Strips cut from the slices were used to quantify activation of contraction by isoproterenol, A61603, and phenylephrine. The slices supported transduction by adenovirus. Conclusions We have developed a simple, high throughput LV myocardial slice culture model to study signaling in the human heart. This model can be useful for translational studies, and we show for the first time that the alpha-1A-AR is functional in signaling and contraction in the human heart. PMID:27453955

  7. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-05-15

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  8. Effects of jump training on procollagen alpha(1)(i) mRNA expression and its relationship with muscle collagen concentration.

    PubMed

    Ducomps, Christophe; Larrouy, Dominique; Mairal, Aline; Doutreloux, Jean-Paul; Lebas, Francois; Mauriege, Pascale

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a prolonged high-intensity exercise, jumping, on procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level and collagen concentration in different muscles of trained (T) and control (C) rabbits. Procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA expression was much higher (2.8 to 23.5 times) in semimembranosus proprius (SMP), a slow-twitch oxidative muscle, than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), rectus femoris (RF), and psoas major (Psoas) muscles, both fast-twitch mixed and glycolytic, whatever group was considered (p < 0.001). Procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level also decreased significantly between 50 and 140 days in all muscles (0.001< p < 0.01). However, mRNA levels were 16 to 97% greater at 140 days in all muscles of T animals compared to C ones (0.01< p <0.05). Collagen concentrations of EDL and RF muscles were also higher (14 to 19%) in T than in C rabbits at 90 and 140 days (0.001 < p < 0.05). In the whole sample, collagen concentration was negatively associated with the procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level in EDL and RF muscles (- 0.49 < r < (- 0.44, p < 0.05), while being positively related to mRNA expression in SMP and Psoas muscles (0.65 < r < 0.85, p < 0.01). It is concluded that jump training clearly restricts the decrease of procollagen (I) mRNA level and probably affects collagen synthesis level. In trained rabbit muscles, the maintenance of a better synthesis level could partly explain the higher collagen concentrations found in EDL and RF at 140 days. Nevertheless, the collagen degradation process seems to play the main role in the increase of total collagen concentration with age in EDL and RF muscles. PMID:15064425

  9. Nonlinear relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and norepinephrine-stimulated calcium flux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, W.S.; Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the relationship between vascular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and receptor-coupled calcium flux, the authors have studied (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding and l-norepinephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from the rabbit aorta. In a crude cellular homogenate, (/sup 3/H)prazosin bound to a single high affinity site, whereas l-norepinephrine (NE) binding was best described by a two-site model. NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was concentration-dependent (EC/sup 50/ = 108 nM) and potently inhibited by prazosin (IC/sup 50/ = 0.15 nM). For the total receptor pool identified by (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding, the relationship between receptor occupancy by NE and NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was markedly nonlinear, such that 50% of maximum NE-stimulated efflux occurred with occupancy of only approximately 7% of receptors. These two experimental approaches provide direct evidence for the presence in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells of a sizable pool of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in excess of those needed for maximum NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. This evidence of ''spare'' receptors, together with the finding of two affinity states of agonist binding, raises the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in this system.

  10. Induction of apoptosis in the prostate by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists: a novel effect of "old" drugs.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, N; Jacobs, S C

    2000-08-01

    Advances in our understanding of the integrated functions governing prostate cell proliferation and cell death imply that effective therapies for prostate neoplasia should not only be molecularly targeted, but should be customized to take into account the delicate balance of opposing growth influences. Evidence from studies on the dynamics of prostate growth in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer established that disruption of the molecular mechanisms that regulate apoptosis and cell proliferation among the stroma and epithelial cell populations may underlie the neoplastic development that characterizes the aging gland. Our own efforts have been focused on investigating whether a1-adrenoceptor antagonists clinically used for the relief of the obstructive symptoms associated with BPH affect prostate pathophysiology via mechanisms other than smooth muscle contraction. Such efforts led to the identification of a novel effect of two alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin. More recent in vitro experiments examined the potential anti-tumor action of three clinically used alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists--doxazosin, terazosin and tamsulosin--against prostate cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin, but not tamsulosin, to suppress prostate growth by inducing apoptosis among the epithelial cells in the benign and malignant prostate. Thus, evidence indicates that rather than just causing pure relaxation of the smooth muscle, certain alpha1-blockers can also affect the dynamics of prostate growth by changing the balance between prostate cell proliferation and apoptosis at the expense of the proliferative process. PMID:12084321

  11. Characterization of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a key control point in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wakarchuk, Warren; Schur, Melissa J; St Michael, Frank; Li, Jinjuan; Eichler, Eva; Whitfield, Dennis

    2004-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria meningitidis has a control point that regulates the extension of the alpha-chain on heptose (I) of the LOS. The gene that encodes the protein responsible for this control had been identified elsewhere, but the enzyme encoded by the gene was not characterized. We have now shown that this same control mechanism operates in the related species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, using a gene knockout and subsequent characterization of the LOS species produced. We also cloned and expressed the enzyme from both of these pathogens. Using a synthetic acceptor substrate, we have shown unequivocally that the enzyme is an alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Experiments with both the core oligosaccharide and the synthetic acceptors suggests that the addition of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety on the heptose (II) residue precedes the addition of the ethanolamine phosphate at the O3 position on this heptose (II), and that in the absence of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety leads to the addition of an extra ethanolamine phosphate on the heptose (II) residue. Our data do not support the hypothesis that ethanolamine phosphate at O3 of heptose (II) is added and is then required for the addition of the N-acetylglucosamine at O2 by the LgtK enzyme. This enzyme represents a control point in the biosynthesis of the LOS of this pathogen and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15044393

  12. Identification of Core Alpha 1,3-Fucosyltransferase Gene From Silkworm: An Insect Popularly Used to Express Mammalian Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Sachi; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Nakaso, Yuzuru; Tomita, Masahiro; Takahisa, Manabu; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2015-01-01

    Silkworm has great potential as production system of recombinant mammalian proteins. When the protein products are used for medical purpose, it is required to reduce the risk of an allergy, the content of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue attached to the N-glycan of proteins, for example. We isolated the gene of an enzyme responsible for the transfer of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue, core alpha 1,3-fucosyltransferase (Fuc-T C3), from silkworm. A candidate cDNA for silkworm Fuc-T C3 was isolated as a homolog of the fruit fly enzyme gene fucTA. The gene was located on chromosome 7 of the silkworm genome and was composed of seven exons, which spanned approximately 10 kb on the genome. The coding region of the gene was 1,350 bp and encoded a 450-amino acid protein with a molecular mass of 52.2 kDa. Deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region showed one transmembrane domain in its N-terminal and typical motifs common to fucosyltransferases including Fuc-T C3s of other organisms in its C-terminal. The extract of CHO cells transfected with the cDNA showed Fuc-T C3 activity using GDP-fucose and DABS-GnGn peptide as substrates. These results showed this cDNA clone actually encodes silkworm Fuc-T C3. PMID:26223947

  13. Polymorphism and structure of the gene coding for the alpha 1 subunit of the Artemia franciscana Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, A; Perona, R; Sastre, L

    1997-01-01

    Genomic clones coding for one of the two identified Artemia franciscana Na/K-ATPase alpha subunits, the alpha 1 subunit, have been isolated. Several overlapping clones were obtained, although their restriction maps showed a large heterogeneity. Sequencing of their exons showed that they differ in up to 3.46% of their nucleotides in translated regions and 8.18% in untranslated regions. Southern blot analysis of DNA purified from different lots of A. franciscana cysts and from isolated individuals suggests that the variation is due to the existence of multiple Na/K-ATPase alpha 1 subunit alleles in A. franciscana. The Na/K-ATPase alpha 1 subunit gene is divided into 15 exons. Ten of the 14 introns are located in identical positions in this gene as in the human Na/K-ATPase alpha 3 subunit gene. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the gene has allowed identification of the transcription-initiation sites. The adjacent upstream region has been shown to have functional promoter activity in cultured mammalian cells, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of some of the promoter regulatory sequences. PMID:9020888

  14. Effect of aging on alpha-1 adrenergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, D.M.; Bowyer, J.F.; Masserano, J.M.; Zahniser, N.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The effects of aging were examined on the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in three brain regions. Tissue minces of thalamus, cerebral cortex and hippocampus from 3-, 18- and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol. Exposure of these prelabeled minces to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine revealed that accumulation of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates was selectively reduced by 20 to 30% in the thalamus and cerebral cortex of the oldest age group. Analysis of concentration-response and competition binding curves indicated that this decrease was due to diminished agonist efficacy rather than diminished receptor affinity. The reduction in responsiveness to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex and the lack of any changes in the hippocampus parallel previously reported changes in the density of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with aging. These data indicate that the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis is reduced in some, but not all, brain regions of aged Fischer 344 rats.

  15. alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin is the human plasma inhibitor of macrophage ectoenzymes that cleave pro-macrophage stimulating protein.

    PubMed

    Skeel, A; Leonard, E J

    2001-06-15

    Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP) is secreted as 78-kDa single chain pro-MSP, which is converted to biologically active, disulfide-linked alphabeta chain MSP by cleavage at Arg(483)-Val(484). Murine resident peritoneal macrophages have two cell surface proteolytic activities that cleave pro-MSP. One is a pro-MSP convertase, which cleaves pro-MSP to active MSP; the other degrades pro-MSP. The degrading protease is inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor or by low concentrations of blood plasma, which allows the convertase to cleave pro-MSP to MSP. Using pro-MSP cleavage as the assay, we purified the inhibitor from human plasma. The bulk of the plasma protein was removed by salting out and by isoelectric precipitation of albumin. Highly purified inhibitor was then obtained in three steps: dye-ligand binding and elution, ion exchange chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography gel filtration. After SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transfer to a polyvinylidene membrane, N-terminal sequencing of the product identified it as alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin. The mean concentration of alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin in human plasma is 7 micrometer. At this concentration, alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin inhibits both macrophage enzymes. A concentration of 0.4 micrometer, which is in the expected concentration range in extracellular fluid, preferentially inhibits the degrading enzyme, which allows for cleavage to active MSP by the pro-MSP convertase. PMID:11274154

  16. Integrin alpha1beta1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor activation by controlling peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent caveolin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiwu; Whiting, Carrie; Borza, Corina; Hu, Wen; Mont, Stacey; Bulus, Nada; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-06-01

    Integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates the generation of profibrotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation; however, the mechanism by which it does this is unknown. In this study, we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a scaffolding protein that binds integrins and controls growth factor receptor signaling, participates in integrin alpha1beta1-mediated EGFR activation. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells (MCs) have reduced Cav-1 levels, and reexpression of the integrin alpha1 subunit increases Cav-1 levels, decreases EGFR activation, and reduces ROS production. Downregulation of Cav-1 in wild-type MCs increases EGFR phosphorylation and ROS synthesis, while overexpression of Cav-1 in the integrin alpha1-null MCs decreases EGFR-mediated ROS production. We further show that integrin alpha1-null MCs have increased levels of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which leads to reduced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a transcription factor that positively regulates Cav-1 expression. Moreover, activation of PPARgamma or inhibition of ERK increases Cav-1 levels in the integrin alpha1-null MCs. Finally, we show that glomeruli of integrin alpha1-null mice have reduced levels of Cav-1 and activated PPARgamma but increased levels of phosphorylated EGFR both at baseline and following injury. Thus, integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates EGFR activation by positively controlling Cav-1 levels, and the ERK/PPARgamma axis plays a key role in regulating integrin alpha1beta1-dependent Cav-1 expression and consequent EGFR-mediated ROS production. PMID:20368353

  17. Characterization of a cDNA encoding a novel human Golgi alpha 1, 2-mannosidase (IC) involved in N-glycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, L O; Herscovics, A

    2000-10-13

    A human cDNA encoding a 70.9-kDa type II membrane protein with sequence similarity to class I alpha1,2-mannosidases was isolated. The enzymatic properties of the novel alpha1,2-mannosidase IC were studied by expressing its catalytic domain in Pichia pastoris as a secreted glycoprotein. alpha1,2-Mannosidase IC sequentially hydrolyzes the alpha1,2-linked mannose residues of [(3)H]mannose-labeled Man(9)GlcNAc to form [(3)H]Man(6)GlcNAc and a small amount of [(3)H]Man(5)GlcNAc. The enzyme requires calcium for activity and is inhibited by both 1-deoxymannojirimycin and kifunensine. The order of mannose removal was determined by separating oligosaccharide isomers formed from pyridylaminated Man(9)GlcNAc(2) by high performance liquid chromatography. The terminal alpha1,2-linked mannose residue from the middle branch is the last mannose removed by the enzyme. This residue is the mannose cleaved from Man(9)GlcNAc(2) by the endoplasmic reticulum alpha1, 2-mannosidase I to form Man(8)GlcNAc(2) isomer B. The order of mannose hydrolysis from either pyridylaminated Man(9)GlcNAc(2) or Man(8)GlcNAc(2) isomer B differs from that previously reported for mammalian Golgi alpha1,2-mannosidases IA and IB. The full-length alpha1,2-mannosidase IC was localized to the Golgi of MDBK and MDCK cells by indirect immunofluorescence. Northern blot analysis showed tissue-specific expression of a major transcript of 3.8 kilobase pairs. The expression pattern is different from that of human Golgi alpha1,2-mannosidases IA and IB. Therefore, the human genome contains at least three differentially regulated Golgi alpha1, 2-mannosidase genes encoding enzymes with similar, but not identical specificities. PMID:10915796

  18. High-density lipoproteins potentiate α1-antitrypsin therapy in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan-Antonio; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Louedec, Liliane; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Antonino; Levoye, Angelique; Plantier, Laurent; Meilhac, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Several studies report that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) can carry α1-antitrypsin (AAT; an elastase inhibitor). We aimed to determine whether injection of exogenous HDL, enriched or not in AAT, may have protective effects against pulmonary emphysema. After tracheal instillation of saline or elastase, mice were randomly treated intravenously with saline, human plasma HDL (75 mg apolipoprotein A1/kg), HDL-AAT (75 mg apolipoprotein A1-3.75 mg AAT/kg), or AAT alone (3.75 mg/kg) at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours. We have shown that HDL-AAT reached the lung and prevented the development of pulmonary emphysema by 59.3% at 3 weeks (alveoli mean chord length, 22.9 ± 2.8 μm versus 30.7 ± 4.5 μm; P < 0.001), whereas injection of HDL or AAT alone only showed a moderate, nonsignificant protective effect (28.2 ± 4.2 μm versus 30.7 ± 5 μm [P = 0.23] and 27.3 ± 5.66 μm versus 30.71 ± 4.96 μm [P = 0.18], respectively). Indeed, protection by HDL-AAT was significantly higher than that observed with HDL or AAT (P = 0.006 and P = 0.048, respectively). This protective effect was associated (at 6, 24, and 72 h) with: (1) a reduction in neutrophil and macrophage number in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; (2) decreased concentrations of IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and TNF-α in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma; (3) a reduction in matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activities; and (4) a reduction in the degradation of fibronectin, a marker of tissue damage. In addition, HDL-AAT reduced acute cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory response. Intravenous HDL-AAT treatment afforded a better protection against elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema than AAT alone, and may represent a significant development for the management of emphysema associated with AAT deficiency. PMID:24787644

  19. α1-Antitrypsin Combines with Plasma Fatty Acids and Induces Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Eileen; Wrenger, Sabine; Brügger, Britta; Salipalli, Sandeep; Immenschuh, Stephan; Aggarwal, Nupur; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Mahadeva, Ravi; Marcondes, A Mario Q; Dinarello, Charles A; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2015-10-15

    α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) purified from human plasma upregulates expression and release of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) in adherent human blood monocytes and in human lung microvascular endothelial cells, providing a mechanism for the broad immune-regulatory properties of A1AT independent of its antiprotease activity. In this study, we demonstrate that A1AT (Prolastin), a potent inducer of Angptl4, contains significant quantities of the fatty acids (FA) linoleic acid (C18:2) and oleic acid (C18:1). However, only trace amounts of FAs were present in preparations that failed to increase Angplt4 expression, for example, A1AT (Zemaira) or M-type A1AT purified by affinity chromatography. FA pull-down assays with Western blot analysis revealed a FA-binding ability of A1AT. In human blood-adherent monocytes, A1AT-FA conjugates upregulated expression of Angptl4 (54.9-fold, p < 0.001), FA-binding protein 4 (FABP4) (11.4-fold, p < 0.001), and, to a lesser degree, FA translocase (CD36) (3.1-fold, p < 0.001) relative to A1AT devoid of FA (A1AT-0). These latter effects of A1AT-FA were blocked by inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ (ST247) and PPARγ (GW9662). When compared with controls, cell pretreatment with ST247 diminished the effect of A1AT-LA on Angptl4 mRNA (11.6- versus 4.1-fold, p < 0.001) and FABP4 mRNA (5.4- versus 2.8-fold, p < 0.001). Similarly, preincubation of cells with GW9662 inhibited inducing effect of A1AT-LA on Angptl4 mRNA (by 2-fold, p < 0.001) and FABP4 mRNA (by 3-fold, p < 0.001). Thus, A1AT binds to FA, and it is this form of A1AT that induces Angptl4 and FABP4 expression via a PPAR-dependent pathway. These findings provide a mechanism for the unexplored area of A1AT biology independent of its antiprotease properties. PMID:26363050

  20. The drug 5-aminosalicylic acid rescues alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from the neutrophil oxidative inactivation. A possible contribution to its therapeutic action in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Vitale, E; Dallegri, F

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor is the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, a major tissue-damaging protease. When incubated with activated neutrophils, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor lost its pancreatic porcine elastase inhibitory capacity and became incapable of forming a sodium dodecyl sulphate-stable complex with pancreatic porcine elastase. Inhibitors and scavengers of neutrophil-derived reactive oxygen species outlined the crucial role of hypochlorous acid in the alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor inactivation. Moreover, the drug 5-aminosalicylic acid prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, when the capacity of 5-aminosalicylic acid to rescue alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from the neutrophil-derived attack was plotted as a function of the 5-aminosalicylic acid ability to scavenge neutrophil-derived hypochlorous acid, a positive linear relationship was found. Thus, our results provide a direct evidence that 5-aminosalicylic acid is able to prevent the oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophils. Therefore, we suggest that the drug has the potential to limit the elastase-mediated damage of colonic connective tissue by creating a microenvironment of active alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor around the neutrophils. PMID:1521714

  1. A galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose epitope on phospholipids of Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis is recognized by trypanosomatid-infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M

    1990-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M antibody reactive with galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose [Gal(alpha 1-3)Man] residues present on phospholipids extracted from Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis was found to be present in high titer in the serum of every normal individual studied. Periodate oxidation, acid hydrolysis, or acetylation suppressed immunoreactivity, suggesting that an oligosaccharide chain was responsible for antibody binding. Interaction occurs only with alpha-Gal terminal residues, since treatment of purified glycophospholipids with alpha-galactosidase but not with beta-galactosidase abolished it. Antibody bound to galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose-linked synthetic antigens but did not bind to the same residues present in rabbit, rat, and guinea pig erythrocytes or in murine laminin. Antigen-antibody binding was strongly blocked with Gal(alpha 1-3)Man and Gal(beta 1-4)Man. These results plus inhibition studies with several oligosaccharides suggest that they are indeed different from antibodies against the galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose residue. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody values were significantly elevated in 89% of patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, 84% of patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, 69% of patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, and 44 and 62% of patients with Trypanosoma cruzi or T. rangeli infection, respectively, but not in patients with 15 other different infectious and inflammatory diseases. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody readily absorbed to American Leishmania and Trypanosoma culture forms, suggesting a surface membrane localization of reactive epitope. Gal(alpha 1-3)Man-bearing glycophospholipid was easily extracted from American Leishmania promastigotes and T. cruzi trypomastigotes as well as from American Trypanosoma culture forms. The possibility that this antibody arises against parasitic glycophospholipid-linked Gal(alpha 1-3)Man terminal residues is proposed. PMID:1696285

  2. Role of receptor reserve in the inhibition of alpha-1 adrenoceptor-mediated pressor responses by calcium antagonists in the pithed rat.

    PubMed

    Jim, K F; Macia, R A; Matthews, W D

    1986-07-01

    The effect of the calcium channel antagonists nifedipine and FR 34235 on the vasopressor response to alpha-1 adrenoceptor stimulation in the pithed normotensive rat was investigated. The maximal pressor response elicited by the full alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonist SK&F l-89748 was slightly but significantly reduced by 1-mg/kg doses of nifedipine (21 +/- 2%) and FR 34235 (34 +/- 4%). In comparison, the maximal pressor response to alpha-1 adrenoceptor stimulation by the partial alpha-1 agonist SK&F 88444 was markedly inhibited by nifedipine (51 +/- 1%) and FR 34235 (65 +/- 3%). Partial inactivation of the postsynaptic alpha-1 adrenoceptors with phenoxybenzamine (0.1 mg/kg) resulted in a maximal increase in diastolic pressure to alpha-1 adrenoceptor activation by SK&F l-89748 less than that induced by SK&F 88444. After phenoxybenzamine treatment, nifedipine and FR 34235 produced even greater reductions in the maximal vasopressor response to alpha-1 adrenoceptor stimulation by SK&F l-89748 (77 +/- 8 and 85 +/- 1%, respectively). Moreover, an inverse linear correlation (r = 1.00) was observed between the sensitivity of the maximal vasopressor response to nifedipine and FR 34235 and the magnitude of the maximal pressor response. The data suggest that the sensitivity of the alpha-1 adrenoceptor-mediated pressor response to inhibition by calcium antagonists in the pithed rat is inversely related to the magnitude of the pressor response, and they are consistent with the notion that the presence of "spare" alpha-1 adrenoceptors may determine the sensitivity of the pressor response to calcium antagonists. PMID:3014124

  3. Automated high-content live animal drug screening using C. elegans expressing the aggregation prone serpin α1-antitrypsin Z.

    PubMed

    Gosai, Sager J; Kwak, Joon Hyeok; Luke, Cliff J; Long, Olivia S; King, Dale E; Kovatch, Kevin J; Johnston, Paul A; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    The development of preclinical models amenable to live animal bioactive compound screening is an attractive approach to discovering effective pharmacological therapies for disorders caused by misfolded and aggregation-prone proteins. In general, however, live animal drug screening is labor and resource intensive, and has been hampered by the lack of robust assay designs and high throughput work-flows. Based on their small size, tissue transparency and ease of cultivation, the use of C. elegans should obviate many of the technical impediments associated with live animal drug screening. Moreover, their genetic tractability and accomplished record for providing insights into the molecular and cellular basis of human disease, should make C. elegans an ideal model system for in vivo drug discovery campaigns. The goal of this study was to determine whether C. elegans could be adapted to high-throughput and high-content drug screening strategies analogous to those developed for cell-based systems. Using transgenic animals expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins, we first developed a high-quality, high-throughput work-flow utilizing an automated fluorescence microscopy platform with integrated image acquisition and data analysis modules to qualitatively assess different biological processes including, growth, tissue development, cell viability and autophagy. We next adapted this technology to conduct a small molecule screen and identified compounds that altered the intracellular accumulation of the human aggregation prone mutant that causes liver disease in α1-antitrypsin deficiency. This study provides powerful validation for advancement in preclinical drug discovery campaigns by screening live C. elegans modeling α1-antitrypsin deficiency and other complex disease phenotypes on high-content imaging platforms. PMID:21103396

  4. Regulation of coronary vascular tone via redox modulation in the alpha1-adrenergic-angiotensin-endothelin axis of the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Ishibashi, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Yukio; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation of cardiac myocytes results in the production of an endothelin (ET)-releasing factor that stimulates the coronary vasculature to release ET and, by manipulating the redox state of cardiac and vascular cells, may influence the extent of alpha(1)-adrenergic-ET-1 vasoconstriction. Dihydroethidium (DHE) and dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) intensities were increased by phenylephrine stimulation in isolated rat cardiac myocytes, which were enhanced by the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone (DHE: 20.4 +/- 1.2-fold and DCF: 25.2 +/- 0.9-fold, n = 8, P < 0.01, respectively) but not by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Olmesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, and enalaprilate did not change DHE and DCF intensities by phenylephrine. Next, we measured the vasoconstriction of isolated, pressurized rat coronary arterioles (diameter: 74 +/- 8 microm) in response to supernatant collected from isolated cardiac myocytes. The addition of supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes to a 2-ml vessel bath (n = 8 each) caused volume-dependent vasoconstriction (500 microl: -14.8 +/- 2.2%). Olmesartan and TA0201, an ET type A receptor antagonist, converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (8.5 +/- 1.2% and 10.5 +/- 0.5%, P < 0.01, respectively) in response to supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes, which was eliminated with catalase. Vasoconstriction was weakened using supernatant from phenylephrine with rotenone-treated myocytes. Treatment of arterioles with apocynin to myocyte supernatant converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (7.8 +/- 0.8%, P < 0.01). These results suggest that alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation in cardiac myocytes produces angiotensin I and H(2)O(2) and that angiotensin releases ET-1 through NADPH oxidase in coronary arterioles. Thus, coronary vasoconstriction via the alpha-adrenergic-angiotensin-ET axis appears to require redox

  5. Isolation and purification of Flavobacterium alpha-1,3-glucanase-hydrolyzing, insoluble, sticky glucan of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebisu, S; Kato, K; Kotani, S; Misaki, A

    1975-01-01

    Studies were made on the physical and chemical properties of polysaccharides synthesized by cell-free extracts of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus sp. and their susceptibilities to dextranases. Among the polysaccharides examined, insoluble glucans were rather resistant to available dextranase preparations, and the insoluble, sticky glucan produced by S. mutans OMZ 176, which could be important in formation of dental plaques, was the most resistant. By enrichment culture of soil specimens, using OMZ 176 glucans as the sole carbon source, an organism was isolated that produced colonies surrounded by a clear lytic zone on opaque agar plates containing the OMZ 176 glucan. The organism was identified as a strain of Flavobacterium and named the Ek-14 bacterium. EK-14 bacterium was grown in Trypticase soy broth, and an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing the OMZ 176 glucan was concentrated from the culture supernatant and purified by negative adsorption on a diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DE-32) column and gradient elution chromatography with a carboxymethyl-cellulose (CM-32) column. The enzyme was a basic protein with an isoelectric point of pH 8.5 and molecular weight of 65,000. Its optimum pH was 6.3 and its optimal temperature was 42 C. The purified enzyme released 11% of the total glucose residues of the OMZ 176 glucan as reducing sugars and solubilized about half of the substrate glucan. The products were found to be isomaltose, nigerose, and nigerotriose, with some oligosaccharides. The purified enzyme split the alpha-1,3-glucan endolytically and was inactive toward glucans containing alpha-1,6, alpha-1,4, beta-1,3, beta-1,4, and/or beta-1,6 bonds as the main linkages. Images PMID:370

  6. A non-Golgi alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase that modifies Skp1 in the cytoplasm of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    van Der Wel, H; Morris, H R; Panico, M; Paxton, T; North, S J; Dell, A; Thomson, J M; West, C M

    2001-09-01

    Skp1 is a subunit of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle and other regulatory factors for degradation. In Dictyostelium, Skp1 is modified by a pentasaccharide containing the type 1 blood group H trisaccharide at its core. To address how the third sugar, fucose alpha1,2-linked to galactose, is attached, a proteomics strategy was applied to determine the primary structure of FT85, previously shown to copurify with the GDP-Fuc:Skp1 alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Tryptic-generated peptides of FT85 were sequenced de novo using Q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Degenerate primers were used to amplify FT85 genomic DNA, which was further extended by a novel linker polymerase chain reaction method to yield an intronless open reading frame of 768 amino acids. Disruption of the FT85 gene by homologous recombination resulted in viable cells, which had altered light scattering properties as revealed by flow cytometry. FT85 was necessary and sufficient for Skp1 fucosylation, based on biochemical analysis of FT85 mutant cells and Escherichia coli that express FT85 recombinantly. FT85 lacks sequence motifs that characterize all other known alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferases and lacks the signal-anchor sequence that targets them to the secretory pathway. The C-terminal region of FT85 harbors motifs found in inverting Family 2 glycosyltransferase domains, and its expression in FT85 mutant cells restores fucosyltransferase activity toward a simple disaccharide substrate. Whereas most prokaryote and eukaryote Family 2 glycosyltransferases are membrane-bound and oriented toward the cytoplasm where they glycosylate lipid-linked or polysaccharide precursors prior to membrane translocation, the soluble, eukaryotic Skp1-fucosyltransferase modifies a protein that resides in the cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:11423539

  7. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, D.K.; Grover, A.K.; Daniel, E.E.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with (3H) prazosin and (3H)yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the (3H)prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the (3H) yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the (3H)prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that (3H)prazosin and (3H)yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle.

  8. The effect of S-(+)-boldine on the alpha 1-adrenoceptor of the guinea-pig aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Chuliá, S.; Moreau, J.; Naline, E.; Noguera, M. A.; Ivorra, M. D.; D'Ocón, M. P.; Advenier, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular activity of S-(+)-boldine, an aporphine alkaloid structurally related to papaverine, was determined. The work includes functional studies on guinea-pig isolated aorta contracted with noradrenaline, caffeine, KCl or Ca2+, and on guinea-pig trachea contracted with acetylcholine or histamine. 2. S-(+)-boldine inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile response evoked by noradrenaline (10 microM) in guinea-pig aorta (IC50 = 1.4 +/- 0.2 microM) while the KCl depolarizing solution (60 mM)- or the Ca2+ (1 mM)-induced contractions were only partially affected by boldine up to 300 microM. In contrast, papaverine relaxed noradrenaline (NA), KCl or Ca2+ induced contractions showing similar IC50 values in all cases. S-(+)-boldine had a greater potency on the contraction elicited by NA whereas papaverine acted in a non-selective manner. 3. S-(+)-boldine was found to be an alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent in guinea-pig aorta as revealed by its competitive antagonism of noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction (pA2 = 5.64 +/- 0.08), and its potency was compared with that of prazosin (pA2 = 8.56 +/- 0.24), a known potent alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist. In contrast, papaverine caused rightward shifts of the NA concentration-response curves with depression of maximal response indicating that it acts as a non-competitive antagonist. 4. Contraction of guinea-pig aorta induced by caffeine (60 mM) in a Ca(2+)-containing Krebs solution was not affected by a 60 min incubation period with different doses of S-(+)-boldine (1-300 microM). Papaverine inhibited partially this caffeine-induced contraction at the maximal dose used (100 microM). 5. Inositol phosphates formation induced by noradrenaline (10 microM) in guinea-pig thoracic aorta was inhibited by S-(+)-boldine (30 microM) but not by papaverine (10 microM). 6. Contractions of guinea-pig trachea caused by acetylcholine (100 microM) or histamine (10 microM) were not modified by S-(+)-boldine (0

  9. Determination of the kappa anti-alpha(1,3) dextran immune response difference by A gene(s) in the VKappa-locus of mice

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Mice lacking the V(alpha(1,3) (h gamma1)-gene do not produce a gamma1 anti-alpha(1,3) dextran response. However, on hyperimmunization some strains mount a kappa-anti-alpha(1,3) dextran response, whereas other remain nonresponder. Responsiveness in dominant. The kappa-anti- alpha(1,3) response difference is linked to the Ly-3 locus on chromosone 6 and is likely the result of a structural Vkappa-gene(s). In conjunction with previous work, three Vkappa-allogroups can now be distinguished. At present, this is the only example of an immune responsiveness difference associated with the Vkappa-locus. PMID:109565

  10. Human placenta type V collagens. Evidence for the existence of an alpha 1(V) alpha 2(V) alpha 3(V) collagen molecule.

    PubMed

    Niyibizi, C; Fietzek, P P; van der Rest, M

    1984-11-25

    Human type V collagen was purified from placenta and found to contain alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) chains in varying ratios. Using any of three independent nondenaturing methods (phosphocellulose chromatography, high-performance ion-exchange chromatography on IEX-540 DEAE, and ammonium sulfate precipitation), this preparation could be resolved into two fractions. Analysis of the two fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that one fraction contained alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) in a 2:1 ratio and the other contained alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) in a 1:1:1 ratio. When the crude placental type V collagen was electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions, two bands were observed, one co-migrating with purified (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and the other co-migrating with the fractions containing alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) chains in a 1:1:1 ratio. Electrophoresis in a second dimension under denaturing conditions confirmed that the fast-migrating band contained (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and that the slow-migrating band contained the three chains in equimolar ratio. CD spectra of the two fractions and resistance to trypsin-chymotrypsin digestion confirmed that the two fractions contain triple helical collagen. Thermal denaturations were monitored by the changes in CD signal at 221 nm. The two fractions purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation melted at 39.1 and 36.4 degrees C for the (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(V) alpha 2(V) alpha 3(V) fractions, respectively. Trypsin cleavage of these two native fractions at temperatures near melting produced completely different fragmentation patterns, indicating different partial unwinding sites of the alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains in the two preparations and thus different molecular assemblies. Our data demonstrate the existence of two different molecular assemblies of type V collagen in human placenta consisting of (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(V

  11. Ethanol reduces GABAA alpha1 subunit receptor surface expression by a protein kinase Cgamma-dependent mechanism in cultured cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Suryanarayanan, Asha; Boyd, Kevin N; Comerford, Chris E; Lai, Marvin A; Ren, Qinglu; Morrow, A Leslie

    2010-05-01

    Prolonged ethanol exposure causes central nervous system hyperexcitability that involves a loss of GABAergic inhibition. We previously demonstrated that long-term ethanol exposure enhances the internalization of synaptic GABA(A) receptors composed of alpha1beta2/3gamma2 subunits. However, the mechanisms of ethanol-mediated internalization are unknown. This study explored the effect of ethanol on surface expression of GABA(A) alpha1 subunit-containing receptors in cultured cerebral cortical neurons and the role of protein kinase C (PKC) beta, gamma, and epsilon isoforms in their trafficking. Cultured neurons were prepared from rat pups on postnatal day 1 and maintained for 18 days. Cells were exposed to ethanol, and surface receptors were isolated by biotinylation and P2 fractionation, whereas functional analysis was conducted by whole-cell patch-clamp recording of GABA- and zolpidem-evoked responses. Ethanol exposure for 4 h decreased biotinylated surface expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits and reduced zolpidem (100 nM) enhancement of GABA-evoked currents. The PKC activator phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate mimicked the effect of ethanol, and the selective PKC inhibitor calphostin C prevented ethanol-induced internalization of these receptors. Ethanol exposure for 4 h also increased the colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation of PKCgamma with alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta/alpha1 association and PKCepsilon/alpha1 colocalization were not altered by ethanol exposure. Selective PKCgamma inhibition by transfection of selective PKCgamma small interfering RNAs blocked ethanol-induced internalization of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta inhibition using pseudo-PKCbeta had no effect. These findings suggest that ethanol exposure selectively alters PKCgamma translocation to GABA(A) receptors and PKCgamma regulates GABA(A) alpha1 receptor trafficking after ethanol exposure. PMID:20159950

  12. Barbiturates require the N terminus and first transmembrane domain of the delta subunit for enhancement of alpha1beta3delta GABAA receptor currents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L

    2010-07-30

    GABA(A) receptors are composed predominantly of alphabetagamma receptors, which mediate primarily synaptic inhibition, and alphabetadelta receptors, which mediate primarily extrasynaptic inhibition. At saturating GABA concentrations, the barbiturate pentobarbital substantially increased the amplitude and desensitization of the alpha1beta3delta receptor but not the alpha1beta3gamma2L receptor currents. To explore the structural domains of the delta subunit that are involved in pentobarbital potentiation and increased desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by progressive replacement of gamma2L subunit sequence with a delta subunit sequence or a delta subunit sequence with a gamma2L subunit sequence, and HEK293T cells were co-transfected with alpha1 and beta3 subunits or alpha1 and beta3 subunits and a gamma2L, delta, or chimeric subunit. Currents evoked by a saturating concentration of GABA or by co-application of GABA and pentobarbital were recorded using the patch clamp technique. By comparing the extent of enhancement and changes in kinetic properties produced by pentobarbital among chimeric and wild type receptors, we concluded that although potentiation of alpha1beta3delta currents by pentobarbital required the delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to proline 241 in the first transmembrane domain (M1), increasing desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents required a delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to isoleucine 235 in M1. These findings suggest that the delta subunit N terminus and N-terminal portion of the M1 domain are, at least in part, involved in transduction of the allosteric effect of pentobarbital to enhance alpha1beta3delta currents and that this effect involves a distinct but overlapping structural domain from that involved in altering desensitization. PMID:20525684

  13. Randomized trial to evaluate the immunorestorative properties of synthetic thymosin-alpha 1 in patients with lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schulof, R.S.; Lloyd, M.J.; Cleary, P.A.; Palaszynski, S.R.; Mai, D.A.; Cox, J.W. Jr.; Alabaster, O.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1985-04-01

    A randomized trial was performed in 42 postradiotherapy patients with non-small cell lung cancer to determine whether the administration of synthetic thymosin-alpha 1 by either a loading dose or a twice-weekly schedule could accelerate the reconstitution of thymic dependent immunity. The radiotherapy-induced immunosuppression was characterized by an absolute T cell lymphopenia and by impaired T cell function in lymphoproliferative assays. Placebo-treated patients did not show any improvement in T cell numbers or function over 15 weeks of serial immune monitoring, and exhibited gradual depressions of helper T lymphocyte percentages. Patients treated with thymosin by the loading dose regimen exhibited a normalization of T cell function (p = 0.04), whereas patients treated with the twice-weekly schedule maintained normal helper T cell percentages (p = 0.04). Thymosin treatment was associated with significant improvements in relapse-free and overall survival, which was most pronounced for patients with nonbulky tumors. Thymosin-alpha 1 exhibits schedule-dependent immune restorative and homeostatic properties. Large scale Phase III trials are indicated to definitively establish the impact of thymosin therapy in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.

  14. Age-related change of the role of alpha1L-adrenoceptor in canine urethral smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Moriyama, N; Okaya, Y; Nishimatsu, H; Kawabe, K; Aisaka, K

    1999-10-01

    To examine age-related alteration of the role of alpha1L-adrenoceptor in the urethra, young non-parous and aged parous female dogs were used. In a functional study, we evaluated phenylephrine-induced contraction and antagonistic effects of JTH-601, a newly synthesized alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, and prazosin; in a localization survey using autoradiographic technique, we investigated specific [3H]JTH-601 and [3H]tamsulosin binding. Concentration-response curves were obtained for phenylephrine (pD2 = 5.0-5.3). JTH-601 and prazosin antagonized this contraction with pA2 values of 8.2-8.3 and 8.0-8.1, respectively. Specific binding of both [3H]JTH-601 and [3H]tamsulosin were observed in the bladder neck and proximal section of urethra. There were no significant differences of the pD2, pA2, and radio ligand binding between young non-parous and aged parous dogs. PMID:10523074

  15. In vivo studies on the effects of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists on pupil diameter and urethral tone in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C; Okutsu, Hiroko; Noguchi, Yukiko; Suzuki, Masanori; Ohtake, Akiyoshi; Yuyama, Hironori; Yanai-Inamura, Hiroko; Ukai, Masashi; Watanabe, Mai; Someya, Akiyoshi; Sasamata, Masao

    2006-02-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptors mediate contraction of iris dilator smooth muscle and hence pupil dilatation. We compared the ability of i.v. bolus injections of alfuzosin, doxazosin, naftopidil, prazosin, tamsulosin and terazosin to antagonise phenylephrine-induced mydriasis relative to their potency for inhibiting phenylephrine-induced elevations of intraurethral pressure (IUP) in rabbits. Moreover, we compared the ability of these drugs to induce miosis in conscious rabbits in the absence of phenylephrine. All antagonists inhibited the effects of phenylephrine on pupil size and IUP, and the ratio of the respective ED50 values was close to unity in all cases. The doses required to induce statistically significant miosis in the absence of phenylephrine were 30- to 100-fold higher than those inhibiting phenylephrine-induced mydriasis for all antagonists, except for naftopidil. Moreover, the miotic effects of all alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists were fully reversible within 8 h. We conclude that alfuzosin, doxazosin, naftopidil, prazosin, tamsulosin and terazosin inhibit phenylephrine-induced mydriasis in the same dose range as they inhibit elevations in IUP. Higher doses of all antagonists are required to induce miosis in the absence of an exogenous agonist, and such miosis is always reversible within hours. PMID:16489448

  16. Calcium currents and transients of native and heterologously expressed mutant skeletal muscle DHP receptor alpha1 subunits (R528H)

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Uetz, U; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Powell, J; Fontaine, B; Melzer, W; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1998-02-20

    Rabbit cDNA of the alpha1 subunit of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine (DHP) receptor was functionally expressed in a muscular dysgenesis mouse (mdg) cell line, GLT. L-type calcium currents and transients were recorded for the wild type and a mutant alpha1 subunit carrying an R528H substitution in the supposed voltage sensor of the second channel domain that is linked to a human disease, hypokalemic periodic paralysis. L-type channels expressed in GLT myotubes exhibited currents similar to those described for primary cultured mdg cells injected with rabbit wild type cDNA, indicating this system to be useful for functional studies of heterologous DHP receptors. Voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation of L-type calcium currents from mutant and wild type channels did not differ significantly. Intracellular calcium release activation measured by fura-2 microfluorimetry was not grossly altered by the mutation either. Analogous measurements on myotubes of three human R528H carriers revealed calcium transients comparable to controls while the voltage dependence of both activation and inactivation of the L-type current showed a shift to more negative potentials of approximately 6 mV. Similar effects on the voltage dependence of the fast T-type current and changes in the expression level of the third-type calcium current point to factors not primarily associated with the mutation perhaps participating in disease pathogenesis. PMID:9512357

  17. Detection of bovine alpha-S1-casein in term and preterm human colostrum with proteomic techniques.

    PubMed

    Orru, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Fabris, C; Conti, A; Coscia, A; Bertino, E

    2013-01-01

    Due to increased social awareness of allergens and population hyper-sensitization, the reported incidence of allergic reactions to food allergens has increased over the past two decades. Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the most common food allergens. The aim of this study was to use proteomics techniques to investigate cow's milk allergens in both full-term human colostrum and in preterm newborns mothers where both groups showed no prior allergen detection -- in order to understand whether cows milk allergens could be a cause of sensitization established through lactation. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using techniques detailed in this paper and which allowed for direct protein identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of the colostrum samples. According to our results, bovine alpha 1 casein is considered a major cow's milk allergen, is readily secreted in human milk, and so could be considered a possible cause of sensitization in exclusively breastfed infants. PMID:23755758

  18. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-03-01

    In vivo binding of (/sup 125/I)-2-(beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ((/sup 125/I)HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of (/sup 125/I)HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of (/sup 125/I)HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, (/sup 125/I)HEAT or (/sup 123/I)HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and (/sup 125/I)HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity.

  19. Molecular evolution of serpins: homologous structure of the human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-antichymotrypsin and. cap alpha. /sub 1/-antitrypsin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, J.; Sifers, R.N.; Kidd, V.J.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1987-12-01

    ..cap alpha../sub 1/-Antichymotrypsin belongs to a supergene family that includes ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, antithrombin III, ovalbumin, and angiotensinogen. The human chromosomal ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antichymotrypsin gene has been cloned and its molecular structure established. The gene is approximately 12 kb in length and contains five exons and four introns. The locations of the introns within the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antichymotrypsin gene are identical with those of the human ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and angiotensinogen genes. Other members of this supergene family contain introns located at nonhomologous positions of the genes. The homologous organization of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antichymotrypsin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin genes corresponds with the high degree of homology between their protein sequences and suggest that these loci arose by recent gene duplication. A model is presented for the evolution of both the genomic structure and the protein sequences of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily.

  20. Characterization of the specificities of human blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase toward sulfated/sialylated/fucosylated acceptors: evidence for an inverse relationship between alpha 1,2-L-fucosylation of Gal and alpha 1,6-L-fucosylation of asparagine-linked GlcNAc.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1996-07-01

    The assembly of complex structures bearing the H determinant was examined by characterizing the specificities of a cloned blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase (FT) toward a variety of sulfated, sialylated, or fucosylated Gal beta 1,3/4GlcNAc beta- or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-based acceptor structures. (a) As compared to the basic type 2, Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-(K(m) = 1.67 mM), the basic type 1 was 137% active (K(m) = 0.83 mM). (b) On C-6 sulfation of Gal, type 1 became 142.1% active and type 2 became 223.0% active (K(m) = 0.45 mM). (c) On C-6 sulfation of GlcNAc, type 2 showed 33.7% activity. (d) On C-3 or C-4 fucosylation of GlcNAc, both types 1 and 2 lost activity. (e) Type 1 showed 70.8% and 5.8% activity, respectively, on C-6 and C-4 O-methylation of GlcNAc. (f) Type 1 retained 18.8% activity on alpha 2,6-sialylation of GlcNAc. (g) Terminal type 1 or 2 of extended chain had lower activity. (h) With Gal in place of GlcNAc in type 1, the activity became 43.2%. (i) Compounds with terminal alpha 1,3-linked Gal were inactive. (j) Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- (the T-hapten) was approximately 0.4-fold as active as Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-. (k) C-6 sulfation of Gal on the T-hapten did not affect the acceptor activity. (l) C-6 sulfation of GalNAc decreased the activity to 70%, whereas on C-6 sulfation of both Gal and GalNAc the T-hapten lost the acceptor ability. (m) C-6 sialylation of GalNAc also led to inactivity. (n) beta 1,6 branching from GalNAc of the T-hapten by a GlcNAc residue or by units such as Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc-, Gal beta 1,4(Fuc alpha 1,3)GlcNAc-, or 3-sulfoGal beta 1,4GlcNAc- resulted in 111.9%, 282.8%, 48.3%, and 75.3% activities, respectively. (o) The enhancement of enzyme affinity by a sulfo group on C-6 of Gal was demonstrated by an increase (approximately 5-fold) in the K(m) for Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta 1,6(Gal beta 1,3)GalNAc alpha-O-Bn in presence of 6-sulfoGal beta 1,- 4GlcNAc beta-O-Me (3.0 mM). (p) Among the two sites in

  1. Tryptophan mutations at azi-etomidate photo-incorporation sites on alpha1 or beta2 subunits enhance GABAA receptor gating and reduce etomidate modulation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Deirdre; Desai, Rooma; Cheng, Qi; Liu, Aiping; Forman, Stuart A

    2008-12-01

    The potent general anesthetic etomidate produces its effects by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activation. Its photolabel analog [(3)H]azi-etomidate labels residues within transmembrane domains on alpha and beta subunits: alphaMet236 and betaMet286. We hypothesized that these methionines contribute to etomidate sites formed at alpha-beta subunit interfaces and that increasing side-chain bulk and hydrophobicity at either locus would mimic etomidate binding and block etomidate effects. Channel activity was electrophysiologically quantified in alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) receptors with alpha(1)M236W or beta(2)M286W mutations, in both the absence and the presence of etomidate. Measurements included spontaneous activation, GABA EC(50), etomidate agonist potentiation, etomidate direct activation, and rapid macrocurrent kinetics. Both alpha(1)M236W and beta(2)M286W mutations induced spontaneous channel opening, lowered GABA EC(50), increased maximal GABA efficacy, and slowed current deactivation, mimicking effects of etomidate on alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) channels. These changes were larger with alpha(1)M236W than with beta(2)M286W. Etomidate (3.2 muM) reduced GABA EC(50) much less in alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) receptors (2-fold) than in wild type (23-fold). However, etomidate was more potent and efficacious in directly activating alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) compared with wild type. In alpha(1)beta(2)M286Wgamma(2L) receptors, etomidate induced neither agonist-potentiation nor direct channel activation. These results support the hypothesis that alpha(1)Met236 and beta(2)Met286 are within etomidate sites that allosterically link to channel gating. Although alpha(1)M236W produced the larger impact on channel gating, beta(2)M286W produced more profound changes in etomidate sensitivity, suggesting a dominant role in drug binding. Furthermore, quantitative mechanistic analysis demonstrated that wild-type and mutant results are consistent with the presence of only one class of

  2. Amino acid sequence and molecular structure of an alkaline amylopullulanase from Bacillus that hydrolyzes alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 linkages in polysaccharides at different active sites.

    PubMed

    Hatada, Y; Igarashi, K; Ozaki, K; Ara, K; Hitomi, J; Kobayashi, T; Kawai, S; Watabe, T; Ito, S

    1996-09-27

    An amylopullulanase from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. KSM-1378 hydrolyzes both alpha-1,6 linkages in pullulan and alpha-1,4 linkages in other polysaccharides, with maximum activity in each case at an alkaline pH, to generate oligosaccharides (Ara, K., Saeki, K., Igarashi, K., Takaiwa, M., Uemura, T., Hagihara, H., Kawai, S., and Ito, S. (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1243, 315-324). Here, we report the molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene for and the structure of this enzyme and show that its dual hydrolytic activities are associated with two independent active sites. The structural gene contained a single, long open reading frame of 5,814 base pairs, corresponding to 1,938 amino acids that included a signal peptide of 32 amino acids. The molecular mass of the extracellular mature enzyme (Glu33 through Leu1938) was calculated to be 211,450 Da, a value close to the 210 kDa determined for the amylopullulanase produced by Bacillus sp. KSM-1378. The amylase and the pullulanase domains were located in the amino-terminal half and in the carboxyl-terminal half of the enzyme, respectively, being separated by a tandem repeat of a sequence of 35 amino acids. Four regions, designated I, II, III, and IV, were highly conserved in each catalytic domain, and they included a putative catalytic triad Asp550-Glu579-Asp645 for the amylase activity and Asp1464-Glu1493-Asp1581 for the pullulanase activity. The purified enzyme was rotary shadowed at a low angle and observed by transmission electron microscopy; it appeared to be a "castanet-like" or "bent dumbbell-like" molecule with a diameter of approximately 25 nm. PMID:8798645

  3. Stimulatory effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1A-adrenoceptor to increase glucose uptake into cultured myoblast C2C12 cell of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, I M; Tsai, C C; Lai, T Y; Cheng, J T

    2001-05-14

    In an attempt to elucidate the effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1-adrenoceptor (AR), the myoblast C2C12 cells of mice were employed to investigate the change of glucose uptake in the present study. Isoferulic acid enhanced the uptake of radioactive glucose into C2C12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which were abolished by pretreatment with prazosin. Effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1-AR was further characterized using the displacement of [3H]YM617 binding in C2C12 cells. The radioactive glucose uptake increasing action of isoferulic acid was abolished by tamsulosin or WB 4101 at concentration sufficient to block alpha1A-adrenoceptor (alpha1A-AR) but it was not modified by chlorethylclonidine (CEC) at the concentration sufficient to abolish alpha1B-AR. An activation of alpha1A-AR by isoferulic acid in C2C12 cells can thus be considered. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73312 resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of isoferulic acid-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. This inhibition by U73112 was specific because the inactive congener, U73343, failed to modify the action of isoferulic acid. Also, chelerythrine and GF 109203X diminished the action of isoferulic acid at concentration sufficient to inhibit the activity of protein kinase C (PKC). The obtained data suggest that an activation of alpha1A-AR by isoferulic acid may increase the glucose uptake via PLC-PKC pathway in C2C12 cells. PMID:11474559

  4. Separation and characterization of mares' milk alpha(s1)-, beta-, kappa-caseins, gamma-casein-like, and proteose peptone component 5-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Egito, A S; Miclo, L; López, C; Adam, A; Girardet, J M; Gaillard, J L

    2002-04-01

    The equine alpha(s1)- and beta-caseins (CN) were purified by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and by reversed-phase HPLC. The alpha(s1)-, beta-, and kappa-CN were characterized either by monodimensional urea-PAGE or sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS)-PAGE or by bidimensional electrophoresis. Kappa-casein was characterized after electrophoresis by glycoprotein-specific staining. To identify alpha(s1)-CN without ambiguity, internal sequences were determined after trypsin or chymosin digestion of purified alpha(s1)-CN. These sequences, that could be estimated to correspond to 62% of the full protein, presented strong identities with regions of alpha(s1)-CN primary structures of other species. In particular, 51, 48, 43, and 40% identities were obtained with corresponding regions of sow, dromedary, cow, and human alpha(s1)-CN, respectively. On the other hand, trace amounts of equine gamma-CN-like and proteose peptone component 5-like peptides were found in the whole CN. They were identified by microsequencing and corresponded to beta-CN peptides generated by plasmin action on the whole CN. The equine alpha(s1), beta-, and kappa-CN were separated by bidimensional electrophoresis in numerous isoelectric variants with apparent isoelectric points distributed between pH 4.4 to 6.3, 4.4 to 5.9, and 3.5 to 5.5, respectively. The beta- and kappa-CN displayed a more acidic character in the mare than in the cow. PMID:12018413

  5. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  6. Amygdala-specific reduction of alpha1-GABAA receptors disrupts the anticonvulsant, locomotor, and sedative, but not anxiolytic, effects of benzodiazepines in mice.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Scott A; Ressler, Kerry J

    2010-05-26

    The heterogeneity and distribution of GABA(A) receptor subunits mediates differential roles in behavior. It is thought that particular behavioral responses to benzodiazepine (BZ) ligands might be associated with an action at a regionally defined receptor subtype. However, the role of specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes in particular brain regions is less clear. Such detailed knowledge of regional alpha1-GABA(A) receptor function will advance our understanding of the neural circuitry underlying the role of GABA(A) receptors and the effects of GABA(A)-modulating drugs on behavior. By combining inducible, site-specific alpha1 subunit deletion, using a lentivirus expressing Cre-recombinase in mice with the alpha1 subunit gene flanked by loxP sites, we examine baseline and pharmacological effects of deletion of amygdala alpha1-GABA(A) receptors. We find that amygdala-specific reduction of alpha1 receptor subunits does not affect mRNA or protein levels of amygdala alpha2 or alpha3 subunit receptors. Nor does this inducible reduction affect baseline locomotion or measures of anxiety. However, we also find that this inducible, site-specific deletion does disrupt the normal sedative-locomotor inhibition as well as the anticonvulsive effects, of two distinct BZ-site ligands, diazepam and zolpidem, which is relatively alpha1-subunit selective. These data, using inducible, region and subunit-specific deletion, combined with pharmacogenetic approaches, demonstrate that amygdala expression of the alpha1-GABA(A) receptor subunit is required for normal BZ effects on sedation, locomotion, and seizure inhibition, but not for anxiolysis. PMID:20505082

  7. Reorganization of GABAergic circuits maintains GABAA receptor-mediated transmission onto CA1 interneurons in alpha1-subunit-null mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider Gasser, Edith M; Duveau, Venceslas; Prenosil, George A; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2007-06-01

    The majority of hippocampal interneurons strongly express GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 subunit, suggesting that inhibitory control of interneurons is important for proper function of hippocampal circuits. Here, we investigated with immunohistochemical and electrophysiological techniques how these GABA(A) receptors are replaced in mice carrying a targeted deletion of the alpha1-subunit gene (alpha1(0/0) mice). Using markers of five major populations of CA1 interneurons (parvalbumin, calretinin, calbindin, neuropeptide Y and somatostatin), we show that these interneurons remain unaffected in alpha1(0/0) mice. In triple immunofluorescence staining experiments combining these markers with the GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha2 or alpha3 subunit and gephyrin, we demonstrate a strong increase in alpha3- and alpha2-GABA(A) receptors clustered at postsynaptic sites along with gephyrin in most CA1 interneurons in alpha1(0/0) mice. The changes were cell type-specific and resulted in an increased number of GABAergic synapses on interneurons. These adjustments were mirrored functionally by retention of spontaneous IPSCs with prolonged decay kinetics, as shown by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 interneurons. However, a significant decrease in frequency and amplitude of miniature IPSCs was evident, suggesting reduced affinity of postsynaptic receptors and/or impaired vesicular GABA release. Finally, to assess whether these compensatory changes are sufficient to protect against a pathological challenge, we tested the susceptibility of alpha1(0/0) mice against kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. No genotype difference was observed in the effects of kainic acid, indicating that the absence of a major GABA(A) receptor subtype is functionally compensated for in hippocampal interneurons by a reorganization of inhibitory circuits. PMID:17552997

  8. Branching enzyme assay: selective quantitation of the alpha 1,6-linked glucosyl residues involved in the branching points.

    PubMed

    Krisman, C R; Tolmasky, D S; Raffo, S

    1985-06-01

    Methods previously described for glycogen or amylopectin branching enzymatic activity are insufficiently sensitive and not quantitative. A new, more sensitive, specific, and quantitative one was developed. It is based upon the quantitation of the glucose residues joined by alpha 1,6 bonds introduced by varying amounts of branching enzyme. The procedure involved the synthesis of a polysaccharide from Glc-1-P and phosphorylase in the presence of the sample to be tested. The branched polysaccharide was then purified and the glucoses involved in the branching points were quantitated after degradation with phosphorylase and debranching enzymes. This method appeared to be useful, not only in enzymatic activity determinations but also in the study of the structure of alpha-D-glucans when combined with those of total polysaccharide quantitation, such as iodine and phenol-sulfuric acid. PMID:3160257

  9. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide rescues alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor from oxidative inactivation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Bevilacqua, M

    1992-01-01

    When neutrophils are recruited to tissue sites and exposed to phagocytosable targets, they release oxidants which may be responsible for the local inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Consequently, A1PI becomes incapable of inhibiting the proteolytic activity of elastase, released at the same time by neutrophils as a result of leakage from phagocytic vacuoles. In the present paper we show that phagocytosing neutrophils inactivate A1PI via a process inhibitable by chemical agents known to interfere with the hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-generating myeloperoxidase pathway. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (NMS), which is able to efficiently limit the extracellular availability of HOCl in the neutrophil surroundings, was found to prevent the inactivation of A1PI by neutrophils. The results provide evidence for a possible way to control neutrophil elastase activity by rescuing its natural inhibitor (A1PI) at inflamed tissue sites during infectious and noninfectious processes. PMID:1579712

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) for direct immunofluorescence of PSA and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in prostatic tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Bjartell, A; Siivola, P; Hulkko, S; Pettersson, K; Rundt, K; Lilja, H; Lövgren, T

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a direct immunofluorescence technique utilising chelates of the lanthanide ions europium and terbium conjugated to monoclonal IgGs (Mabs) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) for the detection and quantification on the same tissue section. Strong signals without disturbance from tissue autofluorescence were demonstrated in paraffin sections of ten benign and six malignant prostate tissue specimens. The signal intensity increased linearly with the amount of labelled Mab until epitope saturation began. The highest concentrations of bound IgG in tissue sections were 27.3 fmol/pixel for ACT and 7.2 for PSA. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) offers an attractive method for histochemical studies based on specific and quantitative detection of fluorescent lanthanide chelates. PMID:12496823

  11. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  12. T-cell abnormalities after mediastinal irradiation for lung cancer. The in vitro influence of synthetic thymosin alpha-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schulof, R.S.; Chorba, T.L.; Cleary, P.A.; Palaszynski, S.R.; Alabaster, O.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1985-03-01

    The effects of mediastinal irradiation (RT) on the numbers and functions of purified peripheral blood T-lymphocytes from patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were evaluated. The patients were candidates for a randomized trial to evaluate the immunorestorative properties of synthetic thymosin alpha-1. Twenty-one patients studied before RT did not exhibit any significant difference in T-cell numbers or function compared to age-matched healthy subjects. However, 41 patients studied within 1 week after completing RT exhibited significant depressions of E-rosette-forming cells at 4 degrees C (E4 degrees-RFC)/mm3, E-rosette-forming cells at 29 degrees C (E29 degrees-RFC)/mm3, OKT3/mm3, OKT4/mm3, and OKT8/mm3 (P . 0.0001); total T-cell percentages (%OKT3, P . 0.01); and T-cell proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLR) (P . 0.01) and to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin under suboptimal conditions (P less than or equal to 0.03). Nine patients studied before and after RT showed a significant increase in OKT4/OKT8 (P . 0.01) following RT. A short-term in vitro incubation with thymosin alpha-1 could enhance MLR of T-cells in 12 of 27 patients with post-RT abnormalities. In 13 patients who were treated with placebo, the RT-induced depression of T-cell numbers and function persisted for at least 3 to 4 months. In addition, in 12 patients progressive decreases developed in %E4 degrees-RFC, %OKT3, %OKT4, and OKT4/OKT8, which always preceded clinical relapse.

  13. Low-intensity contraction activates the alpha1-isoform of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Satsuki; Ebihara, Ken; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sato, Kenji; Fushiki, Tohru; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses two catalytic subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has been implicated in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction activates the alpha2-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha2), but this activation may occur with or without activation of the alpha1-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha1), suggesting that AMPKalpha2 is the major isoform responsible for contraction-induced metabolic events in skeletal muscle. We report for the first time that AMPKalpha1, but not AMPKalpha2, can be activated in contracting skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were isolated and incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing pyruvate. In muscles stimulated to contract at a frequency of 1 and 2 Hz during the last 2 min of incubation, AMPKalpha1 activity increased twofold and AMPKalpha2 activity remained unchanged. Muscle stimulation did not change the muscle AMP concentration or the AMP-to-ATP ratio. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of Thr(172) of the alpha-subunit, the primary activation site. Muscle stimulation increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, and the rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport. In contrast, increasing the frequency (>or=5 Hz) or duration (>or=5 min) of contraction activated AMPKalpha1 and AMPKalpha2 and increased AMP concentration and the AMP/ATP ratio. These results suggest that 1) AMPKalpha1 is the predominant isoform activated by AMP-independent phosphorylation in low-intensity contracting muscle, 2) AMPKalpha2 is activated by an AMP-dependent mechanism in high-intensity contracting muscle, and 3) activation of each isoform enhances glucose transport and ACC phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. PMID:16249251

  14. Effect of JTH-601, a novel alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, on the function of lower urinary tract and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Kanada, A; Okaya, Y; Aisaka, K; Muramatsu, I

    1999-06-25

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of JTH-601 (3-{N-[2-(4-hydroxy-2-isopropyl-5-methylphenoxy)ethyl]-N-methylaminomethyl}-4-methoxy-2,5,6-trimethylphenol hemifumarate), a novel alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, in vitro and in vivo. JTH-601 (10(-9)-3 x 10(-8) M) competitively antagonized phenylephrine-induced contraction in lower urinary tract tissues (prostate, urethra and bladder trigon) in a concentration-dependent manner. The mean pA2 values for JTH-601 were 8.59+/-0.14, 8.74+/-0.09 and 8.77+/-0.11 for prostate, urethra and bladder trigon, respectively. In anesthetized rabbits, intraduodenal administration of JTH-601 (0.3-3 mg/kg), prazosin (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) and tamsulosin (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) dose dependently inhibited the phenylephrine-induced increase in urethral pressure for 3 h. Although these drugs also decreased mean blood pressure, JTH-601 was less potent than prazosin or tamsulosin. In conscious rabbits, administered JTH-601 (0.01-1 mg/kg, i.v.) had a tendency to augment orthostatic hypotension, but dose dependency was not evident. Prazosin (0.01-1 mg/kg) and tamsulosin (0.001-1 mg/kg) dose dependently augmented orthostatic hypotension. These results indicate that JTH-601 antagonized alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile responses more potently than prazosin or tamsulosin in rabbit lower urinary tract both in vitro and in vivo. JTH-601 is therefore expected to be effective in the treatment of urinary outlet obstruction in benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:10422795

  15. Toxin a from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with therminal Gal. cap alpha. 1-3Gal. beta. 1-4GlcNaC sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.; Wilkins, T.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Toxin A is one of two clostridial toxins implicated as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis in patients undergoing postoperative antibiotic therapy. Evidence that the carbohydrate binding determinant for this toxin is a glycoconjugate(s) with non-reducing Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc has recently been reported. Specific agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes by Toxin A is inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin and prevented by pretreatment of cells with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the chromatogram overlaid with purified /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected following autoradiography. The major toxin-binding glycolipids were identified as pentasaccharide- and decasaccharide-ceramides expressing terminal Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc sequences. Treatment of the toxin-binding glycolipids with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase abolished binding. Forsmann glycolipid, globoside, Gal..cap alpha..1-4 Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer, and Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer did not bind the toxin. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate specificity of the toxin for the non-reducing terminal sequence, Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc.

  16. Antagonistic effects of selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists MDL73005EF and tamsulosin and partial agonists clonidine and tizanidine in rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Enomoto, K; Koike, K

    2001-01-01

    The antagonistic effects of MDL73005EF and tamsulosin and partial agonists clonidine and tizanidine at rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery alpha1-adrenoceptors were investigated in this study. Selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists MDL73005EF and tamsulosin dose-dependently shifted the concentration-response curves for noradrenaline to the right. Schild plots of the results obtained from the inhibition by MDL73005EF (pA2 8.30 +/- 0.04) and tamsulosin (pA2 10.51 +/- 0.06) of noradrenaline yielded a straight line with a slope of unity in rat thoracic aorta. The slopes of Schild plots obtained from the inhibition by MDL73005EF and tamsulosin of noradrenaline were significantly different from unity in rabbit iliac artery. Schild plots of the results obtained from the inhibition by clonidine and tizanidine of noradrenaline yielded a straight line with a slope of unity in rat thoracic aorta (pA2 7.08 +/- 0.04 and 7.32 +/- 0.04, respectively). These results suggest that alpha1D-adrenoceptors play a significant role in the alpha1-adrenoceptor-agonist-induced contraction of rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery, and that clonidine and tizanidine interact with the alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtype as competitive antagonists in rat thoracic aorta. PMID:11206183

  17. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from the rabbit heart alpha 1 include a shortened N-terminus, a unique C-terminal insertion, and both forms of an alternatively spliced motif IV S3 region. The shortened N-terminus provides optimal access to consensus sequences thought to facilitate translation. Northern blot analysis revealed a single hybridizing mRNA species of 9.4 kb. The gene for the human heart alpha 1 subunit was localized specifically to the distal region of chromosome 12p13. The cloned alpha 1 subunit was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and single-channel analyses revealed native-like pharmacology and channel properties. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8392192

  18. Proteolytic and N-Glycan Processing of Human α1-Antitrypsin Expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Alexandra; Windwarder, Markus; Gattinger, Pia; Mach, Lukas; Strasser, Richard; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta

    2014-01-01

    Plants are increasingly being used as an expression system for complex recombinant proteins. However, our limited knowledge of the intrinsic factors that act along the secretory pathway, which may compromise product integrity, renders process design difficult in some cases. Here, we pursued the recombinant expression of the human protease inhibitor α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) in Nicotiana benthamiana. This serum protein undergoes intensive posttranslational modifications. Unusually high levels of recombinant A1AT were expressed in leaves (up to 6 mg g−1 of leaf material) in two forms: full-length A1AT located in the endoplasmic reticulum displaying inhibitory activity, and secreted A1AT processed in the reactive center loop, thus rendering it unable to interact with target proteinases. We found that the terminal protein processing is most likely a consequence of the intrinsic function of A1AT (i.e. its interaction with proteases [most likely serine proteases] along the secretory pathway). Secreted A1AT carried vacuolar-type paucimannosidic N-glycans generated by the activity of hexosaminidases located in the apoplast/plasma membrane. Notwithstanding, an intensive glycoengineering approach led to secreted A1AT carrying sialylated N-glycan structures largely resembling its serum-derived counterpart. In summary, we elucidate unique insights in plant glycosylation processes and show important aspects of postendoplasmic reticulum protein processing in plants. PMID:25355867

  19. The BLT1 Inhibitory Function of α-1 Antitrypsin Augmentation Therapy Disrupts Leukotriene B4 Neutrophil Signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Ciara A; O'Brien, M Emmet; Wormald, Mark R; White, Michelle M; Banville, Nessa; Hurley, Killian; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2015-10-15

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) contributes to many inflammatory diseases, including genetic and nongenetic forms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. α-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) is characterized by destruction of lung parenchyma and development of emphysema, caused by low AAT levels and a high neutrophil burden in the airways of affected individuals. In this study we assessed whether AATD is an LTB4-related disease and investigated the ability of serum AAT to control LTB4 signaling in neutrophils. In vitro studies demonstrate that neutrophil elastase is a key player in the LTB4 inflammatory cycle in AATD, causing increased LTB4 production, and associated BLT1 membrane receptor expression. AATD patients homozygous for the Z allele were characterized by increased neutrophil adhesion and degranulation responses to LTB4. We demonstrate that AAT can bind LTB4 and that AAT/LTB4 complex formation modulates BLT1 engagement and downstream signaling events, including 1,4,5-triphosphate production and Ca(2+) flux. Additionally, treatment of ZZ-AATD individuals with AAT augmentation therapy decreased plasma LTB4 concentrations and reduced levels of membrane-bound neutrophil elastase. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism by which AAT augmentation therapy impacts on LTB4 signaling in vivo, and not only reinforces the utility of this therapy for resolving inflammation in AATD, but supports useful future clinical applications in treatment of other LTB4-related diseases. PMID:26371243

  20. Imbalance between neutrophil elastase and its inhibitor α1-antitrypsin in obesity alters insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Mansuy-Aubert, Virginie; Zhou, Qiong L; Xie, Xiangyang; Gong, Zhenwei; Huang, Jun-Yuan; Khan, Abdul R; Aubert, Gregory; Candelaria, Karla; Thomas, Shantele; Shin, Dong-Ju; Booth, Sarah; Baig, Shahid M; Bilal, Ahmed; Hwang, Daehee; Zhang, Hui; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Smith, Steven R; Awan, Fazli R; Jiang, Zhen Y

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and related complications remain unclear. Here, we report that obese mice and human subjects have increased activity of neutrophil elastase (NE) and decreased serum levels of the NE inhibitor α1-antitrypsin (A1AT, SerpinA1). NE null (Ela2(-/-)) mice and A1AT transgenic mice were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced body weight gain, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fatty liver. NE inhibitor GW311616A reversed insulin resistance and body weight gain in HFD-fed mice. Ela2(-/-) mice also augmented circulating high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels, phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the liver and brown adipose tissue (BAT) and uncoupling protein (UCP1) levels in the BAT. These data suggest that the A1AT-NE system regulates AMPK signaling, FAO, and energy expenditure. The imbalance between A1AT and NE contributes to the development of obesity and related inflammation, insulin resistance, and liver steatosis. PMID:23562077

  1. A C. elegans model of human α1-antitrypsin deficiency links components of the RNAi pathway to misfolded protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Long, Olivia S.; Benson, Joshua A.; Kwak, Joon Hyeok; Luke, Cliff J.; Gosai, Sager J.; O'Reilly, Linda P.; Wang, Yan; Li, Jie; Vetica, Anne C.; Miedel, Mark T.; Stolz, Donna B.; Watkins, Simon C.; Züchner, Stephan; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of serpin oligomers and polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes cellular injury in patients with the classical form α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD). To better understand the cellular and molecular genetic aspects of this disorder, we generated transgenic C. elegans strains expressing either the wild-type (ATM) or Z mutant form (ATZ) of the human serpin fused to GFP. Animals secreted ATM, but retained polymerized ATZ within dilated ER cisternae. These latter animals also showed slow growth, smaller brood sizes and decreased longevity; phenotypes observed in ATD patients or transgenic mouse lines expressing ATZ. Similar to mammalian models, ATZ was disposed of by autophagy and ER-associated degradation pathways. Mutant strains defective in insulin signaling (daf-2) also showed a marked decrease in ATZ accumulation. Enhanced ATZ turnover was associated with the activity of two proteins central to systemic/exogenous (exo)-RNAi pathway: the dsRNA importer, SID-1 and the argonaute, RDE-1. Animals with enhanced exo-RNAi activity (rrf-3 mutant) phenocopied the insulin signaling mutants and also showed increased ATZ turnover. Taken together, these studies allude to the existence of a novel proteostasis pathway that mechanistically links misfolded protein turnover to components of the systemic RNAi machinery. PMID:24838286

  2. Toxin A from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.C.; Wilkins, T.D.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-08-15

    The binding of Toxin A isolated from Clostridium difficile to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids has been studied. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and toxin-binding glycolipids detected by using /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A in a direct binding overlay technique. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected in rabbit erythrocytes by this method. The results of structural analyses of the major toxin-binding glycolipids were consistent with a pentasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) and a branched decasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3(Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-6)Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) previously identified as the two most abundant glycolipids in rabbit erythrocytes. /sup 125/I-Toxin A binding to these glycolipids could be inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin, monospecific antiserum to the toxin, or by treatment of the glycolipids with alpha-galactosidase. The absence of toxin interaction with isoglobotriaosylceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) isolated from canine intestine suggested that the GlcNAc residue present in the terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GLcNAc sequence common to all known toxin binding glycoconjugates is required for carbohydrate-specific recognition by Toxin A. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate binding specificity of Toxin A for the nonreducing terminal sequence, Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc.

  3. Interactions of purified transcription factors: binding of yeast MAT alpha 1 and PRTF to cell type-specific, upstream activating sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S; Ammerer, G; Richmond, T J

    1988-01-01

    Pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) and MAT alpha 1 are protein transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of the alpha-specific genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have expressed MAT alpha 1 as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified it from inclusion bodies in milligram quantities. The MAT alpha 1 protein was obtained after specific cleavage of the fusion protein. Quantitative band shift electrophoresis was used to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants that describe the multicomponent binding equilibrium between the PRTF and MAT alpha 1 proteins, and alpha-specific STE3 upstream activating sequence (UAS) DNA. The dissociation constant for the complex of PRTF and the a-specific UAS of STE2 was also measured and found to be 5.9 X 10(-11) M, only three times less than that for the PRTF-STE3 UAS complex. Analyses of these complexes by DNase I footprinting demonstrate that the PRTF binding site is confined to the palindromic P-box sequence in the case of the STE3 UAS, but extends symmetrically from this central region to cover 28 bp for the STE2 UAS. When MAT alpha 1 is bound to the PRTF-STE3 complex, the region of DNA protected is enlarged to that seen for the PRTF-STE2 complex. Our results using these two purified factors in vitro suggest that PRTF has nearly the same affinity for a- and alpha-specific UAS elements and that transcriptional activation requires a particular conformational state for the PRTF-DNA complex which occurs in the PRTF-STE2 and MAT alpha 1-PRTF-STE3 complexes, but not in the PRTF-STE3 complex. Images PMID:2854061

  4. Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ via L-type calcium channels in heart cells by the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of the alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Bui, Michel; Sukarieh, Rami; Jacques, Danielle; Fu, Michael L X

    2003-03-01

    The effects of methoxamine, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist, and the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoceptors were studied on intracellular free Ca2+ levels using confocal microscopy and ionic currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in single cells of 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old fetal human hearts. We observed that like methoxamine, the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoreceptors significantly increased the L-type calcium current (I(Ca(L))) but had no effect on the T-type calcium current (I(Ca(T))), the delayed outward potassium current, or the fast sodium current. This effect of the autoantibody was prevented by a prestimulation of the receptors with methoxamine and vice versa. Moreover, treating the cells with prazosin, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist blocked the methoxamine and the autoantibody-induced increase in I(Ca(L)), respectively. In absence of prazosin, both methoxamine and the autoantibody showed a substantial enhancement in the frequency of cell contraction and that of the concomitant cytosolic and nuclear free Ca2+ variations. The subsequent addition of nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, reversed not only the methoxamine or the autoantibody-induced effect but also completely abolished cell contraction. These results demonstrated that functional alpha1-adrenoceptors exist in both 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old human fetal hearts and that the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of this type of receptors plays an important role in stimulating their activity via activation of L-type calcium channels. This loop seems to have a functional significance by being the target of alpha1-receptor agonists like methoxamine. PMID:12733822

  5. Studies on the characterization and regulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors and (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding sites in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of these studies has been to resolve the anomalous binding characteristics of two alpha adrenergic receptor ligands, (/sup 3/H)WB4101 and (/sup 3/H)prazosin and to study the regulation of the receptors labeled by these compounds after surgical denervation and chronic drug treatments. Preliminary studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding sites, which were believed to represent alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, were increased in number following removal of the fimbrial afferents to the hippocampus. This increase was not due to removal of the adrenergic input into this structure since destruction of the locus coeruleus or the dorsal noradrenergic bundle did not produce the up-regulation. Characterization of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors using (/sup 3/H)prazosin and (/sup 3/H)WB4101 revealed evidence for subtypes of alpha-1 receptors designated alpha-1A and alpha-1B. The nanomolar affinity component of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding is not adrenergic but serotonergic. The serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline have affinities of 1.5 and 3.0 nM for this site, when studied in the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask of the alpha-1 component of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding. Fimbria transection or 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine injections produced increases in the Bmax of the nanomolar affinity component of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. The up-regulated site showed identical serotonergic pharmacology compared to control tissue. Thus, the author concluded that serotonergic denervation of the hippocampus produces the increase in serotonergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)WB4101.

  6. Inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from rabbit skin lesions produced in vivo by sulfur mustard. III. Electrophoretic protein fractions, trypsin-inhibitory capacity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, and alpha 1- and alpha 2-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors of culture fluids and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, S.; Dannenberg, A. M.; Vogt, R. F.; Myrick, J. E.; Tanaka, F.; Redding, L. C.; Merkhofer, R. M.; Pula, P. J.; Scott, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third report in a series on the inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from skin lesions of various ages, which were produced in vivo in rabbits by the military vesicant, sulfur mustard (SM). It describes the electrophoretic protein fractions and trypsin-inhibitory capacities of the various culture fluids and the amounts of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in these fluids. With one-dimensional electrophoresis, the albumin and beta-globulin fractions of protein in culture fluids varied little with the development and healing of the SM lesions. These fractions proportionally resembled the corresponding fractions found in serum. The alpha 1-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum as the lesions healed. The alpha 2-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum at all stages of lesion development and healing. The gamma-globulin fraction was proportionally larger as the lesions healed. With two-dimensional electrophoresis, about 68%, 46%, and 35% of the protein spots in culture fluids from representative 1-day and 6-day SM lesions and normal skin, respectively, matched those from serum. In each case, the large, diffuse, serum albumin spot represented about two-thirds of the protein present. Thus, gravimetrically, in normal skin and in both developing and healing lesions, the extracellular proteins were 80-90% of serum origin. The trypsin-inhibitory capacity (TIC) per milligram protein in the culture fluids of healing lesions was markedly less than the TIC per milligram protein in the fluids of peak lesions. This decrease correlates well with the decrease found in the alpha 1-globulin fraction, which contains alpha 1-antiproteinase (alpha 1-PI) (and alpha 1-macroglobulin [alpha 1M] in rabbits). The alpha 1PI and the alpha 1M-alpha 2M proteinase inhibitors were identified in the culture fluids by means of

  7. Deficiency of reproductive tract alpha(1,2)fucosylated glycans and normal fertility in mice with targeted deletions of the FUT1 or FUT2 alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase locus.

    PubMed

    Domino, S E; Zhang, L; Gillespie, P J; Saunders, T L; Lowe, J B

    2001-12-01

    The fucose alpha(1-->2) galactose beta structure is expressed by uterine epithelial cells in the mouse and has been implicated in blastocyst adhesion events thought to be required for murine implantation. Fucalpha(1-->2)Galbeta moieties and cognate fucosyltransferases are also expressed by epithelial cells of the male reproductive tract and have been implicated in sperm maturation events that may contribute to fertilization. To determine directly if Fucalpha(1-->2)Galbeta moieties are required for fertility, we have generated strains of mice that are deficient in genes encoding FUT1 and FUT2, a pair of GDP-L-fucose:beta(1-->4)-D-galactosyl-R 2-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase enzymes (EC 2.4.1.69) responsible for Fucalpha(1-->2)Galbeta synthesis and expression. FUT1 null mice and FUT2 null mice develop normally and exhibit no gross phenotypic abnormalities. The Fucalpha(1-->2)Galbeta epitope is absent from the uterine epithelia of FUT2 null mice and from the epithelia of the epididymis of FUT1 null mice. Fully normal fertility is observed in FUT1 null intercrosses and in FUT2 null intercrosses. These observations indicate that Fucalpha(1-->2)Galbeta moieties are not essential to blastocyst-uterine epithelial cell interactions required for implantation and are not required for sperm maturation events that permit fertilization and that neither the FUT loci nor their cognate fucosylated glycans are essential to normal development. PMID:11713270

  8. GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mutation A322D associated with autosomal dominant juvenile myoclonic epilepsy reduces the expression and alters the composition of wild type GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L; Botzolakis, Emanuel J; Hu, Ningning; Gallagher, Martin J

    2010-08-20

    A GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) alpha1 subunit mutation, A322D (AD), causes an autosomal dominant form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (ADJME). Previous studies demonstrated that the mutation caused alpha1(AD) subunit misfolding and rapid degradation, reducing its total and surface expression substantially. Here, we determined the effects of the residual alpha1(AD) subunit expression on wild type GABA(A)R expression to determine whether the AD mutation conferred a dominant negative effect. We found that although the alpha1(AD) subunit did not substitute for wild type alpha1 subunits on the cell surface, it reduced the surface expression of alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by associating with the wild type subunits within the endoplasmic reticulum and preventing them from trafficking to the cell surface. The alpha1(AD) subunit reduced surface expression of alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by a greater amount than alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, thus altering cell surface GABA(A)R composition. When transfected into cultured cortical neurons, the alpha1(AD) subunit altered the time course of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current kinetics and reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitudes. These findings demonstrated that, in addition to causing a heterozygous loss of function of alpha1(AD) subunits, this epilepsy mutation also elicited a modest dominant negative effect that likely shapes the epilepsy phenotype. PMID:20551311

  9. Effects of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists on agonist and tilt-induced changes in blood pressure: relationships to uroselectivity.

    PubMed

    Hieble, J P; Kolpak, D C; McCafferty, G P; Ruffolo, R R; Testa, R; Leonardi, A

    1999-05-28

    We evaluated the uroselectivity of a series of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists by comparing their potency against phenylephrine-induced increases in urethral perfusion pressure and diastolic blood pressure in the anesthetized rabbit and pithed rat. In the rabbit, Rec 15/2739 (N-[3-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]propyl]-3-methyl-4-oxo-2-phenyl -4H-1-benzopyran-8-carboxamide) as well as analogs with a chlorine substituent on the methoxyphenyl ring (Rec 15/2869) or this substituent combined with the replacement of the phenyl substituent on the pyran ring by cyclohexyl (Rec 15/3011) were 2-6-fold more potent against the urethral vs. vascular response to phenylephrine. Rec 15/2841 (N-[3-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]propyl]-3-methyl-4-oxo-2-cyc lohexy-4H-1-benzopyran-8-carboxamide) was only 1.5-fold more potent against the urethral response. SL 89.0591 and tamsulosin also showed selectivity for the urethral response (2-2.5-fold), while the quinazolines produced equipotent blockade of urethral and vascular responses (selectivity ratio = 0.9-1.1). The urethral selectivities of Rec 15/2739 and its derivatives were confirmed by evaluation of the response to tilt in sedated, hypovolemic rabbits. Phenylephrine challenge assays did not show any of the antagonists, with the exception of terazosin at 300 microg kg(-1), to be uroselective in the rat (selectivity ratios = 0.2-1.5); potentiation of tilt-induced hypotension in the anesthetized rat showed substantial differences from the rabbit, with Rec 15/2739, but not Rec 15/3011 and Rec 15/2841 showing orthostatic effects equivalent to that observed for prazosin. Hence, Rec 15/2739 was uroselective in the rabbit, but not in the rat, while two of its close structural analogs were highly uroselective in both species. An assay for orthostatic activity in the conscious rat yielded different results, showing prazosin and terazosin, but not Rec 15/2739, to cause a reversal of the pressor response to tilt. Hence, the apparent

  10. Analysis of the effects of alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists on noradrenaline-mediated contraction of rat small mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study, we examined the interaction between noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (PE) with seven antagonists (prazosin, tamsulosin, phentolamine, WB-4101, 5-methylurapidil, spiperone and HV 723) in an attempt to characterize the alpha 1-adrenoceptor population of the rat isolated small mesenteric artery (SMA) preparation. 2. Six of the seven antagonists investigated produced concentration-dependent, parallel, rightward shift of the NA concentration-effect (E/[A]) curves. The exception was tamsulosin, which produced significant decrease of the upper asymptote. In the case of 5-methylurapidil and HV723, the Schild plot slope parameters were not significantly different from unity over the range of concentrations used. However, the Schild plot slopes obtained for the other antagonists were all significantly greater than unity, inconsistent with expectations for simple competitive antagonism. 3. HV723, prazosin and tamsulosin were also tested using PE as an agonist. All three antagonists produced concentration-dependent, parallel, rightward shifts of the PE curves and Schild analysis yielded slope parameters not significantly different from unity. The pKB estimates obtained for tamsulosin and prazosin were not significantly different from the pA2 values obtained when NA was used as agonist. In the case of HV723, the 95% confidence intervals for the pKB values yielded with NA and PE did not overlap (pKB = 8.80-9.13 and 8.15-8.77 for NA and PE, respectively). 4. In the absence of evidence to indicate that the steep Schild plots were due to failure to satisfy the basic criteria for quantitative analysis in a one-receptor system, we considered the possibility that the complexity was caused by an action of NA at inhibitory D1 receptors. The selective D1 receptor antagonists, SCH-23390 (10 nM), had no significant effect on the NA E/[A] control curve, but the apparent potency of 100 nM prazosin was reduced by approximately 3.5 fold. 5. This study indicates that the

  11. [Normal values of cell distribution and function in the human alveolus. Bronchoalveolar lavage as a diagnostic tool in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Obertacke, U; Joka, T; Pison, U; Riewendt, H D; Stimming, W

    1987-10-01

    The cell distribution and cell function in the normal human alveolar were determined in 23 healthy subjects by obtaining the pulmonary lavage fluid from bronchoalveolar lavage. A uniform alveolar cell spectrum was found. (Alveolar macrophages 95-98%, polymorphonuclear neutrophils 2-3%, lymphocytes 0-2%.) The cell systems reacted reproducibly to a defined phagocytosis stimulation in luminol-enhanced chemoluminescence. The phospholipid lung profile, which is important for the function of the surfactant, was determined by means of high-pressure liquid chromatography. The typical inflammation mediators were not present in the humoral spectrum of the supernatant part of the lavage fluid. Albumin, transferrin, and alpha-1-antitrypsin were regularly seen in healthy adults in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The results supply the basis for the interpretation of the findings in polytraumatised patients in adult respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:2446522

  12. Emphysema and Alpha-1

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person inherits a defective copy of the AAT gene from both parents. People who inherit just ... carriers.” These individuals also have lower levels of AAT in the lungs, which predispose them to the ...

  13. A Pilot Trial of Prazosin, an Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist, for Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Tracy L.; Malte, Carol A.; Dietel, Bergetta; Tell, Dana; Pocock, Ian; Lyons, Robert; Varon, Dana; Raskind, Murray; Saxon, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) commonly co-occur and are associated with greater symptom severity and costs than either disorder alone. No pharmacologic interventions have been found to decrease both alcohol use and PTSD symptom severity relative to matched placebo. Prazosin, an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy reducing PTSD and AD symptoms among individuals with one or the other disorder and may be useful in addressing comorbid PTSD/AD. Methods Prazosin and matched placebo were compared in the context of an outpatient 6-week double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial involving 30 individuals with comorbid PTSD/AD. Medication was titrated to 4mg q AM, 4mg q PM and 8mg qhs by the end of week 2. Participants in both conditions received five Medical Management sessions. Information regarding alcohol use, craving, and PTSD was gathered daily using a telephone Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system. Results Participants randomized to prazosin had a greater reduction in percent days drinking per week and percent days heavy drinking per week between baseline and week 6 than did placebo participants. No significant differences were detected within or between groups in change from weeks 1 to 6 in total PTSD symptoms. Participants in the prazosin condition reported drowsiness on significantly more days than those in the placebo condition. Conclusions Consistent with the extant research evaluating medications for comorbid PTSD/AD, the current evaluation of prazosin also found decreased alcohol consumption but no medication effect on PTSD symptomatology. PMID:25827659

  14. Isolation and characterization of human plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and a conformational study of its interaction with proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Saklatvala, J; Wood, G C; White, D D

    1976-01-01

    1. alpha 1-Proteinase inhibitor was isolated from human plasma by a five-step procedure. Isoelectric focusing showed that six components focused between pH4.85 and 4.95. 2. The mol.wt. of the inhibitor was 52000 by sedimentation equilibrium and sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of the inhibitor were also determined. 3. The far-u.v.c.d. (circular-dichroism) spectrum indicated that the inhibitor had about 36% alpha-helical content. 4. The loss of proteinase-inhibitory activity when the inhibitor was exposed to pH values less than 5.0 or greater than 10.5 was accompanied by small changes in the far-u.v.c.d. spectrum and large changes in the near-u.v.c.d. spectrum. The change at alkaline pH was associated with ionization of tyrosine residues. 5. Interaction of inhibitor with chymotrypsin caused perturbation of the c.d. spectrum and this was used to follow the interaction and show a 1:1 stoicheiometry. 6. C.d., electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing showed that the inhibitor-enzyme complex is degraded by free enzyme. 7. Parallel studies with trypsin indicated that it too forms a 1:1 complex with inhibitor and is degraded by excess of enzyme. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PLATE 4 PLATE 5 PLATE 6 PLATE 1 PMID:9069

  15. Effects of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin) on incident of ejaculation and semen quality in the goat.

    PubMed

    Kimsakulvech, S; Suttiyotin, P; Pinyopummin, A

    2015-04-01

    Male temporary contraception is occasionally required in some animals. Alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin) can cause ejaculation disorder. Two sets of Latin square were applied to six male goats to received either normal saline, dimethylsulphoxide or tamsulosin (179.8 nmol kg(-1) ) at 1-week interval. Semen collection and libido scoring were undertaken at 3, 6 and 24 h post-injection. For ejaculated semen, its quality was evaluated. Physiological measurements including body temperature, respiration and heart rates were measured before injection and at 30 min before semen collection. The results showed that libido score and physiological changes were not affected by treatments and time periods. Anejaculation was observed in 11 (91.7%), 5 (41.7%) and 1 (8.3%) males at 3, 6 and 24 h post-tamsulosin injection respectively. The incidence returned to normal when compared with control groups at 24 h. The percentages of motile and live spermatozoa at 6 h post-tamsulosin injection were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of normal saline group. At 24 h post-injection, there were no significant differences of all semen parameters among treatments. This study demonstrated that tamsulosin had temporary effects on ejaculation and semen quality without reducing sex desire and physiological functions in male goats. PMID:24684217

  16. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg's test and Egger's regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  17. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg’s test and Egger’s regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  18. Subcellular site of synthesis of the N-acetylgalactosamine (alpha 1-0) serine (or threonine) linkage in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Abeijon, C.; Hirschberg, C.B.

    1987-03-25

    We have studied the subcellular site of synthesis of the GalNAc(alpha-1-0) Ser/Thr linkage in rat liver. The specific and total activities of polypeptide:N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (using apomucin as exogenous acceptor) were highly enriched in membrane fractions derived from the Golgi apparatus; virtually no activity was detected in membranes from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicles of the above organelles (which were sealed and of the same membrane topographical orientation as in vivo) were able to translocate UDP-GalNAc into their lumen in an assay in vitro; the initial translocation rate into Golgi vesicles was 4-6-fold higher than that into vesicles from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Translocation of UDP-GalNAc into Golgi vesicles was temperature dependent and saturable with an apparent Km of 8-10 microM. UDP-GalNAc labeled with different radioisotopes in the uridine and sugar was used to determine that the intact sugar nucleotide was being translocated in a reaction coupled to the exit of luminal UMP. Following translocation of UDP-GalNAc, transfer of GalNAc into endogenous macromolecular acceptors was detected in Golgi vesicles and not in those from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The above results together with previous studies on the O-xylosylation of the linkage region of proteoglycans strongly suggest that, in rat liver, the bulk of O-glycosylation reactions occur in the Golgi apparatus.

  19. Intravenous administration of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in patients of PiZ and PiM phenotype. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, K.M.; Smith, R.M.; Spragg, R.G.; Tisi, G.M.

    1988-06-24

    Nine patients with moderate pulmonary emphysema, six of PiZ phenotype and three of PiM phenotype, have received a single intravenous infusion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (human) (A1PI), in a dose of 60 mg/kg over a 30-minute period. They also received a tracer dose (300 microCi) of /sup 131/I-labeled A1PI. No active or passive immunization against hepatitis was given. No acute toxicity was observed. Compared with baseline data, significant elevations of serum A1PI (measured both antigenically and as anti-elastase activity) occurred, with a serum half-life approximating 110 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, obtained 48 hours after infusion, reflected a significant increase in A1PI concentration versus baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid values. Serial gamma camera images of the lungs confirmed persistence of enhanced lung radioactivity for several days. Urinary desmosine excretion did not change following A1PI infusion. During the period of follow-up thus far, no patient has had chronic toxicity, results of liver function tests have been stable, and there has been no development of hepatitis B antigen or antibodies to hepatitis B surface or core antigens.

  20. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed. PMID:19519376

  1. N alpha-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-L-arginine, an antioxidant compound identified in aged garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Ryu, K; Ide, N; Matsuura, H; Itakura, Y

    2001-03-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) has been shown to have antioxidant activity. The organosulfur compounds, S-allyl-L-cysteine and S-allylmercapto-L-cysteine, are responsible, at least in part, for the antioxidant activity of AGE. To identify major active components, we fractionated AGE, using hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity as an antioxidative index. Strong activity in the amino acid fraction was found and the major active compound was identified as N alpha-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-L-arginine (Fru-Arg). Antioxidant activity of Fru-Arg was comparable to that of ascorbic acid, scavenging hydrogen peroxide completely at 50 micromol/L and 37% at 10 micromol/L. Quantitative analysis using the established HPLC system revealed that AGE contained 2.1-2.4 mmol/L of Fru-Arg, but none was detected in either raw or heated garlic juice. Furthermore, it was shown that a minimum of 4 mo aging incubation was required for Fru-Arg to be generated. These findings indicate that the aging process is critical for the production of the antioxidant compound, Fru-Arg. These results may explain some of the variation in benefits among different commercially available garlic preparations. PMID:11238799

  2. Values of Alpha 1 Microglobulin Does Not Differ between Individuals with and without Family History of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Trnacevic, Senaid; Hodzic, Emir; Atic, Mirza; Dugonjic, Maida; Hasanovic, Evlijana

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to compare urinary alpha 1 microglobulin (A1MG) in healthy individuals with and without family burden for Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) in an endemic village. Methods. Otherwise healthy inhabitants with microalbuminuria or proteinuria were divided into two groups: with (n = 24) and without (n = 32) family BEN burden and screened for urinary A1MG and A1MG/urine creatinine ratio. Results. Average value of urinary A1MG was 10.35 ± 7.01 mg/L in group with and 10.79 ± 8.27 mg/L in group without family history for BEN (NS, P = 0.87). A1MG was higher than 10 mg/L in eight (33.33%) inhabitants with family history and in 12 (37.5%) without (NS, P = 0.187). Average values of urinary A1MG/creatinine ratio were 1.30 ± 1.59 and 0.94 ± 0.78 in group with and group without family BEN history (NS, P = 0.39, resp.). Elevated values of this ratio were found in 13 (54.17%) inhabitants with and 14 (43.75%) without family history for BEN (NS, P = 0.415). Conclusion. We did not find statistically significant difference in the examined markers between healthy individuals with and without family burden for BEN. We concluded that these markers are not predictive of risk for BEN. PMID:24563783

  3. Alzheimer disease A68 proteins injected into rat brain induce codeposits of beta-amyloid, ubiquitin, and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, R W; Bramblett, G T; Lee, V M; Trojanowski, J Q

    1993-01-01

    Aberrantly phosphorylated tau proteins (i.e., A68 or PHF-tau) and beta-amyloid or A4 (beta A4) peptides are major components of pathologic lesions in Alzheimer disease (AD). Although A68 and beta A4 colocalize in AD neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and amyloid-rich senile plaques (SPs), the mechanisms leading to the convergence of A68, beta A4, and other proteins in the same AD lesions are unknown. To probe the biological properties of A68 in vivo, and to assess interactions of A68 with endogenous proteins in the rodent brain, we injected A68, dephosphorylated A68 (DEP-A68), and normal adult human tau protein into the hippocampus and neocortex of rats. In marked contrast to DEP-A68 and tau, A68 resisted rapid proteolysis and induced codeposits of three rodent proteins--i.e., beta A4, ubiquitin, and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT)--that accumulate in AD NFTs and SPs together with A68. These findings suggest that A68 may interact with beta A4, ubiquitin, and ACT in neuronal perikarya as well as in the extracellular space after release of A68 from degenerating neurons. The model system described here will facilitate efforts to elucidate mechanisms leading to the convergence of A68, beta A4, ubiquitin, and ACT in hallmark lesions of AD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8393578

  4. Mutations in collagen, type XVII, alpha 1 (COL17A1) cause epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED).

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Frida; Byström, Berit; Davidson, Alice E; Backman, Ludvig J; Kellgren, Therese G; Tuft, Stephen J; Koskela, Timo; Rydén, Patrik; Sandgren, Ola; Danielson, Patrik; Hardcastle, Alison J; Golovleva, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that bilaterally affect corneal transparency. They are defined according to the corneal layer affected and by their genetic cause. In this study, we identified a dominantly inherited epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED)-like disease that is common in northern Sweden. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of a novel mutation, c.2816C>T, p.T939I, in the COL17A1 gene, which encodes collagen type XVII alpha 1. The variant segregated with disease in a genealogically expanded pedigree dating back 200 years. We also investigated a unique COL17A1 synonymous variant, c.3156C>T, identified in a previously reported unrelated dominant ERED-like family linked to a locus on chromosome 10q23-q24 encompassing COL17A1. We show that this variant introduces a cryptic donor site resulting in aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and is highly likely to be pathogenic. Bi-allelic COL17A1 mutations have previously been associated with a recessive skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, with recurrent corneal erosions being reported in some cases. Our findings implicate presumed gain-of-function COL17A1 mutations causing dominantly inherited ERED and improve understanding of the underlying pathology. PMID:25676728

  5. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  6. Spatiotemporal expression of alpha(1), alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin subunits is altered in rat myometrium during pregnancy and labour.

    PubMed

    Williams, S J; Shynlova, O; Lye, S J; MacPhee, D J

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors composed of alpha- and beta-subunits. Integrins can cluster to form focal adhesions and, because there is significant ECM remodelling and focal adhesion turnover in the rat myometrium during late pregnancy, we hypothesised that the expression of alpha(1), alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin subunits in the rat myometrium would be altered at this time to accommodate these processes. Expression of alpha(1) and beta(1) integrin subunit mRNA was significantly increased on Days 6-23 of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant (NP) and postpartum (PP) time points (P < 0.05). In contrast, alpha(3) integrin subunit mRNA expression was significantly increased on Days 14, 21 and 22 compared with NP, Day 10, 1 day PP and 4 days PP (P < 0.05). A relative gene expression study revealed that, of the integrins studied, the expression of beta(1) integrin mRNA was highest in pregnant rat myometrium. The alpha(1), alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin subunit proteins became immunolocalised to myocyte membranes in situ by late pregnancy and labour in both myometrial muscle layers. Increased alpha(1), alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin gene expression during gestation and the specific detection of these subunits in myocyte membranes during late pregnancy and labour may contribute to the cell-ECM interactions required for the development of a mechanical syncytium. PMID:20353731

  7. Identification of an alpha(1-->6) mannopyranosyltransferase (MptA), involved in Corynebacterium glutamicum lipomanann biosynthesis, and identification of its orthologue in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arun K; Alderwick, Luke J; Rittmann, Doris; Tatituri, Raju V V; Nigou, Jerome; Gilleron, Martine; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2007-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis share a similar cell wall architecture, and the availability of their genome sequences has enabled the utilization of C. glutamicum as a model for the identification and study of, otherwise essential, mycobacterial genes involved in lipomannan (LM) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM) biosynthesis. We selected the putative glycosyltransferase-Rv2174 from M. tuberculosis and deleted its orthologue NCgl2093 from C. glutamicum. This resulted in the formation of a novel truncated lipomannan (Cg-t-LM) and a complete ablation of LM/LAM biosynthesis. Purification and characterization of Cg-t-LM revealed an overall decrease in molecular mass, a reduction of alpha(1-->6) and alpha(1-->2) glycosidic linkages illustrating a reduced degree of branching compared with wild-type LM. The deletion mutant's biochemical phenotype was fully complemented by either NCgl2093 or Rv2174. Furthermore, the use of a synthetic neoglycolipid acceptor in an in vitro cell-free assay utilizing the sugar donor beta-D-mannopyranosyl-1-monophosphoryl-decaprenol together with the neoglycolipid acceptor alpha-D-Manp-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Manp-O-C8 as a substrate, confirmed NCgl2093 and Rv2174 as an alpha(1-->6) mannopyranosyltransferase (MptA), involved in the latter stages of the biosynthesis of the alpha(1-->6) mannan core of LM. Altogether, these studies have identified a new mannosyltransferase, MptA, and they shed further light on the biosynthesis of LM/LAM in Corynebacterianeae. PMID:17714444

  8. Binding-site mutations in the alpha1 subunit of the inhibitory glycine receptor convert the inhibitory metal ion Cu2+ into a positive modulator.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Tanja; Grudzinska, Joanna; Kuzmin, Dmitry; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    The divalent cation copper (Cu2+) has been shown to inhibit chloride currents mediated by the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). Here, we analyzed Cu2+ inhibition of homo- and hetero-oligomeric GlyRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. No significant differences in Cu2+ inhibitory potency were found between alpha1, alpha2 and alpha3 GlyRs as well as heteromeric alpha1beta receptors. Furthermore, GlyR alpha1 mutations known to reduce inhibition or potentiation of GlyR currents by Zn2+ had no effect on Cu2+ inhibition. However, Cu2+ was found to competitively antagonize glycine binding, suggesting that Cu2+ binds at the agonist-binding site. Mutations within the glycine-binding site of the GlyR alpha1 subunit reduced the inhibitory potency of Cu2+ and led to an up to 4-fold potentiation of glycine-elicited currents by Cu2+. Molecular dynamics simulation suggests this to be due to increased Cu2+ binding energies. Our data show that GlyR binding-site mutations can convert inhibitors of agonist binding into highly effective positive modulators. PMID:18793654

  9. Cyclodextrins are not the major cyclic alpha-1,4-glucans produced by the initial action of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase on amylose.

    PubMed

    Terada, Y; Yanase, M; Takata, H; Takaha, T; Okada, S

    1997-06-20

    The initial action of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) from an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. A2-5a on amylose was investigated. Synthetic amylose was incubated with purified CGTase then terminated in the very early stage of the enzyme reaction. When the reaction mixture was treated with glucoamylase and the resulting glucoamylase-resistant glucans were analyzed with high performance anion exchange chromatography, cyclic alpha-1,4-glucans, with degree of polymerization ranging from 9 to more than 60, in addition to well known alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin (CD), were detected. The time-course analysis revealed that larger cyclic alpha-1, 4-glucans were preferentially produced in the initial stage of the cyclization reaction and were subsequently converted into smaller cyclic alpha-1,4-glucans and into the final major product, beta-CD. CGTase from Bacillus macerans also produced large cyclic alpha-1, 4-glucans except that the final major product was alpha-CD. Based on these results, a new model for the action of CGTase on amylose was proposed, which may contradict the widely held view of the cyclization reaction of CGTase. PMID:9188466

  10. Immunolocalization of thymosin alpha 1, thymopoietin and thymulin in mouse thymic epithelial cells at different stages of culture: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fabien, N; Auger, C; Monier, J C

    1988-01-01

    The secretory evolution of the thymic hormones (thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 and thymopoietin) in cultured thymic reticuloepithelial cells (TREC) was studied by immunocytochemical techniques using monoclonal anti-thymulin or anti-thymosin alpha 1 and polyclonal anti-thymopoietin antibodies (Ab). The culture of TREC was performed with a medium where L-valine was replaced by D-valine, thus ensuring rapid and selective development of these cells. The number of thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 or thymopoietin-containing cells increased progressively from Day 6 to Day 12 of the culture. The localization of the three thymic hormones within the TREC also varied according to the age of the culture. By light microscopy the staining of the three hormones was localized in some cytoplasmic granules at the beginning of the culture and at Day 90, while at Day 12 it was throughout the cytoplasm. In electron microscopy these localizations corresponded respectively to vacuoles of different sizes and to cytosol. All these results show that the synthesis and excretion of thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 and thymopoietin evolve during the development of TREC in culture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3284819

  11. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen type I is required for efficient binding to integrin alpha 1 beta 1 and platelet glycoprotein VI but not to alpha 2 beta 1.

    PubMed

    Perret, Stéephanie; Eble, Johannes A; Siljander, Pia R-M; Merle, Christine; Farndale, Richard W; Theisen, Manfred; Ruggiero, Florence

    2003-08-01

    Collagen is a potent adhesive substrate for cells, an event essentially mediated by the integrins alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1. Collagen fibrils also bind to the integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI to activate and aggregate platelets. The distinct triple helical recognition motifs for these receptors, GXOGER and (GPO)n, respectively, all contain hydroxyproline. Using unhydroxylated collagen I produced in transgenic plants, we investigated the role of hydroxyproline in the receptor-binding properties of collagen. We show that alpha 2 beta 1 but not alpha 1 beta 1 mediates cell adhesion to unhydroxylated collagen. Soluble recombinant alpha 1 beta 1 binding to unhydroxylated collagen is considerably reduced compared with bovine collagens, but binding can be restored by prolyl hydroxylation of recombinant collagen. We also show that platelets use alpha 2 beta 1 to adhere to the unhydroxylated recombinant molecules, but the adhesion is weaker than on fully hydroxylated collagen, and the unhydroxylated collagen fibrils fail to aggregate platelets. Prolyl hydroxylation is thus required for binding of collagen to platelet glycoprotein VI and to cells by alpha 1 beta 1. These observations give new insights into the molecular basis of collagen-receptor interactions and offer new selective applications for the recombinant unhydroxylated collagen I. PMID:12771137

  12. Rescue of type I collagen-deficient phenotype by retroviral-vector-mediated transfer of human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into Mov-13 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, A; Mulligan, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone corresponding to the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene was isolated and inserted into a retrovirus vector. Cell lines were obtained which produced recombinant viruses transducing the collagen cDNA (HUC virus). To test whether the transduced cDNA was functional, Mov-13 mouse cells were infected with the virus. These cells do not produce any type I collagen due to an insertional mutation of the pro alpha 1(I) gene which blocks transcription. While normal amounts of pro alpha 2(I) RNA were synthesized, no alpha 2(I) collagen chains were detectable in the mutant Mov-13 cells. Infection with HUC virus, however, resulted in the production of stable type I collagen, which was secreted into the medium. Analysis of pepsin-resistant proteins indicated that interspecies heterotrimers consisting of human alpha 1(I) and mouse alpha 2(I) collagen chains were secreted by the infected Mov-13 cells. Our results show that pro alpha (I) collagen chains from species as distant as human and mouse can associate to form stable type I collagen. The availability of a retrovirus vector transducing a functional pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene combined with the Mov-13 mutant system should enable us to study the effect of specific mutations on the synthesis, assembly, and function of type I collagen, not only in tissue culture but also in the animal. Images PMID:3599181

  13. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil. PMID:19238461

  14. AMPA receptors serum-dependently mediate GABAA receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunit down-regulation in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Kallinen, Sampsa A; Salonen, Virpi

    2010-04-01

    Depolarization of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells with potassium or kainate results in developmentally arrested state that includes down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha6 and beta2 subunit expression. These subunits are normally strongly expressed in cerebellar granule cells from second postnatal week throughout the adulthood. In the present study we demonstrate that selective activation of AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors down-regulates alpha1 and alpha6 subunit mRNA expression. Removal of AMPA agonist from culture medium restores expression of these subunits indicating reversibility of the down-regulation. In serum-free culture medium AMPA receptor activation did not down-regulate alpha1 or alpha6 subunit expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation was strongly attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of dialysed fetal calf serum. The results indicate that down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunits by AMPA receptor activation is dependent on the presence of low molecular weight compounds present in fetal calf serum. In order to study mouse cerebellar granule cell maturation and/or regulation of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in culture, the experiments should be performed in the absence of fetal calf serum. PMID:20170697

  15. Genotypes and serum concentrations of human alpha‐1‐antitrypsin “P” protein variants in a clinical population

    PubMed Central

    Bornhorst, Joshua A; Calderon, Fernanda R O; Procter, Melinda; Tang, Wei; Ashwood, Edward R; Mao, Rong

    2007-01-01

    Background Alpha‐1‐antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a relatively common genetic disorder that can lead to the development of pulmonary disorders. Diagnosis of AAT deficiency is typically performed by isoelectric focusing (IEF) protein phenotyping in concert with determination of AAT serum concentration levels. The “P” phenotypic variant is associated with several known genetic variants that are found at unknown relative frequencies. Aims To investigate the genetic variation of “P” alleles in patient samples. Methods A DNA sequencing protocol for the full AAT coding region from serum was developed. Additionally, a retrospective evaluation of AAT concentrations in serum samples containing “P” allele IEF phenotype variants was undertaken. Results “P” phenotypic variants are observed in ∼1 of every 90