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Sample records for care buprenorphine treatment

  1. Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Ordean, Alice; Cirone, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the use of buprenorphine for opioid-addicted patients in primary care. Quality of evidence The MEDLINE database was searched for literature on buprenorphine from 1980 to 2009. Controlled trials, meta-analyses, and large observational studies were reviewed. Main message Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that relieves opioid withdrawal symptoms and cravings for 24 hours or longer. Buprenorphine has a much lower risk of overdose than methadone and is preferred for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, those who might need shorter-term maintenance therapy, and those with limited access to methadone treatment. The initial dose should be given only after the patient is in withdrawal. The therapeutic dose range for most patients is 8 to 16 mg daily. It should be dispensed daily by the pharmacist with gradual introduction of take-home doses. Take-home doses should be introduced more slowly for patients at higher risk of abuse and diversion (eg, injection drug users). Patients who fail buprenorphine treatment should be referred for methadone- or abstinence-based treatment. Conclusion Buprenorphine is an effective treatment of opioid addiction and can be safely prescribed by primary care physicians. PMID:21402963

  2. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  3. Buprenorphine-based regimens and methadone for the medical management of opioid dependence: selecting the appropriate drug for treatment.

    PubMed

    Maremmani, Icro; Gerra, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine-based regimens reduces opioid dependence and associated harms. The perception that methadone is more effective than buprenorphine for maintenance treatment has been based on low buprenorphine doses and excessively slow induction regimens used in early buprenorphine trials. Subsequent studies show that the efficacy of buprenorphine sublingual tablet (Subutex®) or buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet (Suboxone®) is equivalent to that of methadone when sufficient buprenorphine doses, rapid induction, and flexible dosing are used. Although methadone remains an essential maintenance therapy option, buprenorphine-based regimens increase access to care and provide safer, more appropriate treatment than methadone for some patients. PMID:20958853

  4. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R; Smith, David E

    2010-06-01

    Compelling clinical evidence establishes that buprenorphine is similar to methadone in efficacy for opiate detoxification and maintenance but safer than methadone in an overdose situation. The Drug Abuse Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) enabled US physicians with additional training to prescribe buprenorphine to a limited number of opiate-dependent patients. The sublingual tablets Subutex (buprenorphine alone) and Suboxone (a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone) meet the specifications of DATA 2000. Suboxone is intended to discourage intravenously administration and has less abuse potential than buprenorphine alone. Suboxone is generally recommended for maintenance treatment except for women who are pregnant. Subutex is recommended in treatment of pregnant women. A buprenorphine opiate withdrawal syndrome can occur in newborns. Although intravenous buprenorphine abuse is a significant public health problem in some countries, buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone has less potential for abuse than heroin and some prescription opiates, such as oxycodone. Pharmacotherapy from physicians' offices makes buprenorphine treatment acceptable to some opiate-dependent patients who would not accept treatment in traditional opiate-maintenance clinics. For reasons not adequately understood, some patients find discontinuation of buprenorphine following long-term use difficult. This article reviews the pharmacology of buprenorphine, summarizes evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine and provides clinical guidelines for treatment. PMID:20648912

  5. Emerging adult age status predicts poor buprenorphine treatment retention

    PubMed Central

    Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Weiss, Roger D.; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Borodovsky, Jacob; Albanese, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults (18–25 years old) are often poorly retained in substance use disorder treatment. Office-based buprenorphine often enhances treatment retention among people with opioid dependence. In this study, we examined the records of a collaborative care buprenorphine treatment program to compare the treatment retention rates of emerging adults versus older adults. Subjects were 294 adults, 71 (24%) aged 18–25, followed in treatment with buprenorphine, nurse care management, and an intensive outpatient program followed by weekly psychosocial treatment. Compared to older adults, emerging adults remained in treatment at a significantly lower rate at 3 months (56% versus 78%) and 12 months (17% versus 45%), and were significantly more likely to test positive for illicit opioids, relapse, or drop out of treatment. Further research into factors associated with buprenorphine treatment retention among emerging adults is needed to improve treatment and long-term outcomes in this group. PMID:24953168

  6. Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine (OBOT-B): Statewide Implementation of the Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model in Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, Colleen T; Han, Steve Choongheon; Bergeron, Alexis; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services' (BSAS) initiative to disseminate the office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine (OBOT-B) Massachusetts Model from its development at Boston Medical Center (BMC) to its implementation at fourteen community health centers (CHCs) beginning in 2007. The Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model for the delivery of opioid agonist therapy with buprenorphine, in which nurses working with physicians play a central role in the evaluation and monitoring of patients, holds promise for the effective expansion of treatment for opioid use disorders. The training of and technical assistance for the OBOT nurses as well as a limited program assessment are described. Data spanning 6years (2007-2013) report patient demographics, prior treatment for opioid use disorders, history of overdose, housing, and employment. The expansion of OBOT to the fourteen CHCs increased the number of physicians who were "waivered" (i.e., enabling their prescribing of buprenorphine) by 375%, from 24 to 114, within 3years. During this period the annual admissions of OBOT patients to CHCs markedly increased. Dissemination of the Massachusetts Model of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine employing a collaborative care model with a central role for nursing enabled implementation of effective treatment for patients with an opioid use disorder at community health centers throughout Massachusetts while effectively engaging primary care physicians in this endeavor. PMID:26233698

  7. Buprenorphine Treatment for Narcotic Addiction: Not Without Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    While most clinicians will never prescribe buprenorphine or combined buprenorphine/naloxone, familiarity with the risks of these pharmacological approaches to the treatment of narcotic addiction remains relevant. Overall, medication-assisted treatment has clearly resulted in meaningful gains for a number of individuals who are addicted to narcotics (i.e., opiates and opioids). However, a certain level of risk is inherent with these approaches. For example, both buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone may be diverted and misused (e.g., intravenously injected, intranasally administered), particularly buprenorphine. Likewise, when illicitly injected, both can cause infectious complications as well as result in death from overdose. The risk of death with buprenorphine overdose appears to be heightened with the coadministration of either benzodiazepines or sedative/hypnotics. To conclude, as with all interventions in medicine, buprenorphine treatment for narcotic addiction has a clinically fluctuating risk/benefit equation that must be continually monitored. PMID:25973324

  8. Parenting and Concerns of Pregnant Women in Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Rachel A; Neumann, Anne M; King, Stella OC; Hoey, Robert F; Finnell, Deborah S; Blondell, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-dependent pregnant women are characterized by drug use during pregnancy and deficits in knowledge of newborn care and feeding, and of child development. We assessed parenting skills and concerns among pregnant women in buprenorphine treatment for prescription opioid-dependence. Study Design and Methods We interviewed 32 pregnant women who received buprenorphine treatment for prescription opioid dependence in a primary care setting and administered questionnaires, including the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory version 2 (AAPI-2) and Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Results AAPI-2 scores revealed medium risk of abuse for all five scales: inappropriate expectations of the child, low level of empathy, strong belief in corporal punishment, reversal of parent-child roles, and oppression of children’s power and independence. Primary concerns of participants were neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and their child’s health. Pregnant women who received buprenorphine for treatment of prescription opioid dependence showed a lack of appropriate parenting skills, but did not express concern about their ability to parent. Clinical Implications Our findings suggest need for nurses to assist prescription opioid-dependent pregnant women in acquiring additional parenting skills, to refer for educational parenting intervention, and to educate patients about NAS. PMID:25137081

  9. Smoking cessation treatment among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Nahvi, Shadi; Blackstock, Oni; Sohler, Nancy L; Thompson, Devin; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2014-08-01

    Opioid-dependent patients smoke at high rates, and office-based buprenorphine treatment provides an opportunity to offer cessation treatment. We examined tobacco use and smoking cessation treatment patterns among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients. We reviewed records of 319 patients treated with buprenorphine from 2005 to 2010. We examined smoking status, cessation medication prescriptions, and factors associated with receipt of cessation prescriptions. Mean age was 43.9 years; most were men (74.2%) and Hispanic (70.9%). At buprenorphine initiation, 21.9% had no documentation of smoking status, while 67.4% were current, 10% former, and 0.9% never smokers. Of current smokers, 16.8% received smoking cessation prescriptions. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to receive smoking cessation medications (26.3% vs. 11.2%, p<0.005). We observed a high tobacco use prevalence among buprenorphine patients, and limited provision of cessation treatment. This is a missed opportunity to impact the high tobacco use burden in opioid-dependent persons. PMID:24912863

  10. Buprenorphine maintenance: a new treatment for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory B; McAllister, Mark S

    2007-07-01

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is a safe and effective treatment for opioid dependence, and has very low potential for abuse, especially when it is combined with naloxone (Narcan) in a single sublingual tablet (Suboxone). New regulations allow physicians who are certified in buprenorphine therapy to offer it in their offices, a development that can substantially increase patient access to treatment. PMID:17682629

  11. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Saxon, Andrew J.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  12. Outcomes among buprenorphine-naloxone primary care patients after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The extent of damage in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was unprecedented. Bellevue Hospital Center (BHC), a tertiary public hospital, was evacuated and temporarily closed as a result of hurricane-related damages. BHC’s large primary care office-based buprenorphine clinic was relocated to an affiliate public hospital for three weeks. The extent of environmental damage and ensuing service disruption effects on rates of illicit drug, tobacco, and alcohol misuse, buprenorphine medication supply disruptions, or direct resource losses among office-based buprenorphine patients is to date unknown. Methods A quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to patients in BHC’s primary care buprenorphine program starting one month after the hurricane. Survey domains included: housing and employment disruptions; social and economic support; treatment outcomes (buprenorphine adherence and ability to get care), and tobacco, alcohol, and drug use. Open-ended questions probed general patient experiences related to the storm, coping strategies, and associated disruptions. Results There were 132 patients enrolled in the clinic at the time of the storm; of those, 91 patients were recruited to the survey, and 89 completed (98% of those invited). Illicit opioid misuse was rare, with 7 respondents reporting increased heroin or illicit prescription opioid use following Sandy. Roughly half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine-naloxone medication supply post-event, and self-lowering of daily doses to prolong supply was common. Additional buprenorphine was obtained through unscheduled telephone or written refills from relocated Bellevue providers, informally from friends and family, and, more rarely, from drug dealers. Conclusions The findings highlight the relative adaptability of public sector office-based buprenorphine treatment during and after a significant natural disaster. Only minimal increases in self-reported substance use were reported despite many disruptions to regular buprenorphine supplies and previous daily doses. Informal supplies of substitute buprenorphine from family and friends was common. Remote telephone refill support and a temporary back-up location that provided written prescription refills and medication dispensing for uninsured patients enabled some patients to maintain an adequate medication supply. Such adaptive strategies to ensure medication maintenance continuity pre/post natural disasters likely minimize poor treatment outcomes. PMID:24467734

  13. Buprenorphine: clinical pharmacokinetics in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Elkader, Alexander; Sproule, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine, a naturally occurring alkaloid of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The pharmacology of buprenorphine is unique in that it is a partial agonist at the opioid mu receptor. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism and therefore has very low oral bioavailability; however, its bioavailability sublingually is extensive enough to make this a feasible route of administration for the treatment of opioid dependence. The mean time to maximum plasma concentration following sublingual administration is variable, ranging from 40 minutes to 3.5 hours. Buprenorphine has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (96%). It is extensively metabolised by N-dealkylation to norbuprenorphine primarily through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The terminal elimination half-life of buprenorphine is long and there is considerable variation in reported values (mean values ranging from 3 to 44 hours). Most of a dose of buprenorphine is eliminated in the faeces, with approximately 10-30% excreted in urine. Naloxone has been added to a sublingual formulation of buprenorphine to reduce the abuse liability of the product. The presence of naloxone does not appear to influence the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine crosses the placenta during pregnancy and also crosses into breast milk. Buprenorphine dosage does not need to be significantly adjusted in patients with renal impairment; however, since CYP3A activity may be decreased in patients with severe chronic liver disease, it is possible that the metabolism of buprenorphine will be altered in these patients. Although there is limited evidence in the literature to date, drugs that are known to inhibit or induce CYP3A4 have the potential to diminish or enhance buprenorphine N-dealkylation. It appears that the interaction between buprenorphine and benzodiazepines is more likely to be a pharmacodynamic (additive or synergistic) than a pharmacokinetic interaction. The relationship between buprenorphine plasma concentration and response in the treatment of opioid dependence has not been well studied. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of buprenorphine allow it to be a feasible option for substitution therapy in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15966752

  14. Impact of research network participation on the adoption of buprenorphine for substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Traci R; Abraham, Amanda J; Kovas, Anne E; McFarland, Bentson H; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (N=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (N=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors' acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  15. Impact of Research Network Participation on the Adoption of Buprenorphine for Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci R.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Kovas, Anne E.; McFarland, Bentson H.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (n=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (n=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1,203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors’ acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  16. Buprenorphine Treatment in an Urban Community Health Center: What to Expect

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Chinazo; Giovanniello, Angela; Sacajiu, Galit; Whitley, Susan; Mund, Pamela; Beil, Robert; Sohler, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite new opportunities to expand buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, use of this treatment modality has been limited. Physicians may question their ability to successfully treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in a primary care setting. We describe a buprenorphine treatment program and treatment outcomes in an urban community health center. Methods We conducted retrospective chart reviews on the first 41 opioid-dependent patients treated with buprenorphine/naloxone. The primary outcome was 90-day retention in treatment. Results Patients’ mean age was 46 years, 70.7% were male, 58.8% Hispanic, 31.7% black, 57.5% unemployed, and 70.0% used heroin prior to treatment. Twenty-nine (70.7%) patients were retained in treatment at day 90. Compared to those not retained, patients retained in treatment were more likely to have used street methadone (0% versus 37.9%) and less likely to have used opioid analgesics (54.6% versus 20.7%) and alcohol (50.0% versus 13.8%) prior to treatment. Of the 25 patients with urine toxicology tests, 24% tested positive for opioids. Conclusions Buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence in an urban community health center resulted in a 90-day retention rate of 70.7%. Type of substance use prior to treatment appeared to be associated with retention. These findings can help guide program development. PMID:18928077

  17. Antidepressant Treatment Does Not Improve Buprenorphine Retention Among Opioid-Dependent Persons

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Michael D.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Cioe, Patricia A.; Friedmann, Peter D.; Tellioglu, Tahir; Anderson, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether treatment of depressive symptoms with escitalopram during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, would improve treatment retention compared to placebo in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind trial. Treatment drop-out was defined as missing seven consecutive buprenorphine dosing days. Participants were 76% male, 80% non-Hispanic Caucasian, and 64% heroin users. At baseline, the mean Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was 28.4 (±9.7). Sixty-one percent of participants completed the 12 week buprenorphine protocol. Dropout rates were 33.3% and 44.0% among those randomized to escitalopram or placebo respectively (p=.19). Relative to baseline, mean BDI-II scores were significantly lower at all follow-up assessments, but the treatment by time interaction effect was not statistically significant (p = .18). Participants randomized to escitalopram also did not have a significantly lower likelihood of testing positive for either opiates or other drugs during follow-up. Depressive symptoms often resolved with buprenorphine treatment and the immediate initiation of escitalopram does not improve treatment retention, depression outcomes, or illicit drug use. Clinicians should determine the need for antidepressant treatment later in buprenorphine care. PMID:20598836

  18. Antidepressant treatment does not improve buprenorphine retention among opioid-dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Kettavong, Malyna; Cioe, Patricia A; Friedmann, Peter D; Tellioglu, Tahir; Anderson, Bradley J

    2010-09-01

    Our goal was to determine whether treatment of depressive symptoms with escitalopram during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence would improve treatment retention compared to placebo in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind trial. Treatment dropout was defined as missing seven consecutive buprenorphine dosing days. Participants were 76% male, 80% non-Hispanic Caucasian, and 64% heroin users. At baseline, the mean Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score was 28.4 (+/-9.7). Sixty-one percent of participants completed the 12-week buprenorphine protocol. Dropout rates were 33.3% and 44.0% among those randomized to escitalopram or placebo, respectively (p = .19). Relative to baseline, mean BDI-II scores were significantly lower at all follow-up assessments, but the Treatment x Time interaction effect was not statistically significant (p = .18). Participants randomized to escitalopram also did not have a significantly lower likelihood of testing positive for either opiates or other drugs during follow-up. Depressive symptoms often resolved with buprenorphine treatment, and the immediate initiation of escitalopram does not improve treatment retention, depression outcomes, or illicit drug use. Clinicians should determine the need for antidepressant treatment later in buprenorphine care. PMID:20598836

  19. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (?10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  20. I Heard About It From a Friend: Assessing Interest in Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Shah, Pooja A.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Lopez, Carolina M.; Starrels, Joanna L.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the United States, opioid abuse and dependence continue to be a growing problem, while treatment for opioid abuse and dependence remains fairly static. Buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence is safe and effective but underutilized. Prior research has demonstrated low awareness and use of buprenorphine among marginalized groups. This study investigates syringe exchange participants’ awareness of, exposure to, and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Methods Syringe exchange participants were recruited from a mobile unit performing outreach to nine street-side sites in New York City. Computer-based interviews were conducted to determine: (1) opioid users’ awareness of, exposure to, and interest in buprenorphine treatment; and (2) the association between awareness or exposure and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between awareness, direct exposure (i.e. having taken buprenorphine), or indirect exposure (i.e. knowing someone who had taken buprenorphine) and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Results Of 158 opioid users, 70% were aware of, 32% had direct exposure to, and 31% had indirect exposure to buprenorphine; 12% had been prescribed buprenorphine. Of 138 opioid users who had never been prescribed buprenorphine, 57% were interested in buprenorphine treatment. In multivariate models, indirect exposure was associated with interest in buprenorphine treatment (AOR = 2.65, 95% CI: 1.22 – 5.77), but awareness and direct exposure were not. Conclusions Syringe exchange participants were mostly aware of buprenorphine and interested in treatment, but few had actually been prescribed buprenorphine. Because indirect exposure to buprenorphine was associated with interest in treatment, future interventions could capitalize on indirect exposure, such as through peer mentorship, to address underutilization of buprenorphine treatment. PMID:24588297

  1. Safety and tolerability of the switch from buprenorphine to buprenorphine/naloxone in an Italian addiction treatment centre.

    PubMed

    Stimolo, Clementina; Favero, Valentina Del; Zecchinato, Giancarlo; Buson, Roberto; Cusin, Davide; Pellachin, Patrizia; Simonetto, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Abuse and misuse of pharmacological therapies represent major challenges in the healthcare system, particularly in patients receiving long-acting opioid drugs for the treatment of heroin or opioid addiction. The partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine is used to treat opioid dependence, but diversion and misuse may occur. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is associated with a reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for the treatment of opioid dependence. This observational study assessed the safety and efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy in patients with opioid dependence after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine monotherapy. A total of 94 patients being treated with buprenorphine monotherapy (average dose 8 mg/day; mean duration of therapy 840 days) were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy. Patients were asked to rate their level of satisfaction with buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment with respect to the management of withdrawal symptoms, and urinary toxicology tests were carried out before and 14 days after switching to combination therapy. Within 3 months, 75/94 patients (80%) previously treated with buprenorphine monotherapy had switched to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment (average dose buprenorphine 8 mg). Among patients receiving combination treatment for >3 months, 83% were receiving medication either weekly or fortnightly, based on the results of toxicological testing. A reduction in positive urinary toxicology tests was observed in patients within two weeks after being switched to combination treatment (before switch: 28, 9 and 2 positive tests for heroin, cocaine and heroin + cocaine, respectively vs 11, 3 and 1 after switch) and a total of 64 patients of the 75 who switched to combination therapy (85%) were satisfied with the management of withdrawal symptoms during buprenorphine/naloxone treatment. Few adverse events were reported and no patients dropped out of treatment. This study shows that switching from buprenorphine monotherapy to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy is effective and well tolerated, and associated with good control of withdrawal symptoms in the majority of patients. In addition, combination therapy reduced illicit drug use (based on negative urinary toxicology texts) and allowed the time between clinic visits to be increased. PMID:20450243

  2. Hypogonadism in men receiving methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, R; Byrne, A; Agho, K; McMahon, C G; Tynan, P; Attia, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and investigate the aetiology of hypogonadism in men on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MMT, BMT). 103 men (mean age 37.6 +/- 7.9) on MMT (n = 84) or BMT (n = 19) were evaluated using hormone assays, body mass index (BMI), serological, biochemical, demographic and substance use measures. Overall 54% of men (methadone 65%; buprenorphine 28%) had total testosterone (TT) <12.0 nm; 34% (methadone 39%; buprenorphine 11%) had TT <8.0 nm. Both methadone- and buprenorphine-treated men had lower free testosterone, luteinising hormone and estradiol than age-matched reference groups. Methadone-treated men had lower TT than buprenorphine-treated men and reference groups. Prolactin did not differ between methadone, buprenorphine groups, and reference groups. Primary testicular failure was an uncommon cause of hypogonadism. Yearly percentage fall in TT by age across the patient group was 2.3%, more than twice that expected normally. There were no associations between TT and opioid dose, cannabis, alcohol and tobacco consumption, or chronic hepatitis C viraemia. On multiple regression higher TT was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase and lower TT with higher BMI. Men on MMT have high prevalence of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The extent of hormonal changes associated with buprenorphine needs to be explored further in larger studies. Men receiving long term opioid replacement treatment, especially methadone treatment, should be screened for hypogonadism. Wide interindividual differences in methadone metabolism and tolerance may in a cross-sectional study obscure a methadone dose relationship to testosterone in individuals. Future studies of hypogonadism in opioid-treated men should examine the potential benefits of dose reduction, choice of opioid medication, weight loss, and androgen replacement. PMID:17971165

  3. Buprenorphine: a (relatively) new treatment for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Christopher; Valadez-Meltzer, Adela

    2005-12-01

    Opioid dependence is a significant and growing problem in the United States. For nearly a century, federal regulations have made it illegal for psychiatrists and other physicians to pharmacologically manage this condition in an office-based setting using opioids. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 has made it possible for all physicians to prescribe buprenorphine to patients in such a setting. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opoid receptor agonist, has unique pharmacologic properties that distinguish it from methadone and other medications used in the treatment of opioid dependence. It has been shown to be as effective as methadone and is generally safe and well-tolerated. It is available in two sublingual formulations: Subutex, which contains only buprenorphine, and Suboxone, which also contains naloxone. Physicians who wish to prescribe either must obtain a special waiver from the federal government and are currently limited to prescribing it for 30 patients at a time. PMID:21124750

  4. Clinical experience with fortnightly buprenorphine/naloxone versus buprenorphine in Italy: preliminary observational data in an office-based setting.

    PubMed

    Amato, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone is a new option for the management of opioid dependence. It has a reduced potential for abuse or misuse compared with methadone and buprenorphine alone, and has a long half-life allowing less frequent dosing. Buprenorphine/naloxone appears to be well suited for the management of opioid dependence in an office-based setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment in an office-based setting. Therefore, we evaluated the effect on misuse/diversion, quality of care, quality of life and service delivery. Seventy-eight patients were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone from either methadone or buprenorphine alone; the median duration of previous buprenorphine or methadone treatment was 10 years. Patients received buprenorphine/naloxone and were evaluated throughout a 1-year follow-up period. Treatment was self-administered by the patients every 2 weeks and the mean buprenorphine dosage at 1 year was 8 mg/day. Comparisons were made before and after the switch for patients who switched from buprenorphine alone to buprenorphine/naloxone. Switching to buprenorphine/naloxone was not associated with clinically relevant problems in 50% of patients studied. Buprenorphine/naloxone provided satisfactory coverage of withdrawal symptoms in 78.1% of patients, and 50% of patients were satisfied with buprenorphine/naloxone therapy. Seventy-eight per cent of patients reported improved psychosocial functioning. The majority of patients (approximately 85%) were negative for opioids during toxicological testing. A significantly higher proportion of treatment recipients were highly satisfied during buprenorphine/naloxone administration (p < 0.001 compared with buprenorphine given before the switch). Other outcomes were similar during buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone administration. Fortnightly self-administration of buprenorphine/naloxone appeared to be cost saving for the clinic. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective and safe treatment option for the outpatient management of opioid dependence. PMID:20450244

  5. Naltrexone and buprenorphine combination in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Fantoma, A; Zaimovic, A

    2006-11-01

    Naltrexone treatment has demonstrated some advantages for special populations of heroin addicted individuals, but patients' compliance seems to be very poor, with a low adherence and low retention rate. Kappa-opioid system overdrive seems to contribute to opioid protracted abstinence syndrome, with dysphoria and psychosomatic symptoms during naltrexone treatment. The objective of this observational study was to determine the effectiveness of a functional k antagonist in improving naltrexone treatment outcome. A partial mu agonist/kappa antagonist (buprenorphine) and a mu antagonist (naltrexone) were combined during a 12 weeks protocol, theoretically leaving k antagonism as the major medication effect. Sixty patients were submitted to outpatient rapid detoxification utilizing buprenorphine and opioid antagonists. Starting on the fifth day, 30 patients (group A) received naltrexone alone. Alternatively, 30 patients (group B) received naltrexone (50mg oral dose) plus buprenorphine (4 mg sublingual) for the 12 weeks of the observational study. The endpoints of the study were: retention in treatment, negative urinalyses, changes in psychological symptoms (Symptom Checklist-90 Revised: SCL-90) and craving scores (visual analysis scale (VAS)). Thirty-four subjects (56.67%) completed the 12 weeks study. Twenty-one patients (35.0%) had all urine samples negative for opiates and cocaine. nine subjects (15.0%) had urine samples negative for cocaine and opiates for the last 4 weeks of the study. five subjects (8.3%) continued to use cocaine during the 12 weeks of the study. No significant change in pupillary diameter after buprenorphine administration was evidenced during clinical observations from baseline across the weekly measurements. Retention rates in group A (naltrexone) and group B (naltrexone + buprenorphine) at week 12 were respectively 40% (12 patients) and 73.33% (22 patients), with a significant difference in favour of group B (p= 0.018). Patients treated with naltrexone in combination with buprenorphine (B patients) showed a significantly lower rate of positive urines for morphine (4.45%) and cocaine metabolites (9.09%) than those treated with naltrexone alone (A) (25%, morphine; 33.33% cocaine) (p< 0.05; p< 0.05). Irritability, depression, tiredness, psychosomatic symptoms and craving scores decreased significantly less in Group A patients than in group B patients. The dysfunction of opioid system with kappa receptors hyper-activation provoked by heroin exposure, probably underlying dysphoric and psychosomatic symptoms during naltrexone treatment, seems to be counteracted, at least in part, by buprenorphine. The combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone may significantly improve the outcome of opioid antagonists treatment in terms of retention, negative urinalyses, and reduced dysphoria, mood symptoms and craving. PMID:16401652

  6. Buprenorphine Prescribing Availability in a Sample of Ohio Specialty Treatment Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Todd; Sherbeck, Carol; Zehner, Mark; Starr, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Buprenorphine, a medication for treating opioid dependence, is underutilized in specialty addiction treatment organizations. Only physicians who have obtained a buprenorphine prescribing license or “waiver” may administer this medication. A limited number of physicians are pursuing this waiver, and a concern in the substance use disorder treatment field is that the shortage of prescribers could be contributing to the low use of buprenorphine at specialty addiction treatment centers. The objective of this study is to assess Ohio specialty treatment organizations’ access to buprenorphine prescribers and the barriers they encounter when seeking new physician prescribing capacity. Methods Forty-one Ohio specialty addiction treatment organizations were invited to complete a survey of their buprenorphine practices and availability of buprenorphine prescribers during August–October 2014. Data was collected on pharmacotherapies used in the treatment of opioid dependence, arrangements treatment organizations have with prescribing physicians, buprenorphine prescribing capacity, and barriers encountered in recruiting new physician prescribers. Results Thirty-seven treatment organizations responded, for a response rate of 90.2%. Seventy-eight percent (n=29) of the sample provided buprenorphine therapy. Of those treatment organizations, 48.3% (n=14) reported insufficient prescribing capacity. Of those, 50% (n=7) indicated they had to turn patients away from buprenorphine therapy due to limited physician prescribing capacity. Conclusion The study suggests that buprenorphine use is constrained by limited physician prescribing capacity, to the degree that 24.1% of the organizations surveyed using buprenorphine therapy had to turn patients away. Potential remedies include encouraging more specialty treatment organizations to have physicians on staff, removing the Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA 2000) cap that limits physician buprenorphine caseloads at 100 patients (after year 1), and developing strategies to recruit physicians into addiction treatment practice. Additional research is needed to increase the knowledge of physician prescribing capacity as a barrier to buprenorphine use, how to overcome these barriers, and to understand the extent physician capacity shortages are affecting buprenorphine use. PMID:26380328

  7. Comparison of Behavioral Treatment Conditions in Buprenorphine Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Jenkins, Jessica; Fahey, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims The Controlled Substances Act requires physicians in the United States to provide or refer to behavioral treatment when treating opioid-dependent individuals with buprenorphine; however no research has examined the combination of buprenorphine with different types of behavioral treatments. This randomized controlled trial compared the effectiveness of 4 behavioral treatment conditions provided with buprenorphine and medical management (MM) for the treatment of opioid dependence. Design After a 2-week buprenorphine induction/stabilization phase, participants were randomized to 1 of 4 behavioral treatment conditions provided for 16 weeks: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT=53); Contingency Management (CM=49); both CBT and CM (CBT+CM=49); and no additional behavioral treatment (NT=51). Setting Study activities occurred at an outpatient clinical research center in Los Angeles, California, USA. Participants Included were 202 male and female opioid-dependent participants. Measurements Primary outcome was opioid use, measured as a proportion of opioid-negative urine results over the number of tests possible. Secondary outcomes include retention, withdrawal symptoms, craving, other drug use, and adverse events. Findings No group differences in opioid use were found for the behavioral treatment phase (Chi-square=1.25, p=0.75), for a second medication-only treatment phase, or at weeks 40 and 52 follow-ups. Analyses revealed no differences across groups for any secondary outcome. Conclusion There remains no clear evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy and contingency management reduce opiate use when added to buprenorphine and medical management in opiates users seeking treatment. PMID:23734858

  8. Implementation of a collaborative care management program with buprenorphine in primary care: A comparison between opioid-dependent patients and chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Joji; Matthews, Michele L.; Brick, David; Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Jamison, Robert N.; Ellner, Andrew L.; Tishler, Lori W.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To implement a collaborative care management program with buprenorphine in a primary care clinic. Design Prospective observational study. Setting A busy urban academic primary care clinic affiliated with a tertiary care hospital. Participants Opioid dependent patients or chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically were recruited for the study. A total of 45 participants enrolled. Interventions Patients were treated with buprenorphine and managed by a supervising psychiatrist, pharmacist care manager and health coaches. The care manager conducted buprenorphine inductions and all follow-ups visits. Health coaches offered telephonic support. The psychiatrist supervised both the care manager and health coaches. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were treatment retention at 6 months, and change in the proportion of aberrant toxicology results and opioid craving scores from baseline to 6 months. After data collection, clinical outcomes were compared between opioid dependent patients and chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically. Overall, 55.0% (25/45) of participants remained in treatment at 6 months. PCPs’ attitudes about opioid dependence treatment were surveyed at baseline and at 18-months. Results Forty-three patients (95.6%) accepted treatment and 25 (55.0%) remained in treatment at 6 months. The proportion of aberrant urine toxicology results decreased significantly from baseline to 6 months (p<0.01). Craving scores significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months (p<0.01). Opioid dependent patients, as opposed to chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically, were significantly more likely to complete 6 months of treatment (p<0.05). PCPs’ confidence in treating opioid dependence in primary care increased significantly from baseline to 18-months post-implementation (p<0.01). Conclusion Collaborative care management for opioid dependence with buprenorphine may be feasible in a primary care clinic. More research is needed to understand the role of buprenorphine in managing chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically. PMID:24944066

  9. Combined Abuse of Clonidine and Amitriptyline in a Patient on Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Trent; Sigman, Erika J.; Clemons, Holly; Johnson, J. Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy is often prescribed in primary care to treat opioid dependence. Previous reports have described concomitant abuse of opioids and clonidine. In this case, a primary care patient on buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy demonstrating altered mental status, hallucinations, falls, and rebound hypertension was found to be concomitantly abusing clonidine and amitryptyline, which share metabolic pathways with buprenorphine. Clinicians should be aware of patients' combining amitryptyline, clonidine, and gabapentin with buprenorphine to achieve a mood altering state, avoid co-prescribing them if possible, and maintain communication with pharmacies and other providers when they are prescribed. PMID:25314340

  10. Emergency Department–Initiated Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Gail; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Pantalon, Michael V.; Chawarski, Marek C.; Busch, Susan H.; Owens, Patricia H.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Opioid-dependent patients often use the emergency department (ED) for medical care. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 3 interventions for opioid dependence: (1) screening and referral to treatment (referral); (2) screening, brief intervention, and facilitated referral to community-based treatment services (brief intervention); and (3) screening, brief intervention, ED-initiated treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone, and referral to primary care for 10-week follow-up (buprenorphine). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial involving 329 opioid-dependent patients who were treated at an urban teaching hospital ED from April 7, 2009, through June 25, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After screening, 104 patients were randomized to the referral group, 111 to the brief intervention group, and 114 to the buprenorphine treatment group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Enrollment in and receiving addiction treatment 30 days after randomization was the primary outcome. Self-reported days of illicit opioid use, urine testing for illicit opioids, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk, and use of addiction treatment services were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS Seventy-eight percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 [95% CI, 70%-85%]) vs 37% in the referral group (38 of 102 [95% CI, 28%-47%]) and 45% in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 [95% CI, 36%-54%]) were engaged in addiction treatment on the 30th day after randomization (P < .001). The buprenorphine group reduced the number of days of illicit opioid use per week from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 0.9 days (95% CI, 0.5-1.3) vs a reduction from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 2.3 days (95% CI, 1.7-3.0) in the referral group and from 5.6 days (95% CI, 5.3-5.9) to 2.4 days (95% CI, 1.8-3.0) in the brief intervention group (P < .001 for both time and intervention effects; P = .02 for the interaction effect). The rates of urine samples that tested negative for opioids did not differ statistically across groups, with 53.8% (95% CI, 42%-65%) in the referral group, 42.9% (95% CI, 31%-55%) in the brief intervention group, and 57.6% (95% CI, 47%-68%) in the buprenorphine group (P = .17). There were no statistically significant differences in HIV risk across groups (P = .66). Eleven percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (95% CI, 6%-19%) used inpatient addiction treatment services, whereas 37% in the referral group (95% CI, 27%-48%) and 35% in the brief intervention group (95% CI, 25%-37%) used inpatient addiction treatment services (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among opioid-dependent patients, ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment vs brief intervention and referral significantly increased engagement in addiction treatment, reduced self-reported illicit opioid use, and decreased use of inpatient addiction treatment services but did not significantly decrease the rates of urine samples that tested positive for opioids or of HIV risk. These findings require replication in other centers before widespread adoption. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00913770 PMID:25919527

  11. Bridging waitlist delays with interim buprenorphine treatment: initial feasibility.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Stacey C; C Meyer, Andrew; Hruska, Bryce; Ochalek, Taylor; Rose, Gail; Badger, Gary J; Brooklyn, John R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T; Moore, Brent A; Schwartz, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    Despite the effectiveness of agonist maintenance for opioid dependence, individuals can remain on waitlists for months, during which they are at significant risk for morbidity and mortality. Interim dosing, consisting of daily medication without counseling, can reduce these risks. In this pilot study, we examined the initial feasibility of a novel technology-assisted interim buprenorphine treatment for waitlisted opioid-dependent adults. Following buprenorphine induction during Week 1, participants (n=10) visited the clinic at Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to ingest their medication under staff observation, provide a urine specimen and receive their remaining doses via a computerized Med-O-Wheel Secure device. They also received daily monitoring via an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) platform, as well as random call-backs for urinalysis and medication adherence checks. The primary outcome was percent of participants negative for illicit opioids at each 2-week visit, with secondary outcomes of past-month drug use, adherence and acceptability. Participants achieved high levels of illicit opioid abstinence, with 90% abstinent at the Week 2 and 4 visits and 60% at Week 12. Significant reductions were observed in self-reported past-month illicit opioid use (p<.001), opioid withdrawal (p<.001), opioid craving (p<.001) and ASI Drug composite score (p=.008). Finally, adherence with buprenorphine administration (99%), daily IVR calls (97%) and random call-backs (82%) was high. Interim buprenorphine treatment shows promise for reducing patient and societal risks during delays to conventional treatment. A larger-scale, randomized clinical trial is underway to more rigorously examine the efficacy of this treatment approach. PMID:26256469

  12. Spotlight on buprenorphine/naloxone in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Orman, Jennifer S; Keating, Gillian M

    2009-10-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) comprises the partial micro-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine in combination with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4 : 1 ratio. When buprenorphine/naloxone is taken sublingually as prescribed, the naloxone exerts no clinically significant effect, leaving the opioid agonist effects of buprenorphine to predominate. However, when buprenorphine/naloxone is parenterally administered in patients physically dependent on full agonist opioids, the opioid antagonism of naloxone causes withdrawal effects, thus reducing the abuse potential of the drug combination. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective maintenance therapy for opioid dependence and has generally similar efficacy to methadone, although more data are needed. Less frequent dispensing of buprenorphine/naloxone (e.g. thrice weekly) does not appear to compromise efficacy and can improve patient satisfaction. Buprenorphine/naloxone is more effective than clonidine as a medically supervised withdrawal therapy. Moreover, buprenorphine/naloxone is a generally well tolerated medically supervised withdrawal and maintenance treatment. Thus, sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone is a valuable pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:19739698

  13. Buprenorphine/naloxone: a review of its use in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Orman, Jennifer S; Keating, Gillian M

    2009-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) comprises the partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine in combination with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4 : 1 ratio. When buprenorphine/naloxone is taken sublingually as prescribed, the naloxone exerts no clinically significant effect, leaving the opioid agonist effects of buprenorphine to predominate. However, when buprenorphine/naloxone is parenterally administered in patients physically dependent on full agonist opioids, the opioid antagonism of naloxone causes withdrawal effects, thus reducing the abuse potential of the drug combination. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective maintenance therapy for opioid dependence and has generally similar efficacy to methadone, although more data are needed. Less frequent dispensing of buprenorphine/naloxone (e.g. thrice weekly) does not appear to compromise efficacy and can improve patient satisfaction. Buprenorphine/naloxone is more effective than clonidine as a medically-supervised withdrawal therapy. Moreover, buprenorphine/naloxone is a generally well tolerated medically-supervised withdrawal and maintenance treatment. Thus, sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone is a valuable pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:19368419

  14. Buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence: methods and design of the COBRA study.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Apelt, Sabine M; Bühringer, Gerhard; Gastpar, Markus; Backmund, Markus; Gölz, Jörg; Kraus, Michael R; Tretter, Felix; Klotsche, Jens; Siegert, Jens; Pittrow, David; Soyka, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are the two established substitution drugs licensed in many countries for the treatment of opioid dependence. Little is known, however, about how these two drugs are applied and how they work in clinical practice. In this paper we present the aims, methods, design and sampling issues of a collaborative multi-stage epidemiological study (COBRA) to address these issues. Based on a nationally representative sample of substitution physicians, the study is designed as an observational, naturalistic study, consisting of three major parts. The first part was a national survey of substitution doctors (prestudy, n = 379 doctors). The second part was a cross-sectional study (n = 223 doctors), which consisted of a target-week assessment of 2,694 consecutive patients to determine (a) the severity and problem profiles and treatment targets; (b) the choice and dosage scheme of the substitution drug; (c) past and current interventions, including treatment of comorbid hepatitis C; and (d) cross-sectional differences between the two drugs with regard to comorbidity, clinical course, acceptance/compliance and social integration. The third part consists of a prospective-longitudinal cohort study of 48 methadone-treated and 48 buprenorphine-treated patients. The cohort is followed up over a period of 12 months to investigate whether course and outcome of the patients differ by type or treatment received in terms of clinical, psychosocial, pharmaco-economic and other related measures. The response rate among substitution doctors was 57.1%; that among eligible patients was 71.7%. Comparisons with the federal registers reveal that the final samples of doctors and patients may be considered nationally representative with regard to regional distribution, training, type of setting as well as the frequency of patients treated with buprenorphine or methadone. The COBRA study provides a unique comprehensive database, informing about the natural allocation and intervention processes in routine care and about the course and outcome of patients treated with buprenorphine or methadone. PMID:16097397

  15. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  16. Buprenorphine adoption in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Johnson, J. Aaron; Roman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN), a collaborative federal research initiative that brings together universities and community-based treatment programs (CTPs), has conducted multiple clinical trials of buprenorphine for opioid dependence. Part of the CTN’s mission is to promote the adoption of evidence-based treatment technologies. Drawing on a data collected during face-to-face interviews with administrators from a panel of 206 CTPs, this research examines the adoption of buprenorphine over a 2-year period. These data indicated that the adoption of buprenorphine doubled between the baseline and 24-month follow-up interviews. Involvement in a buprenorphine protocol continued to be a strong predictor of adoption at the 2-year follow-up, although adoption of buprenorphine tripled among those CTPs without buprenorphine-specific protocol experience. For-profit CTPs and those offering inpatient detoxification services were more likely to adopt buprenorphine over time. A small percentage of programs discontinued using buprenorphine. These findings point to the dynamic nature of service delivery in community-based addiction treatment and the continued need for longitudinal studies of organizational change. PMID:19577406

  17. Buprenorphine-containing treatments: place in the management of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    Although the synthetic opioid buprenorphine has been available clinically for almost 30 years, its use has only recently become much more widespread for the treatment of opioid addiction. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine make it unique in the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of opioid addiction. Buprenorphine has partial mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and is a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist; hence, it can substitute for other micro-opioid receptor agonists, yet is less apt to produce overdose reactions or dysphoria. On the other hand, buprenorphine can block the effects of opioids such as heroin (diamorphine) and morphine, and can even precipitate withdrawal in individuals physically dependent upon these drugs. Buprenorphine has significant sublingual bioavailability and a long half-life, making administration on a less than daily basis possible. Furthermore, its discontinuation is associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome. Clinical trials have demonstrated that sublingual buprenorphine is effective in both maintenance therapy and detoxification of individuals addicted to opioids. The introduction of a sublingual formulation combining naloxone with buprenorphine further reduces the risk of diversion to illicit intravenous use. Because of its relative safety and lower risk of illegal diversion, buprenorphine has been made available in several countries for treating opioid addiction in the private office setting, greatly enhancing treatment options for this condition. PMID:16953647

  18. “The chief of the services is very enthusiastic about it”: A qualitative study of the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid addiction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Carla A.; McCarty, Dennis; Mertens, Jennifer; Lynch, Frances L.; Hilde, Anadam; Firemark, Alison; Weisner, Constance M.; Pating, David; Anderson, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Qualified physicians may prescribe buprenorphine to treat opioid dependence, but medication use remains controversial. We examined adoption of buprenorphine in two not-for-profit integrated health plans, over time, completing 101 semi-structured interviews with clinicians and clinician-administrators from primary and specialty care. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and analyzed. A strong leader championing the new treatment was critical for adoption in both health plans. Once clinicians began using buprenorphine, patients’ and other clinicians’ experiences affected decisions more than did the champion. With experience, protocols developed to manage unsuccessful patients and changed to support maintenance rather than detoxification. Diffusion outside addiction and mental health settings was nonexistent; primary care clinicians cited scope-of-practice issues and referred patients to specialty care. With greater diffusion came questions about long-term use and safety. Recognizing how implementation processes develop may suggest where, when, and how to best expend resources to increase adoption of such treatments. PMID:24268947

  19. Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  20. Adoption of evidence-based clinical innovations: the case of buprenorphine use by opioid treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christina M; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Pollack, Harold A; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations' technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs' decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  1. Training HIV Physicians to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Tetrault, Jeanette; Bangalore, Deepa; Fiellin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Few HIV physicians are trained to provide buprenorphine treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the impact of an eight-hour course on the treatment of opioid dependence on HIV physicians' preparedness to prescribe buprenorphine. One hundred thirteen of 257 trained physicians (44%) provided HIV care. Post-course, the majority of…

  2. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ish K; Pillarisetti, Sivaram

    2015-01-01

    Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed ?-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other ?-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain. PMID:26672499

  3. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Paul J; Remski, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose), buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India) is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field. PMID:22346191

  4. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence: its pharmacology and social context of use in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2004-05-01

    Buprenorphine's physiological effects are produced when it attaches to specific opiate receptors that are designated mu, kappa, or delta. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist at the mu receptor and an antagonist at the kappa receptor, produces typical morphine-like effects at low doses. At higher doses, it produces opiate effects that are less than those of full opiate agonists. Knowledge of the physiological effects of opiate receptors and the way they interact with opiate agonists, partial opiate agonists, and opiate antagonists is fundamental to understanding the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine in treatment of pain and opiate addiction. Knowledge of the historical and social context of opiate agonist treatment of opiate dependence is fundamental to understanding how nonpharmacological factors may limit the clinical adoption and utility of a safe and effective medication in treatment of opiate dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of sublingual buprenorphine and the historical context of opiate agonist therapy; delineates classes of opiate receptors and their interaction with opiate agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists; and describes the commercially available pharmaceutical formulations of buprenorphine. It focuses on sublingual buprenorphine tablets, Subutex and Suboxone, the FDA-approved formulations of buprenorphine for treatment of opiate dependence. Sublingual buprenorphine, and the combination of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, have unique pharmacological properties that make them a logical first-line intervention in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15279124

  5. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P.; Myers, C. Patrick; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (a) retention in treatment and (b) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, 3- and 6-months consisting of the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  6. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Myers, C Patrick; O'Grady, Kevin E; Olsen, Yngvild K; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (1) retention in treatment; and (2) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, three and six months consisting of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  7. State policy influence on the early diffusion of buprenorphine in community treatment programs

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Lori J; Abraham, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine was approved for use in the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002, but its diffusion into everyday clinical practice in community-based treatment programs has been slow. This study examines the net impact of efforts by state agencies, including provision of Medicaid coverage, on program-level adoption of buprenorphine as of 2006. Methods Interviews were conducted with key informants in 49 of the 50 state agencies with oversight responsibility for addiction treatment services. Information from these interviews was integrated with organizational data from the 2006 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. A multivariate logistic regression model was estimated to identify the effects of state efforts to promote the use of this medication, net of a host of organizational characteristics. Results The availability of Medicaid coverage for buprenorphine was a significant predictor of its adoption by treatment organizations. Conclusion Inclusion of buprenorphine on state Medicaid formularies appears to be a key element in ensuring that patients have access to this state-of-the-art treatment option. Other potential barriers to the diffusion of buprenorphine require identification, and the value of additional state-level policies to promote its use should be evaluated. PMID:18570665

  8. Transdermal buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and non-cancer pain - the results of multicenter studies in Poland.

    PubMed

    Przeklasa-Muszy?ska, Anna; Dobrogowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This was a multicenter, non-interventional, post-marketing study that aimed to evaluate the analgesic activity, safety of use, safety profile and adverse drug reactions of transdermal buprenorphine (Transtec 35, 52.5 and 70 ?g/h) during the treatment of moderate to severe chronic cancer and non-cancer pain. The study was performed in Poland by 339 doctors. The study involved 4,030 general practice outpatients (managed by primary care physicians), pain therapy center patients, specialist outpatient clinic patients as well as patients treated in inpatients units. The recruitment process began in September of 2007, and the study was completed in October of 2008. The study has been reported to the Central Register of Clinical Trials in Poland; it was also in accordance with the requirements of the Polish Pharmaceutical Law in force. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety of use and application of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with moderate to severe cancer pain and in patients with severe, non-malignant pain in the course of other diseases. Patients were enrolled if their pain was not well-controlled after using non-opioid analgesics. Another objective of the study was to monitor adverse drug reactions of transdermal buprenorphine reported by patients or noted by the doctors during the study visits. This first such multicenter study in Poland has confirmed high efficacy and good tolerability of buprenorphine and, therefore, confirmed its usefulness in the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain as well as in the treatment of severe pain in patients with non-cancer pain that cannot be effectively treated with non-opioid analgesics. PMID:22001981

  9. Persistence During Stress-Challenge Associated With Lapse to Opioid Use During Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Strong, David R.; Brown, Richard A.; Sims, Meredith; Herman, Debra S.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lapse to opiate use after initiation of buprenorphine treatment is common and is a strong predictor of poor treatment retention and increased risk of chronic opiate use. Drug-cues and situations or events associated with distress are known to provoke craving and increase risk for lapse. The current study evaluated the predictive validity of a behavioral index of persistence during a stress-challenge among opiate users identified as affectively vulnerable to lapse risk due to elevated depressive symptoms. Methods Patients from on ongoing clinical trial (n=48) completed a stress-challenge task prior to receiving their first dose of buprenorphine. Results After controlling for levels of craving on their induction day, persistence on the stress-challenge task prior to initiating buprenorphine treatment was associated with successful transition to early abstinence, and lower rates of opiate use during the initial three months of buprenorphine treatment across antidepressant and placebo groups. Conclusions Results from this preliminary study suggest the promise of laboratory-based behavioral paradigms in facilitating understanding of important mechanisms of early lapse. Identifying individual behavioral responses to drug- and stress-cues prior to attempts at abstinence may facilitate delivery of adjunctive behavioral treatments to prevent early lapse. PMID:22864399

  10. The evidence doesn't justify steps by state Medicaid programs to restrict opioid addiction treatment with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin E; Samnaliev, Mihail; Baxter, Jeffrey D; Leung, Gary Y

    2011-08-01

    Many state Medicaid programs restrict access to buprenorphine, a prescription medication that relieves withdrawal symptoms for people addicted to heroin or other opiates. The reason is that officials fear that the drug is costlier or less safe than other therapies such as methadone. To find out if this is true, we compared spending, the use of services related to drug-use relapses, and mortality for 33,923 Massachusetts Medicaid beneficiaries receiving either buprenorphine, methadone, drug-free treatment, or no treatment during the period 2003-07. Buprenorphine appears to have significantly expanded access to treatment because the drug can be prescribed by a physician and taken at home compared with methadone, which by law must be administered at an approved clinic. Buprenorphine was associated with more relapse-related services but $1,330 lower mean annual spending than methadone when used for maintenance treatment. Mortality rates were similar for buprenorphine and methadone. By contrast, mortality rates were 75 percent higher among those receiving drug-free treatment, and more than twice as high among those receiving no treatment, compared to those receiving buprenorphine. The evidence does not support rationing buprenorphine to save money or ensure safety. PMID:21821560

  11. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  12. Developing and Implementing a New Prison-Based Buprenorphine Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that buprenorphine treatment may be a promising intervention for incarcerated individuals with heroin addiction histories. However, its implementation varies from corrections-based methadone because of unique challenges regarding dosing, administration, and regulation. Describing the first randomized clinical trial of…

  13. Therapeutic switch to buprenorphine/naloxone from buprenorphine alone: clinical experience in an Italian addiction centre.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Franco; Zaccone, Domenico; Battaglia, Egidio; Genco, Felice; Mellace, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy has an important place in the management of opioid dependence. Methadone has been the mainstay of therapy but has a number of limitations. Buprenorphine monotherapy is another option, but misuse and diversion can have negative consequences. The opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, has been added to buprenorphine to create a combination product with a reduced potential for misuse and diversion. This study evaluated the use of buprenorphine/naloxone for 24 weeks as a pharmacological management of opioid-dependent patients after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine alone. Patients (n = 43) received sublingual tablets of buprenorphine/naloxone. The buprenorphine dose was 2-24 mg (mean 16). Patients saw a physician, including an interview using a structured data sheet, and had counselling each week. Assessments were performed at week 2 (period 1), week 6 (period 2), week 16 (period 3) and week 24 (period 4). Laboratory immunoenzymatic testing was performed weekly to detect drugs in the urine. The management of withdrawal symptoms was rated as 'satisfactory' by 67% of patients during period 1 and 91% during period 4. The majority of patients was highly satisfied with therapy and considered that buprenorphine/naloxone provided good control of cravings. Two patients dropped out of therapy, but all others continued to receive buprenorphine throughout the study. Approximately 50% of patients stated that they disliked the sensory properties (taste, colour, odour and feel) of buprenorphine/naloxone. Adverse effects were as would be expected on the basis of the mechanism of action of buprenorphine (i.e. opioid-induced constipation) and for patients undergoing drug withdrawal. Only 2% of patients attempted the intravenous misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, none of whom experienced any gratifying effects. Opioid-dependent patients maintained on buprenorphine monotherapy can be safely switched to a sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet without any loss of treatment effectiveness. Buprenorphine/naloxone can be administered in an outpatient or primary care setting, and effectively controls cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Patient satisfaction was high, making retention in treatment more likely. PMID:20450241

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Treatments for Heroin Dependence in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Aims To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. Design We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants’ time were estimated using Malaysia’s minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars. Setting Muar, Malaysia. Participants 126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003–2005) receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence. Measurements Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores. Findings Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine. Conclusions Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term. PMID:23226534

  15. Practice Guidance for Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders: Results of an Expert Panel Process

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Carrie M.; Lindsay, Dawn; Williams, Jessica; Ayers, Amanda; Schuster, James; Cilia, Alyssa; Flaherty, Michael T.; Mandell, Todd; Gordon, Adam J.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although numbers of physicians credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine has increased over time, many credentialed physicians may be reluctant to treat individuals with opioid use disorders due to discomfort with prescribing buprenorphine. Though prescribing physicians are required to complete a training course, many have questions about buprenorphine and treatment guidelines have not been updated to reflect clinical experience in recent years. We report on an expert panel process to update and expand buprenorphine guidelines. Methods We identified candidate guidelines through expert opinion and a review of the literature and used a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to assess the validity of the candidate guidelines. An expert panel completed two rounds of rating, with a meeting to discuss the guidelines between the first and second rating. Results Through the rating process, expert panel members rated 90 candidate guideline statements across eight domains, including candidacy for buprenorphine treatment, dosing of buprenorphine, psychosocial counseling, and treatment of co-occurring depression and anxiety. A total of 65 guideline statements (72%) were rated as valid. Expert panel members had agreement in some areas, such as the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems, but disagreement in others, including the appropriate dosing of buprenorphine given patient complexities. Conclusions Through an expert panel process, we developed an updated and expanded set of buprenorphine treatment guidelines; this additional guidance may increase credentialed physicians’ comfort with prescribing buprenorphine to patients with opioid use disorders. Future efforts should focus on appropriate dosing guidance and ensuring that guidelines can be adapted to a variety of practice settings. PMID:25844527

  16. Sublingual buprenorphine is effective in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malinoff, Herbert L; Barkin, Robert L; Wilson, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with chronic pain have less than optimal therapeutic outcomes after prolonged treatment with opiate analgesics. Worsening of pain perception, functional capacity, and mood often result. Medical detoxification is often undertaken in this situation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (49 men and 46 women; age range, 26-84) with chronic noncancer pain (maldynia) were referred by local pain clinics for detoxification from long-term opiate analgesic (LTOA) therapy. All patients had failed treatment as manifest by increasing pain levels, worsening functional capacity, and, in 8%, the emergence of opiate addiction. Length of prior LTOA therapy ranged from 1.5 to 27 years (mean, 8.8 years). After a minimum of 12 hours of abstinence from all opiate analgesics, patients were given low doses of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone (Reckitt Benckiser). Maintenance dosing was individualized to treat chronic pain. Daily SL dose of buprenorphine ranged from 4 to 16 mg (mean, 8 mg) in divided doses. Mean duration of treatment is 8.8 months (range, 2.4-16.6 months). At clinic appointments, patients were assessed for pain reports, functional capacity, and mood inventory. Eighty-six percent of patients experienced moderate to substantial relief of pain accompanied by both improved mood and functioning. Patient and family satisfaction was robust. Only 6 patients discontinued therapy secondary to side effects and/or exacerbation of pain. In this open-label study, SL buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were well tolerated and safe and appeared to be effective in the treatment of chronic pain patients refractory to LTOA. PMID:16148422

  17. Preference for buprenorphine/naloxone and buprenorphine among patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy in France: a prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Daulouède, Jean-Pierre; Caer, Yves; Galland, Pascal; Villeger, Pierre; Brunelle, Emmanuel; Bachellier, Jérôme; Piquet, Jean-Michel; Harbonnier, Jean; Leglise, Yves; Courty, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance treatment with buprenorphine tablets (Subutex) has been associated with reductions in heroin use; however, concerns for intravenous misuse exist. A buprenorphine/naloxone formulation (Suboxone) was designed to reduce this misuse risk while retaining buprenorphine's efficacy and safety. This prospective, open-label, multicenter trial compared preferences for buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone in 53 opioid-dependent patients stabilized on buprenorphine. Buprenorphine was first administered at the patient's current dose (Days 1-2), followed by a direct switch to buprenorphine/naloxone (Days 3-5). Global satisfaction rates were high and similar between buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone; however, patients preferred the tablet taste, size, and sublingual dissolution time of buprenorphine/naloxone. At the end of the study, 54% of patients preferred buprenorphine/naloxone, 31% preferred buprenorphine, and 15% had no preference; most patients (71%) wished to continue treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. This study did not identify any impediments to a direct buprenorphine-to-buprenorphine/naloxone switch and revealed some characteristics that may facilitate treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. PMID:19800758

  18. A pilot study of buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablet (Suboxone) in treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Bell, James; Byron, Gaye; Gibson, Amy; Morris, Amanda

    2004-09-01

    In Australia, maintenance treatment for opioid dependence involves supervised daily administration of a dose of methadone or buprenorphine. A sublingual tablet combining buprenorphine and naloxone in a 4:1 ratio (Suboxone) has been developed, designed to deter diversion and intravenous misuse, and may be suitable for unsupervised administration. The aim of this study was to investigate the tolerability of Suboxone, and investigate whether unsupervised administration can be effective in stabilized patients. Employed patients on buprenorphine maintenance, who had ceased heroin use, were switched to Suboxone and provided with weekly supplies of medication to take without supervised administration. Subjects were monitored closely with weekly clinical reviews, and research interviews at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Only 11% of people receiving buprenorphine met eligibility criteria. Seventeen subjects were recruited. Fifteen were retained for the full 6 months. No subject appeared destabilized by unsupervised dosing. Suboxone was well tolerated. The current trial demonstrated that unsupervised administration with regular clinical monitoring can be effective in selected patients. However, using access to unsupervised dosing to promote abstinence from heroin probably limits the potential benefits of unsupervised administration to a very small proportion of patients. PMID:15370011

  19. Treatment Outcomes of African American Buprenorphine Patients by Parole and Probation Status.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Kelly, Sharon M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H; Olsen, Yngvild K; Schwartz, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis compared outcomes of African-American adults newly-admitted to buprenorphine treatment who were on parole and probation to patients who were not under criminal justice supervision. Buprenorphine patients (N=300) were randomly assigned to receive either Intensive Outpatient Treatment (IOP) or Standard Outpatient Treatment (OP) treatment and were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-months. There were no differences between groups in treatment retention. Among probationers/parolees, IOP was associated with lower 3-month treatment retention compared to OP, but among participants not on probation/parole the relationship was reversed (p=.004). Both conditions showed significant declines in heroin and cocaine use, illegal activity, and in meeting DSM-IV criteria for opioid and cocaine dependence. Probationers/parolees reported lower frequency of illegal activities at 3-months compared to non-probationers/parolees (p=.007). Buprenorphine treatment should be made more widely available to individuals on parole/probation as they respond as well to treatment as patients not supervised by the criminal justice system. PMID:25364037

  20. Buprenorphine for office-based treatment of patients with opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Manlandro, James J

    2005-06-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) was established to create a new paradigm for medication-assisted treatment of opiate addiction in the United States. Before enactment of DATA 2000, the use of opioid medications to treat opioid addiction was permissible only in federally approved treatment programs, ie, methadone clinics. The only medications permitted were Schedule II drugs (eg, methadone and l-a-acetylmethadol [LAAM]), which could only be dispensed, not prescribed. Under provisions of DATA 2000, qualified physicians in a medical office and other appropriate settings outside the opioid treatment program system may prescribe or dispense (or both), Schedule III, IV, and V opioid medications for treatment of opioid addiction if such medications have been specifically approved by the the US Food and Drug Administration for that indication. Opioid addiction treatment programs were commonly known as methadone clinics. They now may also dispense buprenorphine hydrochloride and the buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone combination. The information in this article is extracted (with revision) from: Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40. DHS Publication No. (SMA) 04-3939. Rockville, Md: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2004. The Clinical Guidelines document is in the public domain except for material indicated as reprinted from a copyrighted source. The author served on both the Expert Panel and the Consensus Panel that produced the guidelines, available in portable document format at http://buprenorphine.samhsa.gov/Bup%20Guidelines.pdf. PMID:16118361

  1. Addiction to Prescription Opioids: Characteristics of the Emerging Epidemic and Treatment with Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, John; Flower, Keith; Pletcher, Mark; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2015-01-01

    Dependence on and abuse of prescription opioid drugs is now a major health problem, with initiation of prescription opioid abuse exceeding cocaine in young people. Coincident with the emergence of abuse and dependence on prescription opioids, there has been an increased emphasis on the treatment of pain. Pain is now the “5th vital sign” and physicians face disciplinary action for failure to adequately relieve pain. Thus, physicians are whipsawed between the imperative to treat pain with opioids and the fear of producing addiction in some patients. In this article we characterize the emerging epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, discuss the utility of buprenorphine in the treatment of addiction to prescription opioids, and present illustrative case histories of successful treatment with buprenorphine. PMID:18837640

  2. Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatment: comparison of outcomes among prescription opioid users, heroin users and combination users.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Hillhouse, Maureen; Mooney, Larissa; Ang, Alfonso; Ling, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Most research examining buprenorphine has been conducted with heroin users. Few studies have examined buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for prescription opioid users. Data were from a randomized controlled trial of behavioral treatment provided for 16weeks on a platform of buprenorphine pharmacotherapy and medication management. We compared heroin (H, n=54), prescription opioid (PO, n=54) and combination heroin+prescription opioid (POH, n=71) users to test the hypothesis that PO users will have better treatment outcomes compared with heroin users. The PO group provided more opioid-negative urine drug screens over the combined treatment period (PO:70%, POH:40%, H:38%, p<0.001) and at the end of the combined treatment period (PO:65%, POH:31%, H:33%, p<0.001). Retention was lowest in the H group (PO:80%, POH:65%, H:57%, p=0.039). There was no significant difference in buprenorphine dose between the groups. PO users appear to have better outcomes in buprenorphine pharmacotherapy compared to those reporting any heroin use, confirming that buprenorphine pharmacotherapy is effective in PO users. PMID:25065489

  3. French Experience with Buprenorphine : Do Physicians Follow the Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Guillou Landreat, Morgane; Rozaire, Charles; Guillet, Jean yves; Victorri Vigneau, Caroline; Le Reste, Jean Yves; Grall Bronnec, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Opiate dependence affects about 15,479,000 people worldwide. The effectiveness of opiate substitution treatments (OST) has been widely demonstrated. Buprenorphine plays a particular role in opiate dependence care provision in France. It is widely prescribed by physicians and national opiate substitution treatment guidelines have been available since 2004. In order to study the prescribing of buprenorphine, we used a questionnaire sent by email, to a large sample of physicians. These physicians were either in practice, or belonged to an addiction treatment network or a hospital. The main objective of this work was to measure the extent to which the theoretical, clinical attitude of physicians towards prescribing buprenorphine (BHD) complied with the statutory guidelines. We showed that the physicians we interviewed rarely took into account the guidelines regarding buprenorphine prescription. The actual prescribing of Buprenorphine differed from the guidelines. Only 42% of independent Family Physicians (FPs), working outside the national health care system, had prescribed buprenorphine as a first-time prescription and 40% of FPs do not follow up patients on buprenorphine. In terms of compliance with the guidelines, 55% of FPs gave theoretical answers that only partially complied with the guidelines. The variations in compliance with the guidelines was noted according to different variables and took into particular account whether the physician were affiliated to a network or in training. PMID:26479400

  4. Patterns of non-compliant buprenorphine, levomethadone, and methadone use among opioid dependent persons in treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-compliant use of opioid substitution treatment (OST) medicines is widespread and well-documented. However, less is known about characteristics of non-compliant OST medicine use and the factors that predict it. The two main goals of this study are to compare characteristics of non-compliant levomethadone, methadone, and buprenorphine use and to explore factors that may differentially predict it among opioid dependent persons in treatment. Methods Data from 595 opioid dependent patients with non-compliant OST medicine use were analyzed. Characteristics of use between substances were compared using chi-squared tests and predictive factors were explored through multinomial logistic regressions. Results Non-compliant levomethadone and methadone use was characterized by more frequent parallel consumption of other psychoactive substances and intravenous use, whereas buprenorphine was more often procured without a prescription. Regarding predictive factors, methadone was perceived to relieve withdrawal symptoms better than buprenorphine and levomethadone was perceived as being better at modulating the effects of other substances and worst at enhancing mood. Conclusions Patterns of non-compliant use differ according to OST medicine. These patterns are considered with the reduction of non-compliant use and the improvement of treatment in mind. PMID:24885218

  5. Management of opioid painkiller dependence in primary care: ongoing recovery with buprenorphine/naloxone.

    PubMed

    Hard, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Opioid painkiller dependence is a growing problem and best-practice management is not well defined. We report a case of a young woman exhibiting dependence on codeine, originally prescribed for myalgic encephalopathy, after escalating use over a 10-year period. In 2012, a consultation with a new general practitioner, who had extensive experience of patients with substance abuse, revealed the underlying dependence. After building trust for 6?months, she was able to admit to medication abuse, and was referred to the community drug and alcohol team. On presentation to the team, the patient had no pain issues and the dihydrocodeine use--600 tablets/week--solely reflected her dependence. The patient successfully underwent rapid induction with buprenorphine/naloxone as opioid substitution treatment over 2?days. She is currently stable, engaged with recovery support services and psychosocial counselling, and has just returned to work. She is maintained on a therapeutic dose of buprenorphine 10?mg/naloxone 2.5?mg. PMID:25432908

  6. Preliminary survey of office-based opioid treatment practices and attitudes among psychiatrists never receiving buprenorphine training to those who received training during residency

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Joji; Connery, Hilary S.; Ellison, Tatyana V.; Renner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the characteristics, attitudes, and current prescribing practices of recently graduating psychiatrists who completed buprenorphine training during residency to those who never completed any training.. Methods A total of 359 psychiatrists completing residency training between 2008 and 2011 were recruited to complete an on-line survey. Results Responses from 93 psychiatrists were included for a response rate of 25.9%. Psychiatrists completing any buprenorphine training during residency were more likely to be male and report more favorable views of OBOT with buprenorphine than compared to those who never completed any training. Twenty (38.5%) of those psychiatrists who completed training during residency reported the current prescribing of buprenorphine. Conclusions Completion of buprenorphine training during residency may be a factor in shaping future attitudes towards OBOT and buprenorphine prescribing practices . Further research is needed to clarify the impact of buprenorphine training during residency. Scientific Significance Buprenorphine training during residency training may be a contributing factor in shaping future physician attitudes towards office-based opioid treatment and buprenorphine prescribing practices. PMID:25065457

  7. Opioid addicts at admission vs. slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment participants.

    PubMed

    Giacomuzzi, S; Kemmler, G; Ertl, M; Riemer, Y

    2006-01-01

    With use of a randomized study design, quality of life (QOL) and physical symptoms of opioid addicts at admission were compared with slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program participants after 6 months of treatment. The study was conducted from February to July 2004 in the outpatient drug user treatment center at University Department of Psychiatry at Innsbruck, providing maintenance treatment programs and detoxification in Tyrol, Austria. One hundred twenty opioid users seeking treatment were compared with 120 opioid-dependent patients retained for 6 months on a slow-release oral morphine, methadone, or sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program. The German version ("Berlin Quality of Life Profile") of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile was used, and illicit opioid use was determined by urinalysis. Physical symptoms were measured by using the Opioid Withdrawal Scale. Urinalyses revealed a significantly lower consumption of cocaine and opioids in all three substitution groups than in patients at admission (p < 0.001 and p < or = 0.004, respectively). Both the buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission for stomach cramps (p < or = 0.002), muscular tension (p < or = 0.027), general pain (p < or = 0.001), feelings of coldness (p < or = 0.000), heart pounding (p < or = 0.008), runny eyes (p < or = 0.047), and aggressions (p < or = 0.009). Patients who received slow-release oral morphine treatment generally showed the least favorable QOL scores compared with patients at admission or sublingual buprenorphine and methadone clients. Patients in the sublingual buprenorphine or methadone program showed nearly the same QOL scores. The buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission regarding leisure time (p < or = 0.019), finances (p < or = 0.014), mental health (p < or = 0.010), and overall satisfaction (p < or = 0.010). Slow-release oral morphine is a well-established treatment for pain, but more research is required to evaluate it as a treatment for heroin dependence. The present data indicate that slow-release oral morphine could have some disadvantages compared with sublingual buprenorphine and methadone in QOL, physical symptoms, and additional consumption. The results further suggest that buprenorphine treatment is as effective as methadone in effects on quality of life and physical symptoms. PMID:16393744

  8. Buprenorphine Treatment and 12-step Meeting Attendance: Conflicts, Compatibilities, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Monico, Laura B; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-10-01

    This analysis examines patient experiences and outcomes with 12-step recovery group attendance during buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT), two approaches with traditionally divergent philosophies regarding opioid medications for treatment of opioid use disorder. Using quantitative (n = 300) and qualitative (n = 20) data collected during a randomized trial of counseling services in buprenorphine treatment, this mixed-methods analysis of African Americans in BMT finds the number of NA meetings attended in the prior 6 months was associated with a higher rate of retention in BMT (p < .001) and heroin/cocaine abstinence at 6 month follow-up (p = .005). However, patients whose counselors required them to attend 12-step meetings did not have better outcomes than patients not required to attend such meetings. Qualitative narratives highlighted patients' strategies for managing dissonant viewpoints on BMT and disclosing BMT status in community 12-step meetings. Twelve-step meeting attendance is associated with better outcomes for BMT patients over the first 6 months of treatment. However, there is no benefit to requiring meeting attendance as a condition of treatment, and clinicians should be aware of potential philosophical conflicts between 12-step and BMT approaches. PMID:25986647

  9. Adherence to Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependence Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandawar, Mrunal; Kandasamy, Arun; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioid Use disorders are emerging as a serious public health concern in India. Opioid substitution treatment is one of the emerging forms of treatment in this population which needs more evidence to increase its availability and address prejudices towards the same. Materials and Methods: This is a case control study with retrospective design reviewing the charts of patients with opioid dependence syndrome registered between January 2005 to December 2012. Adherence to treatment was the outcome variable assessed in this study. Results: The odds of the Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment (BMT) group remaining in treatment is 4.5 (P < 0.005) times more than Naltrexone Maintenance Treatment (NMT) group and 7 times (P < 0.001) more than Psychosocial intervention (PST) alone group. Discussion: We believe that these study findings will help in reducing the prejudice towards BMT and encourage further research in this field. Conclusion: BMT has a better adherence rate than other treatments in opioid use disorders. PMID:26664083

  10. Comparison of prescriber evaluations and patient-directed self-reports in office-based practice for buprenorphine treatment of opiate-dependent individuals in France, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Estelle; Fatséas, Mélina; Daulouède, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Cécile; Dubernet, Jacques; Cattan, Laurent; Auriacombe, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional evaluation study was to compare data generated through prescriber assessments, and data generated from independent direct contact with opiate-dependent patients in office-based practice to evaluate buprenorphine treatment for modality of buprenorphine absorption, benzodiazepine use, and depressive symptoms. A group of buprenorphine office-based practice prescribers was selected to participate in this study. They were asked to screen for inclusion all their patients coming for a visit from February to August 2002. Once included by their prescribing physician, patients were given a series of self-administered questionnaires to be returned directly to the research staff, independently of their prescriber. Each prescriber was given a questionnaire to complete based on their knowledge and interview of the patient. Items assessed were history of current treatment, current substance use, buprenorphine treatment related behavior (daily frequency of intake, route of administration), benzodiazepine use and existence of a major depressive episode. Prescribers and patients’ questionnaires were compared. Concordance of both assessments was assessed by kappa statistics. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values of prescriber collected information were compared to that of their patients’. There was an overall good correlation between both data sources on the procedures for buprenorphine use especially for intravenous use of buprenorphine. There were important variations: obtaining buprenorphine without a prescription or with a prescription made by another doctor, intravenous administration of buprenorphine, use of benzodiazepines, and depression were underestimated by prescribers. PMID:19920984

  11. [Buprenorphine transdermal patch (Norspan tape)].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke; Ikeda, Tomohito

    2013-07-01

    Buprenorphine is a chemically synthesized opioid characterized as the partial mu agonist and kappa antagonist, and transdermal buprenorphine patch will be considered useful as a strong analgesic with fewer psychological side effects in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain. Use of transdermal buprenorphine should be limited for pain relief of intractable muscle skeletal pain that cannot be alleviated with other analgesics. To avoid severe complication and drug abuse or addiction, assessment of pain and medical history including drug dependence by medical team are important before administration of transdermal buprenorphine. Moreover, side effects such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, erythema and itching, loss of appetite should be treated appropriately. When transdermal buprenorphine is administered to chronic pain patients, physicians must examine the condition of patients regularly at an outpatient clinic. Moreover, decreasing and discontinuation of opioid including transdermal buprenorphine should always be considered during the treatment. Most important objective of chronic pain treatment is to improve QOL and ADL of patients. PMID:23905402

  12. Facts about Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in treatment. Through counseling, you learn about the motivations and behaviors that led to your opioid addiction. ... Counseling can provide you with encouragement and with motivation to stick to treatment. It can help you ...

  13. Predictors of Abstinence: National Institute of Drug Abuse Multisite Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Trial in Opioid-Dependent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Warden, Diane; Minhajuddin, Abu; Fishman, Marc J.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Adinoff, Bryon; Trivedi, Madhukar; Weiss, Roger; Potter, Jennifer; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors of opioid abstinence in buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal)-assisted psychosocial treatment for opioid-dependent youth. Method: Secondary analyses were performed of data from 152 youth (15-21 years old) randomly assigned to 12 weeks of extended Bup/Nal therapy or up to 2 weeks of Bup/Nal detoxification with weekly…

  14. Managing opioid addiction with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Donaher, Paul A; Welsh, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Legislation has enabled physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with an office-based maintenance program using buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid receptor agonist. Clinical studies indicate buprenorphine effectively manages opioid addiction. Buprenorphine is more effective than placebo for managing opioid addiction but may not be superior to methadone if high doses are needed. It is comparable to lower doses of methadone, however. Treatment phases include induction, stabilization, and maintenance. Buprenorphine therapy should be initiated at the onset of withdrawal symptoms and adjusted to address withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Advantages of buprenorphine include low abuse potential and high availability for office use. Disadvantages include high cost and possible lack of effectiveness in patients who require high methadone doses. Most family physicians are required to complete eight hours of training before they can prescribe buprenorphine for opioid addiction. PMID:16719249

  15. Comparative treatment and mortality correlates and adverse event profile of implant naltrexone and sublingual buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of implantable naltrexone as a new treatment for opiate dependence. This center has been one of the leaders in this form of treatment in Australia and has recently completed a registry-controlled review of our mortality data. As part of the study of the safety profile of this therapy, we were interested to review both the treatment correlates of previously presented mortality data and of adverse events. A total of 255 naltrexone implant therapy (NIT) and 2,518 buprenorphine (BUP) patients were followed for 1,322.22 and 8,030.02 patient-years, respectively. NIT patients had significantly longer days in treatment per episode (mean +/- standard deviation, 238.32 +/- 110.11 vs. 46.96 +/- 109.79), total treatment duration (371.21 +/- 284.64 vs. 162.50 +/- 245.76), and mean treatment times but fewer treatment episodes than BUP (all p < .0001). Serious local tissue reaction or infection each occurred in 1% of 200 NIT episodes. These data show that NIT economizes treatment resources without compromising safety concerns. PMID:19394789

  16. Primary tumour growth in an orthotopic osteosarcoma mouse model is not influenced by analgesic treatment with buprenorphine and meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K; Arlt, M J E; Jirkof, P; Arras, M; Born, W; Fuchs, B

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the treatment of bone pain in animal models of bone cancer. In the present study, the orthotopic 143-B human osteosarcoma xenotransplantation model was used to address the following questions: (1) Can repetitive analgesic treatment extend the experimental period by prolonging the time to reach humane endpoints and (2) Does repetitive analgesic treatment affect bone tumour development and metastasis? The analgesics, buprenorphine and meloxicam, were either applied individually or in combination at 12?h intervals as soon as the animals began to avoid using the tumour cell injected leg. While control mice treated with NaCl showed continuous body weight loss, the major criterion previously for terminating the experiments, animals treated with analgesic substances did not. The control mice had to be sacrificed 26 days after tumour cell injection, whereas the groups of animals with the different pain treatments were euthanized after an additional eight days. Importantly, primary intratibial tumour growth was not affected in any of the experimental groups by any of the pain treatment procedures. Between days 26 and 34 after tumour cell injection an increase of about 100% of the number of lung metastases was found for the groups treated with buprenorphine alone or together with meloxicam, but not for the group treated with meloxicam alone. In summary, the results indicated that both buprenorphine and meloxicam are suitable analgesics for prolonging the experimental periods in an experimental intratibial osteosarcoma mouse model. PMID:25650386

  17. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:25834439

  18. Patient Perspectives on Buprenorphine/Naloxone: A Qualitative Study of Retention During the Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) Study

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, Cheryl; Schwartz, Robert P.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Hasson, Albert L.; Thomas, Christie; Buoncristiani, Samantha H.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan J.; Glick, Naomi; Jacobs, Petra; McLaughlin, Paul; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the barriers and facilitators of retention among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone at eight community-based opioid treatment programs across the United States. Participants (n=105) were recruited up to three-and-a-half years after having participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone on liver function. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 67 patients provided with buprenorphine/naloxone who had terminated early and 38 patients who had completed at least 24 weeks of the trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Barriers to buprenorphine/naloxone retention that emerged included factors associated with: (1) the design of the clinical trial, (2) negative medication or treatment experience, and (3) personal circumstances. The facilitators comprised: (1) positive experience with the medication, (2) personal determination and commitment to complete, and (3) staff encouragement and support. The themes drawn from interviews highlight the importance of considering patients’ prior experience with buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone, medication preference, personal circumstances, and motivation to abstain from illicit use or misuse of opioids, as these may influence retention. Ongoing education of patients and staff regarding buprenorphine/naloxone, especially in comparison to methadone, and support from staff and peers are essential. PMID:25364994

  19. Patient perspectives on buprenorphine/naloxone: a qualitative study of retention during the starting treatment with agonist replacement therapies (START) study.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Cheryl; Schwartz, Robert P; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Hasson, Albert L; Thomas, Christie; Buoncristiani, Samantha H; Hser, Yih-Ing; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan J; Glick, Naomi; Jacobs, Petra; McLaughlin, Paul; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the barriers and facilitators of retention among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone at eight community-based opioid treatment programs across the United States. Participants (n = 105) were recruited up to three and a half years after having participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone on liver function. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 67 patients provided with buprenorphine/naloxone who had terminated early and 38 patients who had completed at least 24 weeks of the trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Barriers to buprenorphine/naloxone retention that emerged included factors associated with: (1) the design of the clinical trial; (2) negative medication or treatment experience; and (3) personal circumstances. The facilitators comprised: (1) positive experience with the medication; (2) personal determination and commitment to complete; and (3) staff encouragement and support. The themes drawn from interviews highlight the importance of considering patients' prior experience with buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone, medication preference, personal circumstances, and motivation to abstain from illicit use or misuse of opioids, as these may influence retention. Ongoing education of patients and staff regarding buprenorphine/naloxone, especially in comparison to methadone, and support from staff and peers are essential. PMID:25364994

  20. Buprenorphine and Buprenorphine/Naloxone Diversion, Misuse, and Illicit Use: An International Review

    PubMed Central

    Yokell, Michael A.; Zaller, Nickolas D.; Green, Traci C.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2011-01-01

    The diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone by opioid users are reviewed. Buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are used globally as opioid analgesics and in the treatment of opioid dependency. Diversion of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone represents a complex medical and social issue, and has been widely documented in various geographical regions throughout the world. We first discuss the clinical properties of buprenorphine and its abuse potential. Second, we discuss its diversion and illicit use on an international level, as well as motivations for those activities. Third, we examine the medical risks and benefits of buprenorphine’s non-medically supervised use and misuse. These risks and benefits include the effect of buprenorphine’s use on HIV risk and the risk of its concomitant use with other medications and drugs of abuse. Finally, we discuss the implications of diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use (including potential measures to address issues of diversion); and potential areas for further research. PMID:21466501

  1. Treatment Retention among Patients Randomized to Buprenorphine/Naloxone Compared to Methadone in A Multi-site Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Saxon, Andrew J.; Huang, David; Hasson, Al; Thomas, Christie; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Teruya, Cheryl; McLaughlin, Paul; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine patient and medication characteristics associated with retention and continued illicit opioid use in methadone (MET) versus buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) treatment for opioid dependence. Design/Settings/Participants This secondary analysis included 1,267 opioid-dependent individuals participating in 9 opioid treatment programs between 2006 and 2009 and randomized to receive open-label BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Measurements The analyses included measures of patient characteristics at baseline (demographics; use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs; self-rated mental and physical health), medication dose and urine drug screens during treatment, and treatment completion and days in treatment during the 24 week trial. Findings The treatment completion rate was 74% for MET vs. 46% for BUP (p<.01); the rate among MET participants increased to 80% when the maximum MET dose reached or exceeded 60mg/day. With BUP, the completion rate increased linearly with higher doses, reaching 60% with doses of 30–32mg/day. Of those remaining in treatment, positive opioid urine results were significantly lower (OR=0.63, 95%CI=0.52–0.76, p<.01) among BUP relative to MET participants during the first 9 weeks of treatment. Higher medication dose was related to lower opiate use, more so among BUP patients. A Cox proportional hazards model revealed factors associated with dropout: (1) BUP (vs. MET, HR=1.61, CI:1.20–2.15), (2) lower medication dose (<16mg for BUP, <60mg for MET; HR=3.09, CI:2.19–4.37), (3) the interaction of dose and treatment condition (those with higher BUP dose were 1.04 times more likely to drop out than those with lower MET dose, and (4) being younger, Hispanic, and using heroin or other substances during treatment. Conclusions Provision of methadone appears to be associated with better retention in treatment for opioid dependence than buprenorphine, as does use of provision of higher doses of both medications. Provision of buprenorphine is associated with lower continued use of illicit opioids. PMID:23961726

  2. [The transdermal 7-day buprenorphine patch--an effective and safe treatment option, if tramadol or tilidate/naloxone is insufficient. Results of a non-interventional study].

    PubMed

    Schutter, U; Ritzdorf, I; Heckes, B

    2010-07-01

    The transdermal 7-day buprenorphine matrix patch provides a constant and user-friendly pain management when chronic musculoskeletal pain requires opioids. This analysis of clinical routine data evaluated the benefit of this treatment for patients previously receiving oral long-term treatment with weak opioids alone. Data of 310 patients previously treated with tramadol or tildate/naloxone and part of a multicentre observational study with 3295 patients were analyzed. In 89.7% of the 310 patients oral treatment with weak opioids was replaced by the 7-day buprenorphine patch due to insufficient analgesia. During treatment with the 7-day buprenorphine patch there was a clinically significant decrease of the mean pain intensity at rest during the day from 5.7 to 2.9, on physical effort during the day from 7.3 to 3.8 and at night from 5.2 to 2.3 (11-point NRS scale, p < or = 0.001). In addition, quality of life aspects such as mobility, self-reliance and quality of sleep improved, which are relevant for individual patient satisfaction with pain management. For patients with previous long-term tramadol or tilidate/naloxone treatment the switch to the 7-day buprenorphine matrix patch proved to be effective and safe for the management of chronic pain. The user-friendly 7-day application interval contributes to improving compliance and a reducing exposure to tablets. PMID:21591321

  3. Patients more likely to engage in treatment at 30 days when given buprenorphine in the ED, referred for follow-up.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    A new randomized trial shows patients who present to the ED with opioid dependence are much more likely to engage in treatment when they receive buprenorphine along with coordinated follow-up than when they just receive a brief intervention and a facilitated referral for treatment or just screening and referral. However, barriers to prescribing are robust, and many ED leaders are not persuaded they should be in the business of providing treatment for addiction. In the trial, at 30 days 78% of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 patients) were engaged in addiction treatment, compared with just 45% of the patients in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 patients) and 37% of patients in the referral group (38 of 102 patients). To prescribe buprenorphine for addiction disease, providers must undergo training and pass a test to obtain a DEA waiver; they are limited to treating 100 patients. While experts note there are not enough providers to prescribe buprenorphine and provide the follow-up needed to patients with addiction disease, they also acknowledge concerns about drug diversion as well as potential problems with capacity if EDs take a larger role in treating addiction. PMID:26258203

  4. Timing of buprenorphine adoption by privately funded substance abuse treatment programs: The role of institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sarah A.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying facilitators of more rapid buprenorphine adoption may increase access to this effective treatment for opioid dependence. Using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework, we examine the extent to which programs’ inter-organizational institutional and resource-based linkages predict the likelihood of being an earlier, later, or non-adopter of buprenorphine. Data were derived from face-to-face interviews with administrators of 345 privately funded substance abuse treatment programs in 2007–2008. Results of multinomial logistic regression models show that inter-organizational and resource linkages were associated with timing of adoption. Programs reporting membership in provider associations were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. Programs that relied more on resources linkages, such as the detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies and the NIDA website, were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. These findings suggest that institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages may expose programs to effective treatments, thereby facilitating more rapid and sustained adoption of innovative treatment techniques. PMID:21831565

  5. Dosing considerations with transdermal formulations of fentanyl and buprenorphine for the treatment of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Opioids continue to be first-line pharmacotherapy for patients suffering from cancer pain. Unfortunately, subtherapeutic dosage prescribing of pain medications remains common, and many cancer patients continue to suffer and experience diminished quality of life. A large variety of therapeutic options are available for cancer pain patients. Analgesic pharmacotherapy is based on the patient’s self-report of pain intensity and should be tailored to meet the requirements of each individual. Most, if not all, cancer pain patients will ultimately require modifications in their opioid pharmacotherapy. When changes in a patient’s medication regimen are needed, adequate pain control is best maintained through appropriate dosage conversion, scheduling immediate release medication for withdrawal prevention, and providing as needed dosing for breakthrough pain. Transdermal opioids are noninvasive, cause less constipation and sedation when compared to oral opioids, and may improve patient compliance. A relative potency of 100:1 is recommended when converting the patient from oral morphine to transdermal fentanyl. Based on the limited data available, there is significant interpatient variability with transdermal buprenorphine and equipotency recommendations from oral morphine of 75:1–110:1 have been suggested. Cancer patients may require larger transdermal buprenorphine doses to control their pain and may respond better to a more aggressive 75–100:1 potency ratio. This review outlines the prescribing of transdermal fentanyl and transdermal buprenorphine including how to safely and effectively convert to and use them for those with cancer pain. PMID:25170278

  6. Gender Differences Among Prisoners With Pre-Incarceration Heroin Dependence Participating in a Randomized Clinical Trial of Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; Wilson, Monique E.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of the current study is to examine whether gender and other baseline characteristics were significantly associated with more severe patterns of drug use. It involves data from 260 male and female pre-release prison inmates with pre-incarceration heroin dependence who enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine. Three outcomes are examined: 1) Lifetime Intravenous drug use; 2) Lifetime number of drugs used; and 3) Heroin use in prison. Regarding lifetime intravenous drug use; race (p = .0001), education (p = .009), age (p = .0001), and psychological treatment (p = .028) were significant. Concerning lifetime number of drugs used; race (p =.0001) and age of first crime (p = .001) were significant. Finally, gender (p = .004), was the only significant variable in terms of using heroin while in prison. All of these differences may have important clinical, treatment, and research implications, which are discussed. PMID:23997546

  7. A review of buprenorphine diversion and misuse: the current evidence base and experiences from around the world.

    PubMed

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Walsh, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy has rapidly expanded in the United States and abroad, and, with this increase in medication availability, there have been increasing concerns about its diversion, misuse, and related harms. This narrative review defines the behaviors of diversion and misuse, examines how the pharmacology of buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone influence its abuse liability, and describes the epidemiological data on buprenorphine diversion and intravenous misuse, risk factors for its intravenous misuse, and the unintended consequences of misuse and diversion. Physician practices to prevent, screen for, and therapeutically respond to these behaviors, which are a form of medication nonadherence, are discussed, and gaps in knowledge are identified. Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy experiences from other countries that have varied health care systems, public policies, and access to addiction treatment are shared to make clear that diversion and misuse occur across the world in various contexts, for many different reasons, and are not limited to buprenorphine. Comparisons are made with other opioids with known abuse liability and medications with no known abuse. The objective was to facilitate understanding of diversion and misuse so that all factors influencing their expression (patient and provider characteristics and public policy) can be appreciated within a framework that also recognizes the benefits of addiction treatment. With this comprehensive perspective, further careful work can help determine how to minimize these behaviors without eroding the current benefits realized through improved addiction treatment access and expansion. PMID:25221984

  8. Effects of regulation on methadone and buprenorphine provision in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    McClure, Bridget; Mendoza, Sonia; Duncan, Laura; Rotrosen, John; Hansen, Helena

    2014-10-01

    Hurricane Sandy led to the closing of many major New York City public hospitals including their substance abuse clinics and methadone programs, and the displacement or relocation of thousands of opioid-dependent patients from treatment. The disaster provided a natural experiment that revealed the relative strengths and weaknesses of methadone treatment in comparison to physician office-based buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, two modalities of opioid maintenance with markedly different regulatory requirements and institutional procedures. To assess these two modalities of treatment under emergency conditions, semi-structured interviews about barriers to and facilitators of continuity of care for methadone and buprenorphine patients were conducted with 50 providers of opioid maintenance treatment. Major findings included that methadone programs presented more regulatory barriers for providers, difficulty with dose verification due to impaired communication, and an over reliance on emergency room dosing leading to unsafe or suboptimal dosing. Buprenorphine treatment presented fewer regulatory barriers, but buprenorphine providers had little to no cross-coverage options compared to methadone providers, who could refer to alternate methadone programs. The findings point to the need for well-defined emergency procedures with flexibility around regulations, the need for a central registry with patient dose information, as well as stronger professional networks and cross-coverage procedures. These interventions would improve day-to-day services for opioid-maintained patients as well as services under emergency conditions. PMID:25163931

  9. [Treatment of chronic osteoarthritis pain: effectivity and safety of a 7 day matrix patch with a low dose buprenorphine].

    PubMed

    Schutter, Ulf; Ritzdorf, Ingrid; Heckes, Birgit

    2008-06-26

    Patients with osteoarthritis often suffer from chronic pain. If pain treatment with NSAIDS and coxibes is no longer indicated, a constant and user friendly opioid analgesia can be achieved with a low dose buprenorphine patch being applicated using an interval of 7 days. The use of this matrix patch was evaluated in a multicenter observational study on 4263 patients in clinical practice. During treatment a significant decrease of mean pain intensity on a 11-point scale could be observed from 6.9 points before using the patch to 2.9 points at the end of observation. Further effects were a decrease of additional analgetic medication and an improvement of aspects of life quality, e.g. mobility and quality of sleep. Only in 4.5% of the patients adverse effects were observed, reflecting the expected range of adverse effects of opioids. Thus it could be demonstrated that the use of the transdermal patch is an effective, user friendly and safe way of chronic pain relief for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:18712130

  10. Buprenorphine in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2005-11-01

    Buprenorphine is a broad spectrum, highly lipophilic, and long-acting partial mu opioid receptor agonist that is noncross tolerant to other opioids. Buprenorphine can be given by several routes. Metabolism is through CYP3A4 and CYP2C8 and by conjugases. Constipation and sexual dysfunction appear to be less with buprenorphine than with other opioids. The recent development of a polymer matrix patch delivery system for buprenorphine prevents "dose dumping" and facilitates pain management in those unable to take oral analgesics. Sublingual buprenorphine has been combined with naloxone to prevent illicit conversion to parenteral administration. Buprenorphine has been used extensively to control cancer pain. In certain clinical situations, buprenorphine may have particular advantages over other opioids. PMID:16010532

  11. Adverse effects in children after unintentional buprenorphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Geib, Ann-Jeannette; Babu, Kavita; Ewald, Michele Burns; Boyer, Edward W

    2006-10-01

    Buprenorphine in sublingual formulation was recently introduced to the American market for treatment of opioid dependence. We report a series of 5 toddlers with respiratory and mental-status depression after unintentional buprenorphine exposure. Despite buprenorphine's partial agonist activity and ceiling effect on respiratory depression, all children required hospital admission and either opioid-antagonist therapy or mechanical ventilation. Results of routine urine toxicology screening for opioids were negative in all cases. Confirmatory testing was sent for 1 child and returned with a positive result. The increasing use of buprenorphine as a home-based therapy for opioid addiction in the United States raises public health concerns for the pediatric population. PMID:17015570

  12. CESAR FAX Buprenorphine Series March 31, 2003 to December 15, 2014

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    ..............................23 Number of Law Enforcement-Seized Buprenorphine Items Analyzed by U.S. Labs Increases Dramatically Finds Buprenorphine/Naloxone Effective in Treating Opioid Dependence in HIV-Infected Patients.....................................................................31 #12;TITLE ISSUE NUMBER Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence in HIV

  13. Opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine in Manipur and Nagaland in Northeast India: what has been established needs to be continued and expanded

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Suresh; Natale, Richard D; Langkham, B; Sharma, Charan; Kabi, Rachel; Mortimore, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Manipur and Nagaland in northeast India report an antenatal HIV prevalence of > 1% and the current HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 24% and 4.5% respectively. Through support from DFID's Challenge Fund, Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) established thirteen drop-in-centres across the two states to deliver opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine for 1200 injecting drug users. Within a short span of time the treatment has been found to be attractive to the clients and currently 1248 injecting opioid users are receiving opioid substitution treatment. The project is acceptable to the drug users, the families, the communities, religious as well as the militant groups. The treatment centres operate all days of the week, have trained staff members, utilize standardized protocols and ensure a strict supervised delivery system to prevent illicit diversion of buprenorphine. The drug users receiving the substitution treatment are referred to HIV voluntary counselling and testing. As this treatment has the potential to change HIV related risk behaviours, what has been established in the two states needs to be continued and expanded with the support from the Government of India. PMID:19243636

  14. Heroin-Dependent Inmates’ Experiences with Buprenorphine or Methadone Maintenancet

    PubMed Central

    Awgu, Ezechukwu; Magura, Stephen; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are both efficacious treatments for opioid dependency, but they also have different pharmacological properties and clinical delivery methods that can affect their acceptability to patients. This study was intended to increase our knowledge of heroin-dependent individuals’ perceptions of methadone vs. buprenorphine maintenance based on actual experiences with each. The study sample consists of heroin-dependent men at the Rikers Island jail in New York City who were voluntarily randomly assigned to methadone or buprenorphine maintenance in jail. Methadone patients were more likely to report feeling uncomfortable the first few days, having side/withdrawal effects during treatment, and being concerned about continued dependency on medication after release. In contrast, buprenorphine patients’ main issue was the bitter taste. All of the buprenorphine patients stated that they would recommend the medication to others, with almost all preferring it to methadone. Ninety-three percent of buprenorphine vs. 44 percent of methadone patients intended to enroll in those respective treatments after release, with an added one-quarter of the methadone patients intending to enroll in buprenorphine instead. These results reinforce the importance of increasing access to buprenorphine treatment in the community for indigent heroin-dependent offenders. PMID:21053756

  15. Buprenorphine in combination with naloxone at a ratio of 15:1 does not enhance antinociception from buprenorphine in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, L S; Murrell, J C; Taylor, P M

    2012-06-01

    Naloxone can enhance the antinociceptive/analgesic effects of buprenorphine in humans and rats. The antinociceptive effects of a patented 15:1 buprenorphine:naloxone combination was investigated in cats using a thermal and mechanical nociceptive model. Twelve cats received buprenorphine 10 ?g/kg, naloxone 0.67 ?g/kg or a buprenorphine-naloxone combination intramuscularly in a randomised cross over study. Using thermal and mechanical analgesiometry validated in the cat, pre-treatment baselines were measured. Following test drug administration, thresholds were studied for the next 24h. Naloxone did not enhance the thermal antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine. The results from this study are in agreement with previously published work showing that naloxone antagonises the effects of clinically analgesic doses of buprenorphine. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were not affected by buprenorphine. PMID:22030474

  16. A Review of Buprenorphine Diversion and Misuse: The Current Evidence Base and Experiences from Around the World

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy (OBOT) has rapidly expanded in the United States and abroad, and, with this increase in medication availability, there have been increasing concerns about its diversion, misuse and related harms. This narrative review defines the behaviors of diversion and misuse, examines how the pharmacology of buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone influence its abuse liability, and describes the epidemiological data on buprenorphine diversion and intravenous misuse, risk factors for its intravenous misuse and the unintended consequences of misuse and diversion. Physician practices to prevent, screen for, and therapeutically respond to these behaviors, which are a form of medication non-adherence, are discussed and gaps in knowledge are identified. OBOT experiences from other countries that have varied health care systems, public policies, and access to addiction treatment are shared in order to make clear that diversion and misuse occur across the world in various contexts, for many different reasons, and are not limited to buprenorphine. Comparisons are made with other opioids with known abuse liability as well as medications with no known abuse. The objective is to facilitate understanding of diversion and misuse so that all factors influencing their expression (patient and provider characteristics and public policy) can be appreciated within a framework that also recognizes the benefits of addiction treatment. With this comprehensive perspective, further careful work can help determine how to minimize these behaviors without eroding the current benefits realized through improved addiction treatment access and expansion. PMID:25221984

  17. Buprenorphine in the workers' compensation setting.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Stephen; Pohl, Mel

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic pain in low-dose transdermal patch formulations and for the treatment of addiction in high-dose sublingual tablets and films. Clinicians often prescribe these high-dose preparations "off label" for pain management. In the workers' compensation setting, it is particularly important to consider factors such as a) if the injured person has, and is being treated for co-occurring addiction as well as pain; b) if alternative therapies, including opioid withdrawal, were considered prior to initiating buprenorphine treatment; and c) the anticipated duration of treatment. This article reviews buprenorphine's approved indications, formulations, pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and special considerations in the workers' compensation setting. PMID:25162607

  18. Buprenorphine replacement therapy: a confirmed benefit.

    PubMed

    2006-04-01

    (1) The aim of replacement therapy for heroin addiction is to suppress craving for other opiates and to prevent opiate withdrawal symptoms. (2) In France, methadone was the first drug to be licensed for this use, in 1995, with very strict prescribing and dispensing conditions. Buprenorphine was approved in 1996, and was subject to less restrictive conditions. (3) In 2003 in France, an estimated 80 000 people were receiving replacement therapy with buprenorphine and 14 000 with methadone. (4) A meta-analysis of 13 comparative trials involving a total of 2544 patients showed that buprenorphine 6 to 12 mg initially reduced both opiate and benzodiazepine use, whereas doses of 2 to 4 mg had no marked impact on heroin use. This meta-analysis concluded that buprenorphine and methadone had similar efficacy in clinical trials in which the dose was adjusted to outcome. There were more dropouts with buprenorphine than with methadone. A daily dose of 16 mg appeared to be roughly equivalent to 60 mg/day methadone. (5) France appears to be the only country to have relied primarily on buprenorphine as replacement therapy for heroin addiction. This has been the case in France since 1996. The frequency of heroin overdose has fallen markedly in France since 1996, possibly due in part to the availability of replacement therapies. Overall mortality among drug users has also declined, but this is largely due to more effective treatment of HIV infection. (6) In France, a two-year cohort study of patients treated with buprenorphine and a survey conducted during the first year of buprenorphine replacement were funded by the manufacturer, Schering-Plough. The results showed that more than two-thirds of patients remained on treatment, and that, overall, the patients' general condition improved. (7) Opioid-like adverse effects are infrequent under normal conditions of use. There are reports of cases of hepatitis in patients taking buprenorphine, with or without a benzodiazepine. Attribution to buprenorphine is unclear, however, due to the lack of appropriate analyses. (8) Some of the key adverse effects occur during misuse: buprenorphine tablets are often injected, especially during the first few months of treatment (sometimes for more than two years). Injection carries a risk of infections; other potential long-term effects are poorly understood. Compared with methadone users, and regardless of the substances involved, buprenorphine users appear more likely to self-inject. (9) The consequences of sniffing crushed buprenorphine tablets have not been studied. (10) Deaths have been reported following buprenorphine overdose, but they appear to be less frequent than with methadone (0.2 and 0.7 deaths per 1000 users, respectively in 1998). (11) Approaches designed to help patients stop self-injecting have not been tested in comparative trials. Prescriptions of methadone syrup or an injection opiate may be worth trying when all other measures fail. PMID:16604748

  19. Abuse potential of intranasal buprenorphine versus buprenorphine/naloxone in buprenorphine-maintained heroin users.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Metz, Verena; Comer, Sandra D

    2015-07-01

    In spite of the clinical utility of buprenorphine, parenteral abuse of this medication has been reported in several laboratory investigations and in the real world. Studies have demonstrated lower abuse liability of the buprenorphine/naloxone combination relative to buprenorphine alone. However, clinical research has not yet examined the utility of the combined formulation to deter intranasal use in a buprenorphine-maintained population. Heroin-using volunteers (n = 12) lived in the hospital for 8-9 weeks and were maintained on each of three sublingual buprenorphine doses (2, 8, 24 mg). Under each maintenance dose, participants completed laboratory sessions during which the reinforcing and subjective effects of intranasal doses of buprenorphine (8, 16 mg), buprenorphine/naloxone (8/2, 8/8, 8/16, 16/4 mg) and controls (placebo, heroin 100 mg, naloxone 4 mg) were assessed. Intranasal buprenorphine alone typically produced increases in positive subjective effects and the 8 mg dose was self-administered above the level of placebo. The addition of naloxone dose dependently reduced positive subjective effects and increased aversive effects. No buprenorphine/naloxone combination dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo. These data suggest that within a buprenorphine-dependent population, intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone has reduced abuse potential in comparison to buprenorphine alone. These data strongly argue in favor of buprenorphine/naloxone rather than buprenorphine alone as the more reasonable option for managing the risk of buprenorphine misuse. PMID:25060839

  20. Meloxicam and buprenorphine treatment after ovarian transplantation does not affect estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity in aged CBA/J mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Anna H; Bonachea, Luis A; Cargill, Shelley L

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is important for the survival of ovarian transplants and the restoration of ovarian functions. Without angiogenesis, transplanted ovarian tissue becomes more susceptible to tissue damage and necrosis. Administration of analgesics for pain management has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, which can influence transplant success especially in aged animals. Aging and the effects of hypoxia after transplantation decrease reproductive viability of the ovarian transplant; therefore, it is important to understand the additional effects of analgesics on aged animal models. The present study investigated the effects of two analgesics, buprenorphine, an opiate, and meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the reproductive indicators related to estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity after ovarian transplantation of young ovaries into aged CBA/J mice. These aged females did not show any different reproductive responses when treated with either buprenorphine or meloxicam. No significant differences were observed in estrous cycle length, the onset of estrous cycling, the regularity of estrous cycles, and the proportion of viable follicles and total number of follicles per ovarian sample across treatment groups. PMID:25153315

  1. Meloxicam and Buprenorphine Treatment after Ovarian Transplantation Does Not Affect Estrous Cyclicity and Follicular Integrity in Aged CBA/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anna H.; Bonachea, Luis A.; Cargill, Shelley L.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is important for the survival of ovarian transplants and the restoration of ovarian functions. Without angiogenesis, transplanted ovarian tissue becomes more susceptible to tissue damage and necrosis. Administration of analgesics for pain management has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, which can influence transplant success especially in aged animals. Aging and the effects of hypoxia after transplantation decrease reproductive viability of the ovarian transplant; therefore, it is important to understand the additional effects of analgesics on aged animal models. The present study investigated the effects of two analgesics, buprenorphine, an opiate, and meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the reproductive indicators related to estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity after ovarian transplantation of young ovaries into aged CBA/J mice. These aged females did not show any different reproductive responses when treated with either buprenorphine or meloxicam. No significant differences were observed in estrous cycle length, the onset of estrous cycling, the regularity of estrous cycles, and the proportion of viable follicles and total number of follicles per ovarian sample across treatment groups. PMID:25153315

  2. Preliminary buprenorphine sublingual tablet pharmacokinetic data in plasma, oral fluid and sweat during treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is currently under investigation as a pharmacotherapy to treat pregnant women for opioid dependence. This research evaluates buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenophine (NBUP), buprenorphine-glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) pharmacokinetics after high dose (14–20 mg) BUP sublingual tablet administration in three opioid-dependent pregnant women. Methods Oral fluid and sweat specimens were collected in addition to plasma specimens for 24 h during gestation weeks 28 or 29 and 34, and 2 months after delivery. Tmax was not affected by pregnancy; however, BUP and NBUP Cmax and AUC0–24h tended to be lower during pregnancy compared to postpartum levels. Results Statistically significant but weak positive correlations were found for BUP plasma and OF concentrations, and BUP/NBUP ratios in plasma and OF. Conclusion Statistically significant negative correlations were observed for times of specimen collection and BUP and NBUP OF/plasma ratios. BUP-Gluc and NBUP-Gluc were detected in only 5% of OF specimens. In sweat, BUP and NBUP were detected in only 4 of 25 (12 or 24 h) specimens in low concentrations (<2.4 ng/patch). These preliminary data describe BUP and metabolite pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and suggest that, like methadone, upward dose adjustments may be needed with advancing gestation. PMID:21860340

  3. Buprenorphine substitution treatment in France: drug users' views of the doctor-user relationship

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Anne; Lert, France; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Richard, Lucie

    2007-01-01

    The French system for drug substitution, or maintenance treatment, established in 1996, differs from the often strict conditions attached to methadone clinics in other countries. Because of the predominant role of general practitioners and the flexible prescription rules for Subutex® in France, the relationship between the physician and the drug user becomes a central element in the treatment. This article deals with the expectations that these users have of the physician, and their perception of his or her attitude towards them. In order to identify possible reasons for the absence of treatment compliance and of Subutex® misuse, it focuses on the users’ assessment of the physician’s response to the problems they report. This study, based on a diversified sample of 28 persons in treatment, showed 4 patterns of relationships between physicians and users, which differed in their focus: a) dosage, b) compliance, c) the person and d) obtaining a prescription. In all four case types, users had difficulty reporting other drug use or intravenous Subutex® injection within this relationship in which the stigma attached to drug dependence seems to reappear. Moreover, the lack of clarity about the treatment objectives and time frame limits the users’ ability to integrate the treatment into their lives and to commit themselves to it. The heterogeneity and fragility of the users’ situations are elements related to dependence that, during contact with the physician, require regular assessment of the individual’s situation and of the treatment objectives. This constant reappraisal of the situation with the physician should help to optimize the treatment and avoid the hiatus that can generate or continue “misuse.” PMID:17442473

  4. Buprenorphine for Cancer Pain: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Prommer, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Buprenorphine (BUP) is a semisynthetic derivative of the opium alkaloid thebaine found in the poppy Papaver somniferum. Its chemical structure contains the morphine structure but differs by having a cyclopropylmethyl group. Buprenorphine is a potent µ opioid agonist. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver and gut. The development of a transdermal BUP formulation in 2001 led to its evaluation in cancer pain. This article provides the practitioner with an update on the current role of BUP in cancer care. It highlights data suggesting effectiveness in various types of cancer pain. The article reviews pharmacology, routes of administration, adverse effects, drug interactions, and cost considerations. PMID:25163678

  5. Abuse liability of buprenorphine-naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users.

    PubMed

    Alho, Hannu; Sinclair, David; Vuori, Erkki; Holopainen, Antti

    2007-04-17

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables included: years of prior IV opioid abuse, years of buprenorphine abuse, frequency, dosage, route of administration and reasons for use, concomitant IV abuse of other substances and amount paid on the street for both buprenorphine and buprenorphine+naloxone. Buprenorphine was the most frequently used IV drug for 73% of the respondents. More than 75% said they used IV buprenorphine to self-treat addiction or withdrawal. Most (68%) had tried the buprenorphine+naloxone combination IV, but 80% said they had a "bad" experience. Its street price was less than half that of buprenorphine alone. The buprenorphine+naloxone combination appears to be a feasible tool, along with easier access to addiction treatment, for decreasing IV abuse of buprenorphine. PMID:17055191

  6. Intravenous misuse of buprenorphine: characteristics and extent among patients undergoing drug maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Moratti, Enrico; Kashanpour, Hamid; Lombardelli, Tiziana; Maisto, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Sublingual buprenorphine [Subutex(R)] is used to treat opioid dependence. However, illicit intravenous (IV) injection of buprenorphine is a widespread problem. This survey investigated the IV misuse of buprenorphine among patients receiving drug replacement therapy at the Drug Addiction Centre in Udine, Italy. All patients who were receiving treatment with buprenorphine or methadone at the Drug Addiction Centre were invited to fill in a voluntary and anonymous questionnaire consisting of five questions. The questions asked if the patient had ever misused buprenorphine intravenously, when the misuse had occurred, the patient's reasons for misusing buprenorphine, the patient's perception of their experience, and the patient's perception of how widespread IV misuse of buprenorphine is. 307 patients completed the questionnaire, 93 and 214 of whom, respectively, were receiving buprenorphine and methadone. In total, 23.12% of patients admitted an IV misuse of buprenorphine, with a significantly greater prevalence among patients currently receiving buprenorphine (35.48%) than those receiving methadone (17.75%; p < 0.001). Younger patients were also more likely to have misused buprenorphine, and tended to have done so before coming to the Drug Addiction Centre. The most frequent motivation for IV misuse was treatment of heroin addiction or withdrawal symptoms (50.71%), while only 12.67% of patients reported that their motivation was to experience pleasure or euphoria. The majority of patients who had misused buprenorphine intravenously (53.52%) had a negative experience, and methadone recipients were significantly more likely to find the experience negative than buprenorphine recipients (68.42% vs 36.36%; p = 0.007). Almost half of the patients (45.93%) thought that at least 50% of patients had taken buprenorphine by IV injection. The results of our study confirm the widespread IV misuse of buprenorphine. Misuse was most common among patients currently receiving buprenorphine treatment and younger patients. For the majority of patients, the reason for IV misuse was to treat their dependence. We believe that the prevalence of buprenorphine misuse could be reduced by adopting appropriate clinical practices and treating patients with the buprenorphine/naloxone combination rather than buprenorphine alone. PMID:20450240

  7. Transdermal buprenorphine controls central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michelle; Sarantopoulos, Constantine; Gordon, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A 53-year-old male with peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in right hemiparesis and hemisensory loss. Three months later, he developed constant and burning pain within the entire right side of his body. He was diagnosed with central pain syndrome and treated with antiepileptics and tricyclic antidepressants. Minimal analgesia was achieved, which was limited by intractable sedation and drowsiness. Patient was then treated with oral opioids (morphine and hydrocodone with acetaminophen) in escalating doses that produced cognitive impairment. After an opioid rotation was attempted, by switching morphine to transdermal fentanyl, there was no pain reduction or improved quality of life. A trial of buprenorphine was initiated, by administering transdermal patches in escalating doses in weekly intervals. Patient's pain was eventually successfully controlled with buprenorphine patch 60 ?g/h every 7 days. His self-reported Visual Analogue Scale pain scores decreased from an average of 8/10 to 2/10 or less. Patient's overall function and participation in home activities increased. Buprenorphine is a partial ?-receptor and a ?-? receptor antagonist known to block NMDA receptors and reduce hyperalgesia secondary to central sensitization.(1) Buprenorphine is also a partial agonist at the opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptor, which is found to be analgesic and antinociceptive at the level of the spinal cord.(1,2) The difference in analgesic responses between buprenorphine and other opioids may be due to different receptor G protein interactions and/or selective activation of neuronal K(ATP) channels by buprenorphine.(3) Deficient opening of K(ATP) channels has been shown to mediate neuropathic pain(4); therefore, activation of these channels by buprenorphine may contribute to its analgesic effect in neuropathic pain states wherein other opioids fail. More recently, there have been two case reports in which patients with neuropathic pain of different central etiology were successfully treated with buprenorphine.(5) Despite advances in understanding the pathology related to central pain, effective treatment options are limited. Buprenorphine may be an analgesic option for central pain management when opioids fail to reduce hypersensitivity or when patients exhibit intolerable side effects to other medications. PMID:23264319

  8. Buprenorphine decreases the CCL2-mediated chemotactic response of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Williams, Dionna W; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W

    2015-04-01

    Despite successful combined antiretroviral therapy, ? 60% of HIV-infected people exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV-infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9 were identified and had not been shown previously to be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  9. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dependence (addiction to opioid drugs, including heroin and narcotic painkillers). Buprenorphine is in a class of medications ... and ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra, in Technivie); opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control; phenothiazines (medications used for ...

  10. Office-Based Buprenorphine for Patients with Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Fiellin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The profile of opioid dependence in the United States is changing. Abuse of prescription opioids is more common than that of illicit opioids. Recent data indicate that there are approximately 1.6 million individuals with prescription opioid abuse or dependence and 323,000 with heroin abuse or dependence. Despite this prevalence, nearly 80% of these individuals go untreated. One option for expanding treatment is the use of buprenorphine and the buprenorphine/naloxone combination. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that can be prescribed by trained Internists and dispensed at pharmacies. The case-based discussion in this paper addresses the clinical presentation of a patient with opioid dependence and describes the relatively new practice of office-based treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. It examines the different components of treatment, the role of the Internist in providing this treatment, and the logistics of treating this growing and multi-faceted patient population. PMID:18458279

  11. Engagement and Substance Dependence in a Primary Care-Based Addiction Treatment Program for People Infected with HIV and People at High-Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Walley, Alexander Y; Palmisano, Joseph; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Chaisson, Christine; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-12-01

    To improve outcomes for people with substance dependence and HIV infection or at risk for HIV infection, patients were enrolled in a primary care-based addiction treatment program from 2008-2012 that included a comprehensive substance use assessment, individual and group counseling, addiction pharmacotherapy and case management. We examined whether predisposing characteristics (depression, housing status, polysubstance use) and an enabling resource (buprenorphine treatment) were associated with engagement in the program and persistent substance dependence at 6 months. At program enrollment 61% were HIV-infected, 53% reported heroin use, 46% reported alcohol use, 37% reported cocaine use, and 28% reported marijuana use in the past 30 days, 72% reported depression, 19% were homeless, and 53% had polysubstance use. Within 6-months 60% had been treated with buprenorphine. Engagement (defined as 2 visits in first 14 days and 2 additional visits in next 30 days) occurred in 64%; 49% had substance dependence at 6-months. Receipt of buprenorphine treatment was associated with engagement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 8.32 95% CI: 4.13-16.77). Self-reported depression at baseline was associated with substance dependence at 6-months (AOR 3.30 95% CI: 1.65-6.61). Neither housing status nor polysubstance use was associated with engagement or substance dependence. The FAST PATH program successfully engaged and treated patients in a primary care-based addiction treatment program. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, was a major driver of addiction treatment engagement. Given depression's association with adverse outcomes in this clinical population, including mental health treatment as part of integrated care holds potential to improve addiction treatment outcomes. PMID:26298399

  12. A woman's experience of tapering from buprenorphine during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Welle-Strand, Gabrielle Katrine; Kvamme, Odd; Andreassen, Andreas; Ravndal, Edle

    2014-01-01

    Although opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) is the treatment of choice for pregnant opioid-dependent patients, some professionals argue that tapering the medication dose will reduce the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). This case description is based on the patient's detailed blog, and medical records from her general practitioner and the hospital. The patient is an employed, 32-year-old drug-abstinent woman in OMT. Her taper from 24 mg of buprenorphine started at 14 weeks' gestation and is slow, with withdrawal symptoms increasing gradually. In pregnancy week 31, she is off buprenorphine but she has severe withdrawal symptoms. She chose to go back on 4 mg of buprenorphine. The patient's son was born in pregnancy week 38+3, weighs 2950 g and does not require pharmacological treatment for NAS. The fetus most probably did experience fetal stress during the patient's tapering. It was the right decision by the patient to go back on buprenorphine. PMID:25540212

  13. Current knowledge of buprenorphine and its unique pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Aloisi, Anna Maria; Dahan, Albert; Filitz, Joerg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Mercadante, Sebastiano; Morlion, Bart; Raffa, Robert B; Sabatowski, Rainer; Sacerdote, Paola; Torres, Luis M; Weinbroum, Avi A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing clinical use of transdermal buprenorphine, questions have persisted about the possibility of a ceiling effect for analgesia, its combination with other ?-opioid agonists, and the reversibility of side effects. In October 2008, a consensus group of experts met to review recent research into the pharmacology and clinical use of buprenorphine. The objective was to achieve consensus on the conclusions to be drawn from this work. It was agreed that buprenorphine clearly behaves as a full ?-opioid agonist for analgesia in clinical practice, with no ceiling effect, but that there is a ceiling effect for respiratory depression, reducing the likelihood of this potentially fatal adverse event. This is entirely consistent with receptor theory. In addition, the effects of buprenorphine can be completely reversed by naloxone. No problems are encountered when switching to and from buprenorphine and other opioids, or in combining them. Buprenorphine exhibits a pronounced antihyperalgesic effect that might indicate potential advantages in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Other beneficial properties are the compound's favorable safety profile, particularly in elderly patients and those with renal impairment, and its lack of effect on sex hormones and the immune system. The expert group agreed that these properties, as well as proven efficacy in severe pain and favorable tolerability, mean that buprenorphine can be considered a safe and effective option for treating chronic cancer and noncancer pain. PMID:20492579

  14. Transdermal buprenorphine in chronic pain: indications and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Kusnik, Stefan; Likar, Rudolf; Sittl, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine has been shown to be effective in managing moderate-to-severe cancer pain and severe pain that is unresponsive to nonopioid analgesics. In clinical trials, it provided better pain relief than placebo, despite a higher consumption of rescue analgesia by placebo patients. Analgesia was rated as satisfactory or better by 90% of patients in a long-term follow-up study and 94.6% considered the buprenorphine matrix patch to be user friendly. Transdermal buprenorphine is well tolerated; most adverse events are transient local reactions to the patch or systemic effects typical of treatment with opioids. Even in opioid-experienced volunteers, buprenorphine does not cause respiratory depression at doses up to 70-times higher than those used for analgesia. No problems have been encountered when switching from another opioid to transdermal buprenorphine, or in combining the buprenorphine patch with intravenous morphine or tramadol for breakthrough pain. There is a growing body of evidence that transdermal buprenorphine may be particularly useful for managing neuropathic pain. Most notably, it appears to be effective in treating hyperalgesic states and syndromes characterized by pronounced central sensitization. PMID:24410602

  15. A combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone blocks compulsive cocaine intake in rodents without producing dependence.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Misra, Kaushik K; Schlosburg, Joel E; Koob, George F

    2012-08-01

    Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both ? and ? opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at ? opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non-opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent ? opioid antagonist with weaker ? and ? antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block ? agonist-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction. PMID:22875830

  16. Rewarding or aversive effects of buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone) depend on conditioning trial duration.

    PubMed

    Canestrelli, Corinne; Marie, Nicolas; Noble, Florence

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine is used as a sublingual medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. However, its misuse by i.v. injection may limit its acceptability and dissemination. A buprenorphine/naloxone (ratio 4:1) combination has been developed to reduce diversion and abuse. So far, the relevance of this combination has not been investigated in the animal models traditionally used to study the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. The aim of this study was to compare the rewarding effects, assessed by conditioned place preference (CPP), of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone combination following i.v. administration in mice. Animals were treated with different doses of buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone combination (ratio 4:1), and CPP conditioning trial duration was 5 or 30 min. At the longest trial duration, a bell-shaped dose-response curve was obtained with buprenorphine, which was shifted significantly to the right with naloxone combination. At the shortest trial duration, an aversive effect was observed with the buprenorphine/naloxone combination in animals, involving opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1). These findings may explain the discrepancies reported in the literature as some authors have shown a reduced buprenorphine/naloxone misuse compared to buprenorphine in opioid abusers, while others have not. PMID:24606726

  17. Quantitation of Total Buprenorphine and Norbuprenorphine in Meconium by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv, Buprenex, Butrans, etc.) is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Pregnant women may be prescribed buprenorphine as part of a treatment plan for opioid addiction. This chapter quantitates buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine in meconium by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). PMID:26660174

  18. Transdermal buprenorphine in pain management--experiences from clinical practice: Five case studies.

    PubMed

    Louis, F

    2006-10-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine has been available in Belgium for 3 years, during which time the Pain Clinic of the St Elisabeth of Verviers Hospital has gained experience in the use of transdermal buprenorphine for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. This paper presents four cases of chronic, non-malignant pain, and one case of chronic cancer pain. By starting patients on low doses and slowly titrating upwards, transdermal buprenorphine matrix patches provided effective analgesia and were well tolerated. Low doses of transdermal buprenorphine were created by cutting the smallest available matrix patch (35 mug/h) into halves or quarters. The initial dose was then gradually titrated upwards to the dose needed for optimum pain relief by the patients. No problems were encountered in switching patients from prior analgesic therapy with other opioids to transdermal buprenorphine. PMID:16981980

  19. Who prescribes buprenorphine for rural patients? The impact of specialty, location and practice type in Washington State?,??

    PubMed Central

    Kvamme, Erik; Catlin, Mary; Banta-Green, Caleb; Roll, John; Rosenblatt, Roger

    2013-01-01

    We determined the specialty, geographic location, practice type and treatment capacity of waivered clinicians in Washington State. We utilized the April 2011 Drug Enforcement Agency roster of all waivered buprenorphine prescribers and cross-referenced the data with information from the American Medical Association and online resources. Waivered physicians, as compared to Washington State physicians overall, are more likely to be primary care providers, be older, less likely to be younger than 35years, and more likely to be female. Isolated rural areas have the lowest provider to population ratios. Ten counties lack either a buprenorphine provider or a methadone clinic. In rural areas, waivered physicians work predominately in federally-subsidized safety-net settings, which underscores the need for continued governmental support of primary care and mental health in these settings. PMID:22939650

  20. Safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients: an Italian observational study.

    PubMed

    Magnelli, Fernanda; Biondi, Lorita; Calabria, Roberto; Fiore, Angelo; Peluso, Eugenio; Vonella, Domenico; Rota, Amerigo Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Opioid dependence is a growing problem. Methadone is an established agent for the treatment of opioid dependence, but there is a risk of this agent being abused, a potential for interaction with antiretroviral agents and a risk of cardiac toxicity. Another option is the partial mu-opioid receptor opioid agonist buprenorphine, which has been used successfully to manage opioid dependence. While the risk of abuse is lower than that for methadone, there is still a risk. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is a newer agent with reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for opioid dependence. We describe the results of an observational study investigating the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients. A total of 77 patients were included and were switched from buprenorphine to sublingual tables of buprenorphine/naloxone; the buprenorphine dosage was titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. The prevalence of withdrawal symptoms, craving, constipation, cramps, insomnia, sexual activity, depression, sweating, distress, bone/joint pain and drowsiness were compared over the first 30 days of treatment (period 1) and the total 120-day study duration (period 2). The average buprenorphine/naloxone dose in period 1 was 7.3 mg/day and 12.7 mg/day in period 2. Most patients did not experience any withdrawal symptoms in either period 1 or period 2. Fewer than 20% of patients experienced any cravings over the 120-day study period. Importantly, the adverse effects observed were usually mild, with very few patients experiencing significant adverse effects. This study shows that buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective and well tolerated treatment for opioid withdrawal when the dosage is titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. Switching from buprenorphine alone to buprenorphine/naloxone was possible with very little discomfort for the patient and effective retained patients in treatment. PMID:20450242

  1. From research to the real world: buprenorphine in the decade of the Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter; Jacobs, Petra; Hillhouse, Maureen; Hasson, Albert; Thomas, Christie; Freese, Thomas; Sparenborg, Steven; McCarty, Dennis; Weiss, Roger; Saxon, Andrew; Cohen, Allan; Straus, Michele; Brigham, Gregory; Liu, David; McLaughlin, Paul; Tai, Betty

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in 1999 to bring researchers and treatment providers together to develop a clinically relevant research agenda. Initial CTN efforts addressed the use of buprenorphine, a mu-opioid partial agonist, as treatment for opioid dependence. Strong evidence of buprenorphine's therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated in clinical trials involving several thousand opioid-dependent participants, and in 2002, the Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence. With the advent of a sublingual tablet containing both buprenorphine and naloxone to mitigate abuse and diversion (Suboxone), buprenorphine appeared poised to be the first-line treatment for opioid addiction. Notwithstanding its many attributes, certain implementation barriers remained to be addressed in CTN studies, and these efforts have brought a body of knowledge on buprenorphine to frontline clinicians. The purpose of this article is to review CTN-based buprenorphine research and related efforts to overcome challenges to the implementation of buprenorphine therapy in mainstream practice. Furthermore, this article explores current issues and future challenges that may require additional CTN efforts. PMID:20307796

  2. Methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are effective in reducing illicit buprenorphine and other opioid use, and reducing HIV risk behavior – Outcomes of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Otiashvili, David; Piralishvili, Gvantsa; Sikharulidze, Zura; Kamkamidze, George; Poole, Sabrina; Woody, George E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Determine the extent to which buprenorphine injectors continue treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone or methadone, and the impact of these treatments on substance use and HIV risk in the Republic of Georgia. Methods Randomized controlled 12-week trial of daily-observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone followed by a dose taper, referral to ongoing treatment, and follow-up at week 20 at the Uranti Clinic in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. Eighty consenting treatment-seeking individuals (40/group) aged 25 and above who met ICD-10 criteria for opioid dependence with physiologic features and reported injecting buprenorphine 10 or more times in the past 30 days. Opioid use according to urine tests and self-reports, treatment retention, and HIV risk behavior as determined by the Risk Assessment Battery. Results Mean age of participants was 33.7 (SD5.7), 4 were female, mean history of opioid injection use was 5.8 years (SD4.6), none were HIV+ at intake or at the 12-week assessment and 73.4% were HCV+. Sixty-eight participants (85%) completed the 12-week medication phase (33 from methadone and 35 from buprenorphine/naloxone group); 37 (46%) were in treatment at the 20-week follow-up (21 from methadone and 16 from the buprenorphine/naloxone group). In both study arms, treatment resulted in a marked reduction in unprescribed buprenorphine, other opioid use, and HIV injecting risk behavior with no clinically significant differences between the two treatment arms. Conclusions Daily observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone are effective treatments for non-medical buprenorphine and other opioid use in the Republic of Georgia and likely to be useful for preventing HIV infection. PMID:23916321

  3. Effect of telaprevir on the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine in volunteers on stable buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xia; Trevejo, Jose; van Heeswijk, Rolf P G; Smith, Frances; Garg, Varun

    2012-07-01

    This was an open-label, single-sequence trial in hepatitis C virus-negative volunteers on stable, individualized, buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Telaprevir at 750 mg every 8 h was coadministered with buprenorphine/naloxone (4:1 ratio as sublingual tablets) for 7 days with food. Pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone were measured over the 24-hour dosing interval on day -1 (buprenorphine/naloxone alone, reference) and day 7 of telaprevir coadministration (test). Geometric least-squares mean ratios and associated 90% confidence intervals of treatment ratios (test/reference) were calculated using log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters. Opioid withdrawal symptoms were evaluated throughout the study (via questionnaires and pupillometry). Pharmacokinetic data were available for 14 and 13 volunteers on day -1 and day 7, respectively. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for buprenorphine was unchanged and the maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max)) for buprenorphine, C(max) and AUC for norbuprenorphine, and C(max) naxolone were modestly decreased during coadministration with telaprevir. Geometric least-squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for buprenorphine were 0.80 (0.69, 0.93) for the C(max) and 0.96 (0.84, 1.10) for the AUC from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24)); for norbuprenorphine, values were 0.85 (0.66, 1.09) for C(max) and 0.91 (0.71, 1.16) for AUC(0-24); for naloxone, the C(max) was 0.84 (0.62, 1.13). Coadministration of telaprevir did not increase withdrawal symptom frequency, and there were no serious adverse events reported during or after completion of telaprevir coadministration. Results suggest dose adjustment may not be necessary when telaprevir and buprenorphine/naloxone are coadministered. PMID:22564847

  4. Buprenorphine maintenance and mu-opioid receptor availability in the treatment of opioid use disorder: implications for clinical use and policy

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K.; Comer, Sandra D.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sublingual formulations of buprenorphine (BUP) and BUP/naloxone have well-established pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and are safe and effective for treating opioid use disorder. Since approvals of these formulations, their clinical use has increased. Yet, questions have arisen as to how BUP binding to mu-opioid receptors (?ORs), the neurobiological target for this medication, relate to its clinical application. BUP produces dose- and time-related alterations of ?OR availability but some clinicians express concern about whether doses higher than those needed to prevent opioid withdrawal symptoms are warranted, and policymakers consider limiting reimbursement for certain BUP dosing regimens. Methods We review scientific data concerning BUP-induced changes in ?OR availability and their relationship to clinical efficacy. Results Withdrawal suppression appears to require ?50% ?OR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ?1 ng/mL; for most patients, this may require single daily BUP doses of 4-mg to defend against trough levels, or lower divided doses. Blockade of the reinforcing and subjective effects of typical doses of abused opioids require <20% ?OR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ?3 ng/mL; for most individuals, this may require single daily BUP doses >16-mg, or lower divided doses. For individuals attempting to surmount this blockade with higher-than-usual doses of abused opioids, even larger BUP doses and <10% ?OR availability would be required. Conclusion For these reasons, and given the complexities of studies on this issue and comorbid problems, we conclude that fixed, arbitrary limits on BUP doses in clinical care or limits on reimbursement for this care are unwarranted. PMID:25179217

  5. Buprenorphine for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Raul; Copenhaver, David

    2013-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions, analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The use of transdermal buprenorphine for chronic pain management is discussed. A brief history of the medication is provided. The use of the medication in opioid maintenance, and withdrawal and other concerns are discussed. Possible side effects are described. PMID:24245573

  6. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine–naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine–naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  7. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine-naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  8. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow. PMID:25715074

  9. Interactions of buprenorphine and dipotassium clorazepate on anxiety and memory functions in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Quentin, Thomas; Moreaux, Fabien; Debruyne, Danièle; Boulouard, Michel; Coquerel, Antoine

    2006-11-01

    Buprenorphine, a partial mu-receptor agonist widely substituted for heroin in the treatment of addiction, is often misused in combination with benzodiazepines. Improved hedonic properties may result, but only at the cost of increased buprenorphine toxicity. In order to elucidate the appeal of the benzodiazepine-buprenorphine combination, the present study looked at its neuropsycho-pharmacological effects on various emotional and cognitive parameters in the mouse. On the basis of previous dose-response studies, the regimen used was buprenorphine 0.3mg/kg, s.c. plus dipotassium clorazepate 1, 4 and 16 mg/kg, i.p. Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed using the black and white test box, and memory processes were examined via the spontaneous alternation paradigm in the Y-maze, and passive avoidance tests. Spontaneous locomotor activity was also evaluated. High doses of clorazepate impaired buprenorphine-induced hyperactivity and anxiogenic-like effects. They also increased buprenorphine-induced spontaneous alternation impairment, but did not modify its impact on long-term memory processes. These results suggest that the positive reinforcement experienced with the buprenorphine-benzodiazepine combination may be attributable, at least in part, to an increase in buprenorphine's sedative effect associated with a decrease in anxiogenicity. PMID:16720083

  10. Systematic review of adverse events of buprenorphine patch versus fentanyl patch in patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Robert F; Reid, Kim; di Nisio, Marcello; Aune, Dagfinn; Truyers, Carla; Hernandez, Adrian V; Misso, Kate; Riemsma, Rob; Kleijnen, Jos

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY This systematic review compares convenience of administration, adverse events and tolerability of buprenorphine patch with fentanyl patch in patients with chronic pain. Methods of quantitative and qualitative research were combined. Seventeen databases were searched up to December 2010. A total of 49 unique trials (56 publications) were included. Patients regarded the use of patches, both transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl, as easy and convenient. Compared with buprenorphine patch, fentanyl can cause more cases of constipation and could lead to a higher number of serious adverse events. There were no differences between buprenorphine patch and fentanyl patch regarding dizziness, somnolence, nausea and treatment discontinuation. Overall, transdermal administration of buprenorphine and fentanyl can be seen as an alternative pathway for delivering these drugs. Use of transdermal buprenorphine might be favorable in certain groups of patients, such as renally impaired, elderly and immunosuppressed patients. PMID:24654721

  11. HIV Treatment Access and Scale-Up for Delivery for IDU in Ukraine with Opiate Substitution Therapy with Buprenorphine - Programme Description and Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Dvoryak, Sergey; Sylla, Laurie; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Injection drug use (IDU) accounts for 70% of HIV cases in Ukraine. Until buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was introduced, few effective strategies aimed at achieving reduction in illicit drug use were available as a conduit to antiretroviral therapy (ARV) among IDUs. Description In October 2005, BMT was scaled-up using Global Fund resources in six regions within Ukraine. Entry criteria included opioid-dependence, HIV-1 seropositivity, age ?18 years and reported interest in BMT. All sites included a multidisciplinary team. To date, 207 patients have been initiated on BMT. Lessons Learned The existing infrastructure allows for further scale-up of and administration of BMT and the possibility of co-administration with ARV. The process for prescription and administration of buprenorphine and ARV is at times cumbersome and constrained by current regulations. Recommendations More IDU need BMT to improve overall health outcomes. Central to expanding access will be legislative changes to existing drug policy. Moreover, the cost of buprenorphine is prohibitively expensive. Sustainable substitution therapy in Ukraine requires lower negotiated prices for buprenorphine and/or the addition of methadone to the existing formulary for HIV+ drug users. PMID:17689382

  12. The Implementation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone in College Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaria, Peter A., Jr.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate abuse and dependence have become important concerns for college healthcare providers. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 and the approval of the combination buprenorphine/naloxone for office-based treatment of opiate dependence have increased the options available for college students and their healthcare providers. The…

  13. The relative risk of fatal poisoning by methadone or buprenorphine within the wider population of England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Marteau, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the population-wide overdose risk emerging from the prescription of methadone and buprenorphine for opioid substitution treatment in England and Wales. Design Retrospective administrative data study. Setting National databases for England and Wales. Participants/cases Drug-related mortality data were drawn from the Office for National Statistics, and prescription data for methadone and buprenorphine were obtained from the National Health Service for the years 2007–2012. During this 6-year period, a total of 2366 methadone-related deaths and 52 buprenorphine-related deaths were registered, corresponding to 17?333?163 methadone and 2?602?374 buprenorphine prescriptions issued. The analysis encompassed poisoning deaths among members of the wider population of England and Wales who consumed, but were not prescribed these medications, in addition to patients prescribed methadone or buprenorphine. Main outcome measures Mortality risk: substance-specific overdose rate per 1000 prescriptions issued; relative risk ratio of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. Results During the years 2007–2012, the pooled overdose death rate was 0.137/1000 prescriptions of methadone, compared to 0.022/1000 prescriptions of buprenorphine (including buprenorphine-naloxone). The analysis generated a relative risk ratio of 6.23 (95% CI 4.79 to 8.10) of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. UK Borders Agency data were taken into consideration and revealed that only negligible amounts of methadone and buprenorphine were seized on entering UK territory between 2007 and 2012, suggesting domestic diversion. Conclusions Our analysis of the relative safety of buprenorphine and methadone for opioid substitution treatment reveals that buprenorphine is six times safer than methadone with regard to overdose risk among the general population. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of prescribing methadone, and tighter regulations are needed to prevent its diversion. PMID:26024998

  14. Considerations on the role of buprenorphine in recovery from heroin addiction from a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom Drug Strategy emphasises recovery as a key focus in the treatment of drug dependence. A framework for recovery is defined in the Recovery-Orientated Drug Treatment report, written by an expert working group, and comprises four key phases: engagement and stabilisation, including the establishment of treatment goals; preparation for change, involving engagement in psychosocial and pharmacological interventions; active change, including detoxification and medical withdrawal; and completion, including interventions that strengthen community integration. A body of evidence supports the benefits of buprenorphine, a partial agonist at mu opioid receptors, in supporting individualised recovery based on this framework, specifically in relation to the potential for rapid stabilisation, flexibility to transition to other treatment options or achieve abstinence, effective blocking of on-top use of illicit drugs, the treatment of comorbidities through the minimisation of drug-drug interactions, and a good safety profile. In addition, the newer abuse-deterrent formulation of buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone is likely to strengthen recovery-orientated systems of care due to its potential to reduce misuse and diversion. Progress through the recovery journey and the ability to sustain recovery will depend on individual needs and goals and on the amount of recovery capital that individuals have developed. PMID:25389219

  15. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  16. Urine specimen detection of concurrent nonprescribed medicinal and illicit drug use in patients prescribed buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Alexander Y; Ma, Joseph D; Best, Brookie M; Atayee, Rabia S

    2013-01-01

    Patients being treated with buprenorphine usually have a history of opioid dependence and may be predisposed to misuse of drugs. Concurrent drug misuse increases the risk of life-threatening drug interactions. This retrospective data analysis observed which nonprescribed and illicit drugs were most commonly detected in the urine of patients from pain management clinics taking buprenorphine with or without a prescription. GC, LC/MS and LC-MS-MS were used to quantify 20,929 urine specimens. The most prevalent illicit drug used in both the groups (prescribed and nonprescribed buprenorphine) was marijuana, followed by cocaine. The most prevalent nonprescribed medications abused by both the groups were benzodiazepines, followed by oxycodone and hydrocodone. The overall prevalence of illicit and nonprescribed drug use was significantly higher in subjects who used buprenorphine without a prescription versus prescribed use. Of the concurrent use of marijuana and cocaine with buprenorphine, cocaine is most concerning since it decreases exposure to buprenorphine (lower area under the concentration-time curve and maximum concentration). The concurrent use of nonprescribed benzodiazepines with buprenorphine can cause excess sedation leading to respiratory depression and even death. These findings highlight the importance of educating patients about these potential toxicities. Furthermore, pain providers should consider expanding the spectrum of drugs that they monitor in patients under treatment. PMID:24080973

  17. Drug Interactions of Clinical Importance among the Opioids, Methadone and Buprenorphine, and other Frequently Prescribed Medications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Sullivan, Lynn; Nallani, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Drug interactions are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Methadone and buprenorphine are frequently prescribed for the treatment of opioid addiction. Patients needing treatment with these medications often have co-occurring medical and mental illnesses that require medication treatment. The abuse of illicit substances is also common in opioid-addicted individuals. These clinical realities place patients being treated with methadone and buprenorphine at risk for potentially toxic drug interactions. A substantial literature has accumulated on drug interactions between either methadone or buprenorphine with other medications when ingested concomitantly by humans. This review summarizes current literature in this area. PMID:20132117

  18. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine: a comparison of sublingual tablet versus liquid after chronic dosing.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy; Ling, Walter; Chiang, C Nora; Moody, David E; Huber, Alice; Ling, Debbie; Charuvastra, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Although buprenorphine is approved for use in the outpatient treatment of opioid addiction in 2 tablet formulations, a monoproduct containing buprenorphine only (Subutex) and a buprenorphine/naloxone combination product (Suboxone), much of the clinical data that support the approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration were generated by using a sublingual liquid. To interpret the literature in prescribing parameters for tablet buprenorphine, this study was designed to determine steady state buprenorphine plasma levels for the 2 formulations and to assess the relative bioavailability of each. A randomized, double-blind, crossover study with dose increases was conducted during a 12-week period at an outpatient treatment clinic. Of the 184 subjects initially randomized to treatment, 133 (72.3%) were evaluated for the steady-state trough plasma concentration, 16 (8.7%) for relative bioavailability, and 31 (16.8%) for dose proportionality. At steady state, differences in the trough plasma concentrations of buprenorphine between the 2 formulations were found across all the dose levels. Average plasma concentration (Cavg) of the tablet at twice the milligram dose of the liquid was twice that of the liquid; intersubject variability was greater for the tablet. At double the dose of tablet, there is no difference in steady state plasma concentrations. The bioavailability seems equivalent for the 2 formulations across all the dose levels. PMID:21768940

  19. Buprenorphine therapy for opioid addiction in rural Washington: The experience of the early adopters

    PubMed Central

    Quest, Tyler L.; Merrill, Joseph O.; Roll, John; Saxon, Andrew J.; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The introduction of buprenorphine as office-based treatment for opioid dependence was designed to expand treatment capacity, but virtually there are no data about use of this medication in rural areas. Methods The survey of the first cohort of physicians in rural Washington State who obtained buprenorphine waivers (2002-2010) to determine the volume of treated patients, physician appraisal of the efficacy of this treatment, and perceived barriers to treatment was conducted. Twenty-four (73 percent) of the 33 rural buprenorphine-certified physicians practicing in the state were interviewed in 2010. Results Twenty physicians (83 percent) were actively prescribing buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of addiction. Those currently prescribing averaged 23 active patients and had treated 125 patients since certification. All respondents reported that buprenorphine was efficacious in the treatment of addiction and 95 percent recommended that other rural colleagues adopt buprenorphine treatment. The following four major barriers were cited: 1) lack of adequate financial support from Medicaid, the largest source of third-party coverage for these patients; 2) unavailability of local mental health and behavioral addiction treatment services; 3) difficulty in finding consultants to assist in managing complex patients; and 4) shortages of other rural physicians providing this service. Conclusions Buprenorphine is viewed as a highly effective treatment of opioid addiction by early adopters in rural Washington State, but relatively few rural physicians currently provide this service. Inadequate insurance coverage, a shortage of effective links with consultants and colleagues, and the lack of mental health services are persistent barriers to the use of this modality in rural Washington State. PMID:22479882

  20. [Transdermal buprenorphine: a current overview of pharmacological and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Faymonville, M E; Libbrecht, D

    2008-11-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of chronic pain progresses; the complexity of the problem justifies our need for new molecules and new ways of administration that will help to further optimise and better individualize our pharmacologic therapies. Whereas acute pain can be considered an alarm signal, chronic pain constitutes, per se, a syndrome that requires a meticulous selection of the analgesic drug(s). Since pain is permanent, the continuous administration of the analgesic is recommended rather than an on demand administration. Transdermic modes of administration are of value for the treatment of chronic pain because they allow a progressive delivery of the active compound together with the maintenance of stable plasma levels of the drug. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid that is available in the sublingual, injectable, or transdermic forms. The matrix patch of buprenorphine represents a major asset for the treatment of chronic pain, whether it be cancerous in origin, or not. Its efficacy and safety have been clearly demonstrated in randomised double blind trials as well as in post-marketing surveillance observations. Buprenorphine, administered as a transdermal therapeutic system, induces a dose-related pain relief, whatever the nature of the pain and the age of the patient. Buprenorphine also exerts an analgesic action on neuropathic pain. It differs from other opioids by its affinity as a partial agonist on mu and kappa receptors, and as a complete agonist of ORL-1 receptors. Therefore, transdermal buprenorphine will be useful to all physicians having to control severe pain by powerful opioids. PMID:19112993

  1. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Smith, Michael D; Unal, Cemal; Finn, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine-naloxone (BN) sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV) naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90-1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15) of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15) of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001), and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001). Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. PMID:26604818

  2. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Smith, Michael D; Unal, Cemal; Finn, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine–naloxone (BN) sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV) naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90–1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15) of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15) of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001), and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001). Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. PMID:26604818

  3. Comparing Outcomes for Youth Served in Treatment Foster Care and Treatment Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin

    2011-01-01

    This study compared youth in the Florida Medicaid system prior to entry into treatment foster care or treatment group care, and compared outcomes in the 6 months after treatment. Florida Medicaid data from FY2003/04 through 2006/2007 along with Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Law Enforcement, and involuntary examination data were…

  4. Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Megarbane, Bruno . E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Marie, Nicolas; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Gueye, Papa N.; Risede, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Noble, Florence; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-05-01

    High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD{sub 5}) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD{sub 5} was 10 mg kg{sup -1}. Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg{sup -1} produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.9 versus 5.7 {+-} 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 {+-} 0.06 versus 7.44 {+-} 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 {+-} 0.6 versus 11.1 {+-} 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg{sup -1} norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use.

  5. Sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain: A survey of clinician prescribing practices

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Kristen; Gutierrez, Antonio; Haller, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sublingual buprenorphine, with and without naloxone, is indicated for the treatment of opioid use disorders. Although not approved for pain, some evidence suggests it may be a safe and effective alternative to conventional opioid analgesics, particularly for those with addiction problems. This study surveyed pain specialists to examine the extent to which sublingual buprenorphine was prescribed for chronic pain and explore associated clinician attitudes and characteristics. Method A 36-item survey examining clinician attitudes and characteristics related to sublingual buprenorphine and other opioids was distributed to 1,307 members of the American Pain Society, a multi-disciplinary professional group. Members were provided a paper copy of the survey and URL to an on-line version. A follow up letter was mailed after 2 weeks. Results Overall, 230 completed surveys were returned (18.5%). Of clinicians who prescribed opioids for chronic pain (92.5%), 19.7% reported prescribing sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain at least once; of these prescribers, 39.6% did not have a DEA X-waiver to prescribe sublingual buprenorphine for opioid dependance. Prescribers were more likely than non-prescribers to find sublingual buprenorphine effective for chronic pain. Prescribers were also significantly more likely to view sublingual buprenorphine as safer than full agonists in terms of addiction, overdose, and drug interaction. No differences emerged between prescribers and non-prescribers regarding perceptions of potential for drug diversion or in terms of overall opioid prescribing behaviors. Discussion Results suggest that sublingual buprenorphine is indeed being used to treat chronic pain; however, the circumstances when this occurs are not entirely clear. PMID:23727654

  6. [High-dose buprenorphine for outpatient palliative pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Gastmeier, K; Freye, E

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 78-year-old patient with cancer-related pain and additionally mixed-pain syndrome is presented. Pain therapy with buprenorphine TTS 210 microg/h every 3 days was sufficient in the beginning, later the therapy was changed because of increasing problems of tape fixing during fever periods under chemotherapy to a continuous infusion of buprenorphine intravenously via an external medication pump. During the course of therapy it became necessary to increase the dose to 99.9 mg/day buprenorphine. Under this medication a sufficient pain reduction (median NRS 2-3) over a period of 135 days could be achieved. At the same time the patient was vigilant and cooperative without signs of intoxication until the end of life at home in the presence of his family.If no signs of intoxication occur under extreme opioid therapy and a sufficient pain therapy can be achieved, a rotation to another opioid is not necessary. However, outpatient palliative care requires a frequent adaptation to the individually varying opioid demand of the patient and time-consuming nursing care. PMID:19066981

  7. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  8. Comparison of subcutaneous and transdermal administration of buprenorphine for pre-emptive analgesia in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Moll, Xavier; Fresno, Laura; García, Félix; Prandi, David; Andaluz, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of a 70 microg/h transdermal buprenorphine patch and of 20 microg/kg of buprenorphine administered subcutaneously (SC) for the relief of post-operative pain was determined in 24 healthy female dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy (OHE). Dogs were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) a control group that received no analgesics, (2) a BSC group that received buprenorphine SC (20 microg/kg), and (3) a BP group that received buprenorphine by a 70 microg/h transdermal patch. Dogs were scored for signs of pain at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 26, 32 and 38 h after extubation using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and a modified University of Melbourne Pain Scale (UMPS). Mean NRS and UMPS scores for dogs in the BSC group (2.56 ± 0.23 and 3.05 ± 0.27, respectively) and the BP group (2.02 ± 0.24 and 2.67 ± 0.23, respectively) were significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with dogs in the control group (5.42 ± 0.38 and 7.89 ± 0.44, respectively), whereas differences between the two buprenorphine treatment groups were not significant. The results indicated that the analgesia produced by the 70 microg/h patch was similar to that induced by SC administration of 20 microg/kg of buprenorphine in dogs undergoing OHE, suggesting that the transdermal buprenorphine patch may be a useful alternative for pain management in dogs. PMID:20056555

  9. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  10. Tobacco use disorder treatment in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kunyk, Diane; Els, Charl; Papadakis, Sophia; Selby, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test a team-based, site-specific, multicomponent clinical system pathway designed for enhancing tobacco use disorder treatment by primary care physicians. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Sixty primary care sites in Alberta. Participants A convenience sample of 198 primary care physicians from the population of 2857. Main outcome measures Data collection occurred between September 2010 and February 2012 on 3 distinct measures. Twenty-four weeks after the intervention, audits of the primary care practices assessed the adoption and sustainability of 10 tobacco clinical system pathway components, a survey measured changes in physicians’ treatment intentions, and patient chart reviews examined changes in physicians’ consistency with the treatment algorithm. Results The completion rate by physicians was 89.4%. An intention-to-treat approach was undertaken for statistical analysis. Intervention uptake was demonstrated by positive changes at 4 weeks in how many of the 10 clinical system measures were performed (mean [SD] = 4.22 [1.60] vs 8.57 [1.46]; P < .001). Physicians demonstrated significant favourable changes in 9 of the 12 measures of treatment intention (P < .05). The 18 282 chart reviews documented significant increases in 6 of the 8 algorithm components. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the provision of a tobacco clinical system pathway that incorporates other members of the health care team and builds on existing office infrastructures will support positive and sustainable changes in tobacco use disorder treatment by physicians in primary care. This study reaffirms the substantive and important role of supporting how treatment is delivered in physicians’ practices. PMID:25022640

  11. Abuse and diversion of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and film.

    PubMed

    Lavonas, Eric J; Severtson, S Geoffrey; Martinez, Erin M; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Le Lait, Marie-Claire; Green, Jody L; Murrelle, Lenn E; Cicero, Theodore J; Kurtz, Steven P; Rosenblum, Andrew; Surratt, Hilary L; Dart, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Buprenorphine abuse is common worldwide. Rates of abuse and diversion of three sublingual buprenorphine formulations (single ingredient tablets; naloxone combination tablets and film) were compared. Data were obtained from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS) System Poison Center, Drug Diversion, Opioid Treatment (OTP), Survey of Key Informants' Patients (SKIP), and College Survey Programs through December 2012. To control for drug availability, event ratios (rates) were calculated quarterly, based on the number of patients filling prescriptions for each formulation ("unique recipients of a dispensed drug," URDD) and averaged and compared using negative binomial regression. Abuse rates in the OTP, SKIP, and College Survey Programs were greatest for single ingredient tablets, and abuse rates in the Poison Center Program and illicit diversion rates were greatest for the combination tablets. Combination film rates were significantly less than rates for either tablet formulation in all programs. No geographic pattern could be discerned. PMID:24680219

  12. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Organizational Barriers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer clinical trials offer the opportunity for cancer patients to access state-of-the-art treatments and, in the process, contribute to the scientific knowledge base about effectiveness of curative interventions. However, accrual to clinical trials is far from optimal. Only about 5 percent of cancer patients receive care through a treatment trial. Understanding the factors that promote or impede trial participation is an essential step toward increasing accrual.

  13. Induction of opioid-dependent individuals onto buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone soluble-films.

    PubMed

    Strain, E C; Harrison, J A; Bigelow, G E

    2011-03-01

    A sublingual soluble-film formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid dependency. This preparation provides unit-dose, child-resistant packaging amenable to tracking and accountability, offers more rapid dissolution, and has a potentially preferred taste vs. tablets. This study compared the ability of buprenorphine (B) and B/N films to suppress spontaneous withdrawal in opioid-dependent volunteers. Participants were maintained on morphine and underwent challenge sessions to confirm sensitivity to naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal. Subjects were randomized to receive either B (16 mg, n = 18) or B/N (16/4 mg, n = 16) soluble films for 5 days. The primary outcome measure was the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score. Thirty-four subjects completed induction onto soluble films. There was a significant decrease in COWS scores but no significant differences between the groups. The results support the use of B and B/N soluble films as safe and effective delivery methods for opioid induction. PMID:21270789

  14. Children of Cocaine: Treatment and Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Kate; Howze, Wendell M.

    Information concerning the treatment and care of children addicted to cocaine is provided. Contents: (1) describe the drug; (2) put cocaine use in its historical and demographic perspectives; (3) report findings of a study documenting the incidence of maternal substance abuse in Pinellas County, Florida; (4) point out false perceptions,…

  15. A Double Blind, within Subject Comparison of Spontaneous Opioid Withdrawal from Buprenorphine versus Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael T.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Campbell, Claudia M.; Strain, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical ?-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those of buprenorphine withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0–100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation. PMID:24227768

  16. Buprenorphine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePLUS

    ... longer needed by carefully removing the adhesive backing, folding the sticky sides of each patch together so ... substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist if you have ...

  17. Managing Opioid Use Disorder During and After Acute Hospitalization: A Case-Based Review Clarifying Methadone Regulation for Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Noska, Amanda; Mohan, Aron; Wakeman, Sarah; Rich, Josiah; Boutwell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment with an opioid agonist such as methadone or buprenorphine is the standard of care for opioid use disorder. Persons with opioid use disorder are frequently hospitalized, and may be undertreated due to provider misinformation regarding the legality of prescribing methadone for inpatients. Using a case-based review, this article aims to describe effective management of active opioid withdrawal and ongoing opioid use disorder using methadone or buprenorphine among acutely ill, hospitalized patients. Methods We reviewed pertinent medical and legal literature and consulted with national legal experts regarding methadone for opioid withdrawal and opioid maintenance therapy in hospitalized, general medical and surgical patients, and describe a real-life example of successful implementation of inpatient methadone for these purposes. Results Patients with opioid use disorders can be effectively and legally initiated on methadone maintenance therapy or buprenorphine during an inpatient hospitalization by clinical providers and successfully transitioned to an outpatient methadone maintenance or buprenorphine clinic after discharge for ongoing treatment. Conclusions Inpatient methadone or buprenorphine prescribing is safe and evidence-based, and can be used to effectively treat opioid withdrawal and also serves as a bridge to outpatient treatment of opioid use disorders. PMID:26258153

  18. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction. PMID:23480249

  19. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  20. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  1. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6240 Medical treatment, care and...

  2. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  3. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6240 Medical treatment, care and...

  4. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  5. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6240 Medical treatment, care and...

  6. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  7. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6240 Medical treatment, care and...

  8. Utilizing buprenorphine–naloxone to treat illicit and prescription-opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Sofie; Fraser, Ronald; Gill, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review current evidence on buprenorphine–naloxone (bup/nx) for the treatment of opioid-use disorders, with a focus on strategies for clinical management and office-based patient care. Quality of evidence Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Consensus reports, guidelines published, and other authoritative sources were also included in this review. Apart from expert guidelines, data included in this review constitute level 1 evidence. Findings Bup/nx is a partial ?-opioid agonist combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4:1 ratio. It has a lower abuse potential, carries less stigma, and allows for more flexibility than methadone. Bup/nx is indicated for both inpatient and ambulatory medically assisted withdrawal (acute detoxification) and long-term substitution treatment (maintenance) of patients who have a mild-to-moderate physical dependence. A stepwise long-term substitution treatment with regular monitoring and follow-up assessment is usually preferred, as it has better outcomes in reducing illicit opioid use, minimizing concomitant risks such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C transmission, retaining patients in treatment and improving global functioning. Conclusion Bup/nx is safe and effective for opioid detoxification and substitution treatment. Its unique pharmaceutical properties make it particularly suitable for office-based maintenance treatment of opioid-use disorder. PMID:24741316

  9. The impact of cocaine use on outcomes in HIV-infected patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Botsko, Michael; Cunningham, Chinazo; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Hersh, David; Mitty, Jennifer; Lum, Paula J.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cocaine use is common in opioid dependent HIV-infected patients but its impact on treatment outcomes in these patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone is not known. METHODS We conducted a prospective study in 299 patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone who provided baseline cocaine data and a subset of 266 patients who remained in treatment for greater than or equal to one quarter. Assessments were conducted at baseline and quarterly for one year. We evaluated the association between baseline and in-treatment cocaine use on buprenorphine/naloxone retention, illicit opioid use, antiretroviral adherence, CD4 counts, HIV RNA, and risk behaviors. RESULTS Sixty-six percent (197/299) of patients reported baseline cocaine use and 65% (173/266) of patients with follow-up data reported in-treatment cocaine use. Baseline and in-treatment cocaine use did not impact buprenorphine/naloxone retention, antiretroviral adherence, CD4 lymphocytes, or HIV risk behaviors. However, baseline cocaine use was associated with a 14.8 (95% CI=9.0–24.2) times greater likelihood of subsequent cocaine use (95% CI=9.0 – 24.2), a 1.4 (95% CI=1.02 – 2.00) times greater likelihood of subsequent opioid use, and higher Log10 HIV RNA (p? .016) over time. In-treatment cocaine use was associated with a 1.4 (95% CI=1.01–2.00) times greater likelihood of concurrent opioid use. CONCLUSIONS Given cocaine use negatively impacts opioid and HIV treatment outcomes, interventions to address cocaine use in HIV-infected patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone treatment are warranted. PMID:21317595

  10. The treatment gap in mental health care.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2004-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

  11. Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a user’s drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for “self-medication” purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among young drug users is not a widespread problem in Sweden. Harm-reduction measures should target drug users with more severe problems, among whom illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common and pose a medical risk. Illicit use of other prescription drugs, which are less controlled and more widely used by young people, is an important issue for further research. PMID:24139199

  12. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Adams, Clive E; Rushforth, Bruno J; Harrison, Wendy; Bound, Nicole; Hart, Roger; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2011-01-01

    Background Many opiate users require prescribed medication to help them achieve abstinence, commonly taking the form of a detoxification regime. In UK prisons, drug users are nearly universally treated for their opiate use by primary care clinicians, and once released access GP services where 40% of practices now treat drug users. There is a paucity of evidence evaluating methadone and buprenorphine (the two most commonly prescribed agents in the UK) for opiate detoxification. Aim To evaluate whether buprenorphine or methadone help to achieve drug abstinence at completion of a reducing regimen for heroin users presenting to UK prison health care for detoxification. Design Open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial in three prison primary healthcare departments in the north of England. Method Prisoners (n = 306) using illicit opiates were recruited and given daily sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone, in the context of routine care, over a standard reduced regimen of not more than 20 days. The primary outcome measure was abstinence from illicit opiates at 8 days post detoxification, as indicated by urine test (self-report/clinical notes where urine sample was not feasible). Secondary outcomes were also recorded. Results Abstinence was ascertained for 73.7% at 8 days post detoxification (urine sample = 52.6%, self report = 15.2%, clinical notes = 5.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of achieving abstinence between methadone and buprenorphine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 3.51; P = 0.163). Abstinence was associated solely with whether or not the participant was still in prison at that time (15.22 times the odds; 95% CI = 4.19 to 55.28). The strongest association for lasting abstinence was abstinence at an earlier time point. Conclusion There is equal clinical effectiveness between methadone and buprenorphine in achieving abstinence from opiates at 8 days post detoxification within prison. PMID:22137413

  13. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships of transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl in experimental human pain models.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Trine; Upton, Richard N; Foster, David J R; Christrup, Lona L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling can be used to characterize the relationship between dose regimen of opioids, plasma concentration and effect of opioids, which in turn can lead to more rational treatment regimens of pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration-effect relationship for transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl in experimentally induced pain. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were randomized to receive transdermal patches with fentanyl (25 ?g/hr, 72 hr), buprenorphine (20 ?g/hr, 144 hr) or placebo. The experimental pain tests were pressure at the tibial bone, cutaneous thermal stimulation, cold pressor test (conditioning stimulus (3 ± 0.3°C cold water), nerve growth factor-induced muscle soreness and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. Experiments were carried out at baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 144 hr after application of patches. Time-course of placebo was described first and was afterwards added to the description of the time-courses of buprenorphine and fentanyl. This was either described by zero (no drug effect), linear or E(max) model concentration-effect relationships. Time-dependent changes in pain measures in the placebo arm were described by linear or quadratic functions. The time-course of fentanyl and buprenorphine plasma concentrations was complex but could be represented by cubic spline interpolation in the models. Buprenorphine significantly attenuated bone-associated pain, heat pain, nerve growth factor-induced soreness and cold pressor pain. Fentanyl significantly attenuated cold pressor pain for the administered dose regimens. Although the PK/PD relationship for both drugs could be described with similar models, tissue-differentiated analgesic effects between buprenorphine and fentanyl was shown. PMID:21138531

  14. The Reinforcing and Subjective Effects of Intravenous and Intranasal Buprenorphine in Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

  15. Parenteral buprenorphine-naloxone abuse is a major cause of fatal buprenorphine-related poisoning.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Heikman, Pertti; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-10

    Buprenorphine (BPN) medication for opioid maintenance treatment in Finland consists predominantly of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX). Both BPN and BNX are associated with diversion, abuse and non-medically supervised use worldwide. Our purpose was to estimate the proportion of BNX to all BPN-related fatalities. The material consisted of 225 deceased drug abusers in Finland from January 2010 to June 2011 with a positive BPN and/or norbuprenorphine (NOR) and/or naloxone (NX) finding in urine. The data were divided into three groups based on the urine NX and BPN concentrations. The "Parenteral BNX" group (>100 ?g/l NX) was presumed to consist of injecting or snorting BNX abusers and the "Parenteral BPN" group (>50 ?g/l BPN, 0 ?g/l NX) of injecting or snorting BPN abusers, while the "Other BNX or BPN" group (?100 ?g/l NX, or ?50 ?g/l BPN combined with 0 ?g/l NX) was presumed to consist of mainly sublingual BNX or BPN users. In 12.4% of cases the NX urine concentration was higher than the threshold 100 ?g/l. In fatal BPN poisonings, the proportion of parenteral BNX was 28.4%. In the "Parenteral BNX", "Parenteral BPN" and "Other BNX or BPN" groups, the proportion of fatal BPN poisonings was 67.9, 31.0 and 22.6%, respectively. BNX abuse can be fatal. Among the 225 BPN-related fatalities, parenteral abuse of BNX was shown to be common (12.4%) and BNX poisoning was the underlying cause of death in 8.4%. Parenteral BNX caused fatal BPN poisoning proportionally more often than parenteral BPN. PMID:24053859

  16. Inpatient initiation of buprenorphine maintenance vs. detoxification: can retention of opioid-dependent patients in outpatient counseling be improved?

    PubMed

    Caldiero, Ryan M; Parran, Theodore V; Adelman, Christopher L; Piche, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone is an office-based opioid agonist released in 2003 in the United States for the maintenance of heroin- and other opioid-dependent patients. Concern has been raised that the medication will distract or otherwise inhibit patients from participating in a holistic recovery program or abstinence-based counseling. Using a retrospective chart review, the first thirty opioid-dependent patients induced on buprenorphine maintenance therapy in an inpatient detoxification unit were compared to thirty age- and gender-matched patients who underwent detoxification (with a tramadol taper) and referral to intensive outpatient treatment. The clinical outcomes were a comparison of completion rates for an intensive outpatient program (IOP) and retention in treatment after twelve weeks of aftercare therapy. Patients induced on buprenorphine maintenance over three days had similar relief of withdrawal symptoms to patients detoxified from opioids over five days with tramadol. Patients maintained on buprenorphine had a markedly increased initiation of IOP and remained in outpatient treatment longer than patients who were detoxified (8.5 wks vs. 0.4 wks, p < 0.001). This study indicates that induction and maintenance on buprenorphine may be more effective than detoxification for engaging and retaining patients in abstinence-based comprehensive outpatient addiction treatment. PMID:16449087

  17. Managing processes of inpatient care and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to establish a knowledge bank for the development of overall hospital processes. Description and analysis are used to show how process managers experience their situation and the various possibilities it offers for active management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative and explorative design with open-ended interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals was used. Transcribed interviews were analysed by means of latent content analysis. Findings - The two main categories emerging from the analysis were characteristics of process leadership and prerequisites of process management. Quality, relational and knowledge dimensions, and structure, time and information dimensions emerged as their respective sub-categories. The overall theme describes the interdependence between leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for effective process management. Research limitations/implications - No generalizations could be made from the results of the qualitative interview studies but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which in turn can be transferred to similar settings. Originality/value - This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for active process management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals, a subject that has not been investigated earlier. PMID:26556166

  18. Endocrine and behavioural effects of transdermal buprenorphine in pain-suffering women of different reproductive ages.

    PubMed

    Aurilio, Caterina; Ceccarelli, Ilaria; Pota, Vincenzo; Sansone, Pasquale; Massafra, Cosimo; Barbarisi, Manlio; Pace, Maria Caterina; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Bravi, Fabio; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common problem in clinical practice and women are affected more often than men. Morphine is often used for long-term pain relief, but it induces side effects including endocrine alterations. The aim of the present study was to assess the behavioural and hormonal effects of transdermal buprenorphine in women suffering from persistent non-malignant pain. Hormones (LH, FSH, total and free testosterone, estradiol, cortisol) and pain measures (visual analogue scale, McGill Pain questionnaire, present pain intensity test) were evaluated at baseline and after 1, 3 and 6 months. Subjects were recruited in the Second University of Naples Pain Research Centre. Eighteen chronic pain women were included in the study, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups. A transdermal buprenorphine patch (Buprenorphine TDS, 35 µg/h) was administered every 72 h. As expected, buprenorphine administration led to a decrease in pain intensity and no side effects suggestive of hypogonadism were recorded. Pain measures decreased at the first control visit (T1) in both groups. Total and free testosterone were not reduced by treatment (they tended to increase in both groups) while cortisol progressively recovered from the quite low levels detected at the beginning of treatment. These data confirm that buprenorphine is a safe and effective drug for pain relief in women. It is free from the adverse effects on gonadal hormones frequently associated with other opioid treatments. The lack of opioid-induced effects on gonadal hormones (i.e., hypogonadism) is important to guarantee safe long-term pain treatment. PMID:21937837

  19. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    PubMed Central

    Poloméni, Pierre; Schwan, Raymund

    2014-01-01

    The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000–360,000 “problem drug users” being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as generics of buprenorphine, methadone capsule, and Suboxone. Thus, an update seems necessary. This paper provides a description of opioid addiction management objectives and treatment modalities for general practitioners, based on currently available knowledge. PMID:24623988

  20. Patient Perspectives Associated with Intended Duration of Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Barth, Kelly S; Back, Sudie E; Aronson, Garrett; Book, Sarah W

    2015-09-01

    Patients with opioid use disorders frequently discontinue opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) prematurely, reducing retention and possibly limiting the efficacy of OMT. The current study is a cross-sectional survey of patients (N=69) enrolled in buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT). We examined patient demographics, BMT characteristics (e.g., dose, time in BMT), and patient perspectives regarding intended duration of BMT. In addition, patients' reasons for continuing or discontinuing BMT were investigated. Results revealed that the majority (82%) of participants reported wanting to continue BMT for at least 12months. Age at first drug use, time in BMT, concern about pain, and concern about relapse were all positively associated with intended duration of BMT. The following were negatively associated with intended duration of BMT: recent discussion with a treatment provider about BMT discontinuation, prior attempt to discontinue BMT, concern about withdrawal symptoms, experiencing pleasurable effects from taking buprenorphine, and perceived conflicts of BMT with life, work, or school obligations. The most common reasons for wanting to continue BMT included concerns about withdrawal symptoms, relapse, and pain. Although preliminary, the findings highlight key issues with regard to patients' perspectives of BMT. The results of this study provide information that may be useful in improving OMT programs and treatment outcomes. PMID:25899872

  1. Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care: The Model of Care Thirty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trunzo, Annette C.; Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Strickler, Amy; Doncaster, James

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, trends in children's mental health have moved care from residential and office-based treatment to community-based interventions. The Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care (PRTFC) program was developed in 1981 in response to these trends. Currently, Pressley Ridge provides PR-TFC treatment in 15 programs in six states and the…

  2. Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine–Dexmedetomidine with and without Buprenorphine on Corticoadrenal Function in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    González-Gil, Alfredo; Villa, Alberto; Millán, Pilar; Martínez-Fernández, Leticia; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics may influence adrenal function and consequently alter serum glucocorticoid concentrations, leading to erroneous interpretations of results from anesthetized rabbits. However, decreases in glucocorticoid concentrations may be advantageous in protocols designed to minimize the stress response to surgery. This study characterized the variations in adrenocortical function based on changes in corticosterone and cortisol levels after various doses and combinations of dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and buprenorphine. Each rabbit received all treatments with a minimal interexperiment interval of 10 d. Rabbits were allocated to 7 groups (n = 10 per group) and received either 1 mL saline solution; dexmedetomidine at 0.05, 0.15, or 0.25 mg/kg; ketamine (35 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (0.25 mg/kg) without or with buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg); or ketamine (35 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg). Blood was sampled before drug administration and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min and 24 h afterward. Serum glucocorticoid levels fell in all treatment groups except the one receiving ketamine–dexmedetomidine; in that group, serum glucocorticoids increased. Rabbits that received ketamine–dexmedetomidine–buprenorphine had the lowest serum glucocorticoid levels overall. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine reduces glucocorticoid secretion in rabbits but, when combined with ketamine, increases corticosterone and cortisol levels as well as heart and respiratory rates. The addition of buprenorphine to the ketamine–dexmedetomidine mixture reduces serum glucocorticoid levels. The influence of anesthetic drugs should be considered when designing a protocol to minimize the glucocorticoid response to surgery or when measuring glucocorticoid levels in rabbits. PMID:26045456

  3. Effects of Multimodal Analgesia with Low-Dose Buprenorphine and Meloxicam on Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolites after Surgery in New Zealand White Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschlager, Gregg B; Gillespie, Virginia L; Palme, Rupert; Baxter, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of rabbits as companion animals and models for biomedical research, rabbits have not been extensively studied to identify an efficacious postsurgical analgesic that does not cause systemic complications. The synergy of NSAID and systemic opioids is well-documented, and their combined use reduces the amount of either drug required for adequate analgesia. We measured fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in rabbits after a minimally invasive vascular cut-down procedure. Rabbits received buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d), meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg SC every 24 h for 3 d), buprenorphine–meloxicam (0.01 mg/kg–0.1 mg/kg SC every 24 h for 3 d), or a single dose of 0.5% bupivacaine (0.5 mL) infused locally at the incision site. By day 3 after surgery, buprenorphine, meloxicam, and bupivacaine groups showed elevated FCM levels, which continued to rise until day 7 and then gradually returned to baseline by day 28. In the buprenorphine–meloxicam group, FCM was relatively unchanged until day 3, when treatment was discontinued, and then began to rise. Rabbits in the buprenorphine–meloxicam group gained more weight over the 28-d study than did those in the other 3 treatment groups. This study shows that in rabbits low-dose buprenorphine administered with meloxicam effectively mitigates the FCM response that develops after surgery without the adverse effects associated with higher doses. PMID:24041213

  4. Prenatal buprenorphine exposure decreases neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Chih-Jen; Shen, Ching-Hui; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-02-10

    Perinatal opioid exposure has a negative effect on neurogenesis and produces neurological consequences. However, its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed opioid agonist/antagonist, is an alternative medication for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of decreased neurogenesis and depression-like consequences following prenatal exposure to buprenorphine and sheds light on mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days and a cultured neurosphere model. Results of forced swimming test and tail suspension test showed that pups at postnatal day 21 had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by reduction of neuronal composition, biochemical parameters of neural stem/progenitor cells, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B phosphorylation, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation. Results of parallel cell studies further demonstrated a negative impact of buprenorphine on cultured neurospheres, including proliferation, differentiation, BDNF expression and signaling, and PKA activity. Taken together, our results suggest that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine might result in depression-like phenotypes associated with impaired BDNF action and decreased neurogenesis in the developing brain of weanlings. PMID:24321744

  5. A non-rewarding, non-aversive buprenorphine/naltrexone combination attenuates drug-primed reinstatement to cocaine and morphine in rats in a conditioned place preference paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cordery, Sarah F; Taverner, Alistair; Ridzwan, Irna E; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P

    2014-07-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin is a major public health issue with no effective relapse prevention treatment currently available. To this purpose, a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone, a mixed very-low efficacy mu-opioid receptor agonist/kappa-opioid receptor antagonist/nociceptin receptor agonist, was investigated. The tail-withdrawal and the conditioned place preference (CPP) assays in adult Sprague Dawley rats were used to show that naltrexone dose-dependently blocked the mu-opioid receptor agonism of buprenorphine. Furthermore, in the CPP assay, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 3.0?mg/kg naltrexone was aversive. A combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone was neither rewarding nor aversive, but still possessed mu-opioid receptor antagonist properties. In the CPP extinction and reinstatement method, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone completely blocked drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 3?mg/kg cocaine, drug prime was 3?mg/kg cocaine) and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement in morphine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 5?mg/kg morphine, drug prime was 1.25?mg/kg morphine). These data add to the growing evidence that a buprenorphine/naltrexone combination may be protective against relapse in a polydrug abuse situation. PMID:23240906

  6. The effects of the opioid pharmacotherapies methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine, alone and in combination with alcohol, on simulated driving.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Michael G; Dietze, Paul; Rumbold, Greg R; Redman, Jennifer R; Triggs, Thomas J

    2003-12-11

    While methadone is currently the primary pharmacotherapy used in the treatment of heroin dependence in Australia, levo-alpha-acetyl-methodol (LAAM) and buprenorphine are new pharmacotherapies that are being examined as alternatives to methadone maintenance treatment. The aim of this research is to consider the effects of the methadone, buprenorphine and LAAM, as used in maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin dependence, upon simulated driving. Clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment programs for 3 months, and a control group of non-drug-using participants, took part in this study which involved operating a driving simulator over a 75 min period. All participants attended one session without alcohol and one session with alcohol at around the 0.05% blood alcohol level. Simulated driving skill was measured through standard deviations of lateral position, speed and steering wheel angle, and reaction time to a subsidiary task was also measured. While alcohol impaired all measures of driving performance, there were no differences in driving skills across the four participant groups. These findings suggest that typical community standards around driving safety should be applied to clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment. The findings are important in terms of the widespread implementation of these treatment options in Victoria given that a large proportion of pharmacotherapy clients drive. PMID:14643944

  7. Quantitation of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine Glucuronide, Norbuprenorphine Glucuronide, and Naloxone in Urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Some formulations of buprenorphine also contain naloxone to discourage misuse. The major metabolite of buprenorphine is norbuprenorphine. Both compounds are pharmacologically active and both are extensively metabolized to their glucuronide conjugates, which are also active metabolites. Direct quantitation of the glucuronide conjugates in conjunction with free buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone in urine can distinguish compliance with prescribed therapy from specimen adulteration intended to mimic compliance with prescribed buprenorphine.This chapter quantitates buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, their glucuronide conjugates and naloxone directly in urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine is pretreated with formic acid and undergoes solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26660175

  8. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of intranasal crushed buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone tablets in opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, L.S.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Lofwall, M.R.; Moody, D.E.; Walsh, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Sublingual buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are efficacious opioid dependence pharmacotherapies, but there are reports of their diversion and misuse by the intranasal route. The study objectives were to characterize and compare their intranasal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Setting An in-patient research unit at the University of Kentucky. Participants Healthy adults (n=10) abusing, but not physically dependent on, intranasal opioids. Measurements Six sessions (72 hours apart) tested five intranasal doses [0/0, crushed buprenorphine (2, 8 mg), crushed buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 mg)] and one intravenous dose (0.8 mg buprenorphine/0.2 mg naloxone for bioavailability assessment). Plasma samples, physiological, subject- and observer-rated measures were collected before and for up to 72 hours after drug administration. Findings Both formulations produced time- and dose-dependent increases on subjective and physiological mu-opioid agonist effects (e.g. ‘liking’, miosis). Subjects reported higher subjective ratings and street values for 8 mg compared to 8/2 mg, but these differences were not statistically significant. No significant formulation differences in peak plasma buprenorphine concentration or time-course were observed. Buprenorphine bioavailability was 38–44% and Tmax was 35–40 minutes after all intranasal doses. Naloxone bioavailability was 24% and 30% following 2/0.5 and 8/2 mg, respectively. Conclusions It is difficult to determine if observed differences in abuse potential between intranasal buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are clinically relevant at the doses tested. Greater bioavailability and faster onset of pharmacodynamic effects compared to sublingual administration suggests a motivation for intranasal misuse in non-dependent opioid abusers. However, significant naloxone absorption from intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone administration may deter the likelihood of intranasal misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, but not buprenorphine, in opioid-dependent individuals. PMID:21395892

  9. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for those with congenital heart defects Recommendations for heart health If you are a parent caring for a ... you and supports you in your pursuit of heart health. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • ...

  10. Protein Innovations Advance Drug Treatments, Skin Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Dan Carter carefully layered the sheets of tracing paper on the light box. On each sheet were renderings of the atomic components of an essential human protein, one whose structure had long been a mystery. With each layer Carter laid down, a never-before-seen image became clearer. Carter joined NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in 1985 and began exploring processes of protein crystal growth in space. By bouncing intense X-rays off the crystals, researchers can determine the electron densities around the thousands of atoms forming the protein molecules, unveiling their atomic structures. Cultivating crystals of sufficient quality on Earth was problematic; the microgravity conditions of space were far more accommodating. At the time, only a few hundred protein structures had been mapped, and the methods were time consuming and tedious. Carter hoped his work would help reveal the structure of human serum albumin, a major protein in the human circulatory system responsible for ferrying numerous small molecules in the blood. More was at stake than scientific curiosity. Albumin has a high affinity for most of the world s pharmaceuticals, Carter explains, and its interaction with drugs can change their safety and efficacy. When a medication enters the bloodstream a cancer chemotherapy drug, for example a majority of it can bind with albumin, leaving only a small percentage active for treatment. How a drug interacts with albumin can influence considerations like the necessary effective dosage, playing a significant role in the design and application of therapeutic measures. In spite of numerous difficulties, including having no access to microgravity following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the image Carter had hoped to see was finally clarifying. In 1988, his lab had acquired specialized X-ray and detection equipment a tipping point. Carter and his colleagues began to piece together albumin s portrait, the formation of its electron densities coalescing on the sheets of tracing paper he arranged on the light box. While space-grown crystals were ultimately not involved in the achievement, a year later, Carter says, we were on the cover of Science magazine, having determined the atomic structure of albumin.

  11. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Cerimele, Joseph M.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Saxon, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared to the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques in implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider in treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  12. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past ... Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and joint flexibility, and enhances your balance. Take part in ...

  13. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS...COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance....

  14. Efficacy and safety of transdermal buprenorphine: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 289 patients with severe cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Philippe; Denier, Willy; Douma, Joep; Hoerauf, Klaus; Samija, Mirko; Sopata, Maciej; Wolfram, Gernot

    2008-08-01

    Strong opioids are recommended for treating severe cancer pain in the advanced stages of the disease. Few data are available concerning the efficacy of buprenorphine in cancer pain. We compared transdermal buprenorphine 70 microg/h (BUP TDS) to placebo in an enriched design study. Opioid-tolerant patients with cancer pain requiring strong opioids in the dose range of 90-150 mg/d oral morphine equivalents entered a two-week run-in phase, during which they were converted to BUP TDS. Patients who could be stabilized on BUP TDS were randomized to BUP TDS or placebo patch for a two-week maintenance phase. Rescue medication (buprenorphine sublingual tablets 0.2mg) was allowed as required. Response was defined as a mean pain intensity of <5 (0-10 scale) and a mean daily buprenorphine sublingual tablet intake of < or =2 tablets during the maintenance phase. Of 289 patients who entered the run-in phase, 100 discontinued treatment due to lack of efficacy or adverse events; 189 patients continued treatment in the maintenance phase (94 BUP TDS, 95 placebo), of whom 31 discontinued treatment (7 BUP TDS, 24 placebo). A significant difference in the number of treatment responders was observed: 70 BUP TDS (74.5%, 65.7-83.3) vs. 47 placebo (50%, 39.9-60.1) (P=0.0003). This result was supported by a lower daily pain intensity, lower intake of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and fewer dropouts in the BUP TDS group. The incidence of adverse events was slightly higher for BUP TDS. In conclusion, BUP TDS 70 microg/h is an efficacious and safe treatment for patients with severe cancer pain. PMID:18411010

  15. A Randomized, Double-blind Evaluation of Buprenorphine Taper Duration in Primary Prescription Opioid Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Saulsgiver, Kathryn; Patrick, Mollie E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Brooklyn, John R.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although abuse of prescription opioids (POs) is a significant public health problem, few experimental studies have investigated the treatment needs of this growing population. OBJECTIVE To evaluate, following brief stabilization with a combination of buprenorphine hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate, the relative efficacy of 1-, 2-, and 4-week buprenorphine tapering regimens and subsequent naltrexone hydrochloride therapy in PO-dependent outpatients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A double-blind, 12-week randomized clinical trial was conducted in an outpatient research clinic. Following a brief period of buprenorphine stabilization, 70 PO-dependent adults were randomized to receive 1-, 2-, or 4-week tapers followed by naltrexone therapy. INTERVENTION During phase 1 (weeks 1–5 after randomization), participants visited the clinic daily; during phase 2 (weeks 6–12), visits were reduced to thrice weekly. Participants received behavioral therapy and urine toxicology testing throughout the trial. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The percentage of participants negative for illicit opioid use, retention, naltrexone ingestion, and favorable treatment response (ie, retained in treatment, opioid abstinent, and receiving naltrexone at the end of the study). RESULTS Opioid abstinence at the end of phase 1 was greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week taper conditions (P = .02), with 63% (n = 14), 29% (n = 7), and 29% (n = 7) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. Abstinence at the end of phase 2 was also greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week conditions (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 16% (n = 4), and 20% (n = 5) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. There were more treatment responders in the 4-week condition (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 17% (n = 4), and 21% (n = 5) of participants in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week groups considered responders at the end of treatment, respectively. Retention and naltrexone ingestion also were superior in the 4-week vs briefer tapers (both P = .04). Experimental condition (ie, taper duration) was the strongest predictor of treatment response, followed by buprenorphine stabilization dose. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study represents a rigorous experimental evaluation of outpatient buprenorphine stabilization, brief taper, and naltrexone maintenance for treatment of PO dependence. Results suggest that a meaningful subset of PO-dependent outpatients may respond positively to a 4-week taper plus naltrexone maintenance intervention. PMID:24153411

  16. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery. PMID:26550594

  17. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Association of Cancer Online Resources, a cancer information system that offers access to electronic mailing lists and websites, provides a list of long-term follow-up care clinics on its Ped-Onc ... medical information should patients keep? It is important for people ...

  18. Treatment of Neurocritical Care Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sangini S; Sheth, Kevin N

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Neurologic emergencies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In part because the patient population is young, the nihilistic approach that often accompanies neurologically devastating disorders in other contexts is largely absent. A number of studies have demonstrated improved patient outcomes in the setting of aggressive care delivered by neurointensivists in a specialty-specific environment. It stands to reason that young, pregnant women who suffer from neurologically devastating disorders and who have a wide range of prognosis may also benefit from such specialized care. Close collaboration between obstetricians and neurointensivists is critical in this context. A number of unique considerations in diagnosis and management present dilemmas in the context of pregnancy, such as radiation dose from diagnostic neuroimaging, choice of pharmacotherapy for seizures, anticoagulation, and the method of delivery in the context of cerebral mass lesions and elevated intracranial pressure. Patients and their physicians are often faced with the additional challenge of balancing the relative risks and benefits of the impact of a management approach on both mother and fetus. In general, this balance tends to favor the interests of the mother, but the impact on the fetus becomes more relevant over the course of the pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. A low threshold for admission to an intensive care unit (ideally one that specializes in neurointensive care) should be used for pregnant patients. Because of the limited information regarding long-term outcomes in this population, rigid prognosis formation and early care limitations should be deferred in the immediate period. After the patient is stabilized and a plan has been charted for the remainder of the pregnancy, every effort should be made to engage patients in aggressive, urgent neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:22298283

  19. Indicators of Buprenorphine and Methadone Use and Abuse: What Do We Know?

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of prescription opioids is a growing problem. The number of methadone pain pills distributed now exceeds liquid methadone used in opioid treatment, and the increases in buprenorphine indicators provide evidence of the need to monitor and intervene to decrease the abuse of this drug. The need for additional and improved data to track trends is discussed, along with findings as to the characteristics of the users and combinations of drugs. Data on toxicities related to methadone or buprenorphine, particularly in combination with other prescribed drugs, are presented and clinical implications and considerations are offered. These findings underscore the need for physicians to be aware of potential toxicities and to educate their patients regarding these issues. PMID:20132124

  20. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine-Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, R.; Luo, W.-L.; Wastall, P.; Kandoussi, H.; DeMicco, M.; Bruce, R. D.; Hwang, C.; Bertz, R.; Bifano, M.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC?) or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUC? for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUC? was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized Cmax for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  1. Uptake of Depression Treatment Recommendations among Latino Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Rachel Zack; Cardemil, Esteban V.; Alegría, Margarita; Schuman, Catherine C.; Joseph, Robert C.; Bauer, Amy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care providers (PCP) are the entry point for public sector depression treatment for many Latino patients. However, many Latino patients do not initiate their PCPs’ recommended treatment, which likely contributes to ethnic disparities in depression treatment. This study examined factors related to Latino patients’ uptake of their PCPs’ recommendations for depression treatment. Method Ninety Latino primary care patients who received a depression treatment recommendation from their PCP participated in a telephone interview. Patients rated their working alliance with their PCPs and their PCPs’ cultural competence. They also reported their treatment preference, the type of recommendation, and their intended and actual uptake of the recommendation. Patients were contacted at two time points (Time 1: M = 14 days after PCP appointment; Time 2: M = 84 days after PCP appointment) to report their uptake status. Results At Time 1, 23% of patients had initiated uptake of the treatment recommendation, increasing to 53% at Time 2. Patients who received a medication recommendation were more likely to have followed though on the recommendation, compared to patients who received a psychotherapy recommendation. The working alliance was positively associated with intention to follow up on a treatment recommendation, and also mediated the relationship between cultural competence and intention of following up on the recommendation. Conclusion PCP’s treatment recommendation and the PCP – patient alliance play a role in Latino primary care patients intention to follow a treatment recommendation for depression. An improved understanding of this role could enhance efforts to improve depression treatment uptake. PMID:24512538

  2. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  3. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  4. PATIENT VALUATION OF PRIMARY CARE-BASED TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SUBSTANCE USE AND MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Andrew J.; Barry, Colleen L.; Fiellin, David A.; Busch, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals with substance use and mental health disorders do not receive treatment. If treatment options were more attractive, treatment rates might increase. Although the advantages of novel approaches, including primary care-based treatment and collaborative care in a primary care setting, have been documented, less is known about consumers’ valuation of these options. Contingent valuation methods were used to assess monetary valuation of these treatment types relative to usual care in specialty treatment using a national randomized experiment. Participants valued a primary care-based treatment visit over usual care by $9.00 and a collaborative care visit over usual care by $5.85. PMID:25930049

  5. Atipamezole Reverses Ketamine–Dexmedetomidine Anesthesia without Altering the Antinociceptive Effects of Butorphanol and Buprenorphine in Female C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izer, Jenelle M; Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    2014-01-01

    Butorphanol and buprenorphine are common analgesics used in laboratory mice. Inadvertent attenuation of the antinociceptive effects of these analgesics via the administration of an anesthetic reversal agent could result in postprocedural pain and distress, with subsequent negative effects on animal welfare, study outcomes, and regulatory compliance. This study was undertaken to determine whether atipamezole reverses ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia and alters the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. Atipamezole reliably reversed the anesthetic effects of ketamine–dexmedetomidine, and mice were ambulatory 17.4 ± 30.6 min after administration of the ?2-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Atipamezole alone had no significant effect on tail-flick latency and did not alter the antinociceptive properties of butorphanol or low-dose (0.05 mg/kg) or high-dose (0.1 mg/kg) buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. After reversal of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia, tail-flick latency at 30, 60, and 150 min after analgesic treatment differed significantly between mice treated with atipamezole alone and those given atipamezole followed by butorphanol or high-dose buprenorphine. These results suggest that the analgesic effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine are not affected by atipamezole. Buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg) administered 30 min prior to or at the time of anesthesia resulted in a greater magnitude of antinociception after antagonism of anesthesia than when given at the time of reversal. Given these results, we recommend the use of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia with buprenorphine administered either preemptively or at the time of anesthetic induction to provide a defined period of surgical anesthesia that is effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:25650975

  6. Barriers to HIV Care and Treatment Among Participants in a Public Health HIV Care Relinkage Program.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Simoni, Jane M; Katz, David A; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-05-01

    Improving patient retention in HIV care and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are key steps to improving the HIV care continuum in the US. However, contemporary quantitative data on barriers to care and treatment from population-based samples of persons poorly engaged in care are sparse. We analyzed the prevalence of barriers to clinic visits, ART initiation, and ART continuation reported by 247 participants in a public health HIV care relinkage program in King County, WA. We identified participants using HIV surveillance data (N=188) and referrals from HIV/STD clinics and partner services (N=59). Participants most commonly reported insurance (50%), practical (26-34%), and financial (30%) barriers to care, despite residing in a state with essentially universal access to HIV care. Perceived lack of need for medical care was uncommon (<20%), but many participants (58%) endorsed a perceived lack of need for medication as a reason for not initiating ART. Depression and substance abuse were both highly prevalent (69% and 54%, respectively), and methamphetamine was the most commonly abused substance. Barriers to HIV care and treatment may be amenable to intervention by health department outreach in coordination with existing HIV medical and support services. PMID:25826007

  7. The use of high dosages of transdermal buprenorphine for pain management in palliative cancer patients: a case study.

    PubMed

    M J Clement, Paul; Beuselinck, Benoit; Van Beek, Karen; Georgette Mertens, P; Cornelissen, Paul; Menten, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a prevalent condition in patients with cancer, particularly in advanced stages of cancer. Although strong opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain management protocols, patients are often undertreated. Transdermal buprenorphine is currently available for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain and severe pain which does not respond to nonopioid analgesics; patch doses of 35, 52.5 and 70 µg/h are available (applied for up to 96 h), with no more than 2 transdermal patches at the same time, regardless of the strength. To date, there are no published reports in the literature of the use of high-dose transdermal buprenorphine (>140 µg/h). Herein, we present 2 cases of palliative cancer patients who received transdermal buprenorphine at doses titrated up to 210 and 175 µg/h, respectively, for the management of pain. Transdermal buprenorphine titrated to doses >140 µg/h provided adequate pain control and was well tolerated. Future studies to confirm these initial observations are warranted. PMID:23626556

  8. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Endocrine Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Recent trends in prostate cancer survival illustrate that mortality from prostate cancer is declining. While some of this decline can be attributed to PSA screening, the survival patterns do not fully support PSA as the only reason for the trend. Initial management of localized or regional prostate cancer usually involves surgical excision, radiation therapy or watchful waiting. Although hormonal therapy is also available, this treatment is mostly used only after a recurrence is detected.

  9. The effects of maternally administered methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone on offspring: review of human and animal data.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; Dunlop, S A; Tait, R J; Hulse, G K

    2008-06-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current "gold standard", and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a micro-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial micro-opioid receptor agonist and a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  10. The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data

    PubMed Central

    Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

    2008-01-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current “gold standard”, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a ?-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  11. Treatment retention and care transitions during and after the scale-up of HIV care and treatment in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Jan; Whetten, Kathryn; Reddy, Elizabeth; Pence, Brian; Weinhold, Andrew; Itemba, Dafrosa; Maro, Venance; Mosille, Eligy; Thielman, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Decentralization of HIV care is promoted to improve access to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes care transitions among HIV-infected persons in Northern Tanzania during a period of rapid decentralization of HIV care and treatment centers (CTCs) from hospitals to local health centers. Between November 2008 and June 2009, 492 HIV-infected patients in established care at two referral hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania, and 262 persons newly diagnosed with HIV were selected for participation in a prospective cohort study entitled Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania. Clinical records and participant self-reports, collected between June and November 2012, were used to describe retention in care and transitions between CTCs during the study period. After a mean follow-up period of 3.5 years, 10% of participants had died, 9% were lost to follow-up, and 11% had moved. Of the remaining participants enrolled from CTCs, more than 90% reported at least one CTC visit during the previous six months, with 98% still in care at the CTC at which they were enrolled. Nearly three out of four newly diagnosed clients listed a referral hospital as their primary CTC. Fewer than 10% of participants ever sought care at another CTC in the study area; nearly 90% of those in care bypassed their closest CTC. Administrative data from all facilities in the study area indicate that new clients, even after the scale-up from 8 CTCs in 2006 to 21 CTCs in 2008, disproportionately selected established CTCs, and client volume at newly approved facilities was highly variable. Despite the decentralization of HIV care and treatment in this setting, many patients continue to bypass their closest CTC to seek care at established facilities. Patient preferences for decentralized HIV care, which may inform optimal resource utilization, are largely unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:24517083

  12. Stepped care treatment for depression and anxiety in primary care. a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in general practice but not always treated adequately. Introducing stepped care might improve this. In this randomized trial we examined the effectiveness of such a stepped care model. Methods The study population consisted of primary care attendees aged 18-65 years with minor or major DSM-IV depressive and/or anxiety disorders, recruited through screening. We randomized 120 patients to either stepped care or care as usual. The stepped care program consisted of (1) watchful waiting, (2) guided self-help, (3) short face-to-face Problem Solving Treatment and (4) pharmacotherapy and/or specialized mental health care. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Results Symptoms of depression and anxiety decreased significantly over time for both groups. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (IDS: P = 0.35 and HADS: P = 0.64). The largest, but not significant, effect (d = -0.21) was found for anxiety on T3. In both groups approximately 48% of the patients were recovered from their DSM-IV diagnosis at the final 6 months assessment. Conclusions In summary we could not demonstrate that stepped care for depression and anxiety in general practice was more effective than care as usual. Possible reasons are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610. PMID:21736720

  13. Differences in Treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis by Ambulatory Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Pearson, William S; Gift, Thomas L; Leichliter, Jami S; Jenkins, Wiley D

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the US and timely, correct treatment can reduce CT transmission and sequelae. Emergency departments (ED) are an important location for diagnosing STIs. This study compared recommended treatment of CT in EDs to treatment in physician offices. Five years of data (2006-2010) were analyzed from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (NHAMCS), including the Outpatient survey (NHAMCS-OPD) and Emergency Department survey (NHAMCS-ED). All visits with a CT diagnosis and those with a diagnosis of unspecified venereal disease were selected for analysis. Differences in receipt of recommended treatments were compared between visits to physician offices and emergency departments using Chi square tests and logistic regression models. During the 5 year period, approximately 3.2 million ambulatory care visits had diagnosed CT or an unspecified venereal disease. A greater proportion of visits to EDs received the recommended treatment for CT compared to visits to physician offices (66.1 vs. 44.9 %, p < .01). When controlling for patients' age, sex and race/ethnicity, those presenting to the ED with CT were more likely to receive the recommended antibiotic treatment than patients presenting to a physician's office (OR 2.16; 95 % CI 1.04-4.48). This effect was attenuated when further controlling for patients' expected source of payment. These analyses demonstrate differences in the treatment of CT by ambulatory care setting as well as opportunities for increasing use of recommended treatments for diagnosed cases of this important STI. PMID:25940936

  14. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services. 21.240 Section 21.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and...

  15. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services. 21.6240 Section 21.6240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical...

  16. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services. 21.6240 Section 21.6240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical...

  17. Developing Self-Care Practices in a Trauma Treatment Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patricia J.; Simmelink-McCleary, Jennifer; Im, Hyojin; Becher, Emily; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of self-care practices of social work students who were part of a larger study of students' experiences in a graduate course on the treatment of trauma. Consensual qualitative research methods were used to analyze 17 participant journals submitted at 4 times during the course. Findings indicated that…

  18. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  19. Psychological Barriers to Tobacco Cessation in Indian Buprenorphine-Naloxone Maintained Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Piyali; Jain, Raka; Jhanjee, Sonali; Sreenivas, V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of smoking in opioid agonist treatment programmes remains high, leading to significant tobacco related health hazards and mortality. This is the first study from India addressing tobacco cessation and related barriers among recipients of buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment. Aims: The purpose of the study was to investigate Indian buprenorphine-naloxone maintained patients’ willingness to quit tobacco use, to determine its possible association with demographic, agonist maintenance treatment, tobacco use related variables and personal health and risk perceptions related to health hazards associated with tobacco use. Settings and Design: The study was cross-sectional, observational. It was conducted in the out-patient department of a national level de-addiction centre in India. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five males on buprenorphine-naloxone treatment were assessed using Tobacco Use Characteristics, Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND and FTND-ST), Readiness to Change questionnaire (RCQ), Smoker's Perceived Health Risk Evaluation (SPHERE), Importance of Intervention scale and a semi-structured questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis Chi-square test, Spearman rank order correlation, paired-t test, ANOVA (STATA 9.2 statistical package). Results: Around 65.4% of the subjects were smokers, 9% were using smokeless tobacco only whereas 25.6% were using both. Mean duration of tobacco use was 20 ± 1.5 years. Only 20% had past quit attempts. Only 24% were in action phase of change. Personal health and risk perceptions were poor and only 61.62% considered intervention tobacco smoking cessation important. Conclusions: Higher severity of nicotine dependence, low perception of harm from tobacco warrant immediate attention and need for on-site treatment opportunity.

  20. [Heroin substitution treatments. Analysis of current solutions, trends, and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Guffens, J M

    2006-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of narcotic addicts (buprenorphin at high concentration or methadone) have different advantages and disadvantages. The author has tried to insist on what can be complementary between both treatments. Two new formulations of buprenorphin at high concentration (Suboxone and Subutex NF) are described and proposed to replace Subutex. PMID:16700146

  1. [Home treatment--a treatment model of integrated care in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Daniel; Ruppelt, Friederike; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Treatment models like "Crisis Resolution and Hometreatment (CRHT)" or "Assertive Community Treatment" (ACT), were found to be effective, enhancing the qualitative level of treatment for patients with severe mental disorders. In Germany, these are implemented only sporadically until today, often as part of a cross-sectoral Integrated Care (IC) treatment system. We will present the implementation of an "Assertive Community Treatment" embedded into an IC-treatment model in Hamburg and discuss the 3-year-outcomes. The IC-treatment model has been designed for severe mentally ill patients with psychotic disorders. Since May 2007 the model is financed by different health insurances as a managed-care "capitation-model" and its effectiveness gets continuously evaluated. The model proved to be effective in earlier studies were compared with standard care low rates of service disengagement were found as well as significantly improved psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, satisfaction with care and adherence, while being cost effective. The rates of involuntary admissions declined to 10% in comparison to the years before. In 2011 the model was specified to the indication "first-episode adolescents and young adults in the age of 12-29" in a government-funded study "Integrated Care in Early Psychosis, ICEP Study". In this study an interdisciplinary team of child, adolescent and adult psychiatrists was implemented and since 2012 it is financed by the involved health insurances throughout an expansion of the §140 SGB V agreement. PMID:25485599

  2. Improving Depression Treatment for Women: Integrating a Collaborative Care Depression Intervention into OB-GYN Care

    PubMed Central

    LaRocco-Cockburn, Anna; Reed, Susan D.; Melville, Jennifer; Croicu, Carmen; Russo, Joan; Inspektor, Michal; Edmondson, Eddie; Katon, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Background Women have higher rates of depression and often experience depression symptoms during critical reproductive periods, including adolescence, pregnancy, postpartum, and menopause. Collaborative care intervention models for mood disorders in patients receiving care in an OB-GYN clinic setting have not been evaluated. Study design and methodology for a randomized, controlled trial of collaborative care depression management versus usual care in OB-GYN clinics and the details of the adapted collaborative care intervention and model implementation are described in this paper. Methods Women over age 18 years with clinically significant symptoms of depression, as measured by a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) score ?10 and a clinical diagnosis of major depression or dysthymia, were randomized to the study intervention or to usual care and were followed for 18 months. The primary outcome assessed was change over time in the SCL-20 depression scale between baseline and 12 months. Baseline Results 205 women were randomized: 57% white, 20% African American, 9% Asian or Pacific Islander, 7% Hispanic, and 6% Native American. Mean age was 39 years. 4.6% were pregnant and 7.5% were within 12 months postpartum. The majority were single, (52%), and 95% had at least the equivalent of a high school diploma. Almost all patients met DSM IV criteria for major depression (99%) and approximately 33% met criteria for dysthymia. Conclusions An OB-GYN collaborative care team including a social worker, psychiatrist and OB-GYN physician who met weekly and used an electronic tracking system for patients were essential elements of the proposed depression care treatment model described here. Further study of models that improve quality of depression care that are adapted to the unique OB-GYN setting are needed. PMID:23939510

  3. Treatment-Resistant Depression in Primary Care Across Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Grima, Etienne; Tan, Mary; Rotzinger, Susan; Lin, Peter; McIntyre, Roger S; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) represents a considerable global health concern. The goal of the InSight study was to investigate the prevalence of TRD and to evaluate its clinical characterization and management, compared with nonresistant depression, in primary care centres. Methods: Physicians completed a case report on a consecutive series of patients with major depressive disorder (n = 1212), which captured patient demographics and comorbidity, as well as current and past medication. Results: Using failure to respond to at least 2 antidepressants (ADs) from different classes as the definition of TRD, the overall prevalence was 21.7%. There were no differences in prevalence between men and women or among ethnicities. Patients with TRD had longer episode duration, were more likely to receive polypharmacy (for example, psychotropic, lipid-lowering, and antiinflammatory agents), and reported more AD related side effects. Higher rates of disability and comorbidity (axes I to III) were associated with treatment resistance. Obesity and being overweight were also associated with treatment resistance. While the selection and sequencing of pharmacotherapy by family physicians in this sample was in line with recommendations from evidence-based treatment guidelines, the wait time to make a change in treatment was 6 to 8 weeks in both groups, which exceeds guideline recommendations. Conclusions: These real-world data demonstrate the high prevalence of TRD in primary care settings, and underscore the substantial burden of illness associated with TRD. PMID:25007419

  4. Treatment of opioid dependence in the setting of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica L; Martin, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence in the setting of pregnancy provides a distinct set of challenges for providers. Treatment plans must take into consideration psychiatric and medical comorbidities while balancing risks and benefits for the maternal-fetal dyad. Treatment is best offered through a comprehensive treatment program designed to effectively deliver opioid agonist maintenance treatment along with psychosocial and obstetric care. As misuse of prescription analgesics increases in the United States, identification of the problem in pregnancy will become more important because this misuse is expected to lead to an increased prevalence of opioid dependence in pregnancy. Buprenorphine as maintenance treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy has promise and may offer some benefits, but more research is needed, especially regarding induction of actively addicted women during pregnancy. For the present, methadone maintenance remains the standard of care for agonist treatment of opioid dependence in pregnancy against which other treatments must be compared. PMID:22640765

  5. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and...

  6. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and...

  7. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and...

  8. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21... Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and...

  9. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services. 21...Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6242 Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services....

  10. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Facility Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

  11. Treatment Matching in the Posthospital Care of Depressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ivan W.; Keitner, Gabor I.; Ryan, Christine E.; Solomon, David A.; Cardemil, Esteban V.; Beevers, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the efficacy of 1) matching patients to treatments and 2) adding additional family therapy or cognitive therapy in a group of recently discharged patients with major depression. Method Patients with major depression were recruited during a psychiatric hospitalization. After discharge, they were randomly assigned to one of four treatment conditions that were either “matched” or “mismatched” to their pattern of cognitive distortion and family impairment. The four treatment conditions were 1) pharmacotherapy alone; 2) combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive therapy; 3) combined pharmacotherapy and family therapy; and 4) combined pharmacotherapy, cognitive therapy, and family therapy. Randomly assigned treatment continued for 24 weeks on an outpatient basis. Results Among patients with at least moderate depressive symptoms at hospital discharge, low rates of remission (16%) and improvement (29%) were obtained. Matched treatment led to a significantly greater proportion of patients who improved and greater reductions over time in interviewer-rated depressive symptoms than mismatched treatment. However, matched treatment did not produce greater change in self-reported depression or interviewer-rated suicidal ideation. Treatment that included a family therapy component also led to a greater proportion of patients who improved and to significant reductions in interviewer-rated depression and suicidal ideation than treatment without family therapy. Conclusions These results suggest that 1) current treatments are not very efficacious in the aftercare of hospitalized depressed patients, 2) treatment matching moderately improves outcome for patients who are symptomatic at hospital discharge, and 3) inclusion of family therapy improves the outcome of posthospital care for depressed patients. PMID:16263854

  12. Morphine and buprenorphine do not alter leukocyte cytokine production capacity, early apoptosis, or neutrophil phagocytic function in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Monibi, Farrah A; Dodam, John R; Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Amorim, Juliana; Zhang, Yan; Tsuruta, Kaoru; Mann, F A; DeClue, Amy E

    2015-04-01

    Opioids have immunomodulatory properties in many species, but there is little information pertaining to these properties in dogs. Our objective was to compare the in vivo effects of morphine, buprenorphine, and control solution on innate immune system function and apoptosis in healthy dogs. Six adult dogs received a 24-hour infusion of morphine, buprenorphine, or control solution (saline) in a randomized, controlled, crossover block design. Leukocyte apoptosis, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were evaluated using flow cytometry. Lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and peptidoglycan-stimulated leukocyte production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were determined using canine specific multiplex assays. No significant treatment effects were detected among groups. These data suggest that healthy dogs could be less sensitive to the immunomodulatory effects of acute opioid administration compared with other species. Larger investigations in healthy and immunologically challenged dogs are recommended prior to application of these results in clinical patients. PMID:25660046

  13. Buprenorphine Response as a Function of Neurogenetic Polymorphic Antecedents: Can Dopamine Genes Affect Clinical Outcomes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)?

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Jacobs, William; McLaughlin, Thomas; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a plethora of research indicating the successful treatment of opioid dependence with either buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone (Suboxone®). However, we encourage caution in long-term maintenance with these drugs, albeit, lack of any other FDA approved opioid maintenance compound to date. Our concern has been supported by severe withdrawal (even with tapering of the dosage of for example Suboxone® which is 40 times more potent than morphine) from low dose of buprenorphine (alone or with naloxone). In addition our findings of a long-term flat affect in chronic Suboxone® patients amongst other unwanted side effects including diversion and suicide attempts provides impetus to reconsider long-term utilization. However, it seems prudent to embrace genetic testing to reveal reward circuitry gene polymorphisms especially those related to dopaminergic pathways as well as opioid receptor(s) as a way of improving treatment outcomes. Understanding the interaction of reward circuitry involvement in buprenorphine effects and respective genotypes provide a novel framework to augment a patient's clinical experience and benefits during opioid replacement therapy. PMID:25664200

  14. Integrated care for pregnant women on methadone maintenance treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ordean, Alice; Kahan, Meldon; Graves, Lisa; Abrahams, Ronald; Boyajian, Talar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the characteristics of a national cohort of pregnant women on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and to provide treatment outcome data for integrated care programs. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Three different integrated care programs in geographically distinct cities: the Toronto Centre for Substance Use in Pregnancy in Toronto, Ont; the Herzl Family Practice Centre in Montreal, Que; and the Sheway clinic in Vancouver, BC. Participants Pregnant women meeting criteria for opioid dependence and attending an integrated care program between 1997 and 2009. Women were excluded if they were on MMT only for chronic pain. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics, concurrent medical and psychiatric disorders, and substance use outcome data. Results A total of 102 opioid-dependent pregnancies were included. The mean age was 29.7 years and 64% of women were white. Women in Montreal were more likely to have partners and had fewer children. Differences in living and housing situations among the sites tended to resolve by the time of delivery. Almost half of this cohort tested positive for hepatitis C. Women had a high prevalence of depression and anxiety across all sites. Half of this cohort was on MMT before conception and for the other half, MMT was initiated at a mean gestational age of 20.7 weeks, resulting in a mean dose of 82.4 mg at delivery. At the first visit, polysubstance use was common. Prescription opioid use was more frequent in Toronto and heroin use was more prevalent in Vancouver and Montreal. For the entire population, significant reductions were found by the time of delivery for illicit (P < .001) and prescription opioids (P = .001), cocaine (P < .001), marijuana (P = .009), and alcohol use (P < .001). Conclusion Despite geographic differences, all 3 integrated care programs have been associated with significant decreases in substance use in pregnant opioid-dependent women. PMID:24130301

  15. [Application of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch in multimorbid patients on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac].

    PubMed

    Böhme, K; Heckes, B; Thomitzek, K

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefit of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain previously receiving long-term treatment with ibuprofen or diclofenac alone. Data of a subgroup of 703 patients were analysed which were part of a multicenter observational study with 3,295 patients. These patients had previously received ibuprofen or diclofenac and were characterized by older age,the presence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risk factors and the existence of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The switch to the seven-day buprenorphine patch resulted in a clinically significant decrease of the mean pain intensity at rest during the day from 5.3 to 2.9, on physical effort during the day from 7.1 to 3.3, and at night from 4.9 to 1.9 at the end of the study (11-point NRS scale, pbuprenorphine due to the lack of cardiac, renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. Constant analgesia, improvement of daily activities and reduction of tablets were reported as important advantages of the seven-day patch. In conclusion, the seven-day buprenorphine patch is a valuable therapeutic option for patients with insufficient analgesia on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac. PMID:21598463

  16. Advanced Diabetes care: three levels of prediction, prevention & personalized treatment.

    PubMed

    Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide epidemic scale of Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been underestimated for a long time. Currently every 10 seconds one patient dies of diabetes-related pathologies. Given the high risk and prevalence of secondary complications as well as individual predisposition to target organ injury, DM is one of the best examples for the application of predictive diagnostics aimed at preventive measures and personalized treatment approaches. Generally there are three levels in desirable pre- and Diabetes care: 1st level: prediction of the predisposition early in childhood. 2nd level: prediction of early/premature aging and prestages of Diabetes. 3rd level: prediction of Diabetes-related complications - cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and cancer diseases frequently developed in Diabetics. Predictive diagnosis is considered as the basis for targeted preventive measures and consequent creation of individualized treatment approaches. Communication among the professionals - healthcare providers, policy-makers, educators, etc., obligatory involved in the overall process to improving (pre)Diabetes care is of paramount importance. PMID:20034368

  17. Truth Telling and Treatment Strategies in End-of-Life Care in Physician-Led Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsien-Liang; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Yao, Chien-An; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Providing patient-centered care from preventive medicine to end-of-life care in order to improve care quality and reduce medical cost is important for accountable care. Physicians in the accountable care organizations (ACOs) are suitable for participating in supportive end-of-life care especially when facing issues in truth telling and treatment strategy. This study aimed to investigate patients’ attitudes toward truth telling and treatment preferences in end-of-life care and compare patients’ attitudes with their ACOs physicians’ perceptions. This nationwide study applied snowball sampling to survey physicians in physician-led ACOs and their contracted patients by questionnaire from August 2010 to July 2011 in Taiwan. The main outcome measures were beliefs about palliative care, attitudes toward truth telling, and treatment preferences. The data of 314 patients (effective response rate?=?88.7%) and 177 physicians (88.5%) were analyzed. Regarding truth telling about disease prognosis, 94.3% of patients preferred to be fully informed, whereas only 80% of their physicians had that perception (P?treatment preferences in terminal illness, nearly 90% of patients preferred supportive care, but only 15.8% of physicians reported that their patients had this preference (P?treatment strategies in end-of-life care. It is important to enhance physician–patient communication about end-of-life care preferences in order to achieve the goal of ACOs. Continuing education on communication about end-of-life care during physicians’ professional development would be helpful in the reform strategies of establishing accountable care around the world. PMID:25906093

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple sublingual buprenorphine tablets in dose-escalation trials.

    PubMed

    Ciraulo, Domenic A; Hitzemann, Robert J; Somoza, Eugene; Knapp, Clifford M; Rotrosen, John; Sarid-Segal, Ofra; Ciraulo, Ann Marie; Greenblatt, David J; Chiang, C Nora

    2006-02-01

    In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties were determined of multiple doses of sublingual tablets containing either buprenorphine alone or buprenorphine and naloxone. Subjects were experienced opiate users who received escalating doses (4-24 mg) of buprenorphine either alone or in combination with naloxone. Peak concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curves (AUCs) increased for both buprenorphine and naloxone with escalating doses. Significant differences were found across the range of doses administered for dose-adjusted Cmax for both tablet formulations and for the dose-adjusted AUCs for the buprenorphine-naloxone tablets. For both formulations, the maximal buprenorphine-induced decreases in respiratory rate and pupil diameter did not vary significantly across doses. Several of the subjective effects of buprenorphine did not increase as the dose of buprenorphine administered was increased. These findings are consistent with the ceiling effect associated with the partial agonist actions of buprenorphine. They also indicate a lack of dose proportionality for buprenorphine sublingual tablets, at least during the times at which levels of this agent are highest. PMID:16432270

  19. Problem-Solving Treatment and Coping Styles in Primary Care for Minor Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Thomas E.; Hegel, Mark T.; Hull, Jay G.; Dietrich, Allen J.

    2008-01-01

    Research was undertaken to compare problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) with usual care for minor depression and to examine whether treatment effectiveness was moderated by coping style. PST-PC is a 6-session, manual-based, psychosocial skills intervention. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 academic, primary care

  20. Effect of Steady-State Faldaprevir on the Pharmacokinetics of Steady-State Methadone and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Subjects Receiving Stable Addiction Management Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, David; Schobelock, Michael J.; Riesenberg, Robert R.; Vince, Bradley D.; Webster, Lynn R.; Adeniji, Abidemi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    The effects of steady-state faldaprevir on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of steady-state methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone were assessed in 34 healthy male and female subjects receiving stable addiction management therapy. Subjects continued receiving a stable oral dose of either methadone (up to a maximum dose of 180 mg per day) or buprenorphine-naloxone (up to a maximum dose of 24 mg-6 mg per day) and also received oral faldaprevir (240 mg) once daily (QD) for 8 days following a 480-mg loading dose. Serial blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. The pharmacodynamics of the opioid maintenance regimens were evaluated by the objective and subjective opioid withdrawal scales. Coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in geometric mean ratios for the steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24,ss), the steady-state maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax,ss), and the steady-state concentration of the drug in plasma at 24 h (C24,ss) of 0.92 to 1.18 for (R)-methadone, (S)-methadone, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone, with 90% confidence intervals including, or very close to including, 1.00 (no effect), suggesting a limited overall effect of faldaprevir. Although individual data showed moderate variability in the exposures between subjects and treatments, there was no evidence of symptoms of opiate overdose or withdrawal either during the coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone or after faldaprevir dosing was stopped. Similar faldaprevir exposures were observed in the methadone- and buprenorphine-naloxone-treated subjects. In conclusion, faldaprevir at 240 mg QD can be coadministered with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone without dose adjustment, although given the relatively narrow therapeutic windows of these agents, monitoring for opiate overdose and withdrawal may still be appropriate. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01637922.) PMID:25385094

  1. Predictors of treatment satisfaction among older adults with anxiety in a primary care psychology program

    PubMed Central

    Hundt, Natalie E.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Porter, Bennett; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are treated in integrated primary care mental health programs. The current study examined predictors of satisfaction with treatment in patients from a randomized clinical trial of late-life generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in primary care. Higher treatment satisfaction was associated with receiving CBT rather than enhanced usual care. Treatment credibility, treatment expectancies, social support, and improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms predicted higher treatment satisfaction in the total sample. In the CBT group, only credibility and adherence with treatment predicted satisfaction. This suggests that older patients receiving CBT who believe more strongly in the treatment rationale and follow the therapist’s recommendations more closely are likely to report satisfaction at the end of treatment. In addition, this study found that adherence mediated the relationship between treatment credibility and treatment satisfaction. In other words, patients’ perceptions that the treatment made sense for them led to greater treatment adherence which then increased their satisfaction with treatment. PMID:23434724

  2. Predictors of treatment satisfaction among older adults with anxiety in a primary care psychology program.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Natalie E; Armento, Maria E A; Porter, Bennett; Cully, Jeffrey A; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda

    2013-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are treated in integrated primary care mental health programs. The current study examined predictors of satisfaction with treatment in patients from a randomized clinical trial of late-life generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in primary care. Higher treatment satisfaction was associated with receiving CBT rather than enhanced usual care. Treatment credibility, treatment expectancies, social support, and improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms predicted higher treatment satisfaction in the total sample. In the CBT group, only credibility and adherence with treatment predicted satisfaction. This suggests that older patients receiving CBT who believe more strongly in the treatment rationale and follow the therapist's recommendations more closely are likely to report satisfaction at the end of treatment. In addition, this study found that adherence mediated the relationship between treatment credibility and treatment satisfaction. In other words, patients' perceptions that the treatment made sense for them led to greater treatment adherence which then increased their satisfaction with treatment. PMID:23434724

  3. Nanocarriers and nanoparticles for skin care and dermatological treatments

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Bansal, Radhika; Gupta, Sunita; Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Abhinav

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology (nano: One billionth) is a novel arena with promising applications in the field of medicine, especially pharmaceuticals for safe and targeted drug delivery. The skin is a phenomenal tool for investigation of nanocarriers for drug delivery for topical and dermatological application. The physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as rigidity, hydrophobicity, size and charge are crucial to the skin permeation mechanism. Many nanocarriers such as polymeric, inorganic and lipid nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been developed and some like carbon nanotubes and fullerenes still need further exploration for future use in skin care and dermatological treatments. Risks of nanopollution and cytotoxicity also need to be kept in mind while exploring various nanoparticles for medical use. PMID:24350003

  4. Conservative care in successful treatment of abamectin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Jamali, Seyed Reza; Heidari Gorji, Ali Morad

    2014-01-01

    Human intoxication with abamectin is an uncommon but potentially fatal cause of pesticide poisoning. In this study a 42-year-old man was intoxicated with 3600 mg abamectin orally. On admission patient was fully alert with the smell of the poison from the mouth. Vital signs were normal and conjunctiva was hyperemic. Conservative cares such as gastric lavage was performed and charcoal was administered. After 2.5 hours, the patient gradually developed altered mental status as drowsiness, hypotension, tachycardia and dermal erythema. He was treated with H1 and H2 blockers and vasoactive agents and after 2 days was discharged in good condition. In comparison with organophosphates, abamectin intoxication has less risk in humans. However, consumption of large amounts in human can be fatal. Altered mental status could be considered as the first sign of abamectin intoxication. Normal level of consciousness is the best indicator of improvement of the condition. Conservative treatment is recommended. PMID:25948975

  5. Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

  6. Randomised trial comparing buprenorphine and diamorphine for chest pain in suspected myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M J; Fraser, A R; Hampton, J R

    1979-08-01

    Buprenorphine, a new powerful analgesic agent, was used to treat chest pain in patients with suspected myocardial infarction. Initial studies showed no significant changes in systemic or pulmonary artery blood pressure or in heart rate after intravenous buprenorphine. Sublingual buprenorphine also appeared effective in relieving pain, but its onset of action was considerably delayed compared with the intravenous route. A randomised double-blind controlled trial of equivalent doses of buprenorphine and diamorphine showed no significant difference between the drugs in terms of pain relief and duration of action. The occurrence of nausea, vomiting, and other side effects was similar in the two groups. The onset of action of buprenorphine was slightly but significantly slower than that of diamorphine. Since buprenorphine seems to be comparable with diamorphine in action and is not a controlled drug, it may prove useful in both general and hospital practice. PMID:383195

  7. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Buprenorphine in Macaques (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Halliday, Lisa C; Moody, David E; Fang, Wenfang B; Lindeblad, Matthew; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the cornerstone of pain management in nonhuman primates, but the pharmacokinetics of this widely used drug are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg IM) and sustained-release buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg SC) in 2 macaque species (M. mulatta and M. fascicularis) by using mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics did not differ significantly between species, and buprenorphine was dose-proportional at the tested doses. The low and high doses of buprenorphine had elimination half-lives of 2.6 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 2.0 h, respectively, but the low-dose data were constrained by the sensitivity of the analytical method. Sustained-release buprenorphine had an elimination half-life of 42.6 ± 26.2 h. The AUC0-Tlast of buprenorphine were 9.1 ± 4.3 and 39.0 ± 25.1 ng×h/mL for the low and high doses, respectively, and sustained-release buprenorphine had an AUC0-Tlast of 177 ± 74 ng×h/mL. Assuming a hypothesized therapeutic buprenorphine plasma concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL in macaques, these results suggest that buprenorphine doses of 0.01 mg/kg IM should be administered every 6 to 8 h, whereas doses of 0.03 mg/kg IM can be administered every 12 h. These results further demonstrate that a single 0.2-mg/kg SC injection of sustained-release buprenorphine maintains plasma concentrations above 0.1 ng/mL for 5 d in macaques. These findings support a new dosing strategy using sustained-release buprenorphine to improve pain management, decrease animal stress, improve animal welfare, and simplify the postoperative management of nonhuman primates in laboratory animal and zoological settings. PMID:23562033

  8. Buprenorphine + naloxone: new combination. Opiate dependence: no proof of reduced risk of self-administered injection.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    (1) Two drugs with similar efficacy are available in France for heroin replacement therapy: methadone and buprenorphine. (2) Buprenorphine is sold in the form of sublingual tablets, but some patients dissolve and inject them. Methadone is the main alternative for these patients. Other intravenous opiate derivatives can also be tried, although they have not been approved for this indication. (3) In order to help prevent patients from injecting themselves with buprenorphine, a sublingual combination of buprenorphine + naloxone is to be marketed in France. (4) From a pharmacological point of view, this combination makes sense. Naloxone, an opiate antagonist, is very poorly absorbed with sublingual administration, but if it is injected intravenously, it will antagonise the effects of buprenorphine. However, clinical studies are needed to determine whether or not this prevents injection. (5) A double-blind trial in 326 patients compared replacement therapy with buprenorphine 16 mg + naloxone 4 mg/day versus buprenorphine 16 mg + placebo. The addition of naloxone did not reduce the efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine, but the frequency with which patients injected the drugs was not studied in this trial. (6) This combination of buprenorphine + naloxone has not been directly compared with methadone. (7) In addition to the classical adverse effects of opiates, buprenorphine can cause hepatic adverse effects. (8) Little evidence is available on the effects of intravenous injection of buprenorphine + naloxone. According to an epidemiological survey conducted in Finland, where the combination is also marketed, about 8% of patients regularly inject it intravenously. (9) Patients who are likely to inject buprenorphine should be switched to methadone. PMID:18087797

  9. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine hydrochloride following intramuscular and intravenous administration to American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustavsen, Kate A.; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K.; Petritz, Olivia A.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Buprenorphine was rapidly absorbed, and bioavailability was good after IM administration to American kestrels. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were > 1 ng/mL for 9 hours after both IM and IV administration. These results, in combination with those of a pharmacodynamic study, suggested that the analgesic effects of buprenorphine could last at least 6 to 9 hours in this species. Further investigations of the duration of analgesic effects, multiple-dose protocols, and potential adverse effects of buprenorphine are warranted in American kestrels and other raptors.

  10. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF CONSENSUS: 1. The use of opioids in cancer pain: The criteria for selecting analgesics for pain treatment in the elderly include, but are not limited to, overall efficacy, overall side-effect profile, onset of action, drug interactions, abuse potential, and practical issues, such as cost and availability of the drug, as well as the severity and type of pain (nociceptive, acute/chronic, etc.). At any given time, the order of choice in the decision-making process can change. This consensus is based on evidence-based literature (extended data are not included and chronic, extended-release opioids are not covered). There are various driving factors relating to prescribing medication, including availability of the compound and cost, which may, at times, be the main driving factor. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine is available in most European countries, particularly those with high opioid usage, with the exception of France; however, the availability of the sublingual formulation of buprenorphine in Europe is limited, as it is marketed in only a few countries, including Germany and Belgium. The opioid patch is experimental at present in U.S.A. and the sublingual formulation has dispensing restrictions, therefore, its use is limited. It is evident that the population pyramid is upturned. Globally, there is going to be an older population that needs to be cared for in the future. This older population has expectations in life, in that a retiree is no longer an individual who decreases their lifestyle activities. The "baby-boomers" in their 60s and 70s are "baby zoomers"; they want to have a functional active lifestyle. They are willing to make trade-offs regarding treatment choices and understand that they may experience pain, providing that can have increased quality of life and functionality. Therefore, comorbidities--including cancer and noncancer pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and postherpetic neuralgia--and patient functional status need to be taken carefully into account when addressing pain in the elderly. World Health Organization step III opioids are the mainstay of pain treatment for cancer patients and morphine has been the most commonly used for decades. In general, high level evidence data (Ib or IIb) exist, although many studies have included only few patients. Based on these studies, all opioids are considered effective in cancer pain management (although parts of cancer pain are not or only partially opioid sensitive), but no well-designed specific studies in the elderly cancer patient are available. Of the 2 opioids that are available in transdermal formulation--fentanyl and buprenorphine--fentanyl is the most investigated, but based on the published data both seem to be effective, with low toxicity and good tolerability profiles, especially at low doses. 2. The use of opioids in noncancer-related pain: Evidence is growing that opioids are efficacious in noncancer pain (treatment data mostly level Ib or IIb), but need individual dose titration and consideration of the respective tolerability profiles. Again no specific studies in the elderly have been performed, but it can be concluded that opioids have shown efficacy in noncancer pain, which is often due to diseases typical for an elderly population. When it is not clear which drugs and which regimes are superior in terms of maintaining analgesic efficacy, the appropriate drug should be chosen based on safety and tolerability considerations. Evidence-based medicine, which has been incorporated into best clinical practice guidelines, should serve as a foundation for the decision-making processes in patient care; however, in practice, the art of medicine is realized when we individualize care to the patient. This strikes a balance between the evidence-based medicine and anecdotal experience. Factual recommendations and expert opinion both have a value when applying guidelines in clinical practice. 3. The use of opioids in neuropathic pain: The role of opioids in neuropathic pain has been under debate in the

  11. Treatment of Youth Depression in Primary Care Under Usual Practice Conditions: Observational Findings from Youth Partners in Care

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kenneth B.; Tang, Lingqi; Carlson, Gabrielle A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The effectiveness of treatments for youth depression in primary care, under usual practice conditions, is largely unstudied. This study aims at estimating the effect of “appropriate treatment,” defined as treatment that approximates guideline standards, on clinical outcomes for depressed primary care youth patients by using observational analyses from a randomized trial. Methods Participants were 344 youths aged 13–21 enrolled in the Youth Partners in Care trial. Youths screening positive for depression from six primary care practices in five different health care organizations were randomly assigned to either (1) usual care enhanced by provider education on depression evaluation and management, or (2) a quality improvement (QI) intervention designed to improve access to antidepressant medications and/or cognitive behavior therapy for depression; usual practice conditions otherwise applied. Observational analysis was conducted on the effects of appropriate treatment (antidepressant medication use by algorithms or 6 or more psychotherapy visits) on severe depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression score ?24) at 6 months. Selection into treatment is accounted for by using instrumental variables analysis, with randomized QI intervention status as the instrument. Results At 6 months, youths receiving “appropriate treatment,” compared with others, were significantly less likely to have severe depression (10.9% vs. 45.2%, p<0.0001). Similar findings were observed among youths with depressive disorders and sub-syndromal depressive symptoms, and among Latino and other youths. Conclusions Among depressed primary care youths, care that approximates guideline standards but retains leniency substantially reduces the likelihood of severe depression at 6 months. Such findings apply to youths with or without depressive disorder, and among Latino youth. PMID:22251025

  12. Reinforcement-Based Treatment Improves the Maternal Treatment and Neonatal Outcomes of Pregnant Patients Enrolled in Comprehensive Care Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hendrée E.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Tuten, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial examined the efficacy of comprehensive Usual Care (UC) alone (n=42) or enhanced by Reinforcement-Based Treatment (RBT) (n=47) to produce improved treatment outcomes, maternal delivery, and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with opioid and/or cocaine substance use disorders. RBT participants spent, on average, 32.6 days longer in treatment (p<.001) and almost six times longer in recovery housing than did UC participants (p=.01). There were no significant differences between the RBT and UC conditions in proportion of participants testing positive for any illegal substance. Neonates in the RBT condition spent 1.3 fewer days hospitalized after birth than UC condition neonates (p=.03), although the two conditions did not differ significantly in neonatal gestational age at delivery, birth weight, or number of days hospitalized. Integrating RBT into a rich array of comprehensive care treatment components may be a promising approach to increase maternal treatment retention and reduce neonatal length of hospital stay. PMID:21477047

  13. Pregnancy Rates among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17…

  14. Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

  15. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section 211.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY...

  16. Long-term administration of high doses of transdermal buprenorphine in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Wojciech; Kowalski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is often administered by the transdermal route (transdermal buprenorphine [TB]) in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain. However, high doses of TB of 140 µg/h are rarely used. Patients and methods Three cancer patients with severe neuropathic Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores of 8–10 who were successfully treated with high doses of TB up to 140 µg/h along with other opioids and adjuvant analgesics. Results TB was administered for a long period of follow-up (9 months to 4 years, including 34–261 days of treatment with the dose of 140 µg/h), which allowed achievement of satisfactory analgesia (NRS 3–5) and good treatment tolerance. In all three patients, TB dose was gradually titrated from 35 to 140 µg/h, and all patients used morphine at least for some time for breakthrough and background pain management along with adjuvant analgesics. Two patients continued the treatment with TB until the end of life, and one patient is still receiving the treatment. Conclusion TB at doses of up to 140 µg/h in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain seems to be effective and safe in combination with other opioids and with adjuvant analgesics, and may significantly improve patients’ quality of life. Clinical studies may explore higher than maximal 140 µg/h TB doses recommended by a manufacturer, and also in combination with other opioids and adjuvant analgesics. PMID:26675083

  17. Enzyme immunoassay validation for the detection of buprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Kintz, P; Lohner, S; Ludes, B

    2003-03-01

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was proposed by Microgenics to screen buprenorphine in urine. The intra-assay precision at 10 ng/mL was 7.7% (coefficient of variation). The immunoassay was determined to have no cross-reactivity with codeine, dihydrocodeine, morphine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, methadone, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, and dextromethorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L. A low cross-reactivity (3% at 1 ng/mL) was observed at low concentrations of norbuprenorphine. After comparing this new immunological test (Singlestep ELISA) for 76 urine specimens with our validated high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ES-MS) procedure, an optimum cutoff concentration of 2 ng/mL was determined for the kit. At this cutoff, the screening assay was able to determine more than 90% of true results with 43.4% true positives and 48.7% true negatives. Four positive urines (5.3%) were not confirmed by HPLC-ES-MS. In only one case, the negative urine test was confirmed as positive by HPLC-ES-MS (buprenorphine: 62.5 ng/mL). Buprenorphine concentrations determined by HPLC-ES-MS ranged from 1.2 to 1052 ng/mL. Of the four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that might be added to a positive urine specimen, none were able to cause a false-negative response by the immunoassay. The results of this study support the concept that the Singlestep ELISA for buprenorphine determination in urine should be considered as a new, valided screening procedure. PMID:12670004

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Collaborative Care for the Treatment of Depressive Disorders in Primary Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Grochtdreis, Thomas; Brettschneider, Christian; Wegener, Annemarie; Watzke, Birgit; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Härter, Martin; König, Hans-Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background For the treatment of depressive disorders, the framework of collaborative care has been recommended, which showed improved outcomes in the primary care sector. Yet, an earlier literature review did not find sufficient evidence to draw robust conclusions on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care. Purpose To systematically review studies on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care, compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care. Methods A systematic literature search in major databases was conducted. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC) list. To ensure comparability across studies, cost data were inflated to the year 2012 using country-specific gross domestic product inflation rates, and were adjusted to international dollars using purchasing power parities (PPP). Results In total, 19 cost-effectiveness analyses were reviewed. The included studies had sample sizes between n = 65 to n = 1,801, and time horizons between six to 24 months. Between 42% and 89% of the CHEC quality criteria were fulfilled, and in only one study no risk of bias was identified. A societal perspective was used by five studies. Incremental costs per depression-free day ranged from dominance to US$PPP 64.89, and incremental costs per QALY from dominance to US$PPP 874,562. Conclusion Despite our review improved the comparability of study results, cost-effectiveness of collaborative care compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care is ambiguous depending on willingness to pay. A still considerable uncertainty, due to inconsistent methodological quality and results among included studies, suggests further cost-effectiveness analyses using QALYs as effect measures and a time horizon of at least 1 year. PMID:25993034

  19. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SUBOXONE (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl sublingual tablets, 2......

  20. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual Tablets, 2 Milligrams/0.5 Milligrams and 8 Milligrams/2 Milligrams, Were... (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg... (buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, are the subject of NDA...

  1. Depression-like effect of prenatal buprenorphine exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Jen; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB) phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior. PMID:24367510

  2. Race and Beliefs about Mental Health Treatment Among Anxious Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Justin; Sullivan, Greer; Chavira, Denise A.; Stein, Murray B.; Craske, Michelle G.; Golinelli, Daniella; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Large racial disparities in the utilization of mental health care persist. Differences in treatment preferences could partially explain the differences in care between minority and non-minority populations. We compared beliefs about mental illness and treatment preferences among adult African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and whites, with diagnosed anxiety disorders. Measures of beliefs about mental illness and treatment were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication and from our previous work. There were no significant differences between African-Americans’ and whites’ beliefs. Hispanics’ and Native Americans’ beliefs were most distinctive, but the differences were small in magnitude. Across race/ethnicity, the associations between beliefs and service use were generally weak and statistically insignificant. Differences in illness beliefs and treatment preferences do not fully explain the large, persistent racial disparities in mental health care. Other crucial barriers to quality care exist in our health care system and our society as a whole. PMID:23407203

  3. Use of Pharmacotherapies in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders and Opioid Dependence in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinhee; Kresina, Thomas F.; Campopiano, Melinda; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H. Westley

    2015-01-01

    Substance-related and addictive disorders are chronic relapsing conditions that substantially impact public health. Effective treatments for these disorders require addressing substance use/dependence comprehensively as well as other associated comorbidities. Comprehensive addressing of substance use in a medical setting involves screening for substance use, addressing substance use directly with the patient, and formulating an appropriate intervention. For alcohol dependence and opioid dependence, pharmacotherapies are available that are safe and effective when utilized in a comprehensive treatment paradigm, such as medication assisted treatment. In primary care, substance use disorders involving alcohol, illicit opioids, and prescription opioid abuse are common among patients who seek primary care services. Primary care providers report low levels of preparedness and confidence in identifying substance-related and addictive disorders and providing appropriate care and treatment. However, new models of service delivery in primary care for individuals with substance-related and addictive disorders are being developed to promote screening, care and treatment, and relapse prevention. The education and training of primary care providers utilizing approved medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorders and opioid dependence in a primary care setting would have important public health impact and reduce the burden of alcohol abuse and opioid dependence. PMID:25629034

  4. Lack of Reduction in Buprenorphine Injection After Introduction of Co-Formulated Buprenorphine/Naloxone to the Malaysian Market

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Govindasamy, Sumathi; Sylla, Laurie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Diversion of buprenorphine (BPN) has been described in settings where it is legally prescribed and has resulted in increasing concern. To address this concern, co-formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX) replaced buprenorphine alone in Malaysia in December 2006. Methods To assess the significance of BPN/NLX introduction, 41 BPN/NLX injectors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were recruited using a modified snowball recruitment technique. Results In January 2007, all subjects had previously injected BPN alone. During the transition from injecting BPN alone to co-formulated BPN/NLX, the mean daily BPN injection dose increased from 1.88 mg (range 1.0–4.0 mg) to 2.49 mg/day (p < .001). Overall, 18 (44%) subjects increased their daily amount of injection while 22 (54%) had no change in dose; only one subject reduced the amount of injection. Development of opioid withdrawal symptoms was the primary outcome, however the only symptom that was significantly associated with BPN/NLX dosage was the report of “stomach pains” (p = .01). In logistic regression analysis, the development of opioid withdrawal symptoms was associated with increased benzodiazepine injection and increased syringe sharing. Conclusion and Scientific Significance These data suggests that the introduction of BPN/NLX did not reduce injection related risk behaviors such as syringe sharing and was associated with increased benzodiazepine use. Evidence-based approaches to treat BPN injection are urgently needed. PMID:19212931

  5. Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Tipranavir/Ritonavir in HIV-Negative Subjects Chronically Receiving Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.; Moody, David E.; Lin, Shen-Nan; Fang, Wenfang B.; Sabo, John P.; Wruck, Jan M.; Piliero, Peter J.; Conner, Carolyn; Andrews, Laurie; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence often require opioid replacement therapy. Pharmacokinetic interactions between HIV therapy and opioid-dependence treatment medications can occur. HIV-seronegative subjects stabilized on at least 3 weeks of buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) therapy sequentially underwent baseline and steady-state pharmacokinetic evaluation of open-label, twice daily tipranavir 500 mg co-administered with ritonavir 200 mg (TPV/r). Twelve subjects were enrolled and 10 completed the study. Prior to starting TPV/r, the geometric mean BUP AUC0-24h and Cmax were 43.9 ng?hr/mL and 5.61 ng/mL, respectively. After achieving steady-state with TPV/r (?7 days), these values were similar at 43.7 ng?hr/mL and 4.84 ng/mL, respectively. Similar analyses for norBUP, the primary metabolite of BUP, demonstrated a reduction in geometric mean for AUC0-24h [68.7 to 14.7 ng?hr/mL; ratio=0.21 (90% CI 0.19–0.25)] and Cmax [4.75 to 0.94 ng/mL; ratio=0.20 (90% CI 0.17–0.23)]. The last measurable NLX concentration (Clast) in the concentration-time profile, never measured in previous BUP/NLX interaction studies with antiretroviral medications, was decreased by 20%. Despite these pharmacokinetic effects on BUP metabolites and NLX, no clinical opioid withdrawal symptoms were noted. TPV steady-state AUC0-12h and Cmax decreased 19% and 25% respectively, and Cmin was relatively unchanged when compared to historical control subjects receiving TPV/r alone. No dosage modification of BUP/NLX is required when co-administered with TPV/r. Though mechanistically unclear, it is likely that decreased plasma RTV levels while on BUP/NLX contributed substantially to the decrease in TPV levels. BUP/NLX and TPV/r should therefore be used cautiously to avoid decreased efficacy of TPV in patients taking these agents concomitantly. PMID:19726139

  6. Clinical effects of buprenorphine on open field behaviour and gait symmetry in healthy and lame weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Ellen; van Nes, Arie; Back, Willem; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-12-01

    Lameness in pigs decreases animal welfare and economic profit for the farmer. An important reason for impaired welfare in lame animals is pain due to lameness. No direct measurement of pain is possible in animals, and methods to indirectly detect and quantify the amount of pain an animal is experiencing are urgently needed. In this study, two methods to assess pain associated with lameness in pigs were evaluated to determine if they were sensitive enough to detect a lameness reduction as an effect of an experimental analgesic medication. Asymmetry associated with lameness was objectively quantified using pressure mat kinetic parameters: peak vertical force (PVF), load rate (LR), vertical impulse (VI) and peak vertical pressure (PVP). Locomotor activity was assessed in an open field test. A dose of 0.04?mg/kg buprenorphine, a strong analgesic, was used to treat 10 lame pigs, while eight other lame pigs, treated with physiological saline solution, served as controls. Buprenorphine decreased lameness-associated asymmetry for pressure mat LR (P?=?0.002), VI (P?=?0.003) and PVP (P?=?0.001) and increased activity of the lame pigs in the open field (P?=?0.023), while saline-treated animals did not show any changes in asymmetry and became less active in the open field (P?<0.001). It was concluded that measurement of gait asymmetry by pressure mat analysis and locomotor activity in an open field test are both sensitive enough to detect the analgesic effects of buprenorphine when used to treat moderate to severe clinical pain in a relatively small group of affected pigs. The methods used in this study may also provide promising additional tools for future research into early pain recognition and lameness treatment in pigs. PMID:26521014

  7. Sustained-Release Buprenorphine (RBP-6000) Blocks the Effects of Opioid Challenge With Hydromorphone in Subjects With Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Azmi F; Greenwald, Mark K; Vince, Bradley; Fudala, Paul J; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Liu, Yongzhen; Jones, J P; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-01

    A major goal for the treatment of opioid use disorder is to reduce or eliminate the use of illicit opioids. Buprenorphine, a ?-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa opioid receptor antagonist, is now being developed as a monthly, sustained-release formulation (RBP-6000). The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RBP-6000 blocks the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of the ?-opioid receptor agonist hydromorphone (intramuscularly administered) in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. Subjects were first inducted and dose stabilized on sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (8-24 mg daily; dose expressed as the buprenorphine component), then received two subcutaneous injections of RBP-6000 (300 mg) on Day 1 and Day 29. Hydromorphone challenges (6 mg, 18 mg or placebo administered in randomized order) occurred on 3 consecutive days of each study week before and after receiving RBP-6000. Subjects reported their responses to each challenge on various 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Subjects also completed a choice task to assess the reinforcing efficacy of each hydromorphone dose relative to money. At baseline, mean "drug liking" VAS scores for hydromorphone 18 mg and 6 mg versus placebo were 61 mm (95% confidence interval, 52.3-68.9) and 45 mm (95% confidence interval, 37.2-53.6), respectively. After 300 mg RBP-6000 was administered, mean VAS score differences from placebo were less than 10 mm through week 12. The reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone decreased in a parallel manner. This study demonstrated that RBP-6000 at a 300 mg dose provides durable and potent blockade of the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. PMID:26650971

  8. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence. PMID:23145768

  9. Budgetary impact analysis of buprenorphine-naloxone combination (Suboxone®) in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioid addiction is a worldwide problem. Agonist opioid treatment (AOT) is the most widespread and frequent pharmacotherapeutic approach. Methadone has been the most widely used AOT, but buprenorphine, a partial ?-opiod agonist and a ?-opiod antagonist, is fast gaining acceptance. The objective was to assess the budgetary impact in Spain of the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone (B/N) combination. Methods A budgetary impact model was developed to estimate healthcare costs of the addition of B/N combination to the therapeutic arsenal for treating opioid dependent patients, during a 3-year period under the National Health System perspective. Inputs for the model were obtained from the specialized scientific literature. Detailed information concerning resource consumption (drug cost, logistics, dispensing, medical, psychiatry and pharmacy supervision, counselling and laboratory test) was obtained from a local expert panel. Costs are expressed in euros (€, 2010). Results The number of patients estimated to be prescribed B/N combination was 2,334; 2,993 and 3,589 in the first, second and third year respectively. Total budget is €85,766,129; €79,855,471 and €79,137,502 in the first, second and third year for the scenario without B/N combination. With B/N combination the total budget would be €86,589,210; €80,398,259 and €79,708,964 in the first, second and third year of the analyses. Incremental cost/patient comparing the addition of the B/N combination to the scenario only with methadone is €10.58; €6.98 and €7.34 in the first, second and third year respectively. Conclusion Addition of B/N combination would imply a maximum incremental yearly cost of €10.58 per patient compared to scenario only with methadone and would provide additional benefits. PMID:22828157

  10. A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders.

    PubMed

    Gastfriend, David R

    2014-10-01

    Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models--and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

  11. A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gastfriend, David R

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models—and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

  12. Practice patterns of mitochondrial disease physicians in North America. Part 2: treatment, care and management.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sumit; Goldstein, Amy; Koenig, Mary Kay; Scaglia, Fernando; Enns, Gregory M; Saneto, Russell

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial medicine is a young subspecialty. Clinicians have limited evidence-based guidelines on which to formulate clinical decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment and management for patients with mitochondrial disorders. Mitochondrial medicine specialists have cobbled together an informal set of rules and paradigms for preventive care and management based in part on anecdotal experience. The Mitochondrial Medicine Society (MMS) assessed the current state of clinical practice including diagnosis, preventive care and treatment, as provided by various mitochondrial disease providers in North America. In this second of two reports, we present data related to clinical practice that highlight the challenges clinicians face in the routine care of patients with established mitochondrial disease. Concerning variability in treatment and preventative care approaches were noted. We hope that sharing this information will be a first step toward formulating a set of consensus criteria and establishing standards of care. PMID:24063850

  13. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  14. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  15. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  16. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  17. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  18. Problem-solving treatment and coping styles in primary care for minor depression.

    PubMed

    Oxman, Thomas E; Hegel, Mark T; Hull, Jay G; Dietrich, Allen J

    2008-12-01

    Research was undertaken to compare problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) with usual care for minor depression and to examine whether treatment effectiveness was moderated by coping style. PST-PC is a 6-session, manual-based, psychosocial skills intervention. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 academic, primary care clinics. Those subjects who were eligible were randomized (N = 151), and 107 subjects completed treatment (57 PST-PC, 50 usual care) and a 35-week follow-up. Analysis with linear mixed modeling revealed significant effects of treatment and coping, such that those in PST-PC improved at a faster rate and those initially high in avoidant coping were significantly more likely to have sustained benefit from PST-PC. PMID:19045962

  19. Treatment Foster Care for Improving Outcomes in Children and Young People: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, William; Macdonald, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of treatment foster care (TFC) on psychosocial and behavioral outcomes, delinquency, placement stability, and discharge status for children and adolescents who, for reasons of severe medical, social, psychological and behavioural problems, were placed in out-of-home care in restrictive settings or at risk of…

  20. Crushed and Injected Buprenorphine Tablets: Characteristics of Princeps and Generic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bouquié, Régis; Wainstein, Laura; Pilet, Paul; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Deslandes, Guillaume; Clouet, Johann; Dailly, Eric; Jolliet, Pascale; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Self-injection of high-dose buprenorphine is responsible for well-described complications. In 2011, we have been alerted by unusual but serious cutaneous complication among injection buprenorphine users. A prospective data collection identified 30 cases of necrotic cutaneous lesions after injection of filtered buprenorphine solution, among which 25 cases occurred following injection of buprenorphine generics. The main goal of our study was to put forward particularities that could explain the cutaneous complications, by qualitatively and quantitatively confronting particles present in Subutex and generics solutions. We used the same protocol that injected-buprenorphine users: generic or subutex tablets were crushed in sterile water and filtered through 2 filters commonly used (cotton-pad and sterifilt). Solutions were analyzed by laser granulometry, flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy. We have highlighted the wide variation of the quantity and the size of the particles present in solution between the two drugs after cotton-pad filtration. The proportion of particles <10 µm is systematically higher in the generic solutions than with Subutex. All of the insoluble particles found in generic solutions contain silica, whereas non- organic element was to be identified in the insoluble particles of Subutex. One skin biopsy obtained from one patient who developed a necrotic lesion after intravenous injection of filtrated solution of buprenorphine generic, shows non-organic elements. Identification of particles in situ enables us to confirm the presence of silica in the biopsy. Actually the monitoring of patient receiving generic of buprenorphine must be strengthened. PMID:25474108

  1. Availability of buprenorphine on the Internet for purchase without a prescription

    PubMed Central

    Bachhuber, Marcus A.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of illicit buprenorphine is increasingly recognized, but it is unknown if the Internet currently represents an accessible source. Methods A series of Internet searches were conducted. Twenty searches were performed on two different search engines. The first 100 results of each search were classified into categories based on content. All Internet pharmacies were searched for buprenorphine preparations and if available, sites were examined to determine if a prescription was required for purchase, for the cost of buprenorphine, the geographical origin of the pharmacy, and evidence of validation by an online pharmacy verification service. Results Of the 2,000 links examined, 1422 were unique. Six percent of links were to illicit commercial sites, 2% were to legitimate commercial sites, and 2% were to illicit portal sites, which contained links to many illicit commercial sites. Twenty pharmacies offering buprenorphine for purchase without a prescription were identified. The monthly cost of a typical starting dose of 2 mg buprenorphine daily ranged between $232 and $1,163 USD. No pharmacies were listed by online pharmacy verification services. Conclusion Twenty online pharmacies advertising buprenorphine formulations for sale without a prescription were identified. Prices varied widely between illicit pharmacies but were uniformly more expensive than legitimate pharmacies. Illicitly obtained buprenorphine formulations appear to be relatively inaccessible and at high cost on the Internet. PMID:23201172

  2. Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression

    SciTech Connect

    Hreiche, Raymond; Megarbane, Bruno . E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Monier, Claire; Risede, Patricia; Milan, Nathalie; Descatoire, Veronique; Pessayre, Dominique; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-12-15

    In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg{sup -1} was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P < 0.001), without significant effects on the respiratory frequency, the tidal volume, the minute volume, or arterial blood gases. In dexamethasone-pretreated rats, there was no significant alteration in the respiratory parameters, despite CYP3A induction and significant increase of the ratio of plasma norbuprenorphine-to-buprenorphine concentrations. In conclusion, dexamethasone did not modify the effects of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts.

  3. Safety studies of post-surgical buprenorphine therapy for mice.

    PubMed

    Traul, Karl A; Romero, Jennell B; Brayton, Cory; DeTolla, Louis; Forbes-McBean, Nadine; Halquist, Matthew S; Karnes, H Thomas; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Tomlinson, Michael J; Tyler, Betty M; Ye, Xiaobu; Zadnik, Patricia; Guarnieri, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The use of appropriate analgesia in laboratory mice may be suboptimal because of concerns about adverse events (AE). Target Animal Safety trials were conducted to determine the safety of an extended-release suspension of buprenorphine. Drug or control suspensions were injected subcutaneously in surgically-treated BALB/c mice anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine to mimic post-operative conditions in which the compound might commonly be administered. Single and repeat five-fold (5×) excesses of the 3.25 mg/kg intended dose were used to provoke potential AE. Trials included prospective measurements of weight changes, blood chemistry, hematology, and histopathology. Clinical and histopathology findings were similar in drug-treated and control mice in a four-day trial using a single 16.25 mg/kg, 5× overdose of the drug. In a 12-day trial, which used a total buprenorphine dose of 48.75 mg/kg, clinical and histopathology values were also similar in control and drug-treated female mice. In the male arm of the repeat-overdose trial, two of eight mice died on the morning of day 12, three days following the third 16.25 mg/kg overdose administration. Histopathology did not reveal a cause of death. In a 14-month trial using a single 3.25 mg/kg dose of the drug, no significant findings identified potential AE. These findings indicate a high tolerance to an extended-release buprenorphine suspension administered post-operatively in mice with appropriate husbandry. PMID:25305141

  4. Intravenous use of illicit buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an acute heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Michael A; Zaller, Nickolas D; Green, Traci C; McKenzie, Michelle; Rich, Josiah D

    2012-01-01

    A case of heroin overdose reversed through the intravenous (IV) administration of a crushed sublingual tablet of buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) by a lay responder is described. Although the sublingual administration of buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an overdose has been reported elsewhere, this is the first report of IV administration. Healthcare professionals should be aware that injection drug users may respond to an opioid overdose by injecting buprenorphine/naloxone and should consequently counsel all opioid-using patients on the proper response to an overdose. Physicians should also consider prescribing naloxone to at-risk patients. The work of community-based naloxone distribution programs should be expanded. PMID:22479887

  5. Postconcussive Syndrome Following Sports-related Concussion: A Treatment Overview for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Moran, Byron; Tadikonda, Prathima; Sneed, Kevin B; Hummel, Michelle; Guiteau, Sergio; Coris, Eric E

    2015-09-01

    Postconcussive syndrome is an increasingly recognized outcome of sports-related concussion (SRC), characterized by a constellation of poorly defined symptoms. Treatment of PCS is significantly different from that of SRC alone. Primary care physicians often are the first to evaluate these patients, but some are unfamiliar with the available therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of SRC and descriptions of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options to allow primary care physicians to provide evidence-based care to patients experiencing postconcussive syndrome. PMID:26332481

  6. Treatment preference and patient centered prostate cancer care: Design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce Malkowicz, S; Lee, David; Guzzo, Thomas; Caruso, Adele; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Wein, Alan J; Sanford Schwartz, J

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a slow progressing cancer that affects millions of men in the US. Due to uncertainties in outcomes and treatment complications, it is important that patients engage in informed decision making to choose the "optimal treatment". Patient centered care that encompasses informed decision-making can improve treatment choice and quality of care. Thus, assessing patient treatment preferences is critical for developing an effective decision support system. The objective of this patient-centered randomized clinical trial was to study the comparative effectiveness of a conjoint analysis intervention compared to usual care in improving subjective and objective outcomes in prostate cancer patients. We identified preferred attributes of alternative prostate cancer treatments that will aid in evaluating attributes of treatment options. In this two-phase study, in Phase 1 we used mixed methods to develop an adaptive conjoint task instrument. The conjoint task required the patients to trade-off attributes associated with treatments by assessing their relative importance. Phase 2 consisted of a randomized controlled trial of men with localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the effect of conjoint task intervention on the association between preferences, treatment and objective and subjective outcomes. Our conjoint task instrument can lead to a values-based patient-centered decision aid tool and help tailor treatment decision making to the values of prostate cancer patients. This will ultimately improve clinical decision making, clinical policy process, enhance patient centered care and improve prostate cancer outcomes. PMID:26435200

  7. A costly separation between withdrawing and withholding treatment in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-03-01

    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively weak reasons to restrict rationing to withholding treatment. On the contrary, resource allocation provides a strong argument in favour of equivalence: non-equivalence causes preventable death in critically ill patients. We outline two proposals for increasing equivalence in practice: (1) reduction of the mortality threshold for treatment withdrawal, (2) time-limited trials of intensive care. These strategies would help to move practice towards more rational treatment limitation decisions. PMID:22762352

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Treatment Burden Among Low-Income Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Linda S.; Vest, Bonnie M.; Madurai, Nethra; Singh, Ranjit; York, Trevor R.M.; Cipparone, Charlotte W.; Reilly, Sarah; Malik, Khalid S.; Fox, Chester H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study explored the self-management strategies and treatment burden experienced by low income US primary care patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 patients from two primary care practices on Buffalo’s East Side, a low-income community. Qualitative analysis was undertaken using an inductive thematic content analysis approach. We applied Normalization Process Theory (NPT) to the concept of treatment burden to interpret and categorize our findings. Results The sample was predominantly African-American (79%) and female (59%). Most patients (79%) had a diagnosis of Stage 3 CKD. Four major themes were identified corresponding to NPT and treatment burden: (1) Coherence – making sense of CKD; (2) Cognitive participation – enlisting support and organizing personal resources; (3) Collective action – self-management work; and (4) Reflexive monitoring – further refining chronic illness self-care in the context of CKD. For each component we identified barriers hindering patients’ ability to accomplish the necessary tasks. Conclusions Our findings highlight the substantial treatment burden faced by inner-city primary care patients self-managing CKD in combination with other chronic illnesses. Health care providers’ awareness of treatment burden can inform the development of person-centered care plans that can help patients to better manage their chronic illnesses. PMID:25416418

  9. Acceptable Care? Illness Constructions, Healthworlds, and Accessible Chronic Treatment in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas—conversely—these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating “disease” to responding to “illness” by acknowledging and incorporating patients’ healthworlds in patient–provider interactions. PMID:25829509

  10. The Continuing Care Model of Substance Use Treatment: What Works, and When Is “Enough,” “Enough?”

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Steven L.; Herschman, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    There is little disagreement in the substance use treatment literature regarding the conceptualization of substance dependence as a cyclic, chronic condition consisting of alternating episodes of treatment and subsequent relapse. Likewise, substance use treatment efforts are increasingly being contextualized within a similar disease management framework, much like that of other chronic medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.). As such, substance use treatment has generally been viewed as a process comprised of two phases. Theoretically, the incorporation of some form of lower intensity continuing care services delivered in the context of outpatient treatment after the primary treatment phase (e.g., residential) appears to be a likely requisite if all stakeholders aspire to successful long-term clinical outcomes. Thus, the overarching objective of any continuing care model should be to sustain treatment gains attained in the primary phase in an effort to ultimately prevent relapse. Given the extant treatment literature clearly supports the contention that treatment is superior to no treatment, and longer lengths of stay is associated with a variety of positive outcomes, the more prudent question appears to be not whether treatment works, but rather what are the specific programmatic elements (e.g., duration, intensity) that comprise an adequate continuing care model. Generally speaking, it appears that the duration of continuing care should extend for a minimum of 3 to 6 months. However, continuing care over a protracted period of up to 12 months appears to be essential if a reasonable expectation of robust recovery is desired. Limitations of prior work and implications for routine clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:24839597

  11. [Treatment of fungus infection with diabetic foot--importance of the foot care].

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Takamichi

    2008-12-01

    Fungus infection is high frequently complicated of the diabetic foot. Especially onychomycosis make a injury neighbor toe skin or paronychia. This tiny lesion make a bacterial infection, and progress to foot gangrene unfortunately if patient delayed treatment. So it is important to do daily check of the foot and regularly foot care included nail care. Toenail onychomycosis need medicational treatment just after microscopically diagnosis. It is important to check the interaction between the antifungal medicine and other medicine, and side effect after started treatment. PMID:19069095

  12. Use of a transdermal matrix patch of buprenorphine in cats: preliminary pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J C; Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M; McCown, J L; Bloomfield, M; Sear, J W

    2007-04-28

    Six domestic shorthair cats, aged three to four years and weighing 5.1 to 7.4 kg, were used to assess the thermal antinociceptive effect of a transdermal buprenorphine patch, designed to supply 35 mug buprenorphine/hour, which was applied to the shaved thorax. The cats' thermal thresholds were tested before the patch was applied and two, four, six, eight, 10, 12, 14 and 16 hours after it had been applied, and then every six hours until it was removed after 72 hours, and for a further 24 hours afterwards. Blood was collected at each time to measure the plasma concentration of buprenorphine. The patches did not produce a significant change in the thermal thresholds of the cats throughout the testing period. The mean (sd) peak plasma buprenorphine concentration was 10 (0.81) ng/ml. PMID:17468320

  13. The Anti-Suicidal Potential of Buprenorphine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, Joan M.; Kalapatapu, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    The very strong relationship between suicide, depressive disorders and substance use disorders is well recognized. Certain pain syndromes are significantly associated with suicide, irrespective of co-occurring medical or psychiatric diagnosis. Chronic pain, depression, substance use disorders and suicide appear to involve overlapping neural pathways and brain regions that function in the processing of emotional and physical pain, as well as maintaining reward and anti-reward circuitry. In this article, we employ a clinical case to illustrate how various stressors disrupted the balance between pain and opioid-facilitated analgesia. This disruption resulted in excessive use of short-acting opioids to treat pain with ensuing allostatic overload and culmination in chronic suicidal ideation with a suicide attempt. Sublingual buprenorphine was selected to treat the opioid use disorder. We propose that the unique pharmacodynamics of this drug served to stabilize dysregulated neural circuits, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, allowing the mitigation of pain, assuaging opioid cravings, easing depression and resolving suicidal ideation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe the possible anti-suicidal effect of sublingual buprenorphine. PMID:25084802

  14. Antiretroviral HIV treatment and care for injecting drug users: an evidence-based overview

    PubMed Central

    Lert, France; Kazatchkine, Michel D.

    2007-01-01

    AIDS-related mortality and the rate of progression to AIDS have dramatically decreased since the advent of highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). The overall benefit from antiretroviral HIV treatment has, however, been lesser in HIV-infected IDUs than in other patient groups (e.g. men who have sex with men). Poorer outcomes in HIV-infected IDUs are related to a variety of factors, including increased rates of non-HIV related deaths, hepatitis C, delayed access to effective treatment, lower adherence to care and treatment regimens, continuation of illicit drug use, depression and negative life events. The available evidence strongly suggests the need for the large-scale implementation of comprehensive treatment and care strategies for IDUs that include both treatment of drug-dependence and HAART. PMID:17689373

  15. Diversion of buprenorphine/naloxone coformulated tablets in a region with high prescribing prevalence.

    PubMed

    Monte, Andrew A; Mandell, Todd; Wilford, Bonnie B; Tennyson, Joseph; Boyer, Edward W

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to characterize practices of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) diversion in a region with a high prescribing prevalence. A cross-sectional, open-ended survey was administered to individuals entering opioid addiction treatment programs in two New England states. The authors obtained formative information about the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, practices, and street economy of B/N diversion. The authors interviewed 51 individuals, 49 of which were aware of B/N medication. Of that number, 100% had diverted B/N to modulate opiate withdrawal symptoms arising from attempted "self-detoxification," insufficient funds to purchase preferred illicit opioids, or inability to find a preferred source of drugs. Thirty of 49 (61%) participants obtained the illicit drug from an individual holding a legitimate prescription for B/N. A high proportion of individuals in the study locations who sought treatment for opioid addiction self-reported the purchase and use of diverted B/N. The diversion of B/N may be minimized by modifying educational, treatment, monitoring, and dispensing practices. PMID:20155591

  16. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention. PMID:26030764

  17. Parental beliefs about nocturnal enuresis causes, treatments, and the need to seek professional medical care

    PubMed Central

    Schlomer, Bruce; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana; Copp, Hillary

    2015-01-01

    Objective To better understand parental beliefs regarding the etiology and treatment of nocturnal enuresis (NE). Methods A self-administered survey queried parental NE beliefs including perceived etiologies and home behavioral treatments. We assessed for associations between demographic characteristics and propensity to seek medical care for NE. Results Of 216 respondents, 78% were female. The most common causes for NE reported were: deep sleeper (56%), unknown (39%), and laziness (26%). Popular home behavioral therapies included: void prior to sleep (77%) and limiting fluid intake at night (71%). Few reported they would use a bedwetting alarm (6%). Fifty-five percent reported they would seek medical care for NE and 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. On multivariable analysis, females (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.04–5.0) and those with graduate level education (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.5–15.7) were more likely to seek medical care for their child with NE. Conclusions General parental knowledge of the causes and effective treatments for NE is lacking. Only 55% reported they would seek medical care for their child with NE and only 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. Counseling should focus on dispelling common misconceptions about causes and treatments of NE and focus on proven effective treatments. PMID:23608323

  18. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations after the application of a 70 microg/h transdermal patch in dogs. Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Andaluz, A; Moll, X; Ventura, R; Abellán, R; Fresno, L; García, F

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine after transdermal application in dogs (n = 4). A 70 microg/h transdermal buprenorphine patch was applied to the ventral abdomen of four healthy beagles. Blood samples were collected through a preplaced jugular catheter before and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48 and every 6 h until 108 h after the patch application. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were measured using a (125)I-labelled radioimmunoassay (RIA) assay. No adverse effects were observed in any of the dogs. Concentrations of buprenorphine were detected in plasma after the application of the transdermal buprenorphine patch on the four experimental animals. Buprenorphine plasma concentrations increased during the first 36 h and then remained in the 0.7-1.0 ng/mL range during the study period. A decrease in plasma buprenorphine concentration was not observed during the study. Although analgesia could not be demonstrated the present study shows the ability of buprenorphine transdermal delivery systems developed for human use to deliver measurable concetrations of buprenorphine in dogs. PMID:19754919

  19. Antinociceptive actions of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally in the conscious rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R. M.; Olley, J. E.; Tyers, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 The antinociceptive effects of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally and subcutaneously have been compared in the conscious rat. 2 In the paw pressure test, when given subcutaneously buprenorphine 0.001-0.1 mg/kg s.c., was approximately 100 times more potent than morphine 0.1-3 mg/kg s.c., but in the hot plate test, buprenorphine 0.03-3.0 mg/kg s.c., produced a bell-shaped dose-response curve of low maximum effect and was about equipotent with morphine 0.03-3 mg/kg s.c. 3 When given intrathecally buprenorphine 10 micrograms and morphine, 10-60 micrograms, were approximately equipotent in both paw pressure and hot plate tests. Furthermore, morphine produced these effects at 1/25th of the minimum effective parenteral dose while the dose of buprenorphine exceeded the parenteral dose. 4 It is concluded that the predominant site of the analgesic action of buprenorphine is supraspinal. The significance of these findings in relation to the role of spinal opiate receptors is discussed. PMID:6687818

  20. A Retrospective Evaluation of Inpatient Transfer from High-Dose Methadone to Buprenorphine Substitution Therapy.

    PubMed

    Oretti, Rossana

    2015-10-01

    The product license of buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid substitution therapy indicates reducing methadone concentrations to 30 mg or less per day for a minimum of 1 week before transferring patients to buprenorphine and no sooner than 24 hours after the last methadone dose, because of the risk of precipitated withdrawal and a corresponding high risk of relapse to opioid use. There are few studies describing high-dose methadone transfers. This retrospective case review assessed the feasibility of transferring patients on methadone doses above 30 mg/day to buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone in the inpatient setting. Six of seven patients on 60-120 mg/day of methadone successfully completed the transfer, and four cases tested negative for opiates at long-term follow-up (6-15 months). This suggests that methadone transfer to buprenorphine can be performed rapidly without the need to taper methadone doses in patients indicated for a therapeutic switch. This small study is hypothesis-generating; larger, well-designed trials are needed to define a protocol that can be used routinely to improve and widen transfers to buprenorphine when indicated. PMID:26048187

  1. Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a revolution in care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A generation ago, children with arthritis faced a lifetime of pain and disability. Today, there are a multitude of treatment options, including a variety of biologics targeting key cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. While non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids were once the mainstay of therapy, they are now largely used as bridge or adjunctive therapies. Among the conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, methotrexate remains first-line therapy for most children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) due to its long track record of safety and effectiveness in the management of peripheral arthritis. Sulfasalazine and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA and likely in enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic JIA as well. There may be additional benefit in combining TNFi with methotrexate. Abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear. For the treatment of systemic JIA, while the TNFi are of less benefit, blockade of interleukin-1 or interleukin-6 is highly effective. Additionally, interleukin-1 blockade appears to be effective treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, one of the most dangerous complications of JIA; specifically, anakinra in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids may obviate the need for cytotoxic approaches. In contrast, methotrexate along with the TNFi and abatacept are effective agents for the management of uveitis, another complication of JIA. Overall, the biologics have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although children do need to be monitored for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of malignancy. Finally, there may be a window of opportunity during which children with JIA will demonstrate most optimal responses to aggressive therapy, underscoring the need for rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment. PMID:24782683

  2. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Enrolling Vietnamese & Chinese Women

    Cancer.gov

    With respect to some Asian-American women, studies have addressed some of the problems inherent in undertaking primary and secondary prevention strategies for cancer. Tertiary prevention for cancer is synonymous with treatment. Cancer therapies are aimed at reducing the complications and mortality associated with known cancer, as well as preventing recurrence or relapse. For early stage breast cancer, breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective.

  3. The Importance of Supportive Care in Optimizing Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimal oncologic care of older men with prostate cancer, including effective prevention and management of the disease and treatment side effects (so-called best supportive care measures) can prolong survival, improve quality of life, and reduce depressive symptoms. In addition, the proportion of treatment discontinuations can be reduced through early reporting and management of side effects. Pharmacologic care may be offered to manage the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy and chemotherapy, which may include hot flashes, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, and diarrhea. Nonpharmacologic care (e.g., physical exercise, acupuncture, relaxation) has also been shown to benefit patients. At the Georges Pompidou European Hospital, the Program of Optimization of Chemotherapy Administration has demonstrated that improved outpatient follow-up by supportive care measures can reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-related side effects, reduce cancellations and modifications of treatment, reduce chemotherapy wastage, and reduce the length of stay in the outpatient unit. The importance of supportive care measures to optimize management and outcomes of older men with advanced prostate cancer should not be overlooked. PMID:23015682

  4. Leading processes of patient care and treatment in hierarchical healthcare organizations in Sweden - process managers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers' experiences of leading processes involving patient care and treatment when working in a hierarchical health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach - This study is based on an explorative design. The data were gathered from interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals. These data underwent qualitative and interpretative analysis with a modified editing style. Findings - The process managers' experiences of leading processes in a hierarchical health-care organization are described under three themes: having or not having a mandate, exposure to conflict situations and leading process development. The results indicate a need for clarity regarding process manager's responsibility and work content, which need to be communicated to all managers and staff involved in the patient care and treatment process, irrespective of department. There also needs to be an emphasis on realistic expectations and orientation of the goals that are an intrinsic part of the task of being a process manager. Research limitations/implications - Generalizations from the results of the qualitative interview studies are limited, but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which, in turn, can be transferred to similar settings. Originality/value - This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leading care and treatment processes in a functional, hierarchical health-care organization from process managers' experiences, a subject that has not been investigated earlier. PMID:25921318

  5. The Role of Gender in Moderating Treatment Outcome in Collaborative Care for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Kathleen; Cheney, Ann; Fortney, John; Edlund, Carrie; Han, Xiaotong; Dubbert, Patricia; Sherbourne, Cathy; Craske, Michelle; Stein, Murray; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Sullivan, Greer

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to test whether gender moderates intervention effects in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention, a 12-month, randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care (CC) intervention for anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder) in 17 primary care clinics in California, Washington, and Arkansas. Methods Participants (n = 1004) completed measures of symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory; BSI) and functioning (Mental and Physical Health Components of the Short Form-12; (MCS and PCS), and Healthy Days, Restricted Activity Days Scale) at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data on dose, engagement, and beliefs about psychotherapy were collected for patients in the CC group. Results Gender moderated the relationship between treatment and its outcome on the BSI, MCS and Healthy Days but not on the PCS. Women who received CC showed clinical improvements on the BSI, MHC, and Healthy Days that were significantly different from women in Usual Care. There were no differences for men in CC compared to Usual Care on any measures. In the intervention group, women attended more sessions of psychotherapy, completed more modules of therapy, expressed more commitment and viewed psychotherapy as more helpful than men. Conclusions These findings contribute to the broader literature on treatment heterogeneity, in particular the influence of gender, and may inform personalized care for persons seeking anxiety treatment in primary care settings. PMID:25727114

  6. Psychosexual Symptoms and Treatment of Peyronie's Disease Within a Collaborative Care Model

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peyronie's disease (PD) can be emotionally and sexually debilitating for patients and may negatively impact partner relationships. Aims This study aims to present an ongoing collaborative care model for patients with PD and to discuss the critical need for integration of patient care among sexual medicine physicians and mental health practitioners or sex therapists. Methods PubMed searches using the terms “Peyronie's disease” and “natural history,” “treatment,” “psychosexual,” “depression,” “relationship,” and “partner” were conducted. Expert opinion based on review of the relevant published literature and clinical experience was used to identify meaningful treatment targets for patients with PD within a collaborative care model. Main Outcome Measure Characteristics of PD, medical treatment, and important assessment and treatment targets, including physical, emotional, psychosexual, and relationship concerns, from peer-reviewed published literature and clinical experience. Results PD can result in significant patient and partner distress and relationship disruption. Sex therapy interventions may be directed at acute emotional, psychosexual, and relationship problems that occur during the initial diagnosis of PD, the period following minimally invasive or surgical treatment for PD, or recurring problems over the lifelong course of the disease. Sex therapy to improve self-acceptance, learn new forms of sexual intimacy, and improve communication with partners provides comprehensive treatment targeting emotional, psychosexual, and relationship distress. Ongoing communication between the mental health practitioner and physician working with the patient with PD about key assessments, treatment targets, and treatment responses is necessary for coordinated treatment planning and patient care. Conclusions Men with PD are more likely now than in the past to see both a sexual medicine physician and a mental health practitioner or sex therapist, and the integration of assessments and treatment planning is essential for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:25548648

  7. Oral Ketamine for the Rapid Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Patients Receiving Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Iglewicz, Alana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Depression is prevalent and undertreated in patients receiving hospice care. Standard antidepressants do not work rapidly or often enough to benefit most of these patients. Here, two cases are reported in which a single oral dose of ketamine provided rapid and moderately sustained symptom relief for both depression and anxiety. In addition, no adverse effects were noted. Further investigation with randomized, controlled clinical trials is necessary to firmly establish the effectiveness of oral ketamine for the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients receiving hospice care. Ketamine may be a promising safe, effective, and cost-effective rapid treatment for depression and anxiety in this population. PMID:20636166

  8. Truth Telling and Treatment Strategies in End-of-Life Care in Physician-Led Accountable Care Organizations: Discrepancies Between Patients' Preferences and Physicians' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Liang; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Yao, Chien-An; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Providing patient-centered care from preventive medicine to end-of-life care in order to improve care quality and reduce medical cost is important for accountable care. Physicians in the accountable care organizations (ACOs) are suitable for participating in supportive end-of-life care especially when facing issues in truth telling and treatment strategy. This study aimed to investigate patients' attitudes toward truth telling and treatment preferences in end-of-life care and compare patients' attitudes with their ACOs physicians' perceptions.This nationwide study applied snowball sampling to survey physicians in physician-led ACOs and their contracted patients by questionnaire from August 2010 to July 2011 in Taiwan. The main outcome measures were beliefs about palliative care, attitudes toward truth telling, and treatment preferences.The data of 314 patients (effective response rate?=?88.7%) and 177 physicians (88.5%) were analyzed. Regarding truth telling about disease prognosis, 94.3% of patients preferred to be fully informed, whereas only 80% of their physicians had that perception (P?treatment preferences in terminal illness, nearly 90% of patients preferred supportive care, but only 15.8% of physicians reported that their patients had this preference (P?treatment strategies in end-of-life care. It is important to enhance physician-patient communication about end-of-life care preferences in order to achieve the goal of ACOs. Continuing education on communication about end-of-life care during physicians' professional development would be helpful in the reform strategies of establishing accountable care around the world. PMID:25906093

  9. Comparative Trial to Study the Effectiveness of Clonidine Hydrochloride and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Opioid Withdrawal – A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Abbas, Zaffar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of opioid addiction has alarmingly increased over the recent years. In South Asian region alone there are more than 10 million opioid abusers amounting to 2% of world population. Detoxification remains to be the first step for the successful treatment of opioid addiction. The present study was carried out to compare the relative efficacy and safety of buprenorphine –naloxone and clonidine hydrochloride in the detoxification of opioid-dependents. Materials and Methods: Present trial was conducted at De- addiction centre of Institute of Mental and Neurosciences (IMNS), GMC Srinagar. Fifty four (54) treatment seeking subjects, 15-50 years of age, fulfilling DSM-1V TR (American Psychiatric association`s Mental Disorders-1V text revision) criteria for opioid dependence were included and randomized into two groups. The groups received either clonidine hydrochloride (Group A) or buprenorphine- naloxone (Bup-Nax) (Group B) for the duration of 10 days. The efficacy of the two drugs in controlling the opioid withdrawal was evaluated by Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) and their effect on the desire for the abused substance was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The safety of the two drugs was measured by taking the side effect profile of the two compared drugs into consideration. Results: There was significant difference of COWS-score between the two groups which was evident from day 3 (14.85 ± 3.43 vs. 11.67 ± 2.40, p<0.005) and continued till day 6 (2.56 ± 1.40 vs. 0.30 ± 0.61, p<0.005), for Group A and group B respectively. The effect of two drugs in controlling the craving for the abused substance also showed significant difference from day 2 (66.30 ± 10.80 vs. 47.40 ± 12.90, p<0.005) till day 5 (7.78 ± 6.41 vs. 1.85 ± 6.22, p<0.005), for Group A and Group B respectively. Conclusion: Administration of buprenorphine-naloxone was more efficient in reducing the signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal and in controlling the craving for the abused substance during the first few days of detoxification. PMID:25738001

  10. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Artus, Majid; Croft, Peter; Lewis, Martyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. Methods Aims and objectives To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted about their pain in primary care. Study design Face-to-face interview-based survey. Setting Three general practices in North Staffordshire. Participants Respondents to a population pain survey who had reported having musculoskeletal pain in the survey and who had consulted about their pain in primary care in the previous 12 months as well as consenting to further research and agreeing to an interview. Information was gathered about their pain and the use of all treatments for pain, including CAM, in the previous year. Results 138 interviews were completed. 116 participants (84%) had used at least one CAM treatment for pain in the previous year. 65% were current users of CAM. The ratio of over-the-counter CAM use to care from a CAM provider was 3:2. 111 participants (80%) had used conventional treatment. 95 (69%) were using a combination of CAM and conventional treatment. Glucosamine and fish oil were the most commonly used CAM treatments (38%, 35% respectively). Most CAM treatments were scored on average as being helpful, and users indicated that they intended to use again 87% of the CAM treatments they had already used. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that most primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain have used CAM in the previous year, usually in combination with conventional treatments. The high prevalence and wide range of users experiences of benefit and harm from CAM strengthen the argument for more research into this type of medicine to quantify benefit and assess safety. The observation that most users of conventional medicine also used CAM suggests a continuing need for more investigation of effective pain management in primary care. PMID:17480212

  11. Spontaneous Reductions in Smoking during Double-blind Buprenorphine Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Mollie E.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.; Sigmon, Stacey C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests a positive association between administration of psychoactive drugs and rates of cigarette smoking. Prevalence of smoking among opioid-dependent individuals, for example, is four times greater than the general population. We recently completed a randomized double-blind trial evaluating outpatient buprenorphine taper for prescription opioid (PO) abusers, which provided an unique opportunity to examine naturalistic changes in smoking among participants who detoxified without resumption of illicit opioid use. Participants received no smoking-cessation services and were not encouraged to alter their smoking in any way. A subset of 10 opioid-dependent smokers, who were randomized to receive the same 4-week buprenorphine taper and successfully completed detoxification, were included in the present study. They provided staff-observed urine specimens thrice-weekly throughout the 12-week trial. Specimens were analyzed onsite via enzyme-multiplied immunoassay for urinary cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that provides a sensitive biochemical measure of smoking status. Mean cotinine levels were significantly different across study phases, with significantly lower cotinine levels during taper (1317.5 ng/ml) and post-taper (1015.8 ng/ml) vs. intake (1648.5 ng/ml) phases (p’s<.05). Overall, mean cotinine levels decreased by 38% between intake and end-of-study, reflecting a reduction of approximately eight cigarettes per day. These data provide additional evidence that opioids influence smoking and extend prior findings to include primary PO abusers, rigorous double-blind opioid dosing conditions and urinary cotinine. These results also suggest that, while likely insufficient for complete cessation, patients who successfully taper from opioids may also experience concurrent reductions in smoking and thus may be ideal candidates for smoking cessation services. PMID:24845165

  12. [Septic shock in intensive care units. Current focus on treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Essential therapeutic principles in children with septic shock persist over time, although some new concepts have been recently incorporated, and fully awareness of pediatricians and intensivists is essential. Fluid resuscitation is a fundamental intervention, but the kind of ideal fluid has not been established yet, as each of these interventions has specific limitations and there is no evidence supportive of the superiority of one type of fluid. Should septic shock persists despite adequate fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropic medication and/or vasopressors is indicated. New vasoactive drugs can be used in refractory septic shock caused by vasopressors, and the use of hydrocortisone should be considered in children with suspected adrenal insufficiency, as it reduces the need for vasopressors. The indications for red blood cells transfusion or the optimal level of glycemia are still controversial, with no consensus on the threshold value for the use of these blood products or the initiation of insulin administration, respectively. Likewise, the use of high-volume hemofiltration is a controversial issue and further study is needed on the routine recommendation in the course of septic shock. Nutritional support is crucial, as malnutrition is a serious complication that should be properly prevented and treated. The aim of this paper is to provide update on the most recent advances as concerns the treatment of septic shock in the pediatric population. PMID:26323988

  13. Impact of Brief Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Insomnia on Health Care Utilization and Costs

    PubMed Central

    McCrae, Christina S.; Bramoweth, Adam D.; Williams, Jacob; Roth, Alicia; Mosti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine health care utilization (HCU) and costs following brief cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (bCBTi). Methods: Reviewed medical records of 84 outpatients [mean age = 54.25 years (19.08); 58% women] treated in a behavioral sleep medicine clinic (2005-2010) based in an accredited sleep disorders center. Six indicators of HCU and costs were obtained: estimated total and outpatient costs, estimated primary care visits, CPT costs, number of office visits, and number of medications. All patients completed ? 1 session of bCBTi. Those who attended ? 3 sessions were considered completers (n = 37), and completers with significant sleep improvements were considered responders (n = 32). Results: For completers and responders, all HCU and cost variables, except number of medications, significantly decreased (ps < 0.05) or trended towards decrease at post-treatment. Completers had average decreases in CPT costs of $200 and estimated total costs of $75. Responders had average decreases in CPT costs of $210. No significant decreases occurred for non-completers. Conclusions: bCBTi can reduce HCU and costs. Response to bCBTi resulted in greater reduction of HCU and costs. While limited by small sample size and non-normal data distribution, the findings highlight the need for greater dissemination of bCBTi for several reasons: a high percentage of completers responded to treatment, as few as 3 sessions can result in significant improvements in insomnia severity, bCBTi can be delivered by novice clinicians, and health care costs can reduce following treatment. Insomnia remains an undertreated disorder, and brief behavioral treatments can help to increase access to care and reduce the burden of insomnia. Citation: McCrae CS; Bramoweth AD; Williams J; Roth A; Mosti C. Impact of brief cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia on health care utilization and costs. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):127-135. PMID:24532995

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Sustained-Release and Transdermal Buprenorphine in Göttingen Minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Allison J; Garcia, Kelly D; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Jenkins, Gary J; Nunamaker, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The opioid buprenorphine has been shown to provide adequate postoperative analgesia in both companion and laboratory animals. However, its use is still hindered by the need for multiple parenteral injections to achieve continuous analgesia. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a pharmacokinetic analysis of 2 new long-acting formulations of buprenorphine—an injectable sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and a transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) patch—in healthy Göttingen minipigs by using liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of 0.18 mg/kg SC SRB and 30 ?g/h TDB achieved AUC0-Tlast of 221.6 ± 26.8 and 25.2 ± 3.9 ng × h/mL, respectively, compared with 9.7 ± 1.4 ng*h/mL for 0.02 mg/kg IV buprenorphine. By using a hypothesized therapeutic plasma buprenorphine concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL, therapeutic concentrations were achieved at the first study time point (5 to 30 min) and lasted an average of 8.0 ± 1.3 h for intravenous buprenorphine and 264.0 ± 32.2 h for SRB. TDB achieved therapeutic concentrations in 12 to 24 h after patch application, which lasted until the patch was removed at 72 h. The results of this study suggest that SRB and TDB are long-acting alternatives for pain management, and their use could decrease animal handling and stress, thereby simplifying pain management and improving welfare in laboratory swine. PMID:25650977

  15. Pharmacokinetics of sustained-release and transdermal buprenorphine in Göttingen minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    PubMed

    Thiede, Allison J; Garcia, Kelly D; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Jenkins, Gary J; Nunamaker, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    The opioid buprenorphine has been shown to provide adequate postoperative analgesia in both companion and laboratory animals. However, its use is still hindered by the need for multiple parenteral injections to achieve continuous analgesia. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a pharmacokinetic analysis of 2 new long-acting formulations of buprenorphine-an injectable sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and a transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) patch-in healthy Göttingen minipigs by using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of 0.18 mg/kg SC SRB and 30 ? g/h TDB achieved AUC(0-Tlast) of 221.6 ± 26.8 and 25.2 ± 3.9 ng × h/mL, respectively, compared with 9.7 ± 1.4 ng*h/mL for 0.02 mg/kg IV buprenorphine. By using a hypothesized therapeutic plasma buprenorphine concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL, therapeutic concentrations were achieved at the first study time point (5 to 30 min) and lasted an average of 8.0 ± 1.3 h for intravenous buprenorphine and 264.0 ± 32.2 h for SRB. TDB achieved therapeutic concentrations in 12 to 24 h after patch application, which lasted until the patch was removed at 72 h. The results of this study suggest that SRB and TDB are long-acting alternatives for pain management, and their use could decrease animal handling and stress, thereby simplifying pain management and improving welfare in laboratory swine. PMID:25650977

  16. Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Jaffe, Jerome H; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-02-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a ?-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N=48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs. PMID:25544740

  17. The role of coping in depression treatment utilization for VA primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Glickman, Mark E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Mueller, Nora M.; Dell, Natalie S.; Zhao, Shibei; Eisen, Susan V.; Elwy, A. Rani

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of Veterans’ coping strategies on mental health treatment engagement following a positive screen for depression. Methods A mixed methods observational study using a mailed survey and semi structured interviews. Sample included 271 Veterans who screened positive for depression during a primary care visit at one of three VA medical centers and had not received a diagnosis of depression or prescribed antidepressants 12 months prior to screening. A subsample of 23 Veterans was interviewed. Results Logistic regression models showed that Veterans who reported more instrumental support and active coping were more likely to receive depression or other mental health treatment within three months of their positive depression screen. Those who reported emotional support or self distraction as coping strategies were less likely to receive any treatment in the same time frame. Qualitative analyses revealed that how Veterans use these and other coping strategies can impact treatment engagement in a variety of ways. Conclusions The relationship between Veterans’ use of coping strategies and treatment engagement for depression may not be readily apparent without in depth exploration. Practice implications In VA primary care clinics, nurse care managers and behavioral health providers should explore how Veterans’ methods of coping may impact treatment engagement. PMID:24315160

  18. Chronic care and addictions treatment: a feasibility study on the implementation of posttreatment continuing recovery monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Mark; Banerjee, Kakoli; Garner, Robert

    2010-09-01

    In the treatment of drug addiction, as with other chronic conditions, the effects of treatment are significant but not long lasting after discharge unless continuing monitoring is provided. Efforts to help patients sustain positive treatment outcomes are generally directed to community support. Postdischarge checkups can help patients evaluate their behavior and recovery-related issues--similar to a person with diabetes reporting on blood sugar levels and diet and exercise patterns. The challenge for providers is to raise awareness of the importance of continuing recovery monitoring and the responsibility of the treatment program to build a more seamless continuum of care for patients who have completed a primary treatment episode. This article reviews a pilot project of the Department of Alcohol & Drug Services of Santa Clara County, California that tested the feasibility of implementing a continuing recovery monitoring (CRM) service using post-discharge telephone check-ups for volunteer patients (N=32) who completed treatment. The aims of the study were to (a) develop a model for continuing recovery monitoring, (b) gather data on the model's utility including identifying organizational and logistical challenges and, (c) describe several changes needed in the system of care to add CRM. The study showed that the model of continuing recovery monitoring is a feasible way to extend a system's existing continuum of care. PMID:21138206

  19. Personal care compounds in a reed bed sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xijuan; Pauly, Udo; Rehfus, Stefan; Bester, Kai

    2009-08-01

    Sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) has long been used as fertilizer on agricultural land. The usage of sludge as fertilizer is controversial because of possible high concentration of xenobiotic compounds, heavy metals as well as pathogens. In this study, the fate of the xenobiotic compounds triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol), OTNE (1-(2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-naphthalen-2-yl)ethan-1-one), HHCB (1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-(g)-2-benzopyran), HHCB-lactone, AHTN (7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6 hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronaphthalene), and DEHP (bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate) in advanced biological treatment of sludge was determined. During 13months of field-incubation of the sludge in reed beds, the xenobiotic compounds were analysed. The bactericide triclosan was reduced to 60%, 45%, and 32% of its original concentration in the top, middle, and bottom layer. The fragrance OTNE was decreased to 42% in the top layer, 53% in the middle layer, and 70% in the bottom layer, respectively. For DEHP a reduction of 70%, 71%, and 40% was observed in the top, middle, and bottom layer, respectively. The polycyclic musk compounds HHCB, AHTN, and the primary metabolite of HHCB, i.e., HHCB-lactone showed no degradation in 13months during the experimental period in this installation. Tentative half-lives of degradation of triclosan, OTNE and DEHP were estimated to be 315-770d, 237-630d, and 289-578d, respectively. PMID:19450869

  20. Algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 3-10%. in European studies. However, the diagnosis of RLS in primary care remains low and mistreatment is common. Methods The current article reports on the considerations of RLS diagnosis and management that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored task force consisting of experts and primary care practioners. The task force sought to develop a better understanding of barriers to diagnosis in primary care practice and overcome these barriers with diagnostic and treatment algorithms. Results The barriers to diagnosis identified by the task force include the presentation of symptoms, the language used to describe them, the actual term "restless legs syndrome" and difficulties in the differential diagnosis of RLS. Conclusion The EURLSSG task force reached a consensus and agreed on the diagnostic and treatment algorithms published here. PMID:21352569

  1. Improving Care for Depression & Suicide Risk in Adolescents: Innovative Strategies for Bringing Treatments to Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on interventions and services for depression and suicide prevention among adolescents, with the goals of placing this science within the context of current changing health care environments and highlighting innovative models for improving health and mental health. We examine the: challenges and opportunities offered by new initiatives and legislation designed to transform the U.S. health and mental healthcare systems; summarize knowledge regarding the treatment of depression and suicidality/self-harm in adolescents; and describe innovative models for partnering with health systems and communities. This review demonstrates that treatment models and service delivery strategies are currently available for increasing evidence-based care, particularly for depression, and concludes with recommendations for future research and quality improvement initiatives aimed at inspiring additional efforts to put science to work, bridge science and community practice, and develop strategies for partnering with communities to improve care, mental health, and well-being among adolescents. PMID:24437432

  2. The effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution compared to buprenorphine for the control of postoperative pain in dogs in a randomized, multicentered clinical study.

    PubMed

    Linton, D D; Wilson, M G; Newbound, G C; Freise, K J; Clark, T P

    2012-08-01

    A prospective, double-blinded, positive-controlled, multicenter, noninferiority clinical study was conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution (TFS) for the control of postoperative pain. Four hundred forty-five client-owned dogs of various breeds were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of TFS (2.6 mg/kg [?50 ?L/kg]) (N = 223) applied 2-4 h prior to surgery or buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) (N = 222) administered intramuscularly 2-4 h prior to surgery and every 6 h through 90 h. There were 159 (35.7%) males and 286 (64.3%) females ranging from 0.5 to 16 years of age and 3 to 98.5 kg enrolled. Pain was scored using the modified Glasgow Composite Pain Scale with an a priori dropout criteria of ? 8 (20 maximum score). The one-sided upper 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between fentanyl and buprenorphine treatment failures was 5.6%, which was not greater than the a priori selected margin difference of 15%. Adverse events attributed to either treatment were minimal in impact and were approximately equal between groups. Sustained plasma fentanyl concentrations provided by a single pre-emptive dose of TFS are safe and effective and are noninferior to repeated injections of buprenorphine in controlling postoperative pain over 4?days. This long-acting fentanyl formulation provides veterinarians with a novel, registered option for the control of postoperative pain in dogs that improves dosing compliance and potentially mitigates the disadvantages of oral, parenteral, and patch delivered opioids. PMID:22731776

  3. When Depression Complicates Childbearing: Guidelines for Screening and Treatment during Antenatal and Postpartum Obstetric Care

    PubMed Central

    Muzik, Maria; Marcus, Sheila M.; Heringhausen, Julie E.; Flynn, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Prevalence studies show that one in five women experience an episode of major depressive disorder during their lifetime. The peripartum period constitutes a prime time for symptom exacerbation and relapse of depressive episodes. It is important for health care providers, specifically those in obstetric care, to be aware of (1) the frequency of depression in pregnant and postpartum women; (2) signs, symptoms, and appropriate screening methods; and (3) the health risks for the mother and growing fetus if depression is undetected or untreated. Because management of depressed peripartum women also includes care of a growing fetus or breastfeeding infant, treatment may be complex and requires input from a multidisciplinary team, including an obstetrician, psychiatrist, and pediatrician, to provide optimal care. PMID:19944300

  4. The assessment and treatment of a complex geriatric patient by an interprofessional primary care team

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephanie H; Tracy, C Shawn; Upshur, Ross E G

    2011-01-01

    Mr K is an 89-year-old married man with a number of comorbid conditions and multiple recent falls. He was referred to the IMPACT clinic (Interprofessional Model of Practice for Aging and Complex Treatments) as his primary care physician was concerned about his declining health and the growing care giver burden on his wife. Mr K’s condition was deteriorating while the complexity of his case was increasing; therefore, an in-depth team assessment was sought to determine the best management plan and to assess his capacity to remain at home (his expressed preference). The IMPACT team met with Mr K and his wife for a 2 h interprofessional assessment. A comprehensive care plan was developed including specific recommendations for implementing change. After the visit to the IMPACT clinic, Mr K’s care was returned to his regular family physician. PMID:22698900

  5. Determinants of Engagement in HIV Treatment and Care among Zambians new to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah L.; Zulu, Isaac; Vamos, Szonja; Cook, Ryan; Chitalu, Ndashi; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the determinants of engagement in HIV care among Zambian patients new to antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, and the effect of an intervention to increase medication adherence. Participants (n = 160) were randomized to a 3-month group or individual intervention utilizing a crossover design. Psychophysiological (depression, cognitive functioning, health status), social (social support, disclosure, stigma), and structural (health care access, patient-provider communication) factors and treatment engagement (adherence to clinic visits and medication) were assessed. Participants initially receiving group intervention improved their adherence, but gains were not maintained following crossover to the individual intervention. Increased social support and patient-provider communication and decreased concern about HIV medications predicted increased clinic attendance across both arms. Results suggest that early participation in a group intervention may promote increased adherence among patients new to therapy, but long-term engagement in care may be sustained by both one-on-one and group interventions by health care staff. PMID:23009738

  6. Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Michael A.

    This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…

  7. A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

  8. Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

  9. 76 FR 15349 - Fiscal Year 2011 Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ...2011 Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of Defense Medical Treatment Facilities...and delegated to the Director of the Office of Management...for the cost of inpatient medical services furnished by...

  10. Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary that primary cultures of human hepato- cytes could predict potential drug interactions with methadone, or nelfinavir before incubation with methadone or buprenorphine. Culture me- dia (0­60 min) was analyzed

  11. Patterns of Geographic Mobility Predict Barriers to Engagement in HIV Care and Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A.; Khan, Shah Z.; Garduño, L. Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  12. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... health care operations. (a) Standard: Permitted uses and disclosures. Except with respect to uses or... protected health information for treatment, payment, or health care operations as set forth in paragraph...

  13. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... health care operations. (a) Standard: Permitted uses and disclosures. Except with respect to uses or... protected health information for treatment, payment, or health care operations as set forth in paragraph...

  14. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... health care operations. (a) Standard: Permitted uses and disclosures. Except with respect to uses or... protected health information for treatment, payment, or health care operations as set forth in paragraph...

  15. Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments for Depressive Disorders in Primary Care: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Sigterman, Kirsten; Kriston, Levente; Rücker, Gerta; Jamil, Susanne; Meissner, Karin; Schneider, Antonius

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We performed a systematic review of the currently available evidence on whether psychological treatments are effective for treating depressed primary care patients in comparison with usual care or placebo, taking the type of therapy and its delivery mode into account. METHODS Randomized controlled trials comparing a psychological treatment with a usual care or a placebo control in adult, depressed, primary care patients were identified by searches in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PsycINFO up to December 2013. At least 2 reviewers extracted information from included studies and assessed the risk of bias. Random effects meta-analyses were performed using posttreatment depression scores as outcome. RESULTS A total of 30 studies with 5,159 patients met the inclusion criteria. Compared with control, the effect (standardized mean difference) at completion of treatment was ?0.30 (95% CI, ?0.48 to ?0.13) for face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), ?0.14 (?0.40 to 0.12) for face-to-face problem-solving therapy, ?0.24 (?0.47 to ?0.02) for face-to-face interpersonal psychotherapy, ?0.28 (?0.44 to ?0.12) for other face-to-face psychological interventions, ?0.43 (?0.62 to ?0.24) for remote therapist-led CBT, ?0.56 (?1.57 to 0.45) for remote therapist-led problem-solving therapy, ?0.40 (?0.69 to ?0.11) for guided self-help CBT, and ?0.27 (?0.44 to ?0.10) for no or minimal contact CBT. CONCLUSIONS There is evidence that psychological treatments are effective in depressed primary care patients. For CBT approaches, substantial evidence suggests that interventions that are less resource intensive might have effects similar to more intense treatments. PMID:25583894

  16. Patients' treatment beliefs in low back pain: development and validation of a questionnaire in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dima, Alexandra; Lewith, George T; Little, Paul; Moss-Morris, Rona; Foster, Nadine E; Hankins, Matthew; Surtees, George; Bishop, Felicity L

    2015-08-01

    Choosing the most appropriate treatment for individual patients with low back pain (LBP) can be challenging, and clinical guidelines recommend taking into account patients' preferences. However, no tools exist to assess or compare patients' views about LBP treatments. We report the development and validation of the Low Back Pain Treatment Beliefs Questionnaire (LBP-TBQ) for use across different treatments in clinical practice and research. Using qualitative data, we developed a pool of items assessing perceived credibility, effectiveness, concerns about, and individual "fit" of specific treatments. These items were included in a survey completed by 429 primary care patients with LBP, of whom 115 completed it again 1 to 2 weeks later. We performed psychometric analyses using nonparametric item response theory and classical test theory. The 4 subscales of the resulting 16-item LBP-TBQ showed good homogeneity (H = 0.46-0.76), internal consistency (? = 0.73-0.94), and stability (r = 0.63-0.83), confirmed most convergent and discriminant validity hypotheses, and had acceptable structural validity for 4 guideline-recommended treatments: pain medication, exercise, manual therapy, and acupuncture. Participants with stronger positive treatment beliefs were more likely to rank that treatment as their first choice, indicating good criterion validity (t values = 3.11-9.80, all P < 0.01, except pain medication effectiveness beliefs, t(339) = 1.35; P = 0.18). A short 4-item version also displayed good homogeneity (H = 0.43-0.66), internal consistency (? = 0.70-0.86), and stability (r = 0.82-0.85) and was significantly related to treatment choice (t values = 4.33-9.25, all P < 0.01). The LBP-TBQ can be used to assess treatment beliefs in primary care patients with LBP and to investigate the effects of treatment beliefs on treatment uptake and adherence. PMID:25906346

  17. Depression Treatment for Impoverished Mothers by Point-of-Care Providers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman’s usual point-of-care, including home-visits or an ob-gyn office. Method Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician’s assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study’s participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from four study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared to women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. PMID:25486371

  18. Feasibility of two modes of treatment delivery for child anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chavira, Denise A; Drahota, Amy; Garland, Ann F; Roesch, Scott; Garcia, Maritza; Stein, Murray B

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we examine the feasibility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety in primary care, using two modes of treatment delivery. A total of 48 parents and youth (8-13) with anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to receive 10-sessions of CBT either delivered by a child anxiety specialist in the primary care clinic or implemented by the parent with therapist support by telephone (i.e., face-to-face or therapist-supported bibliotherapy). Feasibility outcomes including satisfaction, barriers to treatment participation, safety, and dropout were assessed. Independent evaluators, blind to treatment condition, administered the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up; clinical self-report questionnaires were also administered. Findings revealed high satisfaction, low endorsement of barriers, low drop out rates, and no adverse events across the two modalities. According to the CGI-I, 58.3%-75% of participants were considered responders (i.e., much or very much improved) at the various time points. Similar patterns were found for remission from "primary anxiety disorder" and "all anxiety disorders" as defined by the ADIS. Clinically significant improvement was seen on the various parent and child self-report measures of anxiety. Findings suggest that both therapy modalities are feasible and associated with significant treatment gains in the primary care setting. (clinicaltrials.gov unique identifier: NCT00769925). PMID:25075802

  19. Feasibility of Two Modes of Treatment Delivery for Child Anxiety in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chavira, Denise A.; Drahota, Amy; Garland, Ann; Roesch, Scott; Garcia, Maritza; Stein, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine the feasibility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety in primary care, using two modes of treatment delivery. A total of 48 parents and youth (8–13) with anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to receive 10-sessions of CBT either delivered by a child anxiety specialist in the primary care clinic or implemented by the parent with therapist support by telephone (i.e., face-to-face or therapist-supported bibliotherapy). Feasibility outcomes including satisfaction, barriers to treatment participation, safety, and dropout were assessed. Independent evaluators, blind to treatment condition, administered the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up; clinical self-report questionnaires were also administered. Findings revealed high satisfaction, low endorsement of barriers, low drop out rates, and no adverse events across the two modalities. According to the CGI-I, 58.3%–75% of participants were considered responders (i.e., much or very much improved) at the various time points. Similar patterns were found for remission from “primary anxiety disorder” and “all anxiety disorders” as defined by the ADIS. Clinically significant improvement was seen on the various parent and child self-report measures of anxiety. Findings suggest that both therapy modalities are feasible and associated with significant treatment gains in the primary care setting. PMID:25075802

  20. Orthodontic treatment of children/adolescents with special health care needs: an analysis of treatment length and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the treatment time and differences between the pre- and post-treatment peer assessment rating (PAR) index and aesthetic component (AC) of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) scores in children/adolescents with special health care needs (SHCNs), compared to non-special health care needs (NSHCNs) controls. Methods Based on certain inclusion and exclusion criteria, medical records of SHCNs and randomly selected NSHCNs controls at the Department of Orthodontics, University Hospital Muenster were analysed retrospectively for the treatment time, number of appointments, chair time (“moderate” or “considerable”), PAR scores, and AC scores. Sample size calculation, descriptive statistics, and explorative analyses were performed using the Mann–Whitney U Test. Results Twenty-nine children with SHCNs (21 boys, 9 girls; median age: 11 years, pre-treatment) and 29 children with NSHCNs (12 boys, 17 girls; median age: 12 years, pre-treatment) were enrolled in this study. The overall treatment time did not differ between the patient groups. However, more “considerable chair time” was needed for the SHCNs group compared to the control group (p?treatment earlier, by a median of 1 year, compared to children in the NSHCNs group. The SHCNs group had significantly higher pre- and post-treatment PAR scores (median 21/median 6) and AC scores (median 9/median 3) compared to NSHCNs patients (PAR: median 17/median 0; AC: median 5/median 1). However, the overall treatment time and the overall PAR and AC score reduction did not differ significantly between the SHCNs and NSHCNs groups. Conclusions While the overall treatment time and number of appointments did not differ, the overall chair time was higher in the SHCNs group. The pre- and post-treatment PAR and AC scores were significantly higher in the SHCNs group. PMID:24915851

  1. The unique role of transdermal buprenorphine in the global chronic pain epidemic.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Scholten, Willem; Smith, Kevin J; Leighton-Scott, James; Willis, Jenna C; Henningfield, Jack E

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a global epidemic, exacerbated by barriers to access of opioid analgesics. Regulations about opioids attempt to protect public health from the risks of harmful use of opioids, diversion, and dependence. Transdermal buprenorphine is an effective opioid analgesic agent with unique properties that may make it particularly well suited for more widespread use. It is a versatile analgesic product with demonstrated safety and effectiveness in cancer and noncancer pain populations. Its pharmacological properties make it a first-line opioid analgesic for geriatric patients and patients with renal dysfunction; no dosing adjustments need to be made. The 7-day transdermal delivery system is convenient for patients and promotes compliance. A low dose of buprenorphine can provide effective and well-tolerated pain relief. Although buprenorphine has been associated with certain opioid-related adverse effects, such as dizziness and nausea, it is associated with a lower rate of constipation than many other opioid analgesics. The potential for nonmedical use of buprenorphine is relatively low compared with other opioid agents. Buprenorphine has a relatively low likeability for nonmedical use and the transdermal matrix patch renders the substance particularly difficult to extract for illicit purposes. PMID:26205326

  2. Reduced fear-recognition sensitivity following acute buprenorphine administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Phillips, Nicole; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Thomas, Kevin; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, and in the reduction of fear in particular. In humans, while there is evidence that the opioid antagonist naloxone acutely enhances the acquisition of conditioned fear, there are no corresponding data on the effect of opioid agonists in moderating responses to fear. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mu-opioid agonist buprenorphine would decrease fear sensitivity with an emotion-recognition paradigm. Healthy human subjects participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, in which they performed a dynamic emotion recognition task 120min after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. In the recognition task, basic emotional expressions were morphed between their full expression and neutral in 2% steps, and presented as dynamic video-clips with final frames of different emotional intensity for each trial, which allows for a fine-grained measurement of emotion sensitivity. Additionally, visual analog scales were used to investigate acute effects of buprenorphine on mood. Compared to placebo, buprenorphine resulted in a significant reduction in the sensitivity for recognizing fearful facial expressions exclusively. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in humans, that acute up-regulation of the opioid system reduces fear recognition sensitivity. Moreover, the absence of an effect of buprenorphine on mood provides evidence of a direct influence of opioids upon the core fear system in the human brain. PMID:22651957

  3. A Question About the Safety of Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Benzodiazepine Drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Drug overdose is the leading cause of injury death in the United States, and most deaths are related to prescription drugs. A substantial proportion of these deaths involve opioid or benzodiazepine drugs, and many overdoses include a combination of both drug classes. Buprenorphine/naloxone has an unusual pharmacology that distinguishes it from other opioid drugs. Animal and human studies have found that buprenorphine is associated with a ceiling to its cardio-respiratory depressant effect at higher doses, such that it may have a wider safety margin compared to other opioid drugs. Compared to buprenorphine alone, buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with less cardiorespiratory depression. Drug safety data from the National Poison Data System, Drug Abuse Warning Network, and other sources suggest that the safety of buprenorphine/naloxone is favorable compared to the morbidity and mortality associated with other opioid drugs and other classes of psychotropic drugs. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(12), 11-14.]. PMID:26653090

  4. Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

    2015-03-01

    Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals. PMID:25831576

  5. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment to follow-up care. PMID:24007941

  6. Clinical Efficacy of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine with Meloxicam for Postoperative Analgesia in Beagle Dogs Undergoing Ovariohysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Wilsey, Amanda S; Jenkins, Gary J; Medina, Chris L

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, and plasma buprenorphine concentrations of sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and buprenorphine after subcutaneous administration in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. In a prospective, randomized, blinded design, 20 healthy adult female Beagle dogs underwent routine ovariohysterectomy and received multimodal analgesia consisting of meloxicam and one of two buprenorphine formulations. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either SRB (0.2 mg/kg SC, once) or buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d). Blinded observers assessed all dogs by using sedation scores, pain scores, temperature, HR, RR, and general wellbeing. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia with 0.02 mg/kg buprenorphine SC if the postoperative pain score exceeded a predetermined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Tukey–Kramer multiple comparison. Age, body weight, anesthetic duration, surgical duration, sevoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between groups. Dogs in both formulation groups had comparable postoperative sedation and pain scores. One dog from each formulation group had breakthrough pain requiring rescue analgesia. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations remained above a hypothesized therapeutic concentration of 0.6 ng/mL for 136.0 ± 11.3 and 10.67 ± 0.84 h for SRB and buprenorphine, respectively. Based on the results of this study, multimodal analgesic regimens consisting of meloxicam and either buprenorphine or SRB are equally efficacious in managing pain associated with an ovariohysterectomy and show comparable side effects. PMID:25255072

  7. Lung and colorectal cancer treatment and outcomes in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Williams, Christina D; Fortune-Britt, Alice G

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the second- and third-most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. While many studies have evaluated the treatment quality and outcomes of various aspects of VA LC and CRC care, there are no known reviews synthesizing this information across studies. The purpose of this literature review was to describe LC and CRC treatment (ie, surgical and nonsurgical) and outcomes (eg, mortality, psychosocial, and other) in the VA health care system as reported in the existing peer-reviewed scientific literature. We identified potential articles through a search of published literature using the PubMed electronic database. Our search strategy identified articles containing Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords addressing veterans or veterans’ health and LC and/or CRC. We limited articles to those published in the previous 11 years (January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2013). A total of 230 articles were retrieved through the search. After applying the selection criteria, we included 74 studies (34 LC, 47 CRC, and seven both LC and CRC). VA provides a full array of treatments, often with better outcomes than other health care systems. More work is needed to assess patient-reported outcomes. PMID:25609998

  8. Effects of care pathways on the in-hospital treatment of heart failure: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Care pathways have become a popular tool to enhance the quality of care by improving patient outcomes, promoting patient safety, increasing patient satisfaction, and optimizing the use of resources. We performed a disease specific systematic review to determine how care pathways in the hospital treatment of heart failure affect in-hospital mortality, length of in-hospital stay, readmission rate and hospitalisation cost when compared with standard care. Methods Medline, Cinahl, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from 1985 to 2010. Each study was assessed independently by two reviewers. Methodological quality of the included studies was assed using the Jadad methodological approach for randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and the New Castle Ottawa Scale for case–control studies, cohort studies and time interrupted series. Results Seven studies met the study inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review with a total sample of 3,690 patients. The combined overall results showed that care pathways have a significant positive effect on mortality and readmission rate. A shorter length of hospital stay was also observed compared with the standard care group. No significant difference was found in the hospitalisation costs. More positive results were observed in controlled trials compared to randomized controlled trials. Conclusion By combining all possible results, it can be concluded that care pathways for treatment of heart failure decrease mortality rates and length of hospital stay, but no statistically significant difference was observed in the readmission rates and hospitalisation costs. However, one should be cautious with overall conclusions: what works for one organization may not work for another because of the subtle differences in processes and bottlenecks. PMID:23009030

  9. Scaling up antiretroviral treatment and improving patient retention in care: lessons from Ethiopia, 2005-2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment (ART) was provided to more than nine million people by the end of 2012. Although ART programs in resource-limited settings have expanded treatment, inadequate retention in care has been a challenge. Ethiopia has been scaling up ART and improving retention (defined as continuous engagement of patients in care) in care. We aimed to analyze the ART program in Ethiopia. Methods A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was used. Routine ART program data was used to study ART scale up and patient retention in care. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with program managers. Results The number of people receiving ART in Ethiopia increased from less than 9,000 in 2005 to more than 439, 000 in 2013. Initially, the public health approach, health system strengthening, community mobilization and provision of care and support services allowed scaling up of ART services. While ART was being scaled up, retention was recognized to be insufficient. To improve retention, a second wave of interventions, related to programmatic, structural, socio-cultural, and patient information systems, have been implemented. Retention rate increased from 77% in 2004/5 to 92% in 2012/13. Conclusion Ethiopia has been able to scale up ART and improve retention in care in spite of its limited resources. This has been possible due to interventions by the ART program, supported by health systems strengthening, community-based organizations and the communities themselves. ART programs in resource-limited settings need to put in place similar measures to scale up ART and retain patients in care. PMID:24886686

  10. Staff Engagement During Complex Pediatric Medical Care: The Role of Patient, Family, and Treatment Variables

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Steinmiller, Elizabeth; Simms, Steve; Grossman, Michael; Li, Yuelin

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of patient, family, and treatment variables on self-reported engagement for physicians and nurses working with pediatric complex care patients. Methods Sixty-eight physicians and 85 registered nurses at a children’s hospital reviewed eight case scenarios that varied by the patient and patient’s family (each cooperative vs. difficult) and the length of hospitalization (<30 vs. >30 days). Participants rated their engagement from highly engaged/responsive to distancing/disconnected behaviors. Results Nurses were more likely than physicians to engage in situations with a difficult patient/cooperative family but less likely to engage in situations with a cooperative patient/difficult family. Nurses were more likely to consult a colleague regarding the care of a difficult patient/difficult family, while physicians were more likely to refer a difficult patient/difficult family to a psychosocial professional. Conclusions Differences were found for engagement with “difficult” patients/families, with physicians more likely to distance themselves or refer to a psychosocial professional, while nurses were more likely to consult with a colleague. Practice Implications Communication between health care team members is essential for optimal family centered health care. Thus, interventions are needed that focus on communication and support for health care teams working with pediatric complex care patients and their families. PMID:19209401

  11. Improving quality of care in substance abuse treatment using five key process improvement principles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kim A.; Green, Carla A.; Ford, James H.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Gustafson, David H.; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Process and quality improvement techniques have been successfully applied in health care arenas, but efforts to institute these strategies in alcohol and drug treatment are underdeveloped. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches participating substance abuse treatment agencies to use process improvement strategies to increase client access to, and retention in, treatment. NIATx recommends five principles to promote organizational change: 1) Understand and involve the customer; 2) Fix key problems; 3) Pick a powerful change leader; 4) Get ideas from outside the organization; and 5) Use rapid-cycle testing. Using case studies, supplemented with cross-agency analyses of interview data, this paper profiles participating NIATx treatment agencies that illustrate application of each principle. Results suggest that the most successful organizations integrate and apply most, if not all, of the five principles as they develop and test change strategies. PMID:22282129

  12. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Woody, George E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol®) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. METHODS Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25 mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. RESULTS Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. PMID:24602363

  13. Health-care costs of losartan and candesartan in the primary treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, M; Russell, D; Bodegard, J; Kjeldsen, S; Hasvold, P; Stålhammar, J; Levin, L-Å

    2011-01-01

    A recent study of two widely used angiotensin receptor blockers reported a reduced risk of cardiovascular events (?14.4%) when using candesartan compared with losartan in the primary treatment of hypertension. In addition to clinical benefits, costs associated with treatment strategies must be considered when allocating scarce health-care resources. The aim of this study was to assess resource use and costs of losartan and candesartan in hypertensive patients. Resource use (drugs, outpatient contacts, hospitalizations and laboratory tests) associated with losartan and candesartan treatment was estimated in 14?100 patients in a real-life clinical setting. We electronically extracted patient data from primary care records and mandatory Swedish national registers for death and hospitalization. Patients treated with losartan had more outpatient contacts (+15.6%), laboratory tests (+13.8%) and hospitalizations (+13.8%) compared with the candesartan group. During a maximum observation time of 9 years, the mean total costs per patient were 10?369 Swedish kronor (95% confidence interval: 3109–17?629) higher in the losartan group. In conclusion, prescribing candesartan for the primary treatment of hypertension results in lower long-term health-care costs compared with losartan. PMID:20376078

  14. Treatment inadequacy in primary and specialized care patients with depressive and/or anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bet, Pierre M; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Balkom, Anton van; Nolen, Willem A; Hoogendijk, Witte J G

    2013-12-15

    All guidelines on major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders recommend pharmacotherapy and/or psychological treatment for moderate to severe disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate treatment inadequacy, both pharmacological and psychological, in a large naturalistic cohort of subjects with MDD and anxiety disorders from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. All subjects with a current 6-month diagnosis were included (n=1662). Demographic data, clinical features and actual medication use were assessed in face-to-face interviews. In moderate to severe MDD, 43% of the subjects were not treated sufficiently with antidepressants or psychological treatment. In primary health care patients, this undertreatment was 70%. In moderate to severe anxiety disorders, 44% of the subjects were not treated sufficiently with antidepressants, benzodiazepines or psychological treatment. Among antidepressant users with moderate to severe MDD, 21% of the pharmacotherapy was inadequate with respect to drug choice, dose and every day use. Undertreatment and pharmacotherapeutic inadequacy are common in moderate to severe MDD and anxiety disorders. Both are more pronounced in primary care than in specialized care. This may be partly due to differences in disease recognition and help seeking behaviour. PMID:23850429

  15. The Cascade of Care for an Australian Community-Based Hepatitis C Treatment Service

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Diana M.; Doyle, Joseph S.; Gordon, Adam; Roberts, Stuart K.; Thompson, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C treatment uptake in Australia is low. To increase access to hepatitis C virus treatment for people who inject drugs, we developed a community-based, nurse-led service that linked a viral hepatitis service in a tertiary hospital to primary care clinics, and resulted in hepatitis C treatment provision in the community. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients referred to the community hepatitis service was undertaken to determine the cascade of care. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of hepatitis C treatment uptake. Results Four hundred and sixty-two patients were referred to the community hepatitis service; 344 attended. Among the 279 attendees with confirmed chronic hepatitis C, 257 (99%) reported ever injecting drugs, and 124 (48%) injected in the last month. Of 201 (72%) patients who had their fibrosis staged, 63 (31%) had F3-F4 fibrosis. Fifty-five patients commenced hepatitis C treatment; 26 (47%) were current injectors and 25 (45%) had F3-F4 fibrosis. Nineteen of the 27 (70%) genotype 1 patients and 14 of the 26 (54%) genotype 3 patients eligible for assessment achieved a sustained virologic response. Advanced fibrosis was a significant predictor of treatment uptake in adjusted analysis (AOR 2.56, CI 1.30–5.00, p = 0.006). Conclusions Our community hepatitis service produced relatively high rates of fibrosis assessment, hepatitis C treatment uptake and cure, among people who inject drugs. These findings highlight the potential benefits of providing community-based hepatitis C care to people who inject drugs in Australia–benefits that should be realised as direct-acting antiviral agents become available. PMID:26562516

  16. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences

    PubMed Central

    Plunkett, Cynthia; Barkan, Ariel L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma) often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients’ lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients’ expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous), we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients’ clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence, and persistence in acromegaly. By encouraging collaboration across the care continuum, this dialog map can facilitate identification of the treatment plan that is most likely to yield the best possible outcome. PMID:26251582

  17. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Health Care Practices Relating to Treatment of HIV in Vellore, India

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ira B.; Wanke, Christine A.; Selvakumar, A.; John, K.R.; Isaac, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In India, little is known about health care-seeking behavior among HIV-infected individuals. Similarly, little is known about how HIV is being treated in the community, in particular by Indian Systems of Medicine (ISM) providers. Therefore, while ART implementation programs continue to expand, it is important to determine whether the knowledge, attitudes, and treatment practices of HIV-infected individuals and their health care providers are aligned with current treatment recommendations. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with persons with HIV (n?=?9 men and 17 women), family members of persons with HIV (n?=?14 men and 3 women), and ISM providers (n?=?7). Many of the patients we studied turned at some point to ISM providers because they believed that such practitioners offer a cure for HIV. ISM treatments sometimes had negative impacts including side effects, unchecked progression of an underlying illness, and financial depletion. Indian women tended to be less knowledgeable about HIV and HIV treatments, and had less access to financial and other resources, than men. Finally, most of the ISM providers reported dangerous misconceptions about HIV transmission, diagnosis, and treatment. While the existence of ART in India is potentially of great benefit to those with HIV infection, this study shows that a variety of social, cultural and governmental barriers may interfere with the effective use of these therapies. Partnerships between the allopathic and traditional/complementary health sectors in research, policy, and practice are essential in building comprehensive HIV/AIDS treatment strategies. PMID:19519232

  18. Persistence of pharmacological treatment into adulthood, in UK primary care, for ADHD patients who started treatment in childhood or adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADHD guidelines in the UK suggest that children and adults who respond to pharmacological treatment should continue for as long as remains clinically effective, subject to regular review. To what extent patients persist with treatment from childhood and adolescence into adulthood is not clear. This study aims to describe, in UK primary care, the persistence of pharmacological treatment for patients with ADHD who started treatment aged 6–17 years and to estimate the percentage of patients who continued treatment from childhood and adolescence into adulthood. Methods The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database was used to identify patients with ADHD who received their first prescription for methylphenidate/ dexamfetamine/atomoxetine, aged 6–17 years. Patients were monitored until their ‘censored date’ (the earliest of the following dates: date the last prescription coded in the database ended, end of the study period (31st December 2008), date at which they transferred out of their practice, date of death, the last date the practice contributed data to the database). Persistence of treatment into adulthood was estimated using Kaplan Meier analysis. Results 610 patients had follow-up data into adulthood. 213 patients (93.4% male) started treatment between 6–12 years; median treatment duration 5.9 years. 131 (61.5%) stopped before 18 years, 82 (38.5%) were still on treatment age ?18 years. 397 patients (86.4% male) started treatment between 13–17 years; median treatment duration was 1.6 years. 227 (57.2%) stopped before 18 years, 170 (42.8%) were still on treatment age ?18 years. The number of females in both age categories was too small to formally test for differences between genders in persistence of treatment. Conclusion Persistence of treatment into adulthood is lower (~40%) compared with published rates of persistence of the condition (~65% when symptomatic definition of remission used). Due to the limited number of patients with data past 18 years, it is important that ongoing monitoring of prescribing into later adulthood is undertaken, particularly to observe the effects of recommendations in new guidelines. PMID:23216881

  19. Palliative Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  20. Sustainable HIV treatment in Africa through viral-load-informed differentiated care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew; Shroufi, Amir; Vojnov, Lara; Cohn, Jennifer; Roberts, Teri; Ellman, Tom; Bonner, Kimberly; Rousseau, Christine; Garnett, Geoff; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Ford, Deborah; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Miners, Alec; Lundgren, Jens D; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katz, Zachary; Maman, David; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Doherty, Meg; Dowdy, David; Nichols, Brooke; Murtagh, Maurine; Wareham, Meghan; Palamountain, Kara M; Chakanyuka Musanhu, Christine; Stevens, Wendy; Katzenstein, David; Ciaranello, Andrea; Barnabas, Ruanne; Braithwaite, R Scott; Bendavid, Eran; Nathoo, Kusum J; van de Vijver, David; Wilson, David P; Holmes, Charles; Bershteyn, Anna; Walker, Simon; Raizes, Elliot; Jani, Ilesh; Nelson, Lisa J; Peeling, Rosanna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Murungu, Joseph; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Hallett, Timothy B; Revill, Paul

    2015-12-01

    There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1 to 3 months for clinical assessment. The clinic costs are comparable with the costs of the drugs themselves and CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, but patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes, a transition to more cost-effective delivery of antiretroviral therapy is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (the viral load) provides a direct measure of the current treatment effect. Viral-load-informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care so that those with suppressed viral load visit the clinic less frequently and attention is focussed on those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach to measuring viral load in many countries is to collect dried blood spot samples for testing in regional laboratories; however, there have been concerns over the sensitivity and specificity of this approach to define treatment failure and the delay in returning results to the clinic. We use modelling to synthesize evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral-load-informed differentiated care, accounting for limitations of dried blood sample testing. We find that viral-load-informed differentiated care using dried blood sample testing is cost-effective and is a recommended strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of point-of-care viral load tests that may become available in the future. PMID:26633768

  1. Home-care treatment of swimmer syndrome in a miniature schnauzer dog

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-A; Na, Ki-Jeong; Cho, Jong-Ki; Shin, Nam-Shik

    2013-01-01

    A 50-day-old, female miniature schnauzer dog was presented for astasia, dorsoventral flattening of the thorax, hypoplasia of hind-limb muscles, stiffness of hind-limb joints, paddling leg motion, and panting. The dog was diagnosed with swimmers syndrome. The dog recovered completely following 40 days of home-care treatment that involved environmental and nutritional management along with intensive physiotherapy. PMID:24155492

  2. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica; Hu, Shaoyan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families' economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  3. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  4. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePLUS

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... Both palliative care and hospice care provide comfort. But palliative care can begin at diagnosis, and at the same time as treatment. Hospice care begins ...

  5. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: Decision-Making in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic episodic illness, characterized by recurrent episodes of manic or depressive symptoms. Patients with bipolar disorder frequently present first to primary care, but the diversity of the potential symptoms and a low index of suspicion among physicians can lead to misdiagnosis in many patients. Frequently, co-occurring psychiatric and medical conditions further complicate the differential diagnosis. A thorough diagnostic evaluation at clinical interview, combined with supportive case-finding tools, is essential to reach an accurate diagnosis. When treating bipolar patients, the primary care physician has an integral role in coordinating the multidisciplinary network. Pharmacologic treatment underpins both short- and long-term management of bipolar disorder. Maintenance treatment to prevent relapse is frequently founded on the same pharmacologic approaches that were effective in treating the acute symptoms. Regardless of the treatment approach that is selected, monitoring over the long term is essential to ensure continued symptom relief, functioning, safety, adherence, and general medical health. This article describes key decision-making steps in the management of bipolar disorder from the primary care perspective: from initial clinical suspicion to confirmation of the diagnosis to decision-making in acute and longer-term management and the importance of patient monitoring. PMID:25317368

  6. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

  7. A dose-effect study of repeated administration of buprenorphine/naloxone on performance in opioid-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Correia, Christopher J; Strain, Eric C

    2004-05-10

    Based on its unique pharmacological profile, buprenorphine may produce less impairment in psychomotor and cognitive performance than methadone. However, the few studies that have investigated the performance effects of buprenorphine in opioid-abusing volunteers examined effects of single acute doses rather than effects of repeated dosing and included a very limited range of measures. The present inpatient study evaluated dose-related effects of repeated administration of the buprenorphine/naloxone combination product (8/2, 16/4, 32/8 mg, sublingual tablets) in eight opioid-dependent volunteers on performance of a broad range of tasks, following a period of 7-10 days of dosing at each level, in a double-blind, within-subject, crossover design. The testing battery included measures of psychomotor speed, time perception, conceptual flexibility, focused attention, working memory, long-term/episodic memory, and metamemory. Supporting the hypothesis of limited impairment with buprenorphine, results revealed minimal impairment in performance as buprenorphine/naloxone dose was increased four-fold. The only significant effect of dose was an impairment in episodic/long-term memory (recognition memory) performance at the highest dose (32/8 mg) relative to the two lower doses. Future studies incorporating larger sample sizes and non-drug controls, as well as directly comparing buprenorphine to methadone and LAAM are needed to further test the hypothesis of limited impairment with buprenorphine. PMID:15099664

  8. Antinociceptive efficacy and plasma concentrations of transdermal buprenorphine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Korbinian; Schuster, Tibor; Levionnois, Olivier; Matis, Ulrike; Bergadano, Alessandra

    2011-03-01

    To assess the antinociceptive efficacy of transdermal (TD) buprenorphine (B) in dogs, a prospective, positive-controlled experimental study was performed in 10 healthy Beagles. In an open label crossover design, the dogs initially received intravenous B (IVB, 0.02 mg kg(-1)) as a positive control, followed by TDB (52.5 ?g h(-1)) 4 months later. Blood was collected at regular intervals for determination of the plasma concentrations of B ([B]) and its metabolite norbuprenorphine. The antinociceptive efficacy was assessed using thermal and mechanical models of nociception. The peak concentration [B] was 1.54 ng mL(-1) (±1.98) 60 h after TDB application, although three dogs had no measurable [B] after TDB. Maximum thermal threshold (TT) was 52.6 °C (±0.48) at 1h after IVB administration and 51.63 °C (±1.01) 72 h after TDB application. The significant increase in TT indicated that effective antinociception was achieved beyond 36 h after the application of TDB, lasting until patch removal. There was hysteresis between [B] and the antinociceptive effect. PMID:20206560

  9. Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice

    PubMed Central

    DeTolla, L.; Sanchez, R.; Khan, E.; Tyler, B.; Guarnieri, M.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3?mg/kg dose of drug. One male mouse treated with three 3?mg/kg doses and surgery on days 0, 4, and 8 died on day 9. The cause of death was not determined. In the surviving 119 mice there was no evidence of skin reaction at the site of the implant. Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable. These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe. Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine. PMID:26464927

  10. Implications of Heterogeneity of Treatment Effect for Reporting and Analysis of Randomized Trials in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Iwashyna, Theodore J; Burke, James F; Sussman, Jeremy B; Prescott, Hallie C; Hayward, Rodney A; Angus, Derek C

    2015-11-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are conducted to guide clinicians' selection of therapies for individual patients. Currently, RCTs in critical care often report an overall mean effect and selected individual subgroups. Yet work in other fields suggests that such reporting practices can be improved. Specifically, this Critical Care Perspective reviews recent work on so-called "heterogeneity of treatment effect" (HTE) by baseline risk and extends that work to examine its applicability to trials of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Because patients in RCTs in critical care medicine-and patients in intensive care units-have wide variability in their risk of death, these patients will have wide variability in the absolute benefit that they can derive from a given therapy. If the side effects of the therapy are not perfectly collinear with the treatment benefits, this will result in HTE, where different patients experience quite different expected benefits of a therapy. We use simulations of RCTs to demonstrate that such HTE could result in apparent paradoxes, including: (1) positive trials of therapies that are beneficial overall but consistently harm or have little benefit to low-risk patients who met enrollment criteria, and (2) overall negative trials of therapies that still consistently benefit high-risk patients. We further show that these results persist even in the presence of causes of death unmodified by the treatment under study. These results have implications for reporting and analyzing RCT data, both to better understand how our therapies work and to improve the bedside applicability of RCTs. We suggest a plan for measurement in future RCTs in the critically ill. PMID:26177009

  11. The Positive Association of End-of-Life Treatment Discussions and Care Satisfaction in the Nursing Home.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Joann P; Boerner, Kathrin; Downes, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    With the progression of dementia, the need for families and health care providers to have discussions about end-of-life (EOL) treatments arises. EOL treatment decisions often involve whether or not medical interventions intended to prolong life-such as resuscitation, artificial nutrition and hydration, and use of antibiotics-are desired. It is unclear if family satisfaction with care in the nursing home may be associated with involvement in EOL treatment discussions. The frequency of discussions that family members reported having with health care team members regarding multiple life-sustaining treatments and symptom management for their relatives with advanced dementia were examined over a 6-month period along with the association of these particular discussions with care satisfaction over time. Results showed that greater frequency of discussion of EOL treatment wishes was positively associated with higher care satisfaction scores among family members of nursing home residents with dementia. When considered together, greater frequency of discussion of artificial hydration was uniquely associated with greater care satisfaction and increased care satisfaction over time. Social workers must ensure that EOL treatment discussions with older adults in the nursing home and their family members take place and that preferences are communicated among the various interdisciplinary health team members. PMID:26654063

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Scalable Weight Loss Treatments in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Rachel D.; White, Marney A.; Martino, Steve; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Primary-care (PC) settings may be an opportune place to deliver obesity interventions. Scalable interventions utilizing motivational interviewing (MI), supported by internet resources, may overcome obstacles to effective obesity treatment dissemination. This study was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) testing two web-supported interventions, motivational interviewing (MIC) and nutrition psychoeducation (NPC), an attention-control intervention, to usual care (UC). Design and Methods 89 overweight/obese patients, with and without binge eating disorder (BED), were randomly assigned to MIC, NPC, or UC for 3 months in PC. Patients were assessed independently at post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up Results Weight, triglyceride levels, and depression scores decreased significantly in NPC when compared to UC but not MIC; UC and MIC did not differ significantly. Weight-loss results maintained at 3-month follow-up: approximately 25% MIC and NPC patients achieved at least 5% weight-loss which did not differ by BED status. Fidelity ratings were high and treatment adherence was associated with weight loss. Conclusions This is the first RCT in PC testing MI for obesity to include an attention-control intervention (NPC). NPC, but not MI, showed a consistent pattern of superior benefits relative to UC. BED status was not associated but treatment adherence was associated with weight loss outcomes. PMID:25298016

  13. Dissemination of an Internet-based treatment for chronic insomnia into primary care.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Julie; Vincent, Norah; Walsh, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of two strategies (provider-targeted, consumer-targeted) in the dissemination of an insomnia treatment into primary care. Results of the study indicated that more patients from the provider-targeted, than the consumer-targeted, clinic followed up on the referral for insomnia treatment, but that overall there was limited uptake. These results did not seem to be associated with low levels of provider interest, although providers expressed need for more education about the insomnia program. Implications of these results are that future research efforts would benefit from expanding upon the education of providers in terms of treatment offered, perhaps teaching providers how to better motivate their patients for behavior change. PMID:24564299

  14. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients’ well-being during surgical hospital treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated “well-being as a matter of different perspectives,” “vulnerability in contrast to well-being,” and “staff mix influencing the care encounter.” The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs. PMID:26499314

  15. Integration of Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations into Accountable Care Organizations: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    D’Aunno, Thomas; Friedmann, Peter D.; Chen, Qixuan; Wilson, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    To meet their aims of managing population health to improve the quality and cost of health care in the United States, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will need to focus on coordinating care for individuals with substance abuse disorders. The prevalence of these disorders is high, and these individuals often suffer from comorbid chronic medical and social conditions. This article examines the extent to which the nation’s fourteen thousand specialty substance abuse treatment (SAT) organizations, which have a daily census of more than 1 million patients, are contracting with ACOs across the country; we also examine factors associated with SAT organization involvement with ACOs. We draw on data from a recent (2014) nationally representative survey of executive directors and clinical supervisors from 635 SAT organizations. Results show that only 15 percent of these organizations had signed contracts with ACOs. Results from multivariate analyses show that directors’ perceptions of market competition, organizational ownership, and geographic location are significantly related to SATinvolvement with ACOs. We discuss implications for integrating the SAT specialty system with the mainstream health care system. PMID:26124307

  16. Racial Differences in Clinical Treatment and Self?Care Behaviors of Adults With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Knafl, George J.; Wald, Joyce; Riegel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background In the United States, the highest prevalence of heart failure (HF) is in blacks followed by whites. Compared with whites, blacks have a higher risk of HF?related morbidity and mortality and HF?related hospitalization. Little research has focused on explaining the reasons for these disparities. The purpose of this study was to examine racial differences in demographic and clinical characteristics in blacks and whites with HF and to determine if these characteristics influenced treatment, or together with treatment, influenced self?care behaviors. Methods and Results This was a secondary analysis of existing data collected from adults (n=272) with chronic HF enrolled from outpatient sites in the northeastern United States and followed for 6 months. After adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics within reduced (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) groups, there were 2 significant racial differences in clinical treatment. Blacks with HFrEF were prescribed ACE inhibitors and hydralazine and isosorbide dinitrate (H?ISDN) more often than whites. In the HFpEF group, blacks were taking more medications and were prescribed digoxin and a diuretic when symptomatic. Deficits in HF knowledge and decreased medication adherence, objectively measured, were more prominent in blacks. These racial differences were not explained by sociodemographic or clinical characteristics or clinical treatment variables. Premorbid intellect and the quality of support received contributed to clinical treatment and self?care. Conclusion Although few differences in clinical treatment could be attributed solely to race, knowledge about HF and medication adherence is lower in blacks than whites. Further research is needed to explain these observations, which may be targets for future intervention research. PMID:25870187

  17. Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies associated with the report of the preferred way that limit the use of such data. Risk factors associated with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis still remain controversial. Methods/Design This work describes a protocol of a multicentric prospective observational study with one year follow up, to describe the women's reasons and preferences to choose the way of administration (oral vs topical) in the treatment of not complicated candidal vaginitis. The number of women required is 765, they are chosen by consecutive sampling. All of whom are aged 16 and over with vaginal discharge and/or vaginal pruritus, diagnosed with not complicated vulvovaginitis in Primary Care in Madrid. The main outcome variable is the preferences of the patients in treatment choice; secondary outcome variables are time to symptoms relief and adverse reactions and the frequency of recurrent vulvovaginitis and the risk factors. In the statistical analysis, for the main objective will be descriptive for each of the variables, bivariant analysis and multivariate analysis (logistic regression).. The dependent variable being the type of treatment chosen (oral or topical) and the independent, the variables that after bivariant analysis, have been associated to the treatment preference. Discussion Clinical decisions, recommendations, and practice guidelines must not only attend to the best available evidence, but also to the values and preferences of the informed patient. PMID:21281464

  18. The safety of high-dose buprenorphine administered subcutaneously in cats.

    PubMed

    Sramek, M K; Haas, M C; Coleman, G D; Atterson, P R; Hamlin, R L

    2015-10-01

    The safety of a proprietary formulation of buprenorphine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously (SC) to young cats was investigated in a blinded, randomized study. Four cohorts of eight cats aged approximately 4 months were administered saline, 0.24, 0.72 or 1.20 mg/kg/day buprenorphine SC for nine consecutive days, representing 0×, 1×, 3× and 5× of the intended dose. Cats were monitored daily for evidence of clinical reactions, food and water intake and adverse events (AEs). Physical examinations, clinical pathology, vital signs and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were evaluated at protocol-specified time points. Complete necropsy and histopathologic examinations were performed following humane euthanasia. Four buprenorphine-treated cats experienced AEs during the study, two unrelated and two related to study drug administration. The two cats with AEs considered related to drug administration had clinical signs of hyperactivity, difficulty in handling, disorientation, agitation and dilated pupils in one 0.24 mg/kg/day cat and one 0.72 mg/kg/day cat. All of these clinical signs were observed simultaneously. There were no drug-related effects on survival, injection response, injection site inspections, body weight, food or water consumption, bleeding time, urinalysis, respiration rate, heart rate, ECGs, blood pressures, body temperatures, macroscopic examinations or organ weights. Once daily buprenorphine s.c. injections at doses of 0.24, 0.72 and 1.20 mg/kg/day for 9 consecutive days were well tolerated in young domestic cats. PMID:25623082

  19. Perioperative Pain Management for Patients on Chronic Buprenorphine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Isserman, Rebecca; Chen, Linda; Ashburn, Michael; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a patient with a Type I Chiari malformation who was receiving buprenorphine for chronic pain who underwent two separate urogynecologic procedures for removal of vaginal mesh with two different pain management regimens. For the first procedure at an outside hospital, the patient’s usual dose of buprenorphine (8 mg sublingual every 8 hours) was continued up through her surgery and then a full opioid receptor agonist was used for postoperative pain management. The patient complained that this resulted in very poor pain control for her in the postoperative period. Prior to her second procedure, which was performed at our institution, buprenorphine was switched to a full opioid agonist (oral hydromorphone 4 mg every 4 to 6 hours, maximum 20 mg per day) for 5 days prior to surgery; postoperative pain was managed with full opioid receptor agonists. The patient again reported suboptimal pain control in spite of substantially increased doses of opioids. This case report highlights the difficulty of perioperative pain management for patients on chronic buprenorphine and emphasizes the need for additional investigation. PMID:24307971

  20. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues. PMID:25569708

  1. 67 FR 62354 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Rescheduling of Buprenorphine From Schedule V to Schedule III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-10-07

    ...symptoms (act as a deterrent) in individuals...buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid naive individuals...4 mg) produced opioid agonist-like effects...not be a serious deterrent to injection by...sublingually, is not a deterrent for abuse by most...many objectives of opioid replacement...

  2. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characterization of a novel sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet formulation in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andreas; Hjelmström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context Bitter taste, as well as dissolve time, presents a significant challenge for the acceptability of formulations for oral transmucosal drug delivery. Objective To characterize a novel sublingual tablet formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone with regards to pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and formulation acceptability. Methods Dry mixing techniques were employed to produce a small and fast dissolving buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet formulation, OX219 (Zubsolv®), using sucralose and menthol as sweetener and flavor to mask the bitter taste of the active ingredients. Two cross-over studies were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and acceptability of OX219 5.7/1.4?mg tablets compared to the commercially available buprenorphine/naloxone formulations Suboxone® tablets and films (8/2?mg). Results Buprenorphine exposure was equivalent in OX219 and Suboxone tablets. Sublingual dissolve times were significantly shorter for OX219 than for Suboxone tablets and were similar to Suboxone films. The OX219 formulation received significantly higher subjective ratings for taste and overall acceptability than both Suboxone formulations. OX219 was preferred over Suboxone tablet and film formulations by 77.4% and 88.9% of subjects, respectively. Conclusions A sublingual tablet formulation with an improved acceptability has been successfully developed. PMID:24099551

  3. HIV Testing and Engagement in Care among Highly Vulnerable Female Sex Workers: Implications for Treatment as Prevention Models

    PubMed Central

    Surratt, Hilary L.; O’Grady, Catherine; Kurtz, Steven P.; Buttram, Mance E.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although emerging Treatment as Prevention models can be effective in reducing HIV incidence among high-risk populations, many HIV infected individuals remain undiagnosed or fail to engage in HIV care. Methods This study examined the factors associated with HIV testing and care among a population of substance using female sex workers. Results Recent HIV testing was associated with higher education level, having a regular health care provider or clinic, recent crack use, and higher sexual risk behaviors; HIV treatment utilization was associated with higher levels of social support, having a regular health care provider or clinic, housing stability and insurance coverage. Qualitative data revealed HIV-related stigma, denial, social isolation, and substance use as barriers to HIV testing and treatment; social support and accessibility of services were key enablers. Conclusions Improving HIV testing and linkage to treatment among female sex workers will require structural initiatives to reduce stigma and increase service seeking support. PMID:25130245

  4. The Effect of Medical Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) on Foster Care Caseloads: Evidence from Danish Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Peter; Wildeman, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Since the early 2000s, foster care caseloads have decreased in many wealthy democracies, yet the causes of these declines remain, for the most part, a mystery. This article uses administrative data on all Danish municipalities (N = 277) and a 10% randomly drawn sample of all Danish children (N = 157,938) in the period from 1998 to 2010 to show that increasing medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) accounts for a substantial share of the decrease in foster care caseloads. According to our estimates, the decline in foster care caseloads during this period would have been 45% smaller absent increases in medical treatment of ADHD. These findings are especially provocative in light of recent research showing ambiguous effects of medical treatment of ADHD. Future research should be attentive to how medical treatment aimed at addressing children's acute behavioral problems could also have a powerful effect on foster care caseloads. PMID:26242740

  5. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

  6. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

  7. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

  8. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

  9. 45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

  10. An Evidence-based Guide for Obesity Treatment in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L; Wischenka, Danielle; Appelhans, Bradley M; Pbert, Lori; Wang, Monica; Wilson, Dawn K; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2016-01-01

    On behalf of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, we present a model of obesity management in primary care based on the 5As counseling framework (Assess, Advise, Agree, Assist, and Arrange). Primary care physicians can use the 5As framework to build and coordinate a multidisciplinary team that: 1) addresses patients' psychosocial issues and medical and psychiatric comorbidities associated with obesity treatment failure; 2) delivers intensive counseling that consists of goal setting, self-monitoring, and problem solving; and 3) connects patients with community resources to assist them in making healthy lifestyle changes. This paper outlines reimbursement guidelines and weight-management counseling strategies, and provides a framework for building a multidisciplinary team to maximize the patient's success at weight management. PMID:26239092

  11. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Nashmia; Pappalardo, Andrea A; Arora, Vineet M; Press, Valerie G

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results); none showed true harm (0; “negative”); and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”). Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and simplification of treatment regimens. We also found discordance between physicians and patients regarding patients’ needs, beliefs, and expectations about asthma. Although some studies show promise regarding the benefits of patient-focused care, these methods require additional study on feasibility and strategies for implementation in real world settings. Further, it is imperative that future studies must be, themselves, patient-centered (eg, pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies) and applicable to a variety of patient populations and settings. Despite the need for further research, enough evidence exists that supports incorporating a patient-centered approach to asthma management, in order to achieve improved outcomes and patient health. PMID:22915970

  12. Treatment Engagement and Response to CBT among Latinos with Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chavira, Denise A.; Golinelli, Daniela; Sherbourne, Cathy; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Rose, Raphael D.; Lang, Ariel J.; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy; Bumgardner, Kristin; Glenn, Daniel; Barrios, Velma; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Craske, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the current study, we compare measures of treatment outcome and engagement for Latino and non-Latino White patients receiving a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program delivered in primary care. Method Participants were 18–65 years old and recruited from 17 clinics at four different sites to participate in a randomized controlled trial for anxiety disorders, which compared the CALM intervention (consisting of CBT, medication, or both) to usual care. Of those participants who were randomized to the intervention arm and selected CBT (either alone or in combination with medication), 85 were Latino and 251 were non-Latino White; the majority of the Latino participants received the CBT intervention in English (n = 77). Blinded assessments of clinical improvement and functioning were administered at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 18 months after baseline. Measures of engagement, including attendance, homework adherence, understanding of CBT principles, and commitment to treatment were assessed weekly during the CBT intervention. Results Findings from propensity weighted linear and logistic regression models revealed no statistically significant differences between Latinos and non-Latino Whites on symptom measures of clinical improvement and functioning at almost all time points. There were significant differences on two of seven engagement outcomes, namely number of sessions attended and patients’ understanding of CBT principles. Conclusions These findings suggest that CBT can be an effective treatment approach for Latinos who are primarily English speaking and likely more acculturated, although continued attention should be directed toward engaging Latinos in such interventions. PMID:24660674

  13. Behavioral Treatment of Obesity in Patients Encountered in Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Thomas A.; Butryn, Meghan L.; Hong, Patricia S.; Tsai, Adam G.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In 2011, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved intensive behavioral weight loss counseling (i.e., approximately 14, 10–15 minute, face-to-face sessions in 6 months) for obese beneficiaries in primary care settings, when delivered by physicians and other CMS-defined primary care practitioners (PCPs). OBJECTIVE To conduct a systematic review of behavioral counseling for overweight/obese patients recruited from primary care, as delivered by PCPs working alone or with trained interventionists (e.g., medical assistants, registered dietitians), or by trained interventionists working independently. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE for randomized controlled trials (January 1980–June 2014) which: recruited overweight/obese patients from primary care; provided behavioral counseling (i.e., diet, exercise, and behavior therapy) for ?3 months, with ?6 months post-randomization follow-up; included ?15 participants/treatment group and objectively measured weights; and had a comparator, an intention-to-treat analysis, and attrition <30% at 1 year or <40% at longer follow-up. FINDINGS Review of 3,304 abstracts yielded 12 trials (with 3,893 total participants) that met inclusion/exclusion criteria and pre-specified quality ratings. No studies were found in which PCPs delivered counseling following CMS guidelines (14 sessions in 6 months). Mean 6-month weight changes (relative to baseline) in the intervention group ranged from ?0.3 to ?6.6 kg, with corresponding values of +0.9 to ?2.0 kg in control group. Weight loss in both groups generally declined with longer follow-up (12–24 months). Interventions that prescribed both reduced energy intake (e.g., ?500 kcal/day deficit) and increased physical activity (e.g., ?150 minutes/week of walking), with traditional behavior therapy, generally produced larger weight loss than interventions without all three specific components. In the former trials, more treatment sessions, delivered in person or by phone by trained interventionists, were associated with greater mean weight loss and likelihood of losing ?5% of baseline weight. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Intensive behavioral counseling can induce clinically meaningful weight loss, but there is little research on PCPs providing such care. The present findings suggest that a range of trained interventionists, who deliver counseling in person or by telephone, could be considered in treating overweight/obesity in patients encountered in primary care. PMID:25369490

  14. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following intravenous and buccal administration in cats, and effects on thermal threshold.

    PubMed

    Hedges, A R; Pypendop, B H; Shilo-Benjamini, Y; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine, following i.v. and buccal administration, and the relationship between buprenorphine concentration and its effect on thermal threshold. Buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) was administered intravenously or buccally to six cats. Thermal threshold was determined, and arterial blood sampled prior to, and at various times up to 24 h following drug administration. Plasma buprenorphine concentration was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Compartment models were fitted to the time-concentration data. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models were fitted to the concentration-thermal threshold data. Thermal threshold was significantly higher than baseline 44 min after buccal administration, and 7, 24, and 104 min after i.v. administration. A two- and three-compartment model best fitted the data following buccal and i.v. administration, respectively. Following i.v. administration, mean ± SD volume of distribution at steady-state (L/kg), clearance (mL·min/kg), and terminal half-life (h) were 11.6 ± 8.5, 23.8 ± 3.5, and 9.8 ± 3.5. Following buccal administration, absorption half-life was 23.7 ± 9.1 min, and terminal half-life was 8.9 ± 4.9 h. An effect-compartment model with a simple effect maximum model best predicted the time-course of the effect of buprenorphine on thermal threshold. Median (range) ke0 and EC50 were 0.003 (0.002-0.018)/min and 0.599 (0.073-1.628) ng/mL (i.v.), and 0.017 (0.002-0.023)/min and 0.429 (0.144-0.556) ng/mL (buccal). PMID:24862514

  15. Parallel buprenorphine phMRI responses in conscious rodents and healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Upadhyay, Jaymin; Chang, Pei-Ching; Bishop, James; Anderson, Julie; Baumgartner, Richard; Schwarz, Adam J; Coimbra, Alexandre; Wallin, Diana; Nutile, Lauren; George, Edward; Maier, Gary; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Iyengar, Smriti; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Bleakman, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Borsook, David

    2013-04-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is one method by which a drug's pharmacodynamic effects in the brain can be assessed. Although phMRI has been frequently used in preclinical and clinical settings, the extent to which a phMRI signature for a compound translates between rodents and humans has not been systematically examined. In the current investigation, we aimed to build on recent clinical work in which the functional response to 0.1 and 0.2 mg/70 kg i.v. buprenorphine (partial µ-opioid receptor agonist) was measured in healthy humans. Here, we measured the phMRI response to 0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg i.v. buprenorphine in conscious, naive rats to establish the parallelism of the phMRI signature of buprenorphine across species. PhMRI of 0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg i.v. buprenorphine yielded dose-dependent activation in a brain network composed of the somatosensory cortex, cingulate, insula, striatum, thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and cerebellum. Similar dose-dependent phMRI activation was observed in the human phMRI studies. These observations indicate an overall preservation of pharmacodynamic responses to buprenorphine between conscious, naive rodents and healthy human subjects, particularly in brain regions implicated in pain and analgesia. This investigation further demonstrates the usefulness of phMRI as a translational tool in neuroscience research that can provide mechanistic insight and guide dose selection in drug development. PMID:23370795

  16. Randomized Trial of Family Therapy Versus Nonfamily Treatment for Adolescent Behavior Problems in Usual Care.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Henderson, Craig E; Bobek, Molly; Johnson, Candace; Lichvar, Emily; Morgenstern, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A major focus of implementation science is discovering whether evidence-based approaches can be delivered with fidelity and potency in routine practice. This randomized trial compared usual care family therapy (UC-FT), implemented without a treatment manual or extramural support as the standard-of-care approach in a community clinic, to nonfamily treatment (UC-Other) for adolescent conduct and substance use disorders. The study recruited 205 adolescents (M age = 15.7 years; 52% male; 59% Hispanic American, 21% African American) from a community referral network, enrolling 63% for primary mental health problems and 37% for primary substance use problems. Clients were randomly assigned to either the UC-FT site or one of five UC-Other sites. Implementation data confirmed that UC-FT showed adherence to the family therapy approach and differentiation from UC-Other. Follow-ups were completed at 3, 6, and 12 months postbaseline. There was no between-group difference in treatment attendance. Both conditions demonstrated improvements in externalizing, internalizing, and delinquency symptoms. However, UC-FT produced greater reductions in youth-reported externalizing and internalizing among the whole sample, in delinquency among substance-using youth, and in alcohol and drug use among substance-using youth. The degree to which UC-FT outperformed UC-Other was consistent with effect sizes from controlled trials of manualized family therapy models. Nonmanualized family therapy can be effective for adolescent behavior problems within diverse populations in usual care, and it may be superior to nonfamily alternatives. PMID:25496283

  17. A randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day buprenorphine inpatient detoxification protocols for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John A; Wu, Joanna; Martus, Wesley; Pierre, James D

    2005-01-01

    Detoxification from opioids remains an important first step in the treatment of many patients with opioid dependence. Several pharmacologic regimens have been used for opioid detoxification. In the United States, the partial mu-opioid agonist, buprenorphine (BUP) is the most recently approved pharmacotherapy for opioid detoxification and replacement. The literature in recent years has described detoxification protocols using a single high dose of BUP and a three-day BUP regimen. In many settings, such as drug-free programs, a single-dose detoxification protocol would be of significant benefit. There have been no prior studies comparing one-day and three-day BUP-assisted opioid withdrawal. In this pilot study, we conducted an open-label, randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day BUP/naloxone sublingual tablet-assisted opioid withdrawal. Twenty patients from a therapeutic community treatment program were randomly assigned to receive either 32 mg sublingual BUP over one hour (one-day group), or 32 mg sublingual BUP over three days (three-day group). Nine of 10 subjects (90 percent) in each group completed seven days in the detoxification protocol. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in all other outcome variables, including retention in the treatment program, intensity of withdrawal signs and symptoms, amounts of adjunct medications used, and ability to produce opiate-free urine. This study further validates the feasibility of the single high dose of BUP as a rapid detoxification method. PMID:17315409

  18. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder Versus Treatment as Usual in a Managed Care Setting: 2-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addis, Michael E.; Hatgis, Christina; Cardemil, Esteban; Jacob, Karen; Krasnow, Aaron D.; Mansfield, Abigail

    2006-01-01

    Eighty clients meeting criteria for panic disorder and receiving either panic control therapy (PCT; M. G. Craske, E. Meadows, & D. H. Barlow, 1994) or treatment as usual (TAU) in a managed care setting were assessed 1 and 2 years following acute treatment. PCT was provided by therapists with little or no previous exposure to cognitive-behavioral…

  19. [Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Health Care Network Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Kästner, Denise; Romer, Georg; Wegscheider, Karl; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    The "Health care network anorexia and bulimia nervosa", a subproject of psychenet - the Hamburg network for mental health - aims to decrease the incidence of eating disorders as well as the risk for chronic illness courses. One focal project, therefore, evaluates a school-based prevention manual in a randomized controlled trial. The other one examines the impact of a systemic public health intervention on early treatment initiation in anorexia nervosa. The present article provides an overview about study design and interventions in both focal projects as well as preliminary results. PMID:26135276

  20. Retained in HIV Care But Not on Antiretroviral Treatment: A Qualitative Patient-Provider Dyadic Study

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, Katerina A.; Olender, Susan; Lopez, Andrea M.; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Jaiswal, Jessica; Mellman, Will; Geng, Elvin; Koester, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients retained in HIV care but not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) represent an important part of the HIV care cascade in the United States. Even in an era of more tolerable and efficacious ART, decision making in regards to ART offer and uptake remains complex and calls for exploration of both patient and provider perspectives. We sought to understand reasons for lack of ART usage in patients meeting the Health Resources Services Administration definition of retention as well as what motivated HIV primary care appointment attendance in the absence of ART. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative study consisting of 70 in-depth interviews with ART-naïve and ART-experienced patients off ART and their primary care providers in two urban safety-net HIV clinics in San Francisco and New York. Twenty patients and their providers were interviewed separately at baseline, and 15 dyads were interviewed again after at least 3 mo and another clinic visit in order to understand any ART use in the interim. We applied dyadic analysis to our data. Nearly all patients were willing to consider ART, and 40% of the sample went on ART, citing education on newer antiretroviral drugs, acceptance of HIV diagnosis, social support, and increased confidence in their ability to adhere as facilitators. However, the strength of the provider recommendation of ART played an important role. Many patients had internalized messages from providers that their health was too good to warrant ART. In addition, providers, while demonstrating patient-centered care through sensitivity to patients experiencing psychosocial instability, frequently muted the offer of ART, at times unintentionally. In the absence of ART, lab monitoring, provider relationships, access to social services, opiate pain medications, and acute symptoms motivated care. The main limitations of this study were that treatment as prevention was not explored in depth and that participants were recruited from academic HIV clinics in the US, making the findings most generalizable to this setting. Conclusions Provider communication with regard to ART is a key focus for further exploration and intervention in order to increase ART uptake for those retained in HIV care. PMID:26263532

  1. Same-Day CD4 Testing to Improve Uptake of HIV Care and Treatment in South Africa: Point-of-Care Is Not Enough

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Bruce A.; Long, Lawrence; Xulu, Thembi; Sanne, Ian; Fox, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. We evaluated whether a pilot program providing point-of-care (POC), but not rapid, CD4 testing (BD FACSCount) immediately after testing HIV-positive improved retention in care. Methods. We conducted a retrospective record review at the Themba Lethu Clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. We compared all walk-in patients testing HIV-positive during February, July 2010 (pilot POC period) to patients testing positive during January 2008–February 2009 (baseline period). The outcome for those with a ?250 cells/mm3 when testing HIV-positive was initiating ART <16 weeks after HIV testing. Results. 771 patients had CD4 results from the day of HIV testing (421 pilots, 350 baselines). ART initiation within 16 weeks was 49% in the pilot period and 46% in the baseline period. While all 421 patients during the pilot period should have been offered the POC test, patient records indicate that only 73% of them were actually offered it, and among these patients only 63% accepted the offer. Conclusions. Offering CD4 testing using a point-of-care, but not rapid, technology and without other health system changes had minor impacts on the uptake of HIV care and treatment. Point-of-care technologies alone may not be enough to improve linkage to care and treatment after HIV testing. PMID:23956850

  2. Brain-orientated intensive care treatment in severe neonatal asphyxia. Effects of phenobarbitone protection.

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, N W; Blennow, G; Lindroth, M; Gäddlin, P O; Ahlström, H

    1982-01-01

    The effect of applying brain-orientated neonatal intensive care for term infants with severe neonatal asphyxia was studied. Such treatment included protective phenobarbitone administration together with assisted ventilation and other measures to counteract postasphyxial cerebral oedema and any abrupt changes in blood pressure and oxygenation. The mortality rate and incidence of long-term sequelae were reduced appreciably, resulting in a 0-1 year mortality rate of 14% (previously 50%) and an incidence of neurodevelopmental handicap at 18 months of 17% (previously 50%). It is important in the management of infants with severe asphyxia at birth to avoid blood pressure fluctuations and to control neuronal epileptic activity by the use of barbiturates and early ventilator treatment. PMID:7073298

  3. Lack of adverse effects during a target animal safety trial of extended-release buprenorphine in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Alan; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Wilkerson, Gina; McKnight, Patrick; Guarnieri, Michael

    2015-12-18

    Extended-release buprenorphine is an effective analgesic in laboratory animals, and its safety has been established in mice but not in rats. The authors used a target animal safety trial to evaluate the safety of extended-release buprenorphine in rats. Fischer 344 rats received post-surgical subcutaneous injections of 1.3 mg, 3.9 mg or 6.5 mg buprenorphine per kg body weight (two times, six times or ten times the intended dose, respectively), and their body weight, clinical signs and symptoms, clinical pathology and histopathology were monitored for 4 d. Body weight was not significantly different in rats that received buprenorphine compared with control rats. Signs of nausea-related behavior were observed in 25% of the rats treated with buprenorphine. Clinical pathology results for all rats were normal, and gross and microscopic histopathology examinations identified no substantial abnormalities, suggesting that this behavior was of minor consequence. Other adverse events previously reported to occur with opiate therapy, including weight loss and dermal lesions at drug injection sites, were not observed in this study. The results of this study show that post-surgical administration of an extended-release buprenorphine product is safe in Fischer 344 rats and does not necessarily cause substantial adverse effects, confirming that opiate therapy is a viable choice in laboratory animal medicine. PMID:26684956

  4. Symptoms and treatment when death is expected in dementia patients in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although dementia at the end of life is increasingly being studied, we lack prospective observational data on dying patients. In this study symptoms were observed in patients with dementia in the last days of life. Methods When the elderly care physicians in two Dutch nursing homes expected death within one week, symptoms of (dis)comfort, pain and suffering were observed twice daily. For this the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD; range 0–10), Discomfort Scale-Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DS-DAT; range 0–27), End-Of-Life in Dementia-Comfort Assessment in Dying (EOLD-CAD; range 14–42) and an adapted version of the Mini-Suffering State Examination (MSSE; range 0–9), were used. Information on care, medical treatment and treatment decisions were also collected. Results Twenty-four participants (median age 91 years; 23 females), were observed several times (mean of 4.3 observations (SD 2.6)), until they died. Most participants (n?=?15) died from dehydration/cachexia and passed away quietly (n?=?22). The mean PAINAD score was 1.0 (SD 1.7), DS-DAT 7.0 (SD 2.1), EOLD-CAD 35.1 (SD 1.7), and MSSE 2.0 (SD 1.7). All participants received morphine, six received antibiotics, and rehydration was prescribed once. Conclusion In these patients with dementia and expected death, a low symptom burden was observed with validated instruments, also in dehydrated patients without aggressive treatment. A good death is possible, but might be enhanced if the symptom burden is regularly assessed with validated instruments. The use of observation tools may have influenced the physicians to make treatment decisions. PMID:25181947

  5. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice.

    PubMed

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-02-01

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system's sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers. PMID:25685723

  6. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice

    PubMed Central

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-01-01

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system’s sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers. PMID:25685723

  7. Is psychotropic medication use related to organisational and treatment culture in residential care.

    PubMed

    Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Moyes, Simon; Scahill, Shane; Chen, Charlotte; Hong, Jae Beom; Hughes, Carmel M

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between organisational culture and psychotropic medication use in residential care. Design/methodology/approach - Cross-sectional analyses of staff and resident's record survey in residential aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand (NZ). The competing values framework categorised organisational culture as clan, hierarchical, market driven or adhocracy and was completed by all staff. The treatment culture tool categorised facilities as having resident centred or traditional culture and was completed by registered nursing staff and general practitioners (GP). Functional and behavioural characteristics of residents were established by staff report and health characteristics and medications used were ascertained from the health record. Multiple regression was used to test for associations between measures of culture with psychotropic medication use (anxiolytics, sedatives, major tranquillisers). Findings - In total 199 staff, 27 GP and 527 residents participated from 14 facilities. On average 8.5 medications per resident were prescribed and 42 per cent of residents received psychotropic medication. Having a diagnosis of anxiety or depression (odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 1.71, 5.91), followed by persistent wandering (OR 2.53, 95 per cent CI 1.59, 4.01) and being in a dementia unit (OR 2.45, 95 per cent CI 1.17, 5.12) were most strongly associated with psychotropic use. Controlling for resident- and facility-level factors, health care assistants' assignation of hierarchical organisational culture type was independently associated with psychotropic medication use, (OR 1.29, CI 1.08, 1.53) and a higher treatment culture score from the GP was associated with lower use of psychotropic medication (OR 0.95, CI 0.92, 0.98). Originality/value - Psychotropic medication use remains prevalent in residential care facilities in NZ. Interventions aimed at changing organisational culture towards a less hierarchical and more resident-centred culture may be another avenue to improve prescribing in residential aged care. PMID:26556168

  8. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare reform in the United States is encouraging Federally Qualified Health Centers and other primary-care practices to integrate treatment for addiction and other behavioral health conditions into their practices. The potential of mobile health technologies to manage addiction and comorbidities such as HIV in these settings is substantial but largely untested. This paper describes a protocol to evaluate the implementation of an E-Health integrated communication technology delivered via mobile phones, called Seva, into primary-care settings. Seva is an evidence-based system of addiction treatment and recovery support for patients and real-time caseload monitoring for clinicians. Methods/Design Our implementation strategy uses three models of organizational change: the Program Planning Model to promote acceptance and sustainability, the NIATx quality improvement model to create a welcoming environment for change, and Rogers’s diffusion of innovations research, which facilitates adaptations of innovations to maximize their adoption potential. We will implement Seva and conduct an intensive, mixed-methods assessment at three diverse Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers in the United States. Our non-concurrent multiple-baseline design includes three periods — pretest (ending in four months of implementation preparation), active Seva implementation, and maintenance — with implementation staggered at six-month intervals across sites. The first site will serve as a pilot clinic. We will track the timing of intervention elements and assess study outcomes within each dimension of the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework, including effects on clinicians, patients, and practices. Our mixed-methods approach will include quantitative (e.g., interrupted time-series analysis of treatment attendance, with clinics as the unit of analysis) and qualitative (e.g., staff interviews regarding adaptations to implementation protocol) methods, and assessment of implementation costs. Discussion If implementation is successful, the field will have a proven technology that helps Federally Qualified Health Centers and affiliated organizations provide addiction treatment and recovery support, as well as a proven strategy for implementing the technology. Seva also has the potential to improve core elements of addiction treatment, such as referral and treatment processes. A mobile technology for addiction treatment and accompanying implementation model could provide a cost-effective means to improve the lives of patients with drug and alcohol problems. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01963234). PMID:24884976

  9. A Randomized Evaluation of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care: Effects on School Attendance and Homework Completion in Juvenile Justice Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Despite growing evidence that child welfare youth are at increased risk for juvenile delinquency, little is known about gender-specific processes and effective treatment programs for girls. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC), an empirically validated intervention for child welfare and juvenile justice populations, has demonstrated…

  10. The role of primary care physicians in early diagnosis and treatment of chronic gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gikas, Aristofanis; Triantafillidis, John K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal disorders are a source of substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost. They are common in general practice, and the primary care physician (PCP) has a central role in the early detection and management of these problems. The need to make cost-effective diagnostic and treatment decisions, avoid unnecessary investigation and referral, provide long-term effective control of symptoms, and minimize the risk of complications constitute the main challenges that PCPs face. The literature review shows that, although best practice standards are available, a considerable number of PCPs do not routinely follow them. Low rates of colorectal cancer screening, suboptimal testing and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, inappropriate use of proton pump inhibitors, and the fact that most PCPs are still approaching the irritable bowel disease as a diagnosis of exclusion represent the main gaps between evidence-based guidelines and clinical practice. This manuscript points out that updating of knowledge and skills of PCPs via continuing medical education is the only way for better adherence with standards and improving quality of care for patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:24648750

  11. Implementation of a comprehensive program including psycho-social and treatment literacy activities to improve adherence to HIV care and treatment for a pediatric population in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Van Winghem, Joelle; Telfer, Barbara; Reid, Tony; Ouko, Judith; Mutunga, Angela; Jama, Zaina; Vakil, Shobha

    2008-01-01

    Background To achieve good clinical outcomes with HAART, patient adherence to treatment and care is a key factor. Since the literature on how to care for pediatric HIV patients is limited, we describe here adherence interventions implemented in our comprehensive care program in a resource-limited setting in Kenya. Methods We based our program on factors reported to influence adherence to HIV care and treatment. We describe, in detail, our program with respect to how we adapted our clinical settings, implemented psycho-social support activities for children and their caregivers and developed treatment literacy for children and teenagers living with HIV/AIDS. Results This paper focused on the details of the program, with the treatment outcomes as secondary. However, our program appeared to have been effective; for 648 children under 15 years of age who were started on HAART, the Kaplan-Meier mortality survival estimate was 95.27% (95%CI 93.16–96.74) at 12 months after the time of initiation of HAART. Conclusion Our model of pediatric HIV/AIDS care, focused on a child-centered approach with inclusion of caregivers and extended family, addressed the main factors influencing treatment adherence. It appeared to produce good results and is replicable in resource-limited settings. PMID:19025581

  12. Barriers to help-seeking, detection, and adequate treatment for anxiety and mood disorders: implications for health care policy.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the focus of health policies and initiatives has been directed toward mental health. More precisely, depressive and anxiety disorders have received particular attention because of their disabling outcomes and prevalence among most populations. Despite this increased interest, numerous issues regarding patients' willingness to seek treatment and the adequate recognition and treatment of these disorders by clinicians remain to be addressed. This article considers the factors that influence patients and physicians in their reticence to acknowledge and adequately treat depression and anxiety disorders. It also reviews the impact of society and the media, together with other factors relating to health care organization and administration that affect the treatment of depression and anxiety. In view of the multifaceted challenge involved, efforts to achieve a consensus in determining treatment for those with depressive and anxiety disorders are essential. A consensus will require easy, measurable, and reliable disability indicators; evidence that treatment of patients with varying levels of need is cost effective; and that persons who most need and would benefit from care can be reliably identified among the highly prevalent population of persons with more transient symptoms. Governments and other policymakers should be encouraged to provide appropriate coverage for access to primary and secondary care, the treatments required, and sufficient resources so that care is available when necessary. An important aspect of the challenge is to incorporate these efforts within the realistic constraints of primary care. PMID:17288503

  13. Implementing Implementation Science: An Approach for HIV Prevention, Care and Treatment Programs.

    PubMed

    Lambdin, Barrot H; Cheng, Ben; Peter, Trevor; Mbwambo, Jessie; Apollo, Tsitsi; Dunbar, Megan; Udoh, Ifeoma C; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Geng, Elvin H; Volberding, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Though great progress has been realized over the last decade in extending HIV prevention, care and treatment in some of the least resourced settings of the world, a substantial gap remains between what we know works and what we are actually achieving in HIV programs. To address this, leaders have called for the adoption of an implementation science framework to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HIV programs. Implementation science (IS) is a multidisciplinary scientific field that seeks generalizable knowledge about the magnitude of, determinants of and strategies to close the gap between evidence and routine practice for health in real-world settings. We propose an IS approach that is iterative in nature and composed of four major components: 1) Identifying Bottlenecks and Gaps, 2) Developing and Implementing Strategies, 3) Measuring Effectiveness and Efficiency, and 4) Utilizing Results. With this framework, IS initiatives draw from a variety of disciplines including qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to develop new approaches responsive to the complexities of real world program delivery. In order to remain useful for the changing programmatic landscape, IS research should factor in relevant timeframes and engage the multi-sectoral community of stakeholders, including community members, health care teams, program managers, researchers and policy makers, to facilitate the development of programs, practices and polices that lead to a more effective and efficient global AIDS response. The approach presented here is a synthesis of approaches and is a useful model to address IS-related questions for HIV prevention, care and treatment programs. This approach, however, is not a panacea, and we will continue to learn new ways of thinking as we move forward to close the implementation gap. PMID:25986374

  14. Juvenile Justice Girls’ Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation Nine Years After Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, David C. R.; DeGarmo, David S.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) has been found to reduce delinquency among girls in juvenile justice through 2-year follow-up. Given that such girls are at elevated risk for suicide and depression into adulthood, we tested MTFC effects on long term trajectories of suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms. Method Girls [n =166; mean (SD) age = 15.3 (1.2) years; 68 % Caucasian] with a recent criminal referral who were mandated to out-of-home care were enrolled in two sequential cohorts. Girls were randomized to receive MTFC (n =81) or group care (GC) treatment as usual (TAU; n =85); the second MTFC cohort also received modules targeting substance use and risky sexual behavior. Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation were assessed repeatedly through early adulthood [mean (SD) follow-up = 8.8 (2.9) years]. Suicide attempt history was assessed in early adulthood. Results Girls assigned to MTFC showed significantly greater decreases in depressive symptoms across the long-term follow-up than GC girls (? = ?.86, p < .05). Decreases in suicidal ideation rates were slightly stronger in MTFC than in GC as indicated by a marginal main effect [odds ratio (OR) = .92, p < .10] and a significant interaction that favored MTFC in the second cohort relative to the first [OR = .88, p < .01]. There were no significant MTFC effects on suicide attempt. Conclusions MTFC decreased depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking beyond the decreases attributable to time and TAU. Thus, MTFC has further impact on girls’ lives than originally anticipated. PMID:24731234

  15. Implementing Implementation Science: An Approach for HIV Prevention, Care and Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lambdin, Barrot H.; Cheng, Ben; Peter, Trevor; Mbwambo, Jessie; Apollo, Tsitsi; Dunbar, Megan; Udoh, Ifeoma C.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Geng, Elvin H.; Volberding, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Though great progress has been realized over the last decade in extending HIV prevention, care and treatment in some of the least resourced settings of the world, a substantial gap remains between what we know works and what we are actually achieving in HIV programs. To address this, leaders have called for the adoption of an implementation science framework to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HIV programs. Implementation science (IS) is a multidisciplinary scientific field that seeks generalizable knowledge about the magnitude of, determinants of and strategies to close the gap between evidence and routine practice for health in real-world settings. We propose an IS approach that is iterative in nature and composed of four major components: 1) Identifying Bottlenecks and Gaps, 2) Developing and Implementing Strategies, 3) Measuring Effectiveness and Efficiency, and 4) Utilizing Results. With this framework, IS initiatives draw from a variety of disciplines including qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to develop new approaches responsive to the complexities of real world program delivery. In order to remain useful for the changing programmatic landscape, IS research should factor in relevant timeframes and engage the multi-sectoral community of stakeholders, including community members, health care teams, program managers, researchers and policy makers, to facilitate the development of programs, practices and polices that lead to a more effective and efficient global AIDS response. The approach presented here is a synthesis of approaches and is a useful model to address IS-related questions for HIV prevention, care and treatment programs. This approach, however, is not a panacea, and we will continue to learn new ways of thinking as we move forward to close the implementation gap. PMID:25986374

  16. Attitudes to directly observed antiretroviral treatment in a workplace HIV care programme in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Page?Shipp, Liesl S; Charalambous, Salome; Roux, Surita; Dias, Belinda; Sefuti, Clement; Churchyard, Gavin J; Grant, Alison D

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate attitudes to directly observed antiretroviral therapy (DOT ART) among HIV infected adults attending a workplace HIV care programme in South Africa. Methods Clients attending workplace HIV clinics in two regions were interviewed using a semi?structured questionnaire. Results 100 individuals (99% male, mean age 40.2?years) participated, 61% were already taking ART by self administration. 71% had previous tuberculosis (TB) with the majority having received DOT for TB. 65% of individuals indicated that they would not like to receive ART by DOT—the main reason given was a desire to take responsibility for their own treatment. This contrasted with 79% who thought TB treatment by DOT a good idea. On questioning about disclosure, 70% reported disclosure to their sexual partners and 21% to fellow workers. 78% of individuals indicated willingness to support someone else taking ART. Conclusion ART by DOT was not an immediately popular concept with our patients, primarily because of a desire to retain responsibility for their own treatment. More work is needed to understand what key elements of treatment support are needed to promote adherence. PMID:17567686

  17. Challenges of malnutrition care among HIV-infected children on antiretroviral treatment in Africa.

    PubMed

    Jesson, J; Leroy, V

    2015-05-01

    More than 90% of the estimated 3.2 million children with HIV worldwide, at the end of 2013, were living in sub-Saharan Africa. The management of these children was still difficult in 2014 despite the progress in access to antiretroviral drugs. A great number of HIV-infected children are not diagnosed at 6 weeks and start antiretroviral treatment late, at an advanced stage of HIV disease complicated by other comorbidities such as malnutrition. Malnutrition is a major problem in the sub-Saharan Africa global population; it is an additional burden for HIV-infected children because they do not respond as well as non-infected children to the usual nutritional care. HIV infection and malnutrition interact, creating a vicious circle. It is important to understand the relationship between these 2 conditions and the effect of antiretroviral treatment on this circle to taking them into account for an optimal management of pediatric HIV. An improved monitoring of growth during follow-up and the introduction of a nutritional support among HIV-infected children, especially at antiretroviral treatment initiation, are important factors that could improve response to antiretroviral treatment and optimize the management of pediatric HIV in resource-limited countries. PMID:25861689

  18. Buprenorphine 5, 10 and 20??g/h transdermal patch: a review of its use in the management of chronic non-malignant pain.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-12-24

    This article reviews the pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy and tolerability profile of the 7-day lower-dose (5, 10 and 20??g/h) buprenorphine transdermal patch (BuTrans®, Norspan®) in the management of chronic non-malignant pain, with a focus on European labelling for the drug. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic that acts primarily as a partial agonist at the mu opioid receptor. The transdermal formulation provides continuous delivery of buprenorphine, resulting in relatively consistent plasma drug concentrations throughout the 7-day dosing interval. The analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee has been demonstrated in several randomized controlled trials, which have shown the formulation to be equivalent to sublingual buprenorphine, noninferior to prolonged-release tramadol tablets, noninferior to codeine plus paracetamol (acetaminophen) combination tablets (when transdermal buprenorphine was used together with regularly scheduled oral paracetamol) and generally superior to a matching transdermal placebo patch. Transdermal buprenorphine was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing chronic low back pain of at least moderate severity in two randomized, double-blind, crossover trials. Other clinical trials, including a randomized, double-blind, maintenance-of-analgesia study, have also demonstrated the analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with chronic non-malignant pain of various causes. In general, serious adverse events with transdermal buprenorphine are similar to those for other opioid analgesics. Transdermal buprenorphine has a ceiling effect for respiratory depression, and the main risk is when it is combined with other CNS depressants. The most frequently reported adverse events with transdermal buprenorphine are headache, dizziness, somnolence, constipation, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, erythema, application site pruritus and application site reactions. Transdermal buprenorphine was better tolerated than sublingual buprenorphine in a 7-week, randomized, double-blind trial in patients with osteoarthritis pain. Nevertheless, as with other opioids, persistence with transdermal buprenorphine therapy is difficult for many patients because of adverse events or other reasons. Thus, transdermal buprenorphine has generally demonstrated good efficacy and tolerability in clinical trials in chronic non-malignant pain, providing effective background analgesia as part of pain management strategies for patients with osteoarthritis, low back pain and other persistent pain syndromes of at least moderate severity. It also has favourable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, which have beneficial clinical implications, most notably the convenience of once-weekly administration and no need for dosage adjustments in the elderly or those with compromised renal function, making it an opioid of choice in these patients, and a useful therapeutic option overall in the management of chronic non-malignant pain. PMID:22141389

  19. Collaborative Care for the Treatment of Depression in Primary Care With a Low-Income, Spanish-Speaking Population: Outcomes From a Community-Based Program Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Toni Terling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative care model with a predominantly Hispanic, low-income population in a primary care setting and (2) examine depression outcomes with a subpopulation of preferentially Spanish-speaking patients compared with non-Hispanic white participants. Method: The data were collected from September 2006 through September 2009 at the study site, the People’s Community Clinic, Austin, Texas. Data collection was part of an evaluation of the Integrated Behavioral Health program, a collaborative care model of identifying and treating mild-to-moderate mental disorders in adults in a primary care setting. A bilingual care manager provided supportive counseling and patient education and systematically tracked patient progress in a patient registry. A consulting psychiatrist evaluated patients with diagnostic or treatment concerns. The study retrospectively examined changes in depression scores among 269 subjects as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the primary outcome measure. The PHQ-9 is a self-report of frequency of symptoms for each of the 9 DSM-IV criteria for depression. Logistic regression models compared race/ethnicity and language group combinations on their odds of achieving clinically meaningful depression improvement when background characteristics were controlled for. Results: Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients had significantly greater odds of achieving a clinically meaningful improvement in depression at 3-month follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 2.45, P = .013) compared to non-Hispanic whites. The finding for greater improvement in the Spanish-speaking population remained after controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, prior treatment, and baseline depression scores. Conclusions: The results suggest a model of care that is effective for a population at great risk for marginal mental health care, non–English-speaking Hispanics. Attention to patient preferences in primary care is essential to improve quality of depression treatment and may improve outcomes. In light of previous research that demonstrates insufficient evidence-based guidelines for patients with limited English proficiency and evidence that evaluation of patients in their nonprimary language or through an interpreter can lead to inaccurate mental health assessments, this study suggests an opportunity to improve the quality of mental health care for non–English-speaking Hispanics in the United States. PMID:23585998

  20. Treatment of mental disorder in the primary care setting in the Netherlands in the light of the new reimbursement system: a challenge?

    PubMed Central

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; Knispel, Aafje; Elfeddali, Iman

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Different professionals provide health care for mental disorder in the primary care setting. In view of the changing reimbursement system in the Netherlands, information is needed on their specific expertise. Method This study attempts to describe this by literature study, by assessment of expert opinions, and by consulting Associations of the relevant professions. Results There is no clear differentiation of expertise and tasks amongst these professionals in primary care. Notably, distinction between different psychotherapeutic treatment modes provided by psychologists is unclear. Discussion Research is needed to assess actual treatment modules in correlation with patient diagnostic classification for the different professions in primary care. An alternative way of classifying patients, that takes into account not only mental disorder or problems but especially the level of functioning, is proposed to discern which patients can be treated in primary care, and which patients should not. Integrated care models are promising, because many professionals can be involved in treatment of mental disorder in the primary care setting; especially for collaborative care models, evidence favours the treatment of common mental disorders in this setting. Conclusion Integrated care models, such as collaborative care, provide a basis for multidisciplinary care for mental disorder in the primary care setting. Professional responsibilities should be clearly differentiated in order to facilitate integrated care. The level of functioning of patients with mental disorder can be used as indication criterion for treatment in the primary care setting or in Mental Health Institutions. Research to establish the feasibility of this model is needed. PMID:18695748

  1. HIV treatment and care in resource-constrained environments: challenges for the next decade

    PubMed Central

    Eholié, Serge-Paul; Aoussi, François Eba; Ouattara, Ismael Songda; Bissagnéné, Emmanuel; Anglaret, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Many successes have been achieved in HIV care in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC): increased number of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), wide decentralization, reduction in morbidity and mortality and accessibility to cheapest drugs. However, these successes should not hide existing failures and difficulties. In this paper, we underline several key challenges. First, ensure long-term financing, increase available resources, in order to meet the increasing needs, and redistribute the overall budget in a concerted way amongst donors. Second, increase ART coverage and treat the many eligible patients who have not yet started ART. Competition amongst countries is expected to become a strong driving force in encouraging the least efficient to join better performing countries. Third, decrease early mortality on ART, by improving access to prevention, case-finding and treatment of tuberculosis and invasive bacterial diseases and by getting people to start ART much earlier. Fourth, move on from WHO 2006 to WHO 2010 guidelines. Raising the cut-off point for starting ART to 350 CD4/mm3 needs changing paradigm, adopting opt-out approach, facilitating pro-active testing, facilitating task shifting and increasing staff recruitments. Phasing out stavudine needs acting for a drastic reduction in the costs of other drugs. Scaling up routine viral load needs a mobilization for lower prices of reagents and equipments, as well as efforts in relation to point-of-care automation and to maintenance. The latter is a key step to boost the utilization of second-line regimens, which are currently dramatically under prescribed. Finally, other challenges are to reduce lost-to-follow-up rates; manage lifelong treatment and care for long-term morbidity, including drug toxicity, residual AIDS and HIV-non-AIDS morbidity and aging-related morbidity; and be able to face unforeseen events such as socio-political and military crisis. An old African proverb states that the growth of a deep-rooted tree cannot be stopped. Our tree is well rooted in existing field experience and is, therefore, expected to grow. In order for us to let it grow, long-term cost-effectiveness approach and life-saving evidence-based programming should replace short-term budgeting approach. PMID:22944479

  2. HIV treatment and care in resource-constrained environments: challenges for the next decade.

    PubMed

    Eholié, Serge-Paul; Aoussi, François Eba; Ouattara, Ismael Songda; Bissagnéné, Emmanuel; Anglaret, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Many successes have been achieved in HIV care in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC): increased number of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), wide decentralization, reduction in morbidity and mortality and accessibility to cheapest drugs. However, these successes should not hide existing failures and difficulties. In this paper, we underline several key challenges. First, ensure long-term financing, increase available resources, in order to meet the increasing needs, and redistribute the overall budget in a concerted way amongst donors. Second, increase ART coverage and treat the many eligible patients who have not yet started ART. Competition amongst countries is expected to become a strong driving force in encouraging the least efficient to join better performing countries. Third, decrease early mortality on ART, by improving access to prevention, case-finding and treatment of tuberculosis and invasive bacterial diseases and by getting people to start ART much earlier. Fourth, move on from WHO 2006 to WHO 2010 guidelines. Raising the cut-off point for starting ART to 350 CD4/mm(3) needs changing paradigm, adopting opt-out approach, facilitating pro-active testing, facilitating task shifting and increasing staff recruitments. Phasing out stavudine needs acting for a drastic reduction in the costs of other drugs. Scaling up routine viral load needs a mobilization for lower prices of reagents and equipments, as well as efforts in relation to point-of-care automation and to maintenance. The latter is a key step to boost the utilization of second-line regimens, which are currently dramatically under prescribed. Finally, other challenges are to reduce lost-to-follow-up rates; manage lifelong treatment and care for long-term morbidity, including drug toxicity, residual AIDS and HIV-non-AIDS morbidity and aging-related morbidity; and be able to face unforeseen events such as socio-political and military crisis. An old African proverb states that the growth of a deep-rooted tree cannot be stopped. Our tree is well rooted in existing field experience and is, therefore, expected to grow. In order for us to let it grow, long-term cost-effectiveness approach and life-saving evidence-based programming should replace short-term budgeting approach. PMID:22944479

  3. Challenges With Acute Care and Response to Treatment Among Adult Patients With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ashley D

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a chronic gastrointestinal tract disorder. The symptoms include cycles of extreme nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain separated by periods of wellness. Previous research suggests a quality gap in early recognition and appropriate management of adults with cyclic vomiting syndrome. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe adult patients' experiences with cyclic vomiting syndrome, including challenges receiving a diagnosis and responses to treatment. This study was conducted using a phenomenological research design. A purposeful sample included 16 adult patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome. All data were collected electronically via Survey Monkey and analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison techniques. Two global themes emerged from the data. These were perceived lack of knowledge among healthcare providers and responses to cyclic vomiting syndrome-related treatments. Perceived lack of healthcare provider knowledge contributed to diagnostic delay, inappropriate treatment, and avoidance of care. A combination of medications aimed at managing symptoms and inducing sleep was the most effective abortive medical regimen described. Marijuana use was common. Hot-water bathing was practiced by users and nonusers of marijuana. PMID:26626034

  4. Depression among patients with tuberculosis: determinants, course and impact on pathways to care and treatment outcomes in a primary care setting in southern Ethiopia—a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ambaw, Fentie; Mayston, Rosie; Hanlon, Charlotte; Alem, Atalay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Depression is commonly comorbid with chronic physical illnesses and is associated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes. Currently, the literature on the role of depression in determining the course and outcome of tuberculosis (TB) is very limited. Aim Our aim is to examine the relationship between depression and TB among people newly diagnosed and accessing care for TB in a rural Ethiopian setting. Our objectives are to investigate: the prevalence and determinants of probable depression, the role of depression in influencing pathways to treatment of TB, the incidence of depression during treatment, the impact of anti-TB treatment on the prognosis of depression and the impact of depression on the outcomes of TB treatment. Methods and analysis We will use a prospective cohort design. 703 newly diagnosed cases of TB (469 without depression and 234 with depression) will be consecutively recruited from primary care health centres. Data collection will take place at baseline, 2 and 6?months after treatment initiation. The primary exposure variable is probable depression measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Outcome variables include: pathways to treatment, classical outcomes for anti-TB treatment quality of life and disability. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression and multilevel mixed-effect analysis will be used to test the study hypotheses. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Findings will be disseminated through scientific publications, conference presentations, community meetings and policy briefs. Anticipated impact Findings will contribute to a sparse evidence base on comorbidity of depression and TB. We hope the dissemination of findings will raise awareness of comorbidity among clinicians and service providers, and contribute to ongoing debates regarding the delivery of mental healthcare in primary care in Ethiopia. PMID:26155818

  5. Taking stock: A multistakeholder perspective on improving the delivery of care and the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick; Akehurst, Ron; Ballard, Clive; Banerjee, Sube; Blennow, Kaj; Bremner, Jennifer; Broich, Karl; Cummings, Jeffrey; Dening, Karen; Dubois, Bruno; Klipper, Wiebke; Leibman, Chris; Mantua, Valentina; Molinuevo, José Luis; Morgan, Susan; Muscolo, Luisa A A; Nicolas, François; Pani, Luca; Robinson, Louise; Siviero, Paolo; van Dam, Julius; Van Emelen, Jan; Wimo, Anders; Wortmann, Marc; Goh, Lindee

    2015-04-01

    Health-care stakeholders increasingly recognize that the scientific and economic challenges associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are simply too great for individual stakeholder groups to address solely from within their own silos. In the necessary spirit of collaboration, we present in this perspective a set of multicountry multistakeholder recommendations to improve the organization of existing AD and dementia care and the development of new treatments. In brief, the five recommendations are (1) health-care systems must make choices regarding the patient populations to be diagnosed and treated, (2) health-care systems should use an evidence-based standard of care, (3) increased collaboration between public and private institutions is needed to enhance research, (4) reimbursement end points need to be agreed on and validated, and (5) innovative business models should be used to spur the introduction of new medicines. PMID:24751826

  6. Toward an Understanding of Disengagement from HIV Treatment and Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C.; Wyatt, Monique A.; Geng, Elvin H.; Kaaya, Sylvia F.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Muyindike, Winnie R.; Chalamilla, Guerino; Agaba, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rollout of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has brought lifesaving treatment to millions of HIV-infected individuals. Treatment is lifelong, however, and to continue to benefit, patients must remain in care. Despite this, systematic investigations of retention have repeatedly documented high rates of loss to follow-up from HIV treatment programs. This paper introduces an explanation for missed clinic visits and subsequent disengagement among patients enrolled in HIV treatment and care programs in Africa. Methods and Findings Eight-hundred-ninety patients enrolled in HIV treatment programs in Jos, Nigeria; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Mbarara, Uganda who had extended absences from care were tracked for qualitative research interviews. Two-hundred-eighty-seven were located, and 91 took part in the study. Interview data were inductively analyzed to identify reasons for missed visits and to assemble them into a broader explanation of how missed visits may develop into disengagement. Findings reveal unintentional and intentional reasons for missing, along with reluctance to return to care following an absence. Disengagement is interpreted as a process through which missed visits and ensuing reluctance to return over time erode patients' subjective sense of connectedness to care. Conclusions Missed visits are inevitable over a lifelong course of HIV care. Efforts to prevent missed clinic visits combined with moves to minimize barriers to re-entry into care are more likely than either approach alone to keep missed visits from turning into long-term disengagement. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23341753

  7. The Machinery of Authoritarian Care: Dramatising Breast Cancer Treatment in 1970s Britain

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the professional and public response to the television play Through the Night, which aired on BBC1 in December 1975. One of the first British mass media portrayals of a woman's experience being treated for breast cancer, this play attracted a large audience and considerable attention from both critics and everyday viewers. My analysis of the play draws on sources documenting expert responses to the play in its production stages, as well as critics' and viewers' responses to what the play said about breast cancer treatment in particular, and about Britons' experiences of medical institutions more broadly. Together, I argue, these sources help us see how Through the Night's critique of what one expert called ‘the machinery of authoritarian care’ reverberated with and supported the efforts of professionals anxious to improve patient experience, and how it crystallised the concerns of activists and everyday viewers. PMID:25067891

  8. Sufficiency of care in disasters: ventilation, ventilator triage, and the misconception of guideline-driven treatment.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Griffin

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the management of ventilatory failure in disaster settings where clinical needs overwhelm available resources. An ethically defensible approach in such settings will adopt a "sufficiency of care" perspective that is: (1) adaptive, (2) resource-driven, and (3) responsive to the values of populations being served. Detailed, generic, antecedently written guidelines for "ventilator triage" or other management issues typically are of limited value, and may even impede ethical disaster response if they result in rescuers' clumsily interpreting events through the lens of the guideline, rather than customizing tactics to the actual context. Especially concerning is the tendency of some expert planners to mistakenly assume that medical treatment of respiratory failure: (1) always requires full-feature mechanical ventilators, (2) will always occur in hospitals, and (3) can be planned in advance without sophisticated public consultation about likely ethical dilemmas. PMID:21313863

  9. The impact of African Americans' beliefs about HIV medical care on treatment adherence: a systematic review and recommendations for interventions.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B; Alleyne-Green, Binta

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in access to and retention of regular HIV medical treatment persist among African Americans living with HIV. Many scholars believe that the mistrust of health care held by many African Americans stems from a legacy of abuse, from medical experimentation on slaves to the unethical practices with patients in the Tuskegee Syphilis study. We performed a systematic appraisal of the literature, using several key terms, in order to understand how attitudes about HIV-related health care influence African Americans' engagement in care. We examined peer-reviewed studies published during the period January 2001 through May 2012. An initial search generated 326 studies. Sixteen descriptive studies met our inclusion criteria. Experiences of racism, conspiracy beliefs and the quality of provider relationships appeared to impact engagement. Providers should openly investigate personal beliefs that adversely affect their treatment decisions, listen to patient narratives, and share treatment decisions in order to create a transparent environment. PMID:23010941

  10. Understanding why women adopt and sustain home water treatment: insights from the Malawi antenatal care program.

    PubMed

    Wood, Siri; Foster, Jennifer; Kols, Adrienne

    2012-08-01

    In many settings in Africa, social marketing has proven more successful in generating brand recognition for chlorine water treatment products than in promoting their use. To promote household use of one such product in Malawi, WaterGuard, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and Population Services International (PSI) distributed free hygiene kits that included WaterGuard to pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2007. Follow-up surveys documented a sustained increase in WaterGuard use three years after the initial intervention. In 2010, PATH (www.path.org) conducted qualitative research on the factors motivating women to adopt, sustain, or discontinue use. To provide context, interviews were also conducted with their friends, relatives, and husbands. Interviews revealed that sustained use of WaterGuard does not necessarily imply consistent use. Most respondents reported switching back and forth between WaterGuard and stock chlorine distributed for free by the government, and many treated water seasonally rather than year-round. Qualitative findings suggest that two program strategies strongly influenced women's decisions to adopt, purchase, and continue using WaterGuard. First, positive, ongoing contacts with health care workers, especially during home visits, raised awareness of the need to treat water, encouraged trial use, and supported continuing use. Second, an extended free trial of the product overcame initial cost barriers and allowed women and their families to experience the health benefits of WaterGuard, appreciate its value and relevance to their lives, and get used to its taste. Social support-from like-minded relatives, friends, neighbors, health care workers, husbands, and children-was also a critical factor that promoted consistent, ongoing use of WaterGuard. The findings confirm the importance of interpersonal communication in prompting adoption of household water treatment and suggest that consumers assess the perceived value of a product, not simply its cost. Further research is planned to investigate questions raised about patterns of ongoing use. PMID:22051403

  11. Application of seamless care service with multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment in patients with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Shen-Qiu; Liang, Xiao; Hong, Pu; Wu, Dan; Ke, Wei-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article was to explore the effect of trinity seamless care service (TSCS) in patients with gestational diabetes with multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment (MDT), and thus, to provide basis for improvement in the quality of patient care. Materials and methods: A total of 200 patients were recruited and randomly divided into observation group and control group with 100 cases in each group, who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes through oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 24 to 28 weeks of gestation from September 2012 to September 2014. In order to control blood glucose and weight, patients in the control group received routine treatment and nursing after diagnosis, while those in the observation group received TSCS with MDT. Rate of insulin usage, weight changes and glycemic indexes before and after nursing were compared within the two groups during pregnancy. Results: Compared with the pregnant patients in the control group, the rate of those in the observation group who needed extra insulin to control blood glucose, or the change of body mass index during pregnancy (?BMI) ?6 kg/m2 and less average weight gain prior to delivery was significantly lower (P<0.05). Glycemic indexes in the observation group after nursing were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Incidences of cesarean delivery, polyhydramnios, gestational hypertension and postpartum hemorrhage in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Incidences of macrosomia, hyperbilirubinemia, fetal distress, stillbirth and teratogeny in the observation group were also significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of TSCS with MDT in patients with gestational diabetes helps to keep appropriate weight gain, control blood glucose by improving glycemic indexes, significantly reduce the incidences of maternal perinatal and neonatal complications and improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26629204

  12. Geographic variability in HIV and injection drug use in Ukraine: Implications for integration and expansion of drug treatment and HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas; Mazhnaya, Alonya; Larney, Sarah; Islam, Zahed; Shost, Alyona; Prokhorova, Tatiana; Rybak, Natasha; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Ukraine has the highest HIV burden of any European country with much of the current HIV epidemic concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and their sexual partners. Opiate substitution therapy (OST) is limited in Ukraine and expansion of OST is urgently needed to help stem the tide of the HIV epidemic. Methods We accessed publicly available data in Ukraine in order to explore geographic variability with respect to prevalence of HIV, PWIDs and OST programmes. Results The regions of Ukraine with the largest number of opioid dependent persons (the south and eastern portions of the country) correspond to the regions with the highest HIV prevalence and HIV incidence. The number of opioid PWIDs per 100,000 population as well as the number of all OST treatment slots per 100,000 varied significantly across the three HIV prevalence categories. Overall, the proportion of individuals receiving either methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) or buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was quite low: average across categories: 7.3% and 0.4%, respectively. Additionally, less than half of OST patients receiving MMT or BMT were HIV positive patients. Conclusion There is significant geographic variability in both numbers of HIV positive individuals and numbers of PWIDs across Ukraine, however, there may be a more concentrated epidemic among PWIDs in many regions of the country. Scale up of addiction treatment for PWID, especially OST, can have a significant impact on preventing injection related morbidity, such as HIV and HCV infection. Ukraine can learn from the mistakes other nations have made in denying critical treatment opportunities to PWID. PMID:25304049

  13. Inequality and inequity in access to health care and treatment for chronic conditions in China: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Elwell-Sutton, Timothy M; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Wei Sen; Cheng, Kar Keung; Lam, Tai H; Leung, Gabriel M; Schooling, C M

    2013-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a large and rapidly-growing problem in China and other middle-income countries. Clinical treatment of NCDs is long-term and expensive, so it may present particular problems for equality and horizontal equity (equal treatment for equal need) in access to health care, although little is known about this at present in low- and middle-income countries. To address this gap, and inform policy for a substantial proportion of the global population, we examined inequality and inequity in general health care utilization (doctor consultations and hospital admissions) and in treatment of chronic conditions (hypertension, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia), in 30 499 Chinese adults aged ?50 years from one of China's richest provinces, using the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-2008). We used concentration indices to test for inequality and inequity in utilization by household income per head. Inequality was decomposed to show the contributions of income, indicators of 'need for health care' (age, sex, self-rated health, coronary heart disease risk and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and non-need factors (education, occupation, out-of-pocket health care payments and health insurance). We found inequality and inequity in treatment of chronic conditions but not in general health care utilization. Using more objective and specific measures of 'need for health care' increased estimates of inequity for treatment of chronic conditions. Income and non-need factors (especially health insurance, education and occupation) made the largest contributions to inequality. Further work is needed on why access to treatment for chronic conditions in China is restricted for those on low incomes and how these inequities can be mitigated. PMID:22987824

  14. Multifactorial control and treatment intensity of type-2 diabetes in primary care settings in Catalonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many studies on diabetes have demonstrated that an intensive control of glycaemia and the main associated risk factors (hypertension, dislipidaemia, obesity and smoking) reduce cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Different scientific societies have proposed a multifactorial approach to type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify the degree of control of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and of cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients, using the GedapS 2004 guidelines, and to analyse the type and intensity of drug treatment. Methods This cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study was conducted in a primary care setting in Vallès Occidental South, Catalonia. Data were collected of 393 patients aged 18 and above who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2. Biodemographic and clinical data, cardiovascular risk factors, associated cardiovascular disease, and treatment were assessed. Descriptive and multivariable analysis with logistic regression was realized. Results A total of 392 patients with a mean age of 66.8 years (SD = 10.6) (45.4% male patients) were analyzed. The duration of diabetes was 8.4 years (SD = 7.6). The degree of multifactorial control of risk factors was only 2.6%, although in more than 50% individual cardiovascular risk factor was controlled, except for LDL cholesterol (40.6%) and systolic blood pressure (29.6%). Furthermore, only 13.0% of subjects had an optimal BMI, 27.5% an optimal waist circumference. Treatment for diabetes was prescribed in 82.7% of patients, for hypertension 70.7%, for dyslipidaemia 47.2% and 40.1% were taking antiplatelets. Conclusion Over 50% of type 2 diabetic patients presented optimal control of the majority of individual cardiovascular risk factors, although the degree of multifactorial control of diabetes was insufficient (2.6%) and should be improved. Drug treatment can be intensified using a larger number of combinations, particularly in patients with target organ damage and associated clinical cardiovascular disease. PMID:20350315

  15. Determination of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD in whole blood by UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Jørgenrud, Benedicte; Strand, Dag Helge

    2013-04-01

    A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantification of buprenorphine, fentanyl and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in whole blood. Sample preparation was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with methyl tert-butyl ether. UPLC-MS-MS analysis was performed with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate (pH 10.2) and methanol. Positive electrospray ionization MS-MS detection was performed with two multiple reaction monitoring transitions for each of the analytes and the deuterium labeled internal standards. Limit of detection values of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD were 0.28, 0.044 and 0.0097 ng/mL and limit of quantification values were 0.94, 0.14 and 0.036 ng/mL, respectively. Most phospholipids were removed during LLE. No or only minor matrix effects were observed. The method has been routinely used at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health since September 2011 for qualitative and quantitative detections of buprenorphine, fentanyl and/or LSD in more than 400 whole blood samples with two replicates per sample. PMID:23423312

  16. Effect of fentanyl versus buprenorphine on the pupil size in phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anaraki, Abdolreza Najafi; Akrami, Abbas; Motamed, Niloofar; Seydali, Elham

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite several recent innovations in phacoemulsification surgery, importance of pupil diameter in this surgery is becoming more evident. Purpose: To compare the effect of opioid agonist (fentanyl) versus opioid agonist–antagonist (buprenorphine) on pupil diameter in cataract surgery and to choose the best opioid in high-risk phacoemulsification surgery. Methods: In this randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 60 patients who were candidates for elective phacoemulsification surgery were randomly divided into two equal groups: experimental (buprenorphine, 0.3 ?g/kg) and control (fentanyl, 1 ?g/kg). Pupil diameter was measured preinjection and at several times postinjection. Blood pressure was recorded at several intervals, as well as shivering, nausea and vomiting, and recovery time. Results: Mean (SD) recovery time was significantly less in the control group (19.46±5.43) than in the experimental group (33.23±10.75) (P<0.0001). The constriction effect (ie, pupillary diameter in mm) was significantly lower in the experimental group (0.53±0.45) than in the control group (1.06±0.52) (P=0.0001). The percentages of constriction effect in experimentaland control groups were 7.68% and 15.07%, respectively. The eye was two times more constricted in the control group in comparison with the experimental group after induction of anesthesia. Conclusion: Buprenorphine is a better solution to decrease pupil constriction in comparison with fentanylinhigh-risk phacoemulsification surgery. PMID:23162402

  17. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  18. Motivation to persist with internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment using blended care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression is high and results in huge costs for society. Internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment (ICBT) has been suggested for use in primary care and has been shown to be more effective when combined with human support. However, non-completion rates remain a challenge. Current recommendations state that steps to improve persistence with ICBT should be determined and the impact of therapist support on persistence explored. A few earlier studies have explored motivations to persist with ICBT without face-to-face therapist support. The present study explored the motivation to persist as experienced by a group of patients who sought help in primary care and used “blended care”, i.e. ICBT supported by short face-to-face consultations. Methods To elucidate motivation in an everyday context and the meaning of patients’ experiences we chose a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. We interviewed participants in the intervention group of a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the efficacy of an ICBT programme called MoodGYM, an eHealth intervention used to treat depression. Fourteen participants, both completers and non-completers, went through individual, semi-structured interviews after they ended their treatment. Results Hope of recovery and a desire to gain control of one’s life were identified as intrinsic motivators. The feeling of being able to freely choose how, when and where to complete the ICBT modules was identified as an important supporting condition and satisfied the participants’ need for autonomy. Furthermore, the importance of a sense of belonging towards partners, friends or family was essential for motivation as was the ability to identify with ICBT content. Another supporting condition was the experience of connectedness when met with acknowledgement, flexibility and feedback from a qualified therapist in the face-to-face consultations. Conclusions A key finding was that participants were motivated to persist with ICBT when their overall need for relatedness was satisfied. This was achieved through a sense of belonging towards partners, friends and family. Connectedness with the therapist and the participant’s ability to identify with the ICBT modules also gave a sense of relatedness. Improving these motivational aspects may increase patients’ persistence with ICBT. PMID:24199672

  19. Buprenorphine 5, 10 and 20??g/h transdermal patch: a guide to its use in chronic non-malignant pain.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L; Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2012-04-01

    Buprenorphine lower-dose (5, 10 and 20??g/h) transdermal patches, which are administered once every 7 days, are indicated in the management of chronic non-malignant pain. This review focuses on the labelling of this formulation (BuTrans®) in the EU. The analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee has been demonstrated to be equivalent to sublingual buprenorphine, noninferior to prolonged-release tramadol and generally superior to a matching transdermal placebo patch. When used together with regularly scheduled oral paracetamol (acetaminophen), transdermal buprenorphine was noninferior to codeine plus paracetamol. Transdermal buprenorphine has also shown analgesic efficacy in patients with chronic non-malignant pain of various causes. PMID:22369187

  20. Understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in rural Tanzania: the ACCESS Programme

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Iteba, Nelly; Makemba, Ahmed; Mshana, Christopher; Lengeler, Christian; Obrist, Brigit; Schulze, Alexander; Nathan, Rose; Dillip, Angel; Alba, Sandra; Mayumana, Iddy; Khatib, Rashid A; Njau, Joseph D; Mshinda, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    Background Prompt access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. However, a variety of interlinked factors at household and health system level influence access to timely and appropriate treatment and care. Furthermore, access may be influenced by global and national health policies. As a consequence, many malaria episodes in highly endemic countries are not treated appropriately. Project The ACCESS Programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in a rural Tanzanian setting. The programme's strategy is based on a set of integrated interventions, including social marketing for improved care seeking at community level as well as strengthening of quality of care at health facilities. This is complemented by a project that aims to improve the performance of drug stores. The interventions are accompanied by a comprehensive set of monitoring and evaluation activities measuring the programme's performance and (health) impact. Baseline data demonstrated heterogeneity in the availability of malaria treatment, unavailability of medicines and treatment providers in certain areas as well as quality problems with regard to drugs and services. Conclusion The ACCESS Programme is a combination of multiple complementary interventions with a strong evaluation component. With this approach, ACCESS aims to contribute to the development of a more comprehensive access framework and to inform and support public health professionals and policy-makers in the delivery of improved health services. PMID:17603898

  1. In vivo receptor binding of the opiate partial agonist, buprenorphine, correlated with its agonistic and antagonistic actions.

    PubMed Central

    Dum, J. E.; Herz, A.

    1981-01-01

    1 In order to gain more insight into the mechanisms behind the actions of opiate partial agonists, an analysis of the dual agonist/antagonist properties of the partial agonist, buprenorphine, was made in conjunction with in vivo binding studies on the drug in the rat. 2 Buprenorphine revealed a bell-shaped dose-response curve for antinociception peaking at approx. 0.5 mg/kg subcutaneously. It antagonized morphine antinociception at doses which normally have agonistic effects and produced maximum antagonistic effects at doses above those having prominent agonistic activity. The withdrawal precipitating potency of buprenorphine as measured in highly morphine-dependent rats was present at doses above those having agonistic activity. The entire dose-response curve for buprenorphine was shifted symmetrically to the right by the opiate antagonist, naltrexone. 3 The dose-dependent occupation of receptors in vivo by buprenorphine seemed to be almost complete over the agonist dosage range; almost no further receptor occupation over the antagonist range was seen. 4 The possibility is discussed that site-to-site receptor interactions leading to cooperativity of effect may be the best explanation of these results. PMID:6271322

  2. The analgesic drug buprenorphine inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro, but is proinflammatory in rat adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hall, T J; Jagher, B; Schaeublin, M; Wiesenberg, I

    1996-06-01

    We have examined the effect of the micro-opioid analgesic buprenorphine on osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro and in the rat adjuvant arthritis model. In the bone slice assay buprenorphine inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption with an IC50 of 1 microM. This effect was not mimicked by the micro-opioid agonist ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin and was not prevented by the micro-opioid antagonist naloxone. Since other agents that inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin prevent bone erosion in the rat adjuvant arthritis model, we also examined the effect of buprenorphine in this model. Surprisingly, buprenorphine exacerbated inflammation measured by paw volume and increased joint destruction assessed by X-ray scores, in the injected paws and particularly in the non-injected paws. These studies also show that attempts to ameliorate animal suffering in this chronic model by using centrally acting analgesics such as buprenorphine may lead to complications in interpreting screening results obtained with novel, potential anti-arthritic compounds. PMID:8814462

  3. Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay in drugs-of-abuse screening: influence of dose and metabolites of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jon Andsnes; Schjøtt, Jan; Fossan, Kjell O; Riedel, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) for buprenorphine is applied for both urine drugs-of-abuse screening and compliance monitoring. Sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff of this assay have differed between studies. This may indicate that cross-reactivity has to be taken into account during assay evaluation. We therefore investigated the performance of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay for use in our patient population and explored the impact of cross-reactivity on assay accuracy. Methods The CEDIA buprenorphine assay and high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were employed to analyze drugs-of-abuse in urine samples from a healthy drug-naïve male volunteer after intake of two tablets of a prescription drug containing 400 mg paracetamol +30 mg codeine phosphate, and in urine samples (n=2,272) from drug-addicted patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to express the diagnostic accuracy of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. Results CEDIA buprenorphine was positive in one urine sample from the drug-naïve person after intake of the prescription drug. Twenty-five (1.1%) of the patient urine samples were positive for buprenorphine by CEDIA, but negative by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Codeine, morphine, and their respective metabolites were prevalent in samples that were false positive for buprenorphine. The specificity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay increased to 99.7% when the cutoff was increased from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Intake of a therapeutic dose of codeine can yield a false-positive CEDIA buprenorphine result. Additive effects from metabolites of codeine contribute to cross-reactivity in concentrations much lower than listed in the manufacturer’s cross-reactivity guide. Raising the cutoff from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL increased the diagnostic accuracy. Clinicians should be informed about the risk of false-positive results with the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. PMID:26604854

  4. Exploring Robust Methods for Evaluating Treatment and Comparison Groups in Chronic Care Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M.; Harrison, Patricia L.; Sidney, James A.; Coberley, Carter R.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Pope, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior to analysis. Two matching techniques used to achieve balanced groups are Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and Coarsened Exact Matching (CEM). Unlike PSM, CEM has been shown to yield estimates of causal (program) effects that are lowest in variance and bias for any given sample size. The objective of this case study was to provide a comprehensive comparison of these 2 matching methods within an evaluation of a CCM program administered to a large health plan during a 2-year time period. Descriptive and statistical methods were used to assess the level of balance between comparison and treatment members pre matching. Compared with PSM, CEM retained more members, achieved better balance between matched members, and resulted in a statistically insignificant Wald test statistic for group aggregation. In terms of program performance, the results showed an overall higher medical cost savings among treatment members matched using CEM compared with those matched using PSM (-$25.57 versus -$19.78, respectively). Collectively, the results suggest CEM is a viable alternative, if not the most appropriate matching method, to apply when evaluating CCM program performance. (Population Health Management 2013;16:35–45) PMID:22788834

  5. Characterizing the passage of personal care products through wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Joan; Stephenson, Roger; Burbano, Arturo; Liu, Li

    2007-12-01

    Wastewater treatment facilities use secondary treatment to stabilize the effect of discharged effluent on receiving waters by oxidizing biodegradable organic matter and reducing suspended solids and nutrients. The process was never specifically intended to remove trace quantities of xenobiotics, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Nevertheless, European studies performed at bench-scale or at small facilities have demonstrated that a critical minimum solids retention time (SRT) can achieve good reduction of many EDCs and pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to expand these findings to the removal performance for 20 PPCPs commonly found in the influent to full-scale facilities operating in the United States. The participating plants use SRT conditions ranging from 0.5 to 30 days and include facility capacities ranging from 19 000 m3/d (5 mgd) to greater than 1 136 000 m3/d (300 mgd). Two pilot membrane bioreactors were also included in the study. The 20 PPCPs were categorized into nine bin combinations of occurrence frequency and treatment reduction performance. While most compounds were well removed, galaxolide (a musk fragrance) occurred frequently and was resistant to removal. A minimum critical SRT, defined as the minimum SRT, needed to consistently demonstrate greater than 80% removal (SRT80), was compound-dependent, with most compounds removed at 5 to 15 days and a small group requiring longer SRTs. From limited data, no additional removal could be attributed to the use of membrane bioreactors, media filters, or longer hydraulic retention times. Reverse osmosis was effective in removing any remaining compounds. PMID:18198702

  6. Exploring robust methods for evaluating treatment and comparison groups in chronic care management programs.

    PubMed

    Wells, Aaron R; Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M; Harrison, Patricia L; Sidney, James A; Coberley, Carter R; Rula, Elizabeth Y; Pope, James E

    2013-02-01

    Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior to analysis. Two matching techniques used to achieve balanced groups are Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and Coarsened Exact Matching (CEM). Unlike PSM, CEM has been shown to yield estimates of causal (program) effects that are lowest in variance and bias for any given sample size. The objective of this case study was to provide a comprehensive comparison of these 2 matching methods within an evaluation of a CCM program administered to a large health plan during a 2-year time period. Descriptive and statistical methods were used to assess the level of balance between comparison and treatment members pre matching. Compared with PSM, CEM retained more members, achieved better balance between matched members, and resulted in a statistically insignificant Wald test statistic for group aggregation. In terms of program performance, the results showed an overall higher medical cost savings among treatment members matched using CEM compared with those matched using PSM (-$25.57 versus -$19.78, respectively). Collectively, the results suggest CEM is a viable alternative, if not the most appropriate matching method, to apply when evaluating CCM program performance. PMID:22788834

  7. The effectiveness of opioid substitution treatments for patients with opioid dependence: a systematic review and multiple treatment comparison protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioids are psychoactive analgesic drugs prescribed for pain relief and palliative care. Due to their addictive potential, effort and vigilance in controlling prescriptions is needed to avoid misuse and dependence. Despite the effort, the prevalence of opioid use disorder continues to rise. Opioid substitution therapies are commonly used to treat opioid dependence; however, there is minimal consensus as to which therapy is most effective. Available treatments include methadone, heroin, buprenorphine, as well as naltrexone. This systematic review aims to assess and compare the effect of all available opioid substitution therapies on the treatment of opioid dependence. Methods/Design The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. The title, abstract, and full-text screening will be completed in duplicate. When appropriate, multiple treatment comparison Bayesian meta-analytic methods will be performed to deduce summary statistics estimating the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies in terms of retention and response to treatment (as measured through continued opioid abuse). Discussion Using evidence gained from this systematic review, we anticipate disseminating an objective review of the current available literature on the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies for the treatment of opioid use disorder. The results of this systematic review are imperative to the further enhancement of clinical practice in addiction medicine. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42013006507. PMID:25239213

  8. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 3. Management and treatment with phototherapy and systemic agents.

    PubMed

    Sidbury, Robert; Davis, Dawn M; Cohen, David E; Cordoro, Kelly M; Berger, Timothy G; Bergman, James N; Chamlin, Sarah L; Cooper, Kevin D; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A; Simpson, Eric L; Tom, Wynnis L; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2014-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2% to 3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in atopic dermatitis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. In this third of 4 sections, treatment of atopic dermatitis with phototherapy and systemic immunomodulators, antimicrobials, and antihistamines is reviewed, including indications for use and the risk-benefit profile of each treatment option. PMID:24813298

  9. Care of the infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome: strength of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Denise

    2014-01-01

    There is little empirical evidence that guides management of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome. The standard of care first described in the 1970s is still prevalent today, although it has never been tested in this population. Standard of care interventions include decreasing external stimulation, holding, nonnutritive sucking, swaddling, pressure/rubbing, and rocking. These interventions meet the goals of nonpharmacologic interventions, which are to facilitate parental attachment and decrease external stimuli. Many nursing interventions used in infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome have been tested in low-birth-weight infants, whose treatment often includes the same goals. Those interventions include music therapy, kangaroo care, massage, and use of nonoscillating water beds. Nursing attitude has also been shown to be impactful on parental attachment. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast-feeding in infants whose mothers are on methadone who do not have any other contraindication. It also provides guidelines for pharmacologic management but cannot provide specific recommendations about a standard first dose, escalation, or weaning schedule. Buprenorphine has some evidence about its safety in newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome, but high-powered studies on its efficacy are currently lacking. There are many opportunities for both evidence-based projects and nursing research projects in this population. PMID:25062522

  10. Ertapenem versus cefepime for initial empirical treatment of pneumonia acquired in skilled-care facilities or in hospitals outside the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, S V; Stratchounski, L S; Woods, G L; Adeyi, B; McCarroll, K A; Ginanni, J A; Friedland, I R; Wood, C A; DiNubile, M J

    2006-10-01

    The study presented here compared the efficacy and safety of ertapenem and cefepime as initial treatment for adults with pneumonia acquired in skilled-care facilities or in hospital environments outside the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-ventilated patients developing pneumonia in hospital environments outside the ICU, in nursing homes, or in other skilled-care facilities were enrolled in this double-blind non-inferiority study, stratified by APACHE II score (15) and randomized (1:1) to receive cefepime (2 g every 12 h with optional metronidazole 500 mg every 12 h) or ertapenem (1 g daily). After 3 days of parenteral therapy, participants demonstrating clinical improvement could be switched to oral ciprofloxacin or another appropriate oral agent. Probable pathogens were identified in 162 (53.5%) of the 303 randomized participants. The most common pathogens were Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from 59 (19.5%), 39 (12.9%), and 35 (11.6%) participants, respectively. At the test-of-cure assessment 7-14 days after completion of all study therapy, pneumonia had resolved or substantially improved in 89 (87.3%) of 102 clinically evaluable ertapenem recipients and 80 (86%) of 93 clinically evaluable cefepime recipients (95% confidence interval for the difference, -9.4 to 11.8%), fulfilling pre-specified criteria for statistical non-inferiority. The frequency and severity of drug-related adverse events were generally similar in both treatment groups. In this study population, ertapenem was as well-tolerated and efficacious as cefepime for the initial treatment of pneumonia acquired in skilled-care facilities or in hospital environments outside the ICU. PMID:17024505

  11. Predictors and Correlates of Completing Behavioral Parent Training for the Treatment of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavigne, John V.; LeBailly, Susan A.; Gouze, Karen R.; Binns, Helen J.; Keller, Jennifer; Pate, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of pretreatment demographic and clinical predictors of attendance as well as barriers to treatment and consumer satisfaction on attendance at therapist-led parent training with 86 families of children ages 3 to 6 years conducted in pediatric primary care settings. Only socioeconomic status (SES) and minority group…

  12. Developing and Implementing Monitoring and Evaluation Methods in the New Era of Expanded Care and Treatment of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, R. Cameron; Bicego, George; Marconi, Katherine; Bessinger, Ruth; van Praag, Eric; Noriega-Minichiello, Shanti; Pappas, Gregory; Fronczak, Nancy; Peersman, Greet; Fiorentino, Renee K.; Rugg, Deborah; Novak, John

    2004-01-01

    The sharp rise in the HIV/AIDS burden worldwide has elicited calls for increased efforts to combat the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS. Efforts must continue with the aim to decrease new infections. At the same time, care and treatment services for those already infected can lead to longer, productive lives, thereby minimizing negative effects on…

  13. Perspectives on Obesity and Its Treatment: Health Care Providers and the General Public in Rural West Virginia and Urban Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menez, Steven; Cheskin, Lawrence; Geller, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the perspectives of the general public and health care providers (HCPs) on obesity and its treatment in rural West Virginia (WV) and Baltimore, MD. Method: Surveys were completed in both locations by the general public (WV: "n" = 200; Baltimore: "n" = 171) and HCPs (WV: "n" = 25;…

  14. Affiliation with Delinquent Peers as a Mediator of the Effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Delinquent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Leve, Leslie D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the ability of delinquent peer affiliation to mediate the effects of multidimensional treatment foster care (MTFC; Chamberlain, 2003) on girls' delinquent behavior. Method: This study used a sample of girls from 2 cohorts (N = 166; M = 15.31 years old at baseline, range 13-17 years; 74% European American, 2% African…

  15. Implementation of a "Learner-Driven" Curriculum: An Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Interdisciplinary Primary Care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Marina R.; Atherton, W. Leigh; Toriello, Paul J.; Hodgson, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Although screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) has been a popular model to address potential substance abuse issues in primary care, there is a need for innovative approaches for training providers and staff on SBIRT protocols. An interdisciplinary approach to SBIRT training, named ICARE, was implemented at 3 different…

  16. Quality Adjustment for Health Care Spending on Chronic Disease: Evidence from Diabetes Treatment, 1999–2009

    E-print Network

    Eggleston, Karen N

    Although US health care expenditures reached 17.6 percent of GDP in 2009, quality measurement in this important service sector remains limited. Studying quality changes associated with 11 years of health care for patients ...

  17. 78 FR 62506 - TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...RIN 0720-AB61 TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery...medically necessary and appropriate follow-on care, resulting from a non-covered incident...a properly granted Supplemental Health Care Program waiver. This proposed rule...

  18. Medicaid Managed Care, Substance Abuse Treatment and People with Disabilities: Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Sara S.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Tobias, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Most states enroll individuals with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in Medicaid managed care plans. The impact of managed care on these individuals, especially those with substance abuse disorders, is not well understood. A review of the literature related to substance abuse, disability, and Medicaid managed care

  19. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers concerning their Latino patients, in particular issues affecting their patients' access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with…

  20. INtegration of DEPression Treatment into HIV Care in Uganda (INDEPTH-Uganda): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite 10 to% of persons living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa having clinical depression, and the consequences of depression for key public health outcomes (HIV treatment adherence and condom use), depression treatment is rarely integrated into HIV care programs. Task-shifting, protocolized approaches to depression care have been used to overcome severe shortages of mental health specialists in developing countries, but not in sub-Saharan Africa and not with HIV clients. The aims of this trial are to evaluate the implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a task-shifting, protocolized model of antidepressant care for HIV clinics in Uganda. Methods/Design INDEPTH-Uganda is a cluster randomized controlled trial that compares two task-shifting models of depression care - a protocolized model versus a model that relies on the clinical acumen of trained providers to provide depression care in ten public health HIV clinics in Uganda. In addition to data abstracted from routine data collection mechanisms and supervision logs, survey data will be collected from patient and provider longitudinal cohorts; at each site, a random sample of 150 medically stable patients who are depressed according to the PHQ-2 screening will be followed for 12 months, and providers involved in depression care implementation will be followed over 24 months. These data will be used to assess whether the two models differ on implementation outcomes (proportion screened, diagnosed, treated; provider fidelity to model of care), provider adoption of treatment care knowledge and practices, and depression alleviation. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted to compare the relative use of resources by each model. Discussion If effective and resource-efficient, the task-shifting, protocolized model will provide an approach to building the capacity for sustainable integration of depression treatment in HIV care settings across sub-Saharan Africa and improving key public health outcomes. Trial registration INDEPTH-Uganda has been registered with the National Institutes of Health sponsored clinical trials registry (3 February 2013) and has been assigned the identifier NCT02056106. PMID:24962086

  1. Review and Evaluation of Online Tobacco Dependence Treatment Training Programs for Health Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Goncharenko, Karina; Barker, Megan; Fahim, Myra; Timothy, Valerie; Dragonetti, Rosa; Kemper, Katherine; Herie, Marilyn; Hays, J Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Background Training health care professionals is associated with increased capacity to deliver evidence-based smoking cessation interventions and increased quit rates among their patients. Online training programs hold promise to provide training but questions remain regarding the quality and usability of available programs. Objective The aim was to assess the quality of English-language online courses in tobacco dependence treatment using a validated instrument. Methods An environmental scan was conducted using the Google search engine to identify available online tobacco dependence treatment courses. The identified courses were then evaluated using the Peer Review Rubric for Online Learning, which was selected based on its ability to evaluate instructional design. It also has clear and concise criteria descriptions to ensure uniformity of evaluations by trained experts. Results A total of 39 courses were identified, of which 24 unique courses were assessed based on their accessibility and functionality during the period of evaluation. Overall, the course ratings indicated that 17 of 24 courses evaluated failed to meet minimal quality standards and none of the courses evaluated could be ranked as superior. However, many excelled in providing effective navigation, course rationale, and content. Many were weak in the use of instructional design elements, such as teaching effectiveness, learning strategies, instructor’s role, and assessment and evaluation. Evaluation results and suggestions for improvement were shared with course administrators. Conclusions Based on the courses evaluated in this review, course developers are encouraged to employ best practices in instructional design, such as cohesiveness of material, linearity of design, practice exercises, problem solving, and ongoing evaluation to improve existing courses and in the design of new online learning opportunities. PMID:25887187

  2. Outcome of treatment in patients with methamphetamine poisoning in an Iranian tertiary care referral center

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Parva; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Paydar, Hooman; Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Joumaa, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Methamphetamine is the second most widely abused drug worldwide. We performed a study on the treatment outcome of acute methamphetamine intoxication in a referral tertiary care University hospital in Iran. Methods: In this hospital-based, retrospective study which was carried out from 2012 to 2013, medical records of all patients aged 18 to 65 years who were admitted with a reliable history and clinical diagnosis of acute methamphetamine intoxication were abstracted and analyzed. Patients’ data included gender, age, type and route of poisoning, clinical manifestations, duration of hospitalization, and the treatment outcome. ANOVA, Chi-square, and binary logistic regression statistical tests were used for data analysis. Findings: A total of 129 patients with a mean age of 30.70 ± 0.93 (mean ± standard error), including 111 (86%) males, had been fully evaluated. Most of the patients had intentional poisoning (93.7%). In 42.6% of patients, inhalation was the main route of exposure. Most of the patients had complete improvement without any complication (89.1%). Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.006–1.099), suicide history (OR, 30.33; 95% CI 3.11–295.24), route of poisoning ([ingestion: OR, 0.21; 95% CI 0.05–0.87], [inhalation: OR, 0.19; 95% CI 0.04–0.78]), and pulmonary system manifestations (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.15–2.93) were predictive in patients outcome (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Methamphetamine poisoning was more common in males with intentional poisoning. Age, past history of suicide, route of poisoning, and pulmonary manifestations on admission could be c