Sample records for care buprenorphine treatment

  1. HIV Provider Endorsement of Primary Care Buprenorphine Treatment: A Vignette Study

    PubMed Central

    Kunins, Hillary V.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Roose, Robert J.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives Opioid dependence is common among HIV-infected persons in the United States. Factors associated with HIV care providers recommending buprenorphine for opioid dependence are poorly defined. Using vignettes, we sought to identify HIV provider characteristics associated with endorsing buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Methods We used a cross-sectional survey of HIV providers, including 497 physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants attending HIV educational conferences in 2006. Anonymous questionnaires distributed to conference attendees contained one of two vignettes depicting opioid-dependent patients. Respondents recommended type of substance abuse treatment for the vignette patient. Using logistic regression, we tested patient and provider factors associated with HIV provider endorsement of buprenorphine in primary care. Results Sixteen percent of providers endorsed buprenorphine treatment in primary care for vignette patients. Family physicians and general internists (AOR=2.8, CI=1.1–7.1), African American providers (AOR=3.0, CI=1.3–6.8), and those with previous buprenorphine prescribing experience (AOR=4.6, CI=1.2–17.9) were more likely to endorse buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Conclusions HIV providers infrequently endorsed buprenorphine treatment in primary care for vignette patients. Generalist and African American providers and those with previous buprenorphine prescribing experience are more likely to endorse buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Targeting generalist and minority providers may be one strategy to promote effective integration of HIV care and opioid addiction treatment. PMID:19882396

  2. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  3. Long-Term Treatment with Buprenorphine\\/Naloxone in Primary Care: Results at 2-5 Years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Fiellin; Brent A. Moore; Lynn E. Sullivan; William C. Becker; Michael V. Pantalon; Marek C. Chawarski; Declan T. Barry; Patrick G. O'Connor; Richard S. Schottenfeld

    To examine long-term outcomes with primary care office- based buprenorphine\\/naloxone treatment, we followed 53 opioid-dependent patients who had already demonstrated six months of documented clinical stability for 2-5 years. Primary outcomes were retention, illicit drug use, dose, satisfaction, serum transaminases, and adverse events. Thirty-eight percent of enrolled subjects were retained for two years. Ninety-one percent of urine samples had no

  4. Emerging adult age status predicts poor buprenorphine treatment retention.

    PubMed

    Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Weiss, Roger D; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Borodovsky, Jacob; Albanese, Mark J

    2014-09-01

    Emerging adults (18-25 years old) are often poorly retained in substance use disorder treatment. Office-based buprenorphine often enhances treatment retention among people with opioid dependence. In this study, we examined the records of a collaborative care buprenorphine treatment program to compare the treatment retention rates of emerging adults versus older adults. Subjects were 294 adults, 71 (24%) aged 18-25, followed in treatment with buprenorphine, nurse care management, and an intensive outpatient program followed by weekly psychosocial treatment. Compared to older adults, emerging adults remained in treatment at a significantly lower rate at 3 months (56% versus 78%) and 12 months (17% versus 45%), and were significantly more likely to test positive for illicit opioids, relapse, or drop out of treatment. Further research into factors associated with buprenorphine treatment retention among emerging adults is needed to improve treatment and long-term outcomes in this group. PMID:24953168

  5. Long-term treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone in primary care: results at 2-5 years.

    PubMed

    Fiellin, David A; Moore, Brent A; Sullivan, Lynn E; Becker, William C; Pantalon, Michael V; Chawarski, Marek C; Barry, Declan T; O'Connor, Patrick G; Schottenfeld, Richard S

    2008-01-01

    To examine long-term outcomes with primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone treatment, we followed 53 opioid-dependent patients who had already demonstrated six months of documented clinical stability for 2-5 years. Primary outcomes were retention, illicit drug use, dose, satisfaction, serum transaminases, and adverse events. Thirty-eight percent of enrolled subjects were retained for two years. Ninety-one percent of urine samples had no evidence of opioid use, and patient satisfaction was high. Serum transaminases remained stable from baseline. No serious adverse events related to treatment occurred. We conclude that select opioid-dependent patients exhibit moderate levels of retention in primary care office-based treatment. PMID:18393054

  6. A buprenorphine education and training program for primary care residents: Implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kunins, Hillary V.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Giovanniello, Angela; Thompson, Devin; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although substance use disorders are highly prevalent, resident preparation to care for patients with these disorders is frequently insufficient. With increasing rates of opioid abuse and dependence, and the availability of medication-assisted treatment, one strategy to improve resident skills is to incorporate buprenorphine treatment into training settings. Methods Residency faculty delivered our BupEd education and training program to 71 primary care residents. BupEd included: 1) a didactic session on buprenorphine, 2) an interactive motivational interviewing session, 3) monthly case conferences, and 4) supervised clinical experience providing buprenorphine treatment. To evaluate BupEd, we assessed: 1) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment during residency, 2) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment after residency, and 4) treatment retention among patients treated by resident versus attending physicians. Results Of 71 residents, most served as a covering or primary provider to at least one buprenorphine-treated patient (84.5 and 66.2% respectively). Of 40 graduates, 27.5% obtained a buprenorphine waiver and 17.5% prescribed buprenorphine. Treatment retention was similar between patients cared for by resident PCPs versus attending PCPs ((90-day retention: 63.6% (n=35) vs. 67.9% (n=152), p=0.55)). Conclusion BupEd is feasible, provides residents with supervised clinical experience in treating opioid dependent patients, and can serve as a model to prepare primary care physicians to care for patients with opioid dependence. PMID:23844954

  7. Models for Integrating Buprenorphine Therapy into the Primary HIV Care Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanjay Basu; R. Douglas Bruce; Frederick L. Altice

    2006-01-01

    Opiate dependence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients has been associated with negative clinical outcomes, yet few affected patients receive appropriate and coordinated treatment for both conditions. The introduction of buprenorphine maintenance therapy into HIV care settings provides an opportunity for providers to integrate treatment for opiate dependence into their practices. Buprenorphine maintenance therapy has been associated with reductions in

  8. Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Valadez-Meltzer, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Opioid dependence is a significant and growing problem in the United States. For nearly a century, federal regulations have made it illegal for psychiatrists and other physicians to pharmacologically manage this condition in an office-based setting using opioids. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 has made it possible for all physicians to prescribe buprenorphine to patients in such a setting. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opoid receptor agonist, has unique pharmacologic properties that distinguish it from methadone and other medications used in the treatment of opioid dependence. It has been shown to be as effective as methadone and is generally safe and well-tolerated. It is available in two sublingual formulations: Subutex, which contains only buprenorphine, and Suboxone, which also contains naloxone. Physicians who wish to prescribe either must obtain a special waiver from the federal government and are currently limited to prescribing it for 30 patients at a time. PMID:21124750

  9. Effect of buprenorphine dose on treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Vayalapalli, Sreedevi; Casarella, Jennifer; Drexler, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this meta-analysis is to provide evidence based information about proper dosing for buprenorphine maintenance treatment to improve treatment outcome. To be selected for the review and inclusion in the meta-analysis, articles had to be randomized, controlled, or double-blind clinical trials, with buprenorphine as the study drug; the length of buprenorphine maintenance treatment had to be 3 weeks or longer; doses of buprenorphine had to be clearly stated; outcome measures had to include retention rates in buprenorphine treatment; outcome measures had to include illicit opioid use based on analytical determination of drugs of abuse in urine samples as outcome variables; and outcome measures had to include illicit cocaine use based on analytical determination of drugs of abuse in urine samples as outcome variables. Twenty-nine articles were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The authors present the results of 21 articles that met inclusion criteria. The higher buprenorphine dose (16-32 mg per day) predicted better retention in treatment compared with the lower dose (less than 16 mg per day) (P = .009, R(2) adjusted = 0.40), and the positive urine drug screens for opiates predicted dropping out of treatment (P = .019, R(2) Adjusted = 0.40). Retention in treatment predicted less illicit opioid use (P = .033, R(2) Adjusted = 0.36), and the positive urine drug screens for cocaine predicted more illicit opioid use (P = .021, R(2) Adjusted = 0.36). Strong evidence exists based on 21 randomized clinical trials that the higher buprenorphine dose may improve retention in buprenorphine maintenance treatment. PMID:22356665

  10. The Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B): a Novel Project to Expand/Improve Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Casadonte, Paul; Gartenmann, Tracy; Martin, Judith; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Netherland, Julie; Renner, John A.; Weiss, Linda; Saxon, Andrew J.; Fiellin, David A.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Opioid dependence is largely an undertreated medical condition in the United States. The introduction of buprenorphine has created the potential to expand access to and use of opioid agonist treatment in generalist settings. Physicians, however, often have limited training and experience providing this type of care. Some physicians believe having a mentoring relationship with an experienced provider during their initial introduction to the use of buprenorphine would ease implementation. Our goal was to describe the development, implementation, resources, and evaluation of the Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B), a federally funded program to improve access to and quality of treatment with buprenorphine. We provide a description of the PCSS-B, a national network of 88 trained physician mentors with expertise in buprenorphine treatment and skills in clinical education. We provide information regarding the use the PCSS-B core services including telephone, email and in-person support, a website, clinical guidances, a warmline and outreach to primary care and specialty organizations. Between July 2005 and July 2009, 67 mentors and 4 clinical experts reported providing mentoring services to 632 participants in 48 states, Washington DC and Puerto Rico. A total of 1,455 contacts were provided through email (45%), telephone (34%) and in-person visits (20%). Seventy-six percent of contacts addressed a clinical issue. Eighteen percent of contacts addressed a logistical issue. The number of contacts per participant ranged from 1–125. Between August 2005 and April 2009 there were 72,822 visits to the PCSS-B website with 179,678 pages viewed. Seven guidances were downloaded more than 1000 times. The warmline averaged more than 100 calls per month. The PCSS-B model provides support for a mentorship program to assist non-specialty physicians in the provision of buprenorphine and may serve as a model for dissemination of other types of care. PMID:20458550

  11. The Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B): a novel project to expand/improve buprenorphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Egan, James E; Casadonte, Paul; Gartenmann, Tracy; Martin, Judith; McCance-Katz, Elinore F; Netherland, Julie; Renner, John A; Weiss, Linda; Saxon, Andrew J; Fiellin, David A

    2010-09-01

    Opioid dependence is largely an undertreated medical condition in the United States. The introduction of buprenorphine has created the potential to expand access to and use of opioid agonist treatment in generalist settings. Physicians, however, often have limited training and experience providing this type of care. Some physicians believe having a mentoring relationship with an experienced provider during their initial introduction to the use of buprenorphine would ease implementation. Our goal was to describe the development, implementation, resources, and evaluation of the Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B), a federally funded program to improve access to and quality of treatment with buprenorphine. We provide a description of the PCSS-B, a national network of 88 trained physician mentors with expertise in buprenorphine treatment and skills in clinical education. We provide information regarding the use the PCSS-B core services including telephone, email and in-person support, a website, clinical guidances, a warmline and outreach to primary care and specialty organizations. Between July 2005 and July 2009, 67 mentors and 4 clinical experts reported providing mentoring services to 632 participants in 48 states, Washington DC and Puerto Rico. A total of 1,455 contacts were provided through email (45%), telephone (34%) and in-person visits (20%). Seventy-six percent of contacts addressed a clinical issue. Eighteen percent of contacts addressed a logistical issue. The number of contacts per participant ranged from 1-125. Between August 2005 and April 2009 there were 72,822 visits to the PCSS-B website with 179,678 pages viewed. Seven guidances were downloaded more than 1000 times. The warmline averaged more than 100 calls per month. The PCSS-B model provides support for a mentorship program to assist non-specialty physicians in the provision of buprenorphine and may serve as a model for dissemination of other types of care. PMID:20458550

  12. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Andrew J; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  13. Buprenorphine: clinical pharmacokinetics in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Elkader, Alexander; Sproule, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine, a naturally occurring alkaloid of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The pharmacology of buprenorphine is unique in that it is a partial agonist at the opioid mu receptor. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism and therefore has very low oral bioavailability; however, its bioavailability sublingually is extensive enough to make this a feasible route of administration for the treatment of opioid dependence. The mean time to maximum plasma concentration following sublingual administration is variable, ranging from 40 minutes to 3.5 hours. Buprenorphine has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (96%). It is extensively metabolised by N-dealkylation to norbuprenorphine primarily through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The terminal elimination half-life of buprenorphine is long and there is considerable variation in reported values (mean values ranging from 3 to 44 hours). Most of a dose of buprenorphine is eliminated in the faeces, with approximately 10-30% excreted in urine. Naloxone has been added to a sublingual formulation of buprenorphine to reduce the abuse liability of the product. The presence of naloxone does not appear to influence the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine crosses the placenta during pregnancy and also crosses into breast milk. Buprenorphine dosage does not need to be significantly adjusted in patients with renal impairment; however, since CYP3A activity may be decreased in patients with severe chronic liver disease, it is possible that the metabolism of buprenorphine will be altered in these patients. Although there is limited evidence in the literature to date, drugs that are known to inhibit or induce CYP3A4 have the potential to diminish or enhance buprenorphine N-dealkylation. It appears that the interaction between buprenorphine and benzodiazepines is more likely to be a pharmacodynamic (additive or synergistic) than a pharmacokinetic interaction. The relationship between buprenorphine plasma concentration and response in the treatment of opioid dependence has not been well studied. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of buprenorphine allow it to be a feasible option for substitution therapy in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15966752

  14. Impact of Research Network Participation on the Adoption of Buprenorphine for Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci R.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Kovas, Anne E.; McFarland, Bentson H.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (n=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (n=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1,203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors’ acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  15. Impact of research network participation on the adoption of buprenorphine for substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Traci R; Abraham, Amanda J; Kovas, Anne E; McFarland, Bentson H; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (N=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (N=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors' acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  16. Hypogonadism in men receiving methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, R; Byrne, A; Agho, K; McMahon, C G; Tynan, P; Attia, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and investigate the aetiology of hypogonadism in men on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MMT, BMT). 103 men (mean age 37.6 +/- 7.9) on MMT (n = 84) or BMT (n = 19) were evaluated using hormone assays, body mass index (BMI), serological, biochemical, demographic and substance use measures. Overall 54% of men (methadone 65%; buprenorphine 28%) had total testosterone (TT) <12.0 nm; 34% (methadone 39%; buprenorphine 11%) had TT <8.0 nm. Both methadone- and buprenorphine-treated men had lower free testosterone, luteinising hormone and estradiol than age-matched reference groups. Methadone-treated men had lower TT than buprenorphine-treated men and reference groups. Prolactin did not differ between methadone, buprenorphine groups, and reference groups. Primary testicular failure was an uncommon cause of hypogonadism. Yearly percentage fall in TT by age across the patient group was 2.3%, more than twice that expected normally. There were no associations between TT and opioid dose, cannabis, alcohol and tobacco consumption, or chronic hepatitis C viraemia. On multiple regression higher TT was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase and lower TT with higher BMI. Men on MMT have high prevalence of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The extent of hormonal changes associated with buprenorphine needs to be explored further in larger studies. Men receiving long term opioid replacement treatment, especially methadone treatment, should be screened for hypogonadism. Wide interindividual differences in methadone metabolism and tolerance may in a cross-sectional study obscure a methadone dose relationship to testosterone in individuals. Future studies of hypogonadism in opioid-treated men should examine the potential benefits of dose reduction, choice of opioid medication, weight loss, and androgen replacement. PMID:17971165

  17. Buprenorphine treatment of pregnant opioid-dependent women: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E Johnson; Hendrée E Jones; Donald R Jasinski; Dace S Svikis; Nancy A Haug; Lauren M Jansson; Wendy B Kissin; Gad Alpan; Michael E Lantz; Edward J Cone; Diana G Wilkins; Archie S Golden; George R Huggins; Barry M Lester

    2001-01-01

    This open-label prospective study examined maternal and neonatal safety and efficacy outcome measures during and following prenatal buprenorphine exposure. Three opioid-dependent pregnant women received 8 or 12 mg sublingual buprenorphine tablets daily for 15–16 weeks prior to delivery. Results showed that buprenorphine in combination with comprehensive prenatal care was safe and effective in these women. Prenatal exposure to buprenorphine resulted

  18. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities, associated pain, and health care utilization of patients prescribed buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Mark, Tami L; Dilonardo, Joan; Vandivort, Rita; Miller, Kay

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the comorbidities and health care utilization of individuals treated with buprenorphine using the 2007-2009 MarketScan Research Databases. Buprenorphine recipients had a high prevalence of comorbidities associated with chronic pain, including back problems (42%), connective tissue disease (24-27%), and nontraumatic joint disorders (20-23%). Approximately 69% of recipients filled prescriptions for opioid agonist medications in the 6 months before buprenorphine initiation. Buprenorphine recipients were frequently diagnosed with anxiety (23-42%) and mood disorders (39-51%) and filled prescriptions for antidepressants (47-56%) and benzodiazepines (47-56%) at high rates. Surprisingly, only 53-54% of patients filling a prescription for buprenorphine had a coded opioid abuse/dependence diagnosis. Research is needed to better understand buprenorphine's effectiveness in the context of prescription drug abuse and the best way to coordinate services to address the patient's comorbid addiction, pain, and psychiatric illnesses. PMID:23265445

  19. Effects of adding behavioral treatment to opioid detoxification with buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warren K. Bickel; Leslie Amass; Stephen T. Higgins; Gary J. Badger; Rebecca A. Esch

    1997-01-01

    This trial assessed whether behavioral treatment improves outcome during a 26-week outpatient opioid detoxification. Thirty-nine opioid-dependent adults were assigned randomly to a buprenorphine dose-taper combined with either behavioral or standard treatment. Behavioral treatment included (a) a voucher incentive program for providing opioid-free urine samples and engaging in verifiable therapeutic activities and (b) the community reinforcement approach, a multicomponent behavioral treatment.

  20. Use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate addiction. I. Physiologic and behavioral effects during a rapid dose induction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E Johnson; Edward J Cone; Jack E Henningfield; Paul J Fudala

    1989-01-01

    A new, rapid dose-induction procedure was used in the evaluation of buprenorphine hydrochloride (buprenorphine) as a treatment for opiate dependence. Nineteen heroin-dependent men were given buprenorphine sublingually in ascending daily doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg and then maintained on 8 mg daily. The observations of the transition from heroin to buprenorphine for the first 4 days are described.

  1. Combined Abuse of Clonidine and Amitriptyline in a Patient on Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Trent; Sigman, Erika J.; Clemons, Holly; Johnson, J. Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy is often prescribed in primary care to treat opioid dependence. Previous reports have described concomitant abuse of opioids and clonidine. In this case, a primary care patient on buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy demonstrating altered mental status, hallucinations, falls, and rebound hypertension was found to be concomitantly abusing clonidine and amitryptyline, which share metabolic pathways with buprenorphine. Clinicians should be aware of patients' combining amitryptyline, clonidine, and gabapentin with buprenorphine to achieve a mood altering state, avoid co-prescribing them if possible, and maintain communication with pharmacies and other providers when they are prescribed. PMID:25314340

  2. Buprenorphine treatment of opioid dependence: clinical trial of daily versus alternate-day dosing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E. Johnson; Thomas Eissenberg; Maxine L. Stitzer; Eric C. Strain; Ira A. Liebson; George E. Bigelow

    1995-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a mu-opioid partial agonist, has demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of opioid dependence comparable to that of methadone. The clinical utility of buprenorphine would be enhanced if it could be dosed on a less than daily basis. The current study is a parallel-group outpatient clinical trial of daily versus alternate-day dosing with 8 mg sublingual (s.l.) buprenorphine. Participants were

  3. Buprenorphine versus methadone in the treatment of opioid-dependent cocaine users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric C. Strain; Maxine L. Stitzer; Ira A. Liebson; George E. Bigelow

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of buprenorphine to methadone for decreasing cocaine use in patients with combined opioid and cocaine use. Participants (n=51) were enrolled in a 26-week treatment program and randomly assigned to either buprenorphine or methadone. Dosing was double-blind and double-dummy. Patients were stabilized on either 8 mg sublingual buprenorphine or 50 mg oral methadone, with dose increases

  4. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  5. Evaluation of buprenorphine maintenance treatment in a French cohort of HIV-infected injecting drug users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria-Patrizia Carrieri; D. Rey; A. Loundou; G. Lepeu; A. Sobel; Y. Obadia

    2003-01-01

    Background: Buprenorphine was approved in France for treating opiate dependence in July 1995 and can be prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Most studies assessing buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) outcomes have taken place in GP settings. An evaluation of BMT outcomes in patients already followed for their HIV-infection could supply additional information about the changes in addictive practices in a non-GP

  6. Buprenorphine: a controlled clinical trial in the treatment of opioid dependence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pier Paolo Pani; Icro Maremmani; Roberto Pirastu; Alessandro Tagliamonte; Gian Luigi Gessa

    2000-01-01

    Clinical trials carried out to compare methadone and buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid dependence have generally employed an alcoholic solution of buprenorphine, which has a bioavailability superior to that of the tablets. Since the product available for large scale use is in tablet form, one intended to verify the efficacy of this formulation. In a multicentre randomised controlled double

  7. A pilot study of buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablet (Suboxone 1) in treatment of opioid dependence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES BELL; GAYE BYRON; AMY GIBSON; AMANDA MORRIS

    In Australia, maintenance treatment for opioid dependence involves supervised daily administration of a dose of methadone or buprenorphine. A sublingual tablet combining buprenorphine and naloxone in a 4 : 1 ratio (Suboxone TM ) has been developed, designed to deter diversion and intravenous misuse, and may be suitable for unsupervised administration. The aim of this study was to investigate the

  8. Buprenorphine versus dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nat MJ Wright; Laura Sheard; Charlotte NE Tompkins; Clive E Adams; Victoria L Allgar; Nicola S Oldham

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many drug users present to primary care requesting detoxification from illicit opiates. There are a number of detoxification agents but no recommended drug of choice. The purpose of this study is to compare buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for detoxification from illicit opiates in primary care. METHODS: Open label randomised controlled trial in NHS Primary Care (General Practices), Leeds, UK. Sixty

  9. “The chief of the services is very enthusiastic about it”: A qualitative study of the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid addiction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Carla A.; McCarty, Dennis; Mertens, Jennifer; Lynch, Frances L.; Hilde, Anadam; Firemark, Alison; Weisner, Constance M.; Pating, David; Anderson, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Qualified physicians may prescribe buprenorphine to treat opioid dependence, but medication use remains controversial. We examined adoption of buprenorphine in two not-for-profit integrated health plans, over time, completing 101 semi-structured interviews with clinicians and clinician-administrators from primary and specialty care. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and analyzed. A strong leader championing the new treatment was critical for adoption in both health plans. Once clinicians began using buprenorphine, patients’ and other clinicians’ experiences affected decisions more than did the champion. With experience, protocols developed to manage unsuccessful patients and changed to support maintenance rather than detoxification. Diffusion outside addiction and mental health settings was nonexistent; primary care clinicians cited scope-of-practice issues and referred patients to specialty care. With greater diffusion came questions about long-term use and safety. Recognizing how implementation processes develop may suggest where, when, and how to best expend resources to increase adoption of such treatments. PMID:24268947

  10. Buprenorphine versus methadone in the treatment of pregnant opioid-dependent patients: effects on the neonatal abstinence syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendree E. Jones; Rolley E. Johnson; Donald R. Jasinski; Kevin E. O’Grady; Christian A. Chisholm; Robin E. Choo; Michael Crocetti; Robert Dudas; Cheryl Harrow; Marilyn A. Huestis; Lauren M. Jansson; Michael Lantz; Barry M. Lester; Lorraine Milio

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in neonates of methadone and buprenorphine maintained pregnant opioid-dependent women and to provide preliminary safety and efficacy data for a larger multi-center trial. This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible dosing, parallel-group controlled trial was conducted in a comprehensive drug-treatment facility that included residential and ambulatory care. Participants were opioid-dependent pregnant

  11. Drug Treatment Outcomes among HIV-Infected Opioid Dependent Patients Receiving Buprenorphine/naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Fiellin, David A.; Weiss, Linda; Botsko, Michael; Egan, James E; Altice, Frederick L.; Bazerman, Lauri B.; Chaudhry, Amina; Cunningham, Chinazo O.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Lum, Paula J.; Sullivan, Lynn E.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; O'Connor, Patrick G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine/naloxone allows the integration of opioid dependence and HIV treatment. Methods We conducted a prospective study in HIV-infected opioid dependent patients to investigate the impact of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment on drug use. Self-report and chart review assessments were conducted every 3 months (Quarters 1 through 4) for one year. Outcomes were buprenorphine/naloxone treatment retention, drug use, and addiction treatment processes. Results Among 303 patients enrolled between July 2005 and December 2007, retention in buprenorphine/naloxone treatment was 74%, 67%, 59% and 49% during Quarters 1,2 3, and 4, respectively. Past 30 day illicit opioid use decreased from 84% of patients at baseline to 42% in retained patients over the year. Patients were 52% less likely to use illicit opioids for each quarter in treatment (OR = .66; 95% CI 0.61–0.72). Buprenorphine/naloxone doses and office visits approximated guidelines published by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Urine toxicology monitoring was less frequent than recommended. Conclusions Buprenorphine/naloxone provided in HIV treatment settings can decrease opioid use. Strategies are needed to improve retention and address ongoing drug use in this treatment population. PMID:21317592

  12. Bringing buprenorphine-naloxone detoxification to community treatment providers: the NIDA Clinical Trials Network field experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie Amass; Walter Ling; Thomas E. Freese; Chris Reiber; Jeffrey J. Annon; Allan J. Cohen; Dennis McCarty; Malcolm S. Reid; Lawrence S. Brown; Cynthia Clark; Douglas M. Ziedonis; Jonathan Krejci; Susan Stine; Theresa Winhusen; Greg Brigham; Dean Babcock; Joan A. Muir; Betty J. Buchan; Terry Horton

    2004-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based

  13. Consensus statement on office-based treatment of opioid dependence using buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Fiellin; Herbert Kleber; Jeanne G. Trumble-Hejduk; A. Thomas McLellan; Thomas R. Kosten

    2004-01-01

    Buprenorphine and buprenorphine\\/naloxone (BUP) are newly approved for office-based treatment of opioid dependence. Federal and non-federal regulatory and monitoring agencies, national and international researchers, national professional organizations, researchers involved in monitoring, opioid treatment programs and the pharmaceutical industry met to synthesize and disseminate practical information to guide training, practice, monitoring, regulation and evaluation efforts with these medications. We performed a

  14. Adoption of evidence-based clinical innovations: the case of buprenorphine use by opioid treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christina M; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Pollack, Harold A; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations' technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs' decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  15. Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  16. Preference for buprenorphine\\/naloxone and buprenorphine among patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy in France: A prospective, multicenter study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Pierre Daulouède; Yves Caer; Pascal Galland; Pierre Villeger; Emmanuel Brunelle; Jérôme Bachellier; Jean-Michel Piquet; Jean Harbonnier; Yves Leglise; Pascal Courty

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance treatment with buprenorphine tablets (Subutex) has been associated with reductions in heroin use; however, concerns for intravenous misuse exist. A buprenorphine\\/naloxone formulation (Suboxone) was designed to reduce this misuse risk while retaining buprenorphine's efficacy and safety. This prospective, open-label, multicenter trial compared preferences for buprenorphine and buprenorphine\\/naloxone in 53 opioid-dependent patients stabilized on buprenorphine. Buprenorphine was first administered at

  17. Training HIV Physicians to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Tetrault, Jeanette; Bangalore, Deepa; Fiellin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Few HIV physicians are trained to provide buprenorphine treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the impact of an eight-hour course on the treatment of opioid dependence on HIV physicians' preparedness to prescribe buprenorphine. One hundred thirteen of 257 trained physicians (44%) provided HIV care. Post-course, the majority of…

  18. Consensus statement on office-based treatment of opioid dependence using buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Fiellin, David A; Kleber, Herbert; Trumble-Hejduk, Jeanne G; McLellan, A Thomas; Kosten, Thomas R

    2004-09-01

    Buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) are newly approved for office-based treatment of opioid dependence. Federal and non-federal regulatory and monitoring agencies, national and international researchers, national professional organizations, researchers involved in monitoring, opioid treatment programs and the pharmaceutical industry met to synthesize and disseminate practical information to guide training, practice, monitoring, regulation and evaluation efforts with these medications. We performed a review of the literature, training curricula and practice guidelines and commissioned manuscripts describing recently completed, or still in progress, studies or field experiences with BUP treatment. A consensus process generated fifteen statements: (1) The federal government should collect baseline data on opioid-related deaths and morbidity to assess the effect of BUP on public health, (2) the patient limit for group practices should apply to individual physicians rather than group practices, (3 and 4) telephone and Internet-based physician and pharmacist support is needed, (5) clinicians who provide psychosocial services to opioid dependent patients should be informed of the role of BUP, (6) opioid-dependent patients should be instructed to present for induction in mild withdrawal, (7) the existing Center for Substance Abuse Treatment guidelines provide a reasonable induction protocol, (8) physicians should be prepared to use ancillary medications with BUP induction, (9) a physician or nurse must be available to the patient during the induction period, (10) concurrent counseling and support services are necessary, (11) detoxification without appropriate followup addiction treatment leads to rapid relapse and is not as effective as maintenance, (12) pregnant opioid-dependent women should be treated using good clinical practice including specialist addiction care and prenatal care, (13) BUP induction and withdrawal treatment may benefit from different designations for payment, (14) take-home medication options should be tailored to patients' needs, (15) there is a need for clinical and policy research in unique patient populations. PMID:15450648

  19. Adjunctive Counseling During Brief and Extended Buprenorphine-Naloxone Treatment for Prescription Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Roger D.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Fiellin, David A.; Byrne, Marilyn; Connery, Hilary S.; Dickinson, William; Gardin, John; Griffin, Margaret L.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Haller, Deborah L.; Hasson, Albert L.; Huang, Zhen; Jacobs, Petra; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Lindblad, Robert; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Provost, Scott E.; Selzer, Jeffrey; Somoza, Eugene C.; Sonne, Susan C.; Ling, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Context No randomized trials have examined treatments for prescription opioid dependence, despite its increasing prevalence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of brief and extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, with different counseling intensities, for patients dependent upon prescription opioids. Setting, Participants 653 treatment-seeking outpatients dependent on prescription opioids, at 10 U.S. sites from June 2006-July 2009. Design Multi-site, randomized clinical trial, using a two-phase adaptive treatment research design. Brief treatment (Phase 1) included 2-week buprenorphine-naloxone stabilization, 2-week taper, and 8-week post-medication follow-up. Patients with successful opioid use outcomes exited the study; unsuccessful patients entered Phase 2: extended (12-week) buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, 4-week taper, and 8-week post-medication follow-up. Main outcome measures Pre-defined “successful outcome” in each phase: composite measures indicating minimal or no opioid use, based on urine-confirmed self-reports. Interventions In both phases, patients were randomized to Standard Medical Management (SMM) or SMM+Opioid Drug Counseling (ODC); all received buprenorphine-naloxone. Results During Phase 1, only 6.6% (43/653) of patients had successful outcomes, with no difference between the SMM and SMM+ODC. In contrast, 49.2% (177/360) attained successful outcomes in Phase 2 during extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (week 12), with no difference between counseling conditions. Success rates 8 weeks after completing the buprenorphine-naloxone taper (Phase 2, week 24) dropped sharply to 8.6% (31/360), again with no counseling difference. In secondary analyses, successful Phase 2 outcomes were far more common while taking buprenorphine-naloxone than 8 weeks post-taper (49.2% (177/360) vs. 8.6% (31/360), p<0.001). Chronic pain did not affect opioid use outcomes; a history of ever using heroin was associated with lower Phase 2 success rates while taking buprenorphine-naloxone. Conclusions Prescription opioid-dependent patients are most likely to reduce opioid use during buprenorphine-naloxone treatment; if tapered off buprenorphine-naloxone, even after 12 weeks of treatment, the likelihood of unsuccessful outcome is extremely high, even among patients receiving counseling in addition to medical management. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00316277 PMID:22065255

  20. Facts about Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or change to every other day. The main advantages of buprenorphine are: • You are unlikely to overdose ... Drink more water and juice. Eat food with fiber. Exercise more. Sweating—Shower often. Dress in layers. ...

  1. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Myers, C Patrick; O'Grady, Kevin E; Olsen, Yngvild K; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (1) retention in treatment; and (2) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, three and six months consisting of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  2. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P.; Myers, C. Patrick; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (a) retention in treatment and (b) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, 3- and 6-months consisting of the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  3. Buprenorphine from detox and beyond: preliminary evaluation of a pilot program to increase heroin dependent individuals' engagement in a full continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Dennis M; Knox, Patricia C; Skytta, Jenny A F; Blayney, Jessica A; DiCenzo, Jessica

    2013-04-01

    Absence of successful transition to post-detoxification treatment leads to high rates of relapse among detoxified heroin users. The present study evaluated a pilot buprenorphine treatment program (BTP). Heroin dependent individuals were inducted onto buprenorphine/naloxone in detox, maintained while transitioning through an intensive inpatient program (IIP), and gradually tapered off medication over 5 months of outpatient (OP) treatment. Compared to programmatic indicators of treatment engagement in the year prior to BTP implementation, referrals from detox to IIP, entry into and completion of IIP and subsequent OP, and days in OP treatment increased substantially. BTP completers, compared to non-completers, viewed abstinence as more difficult and as requiring more assistance to achieve, were less likely to be current cocaine and alcohol users or to have relapsed during the course of treatment. Although preliminary and in need of replication, initial adjunctive use of buprenorphine in an abstinence-based continuum of care may improve post-detoxification treatment entry, engagement, and completion. PMID:23007109

  4. Comparison of methadone and high dosage buprenorphine users in French care centres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karine Barrau; Xavier Thirion; Joëlle Micallef; Christine Chuniaud-Louche; Béatrice Bellemin; Jean Louis San Marco

    2001-01-01

    Aims. In France, maintenance programmes for opiate users were adopted later than in other countri~s. Two maintenance treatments are available: methadone is only delivered in specialized centres while high dosage (HD) buprenorphine can be prescribed by al1 general practitioners and in specialized centres. The aim of this study was to compare the socio-demographic projiles, the practices and drug consumption patterns

  5. Practice Guidance for Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders: Results of an Expert Panel Process

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Carrie M.; Lindsay, Dawn; Williams, Jessica; Ayers, Amanda; Schuster, James; Cilia, Alyssa; Flaherty, Michael T.; Mandell, Todd; Gordon, Adam J.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although numbers of physicians credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine has increased over time, many credentialed physicians may be reluctant to treat individuals with opioid use disorders due to discomfort with prescribing buprenorphine. Though prescribing physicians are required to complete a training course, many have questions about buprenorphine and treatment guidelines have not been updated to reflect clinical experience in recent years. We report on an expert panel process to update and expand buprenorphine guidelines. Methods We identified candidate guidelines through expert opinion and a review of the literature and used a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to assess the validity of the candidate guidelines. An expert panel completed two rounds of rating, with a meeting to discuss the guidelines between the first and second rating. Results Through the rating process, expert panel members rated 90 candidate guideline statements across eight domains, including candidacy for buprenorphine treatment, dosing of buprenorphine, psychosocial counseling, and treatment of co-occurring depression and anxiety. A total of 65 guideline statements (72%) were rated as valid. Expert panel members had agreement in some areas, such as the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems, but disagreement in others, including the appropriate dosing of buprenorphine given patient complexities. Conclusions Through an expert panel process, we developed an updated and expanded set of buprenorphine treatment guidelines; this additional guidance may increase credentialed physicians’ comfort with prescribing buprenorphine to patients with opioid use disorders. Future efforts should focus on appropriate dosing guidance and ensuring that guidelines can be adapted to a variety of practice settings. PMID:25844527

  6. Buprenorphine: Considerations for Pain Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E. Johnson; Paul J. Fudala; Richard Payne

    2005-01-01

    New effective analgesics are needed for the treatment of pain. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid agonist which has been in clinical use for over 25 years, has been found to be amenable to new formulation technology based on its physiochemical and pharmacological profile. Buprenorphine is marketed as parenteral, sublingual, and transdermal formulations. Unlike full mu-opioid agonists, at higher doses, buprenorphine's physiological

  7. PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF STREET-OBTAINED BUPRENORPHINE USE AMONG CURRENT AND FORMER INJECTORS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

    PubMed Central

    Genberg, Becky L.; Gillespie, Mirinda; Schuster, Charles R.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Astemborski, Jacquie; Kirk, Gregory D.; Vlahov, David; Mehta, Shruti H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There are few systematic assessments of street-obtained buprenorphine use from community-based samples in the United States. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence, correlates, and reasons for street-obtained buprenorphine use among current and former injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods In 2008, participants of the ALIVE (AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience) study, a community-based cohort of IDUs, were administered a survey on buprenorphine. Street-obtained buprenorphine represented self-reported use of buprenorphine obtained from the street or a friend in the prior three months. Results 602 respondents were predominantly male (65%), African-American (91%), and 30% were HIV-positive. Overall, nine percent reported recent street-obtained buprenorphine use, and only 2% reported using to get high. Among active opiate users, 23% reported recent use of street-obtained buprenorphine. Use of buprenorphine prescribed by a physician, injection and non-injection drug use, use of street-obtained methadone and prescription opiates, homelessness, and opioid withdrawal symptoms were positively associated, while methadone treatment, health insurance, outpatient care, and HIV-infection were negatively associated with recent street-obtained buprenorphine use in univariate analysis. After adjustment, active injection and heroin use were positively associated with street-obtained buprenorphine use. Ninety-one percent reported using street-obtained buprenorphine to manage withdrawal symptoms. Conclusions While 9% reported recent street-obtained buprenorphine use, only a small minority reported using buprenorphine to get high, with the majority reporting use to manage withdrawal symptoms. There is limited evidence of diversion of buprenorphine in this sample and efforts to expand buprenorphine treatment should continue with further monitoring. PMID:24018232

  8. Suboxone® (Buprenorphine\\/Naloxone) as an Agonist Opioid Treatment in Spain: A Budgetary Impact Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Martínez-Raga; Francisco González Saiz; César Pascual; Miguel A. Casado; Francisco J. Sabater Torres

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of buprenorphine\\/naloxone (B\\/N) as an agonist opioid treatment for opiate dependence. Methods: A budgetary impact analysis model was designed to calculate the annual costs (drugs and associated costs) to the Spanish National Healthcare System of methadone versus B\\/N. Data for the model were obtained from official databases and expert panel opinion. Results: It was

  9. A placebo controlled clinical trial of buprenorphine as a treatment for opioid dependence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E. Johnson; Thomas Eissenberg; Maxine L. Stitzer; Eric C. Strain; Ira A. Liebson; George E. Bigelow

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale placebo controlled clinical trials assessing the efficacy of medications for the treatment of drug dependence have generally been limited to alcohol, cocaine and nicotine dependent populations. The purpose of the present study was to assess the early (1–2 week) clinical effectiveness of buprenorphine versus placebo in an opioid dependent population. The study used a parallel-group design with a behavioral

  10. Brief Buprenorphine Detoxification for the Treatment of Prescription Opioid Dependence: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the feasibility of brief outpatient detoxification as a treatment for prescription opioid (PO) abusers. Fifteen PO-dependent adults were enrolled to receive buprenorphine stabilization, a 2-week buprenorphine taper, and subsequent naltrexone for those who completed the taper. Subjects also received behavioral therapy, urinalysis monitoring, and double-blind drug administration. Subjects provided 83.8%, 91.7% and 31.2% opioid-negative samples during stabilization, taper and naltrexone phases, respectively. Inspection of individual subject data revealed systematic differences in whether subjects successfully completed the taper without resumption of illicit opioid use. Post-hoc analyses were used to examine the characteristics of subjects who successfully completed the taper (Responders, n=5) versus those who failed to do so (Nonresponders, n=9). These pilot data suggest a subset of PO abusers may respond to brief buprenorphine detoxification, though future efforts should aim to improve outcomes, investigate individual differences in treatment response and identify characteristics that may predict those for whom longer-term agonist treatment is warranted. PMID:19081679

  11. Effects of buprenorphine versus buprenorphine\\/naloxone tablets in non-dependent opioid abusers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric C. Strain; Kenneth Stoller; Sharon L. Walsh; George E. Bigelow

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist-antagonist under development in the United States as a sublingual medication for treatment\\u000a of opioid dependence. Buprenorphine may be abused; therefore, tablets combining buprenorphine with naloxone have been developed\\u000a with the intent of reducing the abuse risk in people physically dependent upon opioids. The characteristics and abuse potential\\u000a of buprenorphine and buprenorphine\\/naloxone tablets in non-dependent

  12. Buprenorphine kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy E S Bullingham; Henry J McQuay; Andrew Moore; Martin R D Bennett

    1980-01-01

    Buprenorphine kinetics was determined in surgical patients using radioimmunoassay. Buprenorphine was measured in the plasma of 24 patients who had received 0.3 mg buprenorphine intraoperatively. After 3 hr 10 of these patients then received a further 0.3 mg buprenorphine intravenously for postoperative pain relief, and 11 patients were given 0.3 mg intramuscularly: again, plasma levels were measured for 3 hr.

  13. Growth In Buprenorphine Waivers For Physicians Increased Potential Access To Opioid Agonist Treatment, 2002-11.

    PubMed

    Dick, Andrew W; Pacula, Rosalie L; Gordon, Adam J; Sorbero, Mark; Burns, Rachel M; Leslie, Douglas; Stein, Bradley D

    2015-06-01

    Opioid use disorders are a significant public health problem, affecting two million people in the United States. Treatment with buprenorphine, methadone, or both is predominantly offered in methadone clinics, yet many people do not receive the treatment they need. In 2002 the Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine for prescription by physicians who completed a course and received a waiver from the Drug Enforcement Administration, exempting them from requirements in the Controlled Substances Act. To determine the waiver program's impact on the availability of opioid agonist treatment, we analyzed data for the period 2002-11 to identify counties with opioid treatment shortages. We found that the percentage of counties with a shortage of waivered physicians fell sharply, from 98.9 percent in 2002 to 46.8 percent in 2011. As a result, the percentage of the US population residing in what we classified as opioid treatment shortage counties declined from 48.6 percent in 2002 to 10.4 percent in 2011. These findings suggest that the increase in waivered physicians has dramatically increased potential access to opioid agonist treatment. Policy makers should focus their efforts on further increasing the number and geographical distribution of physicians, particularly in more rural counties, where prescription opioid misuse is rapidly growing. PMID:26056209

  14. Transdermal buprenorphine in the treatment of chronic pain: Resultsof a phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jürgen Sorge; Reinhard Sittl

    2004-01-01

    Background:Buprenorphine, a potent opioid analgesic, has been available in parenteral and oral or sublingual(SL) formulations for >25 years. In 2001, the buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (TES) was introduced at 3 release rates (35, 52.5, and 70 ?g\\/h) for the treatment of chronic cancer and noncancer pain.

  15. Buprenorphine-Naloxone Maintenance Following Release from Jail

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua D.; Grossman, Ellie; Truncali, Andrea; Rotrosen, John; Rosenblum, Andrew; Magura, Steven; Gourevitch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    Primary care is understudied as a re-entry drug and alcohol treatment setting. This study compared treatment retention and opioid misuse among opioid dependent adults seeking buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance in an urban primary care clinic following release from jail vs. community referrals. Post-release patients were either; a) induced to buprenorphine in-jail as part of a clinical trial, or, b) seeking buprenorphine induction post-release. From 2007–2008, N=142 patients were new to primary care buprenorphine: n=32 post-release; n=110 induced after community referral and without recent incarceration. Jail-released patients were more likely African American or Hispanic and uninsured. Treatment retention rates for post-release (37%) vs. community (30%) referrals were similar at 48 weeks. Rates of opioid positive urines and self-reported opioid misuse were also similar between groups. Post-release patients in primary care buprenorphine treatment had equal treatment retention and rates of opioid abstinence vs. community-referred patients. PMID:22263712

  16. Variation in use of Buprenorphine and Methadone Treatment by Racial, Ethnic and Income Characteristics of Residential Social Areas in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Helena B.; Siegel, Carole E.; Case, Brady G.; Bertollo, David N.; DiRocco, Danae; Galanter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    National data indicate that patients treated with buprenorphine for opiate use disorders are more likely to be White, highly educated, and to have greater incomes than those receiving methadone, but patterns of buprenorphine dissemination across demographic areas have not been documented in major metropolitan areas where poverty, minority populations and injection heroin use are concentrated. Rates of buprenorphine and methadone treatment are compared among areas of New York City defined by their income and ethnic/racial composition. Residential social areas (hereinafter called social areas) were defined as aggregations of ZIP codes with similar race/ethnicity and income characteristics, and were formed based on clustering techniques. Treatment rates were obtained for each New York City ZIP code: buprenorphine treatment rates were based on the annual number of buprenorphine prescriptions written, and the methadone treatment rate on the number of methadone clinic visits for persons in each ZIP code. Treatment rates were correlated univariately with ethnicity and income characteristics of ZIP codes. Social area treatment rates were compared using individual ANOVA models for each rate. Buprenorphine and methadone treatment rates were significantly correlated with the ethnicity and income characteristics of ZIP codes, and treatment rates differed significantly across the social areas. Buprenorphine treatment rates were highest in the social area with the highest income and lowest percentage of Black and Hispanic residents. Conversely, the methadone treatment rate was highest in the social area with the highest percentage of low income and Hispanic residents. The uneven dissemination of 0pioid maintenance treatment in New York City may be reflective of the limited public health impact of buprenorphine in ethnic minority and low income areas. Specific policy and educational interventions to providers are needed to promote the use of buprenorphine for opiate use disorders in diverse populations. PMID:23702611

  17. Predictors of Abstinence: National Institute of Drug Abuse Multisite Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Trial in Opioid-Dependent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Warden, Diane; Minhajuddin, Abu; Fishman, Marc J.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Adinoff, Bryon; Trivedi, Madhukar; Weiss, Roger; Potter, Jennifer; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors of opioid abstinence in buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal)-assisted psychosocial treatment for opioid-dependent youth. Method: Secondary analyses were performed of data from 152 youth (15-21 years old) randomly assigned to 12 weeks of extended Bup/Nal therapy or up to 2 weeks of Bup/Nal detoxification with weekly…

  18. Buprenorphine: how to use it right

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E. Johnson; Eric C. Strain; Leslie Amass

    2003-01-01

    The unique pharmacology of buprenorphine at the mu-opioid receptor (i.e. high affinity, low intrinsic activity and slow dissociation) results in buprenorphine having: (1) a good safety profile, (2) low physical dependence, and (3) flexibility in dose scheduling. Early studies assessed the effectiveness of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence using a sublingual solution formulation. More recently, a combination tablet

  19. Relative bioavailability of different buprenorphine formulations under chronic dosing conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric C. Strain; David E. Moody; Kenneth B. Stoller; Sharon L. Walsh; George E. Bigelow

    2004-01-01

    Background: Buprenorphine is an approved medication for the treatment of opioid dependence. Three sublingual formulations have been used at various times during its development—a solution containing alcohol, tablets containing buprenorphine alone, and tablets containing buprenorphine plus naloxone. This study compared the relative buprenorphine bioavailability of these different formulations. Methods: Outpatient volunteers (N=10) were maintained for 14 days of daily administration

  20. Genetic variation in OPRD1 and the response to treatment for opioid dependence with buprenorphine in European-American females.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T-K; Crist, R C; Ang, A; Ambrose-Lanci, L M; Lohoff, F W; Saxon, A J; Ling, W; Hillhouse, M P; Bruce, R D; Woody, G; Berrettini, W H

    2014-06-01

    Two commonly prescribed treatments for opioid addiction are methadone and buprenorphine. Although these drugs show some efficacy in treating opioid dependence, treatment response varies among individuals. It is likely that genetic factors have a role in determining treatment outcome. This study analyses the pharmacogenetic association of six polymorphisms in OPRD1, the gene encoding the delta-opioid receptor, on treatment outcome in 582 opioid addicted European Americans randomized to either methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) over the course of a 24-week open-label clinical trial. Treatment outcome was assessed as the number of missed or opioid-positive urine drug screens over the 24 weeks. In the total sample, no single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in OPRD1 were significantly associated with treatment outcome in either treatment arm. However, sex-specific analyses revealed two intronic SNPs (rs581111 and rs529520) that predicted treatment outcome in females treated with buprenorphine. Females with the AA or AG genotypes at rs581111 had significantly worse outcomes than those with the GG genotype when treated with buprenorphine (P=0.03, relative risk (RR)=1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.1). For rs529520, females with the AA genotype had a significantly worse outcome than those with the CC genotype when (P=0.006, RR=2.15, 95% CI 1.3-2.29). No significant associations were detected in males. These findings suggest that rs581111 and rs52920 may be useful when considering treatment options for female opioid addicts, however, confirmation in an independent sample is warranted. PMID:24126707

  1. Genetic variation in OPRD1 and the response to treatment for opioid dependence with buprenorphine in European American females

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Crist, Richard C.; Ang, Alfonso; Ambrose-Lanci, Lisa M.; Lohoff, Falk W.; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen P.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Woody, George; Berrettini, Wade H.

    2013-01-01

    Two commonly prescribed treatments for opioid addiction are methadone and buprenorphine. While these drugs show some efficacy in treating opioid dependence, treatment response varies among individuals. It is likely that genetic factors play a role in determining treatment outcome. This study analyses the pharmacogenetic association of 6 polymorphisms in OPRD1, the gene encoding the delta-opioid receptor, on treatment outcome in 582 opioid addicted European Americans randomized to either methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone ((Suboxone®) over the course of a 24 week open-label clinical trial. Treatment outcome was assessed as the number of missed or opioid positive urine drug screens over the 24 weeks. In the total sample, no SNPs in OPRD1 were significantly associated with treatment outcome in either treatment arm. However, sex-specific analyses revealed 2 intronic SNPs (rs581111 and rs529520) that predicted treatment outcome in females treated with buprenorphine. Females with the AA or AG genotypes at rs581111 had significantly worse outcomes than those with the GG genotype when treated with buprenorphine (p=0.03, RR=1.67, 95% C.I.[1.06-2.1]). For rs529520, females with the AA genotype had a significantly worse outcome than those with the CC genotype when (p=0.006, RR=2.15, 95%C.I.[1.3-2.29]). No significant associations were detected in males. These findings suggest that rs581111 and rs52920 may be useful when considering treatment options for female opioid addicts, however confirmation in an independent sample is warranted. PMID:24126707

  2. Health-related quality of life changes associated with buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Heather M.; Garnand, David A.; Jones, Mark A.; Sather, Mike R.; Naik, Rupali; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have described improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) associated with opioid dependence treatment with buprenorphine (ODT-B). Objective To evaluate HRQOL changes in domain scores, physical and mental component summaries, and health utilities (HUs) associated with ODT-B using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). Methods We assessed HRQOL changes in a substudy of a pharmacokinetic study that compared buprenorphine oral tablet and liquid dosage formulations over 16 weeks. Individuals, aged 18–65 years, were screened for opioid dependence. They were excluded if they would not agree to birth control or had a serious medical condition. Subjects received psychosocial counseling and weekly group therapy. The SF-36 was administered upon enrollment and at 4-week intervals. We used the SF-6D to estimate HUs. We performed intention to treat (ITT) analyses based on the last observation available for each subject. Paired t tests of each domain and HU, limited to remaining patients at each 4-week interval, were also conducted. Results Of 96 subjects enrolled, cumulative dropouts over time resulted in 80, 69, 59, and 44 subjects remaining at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. There were no significant differences in opioid-positive urines, dropout rates, or dosage changes between formulations. In the ITT analyses, HRQOL improvements over time were bodily pain (62.1 vs. 69.1, P = 0.017), vitality (49.8 vs. 56.5, P = 0.001), mental health (59.9 vs. 66.0, P = 0.001), social function (66.4 vs. 74.7, P = 0.001), role emotional (59.4 vs. 71.9, P = 0.003), role physical (60.9 vs. 70.6, P = 0.005), and mental component summary (41.9 vs. 45.4, P<0.001). HU scores also improved (0.674 vs. 0.715, P = 0.001). Results from paired t tests, with only concurrently enrolled patients, showed similar improvements from baseline to 4, 8, 12, or 16 weeks. Conclusion Buprenorphine, accompanied with psychosocial counseling, was associated with improved HRQOL and HUs. PMID:21987030

  3. Office-Based Treatment of Opiate Addiction with a Sublingual-Tablet Formulation of Buprenorphine and Naloxone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Fudala; T. Peter Bridge; Susan Herbert; William O. Williford; C. Nora Chiang; Karen Jones; Joseph Collins; Dennis Raisch; Paul Casadonte; R. Jeffrey Goldsmith; Walter Ling; Usha Malkerneker; Laura McNicholas; John Renner; Susan Stine; Donald Tusel

    2003-01-01

    background Office-based treatment of opiate addiction with a sublingual-tablet formulation of bu- prenorphine and naloxone has been proposed, but its efficacy and safety have not been well studied. methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 326 opiate- addicted persons who were assigned to office-based treatment with sublingual tablets consisting of buprenorphine (16 mg) in combination with naloxone (4

  4. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-Kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3-20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light-dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light-dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:25834439

  5. The cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine maintenance therapy for opiate addiction in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul G. Barnett; Gregory S. Zaric; Margaret L. Brandeau

    2001-01-01

    Aims. To determine the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine maintenance therapy for opiate addiction in the United States, particularly its effect on the HIV epidemic. Design. We developed a dynamic model to capture the effects of adding buprenorphine maintenance to the current opiate dependence treatment system. We evaluated incremental costs, including all health-care costs, and incremental effectiveness, measured as quality-adjusted life years

  6. Methadone vs. buprenorphine\\/naloxone during early opioid substitution treatment: a naturalistic comparison of cognitive performance relative to healthy controls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pekka Rapeli; Carola Fabritius; Hannu Alho; Mikko Salaspuro; Kristian Wahlbeck; Hely Kalska

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both methadone- and buprenorphine-treated opioid-dependent patients frequently show cognitive deficits in attention, working memory, and verbal memory. However, no study has compared these patient groups with each other during early opioid substitution treatment (OST). Therefore, we investigated attention, working memory, and verbal memory of opioid-dependent patients within six weeks after the introduction of OST in a naturalistic setting and

  7. Effects of buprenorphine and methadone in methadone-maintained subjects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Walsh; H. L. June; K. J. Schuh; K. L. Preston; G. E. Bigelow; M. L. Stitzer

    1995-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a partial mu opioid agonist, is an experimental medication under development for the treatment of opioid dependence as an alternative to methadone maintenance. The present study examined the relationship between level of opioid physical dependence and response to buprenorphine administration as part of a program to develop procedures for transferring patients from methadone to buprenorphine treatment. This laboratory study

  8. Cost Effectiveness of Injectable Extended Release Naltrexone Compared to Methadone Maintenance and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Heide; Mandell, Kara; Johnson, Kimberly; Chatterjee, Debanjana; Vanness, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of injectable extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) compared to methadone maintenance and buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MMT and BMT respectively) for adult males enrolled in treatment for opioid dependence in the United States from the perspective of state-level addiction treatment payers. Methods We used a Markov model with daily time cycles to estimate the incremental cost per opioid-free day in a simulated cohort of adult males ages 18–65 over a six-month period from the state health program perspective. Results XR-NTX is predicted to be more effective and more costly than methadone or buprenorphine in our target population, with an incremental cost per opioid-free day gained relative to the next-most effective treatment (MMT) of $72. The cost-effectiveness of XR-NTX relative to MMT was driven by its effectiveness in deterring opioid use while receiving treatment. Conclusions XR-NTX is a cost-effective medication for treating opioid dependence if state addiction treatment payers are willing to pay at least $72 per opioid-free day. PMID:25775099

  9. Pharmacokinetic comparison of the buprenorphine sublingual liquid and tablet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kory J Schuh; Chris-Ellyn Johanson

    1999-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a ? opioid partial agonist being developed as a treatment for opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, usually administered as a sublingual liquid, is now being developed as a sublingual tablet for clinical use. The present study compared participants’ plasma concentrations after daily maintenance on three buprenorphine liquid doses (2, 4 and 8 mg) and one tablet dose (8 mg). Fourteen

  10. Counseling plus Buprenorphine–Naloxone Maintenance Therapy for Opioid Dependence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Fiellin; Michael V. Pantalon; Marek C. Chawarski; Brent A. Moore; Lynn E. Sullivan; Patrick G. O'Connor; Richard S. Schottenfeld

    2006-01-01

    Background The optimal level of counseling and frequency of attendance for medication distri- bution has not been established for the primary care, office-based buprenorphine- naloxone treatment of opioid dependence. Methods We conducted a 24-week randomized, controlled clinical trial with 166 patients assigned to one of three treatments: standard medical management and either once-weekly or thrice-weekly medication dispensing or enhanced medical

  11. Timing of buprenorphine adoption by privately funded substance abuse treatment programs: The role of institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sarah A.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying facilitators of more rapid buprenorphine adoption may increase access to this effective treatment for opioid dependence. Using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework, we examine the extent to which programs’ inter-organizational institutional and resource-based linkages predict the likelihood of being an earlier, later, or non-adopter of buprenorphine. Data were derived from face-to-face interviews with administrators of 345 privately funded substance abuse treatment programs in 2007–2008. Results of multinomial logistic regression models show that inter-organizational and resource linkages were associated with timing of adoption. Programs reporting membership in provider associations were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. Programs that relied more on resources linkages, such as the detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies and the NIDA website, were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. These findings suggest that institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages may expose programs to effective treatments, thereby facilitating more rapid and sustained adoption of innovative treatment techniques. PMID:21831565

  12. Dosing considerations with transdermal formulations of fentanyl and buprenorphine for the treatment of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Opioids continue to be first-line pharmacotherapy for patients suffering from cancer pain. Unfortunately, subtherapeutic dosage prescribing of pain medications remains common, and many cancer patients continue to suffer and experience diminished quality of life. A large variety of therapeutic options are available for cancer pain patients. Analgesic pharmacotherapy is based on the patient’s self-report of pain intensity and should be tailored to meet the requirements of each individual. Most, if not all, cancer pain patients will ultimately require modifications in their opioid pharmacotherapy. When changes in a patient’s medication regimen are needed, adequate pain control is best maintained through appropriate dosage conversion, scheduling immediate release medication for withdrawal prevention, and providing as needed dosing for breakthrough pain. Transdermal opioids are noninvasive, cause less constipation and sedation when compared to oral opioids, and may improve patient compliance. A relative potency of 100:1 is recommended when converting the patient from oral morphine to transdermal fentanyl. Based on the limited data available, there is significant interpatient variability with transdermal buprenorphine and equipotency recommendations from oral morphine of 75:1–110:1 have been suggested. Cancer patients may require larger transdermal buprenorphine doses to control their pain and may respond better to a more aggressive 75–100:1 potency ratio. This review outlines the prescribing of transdermal fentanyl and transdermal buprenorphine including how to safely and effectively convert to and use them for those with cancer pain. PMID:25170278

  13. Failure to identify or effectively manage prescription opioid dependence acted as a gateway to heroin use-buprenorphine/naloxone treatment and recovery in a surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Stephen; Hill, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    The prescribing of opioid pain medication has increased markedly in recent years, with strong opioid dispensing increasing 18-fold in Tayside, Scotland since 1995. Despite this, little data is available to quantify the problem of opioid pain medication dependence (OPD) and until recently there was little guidance on best-practice treatment. We report the case of a young mother prescribed dihydrocodeine for postoperative pain relief who became opioid dependent. When her prescription was stopped without support, she briefly used heroin to overcome her withdrawal. After re-exposure to dihydrocodeine following surgery 9 years later and treatment with methadone for dependency, she was transferred to buprenorphine/naloxone. In our clinical experience and in agreement with Department of Health and Royal College of General Practitioner guidance, buprenorphine/naloxone is the preferred opioid substitution treatment for OPD. Our patient remains within her treatment programme and has returned to work on buprenorphine 16 mg/naloxone 4 mg in conjunction with social and psychological support. PMID:25519865

  14. Buprenorphine and naloxone interactions in opiate-dependent volunteers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Mendelson; Reese T. Jones; Isabella Fernandez; Susette Welm; Ann K. Melby; Matthew J. Baggott

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Sublingual buprenorphine appears useful in the treatment of opiate dependence. A combination sublingual dose of buprenorphine and naloxone could have less potential for parenteral use by opiate-dependent individuals. To estimate the abuse potential of a combination formulation, we assessed the parenteral effects of a buprenorphine and naloxone combination in untreated heroin addicts.Methods: Eight healthy, opiate-dependent daily users of heroin

  15. Two-year Experience with Buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) for Maintenance Treatment of Opioid Dependence Within a Private Practice Setting.

    PubMed

    Finch, James W; Kamien, Jonathan B; Amass, Leslie

    2007-06-01

    Office-based buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) treatment in the United States has significantly improved access to safe and effective opioid-dependence therapy. Little data from physicians' experiences prescribing Suboxone in private offices have been available. This retrospective chart review describes a family practitioner's first 2 years of clinical experience prescribing Suboxone for opioid dependence to 71 patients in a private office. After directly observed rapid office dose induction, Suboxone prescriptions were given monthly after evidence of continued stability. Urine was screened regularly and patients were referred for counseling and other ancillary services. Patients averaged 32 years old, 4.3 years of opioid dependence, and were primarily white (93%) and employed (70%). Fifty-two percent used heroin primarily (most by injection), and 70% had no agonist substitution therapy history. Almost half (47%) paid for their own treatment. Compliance during dose induction was excellent. Suboxone maintenance doses averaged 10 (range, 2-24) mg per day. More than 80% of urine samples were opioid-negative after Suboxone treatment began, although urinalysis did not always include a test for oxycodone. Seventy-five percent had successful outcomes by remaining in Suboxone treatment (43%), tapering successfully (21%), transferring to methadone maintenance (7%), or inpatient treatment (4%). Fifty-eight percent reported receiving counseling. Almost all (85%) paid their fees on time. There were no safety, medication abuse, or diversion issues detected. Overall, office-based Suboxone therapy was easily implemented and the physician considered the experience excellent. Suboxone maintenance was associated with good treatment retention and significantly reduced opioid use, and it is helping to reach patients, including injection drug users, without histories of agonist substitution therapy. PMID:21768942

  16. Buprenorphine in cancer pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mellar P. Davis

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a broad spectrum, highly lipophilic, and long-acting partial mu opioid receptor agonist that is noncross tolerant to other opioids. Buprenorphine can be given by several routes. Metabolism is through CYP3A4 and CYP2C8 and by conjugases. Constipation and sexual dysfunction appear to be less with buprenorphine than with other opioids. The recent development of a polymer matrix patch delivery

  17. Opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine in Manipur and Nagaland in Northeast India: what has been established needs to be continued and expanded

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Suresh; Natale, Richard D; Langkham, B; Sharma, Charan; Kabi, Rachel; Mortimore, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Manipur and Nagaland in northeast India report an antenatal HIV prevalence of > 1% and the current HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 24% and 4.5% respectively. Through support from DFID's Challenge Fund, Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) established thirteen drop-in-centres across the two states to deliver opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine for 1200 injecting drug users. Within a short span of time the treatment has been found to be attractive to the clients and currently 1248 injecting opioid users are receiving opioid substitution treatment. The project is acceptable to the drug users, the families, the communities, religious as well as the militant groups. The treatment centres operate all days of the week, have trained staff members, utilize standardized protocols and ensure a strict supervised delivery system to prevent illicit diversion of buprenorphine. The drug users receiving the substitution treatment are referred to HIV voluntary counselling and testing. As this treatment has the potential to change HIV related risk behaviours, what has been established in the two states needs to be continued and expanded with the support from the Government of India. PMID:19243636

  18. Deaths involving buprenorphine: a compendium of French cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kintz

    2001-01-01

    Buprenorphine at high dosage became available in France in 1996, as a substitution treatment for heroin addicts. Since this date, numerous deaths were attributed to this drug. This paper reports two original series of 39 and 78 fatalities involving buprenorphine observed at the Institute of Legal Medicine of Strasbourg and at 13 other French forensic centers, respectively. The files were

  19. A new series of 13 buprenorphine-related deaths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascal Kintz

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Buprenorphine at high dosage became available in France in 1996, as a substitution treatment for heroin addicts. Since this date, numerous deaths were attributed to this drug. This paper reports a new series of 13 fatalities involving buprenorphine observed at the Institute of Legal Medicine of Strasbourg, between August 2000 to October 2001.Design and methods: During the mentioned period,

  20. Clinical efficacy of buprenorphine: comparisons to methadone and placebo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter Ling; Donald R Wesson

    2003-01-01

    Buprenorphine has been studied extensively since 1978 when it was initially proposed as an alternative to methadone for treatment of opioid dependence. Early work by Jasinski, Mello, Mendelson and their colleagues demonstrated buprenorphine's low physical abuse potential and its ability to substitute for heroin and reduce heroin self-administration in opiate-dependent humans. The subsequent early clinical studies suggested that, in clinical

  1. Buprenorphine for office-based practice: consensus conference overview.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Thomas R; Fiellin, David A

    2004-01-01

    This overview of the March 2003 conference on the U.S. national buprenorphine implementation program is developed to inform the practitioner about the positive experience that has been accumulated worldwide on the use of buprenorphine for office-based practice. The first paper delineates the challenges for American psychiatry in moving buprenorphine forward into general practice. Most psychiatrists are unprepared to work with opiate-dependent patients or to use buprenorphine. The international successes with office-based buprenorphine from France and Australia are presented in the next papers, followed by presentations on several U.S. studies using buprenorphine in the community for detoxification and office-based maintenance. These experiences have thus far confirmed buprenorphine's utility and promise for opiate addiction treatment in the U.S. Finally, two national monitoring programs have been implemented to assess the public health impact of this new treatment opportunity. This opportunity has a three-year window, however, and a critical need will be to attract a sufficient number of physicians into prescribing buprenorphine/naloxone in order to allow our patients increased access to this treatment. PMID:15204671

  2. Abuse potential of intranasal buprenorphine versus buprenorphine/naloxone in buprenorphine-maintained heroin users.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Metz, Verena; Comer, Sandra D

    2015-07-01

    In spite of the clinical utility of buprenorphine, parenteral abuse of this medication has been reported in several laboratory investigations and in the real world. Studies have demonstrated lower abuse liability of the buprenorphine/naloxone combination relative to buprenorphine alone. However, clinical research has not yet examined the utility of the combined formulation to deter intranasal use in a buprenorphine-maintained population. Heroin-using volunteers (n?=?12) lived in the hospital for 8-9 weeks and were maintained on each of three sublingual buprenorphine doses (2, 8, 24?mg). Under each maintenance dose, participants completed laboratory sessions during which the reinforcing and subjective effects of intranasal doses of buprenorphine (8, 16?mg), buprenorphine/naloxone (8/2, 8/8, 8/16, 16/4?mg) and controls (placebo, heroin 100?mg, naloxone 4?mg) were assessed. Intranasal buprenorphine alone typically produced increases in positive subjective effects and the 8?mg dose was self-administered above the level of placebo. The addition of naloxone dose dependently reduced positive subjective effects and increased aversive effects. No buprenorphine/naloxone combination dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo. These data suggest that within a buprenorphine-dependent population, intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone has reduced abuse potential in comparison to buprenorphine alone. These data strongly argue in favor of buprenorphine/naloxone rather than buprenorphine alone as the more reasonable option for managing the risk of buprenorphine misuse. PMID:25060839

  3. Preliminary buprenorphine sublingual tablet pharmacokinetic data in plasma, oral fluid and sweat during treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is currently under investigation as a pharmacotherapy to treat pregnant women for opioid dependence. This research evaluates buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenophine (NBUP), buprenorphine-glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) pharmacokinetics after high dose (14–20 mg) BUP sublingual tablet administration in three opioid-dependent pregnant women. Methods Oral fluid and sweat specimens were collected in addition to plasma specimens for 24 h during gestation weeks 28 or 29 and 34, and 2 months after delivery. Tmax was not affected by pregnancy; however, BUP and NBUP Cmax and AUC0–24h tended to be lower during pregnancy compared to postpartum levels. Results Statistically significant but weak positive correlations were found for BUP plasma and OF concentrations, and BUP/NBUP ratios in plasma and OF. Conclusion Statistically significant negative correlations were observed for times of specimen collection and BUP and NBUP OF/plasma ratios. BUP-Gluc and NBUP-Gluc were detected in only 5% of OF specimens. In sweat, BUP and NBUP were detected in only 4 of 25 (12 or 24 h) specimens in low concentrations (<2.4 ng/patch). These preliminary data describe BUP and metabolite pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and suggest that, like methadone, upward dose adjustments may be needed with advancing gestation. PMID:21860340

  4. Buprenorphine for Cancer Pain: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Prommer, Eric

    2014-08-27

    Buprenorphine (BUP) is a semisynthetic derivative of the opium alkaloid thebaine found in the poppy Papaver somniferum. Its chemical structure contains the morphine structure but differs by having a cyclopropylmethyl group. Buprenorphine is a potent µ opioid agonist. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver and gut. The development of a transdermal BUP formulation in 2001 led to its evaluation in cancer pain. This article provides the practitioner with an update on the current role of BUP in cancer care. It highlights data suggesting effectiveness in various types of cancer pain. The article reviews pharmacology, routes of administration, adverse effects, drug interactions, and cost considerations. PMID:25163678

  5. Buprenorphine decreases the CCL2-mediated chemotactic response of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Williams, Dionna W; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W

    2015-04-01

    Despite successful combined antiretroviral therapy, ? 60% of HIV-infected people exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV-infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9 were identified and had not been shown previously to be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  6. Use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. II. Physiologic and behavioral effects of daily and alternate-day administration and abrupt withdrawal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J Fudala; Jerome H Jaffe; Elizabeth M Dax; Rolley E Johnson; Rolley E Johnson PharmD

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen heroin-dependent male volunteers were administered buprenorphine sublingually, in ascending daily doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg. They were maintained on 8 mg daily through study day 18. On study days 19 through 36, subjects in group 1 continued to receive burprenorphine daily; subjects in group 2 received buprenorphine or placebo on alternate days. On days 37 through 52,

  7. The clinical pharmacology of buprenorphine: extrapolating from the laboratory to the clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon L Walsh; Thomas Eissenberg

    2003-01-01

    This paper will review clinical pharmacology studies on buprenorphine, a mixed opioid agonist–antagonist currently approved as a treatment for opioid dependence. The focus is on studies characterizing buprenorphine's pharmacodynamic actions, including its safety, abuse liability, withdrawal suppression and withdrawal precipitation capacity, physical dependence potential, cross-tolerance and duration of action as well as a review of the pharmacological profile of buprenorphine\\/naloxone

  8. Buprenorphine and naloxone co-administration in opiate-dependent patients stabilized on sublingual buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra S Harris; Reese T Jones; Susette Welm; Robert A Upton; Emil Lin; John Mendelson

    2000-01-01

    Buprenorphine and naloxone sublingual (s.l.) dose formulations may decrease parenteral buprenorphine abuse. We evaluated pharmacologic interactions between 8 mg s.l. buprenorphine combined with 0, 4, or 8 mg of naloxone in nine opiate-dependent volunteers stabilized on 8 mg s.l. buprenorphine for 7 days. Combined naloxone and buprenorphine did not diminish buprenorphine's effects on opiate withdrawal nor alter buprenorphine bioavailability. Opiate

  9. Assessment of immunotoxicity of buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Van Loveren; N. Gianotten; C. F. M. Hendriksen; H. J. Schuurman; J. W. Van Der Laan

    1994-01-01

    Summary In order to use buprenorphine as an analgesic in immunological experiments, we have studied the potential immunotoxicity of buprenorphine. Three-week-old male Wistar Riv: TOX rats were subcutaneously treated with buprenorphine by injection of 0.1, 0.4, or 1.6 mg\\/kg body weight per day over a period of 4 weeks. Concentrations used were within the range for analgesia in rats. A

  10. Effect of Telaprevir on the Pharmacokinetics of Buprenorphine in Volunteers on Stable Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xia; Trevejo, Jose; van Heeswijk, Rolf P. G.; Smith, Frances

    2012-01-01

    This was an open-label, single-sequence trial in hepatitis C virus-negative volunteers on stable, individualized, buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Telaprevir at 750 mg every 8 h was coadministered with buprenorphine/naloxone (4:1 ratio as sublingual tablets) for 7 days with food. Pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone were measured over the 24-hour dosing interval on day ?1 (buprenorphine/naloxone alone, reference) and day 7 of telaprevir coadministration (test). Geometric least-squares mean ratios and associated 90% confidence intervals of treatment ratios (test/reference) were calculated using log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters. Opioid withdrawal symptoms were evaluated throughout the study (via questionnaires and pupillometry). Pharmacokinetic data were available for 14 and 13 volunteers on day ?1 and day 7, respectively. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for buprenorphine was unchanged and the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) for buprenorphine, Cmax and AUC for norbuprenorphine, and Cmax naxolone were modestly decreased during coadministration with telaprevir. Geometric least-squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for buprenorphine were 0.80 (0.69, 0.93) for the Cmax and 0.96 (0.84, 1.10) for the AUC from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24); for norbuprenorphine, values were 0.85 (0.66, 1.09) for Cmax and 0.91 (0.71, 1.16) for AUC0–24; for naloxone, the Cmax was 0.84 (0.62, 1.13). Coadministration of telaprevir did not increase withdrawal symptom frequency, and there were no serious adverse events reported during or after completion of telaprevir coadministration. Results suggest dose adjustment may not be necessary when telaprevir and buprenorphine/naloxone are coadministered. PMID:22564847

  11. Unobserved versus observed office buprenorphine\\/naloxone induction: A pilot randomized clinical trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik W. Gunderson; Xin-Qun Wang; David A. Fiellin; Benjamin Bryan; Frances R. Levin

    2010-01-01

    Physician adoption of buprenorphine treatment of opioid dependence may be limited in part by concerns regarding the induction process. Although national guidelines recommend observed induction, some physicians utilize unobserved induction outside the office. The aim of this pilot randomized clinical trial was to assess preliminary safety and effectiveness of unobserved versus observed office buprenorphine\\/naloxone induction among patients entering a 12-week

  12. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine-naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  13. Treatment Approaches (Palliative Care)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as anxiety and depression, treatment includes supportive psychotherapy and the use of antidepressant or anti-anxiety drugs. Psychotherapy may include relaxation training, imagery, distraction, coping training, ...

  14. Buprenorphine and naloxone combinations: the effects of three dose ratios in morphine-stabilized, opiate-dependent volunteers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mendelson; Reese T. Jones; Susette Welm; Matthew Baggott; Isabella Fernandez; Ann K. Melby; Rajneesh P. Nath

    1999-01-01

    Sublingual buprenorphine is a promising new treatment for opiate dependence, but its opioid agonist effects pose a risk for\\u000a parenteral abuse. A formulation combining buprenorphine with the opiate antagonist naloxone could discourage such abuse. The\\u000a effects of three intravenous (IV) buprenorphine and naloxone combinations on agonist effects and withdrawal signs and symptoms\\u000a were examined in 12 opiate-dependent subjects. Following stabilization

  15. Patient Perspectives of an Integrated Program of Medical Care and Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

  16. Patient perspectives of an integrated program of medical care and substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

  17. Buprenorphine prescription by general practitioners in a French region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Thirion; V. Lapierre; J. Micallef; E. Ronflé; A. Masut; V. Pradel; C. Coudert; J. C. Mabriez; J. L. Sanmarco

    2002-01-01

    Since 1996 French general practitioners (GPs) may prescribe sublingual buprenorphine tablets as maintenance treatment for opiate dependence. The computerised data management of the main French health reimbursement system now allows surveillance of the use of this drug, and how it is prescribed. The purpose of this study is to determine the profile of maintained patients, prescribed doses, associated psychotropic treatments

  18. The relative risk of fatal poisoning by methadone or buprenorphine within the wider population of England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Marteau, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the population-wide overdose risk emerging from the prescription of methadone and buprenorphine for opioid substitution treatment in England and Wales. Design Retrospective administrative data study. Setting National databases for England and Wales. Participants/cases Drug-related mortality data were drawn from the Office for National Statistics, and prescription data for methadone and buprenorphine were obtained from the National Health Service for the years 2007–2012. During this 6-year period, a total of 2366 methadone-related deaths and 52 buprenorphine-related deaths were registered, corresponding to 17?333?163 methadone and 2?602?374 buprenorphine prescriptions issued. The analysis encompassed poisoning deaths among members of the wider population of England and Wales who consumed, but were not prescribed these medications, in addition to patients prescribed methadone or buprenorphine. Main outcome measures Mortality risk: substance-specific overdose rate per 1000 prescriptions issued; relative risk ratio of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. Results During the years 2007–2012, the pooled overdose death rate was 0.137/1000 prescriptions of methadone, compared to 0.022/1000 prescriptions of buprenorphine (including buprenorphine-naloxone). The analysis generated a relative risk ratio of 6.23 (95% CI 4.79 to 8.10) of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. UK Borders Agency data were taken into consideration and revealed that only negligible amounts of methadone and buprenorphine were seized on entering UK territory between 2007 and 2012, suggesting domestic diversion. Conclusions Our analysis of the relative safety of buprenorphine and methadone for opioid substitution treatment reveals that buprenorphine is six times safer than methadone with regard to overdose risk among the general population. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of prescribing methadone, and tighter regulations are needed to prevent its diversion. PMID:26024998

  19. Unusual false-positive case of urinary screening for buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Romero, Araelsis; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mercadanti, Mariella

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a centrally acting analgesic drug that is administered for the management of opioid dependence and as an analgesic drug for the treatment of chronic pain. The growing use of this substance has determined an increased need for laboratory testing for either detection and confirmation of the illicit use or monitoring compliance as a substitution therapy for opioid dependence. We describe here the case of urinary sample adulteration with exogenous buprenorphine (6,952?ng/ml), which has led to afalse-positive immunoassay test result (14.9?ng/ml) on a subsequent sample due to a phenomenon of instrumental carry-over. This unusual case confirms the importance to take into account adulteration when screening urines for buprenorphine in patients undergoing substitution therapy for opioid dependence, routinely perform a confirmation assay on positive samples, and rule out instrumental carry-over. PMID:21786326

  20. Sublingual versus subcutaneous buprenorphine in opiate abusers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald R Jasinski; Paul J Fudala; Rolley E Johnson; R E Johnson NIDA

    1989-01-01

    To compare the pharmacologic profiles of sublingually and subcutaneously administered buprenorphine, 10 healthy male subjects with histories of opiate abuse were given sublingually administered buprenorphine (1, 2, and 4 mg), subcutaneously administered buprenorphine (1 and 2 mg), and placebo in a double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled study. All active buprenorphine dosages produced a significant degree of miosis but no significant changes in

  1. Efficacy of daily and alternate-day dosing regimens with the combination buprenorphine–naloxone tablet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie Amass; Jonathan B Kamien; Susan K Mikulich

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a combination tablet formulation of buprenorphine containing 8 mg of buprenorphine and 2 mg of naloxone for every other day treatment and whether increasing the daily maintenance dose was essential for maintaining an efficacious alternate-day treatment. Twenty-six opioid-dependent outpatients completing a 16-day baseline entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, triple crossover trial. Twenty-one days of daily

  2. Assessing Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance Under Long-Term Treatment with Transdermal Buprenorphine in Chronic Noncancer Pain Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oguzhan Dagtekin; Hans J. Gerbershagen; Werner Wagner; Frank Petzke; Lukas Radbruch; Rainer Sabatowski

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The therapeutic use of opioids has been associated with altered cognition and impaired psychomotor function. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of opioid therapy on psychomotor performance and cognition, but there are no data about the effect of long-term treatment with transdermal buprenor- phine on driving ability. METHODS: Thirty patients suffering from chronic noncancer pain, who had been treated

  3. Double-blind randomized trial of buprenorphine and methadone in opiate dependence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvie Petitjean; Rudolf Stohler; Jean-Jacques Déglon; Santino Livoti; Doris Waldvogel; Claude Uehlinger; Dieter Ladewig

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the safety and efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine tablets with oral methadone in a population of opioid-dependent individuals in a double-blind, randomized, 6-week trial using a flexible dosing procedure. Fifty-eight patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence were recruited in three outpatient facilities and randomly assigned to substitution with buprenorphine or methadone. The retention rate was significantly better in

  4. Disulfiram versus placebo for cocaine dependence in buprenorphine-maintained subjects: a preliminary trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony P George; Marek C Chawarski; Juliana Pakes; Kathleen M Carroll; Thomas R Kosten; Richard S Schottenfeld

    2000-01-01

    Background: We examined the effects of disulfiram versus placebo on cocaine dependence in buprenorphine-maintained subjects.Methods: Opioid and cocaine dependent subjects (n = 20) were induced onto buprenorphine maintenance, then randomized to disulfiram (250 mg q.d.; n = 11) or placebo (n = 9) treatment for 12 weeks.Results: Groups were comparable at baseline on demographic measures and on baseline measures of

  5. Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Almatroudi, Abdulrahman; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P; Bailey, Sarah J

    2015-07-01

    Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focused on the development of kappa opioid receptor (?-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a ?-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of µ-opioid receptors will be reduced and the ?-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) functions as a short-acting ?-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm, and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced an antidepressant-like response in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression. PMID:26045511

  6. Drug Interactions of Clinical Importance among the Opioids, Methadone and Buprenorphine, and other Frequently Prescribed Medications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Sullivan, Lynn; Nallani, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Drug interactions are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Methadone and buprenorphine are frequently prescribed for the treatment of opioid addiction. Patients needing treatment with these medications often have co-occurring medical and mental illnesses that require medication treatment. The abuse of illicit substances is also common in opioid-addicted individuals. These clinical realities place patients being treated with methadone and buprenorphine at risk for potentially toxic drug interactions. A substantial literature has accumulated on drug interactions between either methadone or buprenorphine with other medications when ingested concomitantly by humans. This review summarizes current literature in this area. PMID:20132117

  7. Oligodendrocyte responses to buprenorphine uncover novel and opposing roles of ?-opioid- and nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors in cell development: implications for drug addiction treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eschenroeder, Andrew C; Vestal-Laborde, Allison A; Sanchez, Emilse S; Robinson, Susan E; Sato-Bigbee, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Although the classical function of myelin is the facilitation of saltatory conduction, this membrane and the oligodendrocytes, the cells that make myelin in the central nervous system (CNS), are now recognized as important regulators of plasticity and remodeling in the developing brain. As such, oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination are among the most vulnerable processes along CNS development. We have shown previously that rat brain myelination is significantly altered by buprenorphine, an opioid analogue currently used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. Perinatal exposure to low levels of this drug induced accelerated and increased expression of myelin basic proteins (MBPs), cellular and myelin components that are markers of mature oligodendrocytes. In contrast, supra-therapeutic drug doses delayed MBP brain expression and resulted in a decreased number of myelinated axons. We have now found that this biphasic-dose response to buprenorphine can be attributed to the participation of both the ?-opioid receptor (MOR) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP receptor) in the oligodendrocytes. This is particularly intriguing because the NOP receptor/nociceptin system has been primarily linked to behavior and pain regulation, but a role in CNS development or myelination has not been described before. Our findings suggest that balance between signaling mediated by (a) MOR activation and (b) a novel, yet unidentified pathway that includes the NOP receptor, plays a crucial role in the timing of oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin synthesis. Moreover, exposure to opioids could disrupt the normal interplay between these two systems altering the developmental pattern of brain myelination. PMID:22002899

  8. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  9. Placement Disruption in Treatment Foster Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana K. Smith; Elizabeth Stormshak; Patricia Chamberlain; Rachel Bridges Whaley

    2001-01-01

    Rates of placement disruption in traditional and treatment foster care are reviewed. Contextual factors, individual child and caregiver characteristics, and risk factors thought to influence rates of placement disruption are explored. A model for treatment foster care is described, and data are presented on disruption rates for this program. The results indicated that the likelihood of placement disruption is two

  10. Pharmacokinetic interactions between buprenorphine\\/naloxone and tipranavir\\/ritonavir in HIV-negative subjects chronically receiving buprenorphine\\/naloxone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Douglas Bruce; Frederick L. Altice; David E. Moody; Shen-Nan Lin; Wenfang B. Fang; John P. Sabo; Jan M. Wruck; Peter J. Piliero; Carolyn Conner; Laurie Andrews; Gerald H. Friedland

    2009-01-01

    HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence often require opioid replacement therapy. Pharmacokinetic interactions between HIV therapy and opioid dependence treatment medications can occur.HIV-seronegative subjects stabilized on at least 3 weeks of buprenorphine\\/naloxone (BUP\\/NLX) therapy sequentially underwent baseline and steady-state pharmacokinetic evaluation of open-label, twice daily tipranavir 500mg co-administered with ritonavir 200mg (TPV\\/r).Twelve subjects were enrolled and 10 completed the study. Prior

  11. The Baltimore Buprenorphine Initiative: understanding the role of buprenorphine in addressing heroin addiction in an urban-based community.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Oros, Marla T; Dorsey, Susan G

    2014-01-01

    Adequate drug treatment for substance users continues to be a challenge for most U.S. cities. To address heroin addiction in Baltimore, the Baltimore Buprenorphine Initiative was implemented as a joint project to promote individualized, patient-centered buprenorphine therapy in conjunction with behavioral treatment to accelerate recovery from opioid addiction. The purpose of this analysis was to explore differences in recovery trajectories predicting length of stay and use this information to predict characteristics that influence an individual's ability to remain in the Baltimore Buprenorphine Initiative program. The sample consisted of 1,039 subjects enrolled in the program between January 2008 and June 2009. The regression modeling determined that age, income, employment, and higher level of treatment were significant predictors of length of stay in the recovery program. The findings of this study have practical implications for the design and implementation of heroin addiction programs. The research indicates that focusing on these specific predictive variables early in the program design phase could increase recovery success rates as measured by length of stay. PMID:24613946

  12. Buprenorphine and methadone for opioid addiction during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L; Rayburn, William F

    2014-06-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are opioid-receptor agonists used as opioid substitution therapy during pregnancy to limit exposure of the fetus to cycles of opioid withdrawal and reduce the risk of infectious comorbidities of illicit opioid use. As part of a comprehensive care plan, such therapy may result in improved access to prenatal care, reduced illicit drug use, reduced exposure to infections associated with intravenous drug use, and improved maternal nutrition and infant birth weight. This article describes differences in patient selection between the two drugs, their relative safety during pregnancy, and changes in daily doses as a guide for prescribing clinicians. PMID:24845488

  13. Abuse and diversion of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and film.

    PubMed

    Lavonas, Eric J; Severtson, S Geoffrey; Martinez, Erin M; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Le Lait, Marie-Claire; Green, Jody L; Murrelle, Lenn E; Cicero, Theodore J; Kurtz, Steven P; Rosenblum, Andrew; Surratt, Hilary L; Dart, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Buprenorphine abuse is common worldwide. Rates of abuse and diversion of three sublingual buprenorphine formulations (single ingredient tablets; naloxone combination tablets and film) were compared. Data were obtained from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS) System Poison Center, Drug Diversion, Opioid Treatment (OTP), Survey of Key Informants' Patients (SKIP), and College Survey Programs through December 2012. To control for drug availability, event ratios (rates) were calculated quarterly, based on the number of patients filling prescriptions for each formulation ("unique recipients of a dispensed drug," URDD) and averaged and compared using negative binomial regression. Abuse rates in the OTP, SKIP, and College Survey Programs were greatest for single ingredient tablets, and abuse rates in the Poison Center Program and illicit diversion rates were greatest for the combination tablets. Combination film rates were significantly less than rates for either tablet formulation in all programs. No geographic pattern could be discerned. PMID:24680219

  14. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6- O-[ 11C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor Galynker; David J. Schlyer; Stephen L. Dewey; Joanna S. Fowler; Jean Logan; S. John Galley; Robert R. MacGregor; Richard A. Ferrieri; M. J. Holland; Jonathan Brodie; Eric Simon; Alfred P. Wolf

    1996-01-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([11C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood cholesterol. In the late nonproliferative stage, focal laser treatments may be used to seal leaking blood vessels. ... begin to appear in the proliferative stage, scatter laser treatment can be used to shrink them. Laser Therapy ...

  16. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can also learn about: Surgical procedures Cardiac catheterizations Heart transplants Preparing children for surgery Feeding Tips Children's special ... Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment Introduction Surgery Cardiac ... Transplants Preparing Children for Surgery - Feeding Tips - Children's Special ...

  17. Comparing Outcomes for Youth Served in Treatment Foster Care and Treatment Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin

    2011-01-01

    This study compared youth in the Florida Medicaid system prior to entry into treatment foster care or treatment group care, and compared outcomes in the 6 months after treatment. Florida Medicaid data from FY2003/04 through 2006/2007 along with Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Law Enforcement, and involuntary examination data were…

  18. [Care of women under chemotherapy treatment. Comprehensive analysis of care].

    PubMed

    Camargo, T C; Souza, I E

    1998-01-01

    This study was developed upon my reflections as a nurse working at the Antineoplastic Chemotherapy Center at Luiza Gomes de Lemos Hospital of the National Cancer Institute (Inca), and as a Master course student at Anna Nery Nursing School. Developing my Master thesis on Martin Heidegger's philosophical thinking it has enabled me to reflect about the nursing care, considering this philosopher's thinking. In this study, I have registered some situations that occurred on my working days, in the scenery mentioned above, and reflected about them, seeking to analyze their proximity and distance from Heidegger's philosophical thinking. This study was also a reflection about questions emerging from the research process and care practice which leaded me to another understanding of nursing care to women who are submitted to chemotherapy treatment. Then, I was able to see nursing care in another way, that one of comprehension as a possibility of professional action. PMID:10776279

  19. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  20. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Trial of Gabapentin During an Outpatient, Buprenorphine-Assisted Detoxification Procedure1

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Nichole C.; Mancino, Michael J.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Guise, J. Benjamin; Bickel, Warren K.; Thostenson, Jeff; Oliveto, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study examined the efficacy of the N-type calcium channel blocker gabapentin to improve outcomes during a brief detoxification protocol with buprenorphine. Treatment-seeking opioid-dependent individuals were enrolled in a 5-wk, double blind, placebo-controlled trial examining the effects of gabapentin during a 10-day outpatient detoxification from buprenorphine. Participants were inducted onto buprenorphine sublingual tablets during week 1, were randomized and inducted onto gabapentin or placebo during week 2, underwent a 10-day buprenorphine taper during weeks 3–4 and then were tapered off gabapentin/placebo during week 5. Assessments included thrice-weekly opioid withdrawal scales, vitals, and urine drug screens. Twenty-four individuals (13 male, 17 Caucasian, 3 African American, 4 Latino, mean age 29.7 yrs) participated in the detoxification portion of the study (gabapentin, N=11; placebo, N=13). Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between groups. Self-reported and observer-rated opioid withdrawal ratings were relatively low and did not differ between groups during the buprenorphine taper. Urine results showed a drug x time interaction, such that the probability of opioid-positive urines significantly decreased over time in the gabapentin versus placebo groups during weeks 3–4 (OR=0.73, p=0.004). These results suggest that gabapentin reduces opioid use during a 10-day buprenorphine detoxification procedure. PMID:23855333

  1. Emotional Availability, Parental Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Child Development in Caregiver-Child Relationships with Buprenorphine-Exposed 3-year-olds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saara Salo; Kaisa Kivistö; Riikka Korja; Zeynep Biringen; Sarimari Tupola; Hanna Kahila; Satu Kivitie-Kallio

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose was to compare emotional availability, maternal self-efficacy beliefs, and child developmental status in caregiver–child relationships with prenatally buprenorphine-exposed and nonexposed 3-year-old children. Design. We compared prenatally buprenorphine-exposed children living either with the biological mother (n = 7) or in foster care (n = 14) to nonexposed participants (n = 13). Emotional availability was coded from videotaped parent-child

  2. Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a user’s drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for “self-medication” purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among young drug users is not a widespread problem in Sweden. Harm-reduction measures should target drug users with more severe problems, among whom illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common and pose a medical risk. Illicit use of other prescription drugs, which are less controlled and more widely used by young people, is an important issue for further research. PMID:24139199

  3. The Reinforcing and Subjective Effects of Intravenous and Intranasal Buprenorphine in Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

  4. The reinforcing and subjective effects of intravenous and intranasal buprenorphine in heroin users.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D

    2014-07-01

    Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

  5. Treatment goals in psoriasis routine care.

    PubMed

    Radtke, M A; Reich, K; Spehr, C; Augustin, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The treatment goal algorithm for psoriasis, first originated in 2007, has ever since been adopted into treatment guidelines. It remained unclear how many patients have experienced the use of treatment goals in routine care and how these are perceived. The aim of the pilot study was to get first insight in the use and impact of therapeutic goals in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis in routine care. This study is a multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional health care study in n = 213 dermatology centers across Germany. A standardized physician and patient questionnaire was used, including demographics, disease and treatment characteristics. To evaluate patient treatment perception and satisfaction, a questionnaire (PsoSat) addressing 8 specific items was designed. Consistency and validity of the questionnaire were controlled by factor analyses and reliability tests. In total n = 1,883 patients were included for analysis (54.2 % male). Mean age was 52 years, mean disease duration 19 years. In total 45.5 % (n = 856) stated an improvement of psoriatic symptoms in the last 4 weeks. In patients including treatment goals, the course of psoriasis in the last 4 weeks was rated significantly better and predicted significantly higher patient satisfaction. Patients reporting periodic outcomes measurement of psoriasis treatment, also had significantly better course of disease, higher satisfaction and a lower psoriasis severity. A majority of patients experienced the use of treatment goals in practice. The association of using treatment goals with clinical outcomes and treatment satisfaction was markedly positive. These findings indicate that the use of treatment goals and outcome measurements in fact improve psoriasis management. PMID:25549606

  6. Late Effects of Treatment and Palliative Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denah Taggart; Robert Goldsby; Anuradha Banerjee

    \\u000a Identifying late effects of treatment and integrating palliative care when appropriate, are increasingly recognized as important\\u000a elements of childhood tumor management. Patients with CNS tumors are at high risk for mortality, and survivors have high morbidity\\u000a rates related to the late effects of treatment. While intensified therapy has improved survival in patients with pediatric\\u000a brain tumors (Packer et al. 1999,

  7. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Organizational Barriers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer clinical trials offer the opportunity for cancer patients to access state-of-the-art treatments and, in the process, contribute to the scientific knowledge base about effectiveness of curative interventions. However, accrual to clinical trials is far from optimal. Only about 5 percent of cancer patients receive care through a treatment trial. Understanding the factors that promote or impede trial participation is an essential step toward increasing accrual.

  8. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    PubMed Central

    Poloméni, Pierre; Schwan, Raymund

    2014-01-01

    The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000–360,000 “problem drug users” being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as generics of buprenorphine, methadone capsule, and Suboxone. Thus, an update seems necessary. This paper provides a description of opioid addiction management objectives and treatment modalities for general practitioners, based on currently available knowledge. PMID:24623988

  9. Effects of voluntarily-ingested buprenorphine on plasma corticosterone levels, body weight, water intake, and behaviour in permanently catheterised rats.

    PubMed

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the peri- and postoperative effect of pre-emptive analgesia through voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in Nutella, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. An arterial catheter was inserted and the rats were connected to an automated blood sampling device (AccuSampler). Blood samples were drawn up to 18 h after surgery and the plasma concentrations of corticosterone were quantified. Postoperative changes in water intake and body weight were recorded, and the behaviour of the rats was analysed during two 30-min periods. Pre-emptive oral buprenorphine treatment reduced the plasma corticosterone levels in the postoperative period, compared to controls treated with local anaesthetics. Buprenorphine-treated rats consumed more water and maintained body weight better. Behavioural observations indicated that buprenorphine changed the behaviour in non-operated rats but there was no difference in the operated rats. The present study strengthens the hypothesis that pre-emptive oral buprenorphine in Nutella is suitable for treatment of postoperative pain in rats. PMID:20363983

  10. 38 CFR 21.240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services § 21.240 Medical treatment, care and...

  11. 38 CFR 21.6240 - Medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment, care and services...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational...Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6240 Medical treatment, care and...

  12. Prenatal buprenorphine exposure decreases neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Chih-Jen; Shen, Ching-Hui; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-02-10

    Perinatal opioid exposure has a negative effect on neurogenesis and produces neurological consequences. However, its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed opioid agonist/antagonist, is an alternative medication for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of decreased neurogenesis and depression-like consequences following prenatal exposure to buprenorphine and sheds light on mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days and a cultured neurosphere model. Results of forced swimming test and tail suspension test showed that pups at postnatal day 21 had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by reduction of neuronal composition, biochemical parameters of neural stem/progenitor cells, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B phosphorylation, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation. Results of parallel cell studies further demonstrated a negative impact of buprenorphine on cultured neurospheres, including proliferation, differentiation, BDNF expression and signaling, and PKA activity. Taken together, our results suggest that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine might result in depression-like phenotypes associated with impaired BDNF action and decreased neurogenesis in the developing brain of weanlings. PMID:24321744

  13. Enhancing transitions from addiction treatment to primary care.

    PubMed

    Cucciare, Michael A; Coleman, Eric A; Saitz, Richard; Timko, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Despite long-standing recommendations that patients with substance use disorders receive primary care, only one-half of patients with substance use disorders receive such care. This article presents a conceptual model to facilitate the transition of patients from addiction treatment to primary care. A narrative review of the healthcare transition literature was conducted with an emphasis on identifying substance use disorder-specific model elements. The resulting model is intended to guide addiction treatment and primary care providers and researchers in understanding factors that impact care coordination between addiction treatment and primary care and to provide an overview of evidence-based methods for supporting this care transition. PMID:25299380

  14. The treatment gap in mental health care.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2004-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

  15. Treatment of Depression in a Low-Income Primary Care Setting With Colocated Mental Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa A. Uebelacker; Marcia Smith; Angelique W. Lewis; Ryan Sasaki; Ivan W. Miller

    2009-01-01

    In order to characterize depression treatment-as-usual in a large primary care practice in the United States with colocated mental health care, and to examine predictors of receiving any treatment and receiving adequate treatment, primary care patients were systematically approached in waiting rooms. Those with a minimum level of depression symptoms (n = 91) were asked to participate in a study

  16. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of intranasal crushed buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone tablets in opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, L.S.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Lofwall, M.R.; Moody, D.E.; Walsh, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Sublingual buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are efficacious opioid dependence pharmacotherapies, but there are reports of their diversion and misuse by the intranasal route. The study objectives were to characterize and compare their intranasal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Setting An in-patient research unit at the University of Kentucky. Participants Healthy adults (n=10) abusing, but not physically dependent on, intranasal opioids. Measurements Six sessions (72 hours apart) tested five intranasal doses [0/0, crushed buprenorphine (2, 8 mg), crushed buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 mg)] and one intravenous dose (0.8 mg buprenorphine/0.2 mg naloxone for bioavailability assessment). Plasma samples, physiological, subject- and observer-rated measures were collected before and for up to 72 hours after drug administration. Findings Both formulations produced time- and dose-dependent increases on subjective and physiological mu-opioid agonist effects (e.g. ‘liking’, miosis). Subjects reported higher subjective ratings and street values for 8 mg compared to 8/2 mg, but these differences were not statistically significant. No significant formulation differences in peak plasma buprenorphine concentration or time-course were observed. Buprenorphine bioavailability was 38–44% and Tmax was 35–40 minutes after all intranasal doses. Naloxone bioavailability was 24% and 30% following 2/0.5 and 8/2 mg, respectively. Conclusions It is difficult to determine if observed differences in abuse potential between intranasal buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are clinically relevant at the doses tested. Greater bioavailability and faster onset of pharmacodynamic effects compared to sublingual administration suggests a motivation for intranasal misuse in non-dependent opioid abusers. However, significant naloxone absorption from intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone administration may deter the likelihood of intranasal misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, but not buprenorphine, in opioid-dependent individuals. PMID:21395892

  17. Do methadone and buprenorphine have the same impact on psychopathological symptoms of heroin addicts?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giovanni Icro Angelo Maremmani; Luca Rovai; Pier Paolo Pani; Matteo Pacini; Francesco Lamanna; Fabio Rugani; Elisa Schiavi; Liliana Dell’Osso; Icro Maremmani

    2011-01-01

    Background  The idea that the impact of opioid agonist treatment is influenced by the psychopathological profile of heroin addicts has\\u000a not yet been investigated, and is based on the concept of a specific therapeutic action displayed by opioid agents on psychopathological\\u000a symptoms. In the present report we compared the effects of buprenorphine and methadone on the psychopathological symptoms\\u000a of 213 patients

  18. Clinical pharmacology of buprenorphine: Ceiling effects at high doses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon L Walsh; Kenzie L Preston; Maxine L Stitzer; Edward J Cone; George E Bigelow

    1994-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize the acute effects of buprenorphine, an opioid partial (?-agonist, across a wide range of doses in comparison to methadone.Method: Healthy adult male volunteers, who had experience with but were not physically dependent on opioids, participated while residing on a closed research unit. Four subjects received buprenorphine (0, 1, 2, 4, 8,

  19. Effects of Buprenorphine and Meloxicam Analgesia on Induced Cerebral Ischemia in C57BL/6 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy; Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Johansen, Flemming F; Abelson, Klas SP

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects were brief and seen only during the treatment period. Fecal corticosterone metabolites did not differ significantly between the groups. In the present study, buprenorphine treatment did not alter infarction volume when compared with that of mice that did not receive analgesia. In contrast, meloxicam treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and may be a confounder if used as an analgesic during MCAO surgery. Furthermore, investigation of behavioral profiles by using an automated behavioral scoring system showed that rearing and sniffing behaviors decreased as infarct volume increased. This suggests that studies of exploratory behavior may aid in developing new markers of short-term stroke-related behavioral deficiencies in laboratory mice. PMID:23582417

  20. Cocaine Use Reduction with Buprenorphine (CURB): Rationale, design, and methodology?

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Larissa J.; Nielsen, Suzanne; Saxon, Andrew; Hillhouse, Maureen; Thomas, Christie; Hasson, Albert; Stablein, Don; McCormack, Jennifer; Lindblad, Robert; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective medications to treat cocaine dependence have not been identified. Recent pharmacotherapy trials demonstrate the potential efficacy of buprenorphine (BUP) (alone or with naltrexone) for reducing cocaine use. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) launched the Cocaine Use Reduction with Buprenorphine (CURB) investigation to examine the safety and efficacy of sublingual BUP (as Suboxone®) in the presence of extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX, as Vivitrol®) for the treatment of cocaine dependence. This paper describes the design and rationale for this study. Methods This multi-site, double-blind, placebo-controlled study will randomize 300 participants across 11 sites. Participants must meet the DSM-IV criteria for cocaine dependence and past or current opioid dependence or abuse. Participants are inducted onto XR-NTX after self-reporting at least 7 days of abstinence from opioids and tolerating a naloxone challenge followed by oral naltrexone and are then randomly assigned to one of three medication conditions (4 mg BUP, 16 mg BUP, or placebo) for 8 weeks. Participants receive a second injection of XR-NTX 4 weeks after the initial injection, and follow-up visits are scheduled at 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Participants receive weekly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recruitment commenced in September, 2011. Enrollment, active medication, and follow-up phases are ongoing, and recruitment is exceeding targeted enrollment rates. Conclusions This research using 2 medications will demonstrate whether BUP, administered in the presence of XR-NTX, reduces cocaine use in adults with cocaine dependence and opioid use disorders and will demonstrate if XR-NTX prevents development of physiologic dependence on BUP. PMID:23159524

  1. A Randomized, Double-blind Evaluation of Buprenorphine Taper Duration in Primary Prescription Opioid Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Saulsgiver, Kathryn; Patrick, Mollie E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Brooklyn, John R.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although abuse of prescription opioids (POs) is a significant public health problem, few experimental studies have investigated the treatment needs of this growing population. OBJECTIVE To evaluate, following brief stabilization with a combination of buprenorphine hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate, the relative efficacy of 1-, 2-, and 4-week buprenorphine tapering regimens and subsequent naltrexone hydrochloride therapy in PO-dependent outpatients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A double-blind, 12-week randomized clinical trial was conducted in an outpatient research clinic. Following a brief period of buprenorphine stabilization, 70 PO-dependent adults were randomized to receive 1-, 2-, or 4-week tapers followed by naltrexone therapy. INTERVENTION During phase 1 (weeks 1–5 after randomization), participants visited the clinic daily; during phase 2 (weeks 6–12), visits were reduced to thrice weekly. Participants received behavioral therapy and urine toxicology testing throughout the trial. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The percentage of participants negative for illicit opioid use, retention, naltrexone ingestion, and favorable treatment response (ie, retained in treatment, opioid abstinent, and receiving naltrexone at the end of the study). RESULTS Opioid abstinence at the end of phase 1 was greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week taper conditions (P = .02), with 63% (n = 14), 29% (n = 7), and 29% (n = 7) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. Abstinence at the end of phase 2 was also greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week conditions (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 16% (n = 4), and 20% (n = 5) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. There were more treatment responders in the 4-week condition (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 17% (n = 4), and 21% (n = 5) of participants in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week groups considered responders at the end of treatment, respectively. Retention and naltrexone ingestion also were superior in the 4-week vs briefer tapers (both P = .04). Experimental condition (ie, taper duration) was the strongest predictor of treatment response, followed by buprenorphine stabilization dose. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study represents a rigorous experimental evaluation of outpatient buprenorphine stabilization, brief taper, and naltrexone maintenance for treatment of PO dependence. Results suggest that a meaningful subset of PO-dependent outpatients may respond positively to a 4-week taper plus naltrexone maintenance intervention. PMID:24153411

  2. Improving Care for the Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Dennis; Gustafson, David; Capoccia, Victor A.; Cotter, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches alcohol and drug treatment programs to apply process improvement strategies and make organizational changes that improve quality of care. Participating programs reduce days to admission, increase retention in care and spread the application of process improvement within their treatment centers. More generally, NIATx provides a framework for addressing the Institute of Medicine’s six dimensions of quality care (i.e., safe, effective, patient-centered, efficient, timely and equitable) in treatments for alcohol, drug and mental health disorders. NIATx and its extensions illustrate how the behavioral health field can respond to the demand for higher quality treatment services. PMID:18259871

  3. Comparing Chronic Pain Treatment Seekers in Primary Care versus Tertiary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fink-Miller, Erin L.; Long, Dustin M.; Gross, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients frequently seek treatment for chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care settings. Compared with physicians who have completed extensive specialization (eg, fellowships) in pain management, primary care physicians receive much less formal training in managing chronic pain. While chronic pain represents a complicated condition in its own right, the recent increase in opioid prescriptions further muddles treatment. It is unknown whether patients with chronic pain seeking treatment in primary care differ from those seeking treatment in tertiary care settings. This study sought to determine whether patients with chronic pain in primary care reported less pain, fewer psychological variables related to pain, and lower risk of medication misuse/abuse compared with those in tertiary care. Methods Data collected from patients with chronic pain in primary care settings and tertiary care settings were analyzed for significant differences using Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Fisher exact tests, and linear regression. A host of variables among populations, including demographics, self-reported pain severity, psychological variables related to pain, and risk for opioid misuse and abuse, were compared. Results Findings suggest that primary care patients with chronic pain were similar to those in tertiary care on a host of indices and reported more severe pain. There were no significant group differences for risk of medication misuse or abuse. Conclusion It seems that primary care physicians care for a complicated group of patients with chronic pain that rivals the complexity of those seen in specialized tertiary care pain management facilities. PMID:25201929

  4. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and productivity, or other measures. At minimum, clinicians will be required to demonstrate that their new systems of care and future clinical activity are in conformance with overall standards of “best practice” in health care. PMID:22640759

  5. Atipamezole Reverses Ketamine–Dexmedetomidine Anesthesia without Altering the Antinociceptive Effects of Butorphanol and Buprenorphine in Female C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izer, Jenelle M; Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    2014-01-01

    Butorphanol and buprenorphine are common analgesics used in laboratory mice. Inadvertent attenuation of the antinociceptive effects of these analgesics via the administration of an anesthetic reversal agent could result in postprocedural pain and distress, with subsequent negative effects on animal welfare, study outcomes, and regulatory compliance. This study was undertaken to determine whether atipamezole reverses ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia and alters the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. Atipamezole reliably reversed the anesthetic effects of ketamine–dexmedetomidine, and mice were ambulatory 17.4 ± 30.6 min after administration of the ?2-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Atipamezole alone had no significant effect on tail-flick latency and did not alter the antinociceptive properties of butorphanol or low-dose (0.05 mg/kg) or high-dose (0.1 mg/kg) buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. After reversal of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia, tail-flick latency at 30, 60, and 150 min after analgesic treatment differed significantly between mice treated with atipamezole alone and those given atipamezole followed by butorphanol or high-dose buprenorphine. These results suggest that the analgesic effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine are not affected by atipamezole. Buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg) administered 30 min prior to or at the time of anesthesia resulted in a greater magnitude of antinociception after antagonism of anesthesia than when given at the time of reversal. Given these results, we recommend the use of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia with buprenorphine administered either preemptively or at the time of anesthetic induction to provide a defined period of surgical anesthesia that is effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:25650975

  6. Medicines and the drug control treaties: is buprenorphine for opioid addiction at risk of being lost?

    PubMed

    Costa E Silva, J A

    2004-06-01

    Over the past century, a worldwide system for the control of drugs with abuse potential has developed through the adoption of a series of international treaties. The important multilateral conventions currently in force are the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961 (Single Convention), the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971 (Psychotropic Convention) and the United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, 1988. From the beginning, the aim of these drug control treaties has been to control the abuse and trafficking of substances with abuse potential while assuring that the availability of these drugs for medical and scientific purposes is not unduly restricted. There is activity in the World Health Organization and the International Narcotics Control Board to determine whether the international control of buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid agonist used as an analgesic and for the treatment of opioid addiction, should be changed from the Psychotropic Convention to the Single Convention. This change would result in the classification and regulation of buprenorphine as a narcotic drug rather than a psychotropic substance. Such a move is unwarranted medically and scientifically and would provoke increased controls on buprenorphine that would fundamentally disrupt the medical practice of pain management and opioid replacement therapy around the world. The negative impact of inappropriate regulatory controls when licensed medicines come under such scrutiny are described. PMID:15181649

  7. Acute Pain Management for Patients Receiving Maintenance Methadone or Buprenorphine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Daniel P.; Compton, Peggy; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2007-01-01

    More patients with opioid addiction are receiving opioid agonist therapy (OAT) with methadone and buprenorphine. As a result, physicians will more frequently encounter patients receiving OAT who develop acutely painful conditions, requiring effective treatment strategies. Undertreatment of acute pain is suboptimal medical treatment, and patients receiving long-term OAT are at particular risk. This paper acknowledges the complex interplay among addictive disease, OAT, and acute pain management and describes 4 common misconceptions resulting in suboptimal treatment of acute pain. Clinical recommendations for providing analgesia for patients with acute pain who are receiving OAT are presented. Although challenging, acute pain in patients receiving this type of therapy can effectively be managed. PMID:16418412

  8. Future advances in addiction treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herbert D. Kleber

    2005-01-01

    In the next decade, we should witness a number of treatment advances for opioids, stimulants, and cannabis derivatives. For opioids, this will include long acting, i.e., one month to one year, injectable or implants of the antagonist naltrexone, injectable or implants of the partial agonist buprenorphine, and innovative detoxification methods using buprenorphine. In addition, there should be much wider office

  9. The pharmacological treatment of opioid addiction—a clinical perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philipp Lobmaier; Michael Gossop; Helge Waal; Jorgen Bramness

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the main pharmacotherapies that are currently being used to treat opioid addiction. Treatments include\\u000a detoxification using tapered methadone, buprenorphine, adrenergic agonists such as clonidine and lofexidine, and forms of\\u000a rapid detoxification. In opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), methadone is most widely used. OMT with buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone\\u000a combination, or other opioid agonists is also discussed. The use of the

  10. Race, Managed Care, And The Quality Of Substance Abuse Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn C. Daley; Grant A. Ritter; Dominic Hodgkin; Richard H. Beinecke

    2005-01-01

    The adoption of managed behavioral health care by state Medicaid agencies has the potential to increase the quality of treatment for racial minorities by promoting access to substance abuse treatment and creating more appropriate utilization patterns. This paper examines three indicators of quality for white, Black, and Hispanic Medicaid clients who received substance abuse treatment in Massachusetts between 1992 and

  11. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  12. Protein Innovations Advance Drug Treatments, Skin Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Dan Carter carefully layered the sheets of tracing paper on the light box. On each sheet were renderings of the atomic components of an essential human protein, one whose structure had long been a mystery. With each layer Carter laid down, a never-before-seen image became clearer. Carter joined NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in 1985 and began exploring processes of protein crystal growth in space. By bouncing intense X-rays off the crystals, researchers can determine the electron densities around the thousands of atoms forming the protein molecules, unveiling their atomic structures. Cultivating crystals of sufficient quality on Earth was problematic; the microgravity conditions of space were far more accommodating. At the time, only a few hundred protein structures had been mapped, and the methods were time consuming and tedious. Carter hoped his work would help reveal the structure of human serum albumin, a major protein in the human circulatory system responsible for ferrying numerous small molecules in the blood. More was at stake than scientific curiosity. Albumin has a high affinity for most of the world s pharmaceuticals, Carter explains, and its interaction with drugs can change their safety and efficacy. When a medication enters the bloodstream a cancer chemotherapy drug, for example a majority of it can bind with albumin, leaving only a small percentage active for treatment. How a drug interacts with albumin can influence considerations like the necessary effective dosage, playing a significant role in the design and application of therapeutic measures. In spite of numerous difficulties, including having no access to microgravity following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the image Carter had hoped to see was finally clarifying. In 1988, his lab had acquired specialized X-ray and detection equipment a tipping point. Carter and his colleagues began to piece together albumin s portrait, the formation of its electron densities coalescing on the sheets of tracing paper he arranged on the light box. While space-grown crystals were ultimately not involved in the achievement, a year later, Carter says, we were on the cover of Science magazine, having determined the atomic structure of albumin.

  13. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Cerimele, Joseph M.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Saxon, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared to the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques in implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider in treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  14. Bibliotherapy as a Treatment for Depression in Primary Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth V. Naylor; David O. Antonuccio; Mark Litt; Gary E. Johnson; Daniel R. Spogen; Richard Williams; Catherine McCarthy; Marcia M. Lu; David C. Fiore; Dianne L. Higgins

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether a physician-delivered bibliotherapy prescription would compare favorably with\\u000a the prevailing usual care treatment for depression in primary care (that often involves medication) and potentially offer\\u000a an alternative. Six family physicians were trained to write and deliver prescriptions for cognitive-behavioral bibliotherapy.\\u000a Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive either usual care or a behavioral

  15. Treatment of Neurocritical Care Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sangini S; Sheth, Kevin N

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Neurologic emergencies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In part because the patient population is young, the nihilistic approach that often accompanies neurologically devastating disorders in other contexts is largely absent. A number of studies have demonstrated improved patient outcomes in the setting of aggressive care delivered by neurointensivists in a specialty-specific environment. It stands to reason that young, pregnant women who suffer from neurologically devastating disorders and who have a wide range of prognosis may also benefit from such specialized care. Close collaboration between obstetricians and neurointensivists is critical in this context. A number of unique considerations in diagnosis and management present dilemmas in the context of pregnancy, such as radiation dose from diagnostic neuroimaging, choice of pharmacotherapy for seizures, anticoagulation, and the method of delivery in the context of cerebral mass lesions and elevated intracranial pressure. Patients and their physicians are often faced with the additional challenge of balancing the relative risks and benefits of the impact of a management approach on both mother and fetus. In general, this balance tends to favor the interests of the mother, but the impact on the fetus becomes more relevant over the course of the pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. A low threshold for admission to an intensive care unit (ideally one that specializes in neurointensive care) should be used for pregnant patients. Because of the limited information regarding long-term outcomes in this population, rigid prognosis formation and early care limitations should be deferred in the immediate period. After the patient is stabilized and a plan has been charted for the remainder of the pregnancy, every effort should be made to engage patients in aggressive, urgent neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:22298283

  16. Buprenorphine and naloxone alone and in combination in opioid-dependent humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenzie L. Preston; George E. Bigelow; Ira A. Liebson

    1988-01-01

    Subjective, physiological and behavioral effects of subcutaneously administered hydromorphone (6 mg), naloxone (0.2 mg), buprenorphine (0.2 and 0.3 mg), and two buprenorphine-naloxone combinations (buprenorphine 0.2 mg plus naloxone 0.2 mg and buprenorphine 0.3 mg plus naloxone 0.2 mg) were assessed under double-blind conditions in six opioid-dependent volunteers. Physiologic measures and subject- and observer-rated behavioral responses were measured before dosing and

  17. [Treatment and subsequent care of oral implants for care-dependent patients].

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Hoeksema, A R; de Baat, C; Vissink, A

    2009-10-01

    Care-dependent people may experience problems with their dentures for which treatment with an implant-supported denture is an effective option. Furthermore, patients treated with an implant-supported denture previously, may have become dependent on care, with the result that their daily oral self-care becomes problematic. These conditions demand an individual approach. In the process of deciding about treatment, the dentist has to ask himself 6 questions. The questions have to do with the benefits and effectiveness of any treatment, the individual oral healthcare programme, the cooperative abilities of the patient, the availability of voluntary and/or professional care providers, and the accessibility of good and quick professional oral healthcare service. Depending on the outcome of these considerations, the treatment may be either removing the superstructure and 'burying' the implants, improving an existing implant-supported denture or inserting implants and fabricating a new implant-supported denture. PMID:19957494

  18. ROAD TRAFFIC CRASHES AND PRESCRIBED METHADONE AND BUPRENORPHINE: A FRENCH REGISTRY-BASED CASE-

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ROAD TRAFFIC CRASHES AND PRESCRIBED METHADONE AND BUPRENORPHINE: A FRENCH REGISTRY-BASED CASE traffic crash among patients under buprenorphine or methadone has not been subject to epidemiological for a road traffic crash and the use of buprenorphine and methadone. Methods: Data from three French national

  19. CESAR FAX Buprenorphine Series March 31, 2003 to February 4, 2013

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    CESAR FAX Buprenorphine Series March 31, 2003 to February 4, 2013 (updated February 4, 2013) CESAR Research #12;CESAR is pleased to provide this compilation of CESAR FAX issues focusing on buprenorphine. While research indicates that buprenorphine is an effective drug for treating opioid dependence, we feel

  20. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  1. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  2. Health Care Equality and Parity for Treatment of Addictive Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Smith; Dorothy R. Lee; Leigh Dickerson Davidson

    2010-01-01

    Substance abuse represents a significant underlying cause of the health issues faced in the United States, which severely impacts the nation's health care system and economy. Recently enacted parity legislation mandates that benefits for addiction and mental health treatment be provided on an equal footing with those for treatment for physical health. Diversion and abuse of prescription medications is growing

  3. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 ?g/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 ?g/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

  4. Involvement of cytochrome P450 3A4 in N-dealkylation of buprenorphine in human liver microsomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christelle Iribarne; Daniel Picart; Yvonne Dréano; Jean-Pierre Bail; François Berthou

    1997-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a long acting analgesic of the opiate family. Recently, it has been proposed for the opioid dependency treatment at a large scale. The drug is extensively metabolized by the hepatic cytochrome P450 in man, yielding a N-dealkylated metabolite, norbuprenorphine. The specific forms of P450 involved in this oxidative N-demethylation were examined in a panel of 18 human liver

  5. Association of Race and Ethnicity With Withdrawal Symptoms, Attrition, Opioid Use, and Side-Effects During Buprenorphine Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Sherwood Brown; Carlos Tirado; Abu Minhajuddin; Maureen Hillhouse; Bryon Adinoff; Walter Ling; Geetha Doraimani; Christie Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Some studies report differences in opioid withdrawal between racial\\/ethnic groups. However, it is not known if these differences are reflected in differential treatment response. Data from National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network-003 were used to examine racial\\/ethnic differences before and during stabilization with buprenorphine. At induction, non-Hispanic Caucasians had higher objective and subjective withdrawal scores and greater

  6. Effect of ?-opioids morphine and buprenorphine on the development of adjuvant arthritis in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Walker; A. K. Chandler; J. L. Wilson; W. Binder; R. O. Day

    1996-01-01

    Objective and Design: On the basis that endogenous opioids play a role in the physiological response to inflammation, this\\u000a study tests the antiarthritic effects of a ?-opioid agonist, morphine and the partial ?-agonist, buprenorphine.\\u000a \\u000a Material: Male Lewis rats were used.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Treatment: Rats were innoculated subcutaneously with 0.05 ml of Freund's complete adjuvant (5 mg\\/ml) into the right hind paw\\u000a to

  7. Predictors of Dropout from Inpatient Opioid Detoxification with Buprenorphine: A Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Hallén, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient withdrawal treatment (detoxification) is common in opioid dependence, although dropout against medical advice often limits its outcome. This study aimed to assess baseline predictors of dropout from inpatient opioid detoxification with buprenorphine, including age, gender, current substance use, and type of postdetoxification planning. A retrospective hospital chart review was carried out for inpatient standard opioid detoxifications using buprenorphine taper, in a detoxification ward in Malmö, Sweden (N = 122). Thirty-four percent of patients (n = 42) dropped out against medical advice. In multivariate logistic regression, dropout was significantly associated with younger age (OR 0.93 [0.89–0.97]) and negatively predicted by inpatient postdetoxification plan (OR 0.41 [0.18–0.94]), thus favouring an inpatient plan as opposed to outpatient treatment while residing at home. Dropout was unrelated to baseline urine toxicology. In opioid detoxification, patients may benefit from a higher degree of postdetoxification planning, including transition to residential treatment, in order to increase the likelihood of a successful detoxification and treatment entry. Young opioid-dependent patients may need particular attention in the planning of detoxification. PMID:25530903

  8. [Nursing care in patients after thoracosurgical treatment especially esophageal tumor].

    PubMed

    Jarmusz, Katarzyna

    2009-05-01

    The main target of this study is to create a model of after-surgery nursing care system in patients after thoracic operations, especial patients with lungs and esophagus tumors. The main task of thoracosurgery is surgical treatment of lungs cancer which is the most common cancer in polish society. The main trigger of this cancer is smoking. In nursing the patients after the thoracosurgery operations the most important is to take care of efficient pleural drainage. This group of patients need special supervision in the early postoperative period. In the further postoperative days nursing care concentrate on mobilization and respiratory rehabilitation. Postoperative care in patient after esophagus operations simply means: continuous monitoring of vital signs, pharmacological treatment, parenteral feeding and daily nursing activities. PMID:19606730

  9. Reversibility of opioid receptor occupancy of buprenorphine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Englberger, Werner; Kögel, Babette; Friderichs, Elmar; Strassburger, Wolfgang; Germann, Tieno

    2006-03-18

    The slow association and incomplete dissociation of buprenorphine from opioid receptors observed in vitro have been suggested to reduce the accessibility of opioid receptors in vivo. If so, it might be expected that buprenorphine continues to occupy opioid receptors long after the antinociceptive activity has dissipated. To examine this hypothesis, buprenorphine (46.4 microg/kg i.v.) was administered to rats 1, 2, 4 or 8 h before isolation of their forebrain membranes and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-[D-Ala2, N-methyl-Phe4-Gly5-ol]-enkephalin ([3H]DAMGO) was determined to measure the number of mu-opioid receptor binding sites remaining. Extent and duration of the reduction of Bmax by buprenorphine (ED50 11.2 microg/kg 1 h post-application) correlated with the antinociceptive activity in the rat tail flick (ED50 16.4 microg/kg i.v. 1 h post-application). At 8 h after administration there was still residual antinociception but no further attenuation of Bmax was detectable. Thus receptor occupancy by buprenorphine does not cause impairment of mu-opioid receptor accessibility beyond the duration of its antinociceptive activity. Therefore, no impairment of antinociception in the case of an opioid switch is to be expected. PMID:16490191

  10. Buprenorphine Response as a Function of Neurogenetic Polymorphic Antecedents: Can Dopamine Genes Affect Clinical Outcomes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)?

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Jacobs, William; McLaughlin, Thomas; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a plethora of research indicating the successful treatment of opioid dependence with either buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone (Suboxone®). However, we encourage caution in long-term maintenance with these drugs, albeit, lack of any other FDA approved opioid maintenance compound to date. Our concern has been supported by severe withdrawal (even with tapering of the dosage of for example Suboxone® which is 40 times more potent than morphine) from low dose of buprenorphine (alone or with naloxone). In addition our findings of a long-term flat affect in chronic Suboxone® patients amongst other unwanted side effects including diversion and suicide attempts provides impetus to reconsider long-term utilization. However, it seems prudent to embrace genetic testing to reveal reward circuitry gene polymorphisms especially those related to dopaminergic pathways as well as opioid receptor(s) as a way of improving treatment outcomes. Understanding the interaction of reward circuitry involvement in buprenorphine effects and respective genotypes provide a novel framework to augment a patient's clinical experience and benefits during opioid replacement therapy. PMID:25664200

  11. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

  12. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

  13. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

  14. Private practitioners' documentation of outpatient psychiatric treatment: Questioning managed care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Keefe; Michael L. Hall

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates how social workers, psychologists, and psychiatrists document the treatment they provide clients to managed behavioral health care organizations. The rosters of the Register of Clinical Social Workers, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychiatric Association yielded a sample of 168 private practicing social workers, 158 psychologists, and 258 psychiatrists from across the nation. Results indicated that

  15. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  16. Developing Self-Care Practices in a Trauma Treatment Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patricia J.; Simmelink-McCleary, Jennifer; Im, Hyojin; Becher, Emily; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of self-care practices of social work students who were part of a larger study of students' experiences in a graduate course on the treatment of trauma. Consensual qualitative research methods were used to analyze 17 participant journals submitted at 4 times during the course. Findings indicated that…

  17. Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project: can Suboxone be a viable outpatient option for heroin addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Sittambalam, Charmian D.; Vij, Radhika; Ferguson, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence treatment traditionally involves methadone clinics, for which dispensing schedules can be cumbersome. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist of the mu receptor and antagonist of the kappa receptor, is a potential outpatient alternative to methadone. Funded by a grant from the State of Maryland's Community Health Resources Commission (CHRC), the Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project (BOOP) evaluates the outcome of Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) treatment on abstinence from heroin use, rates of emergency room visits and hospitalizations, legal issues, and quality of life. Methods Active heroin users were recruited between June 2007 and June 2010 and induction therapy with Suboxone was instituted during hospitalization. Once discharged, patients were followed as outpatients for maintenance treatment and counseling. Data were collected from electronic medical records, Maryland state legal records, and SF-36® Health Surveys regarding several parameters and patients were categorized according to duration of treatment with Suboxone into one of three groups: <1 month, 1–3 months, and >3 months. Results A total of 220 participants were included in the study. The age range of participants was 18–67 years with most being African American males. Eighty-three (38%) remained in the study for at least 1 month, with 37 of the 83 (45%) remaining in treatment for >3 months. Ten of the 37 (27%) never relapsed after their longest period of abstinence from heroin. During the first year after initiating treatment with Suboxone, hospitalization and emergency room visit rates for all 220 participants decreased by 45 and 23%, respectively, as compared to the year prior to starting treatment. The number of legal charges for drug possession decreased from 70 to 62. Anecdotally, the quality of life seemed to improve in those who were treated with Suboxone for longer periods of time and received regular counseling. Conclusion Overall, Suboxone is an effective treatment method for heroin addiction and is a viable outpatient therapy option. Individualized treatment plans and counseling must be implemented for maximum benefits to be seen. Retention of patients for a long duration of therapy was difficult, but for those who did remain, benefits were seen in overall health, abstinence from heroin use, cognition, and quality of life. PMID:24765257

  18. In vitro release of clomipramine HCl and buprenorphine HCl from poly adipic anhydride (PAA) and poly trimethylene carbonate (PTMC) blends.

    PubMed

    Dinarvand, Rassoul; Alimorad, Mohammed Massoud; Amanlou, Massoud; Akbari, Hamid

    2005-10-01

    Controlled drug-delivery technology is concerned with the systematic release of a pharmaceutical agent to maintain a therapeutic level of the drug in the body for modulated and/or prolonged periods of time. This may be achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a degradable polymer vehicle, which releases the agent continuously as the matrix erodes. In this study, poly trimethylene carbonate (PTMC), an aliphatic polycarbonate, and poly adipic anhydride (PAA), an aliphatic polyanhydride, were synthesized via melt condensation and ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate and adipic acid, respectively. The release of clomipramine HCl and buprenorphine HCl from discs prepared with the use of PTMC-PAA blends in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) are also described. Clomipramine HCl and buprenorphine HCl were both used as hydrophilic drug models. Theoretical treatment of the data with the Peppas model revealed that release of clomipramine HCl (5%) in devices containing 70% PTMC or more followed a Fickian diffusion model. However, the releases of buprenorphine HCl (5%) in the same devices were anomalous. For devices containing 50% and more PAA, surface erosion may play a significant role in the release of both molecules. PMID:16044413

  19. Development and GC-MS validation of a highly sensitive recombinant G6PDH-based homogeneous immunoassay for the detection of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohong; Vincent, Michael; Rodrigues, Warren; Agrawal, Alpana; Moore, Christine; Barhate, Rekha; Abolencia, E; Coulter, Cynthia; Soares, James; Zheng, Yi-Feng; Taylor, Celeste; Morjana, Nihmat

    2007-09-01

    Buprenorphine is now increasingly prescribed as an alternative to methadone for the treatment of heroin addiction. Because of its potency (dosage usages from 0.2 mg to 8 mg), the drug concentrations in body fluids are normally very low. Here, we report the first recombinant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH)-based homogeneous immunoassay (EMIT-type assay) for free buprenorphine and free norbuprenorphine in urine. The antibody used in this assay cross-reacts nearly identically with buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine and, at the same time, has less than 1% cross-reactivity with a wide range of commonly prescribed opiates, particularly those structurally related compounds such as morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine. More importantly, this assay has a low detection limit of 1 ng/mL for buprenorphine or norbuprenorphine. Further evaluation of this technique using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of authentic urine samples demonstrated that the accuracy of the assay is greater than 95%. Because this assay is designed to measure the free drugs in urine, it resulted in simplification for GC-MS or liquid chromatography-MS confirmation methods that did not require urine hydrolysis before solid-phase or liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:17725885

  20. [Home treatment--a treatment model of integrated care in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Daniel; Ruppelt, Friederike; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Treatment models like "Crisis Resolution and Hometreatment (CRHT)" or "Assertive Community Treatment" (ACT), were found to be effective, enhancing the qualitative level of treatment for patients with severe mental disorders. In Germany, these are implemented only sporadically until today, often as part of a cross-sectoral Integrated Care (IC) treatment system. We will present the implementation of an "Assertive Community Treatment" embedded into an IC-treatment model in Hamburg and discuss the 3-year-outcomes. The IC-treatment model has been designed for severe mentally ill patients with psychotic disorders. Since May 2007 the model is financed by different health insurances as a managed-care "capitation-model" and its effectiveness gets continuously evaluated. The model proved to be effective in earlier studies were compared with standard care low rates of service disengagement were found as well as significantly improved psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, satisfaction with care and adherence, while being cost effective. The rates of involuntary admissions declined to 10% in comparison to the years before. In 2011 the model was specified to the indication "first-episode adolescents and young adults in the age of 12-29" in a government-funded study "Integrated Care in Early Psychosis, ICEP Study". In this study an interdisciplinary team of child, adolescent and adult psychiatrists was implemented and since 2012 it is financed by the involved health insurances throughout an expansion of the §140 SGB V agreement. PMID:25485599

  1. Palliative care and pain treatment in the global health agenda.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life, published by the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance (WPCA) jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that every year >20 million patients need palliative care (PC) at the end of life. Six percent of these are children. According to the Atlas, in 2011, approximately 3 million patients received PC and only 1 in 10 people in need is currently receiving it. Although most PC is provided in high-income countries (HIC), almost 80% of the global need is in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Only 20 countries have PC well integrated into their health-care systems. In regards to opioids, >5 billion people (83% of the world's population) live in countries with low to nonexistent access, 250 million (4%) have moderate access, and only 460 million (7%) have adequate access. In order for PC and pain treatment strategies to be effective, they must be incorporated by governments into all levels of their health care systems. In 1990, the WHO pioneered a public health strategy to integrate PC into existing health care systems which includes four components: (1) appropriate policies, (2) adequate availability of medications, (3) education of health care workers and the public, and (4) implementation of PC services at all levels throughout the society. This topical review describes the current status of the field, and presents several initiatives by United Nations (UN) organizations and the civil society to improve access to PC and to pain treatment for patients in need. PMID:25789428

  2. Adolescent drug misuse treatment and use of medical care services.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, D K; Polen, M R; Mullooly, J P

    1995-05-01

    Research on adults has documented that use of medical services decreases after initiation of treatment for alcohol problems, but little is known about this relationship among adolescents. We studied utilization and costs of care following participation in the Adolescent Chemical Health Program (ACHP) of Kaiser Permanente, Northwest Region, in 1986-88. Three groups of adolescents (and their parents) were identified: adolescents who were assessed and initiated treatment in ACHP (n = 561), adolescents who were assessed and recommended for treatment but did not return for treatment (n = 278), and adolescents with no known substance use problems (n = 381). Medical records were reviewed for 1 year pre- and 1.5 years postassessment. After adjusting for preassessment medical visits, severity of alcohol and drug use, gender, and age, analyses suggested that substance user treatment was not associated with reduced use of medical services or costs by either adolescents or parents. PMID:7558471

  3. Buprenorphine versus methadone maintenance: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher M. Doran; Marian Shanahan; Richard P. Mattick; Robert Ali; Jason White; James Bell

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the cost-effectiveness results of a randomised controlled trial conducted in two Australian cities. The trial was designed to assess the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine versus methadone in the management of opioid dependence. The trial utilised a flexible dosing regime that was tailored to the clinical need of the patients, with high maximum doses, using the

  4. Development of an enhanced formulation for delivering sustained release of buprenorphine hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Koocheki, S.; Madaeni, S.S.; Niroomandi, P.

    2011-01-01

    To control the minimum effective dose, and reduce the number and quantity of administered potent drugs are unique features of advanced drug delivery in situ forming gel formulation. The efficacy, consistency, and increasing the application of existing injection therapies can be enhanced through optimization of controlled released systems by using FDA approved biodegradable PLGA (poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. The purpose of this study was to develop different in situ forming implant (ISFI) formulations of buprenorphine hydrochloride for post treatment of drug addicts, acute and chronic pains. The drug releases from different ISFIs membranes with and without Tween 80 were compared over a period of time. Kinetic equation followed the Korsmeyer–Peppas model, as the plots showed high linearity. The influence of this additive on polymer properties was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the membranes structure was studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data revealed that Tween 80 modified the drug release pattern using diffusion mechanism and decreased the glass transition temperature (Tg) significantly. The degree of crystallinity was decreased after phase inversion which helps the dissolution of drug from membrane. The porosity of modified membranes was in accordance with release profiles. These findings suggest four different in situ forming implant formulations which can release various dose of the buprenorphine hydrochloride in a prolonged time. Also this surfactant can be an attractive additive for modifying the release rate of drugs from PLGA-based membrane drug delivery systems. PMID:23960766

  5. Self-administered treatment in stepped-care models of depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Scogin, Forrest R; Hanson, Ashley; Welsh, Douglas

    2003-03-01

    Stepped behavioral health care models have begun to receive increased attention. Self-administered treatments deserve consideration as an element in these models for some disorders and for some consumers. Features suggesting inclusion include low cost, wide availability, and evidence-based status. We present a stepped-care model for depression inclusive of a self-administered treatment component. We also discuss cautions such as depression severity and consumer preference. Evaluation of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of this approach to depression treatment is necessary. PMID:12579549

  6. Limiting and rationing treatment in paediatric and neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Peter-Marc

    2006-12-01

    In this chapter I consider the ethical decisions surrounding the provision and limitation of treatment offered to children requiring intensive care. I focus on the processes surrounding end of life decision making and consider how the concepts of futility, burden and uncertainty should impact upon these decisions. I also examine resource allocation to children's critical care services. The discussion does not provide a structure that will solve any given situation. It does take a practical approach to the issues faced by considering why we should engage in life limiting discussions; When they should occur; Who should be involved; How they should be carried out; and where and by what means withholding or withdrawal should occur. I have drawn the discussions closer to clinical practice with the intention of making them more useful, for those engaged in direct patient care, than those focused around philosophical principles. PMID:17219942

  7. A multi-center randomized trial of buprenorphine-naloxone versus clonidine for opioid detoxification: findings from the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter Ling; Leslie Amass; Steve Shoptaw; Jeffrey J. Annon; Maureen Hillhouse; Dean Babcock; Greg Brigham; Judy Harrer; Malcolm S. Reid; Joan A. Muir; Betty J. Buchan; Debbie Orr; George Woody; Jonathan Krejci; Douglas M. Ziedonis

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: The clinical effectiveness of buprenorphine-naloxone (bup-nx) and clonidine for opioid detoxification in in-patient and out-patient community treatment programs was investigated in the first studies of the National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network.\\u000aDESIGN: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version IV (DSM IV)-diagnosed opioid-dependent individuals seeking short-term treatment were randomly assigned, in a 2 : 1 ratio favoring bup-nx,

  8. [Isoflurane-induced malignant hyperthermia during intensive-care treatment].

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, B; Turinsky, S; Schmitz, M

    2015-04-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH), an inherited myopathia varying in severity and course, is induced by halogenated anesthetic agents and depolarizing muscle relaxants. First recognized as a distinct disease entity in 1960, MH is defined as an anesthesia-related disease due to the agents by which it is triggered. Given the wide use of these preparations in prehospital emergency medicine and intensive care treatment, physicians in other disciplines may also encounter MH. PMID:25585653

  9. Predictors of outcome for short-term medically supervised opioid withdrawal during a randomized, multicenter trial of buprenorphine-naloxone and clonidine in the NIDA clinical trials network drug and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Ziedonis, Douglas M; Amass, Leslie; Steinberg, Marc; Woody, George; Krejci, Jonathan; Annon, Jeffrey J; Cohen, Allan J; Waite-O'Brien, Nancy; Stine, Susan M; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S; Brown, Lawrence S; Maslansky, Robert; Winhusen, Theresa; Babcock, Dean; Brigham, Greg; Muir, Joan; Orr, Deborah; Buchan, Betty J; Horton, Terry; Ling, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Few studies in community settings have evaluated predictors, mediators, and moderators of treatment success for medically supervised opioid withdrawal treatment. This report presents new findings about these factors from a study of 344 opioid-dependent men and women prospectively randomized to either buprenorphine-naloxone or clonidine in an open-label 13-day medically supervised withdrawal study. Subjects were either inpatient or outpatient in community treatment settings; however not randomized by treatment setting. Medication type (buprenorphine-naloxone versus clonidine) was the single best predictor of treatment retention and treatment success, regardless of treatment setting. Compared to the outpatient setting, the inpatient setting was associated with higher abstinence rates but similar retention rates when adjusting for medication type. Early opioid withdrawal severity mediated the relationship between medication type and treatment outcome with buprenorphine-naloxone being superior to clonidine at relieving early withdrawal symptoms. Inpatient subjects on clonidine with lower withdrawal scores at baseline did better than those with higher withdrawal scores; inpatient subjects receiving buprenorphine-naloxone did better with higher withdrawal scores at baseline than those with lower withdrawal scores. No relationship was found between treatment outcome and age, gender, race, education, employment, marital status, legal problems, baseline depression, or length/severity of drug use. Tobacco use was associated with worse opioid treatment outcomes. Severe baseline anxiety symptoms doubled treatment success. Medication type (buprenorphine-naloxone) was the most important predictor of positive outcome; however the paper also considers other clinical and policy implications of other results, including that inpatient setting predicted better outcomes and moderated medication outcomes. PMID:18805656

  10. Safety and efficacy of buprenorphine for analgesia in laboratory mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael; Brayton, Cory; DeTolla, Louis; Forbes-McBean, Nadine; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Zadnik, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Buprenorphine is a long-acting opiate with a high therapeutic index. The authors review the pharmacology, toxicity, analgesic effects and delivery of buprenorphine for use in laboratory mice and rats. Buprenorphine-based analgesic therapy has a substantial record of safety, and there is growing evidence of its effectiveness for treating post-operative pain. Nonetheless, more research is needed to determine optimal delivery systems and analgesic regimens for pain therapy in laboratory animals. PMID:23079917

  11. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and...

  12. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and...

  13. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and...

  14. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and...

  15. 45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and...

  16. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services. 21...Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6242 Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services....

  17. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services. 21...Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6242 Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services....

  18. 38 CFR 21.6242 - Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services. 21...Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Medical and Related Services § 21.6242 Resources for provision of medical treatment, care and services....

  19. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine hydrochloride following intramuscular and intravenous administration to American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustavsen, Kate A.; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K.; Petritz, Olivia A.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Buprenorphine was rapidly absorbed, and bioavailability was good after IM administration to American kestrels. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were > 1 ng/mL for 9 hours after both IM and IV administration. These results, in combination with those of a pharmacodynamic study, suggested that the analgesic effects of buprenorphine could last at least 6 to 9 hours in this species. Further investigations of the duration of analgesic effects, multiple-dose protocols, and potential adverse effects of buprenorphine are warranted in American kestrels and other raptors.

  20. Outreach education for integration of HIV\\/AIDS care, antiretroviral treatment, and tuberculosis care in primary care clinics in South Africa: PALSA PLUS pragmatic cluster randomised trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Merrick Zwarenstein; Lara R Fairall; Carl Lombard; Pat Mayers; Angeni Bheekie; René G English; Simon Lewin; Max O Bachmann; Eric Bateman

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether PALSA PLUS, an on-site educational outreach programme of non-didactic, case based, iterative clinical education of staff, led by a trainer, can increase access to and comprehensiveness of care for patients with HIV\\/AIDS.Design Cluster randomised trial.Setting Public primary care clinics offering HIV\\/AIDS care, antiretroviral treatment (ART), tuberculosis care, and ambulatory primary care in Free State province, South

  1. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

  2. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

  3. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

  4. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

  5. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions. PMID:24152056

  6. Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary and buprenorphine. Hepatocytes (five donors) were preincubated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (vehicle), rifampin, or nelfinavir before incubation with methadone or buprenorphine. Culture me- dia (0­60 min) was analyzed

  7. Buprenorphine: dose-related effects on cocaine and opioid use in cocaine-abusing opioid-dependent humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Schottenfeld; Juliana Pakes; Douglas M. Ziedonis; Thomas R. Kosten

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen subjects dependent on both opioids and cocaine completed an ascending and tapering schedule of buprenorphine dosing, with maintenance for 21 days at each dose of buprenorphine (4, 8, 12, 16 mg sublingual daily) during both ascending and tapering phases. Higher doses of buprenorphine led to greater reductions in opioid use: 64.7% of subjects were opioid abstinent for 3 weeks

  8. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine findings in hair during constant maintenance dosage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gisela Skopp; Anja Kniest; Joerg Haisser; Karl Mann; Derik Hermann

    2011-01-01

    It is still a matter of debate whether a positive correlation between the dose and the amount of drug in the hair exists.\\u000a Drugs such as buprenorphine (BUP) used under controlled conditions present an opportunity to prove a possible relationship.\\u000a Due to discrepant findings of BUP\\/norbuprenorphine (NBUP) ratios in hair, in vitro degradation of both analytes in diluted\\u000a acid was

  9. Smoking cessation treatment in primary care: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Hippisley-Cox, J; Coupland, C; Coleman, T; Britton, J; Barrett, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the characteristics of smokers who do and do not receive smoking cessation treatment in primary care. Design: Prospective cohort study using practices registered with the pilot QRESEARCH database. Setting: 156 550 patients aged 18 years and over from 39 general practices located within four strategic health authorities, representing the former Trent Region, UK. Subjects: Patients registered with practices between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2003 aged 18 years and over who were identified as smokers before the two year study period. Outcome: Prescription for smoking cessation treatment (nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or bupropion) in the two year study period. Variables: Age, sex, deprivation score, co-morbidity. Results: Of the 29 492 patients recorded as current smokers at the start of the study period 1892 (6.4%) were given prescriptions for smoking cessation treatment during the subsequent two years. Of these, 1378 (72.8%) were given NRT alone, 406 (21.5%) bupropion alone, and 108 (5.7%) both treatments. Smokers were more likely to receive smoking cessation treatment if they lived in the most deprived areas (odds ratio (OR) for the most relative to the least deprived fifth, adjusted for sex, age, and co-morbidity, 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26 to 1.78), and if they were aged 25–74 years compared to 18–24 years or 75 and over. Smokers with co-morbidity were also more likely to receive smoking cessation treatment. Smokers were less likely to receive smoking cessation treatment if they were male (adjusted OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.75). Conclusion: The low proportion of smokers being prescribed these products strongly suggests that a major public health opportunity to prevent smoking related illness is being missed. PMID:16046686

  10. False-positive buprenorphine by CEDIA in patients prescribed amisulpride or sulpiride.

    PubMed

    Birch, M A; Couchman, L; Pietromartire, S; Karna, T; Paton, C; McAllister, R; Marsh, A; Flanagan, R J

    2013-05-01

    Buprenorphine is a potent partial opioid agonist that is analyzed in urine to (i) monitor adherence to maintenance or detoxification therapy and (ii) detect illicit use. Buprenorphine analysis is commonly conducted on urine by immunoassay, but is subject to cross-reactivity from other drugs/drug metabolites, including morphine, codeine and dihydrocodeine. This study reports false-positive buprenorphine analysis [Thermo Fisher Scientific cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA)] in patients who denied unauthorized buprenorphine use prior to sampling, but who had been prescribed amisulpride. In two cases, confirmatory analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was negative (<0.5 µg/L) for buprenorphine and metabolites and positive for amisulpride. Although the cross-reactivity of amisulpride and sulpiride in the CEDIA buprenorphine assay is low (estimated at 0.003 and 0.002%, respectively), it remains a significant consideration given the likely high concentrations of these compounds in urine relative to the low cutoff of the buprenorphine assay. Neither amisulpride nor sulpiride was listed as potential sources of interference on the CEDIA data sheet when this work was performed. These findings highlight the importance of confirming immunoassay-positive buprenorphine results using a more selective analytical technique. PMID:23471956

  11. Pain management after lumbar spinal fusion surgery using continuous subcutaneous infusion of buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomoyuki Kawamata; Yasumitsu Sato; Yukitoshi Niiyama; Keiichi Omote; Akiyoshi Namiki

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSI) technique is a simple, inexpensive method for managing postoperative pain. We examined the analgesic effects of CSI of buprenorphine in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Methods. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups for postoperative pain management: control group (n = 17), high-dose buprenorphine group (BH group, n = 17),

  12. Brain opioid receptor adaptation and expression after prenatal exposure to buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariana M. Belcheva; Laura M. Bohn; Matthew T. Ho; Frank E. Johnson; Joseph Yanai; Susan Barron; Carmine J. Coscia

    1998-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies revealed that buprenorphine can down-regulate ? and up-regulate ?2 and ?1 opioid receptors in adult and neonatal rat brain. To assess gestational effects of buprenorphine on offspring, pregnant rats were also administered this drug and opioid receptor binding parameters (Kd and Bmax values) were measured by homologous binding assays of postnatal day 1 (P1) brain membranes.

  13. Buprenorphine added to the local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus block prolongs postoperative analgesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth D. Candido; Alon P. Winnie; Ahmed H. Ghaleb; Maher W. Fattouh; Carlo D. Franco

    2002-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Buprenorphine added to local anesthetic solutions for supraclavicular block was found to triple postoperative analgesia duration in a previous study when compared with local anesthetic block alone. That study, however, did not control for potentially confounding factors, such as the possibility that buprenorphine was affecting analgesia through intramuscular absorption or via a spinal mechanism. To specifically delineate

  14. Use of buprenorphine in pregnancy: patient management and effects on the neonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolley E. Johnson; Hendrée E. Jones; Gabriele Fischer

    2003-01-01

    It is estimated that 55–94% of infants born to opioid-dependent mothers in US will show signs of opioid withdrawal. Buprenorphine has been reported to produce little or no autonomic signs or symptoms of opioid withdrawal following abrupt termination in adults. To date, there have been 21 published reports representing approximately 15 evaluable cohorts of infants exposed to buprenorphine in utero.

  15. Evaluation of a Combined Online and in Person Training in the Use of Buprenorphine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Erik W.; Levin, Frances R.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Fiellin, David A.; Sullivan, Lynn E.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate buprenorphine training methodology, we surveyed physicians who had completed a combined online and in person buprenorphine curriculum. Of 53/70 (76%) survey respondents, 57% were psychiatrists and 40% generalists. On a scale of 1 (very poor) to 7 (superlative), the overall training rated a mean of 5.8. The online course (5.0) rated…

  16. Abuse liability of buprenorphine–naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hannu Alho; David Sinclair; Erkki Vuori; Antti Holopainen

    2007-01-01

    Buprenorphine (Subutex®) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone®) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables

  17. Comparison of buprenorphine and pethidine given intravenously on demand to relieve postoperative pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Chakravarty; W Tucker; M Rosen; M D Vickers

    1979-01-01

    In a double-blind study of on-demand intravenous analgesia buprenorphine was found to be about 600 times as potent as pethidine. The incidence of side effects was similar with both drugs. The quality of analgesia, subjectively assessed, was good with both drugs using this method of administration. Provided that its low potential for abuse is substantiated, buprenorphine appears to be a

  18. Addiction treatment centers' progress in preparing for health care reform

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is expected to significantly alter addiction treatment service delivery. Researchers designed the Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) for addiction treatment organizations to assess their readiness for the PPACA. Four-hundred twenty-seven organizations completed the HRRI throughout a three-year period, using a four-point scale to rank their readiness on 13 conditions. HRRI results completed during two different time periods (between 10/1/2010–6/30/2011 and 9/1/2011–9/30/2012) were analyzed and compared. Most respondents self-assessed as being in the early stages of preparation for 9 of the 13 conditions. Survey results showed that organizations with annual budgets <$5 million (n = 295) were less likely to be prepared for the PPACA than organizations with annual budgets >$5 million (n = 132). The HRRI results suggest that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, is not preparing adequately for health care reform; organizations that are making preparations are making only modest gains. PMID:24074851

  19. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Implications for Pharmacologic Treatment and Perioperative Care.

    PubMed

    Leedahl, David D; Vo, Phil H; Maxson, Pamela M; Lovely, Jenna K

    2012-07-13

    This review provides an update on the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and the pharmacologic considerations for perioperative care. By age 85 years, approximately 90% of men have prostate histologic characteristics consistent with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Pharmacologic treatment with an alpha(1) receptor antagonist may reduce symptoms and, when given in combination with a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, may decrease the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Transurethral resection of the prostate has been the historical standard when surgical intervention is indicated. However, recent evidence suggests that Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate may have similar efficacy with less risk of complications and with decreased catheterization time. Prostatic urological operations may have perioperative complications, including urethral bleeding, acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, urge incontinence, and venous thromboembolism. Pharmacist recommendations for the appropriate use of laxatives, antibiotics, anticoagulation, and urinary antispasmodics are key components of perioperative management. Surgical interventions improve symptoms but may have complications, providing the pharmacist an opportunity to improve perioperative care. PMID:22797835

  20. Religion, Spirituality and Health Care Treatment Decisions: The Role of Chaplains in the Australian Clinical Context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindsay B. Carey; Jeffrey Cohen

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the views of Australian health care chaplains concerning their role and involvement in patient\\/family health care treatment decisions. In general terms the findings indicated that the majority of chaplains surveyed believed that it was part of their pastoral role to help patients and their families make decisions about their health care treatment. Differences in involvement of volunteer

  1. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. 156.245 Section...156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical home that meets...

  2. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. 156.245 Section...156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical home that meets...

  3. Problem-Solving Treatment and Coping Styles in Primary Care for Minor Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Thomas E.; Hegel, Mark T.; Hull, Jay G.; Dietrich, Allen J.

    2008-01-01

    Research was undertaken to compare problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) with usual care for minor depression and to examine whether treatment effectiveness was moderated by coping style. PST-PC is a 6-session, manual-based, psychosocial skills intervention. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 academic, primary care

  4. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. 156.245 Section...156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical home that meets...

  5. Treatment of knee pain in older adults in primary care: development of an evidence-based model of care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Porcheret; K. Jordan; P. Croft

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To develop a stepped model of care for the treatment of knee pain in older adults in primary care based on recommended interventions. Methods. A systematic search was undertaken to identify interventions recommended for knee osteoarthritis or knee pain in clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. Following this, a nominal group consensus exercise was conducted with members of the Primary

  6. The Effectiveness of an Experimental Treatment when Compared to Care as Usual Depends on the Type of Care as Usual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Wiel, Nicolle M. H.; Matthys, Walter; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Maassen, Gerard H.; Lochman, John E.; van Engeland, Herman

    2007-01-01

    In psychotherapy, effectiveness of an experimental treatment often is compared to care as usual. However, little if any attention has been paid to the heterogeneity of care as usual. The authors examined the effectiveness of manualized behavior therapy on school-aged disruptive behavior disordered (DBD) children in everyday clinical practice. A…

  7. Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

  8. ER Practices Key to Helping Those Addicted to Painkillers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and treatment with buprenorphine that was continued in primary care. Patients given buprenorphine had the best outcomes and ... initiated medication and referral for ongoing treatment in primary care were twice as likely as the others to ...

  9. Antinociceptive Effects of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine in a Model of Incisional Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Helen H; Jampachairsri, Katechan; McKeon, Gabriel P; Yeomans, David C; Pacharinsak, Cholawat; Felt, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of postoperative pain is an essential component of the care and welfare of laboratory animals. A sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine (Bup-SR) has recently been introduced to the veterinary market and has been reported to provide analgesia for as long as 72 h. Using evoked mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity tests, we here evaluated the antinociceptive effects of Bup-SR in a model of incisional pain in rats. Paw withdrawal responses were obtained before and 1 through 4 d after surgery. Rats are assigned to receive Bup-SR (0.3, 1.2, or 4.5 mg/kg SC once) or buprenorphine HCl (Bup HCl, 0.05 mg/kg SC twice daily for 3 d). Responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli in the 1.2 and 4.5 Bup-SR groups did not differ from those of rats in the Bup HCl group. Thermal latency on day 3 in rats that received 0.3 mg/kg Bup-SR was significantly different from baseline, indicating that this dose effectively decreased thermal hypersensitivity for at least 48 h. Marked sedation occurred in rats in the 4.5 Bup-SR group. Our findings indicate that Bup-SR at 0.3 or 1.2 mg/kg SC is effective in minimizing hypersensitivity with minimal sedation for at least 48 h (thermal hypersensitivity) and 72 h, respectively, in the incisional pain model in rats. PMID:24602547

  10. Duration of Action of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine in 2 Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Elizabeth T; Lindstrom, Krista E; Diep, Sandy; Carbone, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Buprenorphine HCl is a common analgesic for laboratory mice undergoing surgical procedures. The documented duration of action of buprenorphine HCl is as short as 3 to 5 h in mice, potentially necessitating readministration for continued analgesia. A long-acting buprenorphine formulation would reduce handling-associated stress and provide uninterrupted analgesia. This study used the hot-plate assay to assess the antinociceptive effects of a single injection of sustained-release buprenorphine (bup-SR), buprenorphine-HCl (bup-HCl), and saline over 72 h in young adult male BALB/cJ and SWR/J mice. SWR/J mice had shorter baseline latencies than did BALB/cJ mice, possibly reflecting greater sensitivity to thermal nociception. Relative increase from baseline latency (% maximal possible effect) was significant for buprenorphine-SR at 2, 6, and 12 h compared with saline. According to results from a hot-plate assay, the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine-SR appears to last at least 12 h in male BALB/cJ and SWR/J mice. PMID:23294889

  11. Safety studies of post-surgical buprenorphine therapy for mice.

    PubMed

    Traul, Karl A; Romero, Jennell B; Brayton, Cory; DeTolla, Louis; Forbes-McBean, Nadine; Halquist, Matthew S; Karnes, H Thomas; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Tomlinson, Michael J; Tyler, Betty M; Ye, Xiaobu; Zadnik, Patricia; Guarnieri, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The use of appropriate analgesia in laboratory mice may be suboptimal because of concerns about adverse events (AE). Target Animal Safety trials were conducted to determine the safety of an extended-release suspension of buprenorphine. Drug or control suspensions were injected subcutaneously in surgically-treated BALB/c mice anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine to mimic post-operative conditions in which the compound might commonly be administered. Single and repeat five-fold (5×) excesses of the 3.25 mg/kg intended dose were used to provoke potential AE. Trials included prospective measurements of weight changes, blood chemistry, hematology, and histopathology. Clinical and histopathology findings were similar in drug-treated and control mice in a four-day trial using a single 16.25 mg/kg, 5× overdose of the drug. In a 12-day trial, which used a total buprenorphine dose of 48.75 mg/kg, clinical and histopathology values were also similar in control and drug-treated female mice. In the male arm of the repeat-overdose trial, two of eight mice died on the morning of day 12, three days following the third 16.25 mg/kg overdose administration. Histopathology did not reveal a cause of death. In a 14-month trial using a single 3.25 mg/kg dose of the drug, no significant findings identified potential AE. These findings indicate a high tolerance to an extended-release buprenorphine suspension administered post-operatively in mice with appropriate husbandry. PMID:25305141

  12. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

  13. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

  14. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

  15. Memory function in opioid-dependent patients treated with methadone or buprenorphine along with benzodiazepine: longitudinal change in comparison to healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Rapeli, Pekka; Fabritius, Carola; Kalska, Hely; Alho, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Background Opioid-substitution treatment (OST) for opioid dependence (OD) has proven effective in retaining patients in treatment and reducing illegal opiate abuse and crime. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has listed the opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine as essential drugs for OD that should be available worldwide. In many areas of the world, OD is often associated with concomitant benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence and abuse, which complicates treatment. However, possible changes in the cognitive functioning of these patients are not well-known. The present study is the first to examine longitudinal stability of memory function in OST patients with BZD use, thus providing a new tool for health policy authorities in evaluating the usefulness of OST. Methods Within the first two months (T1) and between 6–9 months (T2) after OST admission, we followed the working memory, immediate verbal memory, and memory consolidation of 13 methadone- and 15 buprenorphine- or buprenorphine/naloxone-treated patients with BZD dependence or abuse disorder. The results were compared to those of fifteen normal comparison participants. All participants also completed a self-reported memory complaint questionnaire on both occasions. Results Both patient groups performed statistically significantly worse than normal comparison participants in working memory at time points T1 and T2. In immediate verbal memory, as measured by list learning at T1, patients scored lower than normal comparison participants. Both patient groups reported significantly more subjective memory problems than normal comparison participants. Patients with more memory complaints recalled fewer items at T2 from the verbal list they had learned at T1 than those patients with fewer memory complaints. The significance of the main analyses remained nearly the same when the statistical tests were performed without buprenorphine-only patients leaving 12 patients to buprenorphine/naloxone group. Conclusion Working memory may be persistently affected in OST patients with BZD use. A high number of memory complaints among OST patients with BZD use may indicate memory consolidation impairment. These findings show that recovery of memory function in OD patients treated along with BZDs takes time, and their memory complaints may have practical relevance. PMID:19374740

  16. 78 FR 62506 - TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...bear the sole financial risk for unfortunate sequelae...non-covered treatment or surgery was directed toward...non-covered initial surgery or treatment. (i...nonadjunctive dental care or cosmetic surgery) but only if, the...

  17. Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

  18. Pregnancy Rates among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17…

  19. Economic Evaluation of Continuing Care Interventions in the Treatment of Substance Abuse: Recommendations for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovici, Ioana; French, Michael T.; McKay, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of substance abuse points to the need for continuing care after a primary phase of treatment. This article reviews the economic studies of continuing care, discusses research gaps, highlights some of the challenges of conducting rigorous economic evaluations of continuing care, and offers research guidelines and…

  20. Treatment for substance use disorder: opportunities and challenges under the affordable care act.

    PubMed

    Tai, Betty; Volkow, Nora D

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic brain disease with consequences that remain problematic years after discontinuation of use. Despite this, treatment models focus on acute interventions and are carved out from the main health care system. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) brings the opportunity to change the way substance use disorder (SUD) is treated in the United States. The treatment of SUD must adapt to a chronic care model offered in an integrated care system that screens for at-risk patients and includes services needed to prevent relapses. The partnering of the health care system with substance abuse treatment programs could dramatically expand the benefits of prevention and treatment of SUD. Expanding roles of health information technology and nonphysician workforces, such as social workers, are essential to the success of a chronic care model. PMID:23731411

  1. The Severity, Frequency, and Variety of Crime in Heroin-Dependent Prisoners Enrolled in a Buprenorphine Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Data were obtained on four dimensions of criminal activity (frequency, variety, severity, and income) from male and female prisoners (N = 200) with preincarceration heroin dependence who participated in a randomized clinical trial of buprenorphine treatment. The article examines the above-mentioned dimensions of crime and their relationships with demographic characteristics, substance use, legitimate employment, drug treatment episodes, and psychological problems. Results largely show several important similarities to results on previous prison inmate cohorts with histories of heroin addiction, although the present sample may have more of a tendency toward violent crime than earlier cohorts of heroin-dependent offenders. This study’s findings may have implications for the design of appropriate treatment interventions for prisoners with preincarceration heroin dependence that address not only substance use but also criminal activity. PMID:25392564

  2. Response, Partial Response, and Nonresponse in Primary Care Treatment of Depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia K. Corey-Lisle; Rowena Nash; Paul Stang; Ralph Swindle

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depressive disorders are one of the most common reasons for visits to primary care physicians. This study identifies factors related to poor response to depression treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in primary care settings by (1) exam- ining clinical response taking into account treatment, (2) comparing baseline characteristics and outcomes between patients classified by response, and (3)

  3. Treatment planning for carcinoma of the cervix: A patterns of care study report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Clifton Ling; Alfred R. Smith; Alexandra L. Hanlon; Jean B. Owen; Theodore J. Brickner; Gerald E. Hanks

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) of patients treated in 1988–1989 included “patterns of treatment planning” for radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A Consensus Committee of radiation physicists and oncologists established current guidelines and developed questionnaires to assess the treatment planning process (i.e., the general structure, methodology, and tools) of institutions involved in the Patterns of Care

  4. Organizational Correlates of Access to Primary Care and Mental Health Services in Drug Abuse Treatment Units

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter D. Friedmann; Jeffrey A. Alexander; Thomas A. D’Aunno

    1999-01-01

    Primary care and mental health services improve drug abuse treatment clients’ health and treatment outcomes. To examine the association between clients’ access to these services and the characteristics of drug treatment organizations, we analyze data from a national survey of the unit directors and clinical supervisors of 618 outpatient drug abuse treatment programs in 1995 (88% response rate). In multivariate

  5. Effects of buprenorphine on balance of oxidant/antioxidant system in the different ages of male rat liver.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Afshari, Reza; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Karimnezhad, Fatemeh

    2015-06-01

    Our knowledge about a link between buprenorphine and hepatotoxicity is controversial. This study evaluated the effects of buprenorphine on the liver of young, adult, and aged rats. For this reason, young, adult, and aged rats received intraperitoneally 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg buprenorphine for 30 days. The present results revealed that the normal aging was associated with a significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, and an increase in the liver lipid peroxidation, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the aged rats. This study also demonstrated that buprenorphine led to a significant increase in the serum activities of ALT, AST, and LDH as well as liver lipid peroxidation content with a decrease in the antioxidant enzymes in the liver of buprenorphine-treated aged rat versus the aged matched control animals. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that buprenorphine deteriorated oxidative damage in the aged livers. PMID:25683329

  6. A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders.

    PubMed

    Gastfriend, David R

    2014-10-01

    Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models--and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Collaborative Care for the Treatment of Depressive Disorders in Primary Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Grochtdreis, Thomas; Brettschneider, Christian; Wegener, Annemarie; Watzke, Birgit; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Härter, Martin; König, Hans-Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background For the treatment of depressive disorders, the framework of collaborative care has been recommended, which showed improved outcomes in the primary care sector. Yet, an earlier literature review did not find sufficient evidence to draw robust conclusions on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care. Purpose To systematically review studies on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care, compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care. Methods A systematic literature search in major databases was conducted. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC) list. To ensure comparability across studies, cost data were inflated to the year 2012 using country-specific gross domestic product inflation rates, and were adjusted to international dollars using purchasing power parities (PPP). Results In total, 19 cost-effectiveness analyses were reviewed. The included studies had sample sizes between n = 65 to n = 1,801, and time horizons between six to 24 months. Between 42% and 89% of the CHEC quality criteria were fulfilled, and in only one study no risk of bias was identified. A societal perspective was used by five studies. Incremental costs per depression-free day ranged from dominance to US$PPP 64.89, and incremental costs per QALY from dominance to US$PPP 874,562. Conclusion Despite our review improved the comparability of study results, cost-effectiveness of collaborative care compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care is ambiguous depending on willingness to pay. A still considerable uncertainty, due to inconsistent methodological quality and results among included studies, suggests further cost-effectiveness analyses using QALYs as effect measures and a time horizon of at least 1 year. PMID:25993034

  8. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Good For Mothers, Better for Infants Of 175 women who started a study medication, 131 continued until they gave birth. Those ... Articles of Interest NIDA Notes Distinct Challenges Affect Women’s HIV Treatment Outcomes After Jail Study Points to Individualized Therapy for Opioid Addiction Patients ...

  9. Buprenorphine dosing every 1, 2, or 3 days in opioid-dependent patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warren K. Bickel; Leslie Amass; John P. Crean; Gary J. Badger

    1999-01-01

    Rationale: Administration of double the maintenance dose of buprenorphine has been shown to permit every-other-day dosing. Whether\\u000a longer periods between dosing can be achieved is unknown. Objectives: To examine whether triple the maintenance dose can be administered every 72 h without opioid withdrawal or intoxication. Methods: Sixteen opioid-dependent outpatients each received three conditions (1) the maintenance dose of buprenorphine every

  10. Effects of managed care on programs and practices for the treatment of alcohol and drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Steenrod, S; Brisson, A; McCarty, D; Hodgkin, D

    2001-01-01

    Managed care is affecting the organization and financing of treatment services for alcohol and drug dependence. This paper examines the effects of managed care on program operations including the use of clinical protocols, the administrative burden, information systems, staffing, and program consolidation. It also reviews the effects of managed care on system performance related to employer-sponsored health plans, state employee health plans, and Medicaid and other public plans. Our review of managed care's influences on the alcohol and drug abuse treatment system finds evidence of systemic reductions in access to inpatient care and increased reliance on outpatient services. Moreover, although analyses of behavioral health carve-outs often suggest increases in the use of outpatient care, evaluations of substance abuse claims report reductions in ambulatory utilization for the treatment of alcohol and drug dependence. PMID:11449757

  11. Comparative pharmacokinetics of intravenous fentanyl and buprenorphine in healthy greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, B; Allen, P

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of two highly protein-bound, lipophilic opioid drugs. Fentanyl (10 ?g/kg) and buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) were administered intravenously (IV) to six healthy greyhound dogs (three males and three females). The doses were based on clinically administered doses for dogs. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetics were estimated with computer software. The volume of distribution (area) was larger for fentanyl (7.42 L/kg) compared to buprenorphine (3.54 L/kg). The plasma clearance of fentanyl (38.6 mL·min/kg) was faster than buprenorphine (10.3 mL·min/kg). The terminal half-life of fentanyl (2.22 h) was shorter than buprenorphine (3.96 h). Despite similar physicochemical properties including octanol-water partition coefficient and pKa, the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl and buprenorphine were not similar. Both fentanyl (84%) and buprenorphine (95-98%) are considered highly protein bound, but the differences in protein binding may contribute to the lack of similarity of pharmacokinetics in healthy dogs. PMID:24684621

  12. Antinociceptive actions of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally in the conscious rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R. M.; Olley, J. E.; Tyers, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 The antinociceptive effects of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally and subcutaneously have been compared in the conscious rat. 2 In the paw pressure test, when given subcutaneously buprenorphine 0.001-0.1 mg/kg s.c., was approximately 100 times more potent than morphine 0.1-3 mg/kg s.c., but in the hot plate test, buprenorphine 0.03-3.0 mg/kg s.c., produced a bell-shaped dose-response curve of low maximum effect and was about equipotent with morphine 0.03-3 mg/kg s.c. 3 When given intrathecally buprenorphine 10 micrograms and morphine, 10-60 micrograms, were approximately equipotent in both paw pressure and hot plate tests. Furthermore, morphine produced these effects at 1/25th of the minimum effective parenteral dose while the dose of buprenorphine exceeded the parenteral dose. 4 It is concluded that the predominant site of the analgesic action of buprenorphine is supraspinal. The significance of these findings in relation to the role of spinal opiate receptors is discussed. PMID:6687818

  13. Medication-assisted treatment of opioid use disorder: review of the evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Connery, Hilary Smith

    2015-01-01

    Medication-assisted treatment of opioid use disorder with physiological dependence at least doubles rates of opioid-abstinence outcomes in randomized, controlled trials comparing psychosocial treatment of opioid use disorder with medication versus with placebo or no medication. This article reviews the current evidence for medication-assisted treatment of opioid use disorder and also presents clinical practice imperatives for preventing opioid overdose and the transmission of infectious disease. The evidence strongly supports the use of agonist therapies to reduce opioid use and to retain patients in treatment, with methadone maintenance remaining the gold standard of care. Combined buprenorphine/naloxone, however, also demonstrates significant efficacy and favorable safety and tolerability in multiple populations, including youth and prescription opioid-dependent individuals, as does buprenorphine monotherapy in pregnant women. The evidence for antagonist therapies is weak. Oral naltrexone demonstrates poor adherence and increased mortality rates, although the early evidence looks more favorable for extended-release naltrexone, which has the advantages that it is not subject to misuse or diversion and that it does not present a risk of overdose on its own. Two perspectives-individualized treatment and population management-are presented for selecting among the three available Food and Drug Administration-approved maintenance therapies for opioid use disorder. The currently unmet challenges in treating opioid use disorder are discussed, as are the directions for future research. PMID:25747920

  14. Pressure ulceration and palliative care: prevention, treatment, policy and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer development and management have particular significance in palliative and end-of-life care owing to the prevalence of mobility issues and the skin changes that can occur with ageing, chronic illness, and at the end of life. Hence, it is important for nurses working in palliative care to be vigilant for pressure ulcer development and to possess knowledge relating to the prevention and management of pressure ulceration. This article considers current UK policy regarding pressure ulcers, highlighting contradictions of relevance to patients requiring palliative care. It then provides a brief overview of pressure ulcer prevention, prescription, preservation, and palliation, highlighting areas of specific consideration to pressure ulcer care within palliative care. PMID:22306714

  15. One-year mortality rates of patients receiving methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy: a nationally representative cohort study in 2694 patients.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael; Apelt, Sabine M; Lieb, Martin; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-12-01

    Mortality rates in drug-dependent patients in substitution treatment remain a matter of debate. Although several retrospective toxicological or forensic postmortem studies on this issue have been conducted, few prospective studies have addressed this problem. In a nationally representative sample of 2694 opioid dependent patients in substitution treatment either with methadone or buprenorphine at baseline were monitored over a 12-month period (response rate, 91%). A total number of 1629 (60.4%) were still in treatment after 12 months. The overall mortality rate was 1.04%. In total, 28 patients of the initial sample deceased within the 1-year follow-up period. Eleven (0.4%) of these deaths are due to a fatal intoxication. Three patients (0.1%) died of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and 3 (0.1%) committed suicide. Thirteen of these patients (4 with overdose/polyintoxication) were not in substitution treatment at the time of death. Other reasons included accidents and deaths due to other medical conditions. Only in one case the reason could not be ascertained. The mortality rate was similar in methadone as compared with buprenorphine patients. Taking into account the high comorbidity of opioid dependent patients and the severity of dependence, the mortality rate of approximately 1% confirms that maintenance treatment could be regarded as a fairly safe treatment. PMID:17110826

  16. TRICARE; coverage of care related to non-covered initial surgery or treatment. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-12-31

    This final rule revises the limitations on certain TRICARE basic program benefits. More specifically, it allows coverage for otherwise covered services and supplies required in the treatment of complications (unfortunate sequelae), as well as medically necessary and appropriate follow-on care, resulting from a non-covered incident of treatment provided pursuant to a properly granted Supplemental Health Care Program waiver. This final rule amends two provisions of the TRICARE regulations which limits coverage for the treatment of complications resulting from a non-covered incident of treatment, and which expressly excludes from coverage in the Basic Program services and supplies related to a non-covered condition or treatment. PMID:25562894

  17. Assessing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Treatment across Episodes of Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Benjamin Lê; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Carson, Nicholas; Wayne, Geoffrey Ferris; Vesper, Andrew; McGuire, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate disparities in mental health care episodes, aligning our analyses with decisions to start or drop treatment, and choices made during treatment. Study DesignWe analyzed whites, blacks, and Latinos with probable mental illness from Panels 9–13 of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, assessing disparities at the beginning, middle, and end of episodes of care (initiation, adequate care, having an episode with only psychotropic drug fills, intensity of care, the mixture of primary care provider (PCP) and specialist visits, use of acute psychiatric care, and termination). FindingsCompared with whites, blacks and Latinos had less initiation and adequacy of care. Black and Latino episodes were shorter and had fewer psychotropic drug fills. Black episodes had a greater proportion of specialist visits and Latino episodes had a greater proportion of PCP visits. Blacks were more likely to have an episode with acute psychiatric care. ConclusionsDisparities in adequate care were driven by initiation disparities, reinforcing the need for policies that improve access. Many episodes were characterized only by psychotropic drug fills, suggesting inadequate medication guidance. Blacks’ higher rate of specialist use contradicts previous studies and deserves future investigation. Blacks’ greater acute mental health care use raises concerns over monitoring of their treatment. PMID:23855750

  18. Differences in risk factors and adjustment for male and female delinquents in treatment foster care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Chamberlain; John B. Reid

    1994-01-01

    Differences by gender in the presence of risk factors, patterns of previous delinquency, and response to treatment were examined for a sample of 88 adolescents who were placed in Treatment Foster Care. Females were found to have fewer foster parent-reported problem behaviors than their male counterparts during the first month of treatment. By month 6, problem behavior levels for males

  19. Antiretroviral HIV treatment and care for injecting drug users: an evidence-based overview

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 COMMENTARY Antiretroviral HIV treatment and care for injecting drug users: an evidence the advent of highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). The overall benefit from antiretroviral HIV treatment has, however, been lesser in HIV-infected IDUs than in other patient groups (e.g. men who have sex

  20. Evaluation of medetomidine, ketamine and buprenorphine for neutering feral cats.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kelly A; Robertson, Sheilah A; Levy, Julie K; Isaza, Natalie M

    2011-12-01

    A combination of medetomidine (M, 100 ?g/kg), ketamine (K, 10 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (B, 10 ?g/kg), administered by intramuscular injection, was evaluated for spaying and castration (neutering) of feral cats (n = 101). Eleven animals (11%) required supplemental anesthesia (isoflurane by mask) to maintain an adequate plane of surgical anesthesia. Atipamezole (A, 125 ?g/kg) was administered subcutaneously at the completion of surgery. All cats recovered from surgery and were released the following day. A hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) value of < 95% was recorded at least once during anesthesia in all cats. This MKB combination can be used in a feral cat sterilization clinic, but isoflurane supplementation may be necessary. Further research is indicated to determine the clinical significance of the low SpO(2) values associated with this anesthetic regimen. PMID:21885310

  1. Illicit Use of Buprenorphine in a Community Sample of Young Adult Non-Medical Users of Pharmaceutical Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Daniulaityte, Raminta; Falck, Russel; Carlson, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing evidence about illicit use of buprenorphine in the U.S. The study aims to: 1) identify prevalence and predictors of illicit buprenorphine use in a community sample of 396 young adult (18-23 years old) non-medical users of pharmaceutical opioids; 2) describe knowledge, attitudes and behaviors linked to illicit buprenorphine use as reported by a qualitative sub-sample (n=51). METHODS Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Qualitative interview participants were selected from the larger sample. The sample (n=396) was 54% male and 50% white; 7.8% reported lifetime illicit use of buprenorphine. RESULTS Logistic regression analysis results indicate that white ethnicity, intranasal inhalation of pharmaceutical opioids, symptoms of opioid dependence, and a greater number of pharmaceutical opioids used in lifetime were statistically significant predictors of illicit buprenorphine use. Qualitative interviews revealed that buprenorphine was more commonly used by more experienced users who were introduced to it by their “junkie friends.” Those who used buprenorphine to self-medicate withdrawal referred to it as a “miracle pill.” When used to get high, reported experiences ranged from “the best high ever” to “puking for days.” Participants reported using buprenorphine/naloxone orally or by intranasal inhalation. Injection of buprenorphine without naloxone was also reported. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that illicit buprenorphine use is gaining ground primarily among whites and those who are more advanced in their drug use careers. Continued monitoring is needed to better understand evolving patterns and trends of illicit buprenorphine use. PMID:22036303

  2. Comparative Trial to Study the Effectiveness of Clonidine Hydrochloride and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Opioid Withdrawal – A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Abbas, Zaffar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of opioid addiction has alarmingly increased over the recent years. In South Asian region alone there are more than 10 million opioid abusers amounting to 2% of world population. Detoxification remains to be the first step for the successful treatment of opioid addiction. The present study was carried out to compare the relative efficacy and safety of buprenorphine –naloxone and clonidine hydrochloride in the detoxification of opioid-dependents. Materials and Methods: Present trial was conducted at De- addiction centre of Institute of Mental and Neurosciences (IMNS), GMC Srinagar. Fifty four (54) treatment seeking subjects, 15-50 years of age, fulfilling DSM-1V TR (American Psychiatric association`s Mental Disorders-1V text revision) criteria for opioid dependence were included and randomized into two groups. The groups received either clonidine hydrochloride (Group A) or buprenorphine- naloxone (Bup-Nax) (Group B) for the duration of 10 days. The efficacy of the two drugs in controlling the opioid withdrawal was evaluated by Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) and their effect on the desire for the abused substance was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The safety of the two drugs was measured by taking the side effect profile of the two compared drugs into consideration. Results: There was significant difference of COWS-score between the two groups which was evident from day 3 (14.85 ± 3.43 vs. 11.67 ± 2.40, p<0.005) and continued till day 6 (2.56 ± 1.40 vs. 0.30 ± 0.61, p<0.005), for Group A and group B respectively. The effect of two drugs in controlling the craving for the abused substance also showed significant difference from day 2 (66.30 ± 10.80 vs. 47.40 ± 12.90, p<0.005) till day 5 (7.78 ± 6.41 vs. 1.85 ± 6.22, p<0.005), for Group A and Group B respectively. Conclusion: Administration of buprenorphine-naloxone was more efficient in reducing the signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal and in controlling the craving for the abused substance during the first few days of detoxification. PMID:25738001

  3. Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Methadone Effects on Laboratory Indices of Liver Health: a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen; Thomas, Christie; Hasson, Albert; Ang, Alfonso; Doraimani, Geetha; Tasissa, Gudaye; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Leimberger, Jeff; Bruce, R. Douglas; McCarthy, John; Wiest, Katharina; McLaughlin, Paul; Bilangi, Richard; Cohen, Allan; Woody, George; Jacobs, Petra

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) and methadone (MET) are efficacious treatments for opioid dependence, although concerns about a link between BUP and drug-induced hepatitis have been raised. This study compares the effects of BUP and MET on liver health in opioid-dependent participants. METHODS This was a randomized controlled trial of 1269 opioid-dependent participants seeking treatment at 8 federally licensed opioid treatment programs and followed for up to 32 weeks between May 2006 and August 2010; 731 participants met “evaluable” criteria defined as completing 24 weeks of medication and providing at least 4 blood samples for transaminase testing. Participants were randomly assigned to receive BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Shift table analysis determined how many evaluable participants moved between categories of low and elevated transaminase levels. Predictors of moving from low to high transaminase levels were identified. RESULTS Changes in transaminase levels did not differ by medication condition. Baseline infection with hepatitis C or B was the only significant predictor of moving from low to elevated transaminase levels; 9 BUP and 15 MET participants showed extreme liver test elevations and were more likely than those without extreme elevations to have seroconverted to both hepatitis B and C during the study, or to use illicit drugs during the first 8 weeks of treatment. MET participants were retained longer in treatment than BUP participants. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated no evidence of liver damage during the initial 6 months of treatment in either condition. Physicians can prescribe either medication without major concern for liver injury. PMID:22921476

  4. Treatment of depressive disorders in primary care - protocol of a multiple treatment systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several systematic reviews have summarized the evidence for specific treatments of primary care patients suffering from depression. However, it is not possible to answer the question how the available treatment options compare with each other as review methods differ. We aim to systematically review and compare the available evidence for the effectiveness of pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments for patients with depressive disorders in primary care. Methods/Design To be included, studies have to be randomized trials comparing antidepressant medication (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), hypericum extracts, other agents) and/or psychological therapies (e.g. interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, behavioural therapy, short dynamically-oriented psychotherapy) with another active therapy, placebo or sham intervention, routine care or no treatment in primary care patients in the acute phase of a depressive episode. Main outcome measure is response after completion of acute phase treatment. Eligible studies will be identified from available systematic reviews, from searches in electronic databases (Medline, Embase and Central), trial registers, and citation tracking. Two reviewers will independently extract study data and assess the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's corresponding tool. Meta-analyses (random effects model, inverse variance weighting) will be performed for direct comparisons of single interventions and for groups of similar interventions (e.g. SSRIs vs. tricyclics) and defined time-windows (up to 3 months and above). If possible, a global analysis of the relative effectiveness of treatments will be estimated from all available direct and indirect evidence that is present in a network of treatments and comparisons. Discussion Practitioners do not only want to know whether there is evidence that a specific treatment is more effective than placebo, but also how the treatment options compare to each other. Therefore, we believe that a multiple treatment systematic review of primary-care based randomized controlled trials on the most important therapies against depression is timely. PMID:22085705

  5. Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Jaffe, Jerome H; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-02-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a ?-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N=48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs. PMID:25544740

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Sustained-Release and Transdermal Buprenorphine in Göttingen Minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Allison J; Garcia, Kelly D; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Jenkins, Gary J; Nunamaker, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The opioid buprenorphine has been shown to provide adequate postoperative analgesia in both companion and laboratory animals. However, its use is still hindered by the need for multiple parenteral injections to achieve continuous analgesia. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a pharmacokinetic analysis of 2 new long-acting formulations of buprenorphine—an injectable sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and a transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) patch—in healthy Göttingen minipigs by using liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of 0.18 mg/kg SC SRB and 30 ?g/h TDB achieved AUC0-Tlast of 221.6 ± 26.8 and 25.2 ± 3.9 ng × h/mL, respectively, compared with 9.7 ± 1.4 ng*h/mL for 0.02 mg/kg IV buprenorphine. By using a hypothesized therapeutic plasma buprenorphine concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL, therapeutic concentrations were achieved at the first study time point (5 to 30 min) and lasted an average of 8.0 ± 1.3 h for intravenous buprenorphine and 264.0 ± 32.2 h for SRB. TDB achieved therapeutic concentrations in 12 to 24 h after patch application, which lasted until the patch was removed at 72 h. The results of this study suggest that SRB and TDB are long-acting alternatives for pain management, and their use could decrease animal handling and stress, thereby simplifying pain management and improving welfare in laboratory swine. PMID:25650977

  7. 38 CFR 21.242 - Resources for provision of treatment, care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...S.C. Chapter 31 Medical and Related Services ...(a) General. VA medical centers are the primary resources for the provision of medical treatment, care...

  8. Treatment adequacy of anxiety and depressive disorders: Primary versus specialised care in Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Fernández; Josep Maria Haro; Miquel Codony; Gemma Vilagut; Montserrat Martínez-Alonso; Jaume Autonell; Luis Salvador-Carulla; José Luis Ayuso-Mateos; Miquel Angel Fullana; Jordi Alonso

    2006-01-01

    BackgroundLiterature suggests that a high proportion of the population with mental disorders remains either untreated or poorly treated. This study aimed to describe the adequacy of treatment for Anxiety and Depressive disorders in Spain, how this differs between providers (primary versus specialised care) and which factors are associated with appropriate care.

  9. Patterns of Treatment Use and Barriers to Care Among Hospitalized Adults with HIV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary A. Cavaleri; Laura Elwyn; Alicene Pilgrim; Karyn London; Debbie Indyk; Jerrold Jackson; Mary M. McKay

    2011-01-01

    This study explores utilization of treatment for HIV and barriers to care among 22 low-income adults of color who were hospitalized at an urban medical center in New York City. A semistructured interview assessing use of medical care and adherence to HIV medications, psychosocial stressors (e.g., social support, substance abuse, and mental health need), and logistical, perceptual, and environmental barriers

  10. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  11. Psychological treatment of depression in primary care: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; van Schaik, Anneke; Andersson, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Although most depressive disorders are treated in primary care and several studies have examined the effects of psychological treatment in primary care, hardly any meta-analytic research has been conducted in which the results of these studies are integrated. Aim To integrate the results of randomised controlled trials of psychological treatment of depression in adults in primary care, and to compare these results to psychological treatments in other settings. Design of study A meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of psychological treatments of adult depression in primary care. Setting Primary care. Method An existing database of studies on psychological treatments of adult depression that was built on systematic searches in PubMed, PsychINFO, EMBASE, and Dissertation Abstracts International was used. Randomised trials were included in which the effects of psychological treatments on adult primary care patients with depression were compared to a control condition. Results In the 15 included studies, the standardised mean effect size of psychological treatment versus control groups was 0.31 (95% CI = 0.17 to 0.45), which corresponds with a numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) of 5.75. Studies in which patients were referred by their GP for treatment had significantly higher effect sizes (d = 0.43; NNT = 4.20) than studies in which patients were recruited through systematic screening (d = 0.13, not significantly different from zero; NNT = 13.51). Conclusions Although the number of studies was relatively low and the quality varied, psychological treatment of depression was found to be effective in primary care, especially when GPs refer patients with depression for treatment. PMID:19192368

  12. Patients receiving opioid maintenance treatment in primary care: successful chronic hepatitis C care in a real world setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Injection drug users (IDUs) represent a significant proportion of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). The low treatment uptake among these patients results in a low treatment effectiveness and a limited public health impact. We hypothesised that a general practitioner (GP) providing an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) for addicted patients can achieve CHC treatment and sustained virological response rates (SVR) comparable to patients without drug dependency. Methods Retrospective patient record analysis of 85 CHC patients who received OMT for more than 3 months in a single-handed general practice in Zurich from January 1, 2002 through May 31, 2008. CHC treatment was based on a combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Treatment uptake and SVR (undetectable HCV RNA 6 months after end of treatment) were assessed. The association between treatment uptake and patient characteristics was investigated by multiple logistic regression. Results In 35 out of 85 CHC patients (52 males) with a median (IQR) age of 38.8 (35.0-44.4) years, antiviral therapy was started (41.2%). Median duration (IQR) of OMT in the treatment group was 55.0 (35.0-110.1) months compared to the group without therapy 24.0 (9.8-46.3) months (p<0.001). OMT duration remained a significant determinant for treatment uptake when controlled for potential confounding. SVR was achieved in 25 out of 35 patients (71%). Conclusion In addicted patients a high CHC treatment and viral eradication rate in a primary care setting in Switzerland is feasible. Opioid substitution seems a beneficial framework for CHC care in this “difficult to treat” population. PMID:23298178

  13. BUPRENORPHINE DOES NOT AFFECT ACUTE MURINE TOXOPLASMOSIS AND IS RECOMMENDED AS AN ANALGESIC IN TOXOPLASMA GONDII STUDIES IN MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groups of mice were infected with tachyzoites of the RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii treated with the opioid analgesic buprenorphine, sodium sulfadiazine, a combination of buprenorphine and sodium sulfadiazine, or nothing in the drinking water on days –1 to 12 post-infection. Mice in T. gondii infect...

  14. Benzodiazepines increase the reward effects of buprenorphine in a conditioned place preference test in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Freret, Thomas; Lange, Mathilde; Bourgine, Joanna; Coquerel, Antoine; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is widely used as a substitution treatment for opioid addiction. Some cases of abuse and misuse, especially associated with various benzodiazepines (BZDs), have been described, and a previous study has shown that BZDs increase the sedative effect of BPN and decrease its anxiogenic properties. To investigate the reward effect that may lead to the abusive combination of BPN and BZD, we studied the influence of different doses of three BZDs extensively used with BPN by drug addicts on conditioned place preference behavior in mice. BPN (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously into male mice alone or in combination with a BZD administered intraperitoneally: dipotassium clorazepate (CRZ; 1, 4, 16 mg/kg), diazepam (DAZ; 0.5, 1, 5 mg/kg), or bromazepam (BMZ; 0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). Amphetamine (8 mg/kg) was used as a reference drug. Reward effects of BPN alone or in combination were measured in a conditioned place preference paradigm using an unbiased procedure. Our results showed that groups treated with BPN associated with different doses of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, spent significantly more time in the drug-paired compartment compared to the group treated with BPN alone. Our study shows that joint consumption of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, can increase the reward properties of BPN alone in mice. These results could help to explain the use of this type of drug combination in the drug addict population. PMID:24617653

  15. Antibiotic Treatment of Acute Respiratory Infections in Acute Care Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph Gonzales; Carlos A. Camargo; Thomas MacKenzie; Ayanna S. Kersey; Judith Maselli; Sara K. Levin; Charles E. McCulloch; Joshua P. Metlay

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the patterns of antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) in acute care settings. Methods: Chart reviews were performed retrospectively on a random sample of adult ARI visits to seven Veterans Affairs (VA) and seven non-VA emergency departments (EDs) for the period of November 2003 to February 2004. Visits were limited to those discharged to home

  16. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[11C] methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain.

    PubMed

    Galynker, I; Schlyer, D J; Dewey, S L; Fowler, J S; Logan, J; Gatley, S J; MacGregor, R R; Ferrieri, R A; Holland, M J; Brodie, J; Simon, E; Wolf, A P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([11C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% +/- 2.2% and 43% +/- 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [11C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [11C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi. PMID:8782244

  17. Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

    2015-03-01

    Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals. PMID:25831576

  18. Antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine and hydromorphone in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Mans, Christoph; Lahner, Lesanna L; Baker, Bridget B; Johnson, Stephen M; Sladky, Kurt K

    2012-09-01

    Despite the frequent clinical use of buprenorphine in reptiles, its antinociceptive efficacy is not known. In a randomized, complete cross-over study, the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg s.c.) was compared with hydromorphone (0.5 mg/kg s.c.), and saline (0.9% s.c. equivalent volume) in 11 healthy red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). Additionally, buprenorphine at 0.1 and 1 mg/kg was compared with saline in six turtles. Hindlimb withdrawal latencies were measured after exposure to a focal, thermal noxious stimulus before and between 3 hr and up to 96 hr after drug administration. Buprenorphine did not significantly increase hindlimb withdrawal latencies at any time point compared with saline. In contrast, hydromorphone administration at 0.5 mg/kg significantly increased hindlimb withdrawal latencies for up to 24 hr. These results show that hydromorphone, but not buprenorphine, provides thermal antinociception in red-eared slider turtles. PMID:23082538

  19. Staff attitudes toward patient care and treatment-disposition behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan S. DeWolfe; Robert P. Barrell; Fred E. Spaner

    1969-01-01

    Treatment milieus (staff attitudes) were related to treatment-disposition behavior in 4 autonomous units with comparable staff and patients. Only measures on which units showed significant differences or ratios of these measures were analyzed. Attitudes toward rules informing patients, impact of staff attitudes, and patients' characteristics, and measures of use of restraint and seclusion trial visits, and maximum hospital benefit discharges

  20. A role for health communication in the continuum of HIV care, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Cecilia; Risher, Kathryn; Limaye, Rupali J; Van Lith, Lynn M; Gibbs, Susannah; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Celentano, David D

    2014-08-15

    : Health communication has played a pivotal role in HIV prevention efforts since the beginning of the epidemic. The recent paradigm of combination prevention, which integrates behavioral, biomedical, and structural interventions, offers new opportunities for employing health communication approaches across the entire continuum of care. We describe key areas where health communication can significantly enhance HIV treatment, care, and prevention, presenting evidence from interventions that include health communication components. These interventions rely primarily on interpersonal communication, especially individual and group counseling, both within and beyond clinical settings to enhance the uptake of and continued engagement in care. Many successful interventions mobilize a network of trained community supporters or accompagnateurs, who provide education, counseling, psychosocial support, treatment supervision, and other pragmatic assistance across the care continuum. Community treatment supporters reduce the burden on overworked medical providers, engage a wider segment of the community, and offer a more sustainable model for supporting people living with HIV. Additionally, mobile technologies are increasingly seen as promising avenues for ongoing cost-effective communication throughout the treatment cascade. A broader range of communication approaches, traditionally employed in HIV prevention efforts, that address community and sociopolitical levels through mass media, school- or workplace-based education, and entertainment modalities may be useful to interventions seeking to address the full care continuum. Future interventions would benefit from development of a framework that maps appropriate communication theories and approaches onto each step of the care continuum to evaluate the efficacy of communication components on treatment outcomes. PMID:25007201

  1. Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Claros, Joan M; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin W

    2014-10-01

    Food security and nutrition play an important role in HIV and TB care and treatment, including for improving treatment outcomes, adherence and uptake of HIV and TB care. This AIDS and behaviour supplement on "Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition" provides an overview of the current evidence and knowledge about the barriers to uptake and retention in HIV and TB treatment and care and on whether and how food and nutrition assistance can help overcome these barriers. It contains nine papers on three topic areas discussing: (a) adherence and food and nutrition security in context of HIV and TB, their definitions, measurement tools and the current situation; (b) food and nutrition insecurity as barriers to uptake and retention; and (c) food and nutrition assistance to increase uptake and retention in care and treatment. Future interventions in the areas of food security, nutrition and social protection for increasing access and adherence should be from an HIV sensitive lens, linking the continuum of care with health systems, food systems and the community, complementing existing platforms through partnerships and integrated services. PMID:25092515

  2. Job Satisfaction Differences between Primary Health Care and Treatment Sectors: An Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Shokoufe; Janati, Ali; Kousha, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the levels of job satisfaction and its predictors among primary health care and treatment sectors' staff in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Methods: This comparative study was conducted in East Azerbaijan Province,Iran in 2011. A questionnaire survey was performed on 420 staff from health care and treatment sectors using multi-stage proportional cluster sampling method. Job satisfaction was measured in five aspects namely: structural and managerial; individual; social; work-itself; environmental and welfare job satisfaction factors.The job satisfaction measurement score was normalized to fall into a range of zero to 100. Statistical analyses were performed using Friedman and independent sample t-tests. Results: Overall satisfaction in health and treatment sectors was moderate with a mean score above 50. Hospital General Practitioners reported significantly higher job satisfaction score (mean ± SD=57.34 ± 17.02) compared to health care center General Practitioners (mean ± SD= 31.74±14.99). The highest satisfaction scores belonged to individual factors both in health care sector staff (64.83±18.50) and treatment sector staff (63.55±17.44). The lowest job satisfaction was observed with environmental and welfare factors (38.47±19.86 and 36.83±19.86, respectively). Conclusion: The job satisfaction significantly differs between primary health care and treatment sectors. Based on the results, environmental and welfare factors may be targeted to improve the job satisfaction in public health care system. PMID:24688957

  3. Clinical Efficacy of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine with Meloxicam for Postoperative Analgesia in Beagle Dogs Undergoing Ovariohysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Wilsey, Amanda S; Jenkins, Gary J; Medina, Chris L

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, and plasma buprenorphine concentrations of sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and buprenorphine after subcutaneous administration in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. In a prospective, randomized, blinded design, 20 healthy adult female Beagle dogs underwent routine ovariohysterectomy and received multimodal analgesia consisting of meloxicam and one of two buprenorphine formulations. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either SRB (0.2 mg/kg SC, once) or buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d). Blinded observers assessed all dogs by using sedation scores, pain scores, temperature, HR, RR, and general wellbeing. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia with 0.02 mg/kg buprenorphine SC if the postoperative pain score exceeded a predetermined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Tukey–Kramer multiple comparison. Age, body weight, anesthetic duration, surgical duration, sevoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between groups. Dogs in both formulation groups had comparable postoperative sedation and pain scores. One dog from each formulation group had breakthrough pain requiring rescue analgesia. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations remained above a hypothesized therapeutic concentration of 0.6 ng/mL for 136.0 ± 11.3 and 10.67 ± 0.84 h for SRB and buprenorphine, respectively. Based on the results of this study, multimodal analgesic regimens consisting of meloxicam and either buprenorphine or SRB are equally efficacious in managing pain associated with an ovariohysterectomy and show comparable side effects. PMID:25255072

  4. [Management of treatment omission. Ethical problems in terminal care].

    PubMed

    Remmers, H

    1998-02-01

    Causes and courses of the diseases are subjected to a change of an increasing life expectancy on the one hand and technically highly developed medicine on the other hand. Since a growing number of elderly people is denying intensive medical interventions which serve the purpose of keeping them alive despite severe diseases, the problem of euthanasia imposes direct questions. A central role is played by the active-passive difference and its moralistic legitimacy. The difficulties of this difference are discussed below on the applicable level of ethical discussions. At the same time, knowledge of the danger is being made aware that in a maximal therapeutical orientated medical care system the desire for euthanasia may become identical with the reverse side of this care system. PMID:9553223

  5. Treatment of Osteoporosis in Long-Term Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gustavo Duque; Louise Mallet

    The major determinants of admission at longterm care institutions (LTCI) include severe disability, poor social\\/familial support,\\u000a advanced cognitive impairment, and either sequelae or end stages of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, diabetes,\\u000a and heart and renal failure. All these conditions have made elderly patients unable to cope with their life in the community\\u000a (1), requiring a higher amount of

  6. Acceptable Care? Illness Constructions, Healthworlds, and Accessible Chronic Treatment in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas—conversely—these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating “disease” to responding to “illness” by acknowledging and incorporating patients’ healthworlds in patient–provider interactions. PMID:25829509

  7. A Comparison of Treatment Outcomes Among Chronically Homelessness Adults Receiving Comprehensive Housing and Health Care Services Versus Usual Local Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvin S. MaresRobert; Robert A. Rosenheck

    Service use and 2-year treatment outcomes were compared between chronically homelessness clients receiving comprehensive housing\\u000a and healthcare services through the federal Collaborative Initiative on Chronic Homelessness (CICH) program (n = 281) a sample of similarly chronically homeless individuals receiving usual care (n = 104) in the same 5 communities. CICH clients were housed an average of 23 of 90 days (52%) more than comparison group

  8. The Effect of Screening Versus Nonscreening on Treatment Authorization in a Managed Care Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney C. Howard; Chas A. Bassos

    2000-01-01

    Many psychologists believe that screening evaluations required for treatment authorization are merely mechanisms to restrict needed patient care. Managers of behavioral health organizations, in contrast, fear that providers will misdiagnose patients to ensure reimbursement for unneeded services if not monitored. This study compared the managed behavioral health organization screening evaluation with direct therapist referral in terms of treatment eligibility determination.

  9. Palliative chemotherapy or best supportive care? A prospective study explaining patients' treatment preference and choice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C G Koedoot; R J de Haan; A M Stiggelbout; P F M Stalmeier; A de Graeff; P J M Bakker

    2003-01-01

    In palliative cancer treatment, the choice between palliative chemotherapy and best supportive care may be difficult. In the decision-making process, giving information as well as patients' values and preferences become important issues. Patients, however, may have a treatment preference before they even meet their medical oncologist. An insight into the patient's decision-making process can support clinicians having to inform their

  10. Characterizing the Passage of Personal Care Products Through Wastewater Treatment Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan Oppenheimer; Roger Stephenson; Arturo Burbano; Li Liu

    Wastewater treatment facilities use secondary treatment to stabilize the effect of discharged effluent on receiving waters by oxidizing biodegradable organic matter and reducing suspended solids and nutrients. The process was never specifically intended to remove trace quantities of xenobiotics, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceu- ticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Nevertheless, European studies performed at bench-scale or at

  11. Intraclass correlation coefficients for cluster randomized trials in care pathways and usual care: hospital treatment for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cluster randomized trials are increasingly being used in healthcare evaluation to show the effectiveness of a specific intervention. Care pathways (CPs) are becoming a popular tool to improve the quality of health-care services provided to heart failure patients. In order to perform a well-designed cluster randomized trial to demonstrate the effectiveness of Usual care (UC) and CP in heart failure treatment, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) should be available before conducting a trial to estimate the required sample size. This study reports ICCs for both demographical and outcome variables from cluster randomized trials of heart failure patients in UC and care pathways. Methods To calculate the degree of within-cluster dependence, the ICC and associated 95% confidence interval were calculated by a method based on analysis of variance. All analyses were performed in R software version 2.15.1. Results ICCs for baseline characteristics ranged from 0.025 to 0.058. The median value and interquartile range was 0.043 [0.026-0.052] for ICCs of baseline characteristics. Among baseline characteristics, the highest ICCs were found for admission by referral or admission from home (ICC?=?0.058) and the disease severity at admission (ICC?=?0.046). Corresponding ICCs for appropriateness of the stay, length of stay and hospitalization cost were 0.069, 0.063, and 0.001 in CP group and 0.203, 0.020, 0.046 for usual care, respectively. Conclusion Reported values of ICCs from present care pathway trial and UC results for some common outcomes will be helpful for estimating sample size in future clustered randomized heart failure trials, in particular for the evaluation of care pathways. PMID:24565441

  12. The Perceived Effectiveness of Continuing Care and Group Support in the Long-Term Self-Help Treatment of Obesity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet D. Latner; Albert J. Stunkard; G. Terence Wilson; Mary L. Jackson

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Obesity is increasingly considered a chronic disease requiring continuing care, but professional long-term treatment for most patients is not available. This study examined treatment recipients’ perception of the effectiveness of different components of a group self-help, continuing-care treatment program for obesity.Research Methods and Procedures: Members (n = 120) and volunteer leaders (n = 66) of a self-help, continuing-care treatment

  13. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Woody, George E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol®) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. METHODS Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25 mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. RESULTS Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. PMID:24602363

  14. HIV Risk Reduction With Buprenorphine-Naloxone or Methadone: Findings From A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Woody, George; Bruce, Douglas; Korthuis, P. Todd; Chhatre, Sumedha; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Sorensen, James; Saxon, Andrew J.; Metzger, David; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compare HIV injecting and sex risk in patients being treated with methadone (MET) or buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). Methods Secondary analysis from a study of liver enzyme changes in patients randomized to MET or BUP who completed 24-weeks of treatment and had 4 or more blood draws. The initial 1:1 randomization was changed to 2:1 (BUP: MET) after 18 months due to higher dropout in BUP. The Risk Behavior Survey (RBS) measured past 30-day HIV risk at baseline and weeks 12 and 24. Results Among 529 patients randomized to MET, 391 (74%) were completers; among 740 randomized to BUP, 340 (46%) were completers; 700 completed the RBS. There were significant reductions in injecting risk (p< 0.0008) with no differences between groups in mean number of times reported injecting heroin, speedball, other opiates, and number of injections; or percent who shared needles, did not clean shared needles with bleach, shared cookers, or engaged in front/back loading of syringes. The percent having multiple sex partners decreased equally in both groups (p<0.03). For males on BUP the sex risk composite increased; for males on MET, the sex risk decreased resulting in significant group differences over time (p<0.03). For females, there was a significant reduction in sex risk (p<0.02) with no group differences. Conclusions Among MET and BUP patients that remained in treatment, HIV injecting risk was equally and markedly reduced, however MET retained more patients. Sex risk was equally and significantly reduced among females in both treatment conditions, but increased for males on BUP, and decreased for males on MET. PMID:24751432

  15. Bipolar Disorder Detection, Ascertainment, and Treatment: Primary Care Physician Knowledge, Attitudes, and Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Paul; Frank, Cathy; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Wells, Karen; Burch, Steven; Muma, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe knowledge, attitudes, and awareness of bipolar disorder detection, ascertainment, and treatment among primary care physicians in a managed care setting. Method: Quota sampling was used to obtain 102 completed surveys assessing knowledge, attitudes, and awareness of bipolar disorder from a pool of 350 primary care physicians in a large, vertically integrated Midwestern health system from June 2004 through August 2004. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the distribution of the study results at the physician level. Results: Primary care physicians are experiencing challenges in diagnosing and treating bipolar patients, who can be difficult and time-consuming. In answering questions about major depressive episode and manic episode symptoms, at least 15% of respondents assessed most symptoms incorrectly. In analyzing 3 case studies, 9%, 11%, and 28% of respondents, respectively, answered all of the questions correctly. When asked which drugs are U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved for the maintenance treatment of adults with bipolar I disorder, no survey respondent replied correctly for all drugs listed. Importantly, our survey also indicates that these physicians are very willing to refer bipolar patients to psychiatrists for evaluation and treatment, which may help to ensure optimal care. Conclusions: Opportunities for improvement exist in diagnosing and treating patients with bipolar disorder in the primary care setting, perhaps aided by guidelines, education, and a collaborative care model with psychiatry. PMID:16912817

  16. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention. PMID:26030764

  17. The Effect of Integrating Substance Abuse Treatment With Prenatal Care on Birth Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick J Sweeney; Rachel M Schwartz; Noreen G Mattis; Betty Vohr

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To determine whether engaging pregnant substance abusers in an integrated program of prenatal care and substance abuse treatment would improve neonatal outcomes.STUDY DESIGN:The subjects were women who voluntarily enrolled in Project Link, an intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment program at Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI. A total of 87 women received substance abuse treatment in conjunction with their prenatal

  18. Stepped Care: A Promising Treatment Strategy for Mandated Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsari, Brian; Tevyaw, Tracy O'Leary

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a steady increase in the number of mandated students who have been referred to campus alcohol programs for violating campus alcohol policies. However, the severity of alcohol use and problems varies widely in mandated students, indicating that a "one size fits all" delivery of treatment may be inappropriate.…

  19. Adapting Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa Across Higher Levels of Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Anderson, Leslie K; Rockwell, Roxanne; Griffiths, Scott; Le Grange, Daniel; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence supports the use of family-based treatment (FBT) in medically stable outpatient presentations of adolescent anorexia nervosa, although there is relatively less research on adapting evidence-based treatment approaches in more intensive levels of patient care. The integration of FBT, which centrally leverages parental involvement in more intensive levels of care which typically require greater clinical management, requires careful consideration. We provide an overview of several key practical and theoretical considerations when adjusting the delivery of FBT across more intensive levels of patient care, providing clinical guidelines for the delivery of FBT while ensuring fidelity to the core theoretical tenets. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:26011736

  20. Development of a model for the detection and treatment of depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Feinman, J A; Cardillo, D; Palmer, J; Mitchel, M

    2000-01-01

    Development and implementation of a protocol for identifying and treating depressed patients in a busy, group model, HMO primary care practice is described. Initial results and barriers to implementation are reported. A simple depression screening tool was adapted and a protocol for using available primary care staff and resources was developed to efficiently integrate screening and treatment for depression into daily practice. Important components of the program included specification of the target population, adaptation of a patient self-report diagnostic and rating tool, a nurse-educator protocol for patient follow-up and telephone support, a database to track patient progress, training for primary care staff, and collaboration with specialty Behavioral Health Care. After piloting, plans were made for transferring the model to other practices. Although the protocol was seen as beneficial to the PCP, Nurses, and patients involved, the scarcity of resources in other primary care practices proved a major barrier to full implementation. PMID:10736817

  1. Ambulatory tuberculosis treatment in post-Semashko health care systems needs supportive financing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S; Asadov, D A; Bründer, A; Healy, S; Khamraev, A K; Sergeeva, N; Tinnemann, P

    2014-12-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) control strategy in the Republic of Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan, is being changed to decentralised out-patient care for most TB patients by the Government of Uzbekistan, in collaboration with the international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Ambulatory treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB from the first day of treatment has been recommended since 2011. Out-patient treatment of TB from the beginning of treatment was previously prohibited. However, the current Uzbek health financing system, which evolved from the Soviet Semashko model, offers incentives that work against the adoption of ambulatory TB treatment. Based on the 'Comprehensive TB Care for All' programme implemented in Karakalpakstan, we describe how existing policies for the allocation of health funds complicate the scale-up of ambulatory-based management of TB. PMID:25517802

  2. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Enrolling Vietnamese & Chinese Women

    Cancer.gov

    With respect to some Asian-American women, studies have addressed some of the problems inherent in undertaking primary and secondary prevention strategies for cancer. Tertiary prevention for cancer is synonymous with treatment. Cancer therapies are aimed at reducing the complications and mortality associated with known cancer, as well as preventing recurrence or relapse. For early stage breast cancer, breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective.

  3. The Importance of Supportive Care in Optimizing Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimal oncologic care of older men with prostate cancer, including effective prevention and management of the disease and treatment side effects (so-called best supportive care measures) can prolong survival, improve quality of life, and reduce depressive symptoms. In addition, the proportion of treatment discontinuations can be reduced through early reporting and management of side effects. Pharmacologic care may be offered to manage the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy and chemotherapy, which may include hot flashes, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, and diarrhea. Nonpharmacologic care (e.g., physical exercise, acupuncture, relaxation) has also been shown to benefit patients. At the Georges Pompidou European Hospital, the Program of Optimization of Chemotherapy Administration has demonstrated that improved outpatient follow-up by supportive care measures can reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-related side effects, reduce cancellations and modifications of treatment, reduce chemotherapy wastage, and reduce the length of stay in the outpatient unit. The importance of supportive care measures to optimize management and outcomes of older men with advanced prostate cancer should not be overlooked. PMID:23015682

  4. The Role of Gender in Moderating Treatment Outcome in Collaborative Care for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Kathleen; Cheney, Ann; Fortney, John; Edlund, Carrie; Han, Xiaotong; Dubbert, Patricia; Sherbourne, Cathy; Craske, Michelle; Stein, Murray; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Sullivan, Greer

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to test whether gender moderates intervention effects in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention, a 12-month, randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care (CC) intervention for anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder) in 17 primary care clinics in California, Washington, and Arkansas. Methods Participants (n = 1004) completed measures of symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory; BSI) and functioning (Mental and Physical Health Components of the Short Form-12; (MCS and PCS), and Healthy Days, Restricted Activity Days Scale) at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data on dose, engagement, and beliefs about psychotherapy were collected for patients in the CC group. Results Gender moderated the relationship between treatment and its outcome on the BSI, MCS and Healthy Days but not on the PCS. Women who received CC showed clinical improvements on the BSI, MHC, and Healthy Days that were significantly different from women in Usual Care. There were no differences for men in CC compared to Usual Care on any measures. In the intervention group, women attended more sessions of psychotherapy, completed more modules of therapy, expressed more commitment and viewed psychotherapy as more helpful than men. Conclusions These findings contribute to the broader literature on treatment heterogeneity, in particular the influence of gender, and may inform personalized care for persons seeking anxiety treatment in primary care settings. PMID:25727114

  5. Erdheim–Chester disease: from palliative care to targeted treatment

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Giorgio; Podestà, Manuel A.; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a life-threatening multi-systemic non-Langerhans histiocytosis with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of death. ECD affects the kidneys in up to 30% of cases, with fibrotic tissue deposition in the perirenal fat and renal hilum. Diagnosis is usually based on histological analysis of the pathologic tissue, which typically shows xanthogranulomatous infiltrates of foamy CD68+/CD1a- histiocytes surrounded by fibrosis. A consistent percentage of patients affected by ECD develop renal failure and hypertension as a consequence of renal artery stenosis and hydronephrosis. These conditions have been generally treated with the placement of stents and nephrostomies that frequently led to disappointing outcomes. Before the introduction of interferon-alpha (IFN?) treatment, the mortality rate was as high as 57% in the long term. Recent studies have granted new insights into the pathogenesis of ECD, which seems to bear a dual component of clonal and inflammatory disease. These advances led to use specific therapies targeting either the oncogenes (BRAFV600E) or the effectors of the immune response implicated in ECD (IL-1, TNF?). Drugs such as anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), infliximab (monoclonal antibody against TNF?) and vemurafenib (inhibitor of mutant BRAF) showed promising results in small single-centre series. Although larger trials will be needed to address the impact of these drugs on ECD prognosis and to select the most effective treatment, targeted therapies hold the premises to drastically change the outcome of this condition. PMID:25852907

  6. Understanding treatment with respect and dignity in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Aboumatar, Hanan; Forbes, Lindsay; Branyon, Emily; Carrese, Joseph; Geller, Gail; Beach, Mary Catherine; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Despite wide recognition of the importance of treating patients with respect and dignity, little is known about what constitutes treatment in this regard. The intensive care unit (ICU) is a unique setting that can pose specific threats to treatment with respect and dignity owing to the critical state of patients, stress and anxiety amongst patients and their family members, and the highly technical nature of the environment. In attempt to understand various stakeholders' perspectives of treatment with respect and dignity, patients and family members were interviewed, a wide range of health care professionals participated in focus groups, and third party observers took field notes of interactions in the ICU. This paper compares and contrasts the data that were generated using these different methods. Triangulating the data in this way contributes to a more complete and nuanced understanding of treatment with respect and dignity in the ICU. PMID:25772730

  7. Buprenorfina en el manejo de dolor por cáncer The Use of Buprenorphine to Control Cancer Pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Catalina; Soto Niño

    Opiods are the current pharmalogical remedies of choice for the control of moderate to severe pain. Subsequently, it is important to rely on a number of prescriptions and applications for these drugs, particularly in the case of oncological patients. Low molecular weight, high potency and liposolubility of buprenorphine combine with its favorable tolerance and low abuse probability. Clinical evidence reveals

  8. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual Tablets, 2 Milligrams/0.5 Milligrams and...HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8...buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg,...

  9. Opioid effects and opioid withdrawal during a 24 h dosing interval in patients maintained on buprenorphine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olga V Lopatko; Jason M White; Alice Huber; Walter Ling

    2003-01-01

    In maintenance patients methadone has been shown to produce considerable changes in opioid effects and withdrawal over the dosing interval. As a partial agonist buprenorphine may be expected to produce smaller changes, but the nature and magnitude of these changes have only been described for single doses. In the present study opioid effects and withdrawal were described in patients maintained

  10. Buprenorphine added to the local anesthetic for brachial plexus block to provide postoperative analgesia in outpatients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth D. Candido; Carlo D. Franco; Mohammad A. Khan; Alon P. Winnie; Durre S. Raja

    2001-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Over the past 10 years, several studies have suggested that the addition of certain opiates to the local anesthetic used for brachial block may provide effective, long-lasting postoperative analgesia. One of these studies indicated that the agonist-antagonist, buprenorphine, added to bupivacaine provided a longer period of postoperative analgesia than the traditional opiates, but in this study, it

  11. Effect of modern analgesic drugs (tramadol, pentazocine, and buprenorphine) on the bile duct sphincter in man

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Staritz; T Poralla; M Manns; K H Meyer Zum Büschenfelde

    1986-01-01

    Modern narcotic analgesic drugs, such as tramadol, pentazocine, and buprenorphine share similarities of molecular structure with morphine which is widely believed to cause spasm of the bile duct sphincter and so impede bile flow. This study assessed the effects of intravenously administered analgesics on bile duct sphincter motor activity measured by ERCP manometry. Ten minutes after pentazocine injection the duration

  12. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characterization of a novel sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet formulation in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andreas; Hjelmström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context Bitter taste, as well as dissolve time, presents a significant challenge for the acceptability of formulations for oral transmucosal drug delivery. Objective To characterize a novel sublingual tablet formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone with regards to pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and formulation acceptability. Methods Dry mixing techniques were employed to produce a small and fast dissolving buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet formulation, OX219 (Zubsolv®), using sucralose and menthol as sweetener and flavor to mask the bitter taste of the active ingredients. Two cross-over studies were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and acceptability of OX219 5.7/1.4?mg tablets compared to the commercially available buprenorphine/naloxone formulations Suboxone® tablets and films (8/2?mg). Results Buprenorphine exposure was equivalent in OX219 and Suboxone tablets. Sublingual dissolve times were significantly shorter for OX219 than for Suboxone tablets and were similar to Suboxone films. The OX219 formulation received significantly higher subjective ratings for taste and overall acceptability than both Suboxone formulations. OX219 was preferred over Suboxone tablet and film formulations by 77.4% and 88.9% of subjects, respectively. Conclusions A sublingual tablet formulation with an improved acceptability has been successfully developed. PMID:24099551

  13. Status of minor depression or dysthymia in primary care following a randomized controlled treatment.

    PubMed

    Oxman, T E; Barrett, J E; Sengupta, A; Katon, W; Williams, J W; Frank, E; Hegel, M

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the rates of recovery and remission from minor depression or dysthymia in primary care patients three months after completing a randomized controlled treatment trial. The subjects were primary care patients who received > or =4 treatment sessions with Problem-Solving Treatment, paroxetine, or placebo and who completed an independent assessment 3 months after the study (201 with minor depression, 229 with dysthymia). The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), semistructured questions about postintervention depression treatments, and baseline medical comorbidity, neuroticism, and social function were the primary measures. For minor depression 76% and for dysthymia 68% of subjects who were in remission at the end of the 11-week treatment trial were recovered (HAMD < or =6) three months after the treatment trial. Of patients who were not in remission at 11 weeks, for minor depression 37% and for dysthymia 31% went on to achieve remission at 25 weeks. The majority of patients chose not to use antidepressants or psychotherapy after the trial. Patients with minor depression that had greater baseline social function and lower neuroticism scores were more likely to be recovered. For patients with minor depression, these findings suggest a need for some matching of continuation and maintenance treatment to patient characteristics rather than uniform, automatic treatment recommendations. Because of the chronic, relapsing nature of dysthymia, practical improvements in encouraging effective continuation and maintenance phases of treatment are indicated. PMID:11738460

  14. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Artus, Majid; Croft, Peter; Lewis, Martyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. Methods Aims and objectives To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted about their pain in primary care. Study design Face-to-face interview-based survey. Setting Three general practices in North Staffordshire. Participants Respondents to a population pain survey who had reported having musculoskeletal pain in the survey and who had consulted about their pain in primary care in the previous 12 months as well as consenting to further research and agreeing to an interview. Information was gathered about their pain and the use of all treatments for pain, including CAM, in the previous year. Results 138 interviews were completed. 116 participants (84%) had used at least one CAM treatment for pain in the previous year. 65% were current users of CAM. The ratio of over-the-counter CAM use to care from a CAM provider was 3:2. 111 participants (80%) had used conventional treatment. 95 (69%) were using a combination of CAM and conventional treatment. Glucosamine and fish oil were the most commonly used CAM treatments (38%, 35% respectively). Most CAM treatments were scored on average as being helpful, and users indicated that they intended to use again 87% of the CAM treatments they had already used. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that most primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain have used CAM in the previous year, usually in combination with conventional treatments. The high prevalence and wide range of users experiences of benefit and harm from CAM strengthen the argument for more research into this type of medicine to quantify benefit and assess safety. The observation that most users of conventional medicine also used CAM suggests a continuing need for more investigation of effective pain management in primary care. PMID:17480212

  15. A meta-analysis of the efficacy of fibromyalgia treatment according to level of care

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Magdalena, Jesus; Magallón, Rosa; Fernández-García, Esther; Salas, Montserrat; Andrés, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this paper was to compare the efficacy of the treatments for fibromyalgia currently available in both primary care and specialised settings. Methods Published reports of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) researching pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in patients with fibromyalgia were found in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PsychInfo databases. The most recent electronic search was undertaken in June 2006. Results We identified a total of 594 articles. Based on titles and abstracts, 102 full articles were retrieved, 33 of which met the inclusion criteria. These RCTs assessed 120 treatment interventions in 7789 patients diagnosed with primary fibromyalgia. Of them, 4505 (57.8%) were included in the primary care group of our study and 3284 (42.2%) in the specialised intervention group. The sample was mostly made up of middle-aged women, who have had fibromyalgia for a mean period of 6 to 10 years. The mean effect size of the efficacy of the 120 treatment interventions in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls was 0.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39 to 0.58; p < 0.001). In the primary care group it was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.33 to 0.58) while in specialised care it was 0.53 (95% CI = 0.38 to 0.69), with no statistical significance in the differences. We analysed the efficacy of treatments by comparing primary and specialised care in the different fibromyalgia groups and there were no significant differences. The variables of the studies that affected the improvements in the efficacy of fibromyalgia treatment were low quality of the studies and a shorter duration of treatment. However, both factors were biased by the heterogeneity of the studies. Other variables that also improved outcome and were not biased by the heterogeneity of the studies, were younger age of the patients and shorter duration of the disorder. On the contrary, gender and type of treatment (pharmacological vs. psychological) did not affect outcome. Conclusion Based on this meta-analysis and despite the heterogeneity of specialised care studies and of the other limitations described in this article, treating fibromyalgia in specialised care offers no clear advantages. PMID:18627602

  16. Assessment of health-care waste treatment alternatives using fuzzy multi-criteria decision making approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehtap Dursun; E. Ertugrul Karsak; Melis Almula Karadayi

    2011-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a high priority environmental, public and health concern in developing countries. The management and treatment of HCW are gaining more attention with the rising awareness. The objective of this research is to propose multi-criteria decision making techniques for conducting an analysis based on multi-level hierarchical structure and fuzzy logic for the evaluation of HCW treatment

  17. Outcome of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in the tertiary care setting — Toronto 1992\\/93

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Wobeser; Lilian Yuan; Monika Naus; Charles K. N. Chan; Jeffrey D. Edelson; Donald E. Low; Irving E. Salit; Andrew E. Simor

    Background: Completion of treatment of active cases of tuberculosis (TB) is the most important priority of TB control programs. This study was carried out to as- sess treatment completion for active cases of pulmonary TB in Toronto. Methods: Consecutive cases of culture-proven pulmonary TB were obtained from the microbiology laboratories of 5 university-affiliated tertiary care centres in Toronto in 1992\\/93.

  18. The Impact of Substance Abuse Treatment Modality on Birth Weight and Health Care Expenditures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn Daley; Milton Argeriou; Dennis McCarty; James J. Callahan; Donald S. Shepard; Carol N. Williams

    2001-01-01

    During the 1990s, substance abuse treatment programs were developed for pregnant women to help improve infant birth outcomes, reduce maternal drug dependency and promote positive lifestyle changes. This study compared the relative impact of five treatment modalities—residential, outpatient, residential\\/outpatient, methadone and detoxification-only—on infant birth weight and perinatal health care expenditures for a sample of 445 Medicaid-eligible pregnant women who received

  19. Antipsychotic treatment adherence and associated mental health care use among individuals with bipolar disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank D. Gianfrancesco; Martha Sajatovic; Krithika Rajagopalan; Ruey-Hua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Background: Up to 48% of patients with bipolar disorder are either nonadherent or partially adherent to antipsychotic drug treatment. Medication adherence may differ by bipolar disorder subtype.Objective: This study evaluated the association between antipsychotic treatment adherence and mental health care use among individuals with bipolar disorder with predominantly manic\\/mixed symptoms or predominantly depressive symptoms.Methods: Individuals with bipolar or manic disorder

  20. A Benchmarked Feasibility Study of a Self-Hypnosis Treatment for Depression in Primary Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alastair Dobbin; Margaret Maxwell; Robert Elton

    2009-01-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of a self-help, self-hypnosis treatment in a primary-care setting in Edinburgh, UK. A partially randomized preference (PRP) study design was used, with benchmarking results to trials of CBT and counseling. Patients seeing their general practitioner for depression were offered randomization to, or their treatment preference of, either self-help (self-hypnosis) or antidepressant medication. Evaluation measures were

  1. The role of coping in depression treatment utilization for VA primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Glickman, Mark E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Mueller, Nora M.; Dell, Natalie S.; Zhao, Shibei; Eisen, Susan V.; Elwy, A. Rani

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of Veterans’ coping strategies on mental health treatment engagement following a positive screen for depression. Methods A mixed methods observational study using a mailed survey and semi structured interviews. Sample included 271 Veterans who screened positive for depression during a primary care visit at one of three VA medical centers and had not received a diagnosis of depression or prescribed antidepressants 12 months prior to screening. A subsample of 23 Veterans was interviewed. Results Logistic regression models showed that Veterans who reported more instrumental support and active coping were more likely to receive depression or other mental health treatment within three months of their positive depression screen. Those who reported emotional support or self distraction as coping strategies were less likely to receive any treatment in the same time frame. Qualitative analyses revealed that how Veterans use these and other coping strategies can impact treatment engagement in a variety of ways. Conclusions The relationship between Veterans’ use of coping strategies and treatment engagement for depression may not be readily apparent without in depth exploration. Practice implications In VA primary care clinics, nurse care managers and behavioral health providers should explore how Veterans’ methods of coping may impact treatment engagement. PMID:24315160

  2. U n i v e r s i t y o f M a r y l a n d , C o l l e g e P a r k A Weekly FAX from the Center for Substance Abuse Research

    E-print Network

    Milchberg, Howard

    CESAR as the source. Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence in HIV-Infected Persons Improves Quality of HIV Care Received A recent multisite study found that buprenorphine can effectively demonstration project also found that providing buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence improves

  3. The Associations between Structural Treatment Characteristics and Post-Treatment Functioning in Compulsory Residential Youth Care.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Karin S; Vermulst, Ad A; Veerman, Jan W; van Dam, Coleta; Engels, Rutger C M E; Scholte, Ron H J

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2005 a new compulsory residential treatment program was developed for adolescents in need for protection against themselves or their environment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to examine the association of structural treatment characteristics of this new residential treatment program (i.e., duration of treatment, discharge status, and group composition in terms of sex) with post-treatment functioning. Additionally, the number of pre-treatment risk factors was included in the model. METHOD: A total of 301 adolescents (174 boys, 127 girls), with a mean age at time of admittance of 15.50 (SD = 1.26) participated in this study. The number of risk factors was derived from treatment files of the adolescents at time of entrance. Six months after discharge, adolescents participated in a telephone interview to measure ten post-treatment variables indicating how well they were doing. RESULTS: The results showed that duration of treatment was related to post-treatment living situation, in that adolescents who were in treatment for shorter durations were more likely to live on their own after treatment. For discharge status, findings suggested that adolescents who were regularly discharged had more frequent contact with their family; however, they also showed higher alcohol consumption 6 months after treatment. Group composition was related to the girls' official offending, indicating that girls placed in mixed-sex groups showed significantly fewer official police contacts than did girls in girls-only treatment groups. CONCLUSION: Overall, structural treatment characteristics were hardly related to the adolescents' functioning after treatment. Suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:22815621

  4. Algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 3-10%. in European studies. However, the diagnosis of RLS in primary care remains low and mistreatment is common. Methods The current article reports on the considerations of RLS diagnosis and management that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored task force consisting of experts and primary care practioners. The task force sought to develop a better understanding of barriers to diagnosis in primary care practice and overcome these barriers with diagnostic and treatment algorithms. Results The barriers to diagnosis identified by the task force include the presentation of symptoms, the language used to describe them, the actual term "restless legs syndrome" and difficulties in the differential diagnosis of RLS. Conclusion The EURLSSG task force reached a consensus and agreed on the diagnostic and treatment algorithms published here. PMID:21352569

  5. Improving Care for Depression & Suicide Risk in Adolescents: Innovative Strategies for Bringing Treatments to Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on interventions and services for depression and suicide prevention among adolescents, with the goals of placing this science within the context of current changing health care environments and highlighting innovative models for improving health and mental health. We examine the: challenges and opportunities offered by new initiatives and legislation designed to transform the U.S. health and mental healthcare systems; summarize knowledge regarding the treatment of depression and suicidality/self-harm in adolescents; and describe innovative models for partnering with health systems and communities. This review demonstrates that treatment models and service delivery strategies are currently available for increasing evidence-based care, particularly for depression, and concludes with recommendations for future research and quality improvement initiatives aimed at inspiring additional efforts to put science to work, bridge science and community practice, and develop strategies for partnering with communities to improve care, mental health, and well-being among adolescents. PMID:24437432

  6. Deliberate Self-Harm among Children in Tertiary Care Residential Treatment: Prevalence and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shannon L.; Baiden, Philip; Theall-Honey, Laura; den Dunnen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined deliberate self-harm (DSH) among children in residential treatment in Canada. Most of the existing studies examined adolescent students or children from pediatric emergency departments. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of DSH among children in tertiary care residential…

  7. Staff Group Unanimity in the Care of Juveniles in Institutional Treatment: Routines, Rituals, and Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahonen, Lia; Degner, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    One prerequisite for effective institutional care is that staff agree on how to deliver treatment and have a unified view of how to achieve change--in other words, to have staff group unanimity (SGU). This study used the Correctional Program Assessment Inventory (CPAI) 2000, interviews with key staff, and observations of daily activities to…

  8. Modification of empiric antibiotic treatment in patients with pneumonia acquired in the intensive care unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Alvarez-Lerma; R. Jorda; F. Barcenilla; Arnau de Vilanova; B. Galvan; M. Palomar; J. Serra; B. Bermejo; M. Sanchez Palacios; R. Girat; F. Alvarez Lerma; Maria del Rosell; J. Martinez; J. Insausti; P. Olaechea; A. Gilabert; C. Junque; F. Palacios; R. Calvo; E. Mesalles; J. Nava; A. Santos

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency of and the reasons for changing empiric antibiotics during the treatment of pneumonia ac- quired in the intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective multicenter study of 1 year's duration. Setting: Medical and surgical ICUs in 30 hospitals all over Spain. Patients: Of a total of 16 872 patients initially enrolled into the study, 530 patients

  9. Music therapy—a complementary treatment for mechanically ventilated intensive care patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sofia Almerud; Kerstin Petersson

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether music therapy had a measurable relaxing effect on patients who were temporarily on a respirator in an intensive care unit (ICU) and after completion of respirator treatment investigate those patients’ experiences of the music therapy. In the study both quantitative and qualitative measurements were applied. Twenty patients were included using consecutive

  10. Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Michael A.

    This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…

  11. A new standard of care for forensic mental health treatment: prioritizing forensic intervention.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Katherine D

    2015-06-01

    Many forensic psychiatric settings serve unique populations who have, in addition to traditional psychiatric symptoms, diverse legal and criminogenic needs. A lack of clear treatment standards that address all aspects of forensic care can lead to inefficient or inappropriate interventions and contribute to institutional violence. PMID:25882228

  12. Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care through NIMH Funded Interventions Research Report of the National Advisory Mental Health Council's Workgroup on Clinical Trials EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The mission of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH

  13. A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

  14. Patterns of Geographic Mobility Predict Barriers to Engagement in HIV Care and Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A.; Khan, Shah Z.; Garduño, L. Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  15. Patterns of geographic mobility predict barriers to engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A; Khan, Shah Z; Garduño, L Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  16. The effect of assertive continuing care on continuing care linkage, adherence and abstinence following residential treatment for adolescents with substance use disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Godley; Susan H. Godley; Michael L. Dennis; Rodney R. Funk; Lora L. Passetti

    2007-01-01

    Aims This study compared assertive continuing care (ACC) to usual continuing care (UCC) on linkage, retention and a measure of continuing care adherence. Outcome analyses tested the direct and indirect effects of both conditions and level of adherence on early (months 1-3) and longer-term (months 4-9) abstinence. Design Two-group randomized design. Setting Eleven counties surrounding a community-based residential treatment program

  17. Telephone assessment of parents' knowledge of home-care treatments and readmission outcomes for high-risk infants and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Kun, S; Warburton, D

    1987-08-01

    Medical technology is enabling many high-risk infants and toddlers to be cared for at home. However, techniques for evaluation of home-care and discharge-planning outcomes have not been well documented. Using 60 subjects, we performed telephone assessment of home-care givers' knowledge base in basic knowledge of treatment, operation and maintenance of supplies and equipment, and vendor information, using standard questions, 48 hours following discharge from the hospital. Families giving apnea monitoring or Broviac catheter care as a single treatment scored 100% in all three areas. However, the scores for care givers providing gastrostomy care (54%, 100%, and 91%), tracheostomy care (80%, 70%, and 50%), or total parenteral nutrition (88%, 50%, and 100%) as single treatments were lower. Care givers providing multiple home-care treatments had the lowest scores (65%, 65%, and 76%). However, care givers of patients who were subsequently readmitted scored well (80%, 85%, and 85%), and none of the readmissions were due to a failure of home-care management. Telephone assessment 48 hours after discharge can be used to document home-care and discharge-planning outcomes for high-risk infants and toddlers. PMID:3631022

  18. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults Affected by Chronic Illness During the Health Care Transition From Pediatric to Adult Health Care: A Literature Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahna L. H. Pai; H. Marie Ostendorf

    2011-01-01

    As increasing numbers of children survive into adulthood more adolescents and young adults are negotiating the process of transitioning from pediatric- to adult-centered care. During this health care transition (HCT), significant declines in treatment adherence have been observed. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the rates of, factors that influence, and the impact of non-adherence on health

  19. Culture is treatment: considering pedagogy in the care of Aboriginal people.

    PubMed

    Green, Brenda L

    2010-07-01

    This article presents an overview of culture as treatment, by recognizing the impact that culture has on treatment along with the specific rituals, customs, and meanings related to healing. Attention must be given to the Aboriginal heritage, including various concepts of metaphysics, spirituality, medicines, government, oral history, and language. A pedagogical underpinning of illness and healing is better cared for through cultural messaging and learning that is related to the complex historical legacy of Aboriginal societies, and therefore, culture provides important diverse contributions to current treatment and wellness programs. PMID:20506971

  20. Incremental Benefits and Cost of Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management for Anxiety Treatment in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Joesch, Jutta M.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Sullivan, Greer; Stein, Murray B.; Craske, Michelle G.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of mental health care requires integrating successful research interventions into “real-world” practice settings. Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) is a treatment-delivery model for anxiety disorders encountered in primary care. CALM offers cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, or both; non-expert care managers assisting primary care clinicians with adherence promotion and medication optimization; computer-assisted CBT delivery; and outcome monitoring. This study describes incremental benefits, costs, and net benefits of CALM versus usual care. Methods The CALM randomized, controlled effectiveness trial was conducted in 17 primary care clinics in 4 US cities from 2006 to 2009. Of 1,062 eligible patients, 1,004 English- or Spanish-speaking patients age 18–75 years with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder with or without major depression were randomized. Anxiety-free days, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and expenditures for outpatient visits, emergency room visits, inpatient stays, and psychiatric medications were estimated based on blinded telephone assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Over 18 months, CALM participants, on average, experienced 57.1 more anxiety-free days [95% confidence interval (CI) 31–83] and $245 additional medical expenses (95% CI $ ?733 to $1,223). The mean incremental net benefit of CALM versus usual care was positive when an anxiety-free day was valued ? $4. For QALYs based on the Short-Form Health Survey-12 and the EQ-5D the mean incremental net benefit was positive at ? $5,000. Conclusions Compared with usual care, CALM provides significant benefits with modest increases in health care expenditures. PMID:22152230

  1. Daily Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing Dressing & Grooming Dental Care Medical Care Working with the Doctor Treatments Clinical Trials ... Get Tips on Personal Care Bathing Incontinence Dressing Dental Care Get Educated on Medical Care Working with the Doctor Treatments Medication Safety ...

  2. Disorder specific impact of CALM treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Bystritsky, Alexander; Rose, Raphael D.; Lang, Ariel J.; Welch, Stacy; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Golinelli, Daniela; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety disorders commonly present in primary care where evidence-based mental health treatments often are unavailable or suboptimally delivered. Objective Compare evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders to usual care in primary care, for principal and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We hypothesized superiority of CALM for principal anxiety disorders and comorbid disorders. Design A randomized, controlled trial comparing CALM intervention with Usual Care, at baseline, 6-month, 12-month and 18-month follow-ups. Setting 17 primary care clinics in the United States. Patients Referred primary care sample, 1004 patients, with principal DSM-IV diagnoses of GAD (n=549), PD (n=262), SAD (n=132), or PTSD (n=61), mean 43.7 years (SD=13.7), 70.9% female,. 80% completed 18-month follow-up. Interventions CALM (computer-guided CBT and/or pharmacotherapy recommendations) and Usual Care. Main Outcome Measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale, Panic Disorder Severity-Self Report scale, Social Phobia Inventory, and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version. Results CALM was superior to Usual Care for principal GAD at 6-month (?1.61; 95% CI = ?2.42 to ?.79), 12-month (?2.34; 95% CI = ?3.22 to ?1.45) and 18-month (?2.37; 95% CI = ?3.24 to ?1.50), PD at 6-month (?2.00; 95% CI = ?3.55 to ?0.44) and 12-month (?2.71; 95% CI = ?4.29 to ?1.14), and SAD at 6-month (?7.05; 95% CI = ?12.11 to ?2.00) outcomes. CALM was superior to Usual Care for comorbid SAD at 6-month (?4.26; 95% CI = ?7.96 to ?0.56), 12-month (?8.12, 95% CI = ?11.84 to ?4.40) and 18- month (?6.23, 95% CI = ?9.90 to ?2.55) outcomes. Effect sizes favored CALM, but were not statistically significant for other comorbid disorders. Conclusions CALM (CBT and psychotropic recommendations) is more effective than Usual Care for principal anxiety disorders, and to a lesser extent, comorbid anxiety disorders that present in primary care. PMID:21464362

  3. Outcome of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in the tertiary care setting -- Toronto 1992/93

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, W; Yuan, L; Naus, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completion of treatment of active cases of tuberculosis (TB) is the most important priority of TB control programs. This study was carried out to assess treatment completion for active cases of pulmonary TB in Toronto. METHODS: Consecutive cases of culture-proven pulmonary TB were obtained from the microbiology laboratories of 5 university-affiliated tertiary care centres in Toronto in 1992/93. A standard data-collection tool was used to abstract information from inpatient and outpatient charts. For patients who were transferred to other treatment centres or lost to follow-up, the local health unit was contacted for information about treatment completion. If incomplete information was obtained from these sources, data from the provincial Reportable Disease Information System were also reviewed. The main outcome analysed was treatment outcome, with cases classified as completed (record of treatment completion noted), transferred (patient transferred to another centre but no treatment results available), defaulted (record of defaulting in patient chart but no record of treatment completion elsewhere, or patient still receiving treatment more than 15 months after diagnosis) or dead (patient died before treatment completion). RESULTS: Of the 145 patients 84 (58%) completed treatment, 25 (17%) died, 22 (15%) defaulted and 14 (10%) were transferred. The corresponding values for the 22 patients with HIV coinfection were 6 (27%), 5 (23%), 8 (36%) and 3 (14%). Independent predictors of failure to complete treatment were injection drug use (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 22.0), HIV infection (adjusted OR 4.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.7) and adverse drug reaction (adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.9). Independent predictors of death included age more than 50 years (adjusted OR 16.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 105.1), HIV infection (adjusted OR 16.1, 95% CI 3.9 to 66.4), immunosuppressive therapy (adjusted OR 8.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 34.4) and infection with a multidrug-resistant organism (adjusted OR 30.7, 95% CI 1.5 to 623.0). INTERPRETATION: Treatment completion rates in tertiary care hospitals in Toronto in 1992/93 were below the rate recommended by the World Health Organization. Careful surveillance of treatment completion is necessary for the management of TB in metropolitan centres in Canada. PMID:10189422

  4. Lung and colorectal cancer treatment and outcomes in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Williams, Christina D; Fortune-Britt, Alice G

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the second- and third-most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. While many studies have evaluated the treatment quality and outcomes of various aspects of VA LC and CRC care, there are no known reviews synthesizing this information across studies. The purpose of this literature review was to describe LC and CRC treatment (ie, surgical and nonsurgical) and outcomes (eg, mortality, psychosocial, and other) in the VA health care system as reported in the existing peer-reviewed scientific literature. We identified potential articles through a search of published literature using the PubMed electronic database. Our search strategy identified articles containing Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords addressing veterans or veterans’ health and LC and/or CRC. We limited articles to those published in the previous 11 years (January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2013). A total of 230 articles were retrieved through the search. After applying the selection criteria, we included 74 studies (34 LC, 47 CRC, and seven both LC and CRC). VA provides a full array of treatments, often with better outcomes than other health care systems. More work is needed to assess patient-reported outcomes. PMID:25609998

  5. Prevention and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Substance use and related disorders are among the leading causes of preventable injury and illness, chronic health conditions, medical complications, disability, increased suffering, and premature death. Primary care clinicians can help patients avoid, reduce, or eliminate high-risk behaviors and negative consequences associated with substance use by integrating prevention and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment into their clinical practices. This article provides the necessary information, evidence-based recommendations, and readily available resources to help address substance use and related disorders in primary care, with special emphasis on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, and nonmedical prescription opioid medications. PMID:24830605

  6. Palliative Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  7. Improving quality of care in substance abuse treatment using five key process improvement principles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kim A.; Green, Carla A.; Ford, James H.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Gustafson, David H.; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Process and quality improvement techniques have been successfully applied in health care arenas, but efforts to institute these strategies in alcohol and drug treatment are underdeveloped. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches participating substance abuse treatment agencies to use process improvement strategies to increase client access to, and retention in, treatment. NIATx recommends five principles to promote organizational change: 1) Understand and involve the customer; 2) Fix key problems; 3) Pick a powerful change leader; 4) Get ideas from outside the organization; and 5) Use rapid-cycle testing. Using case studies, supplemented with cross-agency analyses of interview data, this paper profiles participating NIATx treatment agencies that illustrate application of each principle. Results suggest that the most successful organizations integrate and apply most, if not all, of the five principles as they develop and test change strategies. PMID:22282129

  8. Optimal control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci using preventive care and treatment of infections.

    PubMed

    Lowden, Jonathan; Miller Neilan, Rachael; Yahdi, Mohammed

    2014-03-01

    The rising prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is a major health problem in intensive care units (ICU) because of its association with increased mortality and high health care costs. We present a mathematical framework for determining cost-effective strategies for prevention and treatment of VRE in the ICU. A system of five ordinary differential equations describes the movement of ICU patients in and out of five VRE-related states. Two control variables representing the prevention and treatment of VRE are incorporated into the system. The basic reproductive number is derived and calculated for different levels of the two controls. An optimal control problem is formulated to minimize VRE-related deaths and costs associated with prevention and treatment controls over a finite time period. Numerical solutions illustrate optimal single and dual allocations of the controls for various cost values. Results show that preventive care has the greatest impact in reducing the basic reproductive number, while treatment of VRE infections has the most impact on reducing VRE-related deaths. PMID:24480735

  9. Discrimination by health care workers versus discrimination by others: countervailing forces on HCV treatment intentions.

    PubMed

    Brener, Loren; Horwitz, Robyn; von Hippel, Courtney; Bryant, Joanne; Treloar, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health burden. Despite recent advances in HCV treatment, uptake remains low, particularly amongst people who inject drugs. HCV-related stigma and discrimination are common, especially within the health care sector. This research examines a more nuanced approach for how HCV-related stigma and discrimination impacts treatment access and uptake. Based on a social identity framework, we explore whether perceived HCV-related discrimination is associated with attempts to remove the stigma of being HCV-positive via HCV treatment intentions. Based on the results of prior research it was also hypothesised that the source of discrimination (health care workers versus others), and whether the discrimination is perceived to be directed to oneself or to the HCV-positive group, will differentially impact treatment intentions. The sample consisted of 416 people living with HCV in New South Wales, Australia, who acquired HCV from injecting drugs. Participants were asked about their experiences of perceived discrimination directed towards themselves versus their HCV-positive group and perceived discrimination within the health care sector. Findings indicate that discrimination towards the self is a more powerful indicator of treatment intentions than discrimination aimed at the HCV-positive group. This finding is consistent with social identity theory suggesting that people from low status groups are motivated to change their stigmatised status when it is possible to do so. The source of the perceived discrimination also matters, however, as participants who report experiencing discrimination from health workers have lowered intentions to engage with HCV treatment in the future. In combination, the results indicate that while perceived discrimination is commonly understood to act as a barrier to treatment uptake, the relationship is actually more complex than previously conceptualised. PMID:24889417

  10. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Health Care Practices Relating to Treatment of HIV in Vellore, India

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ira B.; Wanke, Christine A.; Selvakumar, A.; John, K.R.; Isaac, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In India, little is known about health care-seeking behavior among HIV-infected individuals. Similarly, little is known about how HIV is being treated in the community, in particular by Indian Systems of Medicine (ISM) providers. Therefore, while ART implementation programs continue to expand, it is important to determine whether the knowledge, attitudes, and treatment practices of HIV-infected individuals and their health care providers are aligned with current treatment recommendations. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with persons with HIV (n?=?9 men and 17 women), family members of persons with HIV (n?=?14 men and 3 women), and ISM providers (n?=?7). Many of the patients we studied turned at some point to ISM providers because they believed that such practitioners offer a cure for HIV. ISM treatments sometimes had negative impacts including side effects, unchecked progression of an underlying illness, and financial depletion. Indian women tended to be less knowledgeable about HIV and HIV treatments, and had less access to financial and other resources, than men. Finally, most of the ISM providers reported dangerous misconceptions about HIV transmission, diagnosis, and treatment. While the existence of ART in India is potentially of great benefit to those with HIV infection, this study shows that a variety of social, cultural and governmental barriers may interfere with the effective use of these therapies. Partnerships between the allopathic and traditional/complementary health sectors in research, policy, and practice are essential in building comprehensive HIV/AIDS treatment strategies. PMID:19519232

  11. Patient self-management in the primary care treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Bachman, John; Swenson, Sara; Reardon, M Elizabeth; Miller, Doriane

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to improve primary care treatment of depression incorporate elements of the chronic illness care model, including patient self-management strategies. Case studies, focus groups and the literature suggest six key components of depression self-management programs: (1) implement behavioral change interventions, (2) plan for crisis and relapse prevention, (3) re-establish personal meaning, (4) attend to patients' experience, context and community, (5) build a patient-clinician partnership and (6) create an integrated, self-management support structure. Successful implementation of these components is facilitated by (1) the care system's collective and empathic understanding of the disease itself; (2) sufficient time; (3) adequate funding and (4) robust clinical information systems. PMID:16215659

  12. [Knowledge and competence of primary care physicians in diagnosis and treatment of nervous system diseases].

    PubMed

    Latalski, M; Gustaw, K; Be?towska, K; Wo?nica, I

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases in primary health care requires not only the specialistic knowledge but also easy access to the diagnostic and rehabilitation procedures and co-operation with neurologist. The aim of this study was to specify the quality of diagnosis and treatment of the neurological diseases in primary health care. The knowledge and practical skills of physicians working in the primary health care were analysed paralell to their possibilities of the diagnostics and rehabilitation of the patients suffering from neurological disturbances. Furthermore the quality of the co-operation with specialised neurologist was assessed. The research was carried on in 1999 using anonymous inquiry in the group of 151 primary health care (p.h.c.) physicians participating in the teaching courses in the Institute of Agricultural Medicine in Lublin. The research proved that patients with disturbances of the nervous system were frequently admitted to the primary health care outpatient departments. Among the diseases the low back pain, headaches and dizziness dominated. Most of the p.h.c. physicians used to examine patients by themselves but were sceptical about their skills. They tried to diagnose the neurological problems according to their abilities. The final effect was satisfactory, however neurological diseases treated by p.h.c. physicians were limited to the low back pain, headache, zoster and the febrile seizures. Only small percentage of patients was treated properly and in accordance with new trends in neurological art. Also the co-operation between primary health care physician and neurologist was not satisfactory. PMID:11247405

  13. Unheard voices: outcomes of tertiary care for treatment-refractory psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S. Neil; Tracy, Derek K.; Fernandez, Maria-Jesus Mateos; Nalesnik, Natasza; Dhillon, Gurbinder; Onwumere, Juliana; Prins, Anne-Marye; Schepman, Karen; Collier, Tracy; White, Thomas P.; Patel, Anita; Gaughran, Fiona; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method In up to a quarter of patients, schizophrenia is resistant to standard treatments. We undertook a naturalistic study of 153 patients treated in the tertiary referral in-patient unit of the National Psychosis Service based at the Maudsley Hospital in London. A retrospective analysis of symptoms on admission and discharge was undertaken using the OPCRIT tool, along with preliminary economic modelling of potential costs related to changes in accommodation. Results In-patient treatment demonstrated statistically significant improvements in all symptom categories in patients already identified as having schizophrenia refractory to standard secondary care. The preliminary cost analysis showed net savings to referring authorities due to changes from pre- to post-discharge accommodation. Clinical implications Despite the enormous clinical, personal and societal burden of refractory psychotic illnesses, there is insufficient information on the outcomes of specialised tertiary-level care. Our pilot data support its utility in all domains measured. PMID:25237502

  14. Intercultural misunderstandings about health care. Recall of descriptions of illness and treatment.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, M S; Colker, L

    1982-01-01

    Noncompliance with medical instructions is a major problem in health care. In areas of the world where traditional and Western systems co-exist, failure to follow medical directives has been attributed to the conscious rejection of Western medical beliefs and values by the indigenous population. This study provides evidence that the absence of shared concepts between practitioners and patients may impede even willing compliance. When patients do not possess the background knowledge, or schemata, undergirding the Western practitioners' conclusions and proposed treatment, they are unable to fully understand what is communicated because they lack the conceptual framework for integrating and holding the information presented. Matched groups of Australian Aboriginal and American women heard and recalled two stories incorporating Aboriginal and Western conceptions of illness and treatment. Analysis of the recall protocols reveals the effect of culture-based schemata on comprehension of the two stories. Implications for health care delivery are discussed. PMID:7157028

  15. Patient satisfaction with eletriptan in the acute treatment of migraine in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nett, R B; Tiseo, P J; Almas, M; Sikes, C R

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective: The efficxacy of triptans for acute migraine has been well established in clinical trials but not in primary care, where they are most commonly prescribed. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the effectiveness of eletriptan 40 mg in primary care, using a patient-weighted satisfaction scale. Methods: Eligible patients met International Headache Society criteria for migraine, with 1–6 attacks per month. Patients completed questionnaires at screening and following a single eletriptan-treated attack. Treatment satisfaction was evaluated using a six-item Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). MSQ item scores were weighted, based on the important score ratings, to yield individualised satisfaction scores. The primary end-point was the difference in weighted satisfaction scores between the patient's previous treatment and eletriptan 40 mg. Secondary end-points assessed quality of life (QOL), functioning and efficacy of treatment. Results: Of 590 patients screened, 437 completed the study. Degree (95.2%), time (88.8%) and duration (83.8%) of headache pain relief were rated as most important by patients. The mean (±SD) total satisfaction score on the MSQ was higher for eletriptan than previous therapy (2.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). The high level of satisfaction with eletriptan vs. previous treatment reflects the improvements in QOL and functioning observed, and the high headache and pain-free response rates. Conclusions: Patient-weighted satisfaction with eletriptan 40 mg was higher than with previous treatment for all items. The use of patient-weighted importance ratings of satisfaction is a promising approach for establishing effectiveness of treatment in primary care. PMID:17877653

  16. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care. A systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten M van Steenbergen-Weijenburg; Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis; Eva K Horn; Harm WJ van Marwijk; Aartjan TF Beekman; Frans FH Rutten; Leona Hakkaart-van Roijen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of collaborative care for patients with major depressive disorder in primary care has been established. Assessing its cost-effectiveness is important for deciding on implementation. This review therefore evaluates the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for major depressive disorder in primary care. METHODS: A systematic search on economic evaluations of collaborative care was conducted in Pubmed and PsychInfo. Quality

  17. Biodegradation and removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in treatment systems: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn M. Onesios; Jim T. Yu; Edward J. Bouwer

    2009-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been the focus of much recent research as concerns rise about their\\u000a occurrence in bodies of water worldwide. In an effort to characterize the risk and determine the prevalence of these micropollutants\\u000a in lakes and rivers, many researchers are examining PPCP removal from impaired water during wastewater treatment and water\\u000a recycling (soil passage)

  18. Home-care treatment of swimmer syndrome in a miniature schnauzer dog

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-A; Na, Ki-Jeong; Cho, Jong-Ki; Shin, Nam-Shik

    2013-01-01

    A 50-day-old, female miniature schnauzer dog was presented for astasia, dorsoventral flattening of the thorax, hypoplasia of hind-limb muscles, stiffness of hind-limb joints, paddling leg motion, and panting. The dog was diagnosed with swimmers syndrome. The dog recovered completely following 40 days of home-care treatment that involved environmental and nutritional management along with intensive physiotherapy. PMID:24155492

  19. SENIORS' PERCEPTIONS OF SURROGATE DECISION MAKING, MEDICAL TREATMENT AND ADVANCE HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen L. Barber

    1994-01-01

    This study examines community living , independent seniors' perceptions and views of preferences for surrogate decision makers, life-sustaining medical treatment, and advance health care directives. Data were collected through in-depth personal interviews with 26 seniors living in the Hamilton-Wentworth area of Ontario. This study looked for differences in these perceptions by socio-demographic background characteristics. Using case vignettes involving elderly patients

  20. Anticonvulsant Use in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: A Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Raphael J.; Narendran, Rajesh

    1999-01-01

    Primary care physicians may be directly or indirectly involved in the management of the bipolar patient. Bipolar affective illness is a chronic, recurrent disorder. Patients, their families and support systems, and the general public can face profound and enduring consequences if the illness is untreated or poorly treated. Consequently, increasing attention has been directed at developing treatment strategies to control symptoms associated with bipolar disorder. While lithium has been the mainstay of treatment for many years, recent investigations have demonstrated the utility of a number of anticonvulsant medications in bipolar disorder. This review will discuss the literature on anticonvulsant efficacy in bipolar disorder in light of the treatment guidelines set forth by the Bipolar Treatment Expert Consensus Panel and the American Psychiatric Association. To orient the clinician, issues related to anticonvulsant use, dosing, adverse effects, and drug interactions are also discussed. PMID:15014689

  1. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  2. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

  3. [Prevention and treatment of hypermotive syndromes in patients needing dental care. 2. Treatment].

    PubMed

    Antenucci, F; Giannoni, M; Chimenti, C; Condò, F

    1988-01-01

    In the present review the Authors describe the most common therapeutical protocols used in the treatment of the most complex cases of hyperreactivity and various therapeutical instrumental and pharmacological tools now available for the dentist to solve problems linked to hyperemotive patients undergoing odontoiatric therapy. PMID:2908541

  4. Early development of opioid?exposed infants born to mothers in buprenorphine?replacement therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara Salo; Johanna Politi; Sarimari Tupola; Zeynep Biringen; Mirjam Kalland; Erja Halmesmäki; Hanna Kahila

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine cognitive development (using the Bayley MDI) and mother–child interaction (using the Emotion Availability Scales, 3rd edition) among infants of opioid?abusing mothers. Participants were 87 dyads (15 opioid?exposed, 15 maternal depression and 57 unexposed mother–infant dyads). The study group included 15 infants (mean age=7.0 months, sd=2.8 months) of mothers who participated in buprenorphine?replacement

  5. Costing Analysis of National HIV Treatment and Care Program in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Anh Thuy; Bales, Sarah; Do, Nhan Thi; Minh Nguyen, Thu Thi; Thanh Cao, Thuy Thi; Nguyen, Long Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vietnam achieved rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), although external funds are declining sharply. To achieve and sustain universal access to HIV services, evidence-based planning is essential. To date, there had been limited HIV treatment and care cost data available in Vietnam. Methods: Cost data of outpatient and inpatient HIV care were extracted at 21 sentinel facilities (17 adult and 4 pediatric) that epitomize the national program. Step-down costing for administration costs and bottom-up resource costing for drugs, diagnostics, and labor were used. Records of 1401 adults and 527 pediatric patients were reviewed. Results: Median outpatient care costs per patient-year for pre-ART, first year ART, later year ART, and second-line ART were US $100, US $316, US $303, and US $1557 for adults; and US $171, US $387, US $320, and US $1069 for children, respectively. Median inpatient care cost per episode was US $162 for adults and US $142 for children. Non-antiretroviral (ARV) costs in adults at stand-alone facilities were 44% (first year ART) and 24% (later year ART) higher than those at integrated facilities. Adults who started ART with CD4 count ?100 cells per cubic millimeter had 47% higher non-ARV costs in the first year ART than those with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter. Adult ARV drug costs at government sites were from 66% to 85% higher than those at donor-supported sites in the first year ART. Conclusions: The study found that HIV treatment and care costs in Vietnam are economical, yet there is potential to further promote efficiency through strengthening competitive procurement, integrating HIV services, and promoting earlier ART initiation. PMID:23846564

  6. Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Joanna; Naismith, Sharon L; Luscombe, Georgina M; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of depression affects beliefs about treatment seeking, and to identify the characteristics of help-seekers. Method One hundred eighteen aged care recipients were surveyed on their beliefs about the helpfulness of a variety of treatments/interventions for depression, on their actual help-seeking behaviors, and on their experience of depression (current and past). Results From the sample, 32.4% of the participants screened positive for depression on the Geriatric Depression Scale, and of these, 24.2% reported receiving treatment. Respondents believed the most helpful treatments for depression were increasing physical activity, counseling, and antidepressant medication. Help-seeking from both professional and informal sources appeared to be related to belief in the helpfulness of counseling and antidepressants; in addition, help-seeking from informal sources was also related to belief in the helpfulness of sleeping tablets and reading self-help books. In univariate analyses, lower levels of cognitive impairment and being in the two lower age tertiles predicted a greater likelihood of help-seeking from professional sources, and female sex and being in the lower two age tertiles predicted greater likelihood of help-seeking from informal sources. In multivariate analyses, only lower levels of cognitive impairment remained a significant predictor of help-seeking from professional sources, whereas both lower age and female sex continued to predict a greater likelihood of help-seeking from informal sources. Conclusion Beliefs in the helpfulness of certain treatments were related to the use of both professional and informal sources of help, indicating the possibility that campaigns or educational programs aimed at changing beliefs about treatments may be useful in older adults. PMID:25653512

  7. Musculoskeletal clinical assessment and treatment services at the primary-secondary care interface: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Edward; Zwierska, Irena; Jordan, Kelvin P; Dawes, Peter; Hider, Samantha L; Packham, Jon; Stevenson, Kay; Hay, Elaine M

    2013-01-01

    Background Management of musculoskeletal conditions in the UK is increasingly delivered in multidisciplinary clinical assessment and treatment services (CATS) at the primary–secondary care interface. However, there is little evidence concerning the characteristics and management of patients attending CATS. Aim To describe the characteristics, investigation, and treatment of adults attending a musculoskeletal CATS. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of cohort study baseline data from a musculoskeletal CATS in Stoke-on-Trent Primary Care Trust, UK. Method All patients referred from primary care between February 2008 and June 2009 were mailed a pre-consultation questionnaire concerning pain duration, general health status, anxiety, depression, employment status, and work absence due to musculoskeletal problems. At the consultation, clinical diagnoses, body region(s) affected, investigations, and treatment were recorded. Result A total of 2166 (73%) completed questionnaires were received. Chronic pain duration >1 year (55%), major physical limitation (76%), anxiety (49%), and depression (37%) were common. Of those currently employed, 516 (45%) had taken time off work in the last 6 months because of their musculoskeletal problem; 325 (29%) were unable to do their usual job. The most frequent investigations were X-rays (23%), magnetic resonance imaging (18%), and blood tests (14%): 1012 (48%) received no investigations. Injections were performed in 282 (13%) and 492 (23%) were referred to physiotherapy. Conclusion Although most patients presented with musculoskeletal problems suitable for CATS, chronic pain, physical limitation, anxiety, depression, and work disability were commonplace, highlighting the need for a biopsychosocial model of care that addresses psychological, social, and work-related needs, as well as pain and physical disability. PMID:23561693

  8. Pioneering early Intensive Care Medicine by the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment for severe acute barbiturate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2015-07-01

    Between the 1920s and the mid-1950s, barbiturates were the sedative-hypnotic agents most used in clinical practice. Their ready availability and narrow therapeutic margin accounted for disturbingly high rates of acute poisoning, whether suicidal or accidental. Until the late 1940s, medical treatment was relatively ineffective, with mortality subsequently high - not only from the effects of coma, respiratory depression and cardiovascular shock with renal impairment, but also from complications of the heavy use in the 1930s and 1940s of analeptic stimulating agents. Incidence of barbiturate intoxication increased substantially following World War II and this paper details development of what became known as the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment, which contributed substantially to the earliest establishment of intensive care units and to the practice and methods of intensive care medicine. Three names stand out for the pioneering of this treatment. Successively, psychiatrist, Aage Kirkegaard, for introducing effective anti-shock fluid therapy; anaesthetist, Eric Nilsson, for introducing anaesthesiologic principles, including manual intermittent positive pressure ventilation into management; and, psychiatrist, Carl Clemmesen, for introducing centralisation of seriously poisoned patients in a dedicated unit. Clemmesen's Intoxication Unit opened at the Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, on 1 October 1949. ICU pioneer Bjørn Ibsen suggested it was the initial ICU, while noting that it supplied Intensive Therapy for one type of disorder only (as had HCA Lassen's Blegdam Hospital unit for Denmark's 1952 to 1953 polio epidemic). Treatment for barbiturate poisoning during the 1950s in some other Scandinavian hospitals will also be considered briefly. PMID:26126074

  9. Retention in medical care and antiretroviral treatment according to skin color in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zubaran, Carlos; Michelim, Lessandra; Foresti, Katia; Medeiros, Gregory; May, William; Madi, José Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the retention in medical care and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment of individuals living with HIV and AIDS to antiretroviral therapy in southern Brazil according to their "race" or skin color. This study is part of a 225-day prospective trial, comprising 7 interviews, in which an intervention designed to improve adherence to treatment was tested. A convenience sample of 73 individuals living with HIV and/or AIDS enrolled in this follow-up procedure. The mean length of continuance in treatment was 161.5 (standard deviation [SD] = 18.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 125-198) and 138.4 (SD = 14.1; 95% C.I. = 111-166) days in the "nonwhite" and "white" categories, respectively. There was no significant difference between the 2 categories, ?(2)(1, n = 72) = 0.76, P = .38, which include similar levels of retention in medical care and treatment with ARV medications between groups of individuals categorized as white and nonwhite in this sample. PMID:23697777

  10. Innovations to achieve excellence in COPD diagnosis and treatment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Len; Barnes, Thomas; Garvey, Chris; Ortiz, Gabriel; Saver, Dennis F; Yawn, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    Recognition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often missed or delayed in primary care. Once recognized, COPD is often undertreated or episodically treated, focusing on acute exacerbations without establishing maintenance treatment to control ongoing disease. Diagnostic and therapeutic pessimism result in missed opportunities to reduce exacerbations, maintain physical functioning, and reduce emergent health care requirements. Proactive diagnosis and evidence-based management can alleviate the impact of COPD on patients' lives. Smoking cessation has been proven to slow the rate of lung function decline. Maintenance pharmacotherapy and immunizations reduce exacerbations. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves respiratory symptoms and physical functioning and reduces rehospitalizations after exacerbations. Self-management education improves health-related quality of life and reduces inpatient and emergency care usage. Maintenance treatment with long-acting inhaled bronchodilators is appropriate beginning in moderate COPD to maintain airway patency and reduce exacerbations. Tiotropium is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat bronchospasm and reduce exacerbations in patients with COPD; salmeterol/fluticasone is FDA approved to treat airflow obstruction in COPD and reduce exacerbations in patients with a history of exacerbations. Other maintenance long-acting bronchodilators-salmeterol, formoterol, and budesonide/formoterol-are FDA approved to treat airway obstruction in COPD but lack an approved indication against exacerbations. FDA warnings on the use of long-acting beta-adrenergic agents (LABAs) in asthma specifically exempt COPD and do not apply to LABA/inhaled corticosteroid combinations used in COPD. The actual effectiveness achieved in practice with any COPD therapies depends on patients' inhaler technique, adherence, and persistence. Medication usage rates and inhaler proficiency may be improved by concordance, in which the health care provider and patient collaborate to make treatment plans sustainable in the patient's daily life. Practice redesign for whole-patient primary care provides additional tools for comprehensive COPD management. Innovations such as group visits and the patient-centered medical home provide newer ways to interact with COPD patients and their families. Patient-focused and evidence-based options enable primary care practices to manage COPD longitudinally and improve patient outcomes through the course of the disease. PMID:20861599

  11. Behavioral Treatment for Weight Gain Prevention Among Black Women in Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary G.; Foley, Perry; Levine, Erica; Whiteley, Jessica; Askew, Sandy; Steinberg, Dori M.; Batch, Bryan; Greaney, Mary L.; Miranda, Heather; Wroth, Thomas H.; Holder, Marni Gwyther; Emmons, Karen M.; Puleo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Few weight loss treatments produce clinically meaningful weight loss outcomes among black women, particularly in the primary care setting. New weight management strategies are necessary for this population. Weight gain prevention might be an effective treatment option, with particular benefits for overweight and class 1 obese black women. OBJECTIVE To compare changes in weight and cardiometabolic risk during a 12-month period among black women randomized to a primary care–based behavioral weight gain prevention intervention, relative to usual care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Two-arm randomized clinical trial (the Shape Program). We recruited patients from a 6-site community health center system. We randomized 194 overweight and class 1 obese (body mass index [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared], 25–34.9) premenopausal black women aged 25 to 44 years. Enrollment began on December 7, 2009; 12- and 18-month assessments were completed in February and October 2, 2012. INTERVENTIONS The medium-intensity intervention included tailored behavior change goals, weekly self-monitoring via interactive voice response, monthly counseling calls, tailored skills training materials, and a gym membership. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Twelve-month change in weight and body mass index and maintenance of change at 18 months. RESULTS Participants had a mean age of 35.4 years, a mean weight of 81.1 kg, and a mean body mass index of 30.2 at baseline. Most were socioeconomically disadvantaged (79.7% with educational level less than a college degree; 74.3% reporting annual income <$30 000). The 12-month weight change was larger among intervention participants (mean [SD], ?1.0 [0.5] kg), relative to usual care (0.5 [0.5] kg; mean difference, ?1.4 kg [95%CI, ?2.8 to ?0.1 kg]; P = .04). At month 12, 62% of intervention participants were at or below their baseline weights compared with 45% of usual-care participants (P = .03). By 18 months, intervention participants maintained significantly larger changes in weight (mean difference, ?1.7 kg; 95% CI, ?3.3 to ?0.2 kg). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE A medium-intensity primary care–based behavioral intervention demonstrated efficacy for weight gain prevention among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women. A “maintain, don’t gain” approach might be a useful alternative treatment for reducing obesity-associated disease risk among some premenopausal black women. PMID:23979005

  12. Dissemination of an Internet-based treatment for chronic insomnia into primary care.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Julie; Vincent, Norah; Walsh, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of two strategies (provider-targeted, consumer-targeted) in the dissemination of an insomnia treatment into primary care. Results of the study indicated that more patients from the provider-targeted, than the consumer-targeted, clinic followed up on the referral for insomnia treatment, but that overall there was limited uptake. These results did not seem to be associated with low levels of provider interest, although providers expressed need for more education about the insomnia program. Implications of these results are that future research efforts would benefit from expanding upon the education of providers in terms of treatment offered, perhaps teaching providers how to better motivate their patients for behavior change. PMID:24564299

  13. Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies associated with the report of the preferred way that limit the use of such data. Risk factors associated with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis still remain controversial. Methods/Design This work describes a protocol of a multicentric prospective observational study with one year follow up, to describe the women's reasons and preferences to choose the way of administration (oral vs topical) in the treatment of not complicated candidal vaginitis. The number of women required is 765, they are chosen by consecutive sampling. All of whom are aged 16 and over with vaginal discharge and/or vaginal pruritus, diagnosed with not complicated vulvovaginitis in Primary Care in Madrid. The main outcome variable is the preferences of the patients in treatment choice; secondary outcome variables are time to symptoms relief and adverse reactions and the frequency of recurrent vulvovaginitis and the risk factors. In the statistical analysis, for the main objective will be descriptive for each of the variables, bivariant analysis and multivariate analysis (logistic regression).. The dependent variable being the type of treatment chosen (oral or topical) and the independent, the variables that after bivariant analysis, have been associated to the treatment preference. Discussion Clinical decisions, recommendations, and practice guidelines must not only attend to the best available evidence, but also to the values and preferences of the informed patient. PMID:21281464

  14. Shared Decision-Making in the Primary Care Treatment of Late-Life Major Depression: A Needed New Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Patrick J.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Hoffman, Amy S.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We suggest that clinicians consider models of shared decision-making for their potential ability to improve the treatment of major depression in the primary care setting and overcome limitations of collaborative care and other interventions. Methods We explore the characteristics and techniques of patient-clinician shared decision-making, with particular emphasis on this model’s relevance to the unique treatment concerns of depressed older adults. Results We describe a shared decision-making intervention to engage older adults in depression treatment in the primary care sector. Conclusions It is timely to examine shared decision-making models for elderly depressed primary care patients given their potential ability to improve treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. PMID:19946872

  15. The DOMUS study protocol: a randomized clinical trial of accelerated transition from oncological treatment to specialized palliative care at home

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The focus of Specialized Palliative Care (SPC) is to improve care for patients with incurable diseases and their families, which includes the opportunity to make their own choice of place of care and ultimately place of death. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DOMUS) aims to investigate whether an accelerated transition process from oncological treatment to continuing SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer results in more patients reaching their preferred place of care and death. The SPC in this trial is enriched with a manualized psychological intervention. Methods/Design DOMUS is a controlled randomized clinical trial with a balanced parallel-group randomization (1:1). The planned sample size is 340 in- and outpatients treated at the Department of Oncology at Copenhagen University Hospital. Patients are randomly assigned either to: a) standard care plus SPC enriched with a standardized psychological intervention for patients and caregivers at home or b) standard care alone. Inclusion criteria are incurable cancer with no or limited antineoplastic treatment options. Discussion Programs that facilitate transition from hospital treatment to SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer can be a powerful tool to improve patients’ quality of life and support family/caregivers during the disease trajectory. The present study offers a model for achieving optimal delivery of palliative care in the patient’s preferred place of care and attempt to clarify challenges. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01885637 PMID:25242890

  16. Enhanced care by community health workers in improving treatment adherence to antidepressant medication in rural women with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Johnson; Isaacs, Anton; Shanbag, Deepthi; Selvan, Sumithra; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Depression remains largely undiagnosed in women residing in rural India and consequently many do not seek help. Moreover, among those who are diagnosed, many do not complete treatment due to high rates of attrition. This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness of enhanced care with usual care in improving treatment seeking and adherence to antidepressant medication in women with depression living in rural India. Methods: Six villages from rural Bangalore were randomized to either community health worker supported enhanced care or usual care. A total of 260 adult depressed women formed the final participants for the analysis. The outcome measures were number of women who sought and completed treatment, number of clinic visits, duration of treatment with antidepressant, changes in severity of depression (HDRS) and changes in quality of life [WHO-QOL (Brev) scale]. Results: A significantly greater number of women from the treatment intervention (TI) group completed the treatment and were on treatment for a longer duration compared to the treatment as usual (TAU) group. However, there were no significant differences in the severity of depression or quality of life between the TI and the TAU groups or between treatment completers and treatment dropouts at six months. Interpretation & conclusions: Enhanced care provided by the trained community health workers to rural women with major depression living in the community resulted in greater number of women seeking help and adhering to treatment with antidepressants. However, despite enhanced care a significant number of rural women diagnosed with depression either did not seek help or discontinued treatment prematurely. These findings have significant public health implications, as untreated depression is associated with considerable disability. PMID:24718398

  17. Treatment, Material, Care, and Patient-Factors in Contact Lens-Related Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Padmapriya; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Nichols, Jason J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To examine the effect of general contact lens and material characteristics, care solutions, treatment and patient-related factors on contact lens-related dry eye. METHODS The data were derived from the Contact Lens and Dry Eye Study, designed as a cross-sectional and nested case-control study including 360 subjects. In separate statistical models, logistic regression was used to examine general contact lens characteristics, specific hydrogel lens materials, care solutions, and patient-related factors associated with dry eye status (controlled for age, gender, and current treatments). RESULTS Several factors were significantly associated with dry eye, including treatment factors such as a recent contact lens refitting (OR = 5.75, 95% CI = 2.14 to 15.46) and use of artificial tears/rewetting drops (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.16), and currently worn materials including FDA group II (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.14 to 6.19) and IV (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.08 to 3.24). Significant patient-related factors included decreased overall satisfaction (OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 2.08 to 5.88,), dry eye in the absence of contact lens wear (OR = 6.54, 95% CI = 2.57 to 16.62), reduced daily lens wear duration (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.26), and reduced ability to wear lenses as long as desired (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.30 to 4.54). Care solutions were not significant. CONCLUSIONS The strong association of common treatment factors with dry eye status in contact lens wearers suggests that these treatments are not entirely effective. The use of high water content materials was strongly related to dry eye in lens wearers, while care solutions were not. Contact lens-related dry eye was also associated with several patient-related factors such as greater ocular discomfort (without lenses), dissatisfaction, and inability to wear lenses for desired durations. PMID:18677240

  18. Quality of nursing home care in Cyprus: are elder residents content with their treatment?

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Savvas

    2008-01-01

    Responding to a conspicuous dearth of knowledge on the quality of elder services in Cyprus, this study ventured to document Cypriot elders' feelings and experiences with nursing home care in Cyprus. Explicitly, four different types of nursing homes were called on (a governmental, a community-run, a faith-based, and a private one) to interview residents (n = 73; a response rate of 100%). Results suggest that Cypriot elders are clearly content with the level of primary care they receive in nursing homes, as mirrored in the quality of nutrition, medical treatment, staff professionalism, and sanitation of nursing home environment. However, the preponderance of residents feels loneliness and denial of essential entertainment opportunities in these institutions and a consequential motivational depletion. Finding implications for domestic and international policy, social work practice, and future research are explored. PMID:18510187

  19. Treatment Engagement and Response to CBT among Latinos with Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chavira, Denise A.; Golinelli, Daniela; Sherbourne, Cathy; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Rose, Raphael D.; Lang, Ariel J.; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy; Bumgardner, Kristin; Glenn, Daniel; Barrios, Velma; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Craske, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the current study, we compare measures of treatment outcome and engagement for Latino and non-Latino White patients receiving a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program delivered in primary care. Method Participants were 18–65 years old and recruited from 17 clinics at four different sites to participate in a randomized controlled trial for anxiety disorders, which compared the CALM intervention (consisting of CBT, medication, or both) to usual care. Of those participants who were randomized to the intervention arm and selected CBT (either alone or in combination with medication), 85 were Latino and 251 were non-Latino White; the majority of the Latino participants received the CBT intervention in English (n = 77). Blinded assessments of clinical improvement and functioning were administered at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 18 months after baseline. Measures of engagement, including attendance, homework adherence, understanding of CBT principles, and commitment to treatment were assessed weekly during the CBT intervention. Results Findings from propensity weighted linear and logistic regression models revealed no statistically significant differences between Latinos and non-Latino Whites on symptom measures of clinical improvement and functioning at almost all time points. There were significant differences on two of seven engagement outcomes, namely number of sessions attended and patients’ understanding of CBT principles. Conclusions These findings suggest that CBT can be an effective treatment approach for Latinos who are primarily English speaking and likely more acculturated, although continued attention should be directed toward engaging Latinos in such interventions. PMID:24660674

  20. Quality management in the early care of patients with multiple injuries:Documentation of treatment and review of quality of care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Zintl; S. Ruchholtz; D. Nast-Kolb; C. Waydhas; L. Schweiberer

    1997-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a Quality management in early clinical care of patients with multiple injuries (description of actual process, identification\\u000a of problems, implementation of quality improvement) is not possible without sufficient baseline data about the present situation\\u000a of medical treatment. This study investigates whether the current documentation of treatment in the emergency room is appropriate\\u000a to judge upon the quality of the process

  1. Integration of Medical and Psychological Treatment within the Primary Health Care Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristine E. Hine; Heather B. Howell; Kimberly A. Yonkers

    2008-01-01

    Integrated care entails the provision of behavioral health services within the primary care setting and emphasizes a collaborative approach between mental health professionals and primary care providers (Kenkel, Deleon, Orabona Mantell, Steep, 2005). Research was collected to highlight the history, development, and implementation of integrated care within primary care facilities. The authors performed a comprehensive literature review of collaborative care

  2. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 2. Psoriatic arthritis: Overview and guidelines of care for treatment with an emphasis on the biologics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice Gottlieb; Neil J. Korman; Kenneth B. Gordon; Steven R. Feldman; Mark Lebwohl; John Y. M. Koo; Abby S. Van Voorhees; Craig A. Elmets

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this second of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we give an overview of psoriatic arthritis including its cardinal clinical features, pathogenesis, prognosis, classification, assessment tools used to evaluate psoriatic arthritis, and the approach to treatment.

  3. Identification and treatment of eating disorders in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Sim, Leslie A; McAlpine, Donald E; Grothe, Karen B; Himes, Susan M; Cockerill, Richard G; Clark, Matthew M

    2010-08-01

    Eating disorders, which are associated with a host of adverse medical morbidities, negative psychological sequelae, and considerable reductions in quality of life, should be diagnosed and treated promptly. However, primary care physicians may find it uniquely challenging to detect eating disorders in their early stages, before obvious physical problems arise and while psychological symptoms are subtle. Although psychological symptoms may dominate the presentation, the physician is an integral member of the treatment team and is in a unique role to diagnose and treat eating disorders. This clinical review surveys the eating disorders literature, identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed for articles published from January 1, 1983, to September 30, 2009, using the following keywords: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, eating disorders NOS, binge eating, binge eating disorder, and night eating syndrome. This review also focuses on practical issues faced by primary care physicians in the management of these conditions and other issues central to the care of these complex patients with medical and psychiatric comorbid conditions. PMID:20605951

  4. Meanings, expressions, and experiences of care of chronically mentally ill in a day treatment center using Leininger's culture care theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamara Bloom George

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover the care meanings, expressions, and lived experiences of the chronically mentally ill living in an urban community as a subculture. This study was conceptualized within Leiningers Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality with the use of the Sunrise Model to explicate worldview, social structure factors, and historical and environmental context

  5. MEDICAL TREATMENT OF MINOR STUDENTS MSU Student Health Services provides medical care for students during their enrollment at Michigan State

    E-print Network

    MEDICAL TREATMENT OF MINOR STUDENTS MSU Student Health Services provides medical care for students refers students for specialty services with other physicians within the MSU HealthTeam (medical school generally seek parental consent prior to providing that treatment. (In certain circumstances, like medical

  6. A Randomized Evaluation of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care: Effects on School Attendance and Homework Completion in Juvenile Justice Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Despite growing evidence that child welfare youth are at increased risk for juvenile delinquency, little is known about gender-specific processes and effective treatment programs for girls. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC), an empirically validated intervention for child welfare and juvenile justice populations, has demonstrated…

  7. Finding the moral heart of treatment: mental health care in a French prison.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Fabrice; Lézé, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Morality is one of the most important elements of social actions, specifically in medical settings. Unfortunately, in social science, morality is often undertheorized and can lead to moralism. The aim of the paper is to test the "moral economy theory" which highlights the link between some local moral evaluations and a political context. We focus on "treatment" as therapeutic tool and as moral regulation of patients in a French remand centre. On the basis of an ethnography of forms of care for prisoners (2009-2010), and semi-directed interviews with working mental health professionals (n = 10), we analyse their engagement and their moral expectations of the prisoners under their care. Firstly, we show how prisoners are selected and then converted into patients deserving of attention (expectations of honesty, sincerity and compliance). Secondly, we show how these patients are divided into three main intervention categories, in which the treatment is both therapeutic and moral (expectations of responsibility, recognition of guilt, and self-esteem). Finally, we discuss these moral criteria within a new moral economy of vulnerability. PMID:21489669

  8. The role of primary care physicians in early diagnosis and treatment of chronic gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gikas, Aristofanis; Triantafillidis, John K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal disorders are a source of substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost. They are common in general practice, and the primary care physician (PCP) has a central role in the early detection and management of these problems. The need to make cost-effective diagnostic and treatment decisions, avoid unnecessary investigation and referral, provide long-term effective control of symptoms, and minimize the risk of complications constitute the main challenges that PCPs face. The literature review shows that, although best practice standards are available, a considerable number of PCPs do not routinely follow them. Low rates of colorectal cancer screening, suboptimal testing and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, inappropriate use of proton pump inhibitors, and the fact that most PCPs are still approaching the irritable bowel disease as a diagnosis of exclusion represent the main gaps between evidence-based guidelines and clinical practice. This manuscript points out that updating of knowledge and skills of PCPs via continuing medical education is the only way for better adherence with standards and improving quality of care for patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:24648750

  9. Newer drugs and earlier treatment: Impact on lifetime cost of care for HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, C.E.; Champenois, K.; Choisy, P.; Losina, E.; Walensky, R.P.; Schackmanj, B.R.; Ajana, F.; Melliez, H.; Paltiel, A.D.; Freedberg, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the component costs of care to optimize treatment with limited resources. Design We used the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications Model of HIV disease and treatment to project life expectancy (LE) and both undiscounted and discounted lifetime costs (2010€). Methods We determined medical resource utilization among HIV-infected adults followed from 1998 to 2005 in Northern France. Monthly HIV costs were stratified by CD4 count. Costs of CD4, HIV RNA and genotype tests and antiretroviral therapy (ART) were derived from published literature. Model inputs from national data included mean age 38 years, mean initial CD4 count 372/µl, ART initiation at CD4 counts <350/µl, and ART regimen costs ranging from €760/month to €2,570/month. Results The model projected a mean undiscounted LE of 26.5 years and a lifetime undiscounted cost of €535,000/patient (€320,700 discounted); 73% of costs were ART-related. When patients presented to care with mean CD4 counts of 510/µl and initiated ART at CD4 counts <500/µl or HIV RNA >100,000 copies/ml, LE was 27.4 years and costs increased 1–2%, to €546,700 (€324,500 discounted). When we assumed introducing generic drugs would result in a 50% decline in first-line ART costs, lifetime costs decreased 4–6%, to €514,200 (€302,800 discounted). Conclusions As HIV disease is treated earlier with more efficacious drugs, survival and thus costs of care will continue to increase. The availability in high-income countries of widely-used antiretroviral drugs in generic form could reduce these costs. PMID:22008655

  10. Implementing Implementation Science: An Approach for HIV Prevention, Care and Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lambdin, Barrot H.; Cheng, Ben; Peter, Trevor; Mbwambo, Jessie; Apollo, Tsitsi; Dunbar, Megan; Udoh, Ifeoma C.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Geng, Elvin H.; Volberding, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Though great progress has been realized over the last decade in extending HIV prevention, care and treatment in some of the least resourced settings of the world, a substantial gap remains between what we know works and what we are actually achieving in HIV programs. To address this, leaders have called for the adoption of an implementation science framework to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HIV programs. Implementation science (IS) is a multidisciplinary scientific field that seeks generalizable knowledge about the magnitude of, determinants of and strategies to close the gap between evidence and routine practice for health in real-world settings. We propose an IS approach that is iterative in nature and composed of four major components: 1) Identifying Bottlenecks and Gaps, 2) Developing and Implementing Strategies, 3) Measuring Effectiveness and Efficiency, and 4) Utilizing Results. With this framework, IS initiatives draw from a variety of disciplines including qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to develop new approaches responsive to the complexities of real world program delivery. In order to remain useful for the changing programmatic landscape, IS research should factor in relevant timeframes and engage the multi-sectoral community of stakeholders, including community members, health care teams, program managers, researchers and policy makers, to facilitate the development of programs, practices and polices that lead to a more effective and efficient global AIDS response. The approach presented here is a synthesis of approaches and is a useful model to address IS-related questions for HIV prevention, care and treatment programs. This approach, however, is not a panacea, and we will continue to learn new ways of thinking as we move forward to close the implementation gap. PMID:25986374

  11. Combined Ablation and Resection (CARe) as an Effective Parenchymal Sparing Treatment for Extensive Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Serge; Poston, Graeme; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, Peter; Diallo, Abou; Desolneux, Grégoire; Brouste, Véronique; Lalet, Caroline; Mortensen, Frank; Stättner, Stefan; Fenwick, Stephen; Malik, Hassan; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; DeMatteo, Ronald; D'Angelica, Michael; Allen, Peter; Jarnagin, William; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Fong, Yuman

    2014-01-01

    Background Combined intra-operative ablation and resection (CARe) is proposed to treat extensive colorectal liver metastases (CLM). This multicenter study was conducted to evaluate overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), hepatic recurrence-free survival (HRFS) and progression-free survival (PFS), to identify factors associated with survival, and to report complications. Materials and Methods Four centers combined retropectively their clinical experiences regarding CLM treated by CARe. CLM characteristics, pre- and post-operative chemotherapy regimens, surgical procedures, complications and survivals were analyzed. Results Of the 288 patients who received CARe, 210 (73%) had synchronous and 255 (88%) had bilateral CLM. Twenty-two patients (8%) had extrahepatic disease. Median follow-up was 3.17 years (95%CI 2.83–4.08). Median OS was 3.33 years (95%CI 3.08–4.17) and 5-year OS was 37% (95%CI 29–45). One- and 5-year LRFS from ablated lesions were 87.9% (95%CI 83.3–91.2) and 78.0% (95%CI 71–83), respectively. Median HRFS and PFS were 14 months (95%CI 11–18) and 9 months (95%CI 8–11), respectively. One hundred patients experienced complications: 29 grade I, 68 grade II–III–IV, and three deaths. In the multivariate models adjusted for center, the occurrence of complications was confirmed as a major independent factor associated with 3-year OS (HR 1.80; P?=?0.008). Five-year OS was 25.6% (95%CI 14.9–37.6) for patients with complications and 45% (95%CI 33.3–53.4) for patients without. Conclusions Recent strategies facing advanced CLM include non-anatomic resections, portal-induced hypertrophy of the future remnant liver and aggressive medical preoperative treatments. CARe has the qualities of an approach that allows effective tumor clearance while maintaining good tolerance for the patient. PMID:25485541

  12. Presence of selected priority and personal care substances in an onsite bathroom greywater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Donner, E; Ledin, A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, concerns about climate change and the inefficient use and ongoing pollution of water resources have increased the political motivation to encourage water recycling. This has led to the widespread introduction of water saving measures and to advances in the decentralised treatment and reuse of wastewater. In particular, the treatment and reuse of greywater has received attention, although important information such as greywater substance loadings is still only rarely available. With the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive the focus on controlling and phasing-out Priority/Priority Hazardous Substances (PS/PHS) is growing, and it is vital to know their sources and flows in order to generate sustainable emission control strategies. The main objective of this study was to quantify the concentrations and loads of PS/PHS and personal care substances in bathroom greywater, and to thereby assess the contribution of household activities to municipal wastewater loads for these substances. Nickel and mercury may be sourced substantially from household activities as it shown in the paper that bathroom greywater contributed a significant proportion of the overall load of these substances at the municipal wastewater treatment plant. Organic matter in the influent greywater was found to be principally associated with large particles (>8 µm), however it was the dissolved and small sized particles that were predominantly removed in the treatment. PMID:21123919

  13. Comparison of Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine with Buprenorphine as Adjuvant to Bupivacaine in Spinal Asnaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mahima; Shailaja, S.; Hegde, K. Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Background: The supplementation of local anaesthetics with adjuvants to improve the efficacy of subarachnoid block has been recognised since long. The most preferred drug has been opioids, but newer drugs like dexmedetomidine has also been introduced and investigated as an effective adjuvant. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the characteristics of subarachnoid blockade, hemodynamic stability and adverse effects of intrathecal buprenorphine and intrathecal dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine for lower abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: The present study included 60 patients aged between 18-60 years classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status (PS) I/II scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgeries. The patients were randomly allotted to two groups to receive intrathecal 3ml of 0.5% bupivacine with 60µg of buprenorphine (Group B; n=30) or 3ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with 5µg of dexmedetomidine (Group D; n=30). The onset time to peak sensory level, motor block, sedation, Haemodynamic variables, duration of motor block, analgesia and any adverse effects were noted. Results: There was no significant difference between groups regarding demographic characteristics and type of surgery. The motor, sensory blockade and time of rescue analgesia were significantly prolonged in Group D compared to Group B. The sedation level was higher in Group D compared to Group B. There was no significant difference in haemodynamic variables although Group B had lower Heart Rate (HR) than Group D. Conclusion: Intrathecal dexmedetomidine when compared to intrathecal buprenorphine causes prolonged anaesthesia and analgesia with reduced need for sedation and rescue analgesics. PMID:24701498

  14. Collaborative Care for the Treatment of Depression in Primary Care With a Low-Income, Spanish-Speaking Population: Outcomes From a Community-Based Program Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Toni Terling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative care model with a predominantly Hispanic, low-income population in a primary care setting and (2) examine depression outcomes with a subpopulation of preferentially Spanish-speaking patients compared with non-Hispanic white participants. Method: The data were collected from September 2006 through September 2009 at the study site, the People’s Community Clinic, Austin, Texas. Data collection was part of an evaluation of the Integrated Behavioral Health program, a collaborative care model of identifying and treating mild-to-moderate mental disorders in adults in a primary care setting. A bilingual care manager provided supportive counseling and patient education and systematically tracked patient progress in a patient registry. A consulting psychiatrist evaluated patients with diagnostic or treatment concerns. The study retrospectively examined changes in depression scores among 269 subjects as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the primary outcome measure. The PHQ-9 is a self-report of frequency of symptoms for each of the 9 DSM-IV criteria for depression. Logistic regression models compared race/ethnicity and language group combinations on their odds of achieving clinically meaningful depression improvement when background characteristics were controlled for. Results: Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients had significantly greater odds of achieving a clinically meaningful improvement in depression at 3-month follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 2.45, P = .013) compared to non-Hispanic whites. The finding for greater improvement in the Spanish-speaking population remained after controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, prior treatment, and baseline depression scores. Conclusions: The results suggest a model of care that is effective for a population at great risk for marginal mental health care, non–English-speaking Hispanics. Attention to patient preferences in primary care is essential to improve quality of depression treatment and may improve outcomes. In light of previous research that demonstrates insufficient evidence-based guidelines for patients with limited English proficiency and evidence that evaluation of patients in their nonprimary language or through an interpreter can lead to inaccurate mental health assessments, this study suggests an opportunity to improve the quality of mental health care for non–English-speaking Hispanics in the United States. PMID:23585998

  15. Geographic variability in HIV and injection drug use in Ukraine: Implications for integration and expansion of drug treatment and HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas; Mazhnaya, Alonya; Larney, Sarah; Islam, Zahed; Shost, Alyona; Prokhorova, Tatiana; Rybak, Natasha; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Ukraine has the highest HIV burden of any European country with much of the current HIV epidemic concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and their sexual partners. Opiate substitution therapy (OST) is limited in Ukraine and expansion of OST is urgently needed to help stem the tide of the HIV epidemic. Methods We accessed publicly available data in Ukraine in order to explore geographic variability with respect to prevalence of HIV, PWIDs and OST programmes. Results The regions of Ukraine with the largest number of opioid dependent persons (the south and eastern portions of the country) correspond to the regions with the highest HIV prevalence and HIV incidence. The number of opioid PWIDs per 100,000 population as well as the number of all OST treatment slots per 100,000 varied significantly across the three HIV prevalence categories. Overall, the proportion of individuals receiving either methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) or buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was quite low: average across categories: 7.3% and 0.4%, respectively. Additionally, less than half of OST patients receiving MMT or BMT were HIV positive patients. Conclusion There is significant geographic variability in both numbers of HIV positive individuals and numbers of PWIDs across Ukraine, however, there may be a more concentrated epidemic among PWIDs in many regions of the country. Scale up of addiction treatment for PWID, especially OST, can have a significant impact on preventing injection related morbidity, such as HIV and HCV infection. Ukraine can learn from the mistakes other nations have made in denying critical treatment opportunities to PWID. PMID:25304049

  16. Economic efficiency of primary care for CVD prevention and treatment in Eastern European countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but it also is highly preventable. The prevention rate mainly depends on the patients’ readiness to follow recommendations and the state’s capacity to support patients. Our study aims to show that proper primary care can decrease the CVD-related morbidity rate and increase the economic efficiency of the healthcare system. Since their admission to the European Union (EU), the Eastern European countries have been in a quest to achieve the Western European standards of living. As a representative Eastern European country, Romania implemented the same strategies as the rest of Eastern Europe, reflected in the health status and lifestyle of its inhabitants. Thus, a valid health policy implemented in Romania should be valid for the rest of the Eastern European countries. Methods Based on the data collected during the EUROASPIRE III Romania Follow Up study, the potential costs of healthcare were estimated for various cases over a 10-year time period. The total costs were split into patient-supported costs and state-supported costs. The state-supported costs were used to deduce the rate of patients with severe CVD that can be treated yearly. A statistical model for the evolution of this rate was computed based on the readiness of the patients to comply with proper primary care treatment. Results We demonstrate that for patients ignoring the risks, a severe CVD has disadvantageous economic consequences, leading to increased healthcare expenses and even poverty. In contrast, performing appropriate prevention activities result in a decrease of the expenses allocated to a (eventual) CVD. In the long-term, the number of patients with severe CVD that can be treated increases as the number of patients receiving proper primary care increases. Conclusions Proper primary care can not only decrease the risk of major CVD but also decrease the healthcare costs and increase the number of patients that can be treated. Most importantly, the health standards of the EU can be achieved more rapidly when primary care is delivered appropriately. JEL I18, H51 PMID:23433501

  17. Capacity enhancement of hepatitis C virus treatment through integrated, community-based care

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Warren D; Butt, Gail; Alvarez, Maria; Krajden, Mel

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An estimated 250,000 Canadians are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The present study describes a cohort of individuals with HCV referred to community-based, integrated prevention and care projects developed in British Columbia. Treatment outcomes are reported for a subset of individuals undergoing antiviral therapy at four project sites. METHODS: Four demonstration projects based on a public health nurse and physician partnership were established in rural and small urban centres in British Columbia. Comprehensive medical assessments determined whether individuals received treatment, or counselling and education. Outcomes of the treatment group were compared with published randomized controlled trials. Client demographics were mapped using geographical information systems applications. RESULTS: A total of 1795 individuals were referred to the clinics for medical assessment between Septmber 2001 and December 2005. After assessment, 26% were eligible for therapy, while 74% received counselling and education. Wait times decreased annually, with one-half of all referrals assessed within 30 days. Combination antiviral therapy was initiated in 363 clients with interferon plus ribavirin (n=36) or pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (n=327). Treatment outcomes were available for 205 individuals. The overall rate of sustained virological response was 61% (126 of 205 individuals). The number of individuals assessed at each site represented, on average, 20% of the total cumulative reported HCV cases in the catchment areas. DISCUSSION: The study findings illustrate how a public health nurse and physician partnership can service a population with complex medical needs while simultaneously increasing local capacity. Treatment outcomes were comparable with published clinical trials. PMID:18209777

  18. Care of the infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome: strength of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Denise

    2014-01-01

    There is little empirical evidence that guides management of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome. The standard of care first described in the 1970s is still prevalent today, although it has never been tested in this population. Standard of care interventions include decreasing external stimulation, holding, nonnutritive sucking, swaddling, pressure/rubbing, and rocking. These interventions meet the goals of nonpharmacologic interventions, which are to facilitate parental attachment and decrease external stimuli. Many nursing interventions used in infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome have been tested in low-birth-weight infants, whose treatment often includes the same goals. Those interventions include music therapy, kangaroo care, massage, and use of nonoscillating water beds. Nursing attitude has also been shown to be impactful on parental attachment. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast-feeding in infants whose mothers are on methadone who do not have any other contraindication. It also provides guidelines for pharmacologic management but cannot provide specific recommendations about a standard first dose, escalation, or weaning schedule. Buprenorphine has some evidence about its safety in newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome, but high-powered studies on its efficacy are currently lacking. There are many opportunities for both evidence-based projects and nursing research projects in this population. PMID:25062522

  19. Depression among patients with tuberculosis: determinants, course and impact on pathways to care and treatment outcomes in a primary care setting in southern Ethiopia—a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ambaw, Fentie; Mayston, Rosie; Hanlon, Charlotte; Alem, Atalay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Depression is commonly comorbid with chronic physical illnesses and is associated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes. Currently, the literature on the role of depression in determining the course and outcome of tuberculosis (TB) is very limited. Aim Our aim is to examine the relationship between depression and TB among people newly diagnosed and accessing care for TB in a rural Ethiopian setting. Our objectives are to investigate: the prevalence and determinants of probable depression, the role of depression in influencing pathways to treatment of TB, the incidence of depression during treatment, the impact of anti-TB treatment on the prognosis of depression and the impact of depression on the outcomes of TB treatment. Methods and analysis We will use a prospective cohort design. 703 newly diagnosed cases of TB (469 without depression and 234 with depression) will be consecutively recruited from primary care health centres. Data collection will take place at baseline, 2 and 6?months after treatment initiation. The primary exposure variable is probable depression measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Outcome variables include: pathways to treatment, classical outcomes for anti-TB treatment quality of life and disability. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression and multilevel mixed-effect analysis will be used to test the study hypotheses. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Findings will be disseminated through scientific publications, conference presentations, community meetings and policy briefs. Anticipated impact Findings will contribute to a sparse evidence base on comorbidity of depression and TB. We hope the dissemination of findings will raise awareness of comorbidity among clinicians and service providers, and contribute to ongoing debates regarding the delivery of mental healthcare in primary care in Ethiopia. PMID:26155818

  20. Toward an Understanding of Disengagement from HIV Treatment and Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C.; Wyatt, Monique A.; Geng, Elvin H.; Kaaya, Sylvia F.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Muyindike, Winnie R.; Chalamilla, Guerino; Agaba, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rollout of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has brought lifesaving treatment to millions of HIV-infected individuals. Treatment is lifelong, however, and to continue to benefit, patients must remain in care. Despite this, systematic investigations of retention have repeatedly documented high rates of loss to follow-up from HIV treatment programs. This paper introduces an explanation for missed clinic visits and subsequent disengagement among patients enrolled in HIV treatment and care programs in Africa. Methods and Findings Eight-hundred-ninety patients enrolled in HIV treatment programs in Jos, Nigeria; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Mbarara, Uganda who had extended absences from care were tracked for qualitative research interviews. Two-hundred-eighty-seven were located, and 91 took part in the study. Interview data were inductively analyzed to identify reasons for missed visits and to assemble them into a broader explanation of how missed visits may develop into disengagement. Findings reveal unintentional and intentional reasons for missing, along with reluctance to return to care following an absence. Disengagement is interpreted as a process through which missed visits and ensuing reluctance to return over time erode patients' subjective sense of connectedness to care. Conclusions Missed visits are inevitable over a lifelong course of HIV care. Efforts to prevent missed clinic visits combined with moves to minimize barriers to re-entry into care are more likely than either approach alone to keep missed visits from turning into long-term disengagement. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23341753

  1. “Stepped Care”: A Health Technology Solution for Delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as a First Line Insomnia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Espie, Colin A.

    2009-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia (CBT) is an effective treatment for persistent insomnia. However, despite two decades of research it is still not readily available, and there are no immediate signs that this situation is about to change. This paper proposes that a service delivery model, based on “stepped care” principles, would enable this relatively scarce healthcare expertise to be applied in a cost-effective way to achieve optimal development of CBT services and best clinical care. The research evidence on methods of delivering CBT, and the associated clinical leadership roles, is reviewed. On this basis, self-administered CBT is posited as the “entry level” treatment for stepped care, with manualized, small group, CBT delivered by nurses, at the next level. Overall, a hierarchy comprising five levels of CBT stepped care is suggested. Allocation to a particular level should reflect assessed need, which in turn represents increased resource requirement in terms of time, cost and expertise. Stepped care models must also be capable of “referring” people upstream where there is an incomplete therapeutic response to a lower level intervention. Ultimately, the challenge is for CBT to be delivered competently and effectively in diversified formats on a whole population basis. That is, it needs to become “scalable”. This will require a robust approach to clinical governance. Citation: Espie CA. “Stepped care”: A health technology solution for delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as a first line insomnia treatment. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1549-1558. PMID:20041590

  2. Care and treatment of the mentally ill in the United States: historical developments and reforms.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J P; Goldman, H H

    1986-03-01

    Three major cycles of reform in public mental health care in the United States--the moral treatment, mental hygiene, and community mental health movements--are described as a basis for assessing the shifting boundaries between the mental health, social welfare, and criminal justice systems. Historical forces that led to the transinstitutionalization of the mentally ill from almshouses to the state mental hospitals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have now been reversed in the aftermath of recent deinstitutionalization policies. Evidence is suggestive that the mentally ill are also being caught up in the criminal justice system, a circumstance reminiscent of pre-asylum conditions in the early nineteenth century. These trends shape the current mental health service delivery system and the agenda for policy-relevant research on issues involving the legal and mental health fields. PMID:10300755

  3. [Update: invasive fungal infections: Diagnosis and treatment in surgical intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Lichtenstern, C; Swoboda, S; Hirschburger, M; Domann, E; Hoppe-Tichy, T; Winkler, M; Lass-Flörl, C; Weigand, M A

    2010-01-01

    Fungal infections are of great relevance in surgical intensive care and Candida species represent the predominant part of fungal pathogens. Invasive aspergillosis is also relevant especially in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. It is crucial for therapy success to begin adequate antifungal treatment at an early stage of the disease. Risk stratification of individual patient symptoms is essential for therapy timing. In case of suspected or proven candida infection, fluconazole is the agent of choice when the patient is clinically stable and no azoles have been administrated in advance and the local epidemiology makes azol resistance unlikely. For clinically instable patients with organ dysfunction the echinocandins serve as primary therapy because of their broad spectrum and reasonable safety profile. Due to a relevant proportion of azole resistant Candida species, susceptibility testing should be done routinely. Depending on the species detected de-escalating to an azole is feasible if organ dysfunctions have resolved. An invasive aspergillosis is primarily treated with voriconazole. PMID:20082061

  4. [Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the effluent of sewage treatment plants].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shao-Kui; Li, Xiao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing concern about pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), newly identified as micro-pollutants, due to their potential ecological risks. Sewage treatment plant (STP) is well demonstrated as the most significant way for PPCPs to enter into the environment. Therefore, PPCPs' discharge control from STPs' effluents is the key to reduce their ecological risks. Based on the therapeutic classes of PPCPs, this paper individually reviews the pharmacology, function, application and ecotoxicology of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, psychiatric drugs, beta-blockers, environmental estrogen, lipid regulators, musk fragrances and other PPCPs. A great attention is paid to typical PPCPs frequently detected in STPs' effluents worldwide and their maximum concentrations were reported during 1998-2012, which provides important information for PPCPs' discharge control in STPs. Finally, the potential research fields on this topic are proposed. PMID:24191585

  5. Lessons from scaling up a depression treatment program in primary care in Chile.

    PubMed

    Araya, Ricardo; Alvarado, Rubén; Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Rojas, Graciela

    2012-09-01

    In Chile, the National Depression Detection and Treatment Program (Programa Nacional de Diagnóstico y Tratamiento de la Depresión, PNDTD) in primary care is a rare example of an evidence-based mental health program that was scaled up to the national level in a low- or middle-income country. This retrospective qualitative study aimed to better understand how policymakers made the decision to scale up mental health services to the national level, and to explore the elements, contexts, and processes that facilitated the decision to implement and sustain PNDTD. In-depth semistructured interviews with six key informants selected through intentional sampling were conducted in August-December 2008. Interviewees were senior officers at the Ministry of Health who were directly involved in the decision to scale up the program. Results yielded four elements pivotal to the decisionmaking process: scientific evidence, teamwork and leadership, strategic alliances, and program institutionalization. Each element contributed to building consensus, securing funding, attracting resources, and gaining lasting support from policymakers. Additionally, a review of available documentation led the authors to consider sociopolitical context and use of the media to be important factors. While research evidence for the effectiveness of mental health services in the primary care setting continues to accumulate, low- and middle-income countries should get started on the lengthy process of scaling up by incorporating the elements that led to decisionmaking and implementation of the PNDTD in Chile. PMID:23183564

  6. A Randomized Trial of a Hepatitis Care Coordination Model in Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Delucchi, Kevin L.; McKnight, Courtney; Hettema, Jennifer; Khalili, Mandana; Min, Albert; Jordan, Ashly E.; Pepper, Nicole; Hall, Jessica; Hengl, Nicholas S.; Young, Christopher; Shopshire, Michael S.; Manuel, Jennifer K.; Coffin, Lara; Hammer, Hali; Shapiro, Bradley; Seewald, Randy M.; Bodenheimer, Henry C.; Sorensen, James L.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the efficacy of a hepatitis care coordination intervention to improve linkage to hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination and clinical evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among methadone maintenance patients. Methods. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 489 participants from methadone maintenance treatment programs in San Francisco, California, and New York City from February 2008 through June 2011. We randomized participants to a control arm (n?=?245) and an intervention arm (n?=?244), which included on-site screening, motivational-enhanced education and counseling, on-site vaccination, and case management services. Results. Compared with the control group, intervention group participants were significantly more likely (odds ratio [OR]?=?41.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?19.4, 90.0) to receive their first vaccine dose within 30 days and to receive an HCV evaluation within 6 months (OR?=?4.10; 95% CI?=?2.35, 7.17). A combined intervention adherence outcome that measured adherence to HAV–HBV vaccination, HCV evaluation, or both strongly favored the intervention group (OR?=?8.70; 95% CI?=?5.56, 13.61). Conclusions. Hepatitis care coordination was efficacious in increasing adherence to HAV–HBV vaccination and HCV clinical evaluation among methadone patients. PMID:23947319

  7. Understanding why women adopt and sustain home water treatment: insights from the Malawi antenatal care program.

    PubMed

    Wood, Siri; Foster, Jennifer; Kols, Adrienne

    2012-08-01

    In many settings in Africa, social marketing has proven more successful in generating brand recognition for chlorine water treatment products than in promoting their use. To promote household use of one such product in Malawi, WaterGuard, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and Population Services International (PSI) distributed free hygiene kits that included WaterGuard to pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2007. Follow-up surveys documented a sustained increase in WaterGuard use three years after the initial intervention. In 2010, PATH (www.path.org) conducted qualitative research on the factors motivating women to adopt, sustain, or discontinue use. To provide context, interviews were also conducted with their friends, relatives, and husbands. Interviews revealed that sustained use of WaterGuard does not necessarily imply consistent use. Most respondents reported switching back and forth between WaterGuard and stock chlorine distributed for free by the government, and many treated water seasonally rather than year-round. Qualitative findings suggest that two program strategies strongly influenced women's decisions to adopt, purchase, and continue using WaterGuard. First, positive, ongoing contacts with health care workers, especially during home visits, raised awareness of the need to treat water, encouraged trial use, and supported continuing use. Second, an extended free trial of the product overcame initial cost barriers and allowed women and their families to experience the health benefits of WaterGuard, appreciate its value and relevance to their lives, and get used to its taste. Social support-from like-minded relatives, friends, neighbors, health care workers, husbands, and children-was also a critical factor that promoted consistent, ongoing use of WaterGuard. The findings confirm the importance of interpersonal communication in prompting adoption of household water treatment and suggest that consumers assess the perceived value of a product, not simply its cost. Further research is planned to investigate questions raised about patterns of ongoing use. PMID:22051403

  8. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  9. Treatment of Late-Life Mental Disorders in Primary Care: We Can Do a Better Job

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary S. Moak

    2011-01-01

    Health care services provided to older adults today are not as effective as they should be. The quality of care for late-life mental disorders often falls short of desired standards. The growth of the elderly population makes it imperative for the health care system to address late-life mental disorders more effectively. Intervention strategies based in primary care settings show the

  10. Integrating individual and public health perspectives for treatment of tobacco dependence under managed health care: A combined stepped-care and matching model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David B. Abrams; C. Tracy Orleans; Raymond S. Niaura; Michael G. Goldstein; James O. Prochaska; Wayne Velicer

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing momentum to integrate prevention into mainstream health care. Three decades of research on tobacco\\u000a dependence can provide insights into the conceptual, clinical, economic, and service delivery challenges to such an integration.\\u000a Biological sciences, cognitive-behavioral, clinical treatment outcome, and public health arenas are selectively reviewed.\\u000a The key conceptual issues are explored relevant to the optimal delivery of

  11. ART treatment costs and retention in care in Kenya: a cohort study in three rural outpatient clinics

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Bruce A; Bii, Margaret; Henly-Thomas, Sarah; McCoy, Kelly; Sawe, Fredrick; Shaffer, Douglas; Rosen, Sydney

    2013-01-01

    Introduction After almost 10 years of PEPFAR funding for antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment programmes in Kenya, little is known about the cost of care provided to HIV-positive patients receiving ART. With some 430,000 ART patients, understanding and managing costs is essential to treatment programme sustainability. Methods Using patient-level data from medical records (n=120/site), we estimated the cost of providing ART at three treatment sites in the Rift Valley Province of Kenya (a clinic at a government hospital, a hospital run by a large agricultural company and a mission hospital). Costs included ARV and non-ARV drugs, laboratory tests, salaries to personnel providing patient care, and infrastructure and other fixed costs. We report the average cost per patient during the first 12 months after ART initiation, stratified by site, and the average cost per patient achieving the primary outcome, retention in care 12 months after treatment initiation. Results The cost per patient initiated on ART was $206, $252 and $213 at Sites 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The proportion of patients remaining in care at 12 months was similar across all sites (0.82, 0.80 and 0.84). Average costs for the subset of patients who remained in care at 12 months was also similar (Site 1, $229; Site 2, $287; Site 3, $237). Patients not retained in care cost substantially less (Site 1, $104; Site 2, $113; Site 3, $88). For the subset of patients who remained in care at 12 months, ART medications accounted for 51%, 44% and 50% of the costs, with the remaining costs split between non-ART medications (15%, 11%, 10%), laboratory tests (14%, 15%, 15%), salaries to personnel providing patient care (9%, 11%, 12%) and fixed costs (11%, 18%, 13%). Conclusions At all three sites, 12-month retention in care compared favourably to retention rates reported in the literature from other low-income African countries. The cost of providing treatment was very low, averaging $224 in the first year, less than $20/month. The cost of antiretroviral medications, roughly $120 per year, accounted for approximately half of the total costs per patient retained in care after 12 months. PMID:23305696

  12. Delivery of Evidence-Based Treatment for Multiple Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Byrne, Peter; Craske, Michelle G.; Sullivan, Greer; Rose, Raphael D.; Edlund, Mark J.; Lang, Ariel J.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Welch, Stacy Shaw; Chavira, Denise A.; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Stein, Murray B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Improving the quality of mental health care requires moving clinical interventions from controlled research settings into “real world” practice settings. While such advances have been made for depression, little work has been done for anxiety disorders. Objective To determine whether a flexible treatment-delivery model for multiple primary care anxiety disorders (panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and/or posttraumatic stress disorders) would be superior to usual care. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled effectiveness trial of CALM (“Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management”) compared to usual care (UC) in 17 primary care clinics in 4 US cities. Between June 2006 and April 2008, 1004 patients with anxiety disorders (with or without major depression), age 18–75, English- or Spanish-speaking, enrolled and subsequently received treatment for 3–12 months. Blinded follow-up assessments at 6, 12, and 18 months after baseline were completed in October 2009. Intervention(s) CALM allowed choice of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, or both; included real-time web-based outcomes monitoring to optimize treatment decisions and a computer-assisted program to optimize delivery of CBT by non-expert care managers who also assisted primary care providers in promoting adherence and optimizing medications. Main Outcome Measure(s) 12-item Brief Symptom Inventory (anxiety and somatic symptoms) score. Secondary outcomes: Proportion of responders (? 50% reduction from pre-treatment BSI-12 score) and remitters (total BSI-12 score < 6). Results Significantly greater improvement for CALM than UC in global anxiety symptoms: BSI-12 group differences of ?2.49 (95% CI, ?3.59 to ?1.40), ?2.63 (95% CI, ?3.73 to ?1.54), and ?1.63 (95% CI, ?2.73 to ?0.53) at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. At 12 months, response and remission rates (CALM vs. UC) were 63.66% (58.95–68.37) vs. 44.68% (39.76–49.59), and 51.49% (46.60–56.38) vs. 33.28% (28.62–37.93), with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 5.27 (4.18–7.13) for response and 5.5 (4.32–7.55) for remission. Conclusions For patients with anxiety disorders treated in primary care clinics, a collaborative care intervention, compared to usual care, resulted in greater improvement in anxiety symptoms, functional disability, and quality of care over 18 months. PMID:20483968

  13. Radiation Therapy for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis: Results of a National Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard, E-mail: Reiniheyd@aol.co [Department of Radiotherapy, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Berger, Bernhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Eich, Hans T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Department of Medical Statistics, Hospital of the J.W. Goethe University Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen-Ruettenscheid (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy in Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) conducted a pattern-of-care study (PCS) to analyze the radiation therapy (RT) practice for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). Methods and Materials: In 2007, a structured questionnaire to assess the number of patients, the pretreatments, the RT indication, technique, target volume concepts, outcome data, and possible early or late toxicity was circulated to 227 institutions. Results: Until August 2008, a response was available from 189 institutions (83.2 %), of whom 19 (10.0 %) experienced RT for PVNS. Complete clinical information was available for 41 patients from 14 RT departments. Thirty patients (73.2 %) received postsurgical RT because of primary incomplete resection, 11 patients (26.8 %) as an adjunct after complete resections of recurrences or unclear resection status. The total doses ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median, 36 Gy), the median single dose was 2.0 Gy. Local control was achieved 95.1%, and 82.9% had no or only slight functional impairment. The early and late toxicity was mild ({<=}RTOG Grade II). Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVNS in the postoperative setting after incomplete resection, and also as a salvage option for treatment of recurrences it provides a high rate of local control.

  14. Child- and family-centered care in the treatment of children - knowledge, attitudes, practice.

    PubMed

    Sumanovi?-Glamuzina, Darinka; Sesar, Irena; Krišto, Branka; Ostoji?, Ljerka

    2013-06-01

    Despite the advances in medical technology, health care improvements have not always been accompanied by commensurate attention to the child's well-being. Psychological and emotional status of children during hospital treatment is often underestimated. Namely, certain kind of institutional negligence is frequently present in everyday practice in children's institutions. Many hospitals in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) have become child-friendly during the implementation of the Project on Child-Friendly Hospitals supported by UNICEF and WHO. Apart from the introduction of child friendly environment, staff in hospitals was trained to provide a holistic approach. The program was closely linked to the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative that supported breastfeeding. A few years thereafter, our focus is still on the physical treatment of sick children, whereas the attention to their anxieties, fears and suffering has failed. A more serious approach to this problem is needed and should begin at an educational level in medical school programs. Accordingly, our philosophy (mission) should change from a mechanical (techno-) medicine to holistic medicine. PMID:23806965

  15. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment. PMID:21052500

  16. Cost of Care: A Study of Patients Hospitalized for Treatment of Psychotic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Rejani, P. P.; Sumesh, T. P.; Shaji, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Combination of ill health and poverty poses special challenges to health care providers. Mental illness and costs are linked in terms of long-term treatment and lost productivity, and it affects social development. The purpose of the present study is to assess the economic burden of poor families when a family member needs hospitalization due to psychosis. Materials and Methods: The information was gathered from caregivers of 100 psychotic inpatients of Medical College Hospital of Kerala during a period of 6 months. Data regarding components of expenses such as cost of medicine, laboratory investigations, food, travel, and other miscellaneous expenses during their inpatient period were collected by direct personal interview using specially designed proforma. The data were analyzed using Epi-info software. The patients below the poverty line (BPL) were compared with those above poverty line (APL). Results: There was no significant difference between patients from BPL and APL in respect of amounts spent on the studied variables except for laboratory investigations during the hospital stay. Conclusions: The results showed that the studied subjects are facing financial difficulties not only due to hospitalization, but also due to the recurrent expense of their ongoing medication. The study recommends the need of financial support from the government for the treatment of psychotic patients. PMID:25722516

  17. Anaerobic-aerobic sequencing bioreactors improve energy efficiency for treatment of personal care product industry wastes.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, S Z; Bereslawski, J L; Dolfing, J; Mota, C; Graham, D W

    2013-07-01

    Personal care product (PCP) industry liquid wastes contain shampoo residues, which are usually treated by aerobic activated sludge (AS). Unfortunately, AS is expensive for PCP wastes because of high aeration and energy demands, whereas potentially energy-positive anaerobic designs cannot meet effluent targets. Therefore, combined anaerobic-aerobic systems may be the best solution. Seven treatment systems were assessed in terms of energy and treatment performance for shampoo wastes, including one aerobic, three anaerobic (HUASB, AHR and AnCSTR) and three anaerobic-aerobic reactor designs. COD removals were highest in the HUASB-aerobic (87.9 ± 0.4%) and AHR-aerobic (86.8±0.5%) systems, which used 69.2% and 62.5% less energy than aerobic AS. However, actual methane production rates were low relative to theoretical in the UASB and AHR units (?10% methane/COD removed) compared with the AnCSTR unit (?70%). Anaerobic-aerobic sequence reactors show promise for treating shampoo wastes, but optimal designs depend upon whether methane production or COD removal is most important to operations. PMID:23639409

  18. Analgesic efficacy and tolerability of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with inadequately controlled chronic pain related to cancer and other disorders: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Sittl; Norbert Griessinger; Rudolf Likar

    2003-01-01

    Background: Buprenorphine is a potent opioid analgesic that is available in sublingual and parenteral formulations. A new formulation, buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (TDS), has been developed.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of the 3 available dosages of buprenorphine TDS (35.0, 52.5, and 70.0 ?g\\/h) with placebo.Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,

  19. Pronociceptive and Antinociceptive Effects of Buprenorphine in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Cover a Dose Range of Four Orders of Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Katharina J; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Honsek, Silke D; Forsthuber, Liesbeth; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Due to its distinct pharmacological profile and lower incidence of adverse events compared with other opioids, buprenorphine is considered a safe option for pain and substitution therapy. However, despite its wide clinical use, little is known about the synaptic effects of buprenorphine in nociceptive pathways. Here, we demonstrate dose-dependent, bimodal effects of buprenorphine on transmission at C-fiber synapses in rat spinal cord dorsal horn in vivo. At an analgesically active dose of 1500 ?g·kg(-1), buprenorphine reduced the strength of spinal C-fiber synapses. This depression required activation of spinal opioid receptors, putatively ?1-opioid receptors, as indicated by its sensitivity to spinal naloxone and to the selective ?1-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine. In contrast, a 15,000-fold lower dose of buprenorphine (0.1 ?g·kg(-1)), which caused thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in behaving animals, induced an enhancement of transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses. The ultra-low-dose buprenorphine-induced synaptic facilitation was mediated by supraspinal naloxonazine-insensitive, but CTOP-sensitive ?-opioid receptors, descending serotonergic pathways, and activation of spinal glial cells. Selective inhibition of spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs), putatively located on spinal astrocytes, abolished both the induction of synaptic facilitation and the hyperalgesia elicited by ultra-low-dose buprenorphine. Our study revealed that buprenorphine mediates its modulatory effects on transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses by dose dependently acting on distinct ?-opioid receptor subtypes located at different levels of the neuraxis. PMID:26134641

  20. Treatment Evolution after COPD Diagnosis in the UK Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wurst, Keele E.; Punekar, Yogesh Suresh; Shukla, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Rationale To assess the treatment progression during the 24 months following a formal diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the UK primary care setting. Methods A retrospective cohort of newly diagnosed COPD patients was identified in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) from 1/1/2008 until 31/12/2009. Maintenance therapy prescribed within the first 3 months of diagnosis and in the subsequent 3-month intervals for 24 months were analyzed. Treatment classes included long-acting ?2-agonists (LABAs), long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs), inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs), and respective combinations. At each 3-month interval, discontinuation, switching, addition, and stepping down patterns were analyzed cumulatively for the first 12 months and over the 24-month of follow-up. Results A total of 3199 patients with at least one prescription of a maintenance therapy at baseline and during 4th-6th month interval were included in the analysis. At diagnosis (0–3 months), the most frequently prescribed maintenance therapy was LABA+ICS (43%), followed by LAMA (24%) and LABA+LAMA+ICS (23%). Nearly half the patients (LABA-50%, LAMA-43%) starting on a monobronchodilator had additions to their treatment in 24 months. Compared to other medications, patients starting on a LAMA were most likely to escalate to triple therapy in 24 months. Nearly one-fourth of the patients prescribed triple therapy at baseline stepped down to LABA+ICS (25%) or LAMA (31%) within 24 months. Conclusion Disease progression is evident over the 24 months after COPD diagnosis, as more patients were prescribed additional maintenance therapy in the 24-month period compared to baseline. The changes in therapy suggest that it is difficult to achieve a consistently improved COPD disease state. PMID:25180802

  1. Primary Care Providers’ Initial Treatment Decisions and Antidepressant Prescribing for Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Ana; Farris, Coreen; Reynolds, Kerry; Reis, Evelyn C.; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Adolescent depression is a serious and undertreated public health problem. Nonetheless, pediatric primary care providers (PCPs) may have low rates of antidepressant prescribing due to structural and training barriers. We examined the impact of symptom severity and provider characteristics on initial depression treatment decisions in a setting with fewer structural barriers, an integrated behavioral health network. METHOD We administered a cross sectional survey to 58 PCPs within a large pediatric practice network. We compared PCP reports of initial treatment decisions in response to two vignettes describing depressed adolescents with either moderate or severe symptoms. We measured PCP depression knowledge, attitudes toward addressing psychosocial concerns, demographics, and practice characteristics. RESULTS Few PCPs (25% for moderate, 32% for severe) recommended an antidepressant. Compared with treatment recommendations for moderate depression, severe depression was associated with a greater likelihood of child psychiatry referral (OR 5.50[95% CI 2.47-12.2] p<.001). Depression severity did not affect the likelihood of antidepressant recommendation (OR 1.58[95% CI 0.80-3.11] p=.19). Antidepressants were more likely to be recommended by PCPs with greater depression knowledge (OR 1.72[95% CI 1.14-2.59] p=.009) and access to an on-site mental health provider (OR 5.13[95% CI 1.24-21.2] p=.02) and less likely to be recommended by PCPs who reported higher provider burden when addressing psychosocial concerns (OR 0.85[95% CI 0.75-0.98] p=.02). CONCLUSION PCPs infrequently recommended antidepressants for adolescents, regardless of depression severity. Continued PCP support through experiential training, accounting for provider burden when addressing psychosocial concerns, and co-management with mental health providers may increase PCPs’ antidepressant prescribing. PMID:24336091

  2. Characterizing the passage of personal care products through wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Joan; Stephenson, Roger; Burbano, Arturo; Liu, Li

    2007-12-01

    Wastewater treatment facilities use secondary treatment to stabilize the effect of discharged effluent on receiving waters by oxidizing biodegradable organic matter and reducing suspended solids and nutrients. The process was never specifically intended to remove trace quantities of xenobiotics, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Nevertheless, European studies performed at bench-scale or at small facilities have demonstrated that a critical minimum solids retention time (SRT) can achieve good reduction of many EDCs and pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to expand these findings to the removal performance for 20 PPCPs commonly found in the influent to full-scale facilities operating in the United States. The participating plants use SRT conditions ranging from 0.5 to 30 days and include facility capacities ranging from 19 000 m3/d (5 mgd) to greater than 1 136 000 m3/d (300 mgd). Two pilot membrane bioreactors were also included in the study. The 20 PPCPs were categorized into nine bin combinations of occurrence frequency and treatment reduction performance. While most compounds were well removed, galaxolide (a musk fragrance) occurred frequently and was resistant to removal. A minimum critical SRT, defined as the minimum SRT, needed to consistently demonstrate greater than 80% removal (SRT80), was compound-dependent, with most compounds removed at 5 to 15 days and a small group requiring longer SRTs. From limited data, no additional removal could be attributed to the use of membrane bioreactors, media filters, or longer hydraulic retention times. Reverse osmosis was effective in removing any remaining compounds. PMID:18198702

  3. ADventure program: Therapeutic biking for the treatment of depression in long-term care residents with dementia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda L. Buettner; Suzanne Fitzsimmons

    2002-01-01

    This project tested an innovative intervention in a controlled clinical investigation of a nonpharmacological treatment of depression in long-term care residents with dementia. This treatment utilized a wheelchair bicycle in a recreation therapy protocol, which combined small group activity therapy and one-to-one bike rides with a staff member. Depression levels were significantly reduced in the two-week portion of the study

  4. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Methods Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Results Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70%) remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50%) remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine), and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Conclusion Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID screen and younger age at intake had a negative impact on retention and abstinence. PMID:21569440

  5. Patient Engagement Programs for Recognition and Initial Treatment of Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Franks, Peter; Feldman, Mitchell D.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Slee, Christina A.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Bell, Robert A.; Jackson-Triche, Maga; Paterniti, Debora A.; Cipri, Camille; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Olson, Sarah; Kelly-Reif, Steven; Hudnut, Andrew; Dvorak, Simon; Turner, Charles; Jerant, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Importance Interventions encouraging primary care patients’ engagement with their clinicians to address depression could improve outcomes but foster unnecessary treatment. Objective Determine whether a depression engagement video (DEV) or a tailored interactive multimedia computer program (IMCP) improves initial depression care without increasing unnecessary anti-depressant prescribing. Design Randomized controlled trial comparing three interventions (DEV, IMCP, and control) conducted in two patients groups (depressed, defined by a Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]-9 score ?5, and non-depressed [PHQ-9<5]) conducted between June 2010 and March 2012. Setting Primary care offices at 7 sites in 2 cities. Participants Depressed (N=559) and non-depressed (N=308) adult patients of 135 primary care clinicians. Intervention(s) DEV targeted to gender and income; IMCP tailored to individual patient characteristics; a sleep hygiene video (control). Main Outcome Measure(s) Depressed patients: composite measure of antidepressant recommendation and/or mental health referral (primary outcome); 12-week mental health, measured by the PHQ-8 (secondary outcome). Non- depressed patients: clinician-reported prescribing and patient-reported antidepressant recommendation (primary outcomes, pre-specified 3.5% non-inferiority margins). Results Depressed patients: composite care outcome rates were 18%, 26%, and 16% respectively in the DEV, IMCP, and control groups (cluster-adjusted DEV-control difference = 1.1% [95% CI ?6.7 to 8.9, P=.79]; IMCP-control = 9.9% [95% CI 1.6 to 18.2, P=.02]). Twelve-week PHQ-8 effects were not significant: DEV- control = ?0.2 points (95% CI ?1.2 to 0.8); IMCP – control = 0.9 (95% CI ?0.1 to 1.9). Non-depressed patients: clinician-reported antidepressant prescribing in the DEV and IMCP groups was non-inferior to control (DEV-control = ?2.2%, 90% CI ?8.0 to 3.498, non-inferiority (NI) P=.0499; IMCP-control = ?3.3%, 90% CI ?9.1 to 2.4, NI P=.02); patient-reported antidepressant recommendation did not achieve non-inferiority: DEV-control = 0.9% (90% CI ?4.9 to 6.7; NI P=.23); IMCP-control = 0.3% (90% CI ?5.1 to 5.7; NI P=.16). Conclusions and Relevance A tailored IMCP increased antidepressant recommendation and/or mental health referral among depressed patients but had no effect on 12-week mental health. The possibility that the IMCP and DEV increased patient-reported antidepressant recommendations among non-depressed patients could not be excluded. Further research is needed on the benefits and harms of these interventions. PMID:24193079

  6. Placement and Permanency Outcomes for Children in Out-of-Home Care by Prior Inpatient Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung Min; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study followed 5,978 children in out-of-home care to examine whether placement and permanency outcomes differ between children with and without a history of inpatient mental health treatment. Method: Data were drawn from child welfare and Medicaid records from the state of Illinois. Logistic regression and survival…

  7. Predictors and Correlates of Completing Behavioral Parent Training for the Treatment of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavigne, John V.; LeBailly, Susan A.; Gouze, Karen R.; Binns, Helen J.; Keller, Jennifer; Pate, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of pretreatment demographic and clinical predictors of attendance as well as barriers to treatment and consumer satisfaction on attendance at therapist-led parent training with 86 families of children ages 3 to 6 years conducted in pediatric primary care settings. Only socioeconomic status (SES) and minority group…

  8. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas (intentionality,…

  9. Affiliation with Delinquent Peers as a Mediator of the Effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Delinquent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Leve, Leslie D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the ability of delinquent peer affiliation to mediate the effects of multidimensional treatment foster care (MTFC; Chamberlain, 2003) on girls' delinquent behavior. Method: This study used a sample of girls from 2 cohorts (N = 166; M = 15.31 years old at baseline, range 13-17 years; 74% European American, 2% African…

  10. Intensive Home-Based Treatment for Children and Adolescents: A Promising Alternative to Residential and Hospital Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally Stevens; Bridget Ruiz; Christine Bracamonte-Wiggs; Mary Shea

    2006-01-01

    The number of children and adolescents in the United States requiring care for emotional and behavioral problems is a major public health concern. Increased attention to the limitations of current social service systems to meet the needs of this population led to the development and administration of an innovative outpatient Intensive Home-Based (IHB) treatment program for youth who would typically

  11. Fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wastewater treatment plants – Conception of a database and first results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Miège; J. M. Choubert; L. Ribeiro; M. Eusèbe; M. Coquery

    2009-01-01

    We created a database in order to quantitatively assess the occurrence and removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). From 117 scientific publications, we compiled 6641 data covering 184 PPCPs. Data included the concentrations of PPCPs in WWTP influents and effluents, their removal efficiency and their loads to the aquatic environment. The first

  12. Occurrence and reductions of pharmaceuticals and personal care products and estrogens by municipal wastewater treatment plants in Ontario, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori Lishman; Shirley Anne Smyth; Kurtis Sarafin; Sonya Kleywegt; John Toito; Thomas Peart; Bill Lee; Mark Servos; Michel Beland; Peter Seto

    2006-01-01

    Over the last ten years there have been reports of pharmaceuticals and personal care product (PPCP) residuals in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. The principle goal of this study was specifically to expand and in some cases establish a Canadian database for the presence of selected acidic drugs, triclosan, polycyclic musks, and selected estrogens in MWWTP influent and effluent.

  13. Developing and Implementing Monitoring and Evaluation Methods in the New Era of Expanded Care and Treatment of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, R. Cameron; Bicego, George; Marconi, Katherine; Bessinger, Ruth; van Praag, Eric; Noriega-Minichiello, Shanti; Pappas, Gregory; Fronczak, Nancy; Peersman, Greet; Fiorentino, Renee K.; Rugg, Deborah; Novak, John

    2004-01-01

    The sharp rise in the HIV/AIDS burden worldwide has elicited calls for increased efforts to combat the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS. Efforts must continue with the aim to decrease new infections. At the same time, care and treatment services for those already infected can lead to longer, productive lives, thereby minimizing negative effects on…

  14. Perspectives on Obesity and Its Treatment: Health Care Providers and the General Public in Rural West Virginia and Urban Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menez, Steven; Cheskin, Lawrence; Geller, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the perspectives of the general public and health care providers (HCPs) on obesity and its treatment in rural West Virginia (WV) and Baltimore, MD. Method: Surveys were completed in both locations by the general public (WV: "n" = 200; Baltimore: "n" = 171) and HCPs (WV: "n" = 25;…

  15. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madelon B Bronner; Hendrika Knoester; Albert P Bos; Bob F Last; Martha A Grootenhuis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. METHODS: Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the

  16. The Treatment of Depression in Older Adults in the Primary Care Setting: An Evidence-Based Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karyn M. Skultety; Antonette Zeiss

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an evidence-based review of treatments for depression in older adults in the primary care setting. A literature search was conducted using PsycINFO and Medline to identify relevant, English language studies published from January 1994 to April 2004 with samples aged 55 and older. Studies were required to be randomized controlled trials that

  17. Implementation of a "Learner-Driven" Curriculum: An Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Interdisciplinary Primary Care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Marina R.; Atherton, W. Leigh; Toriello, Paul J.; Hodgson, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Although screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) has been a popular model to address potential substance abuse issues in primary care, there is a need for innovative approaches for training providers and staff on SBIRT protocols. An interdisciplinary approach to SBIRT training, named ICARE, was implemented at 3 different…

  18. Methadone induction in primary care (ANRS-Methaville): a phase III randomized intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, the rapid scale-up of buprenorphine, an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), in primary care for drug users has led to an impressive reduction in HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDU) but has had no major effect on Hepatitis C incidence. To date, patients willing to start methadone can only do so in a methadone clinic (a medical centre for drug and alcohol dependence (CSAPA) or a hospital setting) and are referred to primary care physicians after dose stabilization. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of methadone in patients who initiated treatment in primary care compared with those who initiated it in a CSAPA, by measuring abstinence from street opioid use after one year of treatment. Methods/Design The ANRS-Methaville study is a randomized multicenter non-inferiority control trial comparing methadone induction (lasting approximately 2 weeks) in primary care and in CSAPA. The model of care chosen for methadone induction in primary care was based on study-specific pre-training of all physicians, exclusion criteria and daily supervision of methadone during the initiation phase. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 10 sites each having one CSAPA and several primary care physicians, were identified to recruit patients to be randomized into two groups, one starting methadone in primary care (n?=?147), the other in CSAPA (n?=?48). The primary outcome of the study is the proportion of participants abstinent from street opioids after 1 year of treatment i.e. non-inferiority of primary care model in terms of the proportion of patients not using street opioids compared with the proportion observed in those starting methadone in a CSAPA. Discussion The ANRS-Methaville study is the first in France to use an interventional trial to improve access to OMT for drug users. Once the non-inferiority results become available, the Ministry of Health and agency for the safety of health products may change the the New Drug Application (NDA) of methadone and make methadone induction by trained primary care physicians possible. The trial is registered with the French Agency of Pharmaceutical Products (AFSSAPS) under the number 2008-A0277-48, the European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials. Number Eudract 2008-001338-28, the ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00657397 and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN31125511. PMID:22741944

  19. Collaborative care for the treatment of comorbid depression and coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) are frequently comorbid and portend higher morbidity, mortality and poorer quality of life. Prior systematic reviews of depression treatment randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the population with CHD have not assessed the efficacy of collaborative care. This systematic review aims to bring together the contemporary research on the effectiveness of collaborative care interventions for depression in comorbid CHD populations. Methods/Design Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL) will be searched using a sensitive search strategy exploding the topics CHD, depression and RCT. Full text inspection and bibliography searching will be conducted, and authors of included studies will be contacted to identify unpublished studies. Eligibility criteria are: population, depression comorbid with CHD; intervention, RCT of collaborative care defined as a coordinated model of care involving multidisciplinary health care providers, including: (a) primary physician and at least one other health professional (e.g. nurse, psychiatrist, psychologist), (b) a structured patient management plan that delivers either pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention, (c) scheduled patient follow-up and (d) enhanced inter-professional communication between the multiprofessional team; comparison, either usual care, enhanced usual care, wait-list control group or no further treatment; and outcome, major adverse cardiac events (MACE), standardized measure of depression, anxiety, quality of life, cost-effectiveness. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two reviewers with disagreements resolved through discussion. Meta-analytic methods will be used to synthesize the data collected relating to the outcomes. Discussion This review will evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for depression in populations primarily with CHD. The results will facilitate integration of evidence-based practice for this precarious population. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013653. PMID:25351999

  20. Quality Adjustment for Health Care Spending on Chronic Disease: Evidence from Diabetes Treatment, 1999–2009

    E-print Network

    Eggleston, Karen N

    Although US health care expenditures reached 17.6 percent of GDP in 2009, quality measurement in this important service sector remains limited. Studying quality changes associated with 11 years of health care for patients ...

  1. IX. Reporting Deficiencies in Animal Care or Treatment IX.1. Reporting concerns, deficiencies, or observations made regarding the adequacy or appropriateness of the

    E-print Network

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    IX. Reporting Deficiencies in Animal Care or Treatment IX.1. Reporting concerns, deficiencies, or procedures contributes to the oversight, development, and improvement of the program for animal care and use, and contributes to the resolution of the concern or deficiency. IX.2. Deficiencies in animal care, use

  2. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers concerning their Latino patients, in particular issues affecting their patients' access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with…

  3. INtegration of DEPression Treatment into HIV Care in Uganda (INDEPTH-Uganda): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite 10 to% of persons living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa having clinical depression, and the consequences of depression for key public health outcomes (HIV treatment adherence and condom use), depression treatment is rarely integrated into HIV care programs. Task-shifting, protocolized approaches to depression care have been used to overcome severe shortages of mental health specialists in developing countries, but not in sub-Saharan Africa and not with HIV clients. The aims of this trial are to evaluate the implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a task-shifting, protocolized model of antidepressant care for HIV clinics in Uganda. Methods/Design INDEPTH-Uganda is a cluster randomized controlled trial that compares two task-shifting models of depression care - a protocolized model versus a model that relies on the clinical acumen of trained providers to provide depression care in ten public health HIV clinics in Uganda. In addition to data abstracted from routine data collection mechanisms and supervision logs, survey data will be collected from patient and provider longitudinal cohorts; at each site, a random sample of 150 medically stable patients who are depressed according to the PHQ-2 screening will be followed for 12 months, and providers involved in depression care implementation will be followed over 24 months. These data will be used to assess whether the two models differ on implementation outcomes (proportion screened, diagnosed, treated; provider fidelity to model of care), provider adoption of treatment care knowledge and practices, and depression alleviation. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted to compare the relative use of resources by each model. Discussion If effective and resource-efficient, the task-shifting, protocolized model will provide an approach to building the capacity for sustainable integration of depression treatment in HIV care settings across sub-Saharan Africa and improving key public health outcomes. Trial registration INDEPTH-Uganda has been registered with the National Institutes of Health sponsored clinical trials registry (3 February 2013) and has been assigned the identifier NCT02056106. PMID:24962086

  4. Review and Evaluation of Online Tobacco Dependence Treatment Training Programs for Health Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Goncharenko, Karina; Barker, Megan; Fahim, Myra; Timothy, Valerie; Dragonetti, Rosa; Kemper, Katherine; Herie, Marilyn; Hays, J Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Background Training health care professionals is associated with increased capacity to deliver evidence-based smoking cessation interventions and increased quit rates among their patients. Online training programs hold promise to provide training but questions remain regarding the quality and usability of available programs. Objective The aim was to assess the quality of English-language online courses in tobacco dependence treatment using a validated instrument. Methods An environmental scan was conducted using the Google search engine to identify available online tobacco dependence treatment courses. The identified courses were then evaluated using the Peer Review Rubric for Online Learning, which was selected based on its ability to evaluate instructional design. It also has clear and concise criteria descriptions to ensure uniformity of evaluations by trained experts. Results A total of 39 courses were identified, of which 24 unique courses were assessed based on their accessibility and functionality during the period of evaluation. Overall, the course ratings indicated that 17 of 24 courses evaluated failed to meet minimal quality standards and none of the courses evaluated could be ranked as superior. However, many excelled in providing effective navigation, course rationale, and content. Many were weak in the use of instructional design elements, such as teaching effectiveness, learning strategies, instructor’s role, and assessment and evaluation. Evaluation results and suggestions for improvement were shared with course administrators. Conclusions Based on the courses evaluated in this review, course developers are encouraged to employ best practices in instructional design, such as cohesiveness of material, linearity of design, practice exercises, problem solving, and ongoing evaluation to improve existing courses and in the design of new online learning opportunities. PMID:25887187

  5. The ABCs of incentive-based treatment in health care: a behavior analytic framework to inform research and practice

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Steven E; Jarvis, Brantley P; Raiff, Bethany R; Rojewski, Alana M; Kurti, Allison; Cassidy, Rachel N; Erb, Philip; Sy, Jolene R; Dallery, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Behavior plays an important role in health promotion. Exercise, smoking cessation, medication adherence, and other healthy behavior can help prevent, or even treat, some diseases. Consequently, interventions that promote healthy behavior have become increasingly common in health care settings. Many of these interventions award incentives contingent upon preventive health-related behavior. Incentive-based interventions vary considerably along several dimensions, including who is targeted in the intervention, which behavior is targeted, and what type of incentive is used. More research on the quantitative and qualitative features of many of these variables is still needed to inform treatment. However, extensive literature on basic and applied behavior analytic research is currently available to help guide the study and practice of incentive-based treatment in health care. In this integrated review, we discuss how behavior analytic research and theory can help treatment providers design and implement incentive-based interventions that promote healthy behavior. PMID:24672264

  6. [The nursing profession regarding limitation of life support treatment in the intensive care units. Technical and practical features].

    PubMed

    Falcó-Pegueroles, A

    2009-01-01

    The scientific and technical developments in medicine in the recent decades have greatly helped to increase life expectancy and quality of life of many patients. In hospitals, this technological scenario has clearly influenced patient care, for example, in the Intensive Medicine Departments, leading to new clinical perspectives and has made the growing complexity of giving treatment and making decisions more evident. In some cases, it is difficult to predict how beneficial intensive medical care can be when there is no reasonable prospect of improving the patient's health, prolonging their life in situations with poor prognosis or dramatically reducing their quality of life. The clinical diagnosis of irreversibility, through indicators of severity and principles of beneficence, autonomy and justice in the professional conduct are the elements that give rise to the consideration of withholding and withdrawing treatment in the critical patient. However, there are other factors that need to be taken into consideration and that are analyzed by professional ethics and bioethics. It is from this approach that any decision involving withholding and withdrawing treatment should be taken so that these decisions can be considered estimable form an ethical point of view. The nursing professional in intensive care units is expected to actively participate in decision making by contributing with their humanizing vision and care ethics. They should be aware of their contribution in the medical team behaving, representing and encouraging the requirements of bioethics. PMID:19775567

  7. Expanding access to hepatitis C virus treatment--Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) project: disruptive innovation in specialty care.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Thornton, Karla; Dion, Denise; Murata, Glen; Deming, Paulina; Parish, Brooke; Brown, John; Komaromy, Miriam; Colleran, Kathleen; Bankhurst, Arthur; Katzman, Joanna; Harkins, Michelle; Curet, Luis; Cosgrove, Ellen; Pak, Wesley

    2010-09-01

    The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Model was developed by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center as a platform to deliver complex specialty medical care to underserved populations through an innovative educational model of team-based interdisciplinary development. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology, best practice protocols, and case-based learning, ECHO trains and supports primary care providers to develop knowledge and self-efficacy on a variety of diseases. As a result, they can deliver best practice care for complex health conditions in communities where specialty care is unavailable. ECHO was first developed for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV), optimal management of which requires consultation with multidisciplinary experts in medical specialties, mental health, and substance abuse. Few practitioners, particularly in rural and underserved areas, have the knowledge to manage its emerging treatment options, side effects, drug toxicities, and treatment-induced depression. In addition, data were obtained from observation of ECHO weekly clinics and database of ECHO clinic participation and patient presentations by clinical provider. Evaluation of the ECHO program incorporates an annual survey integrated into the ECHO annual meeting and routine surveys of community providers about workplace learning, personal and professional experiences, systems and environmental factors associated with professional practice, self-efficacy, facilitators, and barriers to ECHO. The initial survey data show a significant improvement in provider knowledge, self-efficacy, and professional satisfaction through participation in ECHO HCV clinics. Clinicians reported a moderate to major benefit from participation. We conclude that ECHO expands access to best practice care for underserved populations, builds communities of practice to enhance professional development and satisfaction of primary care clinicians, and expands sustainable capacity for care by building local centers of excellence. PMID:20607688

  8. Expanding Access to HCV Treatment - Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Project: Disruptive Innovation in Specialty Care

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Thornton, Karla; Dion, Denise; Murata, Glen; Deming, Paulina; Parish, Brooke; Brown, John; Komaromy, Miriam; Colleran, Kathleen; Bankhurst, Arthur; Katzman, Joanna; Harkins, Michelle; Curet, Luis; Cosgrove, Ellen; Pak, Wesley

    2013-01-01

    The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Model was developed by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC) as a platform to deliver complex specialty medical care to underserved populations through an innovative educational model of team-based inter-disciplinary development. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology, best practice protocols, and case based learning, ECHO trains and supports primary care providers to develop knowledge and self-efficacy on a variety of diseases. As a result, they can deliver best practice care for complex health conditions in communities where specialty care is unavailable. ECHO was first developed for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV), optimal management of which requires consultation with multi-disciplinary experts in medical specialties, mental health and substance abuse. Few practitioners, particularly in rural and underserved areas, have the knowledge to manage its emerging treatment options, side effects, drug toxicities and treatment-induced depression. In addition data was obtained from observation of ECHO weekly clinics and database of ECHO clinic participation and patient presentations by clinical provider, evaluation of the ECHO program incorporates annual survey integrated into the ECHO annual meeting and routine surveys of community providers about workplace learning, personal and professional experiences, systems and environmental factors associated with professional practice, self-efficacy, facilitators and barriers to ECHO. The initial survey data show a significant improvement in provider knowledge, self-efficacy and professional satisfaction through participation in ECHO HCV clinics. Clinicians reported a moderate to major benefit from participation. We conclude that ECHO expands access to best practice care for underserved populations, builds communities of practice to enhance professional development and satisfaction of primary care clinicians, and expands sustainable capacity for care by building local centers of excellence. PMID:20607688

  9. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders in correctional settings: an ethics review.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ariel S; Peters, Roger H

    2014-11-01

    Opioid use disorders are a pressing health concern that disproportionately impacts the United States (U.S.) correctional population. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is an evidence-based standard of care for opioid use disorders. Despite its availability in the community, MAT and MAT medications (buprenorphine and methadone) are largely unavailable and/or inaccessible for the treatment of opioid use disorders in U.S. prisons and jails. Given that the ethical principles have served as justification for limiting access to MAT on "moral" grounds, this article examines the implications of current correctional policies through the ethical principles of: (1) beneficence/non-maleficence; (2) distributive justice (equivalence-of-care); and (3) autonomy (informed consent). Special attention is paid to the five components of informed consent (capacity, disclosure, understanding, voluntariness, and access), as this facet has been used most often to justify policies that limit access to MAT in the past. Findings highlight that these core ethical principles support the adoption of correctional policies that include MAT. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that autonomy is maximized during the informed consent process when MAT is available as a treatment option. PMID:25249444

  10. The role of perceived need and health insurance in substance use treatment: implications for the affordable care act.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mir M; Teich, Judith L; Mutter, Ryan

    2015-07-01

    The expansions in insurance coverage under the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (ACA) that took full effect in 2014 have been projected to increase the number of users of behavioral health services. By analyzing data from the 2008-2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this paper examines whether health insurance expansion may result in an increase in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment utilization. The study sample includes 18,600 adults with SUD but no diagnosable mental health condition. The analysis finds that over 80% of that population receives no treatment and 97% do not perceive a need for treatment. When they do receive treatment, they are more likely to receive mental health treatment. Using multinomial logistic regression, the study finds that having Medicaid or private insurance is associated with higher likelihood of receiving SUD treatment, but only when individuals perceive a need for it, compared to being uninsured and not perceiving a need for treatment (the reference category). These results indicate that increased service utilization is associated with perceiving a need for substance abuse treatment, implying that outreach initiatives to raise awareness about SUD and the effective role of substance use treatment are needed to enhance the impact of the structural changes to the substance abuse treatment system resulting from the ACA. PMID:25753655

  11. Morphine intake and the effects of naltrexone and buprenorphine on the acquisition of methamphetamine intake.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, E C; Phillips, T J

    2014-02-01

    Some common genetic factors appear to influence risk for drug dependence across multiple drugs of abuse. In previous research, mice that were selectively bred for higher amounts of methamphetamine consumption, using a two-bottle choice methamphetamine drinking procedure, were found to be less sensitive to the locomotor stimulant effects of morphine and of the more selective ?-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl, compared to mice that were bred for low methamphetamine consumption. This suggested that ?-opioid receptor-mediated pathways may influence genetic risk for methamphetamine consumption. We hypothesized that these differences in opioid sensitivity would impact opioid intake in the methamphetamine drinking lines and that drugs with ?-opioid receptor activity would impact methamphetamine intake. Consumption of morphine was examined in 2, two-bottle choice studies, one that compared morphine to quinine consumption and another that used a saccharin fading procedure. Next, naltrexone (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20?mg/kg), a ?-opioid receptor antagonist, and buprenorphine (0, 1, 2 or 4?mg/kg), a ?-opioid receptor partial agonist, were each examined for their effects on the acquisition of methamphetamine consumption. Low methamphetamine drinking mice consumed more morphine compared to high methamphetamine drinking mice. Naltrexone did not alter methamphetamine consumption in either selected line; however, buprenorphine reduced methamphetamine intake in the high methamphetamine drinking line. These data show that greater sensitivity to opioids is associated with greater opioid intake and warrant further investigation of drugs with ?-opioid receptor-specific agonist activity in genetically determined differences in methamphetamine consumption. PMID:24152140

  12. Course of health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment: patient-reported vs. administrative records

    PubMed Central

    Zentner, Nadja; Baumgartner, Ildiko; Becker, Thomas; Puschner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence on the course of health service costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, which might also be affected by source of cost data. Thus, this study examines: i) differences in health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, ii) whether these differences vary by source of cost-data (self-report vs. administrative), and iii) predictors of cost differences over time. Methods: Sixty-one psychiatric inpatients gave informed consent to their statutory health insurance company to provide insurance records and completed assessments at admission and 6-month follow-up. These were compared to the self?reported treatment costs derived from the "Client Socio-demographic and Service Use Inventory" (CSSRI?EU) for two 6?month observation periods before and after admission to inpatient treatment to a large psychiatric hospital in rural Bavaria. Costs were divided into subtypes including costs for inpatient and outpatient treatment as well as for medication. Results: Sixty-one participants completed both assessments. Over one year, the average patient?reported total monthly treatment costs increased from € 276.91 to € 517.88 (paired Wilcoxon Z = ?2.27; P = 0.023). Also all subtypes of treatment costs increased according to both data sources. Predictors of changes in costs were duration of the index admission and marital status. Conclusion: Self-reported costs of people with severe mental illness adequately reflect actual service use as recorded in administrative data. The increase in health service use after inpatient treatment can be seen as positive, while the pre-inpatient level of care is a potential problem, raising the question whether more or better outpatient care might have prevented hospital admission. Findings may serve as a basis for future studies aiming at furthering the understanding of what to expect regarding appropriate levels of post-hospital care, and what factors may help or inhibit post-discharge treatment engagement. Future research is also needed to examine long-term effects of inpatient psychiatric treatment on outcome and costs. PMID:25774372

  13. Predictors of treatment interest and treatment initiation in a VA outpatient trauma services program providing evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Lamp, Kristen; Maieritch, Kelly P; Winer, E Samuel; Hessinger, Jonathan D; Klenk, Megan

    2014-12-01

    The present study explored interest in treatment and treatment initiation patterns among veterans presenting at a VA posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clinic. U.S. veterans who were referred for treatment of posttraumatic stress symptoms (N = 476) attended a 2-session psychoeducation and orientation class where they completed measures of demographic variables, PTSD and depression symptom severity, and interest in treatment. Consistent with previous literature and our hypotheses, Vietnam (OR = 1.78) and Persian Gulf veterans (OR = 2.05) were more likely than Iraq and Afghanistan veterans to initiate treatment. Veterans reporting more severe PTSD and depression symptoms were more likely to initiate treatment than not (OR for PTSD = 1.02, OR for depression = 1.02). Interest in treatment emerged as a strong predictor of treatment initiation. Specifically, interest in trauma-focused treatment showed a significant independent predictive effect on initiation such that veterans who expressed interest in trauma-focused treatment were significantly more likely to initiate treatment than those who did not express interest (OR = 2.13). Building interest in trauma-focused treatment may be a vital component for engaging veterans in evidence-based trauma-focused therapy. PMID:25418632

  14. Healthcare utilization in general practice before and after psychological treatment: A follow-up data linkage study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Verhaak, Peter F.M.; Smit, Dineke; Verheij, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Literature suggests that serious mental health problems increase the use of health services and psychological interventions can reduce this effect. This study investigates whether this effect is also found in primary care patients with less serious mental health problems. Design/setting. Routine electronic health records (EHR) from a representative sample of 128 general practices were linked to patient files from 150 primary care psychologists participating in the NIVEL Primary Care Database, using a trusted third party. Data were linked using the date of birth, gender, and postcode. This yielded 503 unique data pairs that were listed in one of the participating GP practices in 2008–2010, for people who had psychological treatment from a psychologist that ended in 2009. Main outcome measures. The number of contacts, health problems presented, and prescribed medication in general practice were analysed before and after the psychological treatment. Results. Nearly all 503 patients consulted their GP during the six months preceding the psychological treatment (90.9%) and also in the six months after this treatment had ended (83.7%). The frequency of contacts was significantly higher before than after the psychological treatment (6.1 vs. 4.8). Fewer patients contacted their GPs specifically for psychological or social problems (46.3% vs. 38.8%) and fewer patients had anxiolytic drug prescriptions (15.5% vs. 7.6%) after psychological treatment. Conclusion. After psychological treatment, patients contact their GPs less often and present fewer psychological or social problems. Although contact rates seem to decrease, clients of psychologists are still frequent GP attenders. PMID:25142308

  15. Findings from the NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA): implications and applications for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S; Hinshaw, S P; Swanson, J M; Greenhill, L L; Conners, C K; Arnold, L E; Abikoff, H B; Elliott, G; Hechtman, L; Hoza, B; March, J S; Newcorn, J H; Severe, J B; Vitiello, B; Wells, K; Wigal, T

    2001-02-01

    In 1992, the National Institute of Mental Health and 6 teams of investigators began a multisite clinical trial, the Multimodal Treatment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA) study. Five hundred seventy-nine children were randomly assigned to either routine community care (CC) or one of three study-delivered treatments, all lasting 14 months. The three MTA treatments-monthly medication management (usually methylphenidate) following weekly titration (MedMgt), intensive behavioral treatment (Beh), and the combination (Comb)-were designed to reflect known best practices within each treatment approach. Children were assessed at four time points in multiple outcome. Results indicated that Comb and MedMgt interventions were substantially superior to Beh and CC interventions for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms. For other functioning domains (social skills, academics, parent-child relations, oppositional behavior, anxiety/depression), results suggested slight advantages of Comb over single treatments (MedMgt, Beh) and community care. High quality medication treatment characterized by careful yet adequate dosing, three times daily methylphenidate administration, monthly follow-up visits, and communication with schools conveyed substantial benefits to those children that received it. In contrast to the overall study findings that showed the largest benefits for high quality medication management (regardless of whether given in the MedMgt or Comb group), secondary analyses revealed that Comb had a significant incremental effect over MedMgt (with a small effect size for this comparison) when categorical indicators of excellent response and when composite outcome measures were used. In addition, children with parent-defined comorbid anxiety disorders, particularly those with overlapping disruptive disorder comorbidities, showed preferential benefits to the Beh and Comb interventions. Parental attitudes and disciplinary practices appeared to mediate improved response to the Beh and Comb interventions. PMID:11265923

  16. The in vivo glucuronidation of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine determined by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Moody, David E; McCance-Katz, Elinore F

    2006-04-01

    The opioid partial agonist medication, buprenorphine (BUP), and its primary metabolite, norbuprenorphine (NBUP), are extensively glucuronidated. Sensitive analytical methods that include determination of buprenorphine-3-glucuronide (BUPG) and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide (NBUPG) are needed to more fully understand the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. A method has now been developed that uses solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. BUP-d4, NBUP-d3, and morphine-3-glucuronide-d3 were used as internal standards. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.1 and 0.5 ng/mL for each of the analytes in 1-mL of human plasma and urine, respectively, except for NBUP in urine in which it was 2.5 ng/mL. The analytes were stable under the following conditions: plasma and urine at room temperature, up to 20 hours; plasma and urine at -20 degrees C for 119 and 85 days, respectively; plasma freeze-thaw, up to 3 cycles; processed sample, up to 96 hours at -20 degrees C and up to 48 hours on the autosampler; stock solutions at room temperature and at -20 degrees C, up to 6 hours and 128 days, respectively. In plasma collected from 5 subjects on maintenance daily sublingual doses of 16 mg BUP and 4 mg naloxone, respective 0- to 24-hour areas under the curve were 32, 88, 26, and 316 ng/mL x h for BUP, NBUP, BUPG, and NBUPG. In urine samples respective percent of daily dose excreted in the 24-hour urine were 0.014%, 1.89%, 1.01%, and 7.76%. This method allowed us to determine that NBUPG is a major metabolite present in plasma and urine of BUP. Because urinary elimination is limited ( approximately 11% of daily dose), the role of NBUPG in total clearance of buprenorphine is not yet known. PMID:16628138

  17. Occurrence and removal of selected pharmaceuticals and personal care products in three wastewater-treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Wook; Rodriguez, Jose M

    2014-05-01

    Residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been detected in surface waters. Incomplete removal of these compounds by wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) results in their presence in effluents and finally in surface waters. The occurrence and removal of four PPCPs was investigated in three WWTPs in Mississippi, USA, during a period of 1 year. Influent and effluent were sampled from the three WWTPs. Upstream and downstream samples of the WWTPs were also collected. All four PPCPs were detected in all influents where sulfamethoxazole showed the highest concentration levels with a median concentration of 1,640 ng/L, and carbamazepine was detected at the lowest level with a median concentration of 132 ng/L. Different PPCPs were removed to different extents varying from 99 to 100 %. Gemfibrozil showed the highest removal rates (73-100 %), whereas carbamazepine showed the lowest (-99 to -30 %). Secondary activated sludge in oxidation-ditch process showed remarkable PPCP-specific removal rates. Galaxolide was removed more than the other PPCPs, and sulfamethoxazole showed the least removal. Galaxolide was found to be a predominant PPCP in effluent among the PPCPs studied, and it was detected in all downstream (14.1-428.2 ng/L) and upstream (4.1-60.0 ng/L) samples. Sulfamethoxazole was removed more during the summer than the winter season. A clear increase of PPCP concentrations was observed in most downstream samples compared with upstream samples suggesting that discharges from WWTPs are the major source of PPCPs in surface waters. PMID:24357097

  18. HIV Testing, Care, and Treatment Among Women Who Use Drugs From a Global Perspective: Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Metsch, Lisa; Philbin, Morgan M; Parish, Carrigan; Shiu, Karen; Frimpong, Jemima A; Giang, Le Minh

    2015-06-01

    The article reviews data on HIV testing, treatment, and care outcomes for women who use drugs in 5 countries across 5 continents. We chose countries in which the HIV epidemic has, either currently or historically, been fueled by injection and non-injection drug use and that have considerable variation in social structural and drug policies: Argentina, Vietnam, Australia, Ukraine, and the United States. There is a dearth of available HIV care continuum outcome data [ie, testing, linkage, retention, antiretroviral therapy (ART) provision, viral suppression] among women drug users, particularly among noninjectors. Although some progress has been made in increasing HIV testing in this population, HIV-positive women drug users in 4 of the 5 countries have not fully benefitted from ART nor are they regularly engaged in HIV care. Issues such as the criminalization of drug users, HIV-specific criminal laws, and the lack of integration between substance use treatment and HIV primary care play a major role. Strategies that effectively address the pervasive factors that prevent women drug users from engaging in HIV care and benefitting from ART and other prevention services are critical. Future success in enhancing the HIV continuum for women drug users should consider structural and contextual level barriers and promote social, economic, and legal policies that overhaul the many years of discrimination and stigmatization faced by women drug users worldwide. Such efforts must emphasis the translation of policies into practice and approaches to implementation that can help HIV-infected women who use drugs engage at all points of the HIV care continuum. PMID:25978483

  19. Shared treatment decision making in a collectively funded health care system: possible conflicts and some potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Sculpher, Mark; Gafni, Amiram; Watt, Ian

    2002-05-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in the advocacy of shared decision making (SDM) between clinicians and patients as a way of practicing medicine. Although there is a range of perspectives on what SDM means, in essence it refers to greater involvement of the individual patient in deliberations about appropriate forms of clinical management. The patient's perception of the role of the doctor in SDM is crucial: for it to work successfully, the patient needs to be able to be confident that the doctor is focused on which treatment will generate the greatest benefit for them. However, the doctor also has responsibilities to others, in particular to other patients and potential patients within the collectively funded health care system. This dual responsibility can create a range of dilemmas for the clinician in the context of SDM: Should they inform patients about all effective treatments or just those that the health care system considers cost-effective? Do they risk losing patients from their books if they inform patients about their responsibilities to the health care system? SDM also raises questions about the wider principles of the health care system: Are its equity principles consistent with SDM? Should patients with a strong preference for an effective but non-cost-effective treatment be permitted to pay for it privately? This paper describes the nature of the conflicts that are likely to emerge if SDM diffuses within collectively funded health care systems, and considers a range of policy responses. It argues that the risk of conflict may be reduced by making a clear distinction between clinical guidelines (focusing on effectiveness) and system guidelines (focusing on cost-effectiveness). PMID:12058853

  20. [Treatment in a health care operational group: how it is perceived by users of alcohol and other drugs].

    PubMed

    Cassol, Paulo Barrozo; Terra, Marlene Gomes; Mostardeiro, Sadja Cristina Tassinari de Souza; Gonçalves, Mariam de Oliveira; Pinheiro, Ursula Maria Stockmann

    2012-03-01

    This is a qualitative research which aimed to describe how users of alcohol and other drugs perceive their treatment in an operational group focused on teaching-learning health care. A semi-structured interview was conducted with 16 users of alcohol and other drugs who participated in an operational group that took place from January to March, 2010, in a teaching hospital in Southern Brazil. The users' testimonials were interpreted according to thematic content analyses, which revealed two categories: perception of the losses resultant of the use of alcohol and other drugs and perception of the operational group regarding their treatment. Results showed that the group can contribute to the abstinence process and the social inclusion of these users, and also highlighted the importance of the nurse in the coordination of mental health care groups. PMID:22737806

  1. Incorporating positive body image into the treatment of eating disorders: A model for attunement and mindful self-care.

    PubMed

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine P

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a model for understanding the role positive body image can play in the treatment of eating disorders and methods for guiding patients away from symptoms and toward flourishing. The Attuned Representational Model of Self (Cook-Cottone, 2006) and a conceptual model detailing flourishing in the context of body image and eating behavior (Cook-Cottone et al., 2013) are discussed. The flourishing inherent in positive body image comes hand-in-hand with two critical ways of being: (a) having healthy, embodied awareness of the internal and external aspects of self (i.e., attunement) and (b) engaging in mindful self-care. Attunement and mindful self-care thus are considered as potential targets of actionable therapeutic work in the cultivation of positive body image among those with disordered eating. For context, best-practices in eating disorder treatment are also reviewed. Limitations in current research are detailed and directions for future research are explicated. PMID:25886712

  2. Increasing Physicians' and Nurses' Compliance with Treatment Guidelines in Cancer Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slenker, Suzanne E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the use of guidelines on the care of patients with breast, colon, and non-small-cell lung cancers is reported. Audits of patient records revealed an increase over time in the percentage of recommended cancer care procedures that were complied with. (Author/MLW)

  3. Quality of Medical Care and Choice of Medical Treatment in Kenya: An Empirical Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Germano Mwabu; Martha Ainsworth; Andrew Nyamete

    1993-01-01

    Underutilization of medical facilities in African countries is widely believed to be a result of consumer disappointments with quality of care. This paper uses data from a randomized household survey, enriched with exogenous information on health facility attributes, to examine more deeply the quality factor in health care demand in rural Kenya. We find that broad availability of drugs in

  4. Outpatient Care of Young People after Emergency Treatment of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Olfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the mental health care received by young people after an episode of deliberate self-harm. This study examined predictors of emergency department (ED) discharge, mental health assessments in the ED, and follow-up outpatient mental health care for Medicaid-covered youth with deliberate self-harm. Method: A…

  5. ‘The Human Prerogative’: A Critical Analysis of Evidence-Based and Other Paradigms of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Broekaert; Mieke Autrique; Wouter Vanderplasschen; Kathy Colpaert

    2010-01-01

    Present-day substance abuse treatment is characterized by a compelling demand for applying evidence-based interventions. Vehement\\u000a discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers illustrate this clash of differing paradigms. The aim of this\\u000a article is to situate evidence-based practice among the leading paradigms of care and to elucidate its implicit assumptions\\u000a and potential implications. Evidence-based practice is inherent in the empirical-analytical paradigm

  6. Management and treatment of hepatitis B virus in patients with HIV infection: A practical guide for health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marina B; Baril, Jean-Guy; Charron, Marc-André; Fortin, Claude; Lalonde, Richard; Matte, Marie-France; Poliquin, Marc; Talbot, Annie; Therrien, Rachel; Tremblay, Cécile; Trottier, Benoît; Tsarevsky, Irina; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The management and treatment of HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients present specific challenges for clinicians. The morbidity and mortality related to these concomitant infections are growing concerns, while the use of antiviral drugs effective against both viruses complicates therapeutic decision making. The present document provides guidelines for physicians regarding care and treatment of patients coinfected with HIV and HBV. Primary prevention of HBV in HIV-positive patients is achieved through appropriate vaccination schedules. Follow-up before treatment of HBV may include liver biopsy, screening for hepatocellular carcinoma and testing for esophageal varicies in cases of cirrhosis. In HBV-infected patients requiring treatment, recommendations regarding initiation, duration and choice of first-line drugs are made. Finally, in the case of resistance, appropriate alternative therapies are necessary. PMID:22942885

  7. Challenges and Outcomes of Parallel Care for Patients with Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorder in Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    King, Van L.; Brooner, Robert K.; Peirce, Jessica; Kolodner, Ken; Kidorf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Most opioid users seeking treatment in community-based substance abuse treatment programs have at least one co-occurring psychiatric disorder, and the presence of psychiatric comorbidity in this population is associated with increased psychological distress, poorer quality of life, and reduced response to substance abuse treatment. This observational study describes clinical outcomes of referring patients receiving methadone maintenance and diagnosed with at least one co-occurring psychiatric disorder to a community psychiatry program located on the same hospital campus. Methods Participants (n=156) were offered priority referrals to a community psychiatry program that included regularly scheduled psychiatrist appointments, individual and group therapy, and enhanced access to psychiatric medications for one-year. Psychiatric distress was measured with the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R), which participants completed monthly. Results While about 80% of the sample (n=124) initiated psychiatric care, the average length of treatment was only 128.2 days (SD = 122.8), participants attended only 33% of all scheduled appointments (M = 14.9 sessions, SD = 14.1), and 84% (n = 104) did not complete a full year of care. Of those who did not complete a full year, almost two-thirds (65%, n = 68) left psychiatric care while still receiving substance abuse treatment. Exploratory negative binomial regression showed that baseline cocaine and alcohol use disorder (p = .002 and .022, respectively), and current employment (p = .034), were associated with worse psychiatric treatment retention. Modest reductions in psychiatric distress over time were observed (SCL-90-R Global Severity Index change score = 2.5; paired t = 3.54, df = 121, p = .001). Conclusions Referral of patients with co-occurring psychiatric disorders receiving methadone maintenance to a community psychiatry program is often ineffective, even after reducing common barriers to care. Service delivery models designed to improve attendance and retention, such as integrated care models, should be evaluated. This study is part of a larger clinical trial, registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov under #NCT00787735. PMID:24976801

  8. Care seeking and attitudes towards treatment compliance by newly enrolled tuberculosis patients in the district treatment programme in rural western Kenya: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The two issues mostly affecting the success of tuberculosis (TB) control programmes are delay in presentation and non-adherence to treatment. It is important to understand the factors that contribute to these issues, particularly in resource limited settings, where rates of tuberculosis are high. The objective of this study is to assess health-seeking behaviour and health care experiences among persons with pulmonary tuberculosis, and identify the reasons patients might not complete their treatment. Methods We performed qualitative one-on-one in-depth interviews with pulmonary tuberculosis patients in nine health facilities in rural western Kenya. Thirty-one patients, 18 women and 13 men, participated in the study. All reside in an area of western Kenya with a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). They had attended treatment for up to 4 weeks on scheduled TB clinic days in September and October 2005. The nine sites all provide diagnostic and treatment services. Eight of the facilities were public (3 hospitals and 5 health centres) and one was a mission health centre. Results Most patients initially self-treated with herbal remedies or drugs purchased from kiosks or pharmacies before seeking professional care. The reported time from initial symptoms to TB diagnosis ranged from 3 weeks to 9 years. Misinterpretation of early symptoms and financial constraints were the most common reasons reported for the delay. We also explored potential reasons that patients might discontinue their treatment before completing it. Reasons included being unaware of the duration of TB treatment, stopping treatment once symptoms subsided, and lack of family support. Conclusions This qualitative study highlighted important challenges to TB control in rural western Kenya, and provided useful information that was further validated in a quantitative study in the same area. PMID:21714895

  9. Loss to follow-up of adults in public HIV care systems in Mozambique: Identifying obstacles to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A; Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth; Baptista, Alberto João; Matediana, Eduardo; Montoya, Pablo; Pfeiffer, James; Melo, Armando; Gimbel-Sherr, Sarah; Johnson, Wendy; Gloyd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has expanded dramatically in resource-limited settings. Evaluating loss to follow-up from HIV testing through post-ART care can help identify obstacles to care. Methods Routine data was analyzed for adults receiving services in two public HIV care systems in central Mozambique. The proportion of people passing through the following steps was determined: (1) HIV testing, (2) enrollment at an ART clinic, (3) CD4 testing, (4) starting ART if eligible, and (5) adhering to ART. Results During the 12-month study period (2004–2005), an estimated 23,430 adults were tested for HIV, and 7,005 (29.9%) were HIV-positive. Only 3,956 (56.5%) of those HIV-positive enrolled at an ART clinic ?30 days after testing. CD4 testing was obtained in 77.1% ?30 days of enrollment. Of 1,506 eligible for ART, 471 (31.3%) started ART ?90 days after CD4 testing. Of 382 with ?180 days of potential follow-up time on ART, 317 (83.0%) had pharmacy-based adherence rates ?90%. Discussion Substantial drop-offs were observed for each step between HIV testing and treatment, but were highest for referral from HIV testing to treatment sites and for starting ART. Interventions are needed to improve follow-up and ensure that people benefit from available HIV services. PMID:19550350

  10. Homeopathic and conventional treatment for acute respiratory and ear complaints: A comparative study on outcome in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Haidvogl, Max; Riley, David S; Heger, Marianne; Brien, Sara; Jong, Miek; Fischer, Michael; Lewith, George T; Jansen, Gerard; Thurneysen, André E

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of homeopathy compared to conventional treatment in acute respiratory and ear complaints in a primary care setting. Methods The study was designed as an international, multi-centre, comparative cohort study of non-randomised design. Patients, presenting themselves with at least one chief complaint: acute (? 7 days) runny nose, sore throat, ear pain, sinus pain or cough, were recruited at 57 primary care practices in Austria (8), Germany (8), the Netherlands (7), Russia (6), Spain (6), Ukraine (4), United Kingdom (10) and the USA (8) and given either homeopathic or conventional treatment. Therapy outcome was measured by using the response rate, defined as the proportion of patients experiencing 'complete recovery' or 'major improvement' in each treatment group. The primary outcome criterion was the response rate after 14 days of therapy. Results Data of 1,577 patients were evaluated in the full analysis set of which 857 received homeopathic (H) and 720 conventional (C) treatment. The majority of patients in both groups reported their outcome after 14 days of treatment as complete recovery or major improvement (H: 86.9%; C: 86.0%; p = 0.0003 for non-inferiority testing). In the per-protocol set (H: 576 and C: 540 patients) similar results were obtained (H: 87.7%; C: 86.9%; p = 0.0019). Further subgroup analysis of the full analysis set showed no differences of response rates after 14 days in children (H: 88.5%; C: 84.5%) and adults (H: 85.6%; C: 86.6%). The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of the primary outcome criterion was 1.40 (0.89–2.22) in children and 0.92 (0.63–1.34) in adults. Adjustments for demographic differences at baseline did not significantly alter the OR. The response rates after 7 and 28 days also showed no significant differences between both treatment groups. However, onset of improvement within the first 7 days after treatment was significantly faster upon homeopathic treatment both in children (p = 0.0488) and adults (p = 0.0001). Adverse drug reactions occurred more frequently in adults of the conventional group than in the homeopathic group (C: 7.6%; H: 3.1%, p = 0.0032), whereas in children the occurrence of adverse drug reactions was not significantly different (H: 2.0%; C: 2.4%, p = 0.7838). Conclusion In primary care, homeopathic treatment for acute respiratory and ear complaints was not inferior to conventional treatment. PMID:17335565

  11. Effectiveness of Computer-Based Treatment for Dyslexia in a Clinical Care Setting: Outcomes and Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijms, Jurgen

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of a treatment for children with dyslexia was examined, as well as the moderating impact of plausible cognitive and socio-economic factors on treatment success. Results revealed that the treatment group accrued significant greater gains than the control group in reading and spelling skills. The treatment group obtained a…

  12. Scaled-Up Mobile Phone Intervention for HIV Care and Treatment: Protocol for a Facility Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly; Succop, Stacey M; Laar, Amos; Wambugu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to prevention, care, and treatment recommendations among people living with HIV (PLHIV) is a critical challenge. Yet good clinical outcomes depend on consistent, high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Mobile phones offer a promising means to improve patient adherence and health outcomes. However, limited information exists on the impact that mobile phones for health (mHealth) programs have on ART adherence or the behavior change processes through which such interventions may improve patient health, particularly among ongoing clients enrolled in large public sector HIV service delivery programs and key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and female sex workers (FSW). Objective Our aim is to evaluate an mHealth intervention where text message reminders are used as supportive tools for health providers and as motivators and reminders for ART clients to adhere to treatment and remain linked to care in Ghana. Using an implementation science framework, we seek to: (1) evaluate mHealth intervention effects on patient adherence and health outcomes, (2) examine the delivery of the mHealth intervention for improving HIV care and treatment, and (3) assess the cost-effectiveness of the mHealth intervention. Methods The 36-month study will use a facility cluster randomized controlled design (intervention vs standard of care) for evaluating the impact of mHealth on HIV care and treatment. Specifically, we will look at ART adherence, HIV viral load, retention in care, and condom use at 6 and 12-month follow-up. In addition, participant adoption and satisfaction with the program will be measured. This robust methodology will be complemented by qualitative interviews to obtain feedback on the motivational qualities of the program and benefits and challenges of delivery, especially for key populations. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, with health effects expressed in terms of viral load suppression and costs of resources used for the intervention. Results This study and protocol was fully funded, but it was terminated prior to review from ethics boards and study implementation. Conclusions This cluster-RCT would have provided insights into the health effects, motivational qualities, and cost-effectiveness of mHealth interventions for PLHIV in public sector settings. We are seeking funding from alternate sources to implement the trial. PMID:25650838

  13. Novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment of opioid-induced neonatal abstinence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McLemore, Gabrielle L.; Lewis, Tamorah; Jones, Catherine H.; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The non-medical use of prescription drugs, in general, and opioids, in particular, is a national epidemic, resulting in enormous addiction rates, healthcare expenditures, and overdose deaths. Prescription opioids are overly prescribed, illegally trafficked, and frequently abused, all of which have created a new opioid addiction pathway, adding to the number of opioid-dependent newborns requiring treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), and contributing to challenges in effective care in maternal and fetal/neonatal (M-F/N) medicine. The standard of care for illicit or prescription opioid dependence during pregnancy is opioid agonist (methadone or buprenorphine) substitution therapy, which are also frequently abused. The next generation of pharmacotherapies for the treatment of illicit or prescription opioid addiction in the M-F/N interactional dyad must take into consideration the interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Addiction to illicit drugs during pregnancy presents unique challenges to effectively treat the mother, and the developing fetus and infant after delivery. New pharmacotherapies should be safe to the developing fetus, effective in treating the physical and psychological consequences of addiction in the mother, and reduce the incidence and severity of NAS in the infant after birth. More pharmacotherapeutic options should be available to the physician such that a more individualized rather than a one-drug/strategy-fits-all approach can be used. A myriad of new and exciting pharmacotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of opioid dependence and addiction are on the horizon. This review focuses on such three strategies: (i) pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the serotoninergic system; (ii) mixed opioid immunotherapeutics (vaccines); (iii) pharmacogenomics as a therapeutic strategy to insure personalized care. We review and discuss how these strategies may offer additional treatment modalities for the treatment of M-F/N during pregnancy and the treatment of the infant after birth. PMID:23059064

  14. CONSENT FOR TREATMENT OF A MINOR PARENT/GUARDIAN MUST SIGN BELOW FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CARE FOR STUDENTS UNDER AGE 19

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    CONSENT FOR TREATMENT OF A MINOR PARENT/GUARDIAN MUST SIGN BELOW FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CARE, but are not limited to, necessary medical treatment, including procedures, diagnostic examinations, including, but treatment will not be delayed. · I understand, according to Nebraska law, that once the above named minor

  15. Theoretically-driven infrastructure for supporting health care teams training at a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Turner, T Robert; Parodi, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Designated a Department of Defense Team Resource Center (TRC) in 2008, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts three tri-service health care teams training courses annually. Each consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation-based training exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for health care professionals. Simulated cases are developed to reinforce specific teamwork skills and behaviors, and to incorporate a variety of technologies including standardized patients, manikins, and virtual reality. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore applications of modeling and simulation for enhanced team training in health care. The TRC has adopted two theoretical frameworks for evaluating training efficacy and outcomes, and has used these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting health care teams training at NMCP. PMID:22360057

  16. Fate and removal of typical pharmaceuticals and personal care products by three different treatment processes.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Jie; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xing-Nan; Huang, Xi

    2013-03-01

    The presence and distribution of typical of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), which comprise two types of polycyclic musks (PCMs) including Galaxolide (HHCB) and Tonalide (AHTN) as well as six types of estrogens containing estrone (E1), 17?-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), and bisphenol A (BPA), were investigated at two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Jiangsu, China. Only raw wastewater was treated in WWTP A while WWTP B was serving an urban-industrialized area. In the influent, the concentrations of EE2 (2193-4437ngL(-1)), E2 (1126-1170ngL(-1)), and DES (268-421ngL(-1)) were generally higher than the previously reported values, whereas the concentrations of HHCB (306-316ngL(-1)), E1 (29-129ngL(-1)), E3 (53ngL(-1)), and BPA (26-176ngL(-1)) were much lower than those reported in other previous studies. In addition, AHTN was not detected in either WWTP and E3 was not found in WWTP B. The detected processes including anaerobic/oxic process (A/O), combined orbal oxidation ditch process (C-orbal OD) and anaerobic/anoxic/anoxic/oxic membrane biological reactor (A/A/A/O-MBR) showed higher removal efficiencies for HHCB (67-71%) and EE2 (87%) than those in other previous studies. Besides, the total hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranged between 6.7 and 20.0h, sludge retention time (SRT) ranged between 8 and 23d, and water temperature ranged from 24.8 to 28.2°C. The removal efficiencies for estrogens in biological processes were related to the following factors: the level of hydrophobic estrogens, the type of removal process (C-orbal OD was consistently less efficient in removing estrogens than A/O and A/A/A/O-MBR), and a high SRT or HRT (A/A/A/O-MBR with higher SRT and HRT showed higher and more stable removal of hydrophobic estrogens). PMID:23384648

  17. Evolution in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis: experience from a single tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Yurci, Alper; Stevens, Tyler; Shah, Shetal N; Law, Ryan E; Walsh, Matthew R; Yerian, Lisa; Liu, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently characterized disease with specific clinical, radiographic, and histological features. These diagnostic features have been codified in the recently revised HISORt criteria. The aim of this study was to determine how the recognition and management of AIP has evolved at our center since the publication of the HISORt criteria in 2006. Methods: We conducted a historical cohort study consisting of patients with AIP based on the revised HISORt criteria seen at our tertiary care center since 1990. Cases were identified from pathology, laboratory, and pancreas clinic databases. The medical records were reviewed to ascertain demographic and clinical characteristics, radiologic and laboratory results, and patient outcomes. When available, prior images and pathology slides were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical outcomes of the patients were assessed following surgical or medical treatment, and compared based on the calendar year of presentation (before or after 2006). Results: Forty-seven cases were identified based on the revised HISORt criteria. Of these, 22 were evaluated before and 25 after January 1, 2006. In the early cohort, the diagnosis was frequently missed, including 15 patients that underwent surgical resections. None from the early cohort had a serum IgG4 drawn or mention of possible AIP in the imaging reports. When histology was obtained, the surgical pathologist did not perform IgG4 or Movat stain to allow a histological diagnosis of AIP. Several patients developed diabetes (n=3), calcific pancreatitis with exocrine insufficiency (n=3), proximal biliary strictures (n=7), and pancreatic cancer (n=1) during follow-up. In contrast, patients in the late cohort were less likely to undergo a surgical resection that the early cohort (36% vs. 68%, p=0.042). They were more likely to have a serum IgG4 drawn (80% vs. 0%) and to undergo a corticosteroid trial (44% vs. 0%, p=0.0003). 10/11 patients (92%) who underwent corticosteroid trials had resolution of their symptoms and improvement in structural abnormalities on imaging. Conclusion: A growing multidisciplinary awareness of AIP has led to improved diagnostic evaluation, prompter diagnosis, fewer surgical resections, and more frequent corticosteroid trials. PMID:23826412

  18. Medical Mistrust and Less Satisfaction With Health Care Among Native Americans Presenting for Cancer Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MPH Kristin Cina; Daniel G. Petereit

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To assess barriers to cancer care among Native Americans, whose health outcomes compare unfavorably with those of the general U.S. population. Methods and patients. We undertook a comparative community-based participatory research project in which newly-diagnosed cancer patients were prospectively surveyed using novel scales for medical mistrust and satisfaction with health care. Socio-demographic information was obtained. Mean scale scores for

  19. Mental health\\/substance abuse treatment in managed care: the Massachusetts Medicaid experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Callahan; Donald S. Shepard; Richard H. Beinecke; Mary Jo Larson; Doreen Cavanaugh

    1995-01-01

    Massachusetts was the first state to introduce a statewide specialty mental health managed care plan for its Medicaid program. This study assesses the impact of this program on expenditures, access, and relative quality. Over a one-year period, expenditures were reduced by 22 percent below predicted levels without managed care, without any overall reduction in access or relative quality. Reduced lengths-of-stay,

  20. Improving HIV/AIDS care through treatment advocacy: going beyond client education to empowerment by facilitating client-provider relationships.

    PubMed

    Mutchler, Matt G; Wagner, Glenn; Cowgill, Burt O; McKay, Tara; Risley, Brian; Bogart, Laura M

    2011-01-01

    Treatment advocacy (TA) programs have been implemented by AIDS service organizations (ASOs) and primary care clinics across the USA to help engage clients with HIV into care and support their adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). TA aims to empower people with HIV through education and client-centered counseling regarding HIV, ART, and other health issues; advocate on behalf of patients with providers; and make referrals to healthcare services and clinical trials. However, relatively little is known about the impact TA has on clients' healthcare experiences. The present study's objectives included exploring how TA services help clients engage in HIV care, initiate ART, and adhere to HIV medications. We conducted 25 semi-structured qualitative open-ended interviews with clients living with HIV/AIDS recruited from AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA); four HIV medical providers; and two TA staff at APLA. Of the 25 clients interviewed, 92% were male and 8% were female. The average age was 43 years (SD=9). About 60% were African-American, 20% were White, 12% were other or multiracial, 4% were Latino, and 4% were Asian/Pacific Islander. Five interconnected themes consistently emerged across clients, TAs, and providers. TAs helped clients understand treatments and supported adherence within a holistic context. Further, TAs acted as a bridge to providers and helped clients build self-advocacy skills. Our data show that TA services go beyond traditional areas of education and treatment adherence. TA services within an ASO also provide a safe place to discuss initial HIV diagnoses and other health issues in a more comprehensive manner. TA services complemented medical and other social services by preparing clients with HIV to be better consumers of healthcare services. Future quantitative research examining the effectiveness of TA on improving clients' engagement in care and adherence is a critical next step. PMID:21218280

  1. Retention in care prior to antiretroviral treatment eligibility in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Plazy, Mélanie; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Dabis, François; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed at summarising rates and factors associated with retention in HIV care prior to antiretroviral treatment (ART) eligibility in sub-Saharan Africa. Design We conducted a systematic literature review (2002–2014). We searched Medline/Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science, as well as proceedings of conferences. We included all original research studies published in peer-reviewed journals, which used quantitative indicators of retention in care prior to ART eligibility. Participants People not yet eligible for ART. Primary and secondary outcomes Rate of retention in HIV care prior to ART eligibility and associated factors. Results 10 papers and 2 abstracts were included. Most studies were conducted in Southern and Eastern Africa between 2004 and 2011 and reported retention rates in pre-ART care up to the second CD4 measurement. Definition of retention in HIV care prior to ART eligibility differed substantially across studies. Retention rates ranged between 23% and 88% based on series ranging from 112 to 10?314 individuals; retention was higher in women, individuals aged >25?years, those with low CD4 count, high body mass index or co-infected with tuberculosis, and in settings with free cotrimoxazole use. Conclusions Retention in HIV care prior to ART eligibility in sub-Saharan Africa has been insufficiently described so far leaving major research gaps, especially regarding long-term retention rates and sociodemographic, economic, clinical and programmatic logistic determinants. The prospective follow-up of newly diagnosed individuals is required to better evaluate attrition prior to ART eligibility among HIV-infected people. PMID:26109110

  2. From morphine clinics to buprenorphine: regulating opioid agonist treatment of addiction in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerome H. Jaffe; Charles O'Keeffe

    2003-01-01

    The practice of prescribing opioid drugs for opioid dependent patients in the U.S. has been subjected to special government scrutiny for almost 100 years. From 1920 until 1964, doctors who used opioids to treat addicts risked federal and\\/or state criminal prosecution. Although that period ended when oral methadone maintenance was established as legitimate medical practice, public concern about methadone diversion

  3. Addressing the Cost of Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Translate Text Size Print Addressing the Cost of Care Paying For HIV Care HIV care and treatment involves taking antiretroviral therapy ( ... applicants. Learn more about the CPAPA form . Find Care & Treatment You & Your Provider Discrimination By Providers Locating ...

  4. Cost-effectiveness of primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment, relative to standard care–a modelled lifetime analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Nicholas R; Carter, Hannah; Schofield, Deborah; Hauner, Hans; Jebb, Susan A; Colagiuri, Stephen; Caterson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity there is a need to identify cost-effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. Objective To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of a commercial weight loss programme (Weight Watchers) (CP) compared with standard care (SC), as defined by national guidelines. Methods A Markov model was developed to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), expressed as the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) over the lifetime. The probabilities and quality-of-life utilities of outcomes were extrapolated from trial data using estimates from the published literature. A health sector perspective was adopted. Results Over a patient’s lifetime, the CP resulted in an incremental cost saving of AUD 70 per patient, and an incremental 0.03 QALYs gained per patient. As such, the CP was found to be the dominant treatment, being more effective and less costly than SC (95% confidence interval: dominant to 6 225 per QALY). Despite the CP delaying the onset of diabetes by approximately 10 months, there was no significant difference in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, with the CP achieving less than 0.1% fewer cases than SC over the lifetime. Conclusion The modelled results suggest that referral to community based interventions may provide a highly cost-effective approach for those at high risk of weight-related co-morbidities. PMID:24301133

  5. [Decisions around the end of life on Intensive Care: making the transition from curative to palliative treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Werf, T S; Zijlstra, J G; Ligtenberg, J J M; Tulleken, J E

    2005-04-01

    The decision to move from curative treatment to palliative care in the intensive-care situation is less related to morals and ethics than it is to the assessment of medical issues, professionalism, communication and orchestration. Treatment should be considered medically pointless if, in the view of the treating physicians, it does not offer realistic chance to return to a meaningful life. Continuing futile care can be seen as disrespectful, both to the patient, his partner and the family, as well as to the members of the ICU team. Intensivists are responsible for withholding or withdrawing life support to patients in whom further life support is considered futile and who are unable to express their wishes due to critical illness and sedation. The intensivist typically makes this type of decision after a period in which medical and other information has been collected and after intensive discussions with other medical professionals as well as the partner and family. This is based on the trust that is built up through their skill, attitude and behaviour and that is perpetuated in a continuing process of intensive communication. Conflicts should be prevented, or at least recognised early and discussed. Ifa conflict is ongoing then it should be tackled by planning a number of consecutive consultations. PMID:15835624

  6. The role of email guidance in internet-based cognitive-behavioural self-care treatment for bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortiz, Varinia C; Munro, Calum; Startup, Helen; Treasure, Janet; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Email has been progressively used as a means for providing therapeutic guidance and support for cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) self-care programmes. Many aspects of the use of email in self-care need to be explored such as the content of therapists' emails. Such information would optimise the delivery of self-care treatments. To date no study has looked at the content of the therapists' emails. We analysed the content of emails (n?=?712) sent by therapists to participants (n?=?71) of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of internet-based CBT with email support for bulimic disorders. 14.7% of the emails therapists sent contained at least one CBT comment, while 95.4% had at least one supportive comment and 13.6% had at least one technical comment. The mean time spent on providing email support to each participant across the complete programme was 45 minutes. Emails sent by therapists were mainly supportive in content, with only a small amount of time being required by therapists to provide email support. PMID:21394832

  7. Treatment for upper-limb and lower-limb lymphedema by professionals specializing in lymphedema care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. LANGBECKER; S. C. HAYES; B. NEWMAN; M. JANDA

    2008-01-01

    Up to 60% of patients with cancer of the vulva, and between 20 and 30% of patients with breast or abdominal cancers may develop lymphedema following treatment. The aims of this study were to assess health profes- sionals' knowledge about treatment, diagnostic procedures, advice and confidence in treatment of patients with either upper-limb (ULL) or lower-limb lymphoedema (LLL), and whether

  8. Buprenorphine added to bupivacaine prolongs femoral nerve block duration and improves analgesia in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty-a randomised prospective double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Juliusz; Bobik, Piotr; Siemi?tkowski, Andrzej

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition the long-acting opioid buprenorphine as an adjuvant to the local anaesthetic agent would improve quality and prolong duration of femoral nerve blockade in post-operative analgesia following primary total knee arthroplasty. The study involved 48 patients. The femoral nerve was anaesthetised with a 0.25% solution of bupivacaine with adrenaline or with the addition of 0.3mg of buprenorphine. The duration of the sensory block and analgesic effect was assessed according to NRS scale at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 hours post-surgery. Patients who received buprenorphine as an adjuvant to the local anaesthetic had significantly longer sensory blockade and lower NRS-rated pain intensity with the difference reaching statistical significance at 12 hours post-surgery. PMID:25512031

  9. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison

    E-print Network

    Foster, Nadine E; Mullis, Ricky; Young, Julie; Doyle, Carol; Lewis, Martyn; Whitehurst, David G; Hay, Elaine M; IMPaCT Back Study Team

    2010-08-20

    Abstract Background Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating...

  10. Enhanced treatment for depression in primary care: Long-term outcomes of a psycho-educational prevention program alone and enriched with psychiatric consultation or cognitive behavioral therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HENK JAN CONRADI; PETER de JONGE; HERMAN KLUITER; ANNET SMIT; KLAAS van der MEER; JACK A. JENNER; Os van T. W. D. P; PAUL M. G. EMMELKAMP; JOHAN ORMEL

    2007-01-01

    Background. The long-term outcome of major depression is often unfavorable, and because most cases of depression are managed by general practitioners (GPs), this places stress on the need to improve treatment in primary care. This study evaluated the long-term effects of enhancing the GP's usual care (UC) with three experimental interventions. Method. A randomized controlled trial was conducted from 1998

  11. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Girls in the Juvenile Justice System: 2-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Patricia; Leve, Leslie D.; DeGarmo, David S.

    2007-01-01

    This study is a 2-year follow-up of girls with serious and chronic delinquency who were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial conducted from 1997 to 2002 comparing multidimensional treatment foster care (MTFC) and group care (N = 81). Girls were referred by juvenile court judges and had an average of over 11 criminal referrals when they entered…

  12. Medical Mistrust and Less Satisfaction With Health Care Among Native Americans Presenting for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Cina, Kristin; Helbig, Petra; Molloy, Kevin; Reiner, Mary; Cook, E. Francis; Petereit, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To assess barriers to cancer care among Native Americans, whose health outcomes compare unfavorably with those of the general U. S. population. Methods and patients We undertook a comparative community-based participatory research project in which newly-diagnosed cancer patients were prospectively surveyed using novel scales for medical mistrust and satisfaction with health care. Socio-demographic information was obtained. Mean scale scores for mistrust and satisfaction were analyzed by race. Multi-variable models were used to adjust for income, education level, and distance lived from cancer care institute. Results Participation refusal rate was 38%. Of 165 eligible patients, 52 were Native American and 113 where non-Hispanic White. Native Americans expressed significantly higher levels of mistrust (p=.0001) and lower levels of satisfaction (p= .0001) with health care than Whites. In multivariable analyses, race was the only factor found to be significantly predictive of higher mistrust and lower satisfaction scores. Conclusion Native Americans exhibit higher medical mistrust and lower satisfaction with health care. PMID:19202258

  13. Shortening the course of antibiotic treatment in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jessica; Edgeworth, Jonathan; Wyncoll, Duncan

    2015-04-01

    Effective antimicrobial stewardship is an increasingly important concern for healthcare providers globally. Antibiotics are frequently prescribed for patients who develop sepsis in the intensive care unit and traditionally courses are prolonged, with uncertain benefit and probable harm. There is little evidence to support many guidelines recommending between 10 and 14 days, and a number of studies suggest substantially shorter courses of less than 7 days may suffice. Safely reducing course length is likely to depend on a number of preconditions, including thorough eradication of any septic foci; optimization of serum antibiotic concentrations, particularly when there is physiological derangement; and use of novel biomarkers such as procalcitonin. The critical care environment is well suited to this aim as patients are closely monitored. With these measures in place, it is reasonable to believe short antibiotic courses can safely be used for the majority of intensive care infections. PMID:25645293

  14. Impact of Health Insurance on Health Care Treatment and Cost in Vietnam: A Health Capability Approach to Financial Protection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Thuy; Khuat, Oanh Thi Hai; Pham, Duc Cuong; Khuat, Giang Thi Hong

    2012-01-01

    We applied an alternative conceptual framework for analyzing health insurance and financial protection grounded in the health capability paradigm. Through an original survey of 706 households in Dai Dong, Vietnam, we examined the impact of Vietnamese health insurance schemes on inpatient and outpatient health care access, costs, and health outcomes using bivariate and multivariable regression analyses. Insured respondents had lower outpatient and inpatient treatment costs and longer hospital stays but fewer days of missed work or school than the uninsured. Insurance reform reduced household vulnerability to high health care costs through direct reduction of medical costs and indirect reduction of income lost to illness. However, from a normative perspective, out-of-pocket costs are still too high, and accessibility issues persist; a comprehensive insurance package and additional health system reforms are needed. PMID:22698046

  15. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadine E Foster; Ricky Mullis; Julie Young; Carol Doyle; Martyn Lewis; David G Whitehurst; Elaine M Hay

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system in primary care. METHODS\\/DESIGN: A prospective, population-based, quality improvement study in one

  16. Ethnic and racial disparities in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Raymond O

    2007-01-01

    Studies from four areas of musculoskeletal health care disparities were reviewed to determine the root causes of the disparities and gain insight into measurable interventions. The areas of musculoskeletal health were total joint arthroplasty, amputation for patients with diabetes, rehabilitation of and impairment in patients with stroke, and morbidity associated with unintentional injuries. The Jenkins Model on Health Disparities was used to investigate and rank the contributing causes (socioeconomic status, sociocultural beliefs, racism, biology) of the health care disparities. No single root cause was found for any of the conditions. Thus, all contributing factors must be considered when planning meaningful interventions. PMID:17766797

  17. Adapting Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for the Treatment of Co-occurring Trauma and Delinquency in Adolescent Girls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana K. Smith; Patricia Chamberlain; Esther Deblinger

    2012-01-01

    Girls in the juvenile justice system have been found to experience high rates of traumatic childhood events. Despite the well-documented coexistence of trauma and delinquency, few programs integrate the treatment of both disorders. Because of the lack of intervention studies addressing co-occurring trauma and delinquency and the lack of data about how these disorders impact each other, there is limited

  18. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Menter, A.; Korman, N.J.; Elmets, C.A.; Feldman, S.R.; Gelfand, J.M.; Gordon, K.B.; Gottlieb, A.; Koo, J.Y.M.; Lebwohl, M.; Lim, H.W.; Van Voorhees, A.S.; Beutner, K.R.; Bhushan, R. [University of Texas South West Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the Population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

  19. Early Linkage to HIV Care and Antiretroviral Treatment among Men Who Have Sex with Men — 20 Cities, United States, 2008 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Hoots, Brooke E.; Finlayson, Teresa J.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Early linkage to care and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment are associated with reduced HIV transmission. Male-to-male sexual contact represents the largest HIV transmission category in the United States; men who have sex with men (MSM) are an important focus of care and treatment efforts. With the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and expanded HIV treatment guidelines, increases in early linkage to care and ARV treatment are expected. We examined differences in prevalence of early linkage to care and ARV treatment among HIV-positive MSM between 2008 and 2011. Data are from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, which monitors behaviors among populations at high risk of HIV infection in 20 U.S. cities with high AIDS burden. MSM were recruited through venue-based, time-space sampling. Prevalence ratios comparing 2011 to 2008 were estimated using linear mixed models. Early linkage was defined as an HIV clinic visit within 3 months of diagnosis. ARV treatment was defined as use at interview. Prevalence of early linkage to care was 79% (187/236) in 2008 and 83% (241/291) in 2011. In multivariable analysis, prevalence of early linkage did not differ significantly between years overall (P = 0.44). Prevalence of ARV treatment was 69% (790/1,142) in 2008 and 79% (1,049/1,336) in 2001. In multivariable analysis, ARV treatment increased overall (P = 0.0003) and among most sub-groups. Black MSM were less likely than white MSM to report ARV treatment (P = 0.01). While early linkage to care did not increase significantly between 2008 and 2011, ARV treatment increased among most sub-groups. Progress is being made in getting MSM on HIV treatment, but more efforts are needed to decrease disparities in ARV coverage. PMID:26176856

  20. Diagnostic and treatment delay, quality of life and satisfaction with care in colorectal cancer patients: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to recent improvements in colorectal cancer survival, patient-reported outcomes, including health-related quality of life and satisfaction with care, have become well-established endpoints to determine the impact of the disease on the lives of patients. The aim of this study is to determine prospectively, in a cohort of colorectal cancer incident cases: a) health-related quality of life, b) satisfaction with hospital-based care, and c) functional status. A secondary objective is to determine whether diagnostic/therapeutic delay influence quality of life or patients’ satisfaction levels. Methods/design Single-centre prospective follow-up study of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during the period 2011–2012 (n?=?375). This project was approved by the corresponding ethics review board, and informed consent is obtained from each patient. After diagnosis, patients are interviewed by a trained nurse, obtaining information on sociodemographic characteristics, family history of cancer, first symptoms, symptom perception and reaction to early symptoms. Quality of life is assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires, and patients’ satisfaction with care is determined using the EORTC IN-PATSAT32. Functional status is measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Clinical records are also reviewed to collect information on comorbidity, tumour characteristics, treatment, hospital consultations and exploratory procedures. Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time from the date of first symptoms until the cytohistological confirmation of cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time between diagnosis and surgical treatment. All the patients will be followed-up for a maximum of 2 years. For survivors, assessments will be re-evaluated at one and two years after the diagnosis. Multiple linear/logistic regression models will be used to identify variables associated with the patients’ functional status, quality of life and satisfaction with care score. Changes in quality of life over time will be analysed with linear mixed-effects regression models. Discussion The results will provide a deeper understanding of the impact of colorectal cancer from a more patient-centred approach, allowing us to identify groups of patients in need of additional attention, as well as areas for improvement. Special attention will be given to the relationship between diagnostic/therapeutic delay and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction with the care received. PMID:23845102