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1

Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options  

PubMed Central

Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

2014-01-01

2

Home Buprenorphine\\/Naloxone Induction in Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND  Buprenorphine can be used for the treatment of opioid dependence in primary care settings. National guidelines recommend directly\\u000a observed initial dosing followed by multiple in-clinic visits during the induction week. We offered buprenorphine treatment\\u000a at a public hospital primary care clinic using a home, unobserved induction protocol.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a METHODS  Participants were opioid-dependent adults eligible for office-based buprenorphine treatment. The initial physician visit

Joshua D. Lee; Ellie Grossman; Danae DiRocco; Marc N. Gourevitch

2009-01-01

3

The Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B): a novel project to expand/improve buprenorphine treatment.  

PubMed

Opioid dependence is largely an undertreated medical condition in the United States. The introduction of buprenorphine has created the potential to expand access to and use of opioid agonist treatment in generalist settings. Physicians, however, often have limited training and experience providing this type of care. Some physicians believe having a mentoring relationship with an experienced provider during their initial introduction to the use of buprenorphine would ease implementation. Our goal was to describe the development, implementation, resources, and evaluation of the Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B), a federally funded program to improve access to and quality of treatment with buprenorphine. We provide a description of the PCSS-B, a national network of 88 trained physician mentors with expertise in buprenorphine treatment and skills in clinical education. We provide information regarding the use the PCSS-B core services including telephone, email and in-person support, a website, clinical guidances, a warmline and outreach to primary care and specialty organizations. Between July 2005 and July 2009, 67 mentors and 4 clinical experts reported providing mentoring services to 632 participants in 48 states, Washington DC and Puerto Rico. A total of 1,455 contacts were provided through email (45%), telephone (34%) and in-person visits (20%). Seventy-six percent of contacts addressed a clinical issue. Eighteen percent of contacts addressed a logistical issue. The number of contacts per participant ranged from 1-125. Between August 2005 and April 2009 there were 72,822 visits to the PCSS-B website with 179,678 pages viewed. Seven guidances were downloaded more than 1000 times. The warmline averaged more than 100 calls per month. The PCSS-B model provides support for a mentorship program to assist non-specialty physicians in the provision of buprenorphine and may serve as a model for dissemination of other types of care. PMID:20458550

Egan, James E; Casadonte, Paul; Gartenmann, Tracy; Martin, Judith; McCance-Katz, Elinore F; Netherland, Julie; Renner, John A; Weiss, Linda; Saxon, Andrew J; Fiellin, David A

2010-09-01

4

Inability to access buprenorphine treatment as a risk factor for using diverted buprenorphine  

PubMed Central

Background As buprenorphine prescribing has increased in the United States so have reports of its diversion. The study purpose was to examine frequency and source of and risk factors for diverted buprenorphine use over a 6-month period in an Appalachian community sample of prescription opioid abusers. Methods There were 503 participants at baseline; 471 completed the 6-month follow-up assessment. Psychiatric disorders and demographic, drug use, and social network characteristics were ascertained at baseline and follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of diverted buprenorphine use over the 6-month period. Results Lifetime buprenorphine use “to get high” was 70.1%. Nearly half (46.5%) used diverted buprenorphine over the 6-month follow-up period; among these persons, 9.6% and 50.6% were daily and sporadic (1–2 uses over the 6-months) users, respectively. The most common sources were dealers (58.7%) and friends (31.6%). Predictors of increased risk of use of diverted buprenorphine during the 6-month follow-up included inability to access buprenorphine treatment (AOR: 7.31, 95% CI: 2.07, 25.8), meeting criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and past 30 day use of OxyContin, methamphetamine and/or alcohol. Conclusions These results suggest that improving, rather than limiting, access to good quality affordable buprenorphine treatment may be an effective public health strategy to mitigate buprenorphine abuse. Future work should evaluate why more persons did not attempt to access treatment, determine how motivations change over time, and how different motivations affect diversion of the different buprenorphine formulations. PMID:22704124

Lofwall, Michelle R.; Havens, Jennifer R.

2012-01-01

5

Buprenorphine: clinical pharmacokinetics in the treatment of opioid dependence.  

PubMed

Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine, a naturally occurring alkaloid of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The pharmacology of buprenorphine is unique in that it is a partial agonist at the opioid mu receptor. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism and therefore has very low oral bioavailability; however, its bioavailability sublingually is extensive enough to make this a feasible route of administration for the treatment of opioid dependence. The mean time to maximum plasma concentration following sublingual administration is variable, ranging from 40 minutes to 3.5 hours. Buprenorphine has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (96%). It is extensively metabolised by N-dealkylation to norbuprenorphine primarily through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The terminal elimination half-life of buprenorphine is long and there is considerable variation in reported values (mean values ranging from 3 to 44 hours). Most of a dose of buprenorphine is eliminated in the faeces, with approximately 10-30% excreted in urine. Naloxone has been added to a sublingual formulation of buprenorphine to reduce the abuse liability of the product. The presence of naloxone does not appear to influence the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine crosses the placenta during pregnancy and also crosses into breast milk. Buprenorphine dosage does not need to be significantly adjusted in patients with renal impairment; however, since CYP3A activity may be decreased in patients with severe chronic liver disease, it is possible that the metabolism of buprenorphine will be altered in these patients. Although there is limited evidence in the literature to date, drugs that are known to inhibit or induce CYP3A4 have the potential to diminish or enhance buprenorphine N-dealkylation. It appears that the interaction between buprenorphine and benzodiazepines is more likely to be a pharmacodynamic (additive or synergistic) than a pharmacokinetic interaction. The relationship between buprenorphine plasma concentration and response in the treatment of opioid dependence has not been well studied. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of buprenorphine allow it to be a feasible option for substitution therapy in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15966752

Elkader, Alexander; Sproule, Beth

2005-01-01

6

Impact of research network participation on the adoption of buprenorphine for substance abuse treatment.  

PubMed

There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (N=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (N=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors' acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

Rieckmann, Traci R; Abraham, Amanda J; Kovas, Anne E; McFarland, Bentson H; Roman, Paul M

2014-05-01

7

A randomized trial of buprenorphine maintenance for heroin dependence in a primary care clinic for substance users versus a methadone clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Buprenorphine is an alternative to methadone for the maintenance treatment of heroine dependence and may be effective on a thrice weekly basis. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of thrice weekly buprenorphine maintenance for the treatment of heroin dependence in a primary care clinic on retention in treatment and illicit opioid use.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Opioid-dependent patients were randomly

PatrickG O’Connor; AlisonH Oliveto; JuliaM Shi; ElisaG Triffleman; KathleenM Carroll; ThomasR Kosten; BruceJ Rounsaville; JulianaA Pakes; RichardS Schottenfeld

1998-01-01

8

A qualitative study of the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid addiction treatment.  

PubMed

Qualified physicians may prescribe buprenorphine to treat opioid dependence, but medication use remains controversial. We examined adoption of buprenorphine in two not-for-profit integrated health plans, over time, completing 101 semi-structured interviews with clinicians and clinician-administrators from primary and specialty care. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and analyzed. A strong leader championing the new treatment was critical for adoption in both health plans. Once clinicians began using buprenorphine, patients' and other clinicians' experiences affected decisions more than did the champion. With experience, protocols developed to manage unsuccessful patients and changed to support maintenance rather than detoxification. Diffusion outside addiction and mental health settings was nonexistent; primary care clinicians cited scope-of-practice issues and referred patients to specialty care. With greater diffusion came questions about long-term use and safety. Recognizing how implementation processes develop may suggest where, when, and how to best expend resources to increase adoption of such treatments. PMID:24268947

Green, Carla A; McCarty, Dennis; Mertens, Jennifer; Lynch, Frances L; Hilde, Anadam; Firemark, Alison; Weisner, Constance M; Pating, David; Anderson, Bradley M

2014-03-01

9

Integrating buprenorphine treatment into a public healthcare system: the San Francisco Department of Public Health's office-based Buprenorphine Pilot Program.  

PubMed

Despite well-documented efficacy, US physicians have been relatively slow to embrace the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence. In order to introduce and support the use of buprenorphine across the San Francisco Department of Public Health system of care, the Buprenorphine Pilot Program was initiated in 2003. Program treatment sites included a centralized buprenorphine induction clinic and program pharmacy, and three community-based treatment sites; two primary care clinics and a private dual diagnosis group practice. The target patient population consisted of opioid-dependent patients typically seen in an urban, public health setting, including individuals experiencing extreme poverty, homelessness/unstable housing, unemployment, polysubstance abuse/dependence, coexisting mental health disorders, and/or little psychosocial support. This program evaluation reviews patient characteristics, treatment retention, substance use over time, patient impressions, and provider practices for the 57 patients admitted between 9/1/03 and 8/31/05. At baseline, over 80% of patients were injecting heroin, over 40% were homeless, and over one-third were using cocaine. Outcomes included an overall one-year retention rate of 61%, a rapid and dramatic decline in opioid use, very positive patient impressions of the program and of buprenorphine, and significant shifts in provider practices over time. PMID:21858959

Hersh, David; Little, Sherri L; Gleghorn, Alice

2011-01-01

10

Self-treatment: Illicit buprenorphine use by opioid-dependent treatment seekers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outpatient-based opioid treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine is an important treatment for people with opioid dependence. No quantitative empirical research has examined rationales for use of illicit buprenorphine by U.S. opioid-dependent treatment seekers. The current study sequentially screened OBOT admissions (n = 129) during a 6-month period in 2009. This study had two stages: (a) a cross-sectional epidemiological analysis of new

Zev Schuman-Olivier; Mark Albanese; Sarah E. Nelson; Lolita Roland; Francyne Puopolo; Lauren Klinker; Howard J. Shaffer

2010-01-01

11

Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience  

PubMed Central

In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

2005-01-01

12

Buprenorphine-containing treatments: place in the management of opioid addiction.  

PubMed

Although the synthetic opioid buprenorphine has been available clinically for almost 30 years, its use has only recently become much more widespread for the treatment of opioid addiction. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine make it unique in the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of opioid addiction. Buprenorphine has partial mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and is a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist; hence, it can substitute for other micro-opioid receptor agonists, yet is less apt to produce overdose reactions or dysphoria. On the other hand, buprenorphine can block the effects of opioids such as heroin (diamorphine) and morphine, and can even precipitate withdrawal in individuals physically dependent upon these drugs. Buprenorphine has significant sublingual bioavailability and a long half-life, making administration on a less than daily basis possible. Furthermore, its discontinuation is associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome. Clinical trials have demonstrated that sublingual buprenorphine is effective in both maintenance therapy and detoxification of individuals addicted to opioids. The introduction of a sublingual formulation combining naloxone with buprenorphine further reduces the risk of diversion to illicit intravenous use. Because of its relative safety and lower risk of illegal diversion, buprenorphine has been made available in several countries for treating opioid addiction in the private office setting, greatly enhancing treatment options for this condition. PMID:16953647

Robinson, Susan E

2006-01-01

13

“The chief of the services is very enthusiastic about it”: A qualitative study of the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid addiction treatment  

PubMed Central

Qualified physicians may prescribe buprenorphine to treat opioid dependence, but medication use remains controversial. We examined adoption of buprenorphine in two not-for-profit integrated health plans, over time, completing 101 semi-structured interviews with clinicians and clinician-administrators from primary and specialty care. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and analyzed. A strong leader championing the new treatment was critical for adoption in both health plans. Once clinicians began using buprenorphine, patients’ and other clinicians’ experiences affected decisions more than did the champion. With experience, protocols developed to manage unsuccessful patients and changed to support maintenance rather than detoxification. Diffusion outside addiction and mental health settings was nonexistent; primary care clinicians cited scope-of-practice issues and referred patients to specialty care. With greater diffusion came questions about long-term use and safety. Recognizing how implementation processes develop may suggest where, when, and how to best expend resources to increase adoption of such treatments. PMID:24268947

Green, Carla A.; McCarty, Dennis; Mertens, Jennifer; Lynch, Frances L.; Hilde, Anadam; Firemark, Alison; Weisner, Constance M.; Pating, David; Anderson, Bradley M.

2013-01-01

14

Top Manager Effects on Buprenorphine Adoption in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Programs  

PubMed Central

To examine the influence of top managers’ characteristics on the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid dependence among U.S. outpatient substance abuse treatment units, this investigation analyzed a cross-sectional national study of 547 such units in the 2004–2005 wave of the Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey. Administrators reported their demographics, training, and treatment orientation, as well as features of the unit and its pattern of use of buprenorphine. Nationally, 15.8% of programs offered any buprenorphine services. Greater adoption of buprenorphine correlated with directors’ younger age, longer tenure, male gender, and weaker endorsement of abstinence as the most important treatment goal. Availability of naltrexone and medical services also correlated positively with buprenorphine adoption. The authors conclude that leaders’ characteristics are related to the adoption of innovative practices in addiction treatment programs. Future work should examine whether leadership development for community addiction programs might speed up the diffusion of buprenorphine and other innovative, evidence-based practices. PMID:19296223

Friedmann, Peter D.; Jiang, Lan; Alexander, Jeffrey A.

2013-01-01

15

Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs  

PubMed Central

This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

2015-01-01

16

Brief buprenorphine detoxification for the treatment of prescription opioid dependence: A pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the feasibility of brief outpatient detoxification as a treatment for prescription opioid (PO) abusers. Fifteen PO-dependent adults were enrolled to receive buprenorphine stabilization, a 2-week buprenorphine taper, and subsequent naltrexone for those who completed the taper. Subjects also received behavioral therapy, urinalysis monitoring, and double-blind drug administration. Subjects provided 83.8%, 91.7% and 31.2% opioid-negative samples during stabilization, taper

Stacey C. Sigmon; Kelly E. Dunn; Gary J. Badger; Sarah H. Heil; Stephen T. Higgins

2009-01-01

17

Buprenorphine treatment outcome in dually diagnosed heroin dependent patients: A retrospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study compared retrospectively in a clinical non-experimental setting the efficacy of buprenorphine (BUP) in different subgroups of dually diagnosed and non-dually diagnosed opioid-dependent patients: all the subjects included in the study showed severe long-lasting heroin addiction and 68.4% were affected by psychiatric comorbidity. Participants (206) (mean age 32.2±8.9, 177 males–29 females) were applicants to a long-term buprenorphine treatment

Gilberto Gerra; Claudio Leonardi; Antonio D'Amore; Giovanni Strepparola; Roberto Fagetti; Cinzia Assi; Amir Zaimovic; Alfio Lucchini

2006-01-01

18

Training HIV Physicians to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few HIV physicians are trained to provide buprenorphine treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the impact of an eight-hour course on the treatment of opioid dependence on HIV physicians' preparedness to prescribe buprenorphine. One hundred thirteen of 257 trained physicians (44%) provided HIV care. Post-course, the majority of…

Sullivan, Lynn E.; Tetrault, Jeanette; Bangalore, Deepa; Fiellin, David A.

2006-01-01

19

Extended vs Short-term Buprenorphine-Naloxone for Treatment of Opioid-Addicted Youth  

PubMed Central

Context The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Design, Setting, and Patients Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Interventions Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Main Outcome Measure Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 ( ?22 = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; ?12 = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use ( ?12 = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting ( ?12 = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment ( ?12 = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use occurred in both groups at follow-up. Four of 83 patients who tested negative for hepatitis C at baseline were positive for hepatitis C at week 12. Conclusions Continuing treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone improved outcome compared with short-term detoxification. Further research is necessary to assess the efficacy and safety of longer-term treatment with buprenorphine for young individuals with opioid dependence. PMID:18984887

Woody, George E.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G.; Fudala, Paul

2008-01-01

20

Clinical Differences Between Opioid Abuse Classes Ameliorated After One Year of Buprenorphine-Medication Assisted Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared clinical and demographic profiles of three opioid dependent user groups, while also measuring their response to one year of buprenorphine-medication assisted treatment (B-MAT). Opioid prescription, street, and combination (street + prescription) users completed the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) multiple times over the course of one treatment year. Although groups differed on all measured demographics (p's < .05),

Joseph Tkacz; Jamie Severt; Cheryl Kassed; Charles Ruetsch

2012-01-01

21

Clinical Differences Between Opioid Abuse Classes Ameliorated After 1 Year of Buprenorphine-Medication Assisted Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the clinical and demographic profiles of three opioid-dependent user groups, and measured their response to 1 year of buprenorphine-medication assisted treatment. Opioid prescription, street, and combination (street + prescription) users completed the Addiction Severity Index multiple times over the course of one treatment year. Although groups differed on all measured demographics (P values <.05) and on six

Joseph Tkacz; Jamie Severt; Cheryl Kassed; Charles Ruetsch

2012-01-01

22

Benzodiazepine use during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence: Clinical and safety outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background Prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment is a topic of active discussion. Clinical benefit is unclear. Overdose, accidental injury, and benzodiazepine misuse remain concerns. We examine the relationship between benzodiazepine misuse history, benzodiazepine prescription, and both clinical and safety outcomes during buprenorphine treatment. Methods We retrospectively examined outpatient buprenorphine treatment records, classifying patients by past-year benzodiazepine misuse history and approved benzodiazepine prescription at intake. Primary clinical outcomes included 12-month treatment retention and urine toxicology for illicit opioids. Primary safety outcomes included total emergency department (ED) visits and odds of an ED visit related to overdose or accidental injury during treatment. Results The 12-month treatment retention rate for the sample (N = 328) was 40%. Neither benzodiazepine misuse history nor benzodiazepine prescription was associated with treatment retention or illicit opioid use. Poisson regressions of ED visits during buprenorphine treatment revealed more ED visits among those with a benzodiazepine prescription versus those without (p < 0.001); benzodiazepine misuse history had no effect. The odds of an accidental injury-related ED visit during treatment were greater among those with a benzodiazepine prescription (OR: 3.7, p < 0.01), with an enhanced effect among females (OR: 4.7, p < 0.01). Overdose was not associated with benzodiazepine misuse history or prescription. Conclusions We found no effect of benzodiazepine prescriptions on opioid treatment outcomes; however, benzodiazepine prescription was associated with more frequent ED visits and accidental injuries, especially among females. When prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment, patients need more education about accidental injury risk. Alternative treatments for anxiety should be considered when possible, especially among females. PMID:23688843

Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Weiss, Roger D.; Borodovsky, Jacob; Shaffer, Howard J.; Albanese, Mark J.

2013-01-01

23

Persistence During Stress-Challenge Associated With Lapse to Opioid Use During Buprenorphine Treatment  

PubMed Central

Objectives Lapse to opiate use after initiation of buprenorphine treatment is common and is a strong predictor of poor treatment retention and increased risk of chronic opiate use. Drug-cues and situations or events associated with distress are known to provoke craving and increase risk for lapse. The current study evaluated the predictive validity of a behavioral index of persistence during a stress-challenge among opiate users identified as affectively vulnerable to lapse risk due to elevated depressive symptoms. Methods Patients from on ongoing clinical trial (n=48) completed a stress-challenge task prior to receiving their first dose of buprenorphine. Results After controlling for levels of craving on their induction day, persistence on the stress-challenge task prior to initiating buprenorphine treatment was associated with successful transition to early abstinence, and lower rates of opiate use during the initial three months of buprenorphine treatment across antidepressant and placebo groups. Conclusions Results from this preliminary study suggest the promise of laboratory-based behavioral paradigms in facilitating understanding of important mechanisms of early lapse. Identifying individual behavioral responses to drug- and stress-cues prior to attempts at abstinence may facilitate delivery of adjunctive behavioral treatments to prevent early lapse. PMID:22864399

Strong, David R.; Brown, Richard A.; Sims, Meredith; Herman, Debra S.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

2014-01-01

24

Buprenorphine from detox and beyond: preliminary evaluation of a pilot program to increase heroin dependent individuals' engagement in a full continuum of care.  

PubMed

Absence of successful transition to post-detoxification treatment leads to high rates of relapse among detoxified heroin users. The present study evaluated a pilot buprenorphine treatment program (BTP). Heroin dependent individuals were inducted onto buprenorphine/naloxone in detox, maintained while transitioning through an intensive inpatient program (IIP), and gradually tapered off medication over 5 months of outpatient (OP) treatment. Compared to programmatic indicators of treatment engagement in the year prior to BTP implementation, referrals from detox to IIP, entry into and completion of IIP and subsequent OP, and days in OP treatment increased substantially. BTP completers, compared to non-completers, viewed abstinence as more difficult and as requiring more assistance to achieve, were less likely to be current cocaine and alcohol users or to have relapsed during the course of treatment. Although preliminary and in need of replication, initial adjunctive use of buprenorphine in an abstinence-based continuum of care may improve post-detoxification treatment entry, engagement, and completion. PMID:23007109

Donovan, Dennis M; Knox, Patricia C; Skytta, Jenny A F; Blayney, Jessica A; DiCenzo, Jessica

2013-04-01

25

Developing and Implementing a New Prison-Based Buprenorphine Treatment Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research suggests that buprenorphine treatment may be a promising intervention for incarcerated individuals with heroin addiction histories. However, its implementation varies from corrections-based methadone because of unique challenges regarding dosing, administration, and regulation. Describing the first randomized clinical trial of…

Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.

2010-01-01

26

Cost-Effectiveness of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Treatments for Heroin Dependence in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Aims To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. Design We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants’ time were estimated using Malaysia’s minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars. Setting Muar, Malaysia. Participants 126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003–2005) receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence. Measurements Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores. Findings Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine. Conclusions Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term. PMID:23226534

Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

2012-01-01

27

Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

2004-01-01

28

Buprenorphine and nor-buprenorphine levels in head hair samples from former heroin users under Suboxone® treatment.  

PubMed

In the current study, buprenorphine (BUP) and its major metabolite, nor-buprenorphine (NBUP), were determined in hair samples from former heroin users following Suboxone® treatment. Hair samples from 36 subjects were analyzed. The drugs of interest were isolated from hair by solid-liquid extraction with methanol and were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, using an electrospray ionization interface. The analytical parameters of the method (such as linearity, limits of quantification, recovery, accuracy, and precision) were determined. The inter-quartile range of BUP levels was from 11.4 to 37.4?pg/mg (mean value 56.6?pg/mg) for the proximal hair segment, from 5.8 to 43.3?pg/mg for the middle hair segment (mean value 25.3?pg/mg), while a range from 4.3 to 33.9?pg/mg (mean value 105.2?pg/mg) for the distant to the root hair segment was determined. For NBUP the corresponding inter-quartile range was from 27.0 to 147.6 for the proximal segment (mean value 95.4?pg/mg), from 21.5 to 164.7?pg/mg for the middle segment (mean value 102.0?pg/mg) and from 20.4 to 103.6?pg/mg for the distant segment (mean value 156.8?pg/mg). The mean BUP/NBUP concentration ratio was 0.5. The daily dose of Suboxone® correlated significantly with BUP and NBUP levels in hair (p?=?0.001 and p?=?0.023) as well as with the BUP/NBUP ratio (p?=?0.010). No significant correlation was found between the levels of BUP and NBUP and the duration of Suboxone® administration. The developed and validated method was successfully used for the determination of BUP and NBUP in hair samples collected from former heroin users under Suboxone® treatment. PMID:24817054

Belivanis, Stamatis; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Vakonaki, Elena; Kovatsi, Leda; Mantsi, Mary; Alegakis, Athanasios; Kavvalakis, Matthaios P; Vynias, Dionisios; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

2014-06-01

29

Treatment Outcomes of African American Buprenorphine Patients by Parole and Probation Status.  

PubMed

This secondary analysis compared outcomes of African-American adults newly-admitted to buprenorphine treatment who were on parole and probation to patients who were not under criminal justice supervision. Buprenorphine patients (N=300) were randomly assigned to receive either Intensive Outpatient Treatment (IOP) or Standard Outpatient Treatment (OP) treatment and were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-months. There were no differences between groups in treatment retention. Among probationers/parolees, IOP was associated with lower 3-month treatment retention compared to OP, but among participants not on probation/parole the relationship was reversed (p=.004). Both conditions showed significant declines in heroin and cocaine use, illegal activity, and in meeting DSM-IV criteria for opioid and cocaine dependence. Probationers/parolees reported lower frequency of illegal activities at 3-months compared to non-probationers/parolees (p=.007). Buprenorphine treatment should be made more widely available to individuals on parole/probation as they respond as well to treatment as patients not supervised by the criminal justice system. PMID:25364037

Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Kelly, Sharon M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H; Olsen, Yngvild K; Schwartz, Robert P

2014-01-01

30

Motivational Assessment of Non-Treatment Buprenorphine Research Participation in Heroin Dependent Individuals  

PubMed Central

Background Heroin abuse remains an important public health problem, particularly in economically disadvantaged areas. Insight into this problem is gained from interviewing addicted individuals. However, we lack systematic data on factors that motivate heroin users to participate in non-treatment research that offers both financial incentives (compensation) and non-financial incentives (e.g., short-term medication). Aim To better understand the relative importance of several types of personal motivations to participate in non-treatment buprenorphine research, and to relate self-motivations to social, economic, demographic and drug use factors. Methods Heroin dependent volunteers (N = 235 total; 57 female and 178 male; 136 African American, 86 Caucasian, and 13 Other) applied for non-therapeutic buprenorphine research in an urban outpatient setting from 2004–2008. We conducted a semi-structured behavioral economic interview, after which participants ranked 11 possible motivations for research participation. Results Although the study was repeatedly described as non-treatment research involving buprenorphine, participants often ranked some treatment-related motivations as important (wanting to reduce/stop heroin use, needing a medication to get stabilized/detoxify). Some motivations correlated with income, heroin use, and years since marketing of buprenorphine. Two dimensions emerged from principal component analysis of motivation rankings: (1) treatment motivation vs. greater immediate needs, and (2) commitment to trying alternatives vs. a more accepting attitude toward traditional interventions. In summary, heroin addicts’ self-motivations to engage in non-therapeutic research are complex – they value economic gain but not exclusively or primarily – and relate to variables such as socioeconomic factors and drug use. PMID:22137646

Papke, Gina; Greenwald, Mark K.

2011-01-01

31

Reversal of Sleep Disturbances in Cocaine-and Heroin-Dependent Men During Chronic Buprenorphine Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in sleep architecture and continuity are frequent side effects of drugs of abuse, and complaints of poor sleep are often reported by recovering drug abusers. As part of a Phase 1 assessment of the safety and efficacy of 4 and 8 mg\\/day of buprenorphine treatment, the sleep patterns of 20 male opiate-and cocaine-dependent patients were quantified by using standard

Scott E. Lukas; Cynthia M. Dorsey; Nancy K. Mello; Jack H. Mendelson; Leslie H. Lundahl; Michelle Sholar; Steven L. Cunningham

1996-01-01

32

Suboxone® (Buprenorphine\\/Naloxone) as an Agonist Opioid Treatment in Spain: A Budgetary Impact Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of buprenorphine\\/naloxone (B\\/N) as an agonist opioid treatment for opiate dependence. Methods: A budgetary impact analysis model was designed to calculate the annual costs (drugs and associated costs) to the Spanish National Healthcare System of methadone versus B\\/N. Data for the model were obtained from official databases and expert panel opinion. Results: It was

José Martínez-Raga; Francisco González Saiz; César Pascual; Miguel A. Casado; Francisco J. Sabater Torres

2010-01-01

33

Preferences for clinic privileges, retail items and social activities in an outpatient buprenorphine treatment program.  

PubMed

This study evaluated preferences for various clinic privileges, retail items, and social activities for use in an outpatient opioid dependence treatment program. Fifty-three opioid-dependent patients who received treatment with buprenorphine for at least 30 days rank ordered 11 clinic privileges, 19 retail items, and 8 social activities from the most desirable (a rank of 1) to the least desirable (a rank equal to the number of items in that category). Additional questions determined preference for counseling frequency and dosing levels. The top three mean rankings for clinic privileges were $50 cash for opioid-negative urines (2.8), take-home doses of buprenorphine (3.6), and voucher points for opioid-negative urines (4.7). The top three mean rankings for retail items were restaurant gift certificates (4.1), movie passes (4.9), and videotape movie and player rentals (6.8). The top three mean rankings for social activities were movies (2.4), barbecues (3.8), and hiking trips (4.3). There was no preference reported for increases or decreases in counseling frequency. Seventy-four percent of subjects preferred to increase their buprenorphine dose by an average of 60.84% independent of their present dose. Consistent with previous findings from methadone treatment, cash payments for opioid-negative urines and take-home medication were the highest ranked clinic privileges. These results suggest that various retail items and social activities may also be useful for reinforcing positive treatment outcomes during outpatient opioid treatment. PMID:8699542

Amass, L; Bickel, W K; Crean, J P; Higgins, S T; Badger, G J

1996-01-01

34

Effects of buprenorphine versus buprenorphine\\/naloxone tablets in non-dependent opioid abusers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist-antagonist under development in the United States as a sublingual medication for treatment\\u000a of opioid dependence. Buprenorphine may be abused; therefore, tablets combining buprenorphine with naloxone have been developed\\u000a with the intent of reducing the abuse risk in people physically dependent upon opioids. The characteristics and abuse potential\\u000a of buprenorphine and buprenorphine\\/naloxone tablets in non-dependent

Eric C. Strain; Kenneth Stoller; Sharon L. Walsh; George E. Bigelow

2000-01-01

35

Diversion of methadone and buprenorphine from opioid substitution treatment: a staff perspective.  

PubMed

Opioid substitution treatment (OST) is still controversial, despite positive results. The issue of diversion to the illicit drug market is a cornerstone in the criticism typically voiced against the treatment. Little research is available concerning how professionals who work in OST view the issue of diversion. In this article, we discuss existing ideas and attitudes toward diversion of methadone and buprenorphine among OST staff in Sweden. The article is based on semi-structured interviews with 25 professionals working in eight OST-programs in southern Sweden. Diversion was seen as a deleterious phenomenon by the interviewees. Three problematic aspects were highlighted: medical risks in the form of overdose fatalities and the recruitment of new opiate/opioid users; negative consequences for the legitimacy of OST; and moral objections, since diversion means that the patients remain in a criminal environment. However, positive aspects were also highlighted. Illicit methadone or buprenorphine is perceived as safer than heroin. In this way, diversion can fulfill a positive function; for instance, if there is a shortage of access to regular treatment. Patients who share their medication with opioid-dependent friends are seen as less culpable than those who sell to anyone for money. PMID:25364995

Johnson, Björn; Richert, Torkel

2014-01-01

36

Predictors of Abstinence: National Institute of Drug Abuse Multisite Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Trial in Opioid-Dependent Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine predictors of opioid abstinence in buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal)-assisted psychosocial treatment for opioid-dependent youth. Method: Secondary analyses were performed of data from 152 youth (15-21 years old) randomly assigned to 12 weeks of extended Bup/Nal therapy or up to 2 weeks of Bup/Nal detoxification with weekly…

Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Warden, Diane; Minhajuddin, Abu; Fishman, Marc J.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Adinoff, Bryon; Trivedi, Madhukar; Weiss, Roger; Potter, Jennifer; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

2011-01-01

37

Office-Based Treatment of Opiate Addiction with a Sublingual-Tablet Formulation of Buprenorphine and Naloxone  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Office-based treatment of opiate addiction with a sublingual-tablet formulation of bu- prenorphine and naloxone has been proposed, but its efficacy and safety have not been well studied. methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 326 opiate- addicted persons who were assigned to office-based treatment with sublingual tablets consisting of buprenorphine (16 mg) in combination with naloxone (4

Paul J. Fudala; T. Peter Bridge; Susan Herbert; William O. Williford; C. Nora Chiang; Karen Jones; Joseph Collins; Dennis Raisch; Paul Casadonte; R. Jeffrey Goldsmith; Walter Ling; Usha Malkerneker; Laura McNicholas; John Renner; Susan Stine; Donald Tusel

2003-01-01

38

Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats  

PubMed Central

Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders.

Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

2015-01-01

39

Timing of buprenorphine adoption by privately funded substance abuse treatment programs: The role of institutional and resource-based interorganizational linkages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying facilitators of more rapid buprenorphine adoption may increase access to this effective treatment for opioid dependence. Using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework, we examine the extent to which programs' interorganizational institutional and resource-based linkages predict the likelihood of being an earlier adopter, later adopter, or nonadopter of buprenorphine. Data were derived from face-to-face interviews with administrators of 345

Sarah A. Savage; Amanda J. Abraham; Hannah K. Knudsen; Tanja C. Rothrauff; Paul M. Roman

40

Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth?  

PubMed Central

Background In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Methods Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15–21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Conclusions Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/ Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. PMID:22626890

Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A.; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

2012-01-01

41

Predictors of Abstinence: NIDA Multi-site Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Trial in Opioid Dependent Youth  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine predictors of opioid abstinence in buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal) assisted psychosocial treatment for opioid dependent youth Method Secondary analyses of data from 152 youth (ages 15–21) randomly assigned to 12 weeks of extended Bup/Nal therapy or up to 2 weeks of Bup/Nal detoxification, both with weekly individual and group drug counseling. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify baseline and during-treatment predictors of opioid positive urines (OPU) at week-12. Predictors were selected based on significance or trend toward significance (i.e. p<0.1) and backward stepwise selection was used, controlling for treatment group, to produce final independent predictors at p ? 0.05. Results Youth presenting to treatment with past 30-day injection drug use (IDU) and more active medical/psychiatric problems were less likely to have a week-12 OPU. Those with early treatment opioid abstinence (i.e. weeks 1 and 2); and those who received additional non-study treatments during the study were less likely to have a week-12 OPU; and those not completing 12 weeks of treatment were more likely to have an OPU. Conclusions Youth with advanced illness (i.e. reporting IDU and additional health problems), and those receiving ancillary treatments to augment study treatment were more likely to have lower opioid use. Treatment success in the first 2 weeks and completion of 12 weeks of treatment were associated with lower rates of OPU. These findings suggest that youth with advanced illness respond well to Bup/Nal treatment, and identify options for tailoring treatment for opioid-dependent youth presenting at community-based settings. PMID:22024000

Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Warden, Diane; Minhajuddin, Abu; Fishman, Marc J.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Adinoff, Bryon; Trivedi, Madhukar; Weiss, Roger; Potter, Jennifer; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

2013-01-01

42

Patient perspectives on buprenorphine/naloxone: a qualitative study of retention during the starting treatment with agonist replacement therapies (START) study.  

PubMed

This study examines the barriers and facilitators of retention among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone at eight community-based opioid treatment programs across the United States. Participants (n = 105) were recruited up to three and a half years after having participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone on liver function. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 67 patients provided with buprenorphine/naloxone who had terminated early and 38 patients who had completed at least 24 weeks of the trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Barriers to buprenorphine/naloxone retention that emerged included factors associated with: (1) the design of the clinical trial; (2) negative medication or treatment experience; and (3) personal circumstances. The facilitators comprised: (1) positive experience with the medication; (2) personal determination and commitment to complete; and (3) staff encouragement and support. The themes drawn from interviews highlight the importance of considering patients' prior experience with buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone, medication preference, personal circumstances, and motivation to abstain from illicit use or misuse of opioids, as these may influence retention. Ongoing education of patients and staff regarding buprenorphine/naloxone, especially in comparison to methadone, and support from staff and peers are essential. PMID:25364994

Teruya, Cheryl; Schwartz, Robert P; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Hasson, Albert L; Thomas, Christie; Buoncristiani, Samantha H; Hser, Yih-Ing; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan J; Glick, Naomi; Jacobs, Petra; McLaughlin, Paul; Ling, Walter

2014-01-01

43

Provision of Ancillary Medications during Buprenorphine Detoxification Does Not improve Treatment Outcomes  

PubMed Central

For opioid-dependent individuals, recovery efforts begin with a period of withdrawal that typically include discomfort from symptoms, possibly precipitating a return to drug use. The study described here investigated whether the provision of ancillary medications for opioid withdrawal symptoms affects treatment outcomes in 139 participants receiving buprenorphine in a 13-day detoxification trial. Outcome measures include the number of opioid-free urine samples collected and retention in treatment. Ancillary medications were provided to 70% of participants: 59% received medication for insomnia, 45% for anxiety, 40% for bone pain, 35% for nausea, and 28% for diarrhea. Findings indicate no difference in the number of opioid-free urine samples between the group receiving ancillary medication and the group who did not, although tests of specific ancillary medications indicate that those who received diarrhea medication had fewer opioid-free urines than those who did not (p = 0.004). Results also indicate that participants attended fewer days of treatment if they received anxiety, nausea, or diarrhea medication compared to no medication (all p values < .05). PMID:20390696

Hillhouse, Maureen; Domier, Catherine P.; Chim, David; Ling, Walter

2009-01-01

44

Patient Characteristics Associated with Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Outcome for Prescription Opioid Dependence: Results from a Multisite Study  

PubMed Central

Background Prescription opioid dependence is a growing problem, but little research exists on its treatment, including patient characteristics that predict treatment outcome. Methods A secondary analysis of data from a large multisite, randomized clinical trial, the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) was undertaken to examine baseline patient characteristics (N=360) associated with success during 12-week buprenorphine/naloxone treatment for prescription opioid dependence. Baseline predictor variables included self-reported demographic and opioid use history information, diagnoses assessed via the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and historical opioid use and related information from the Pain And Opiate Analgesic Use History. Results In bivariate analyses, pre-treatment characteristics associated with successful opioid use outcome included older age, past-year or lifetime diagnosis of major depressive disorder, initially obtaining opioids with a medical prescription to relieve pain, having only used opioids by swallowing or sublingual administration, never having used heroin, using an opioid other than extended-release oxycodone most frequently, and no prior opioid dependence treatment. In multivariate analysis, age, lifetime major depressive disorder, having only used opioids by swallowing or sublingual administration, and receiving no prior opioid dependence treatment remained as significant predictors of successful outcome. Conclusions This is the first study to examine characteristics associated with treatment outcome in patients dependent exclusively on prescription opioids. Characteristics associated with successful outcome after 12 weeks of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment include some that have previously been found to predict heroin-dependent patients’ response to methadone treatment and some specific to prescription opioid-dependent patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone. PMID:23333292

Dreifuss, Jessica A.; Griffin, Margaret L.; Frost, Katherine; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Fiellin, David A.; Selzer, Jeffrey; Hatch-Maillette, Mary; Sonne, Susan C.; Weiss, Roger D.

2012-01-01

45

Buprenorphine and Buprenorphine/Naloxone Diversion, Misuse, and Illicit Use: An International Review  

PubMed Central

The diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone by opioid users are reviewed. Buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are used globally as opioid analgesics and in the treatment of opioid dependency. Diversion of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone represents a complex medical and social issue, and has been widely documented in various geographical regions throughout the world. We first discuss the clinical properties of buprenorphine and its abuse potential. Second, we discuss its diversion and illicit use on an international level, as well as motivations for those activities. Third, we examine the medical risks and benefits of buprenorphine’s non-medically supervised use and misuse. These risks and benefits include the effect of buprenorphine’s use on HIV risk and the risk of its concomitant use with other medications and drugs of abuse. Finally, we discuss the implications of diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use (including potential measures to address issues of diversion); and potential areas for further research. PMID:21466501

Yokell, Michael A.; Zaller, Nickolas D.; Green, Traci C.; Rich, Josiah D.

2011-01-01

46

Pharmacokinetic comparison of the buprenorphine sublingual liquid and tablet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buprenorphine is a ? opioid partial agonist being developed as a treatment for opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, usually administered as a sublingual liquid, is now being developed as a sublingual tablet for clinical use. The present study compared participants’ plasma concentrations after daily maintenance on three buprenorphine liquid doses (2, 4 and 8 mg) and one tablet dose (8 mg). Fourteen

Kory J Schuh; Chris-Ellyn Johanson

1999-01-01

47

Treatment Retention among Patients Randomized to Buprenorphine/Naloxone Compared to Methadone in A Multi-site Trial  

PubMed Central

Aims To examine patient and medication characteristics associated with retention and continued illicit opioid use in methadone (MET) versus buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) treatment for opioid dependence. Design/Settings/Participants This secondary analysis included 1,267 opioid-dependent individuals participating in 9 opioid treatment programs between 2006 and 2009 and randomized to receive open-label BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Measurements The analyses included measures of patient characteristics at baseline (demographics; use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs; self-rated mental and physical health), medication dose and urine drug screens during treatment, and treatment completion and days in treatment during the 24 week trial. Findings The treatment completion rate was 74% for MET vs. 46% for BUP (p<.01); the rate among MET participants increased to 80% when the maximum MET dose reached or exceeded 60mg/day. With BUP, the completion rate increased linearly with higher doses, reaching 60% with doses of 30–32mg/day. Of those remaining in treatment, positive opioid urine results were significantly lower (OR=0.63, 95%CI=0.52–0.76, p<.01) among BUP relative to MET participants during the first 9 weeks of treatment. Higher medication dose was related to lower opiate use, more so among BUP patients. A Cox proportional hazards model revealed factors associated with dropout: (1) BUP (vs. MET, HR=1.61, CI:1.20–2.15), (2) lower medication dose (<16mg for BUP, <60mg for MET; HR=3.09, CI:2.19–4.37), (3) the interaction of dose and treatment condition (those with higher BUP dose were 1.04 times more likely to drop out than those with lower MET dose, and (4) being younger, Hispanic, and using heroin or other substances during treatment. Conclusions Provision of methadone appears to be associated with better retention in treatment for opioid dependence than buprenorphine, as does use of provision of higher doses of both medications. Provision of buprenorphine is associated with lower continued use of illicit opioids. PMID:23961726

Hser, Yih-Ing; Saxon, Andrew J.; Huang, David; Hasson, Al; Thomas, Christie; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Teruya, Cheryl; McLaughlin, Paul; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan; Ling, Walter

2013-01-01

48

Dosing considerations with transdermal formulations of fentanyl and buprenorphine for the treatment of cancer pain  

PubMed Central

Opioids continue to be first-line pharmacotherapy for patients suffering from cancer pain. Unfortunately, subtherapeutic dosage prescribing of pain medications remains common, and many cancer patients continue to suffer and experience diminished quality of life. A large variety of therapeutic options are available for cancer pain patients. Analgesic pharmacotherapy is based on the patient’s self-report of pain intensity and should be tailored to meet the requirements of each individual. Most, if not all, cancer pain patients will ultimately require modifications in their opioid pharmacotherapy. When changes in a patient’s medication regimen are needed, adequate pain control is best maintained through appropriate dosage conversion, scheduling immediate release medication for withdrawal prevention, and providing as needed dosing for breakthrough pain. Transdermal opioids are noninvasive, cause less constipation and sedation when compared to oral opioids, and may improve patient compliance. A relative potency of 100:1 is recommended when converting the patient from oral morphine to transdermal fentanyl. Based on the limited data available, there is significant interpatient variability with transdermal buprenorphine and equipotency recommendations from oral morphine of 75:1–110:1 have been suggested. Cancer patients may require larger transdermal buprenorphine doses to control their pain and may respond better to a more aggressive 75–100:1 potency ratio. This review outlines the prescribing of transdermal fentanyl and transdermal buprenorphine including how to safely and effectively convert to and use them for those with cancer pain. PMID:25170278

Skaer, Tracy L

2014-01-01

49

Timing of buprenorphine adoption by privately funded substance abuse treatment programs: The role of institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages  

PubMed Central

Identifying facilitators of more rapid buprenorphine adoption may increase access to this effective treatment for opioid dependence. Using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework, we examine the extent to which programs’ inter-organizational institutional and resource-based linkages predict the likelihood of being an earlier, later, or non-adopter of buprenorphine. Data were derived from face-to-face interviews with administrators of 345 privately funded substance abuse treatment programs in 2007–2008. Results of multinomial logistic regression models show that inter-organizational and resource linkages were associated with timing of adoption. Programs reporting membership in provider associations were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. Programs that relied more on resources linkages, such as the detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies and the NIDA website, were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. These findings suggest that institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages may expose programs to effective treatments, thereby facilitating more rapid and sustained adoption of innovative treatment techniques. PMID:21831565

Savage, Sarah A.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Roman, Paul M.

2011-01-01

50

Gender Differences Among Prisoners With Pre-Incarceration Heroin Dependence Participating in a Randomized Clinical Trial of Buprenorphine Treatment  

PubMed Central

The primary focus of the current study is to examine whether gender and other baseline characteristics were significantly associated with more severe patterns of drug use. It involves data from 260 male and female pre-release prison inmates with pre-incarceration heroin dependence who enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine. Three outcomes are examined: 1) Lifetime Intravenous drug use; 2) Lifetime number of drugs used; and 3) Heroin use in prison. Regarding lifetime intravenous drug use; race (p = .0001), education (p = .009), age (p = .0001), and psychological treatment (p = .028) were significant. Concerning lifetime number of drugs used; race (p =.0001) and age of first crime (p = .001) were significant. Finally, gender (p = .004), was the only significant variable in terms of using heroin while in prison. All of these differences may have important clinical, treatment, and research implications, which are discussed. PMID:23997546

Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; Wilson, Monique E.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

2013-01-01

51

78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...indicated for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. In a letter dated September...buprenorphine-containing products for the treatment of opioid dependence to implement certain public...buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl products for opioid dependence until the Agency...

2013-06-06

52

Bioavailability of Buprenorphine from Crushed and Whole Buprenorphine (Subutex) Tablets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Buprenorphine (Subutex) is the most abused opioid in Finland. In order to curb the abuse potential of this drug, many treatment centers and prisons crush Subutex tablets before administering them to patients. To date, there are no published studies comparing the efficacy and bioavailability of crushed and whole Subutex tablets. Methods: A total of 16 opioid-dependent patients stabilized on

Kaarlo Simojoki; Pirjo Lillsunde; Nicholas Lintzeris; Hannu Alho

2010-01-01

53

Effects of regulation on methadone and buprenorphine provision in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.  

PubMed

Hurricane Sandy led to the closing of many major New York City public hospitals including their substance abuse clinics and methadone programs, and the displacement or relocation of thousands of opioid-dependent patients from treatment. The disaster provided a natural experiment that revealed the relative strengths and weaknesses of methadone treatment in comparison to physician office-based buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, two modalities of opioid maintenance with markedly different regulatory requirements and institutional procedures. To assess these two modalities of treatment under emergency conditions, semi-structured interviews about barriers to and facilitators of continuity of care for methadone and buprenorphine patients were conducted with 50 providers of opioid maintenance treatment. Major findings included that methadone programs presented more regulatory barriers for providers, difficulty with dose verification due to impaired communication, and an over reliance on emergency room dosing leading to unsafe or suboptimal dosing. Buprenorphine treatment presented fewer regulatory barriers, but buprenorphine providers had little to no cross-coverage options compared to methadone providers, who could refer to alternate methadone programs. The findings point to the need for well-defined emergency procedures with flexibility around regulations, the need for a central registry with patient dose information, as well as stronger professional networks and cross-coverage procedures. These interventions would improve day-to-day services for opioid-maintained patients as well as services under emergency conditions. PMID:25163931

McClure, Bridget; Mendoza, Sonia; Duncan, Laura; Rotrosen, John; Hansen, Helena

2014-10-01

54

Combined Buprenorphine and Clonidine for Short-Term Opiate Detoxification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The approval in 2003 for the use of buprenorphine in opiate addiction treatment has provided physicians with a new pharmacological tool to combat opiate addiction. We surveyed a sample of 100 inpatients who completed short-term opiate detoxification treatment utilizing a combination of buprenorphine and clonidine to assess patient perspectives regarding the usefulness and tolerability of this medication regimen and to

Mark C. Wallen; William J. Lorman; Joyce L. Gosciniak

2006-01-01

55

CASE REPORT OF SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCE WITH BUPRENORPHINE AND MEPHENTERMINE  

E-print Network

Here is reported an unusual case of substance dependence with buprenorphine, mephentermine, & promethazine. This combination taken through intramuscular route produced a relatively mild & delayed abstinence syndrome with features viz. increased sleep and appetite in the patients. The neurophysiological basis for use of this rare form of additive (mephentermine) with buprenorphine is speculated. Key words: Buprenorphine; mephentermine; dependence; withdrawal symptoms Opium (afeem) (Aggarwal,1995) a derivative of "Papaver somniferum " and its congeners like heroine, morphine, methadone and buprenorphine are well recognised as drugs for abuse and dependence. According to one estimate 0.2-0.6 % of Indian urban population need treatment for opioid dependent use (Malhotraetal.,1997).

O. N. Mendhekar; Himanshu Sharma

56

Patient Perspectives on Choosing Buprenorphine over Methadone in an Urban Equal Access System  

PubMed Central

Background Recent policy initiatives in Baltimore City, MD significantly reduced access disparities between methadone and buprenorphine in the publicly-funded treatment sector. Objectives This study examines reasons for choosing buprenorphine over methadone among patients with access to both medications. Methods This study was embedded within a larger clinical trial conducted at two outpatient substance abuse treatment programs offering buprenorphine. Qualitative and quantitative data on treatment choice were collected for new patients starting buprenorphine treatment (n=80). The sample consisted of predominantly urban African American (94%) heroin users who had prior experience with non-prescribed street buprenorphine (85%) and opioid agonist treatment (68%). Qualitative data were transcribed and coded for themes, while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and bivariate statistics. Results Participants typically conveyed their choice of buprenorphine treatment as a decision against methadone. Buprenorphine was perceived as a helpful medication while methadone was perceived as a harmful narcotic with multiple unwanted physical effects. Positive experiences with non-prescribed “street buprenorphine” were a central factor in participants’ decisions to seek buprenorphine treatment. Conclusions Differences in service structure between methadone and buprenorphine did not strongly influence treatment-seeking decisions in this sample. Personal experiences with medications and the street narrative surrounding them play an important role in treatment selection decisions. Scientific Significance This study characterizes important decision factors that underlie patients’ selection of buprenorphine over methadone treatment. PMID:23617873

Gryczynski, Jan; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Dušek, Kristi A.; Gugsa, Nishan; Monroe, Cristin L.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin

2014-01-01

57

[Primary health care and family medicine--possibilities for treatment of opiate addicts].  

PubMed

The global trend of promoting management and treatment of drug addicts in family physician offices is the result of the success of opioid agonist therapy. Studies have shown favorable results by shifting treatment into the hands of family physician. This process contributes to general health care of drug addicts and their health by linking different areas of health care, thereby providing comprehensive protection. Shifting treatment of addiction to family physician offices contributes to the elimination of treatment isolation and stigmatization, while further benefits are lower barriers to employment, increase in patient privacy and opportunity to provide health care. The aim of this study was to provide a concise overview of the knowledge from new clinical research over the past ten years on heroin addiction treatment in primary care. New research dealing with the approach to treating addicts indicates a direct link between receiving primary health care with a reduced likelihood of using heroin; furthermore, the main concerns of drug addicts for treatment are availability of more therapeutic programs, better functioning of existing programs, and improved staff relations towards them; final results and outcomes achieved by office and hospital treatment of drug addicts are similar and confirm the positive linear relationship between treatment duration and outcome. Studies comparing therapies show a positive effect of the adaptive methadone treatment maintenance model on the psychosocial factors; equal efficiency of treatment regardless of initiation with buprenorphine or with methadone; and equal effectiveness of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol treatment compared with methadone and diacetylmorphine as a good alternative for addiction therapy with previously unsatisfactory results. New studies on buprenorphine show equal effectiveness and cost of detoxification whether guided by a family physician or at the hospital; non-supervised therapy does not significantly influence the outcome, but is significantly cheaper; long-term therapy with buprenorphine in the doctor's office shows mild retention. PMID:23814972

Tiljak, Hrvoje; Nerali?, Ivana; Cerovecki, Venija; Kastelic, Andrej; Adzi?, Zlata Ozvaci?; Tiljak, Anja

2012-10-01

58

Buprenorphine for office-based practice: consensus conference overview.  

PubMed

This overview of the March 2003 conference on the U.S. national buprenorphine implementation program is developed to inform the practitioner about the positive experience that has been accumulated worldwide on the use of buprenorphine for office-based practice. The first paper delineates the challenges for American psychiatry in moving buprenorphine forward into general practice. Most psychiatrists are unprepared to work with opiate-dependent patients or to use buprenorphine. The international successes with office-based buprenorphine from France and Australia are presented in the next papers, followed by presentations on several U.S. studies using buprenorphine in the community for detoxification and office-based maintenance. These experiences have thus far confirmed buprenorphine's utility and promise for opiate addiction treatment in the U.S. Finally, two national monitoring programs have been implemented to assess the public health impact of this new treatment opportunity. This opportunity has a three-year window, however, and a critical need will be to attract a sufficient number of physicians into prescribing buprenorphine/naloxone in order to allow our patients increased access to this treatment. PMID:15204671

Kosten, Thomas R; Fiellin, David A

2004-01-01

59

The Impact of Recent Cocaine Use on Plasma Levels of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Patients with and Without HIV-infection.  

PubMed

Cocaine decreases methadone and buprenorphine plasma concentrations. HIV infection and/or antiretroviral medication use may impact these relationships. We sought to determine the association between recent cocaine use and methadone and buprenorphine concentrations in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects in clinical care. R- and S-methadone or buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations were assessed at 0.5, 1, 2, and 24hours after dosing in subjects with confirmed cocaine use and abstinence. We compared methadone and buprenorphine concentrations for cocaine use vs. abstinence, by HIV status in 16 subjects receiving methadone (6 HIV-infected) and 17 receiving buprenorphine (8 HIV-infected). With recent cocaine use, peak R-methadone (244 vs. 297ng/mL, p=0.03) and peak S-methadone (285 vs. 339ng/mL); p=0.03 concentrations were lower in HIV-uninfected subjects only. Peak buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations were unchanged regardless of cocaine use or HIV status. Cocaine may decrease methadone concentrations in HIV-uninfected subjects. HIV infection or its treatment may attenuate cocaine's effect on methadone. PMID:25480096

Tetrault, Jeanette M; McCance-Katz, Elinore F; Moody, David E; Fiellin, David A; Lruie, Bonnie S; DInh, An T; Fiellin, Lynn E

2015-04-01

60

Preliminary buprenorphine sublingual tablet pharmacokinetic data in plasma, oral fluid and sweat during treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women  

PubMed Central

Background Buprenorphine is currently under investigation as a pharmacotherapy to treat pregnant women for opioid dependence. This research evaluates buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenophine (NBUP), buprenorphine-glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) pharmacokinetics after high dose (14–20 mg) BUP sublingual tablet administration in three opioid-dependent pregnant women. Methods Oral fluid and sweat specimens were collected in addition to plasma specimens for 24 h during gestation weeks 28 or 29 and 34, and 2 months after delivery. Tmax was not affected by pregnancy; however, BUP and NBUP Cmax and AUC0–24h tended to be lower during pregnancy compared to postpartum levels. Results Statistically significant but weak positive correlations were found for BUP plasma and OF concentrations, and BUP/NBUP ratios in plasma and OF. Conclusion Statistically significant negative correlations were observed for times of specimen collection and BUP and NBUP OF/plasma ratios. BUP-Gluc and NBUP-Gluc were detected in only 5% of OF specimens. In sweat, BUP and NBUP were detected in only 4 of 25 (12 or 24 h) specimens in low concentrations (<2.4 ng/patch). These preliminary data describe BUP and metabolite pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and suggest that, like methadone, upward dose adjustments may be needed with advancing gestation. PMID:21860340

Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Huestis, Marilyn A.

2011-01-01

61

Meloxicam and Buprenorphine Treatment after Ovarian Transplantation Does Not Affect Estrous Cyclicity and Follicular Integrity in Aged CBA/J Mice  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is important for the survival of ovarian transplants and the restoration of ovarian functions. Without angiogenesis, transplanted ovarian tissue becomes more susceptible to tissue damage and necrosis. Administration of analgesics for pain management has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, which can influence transplant success especially in aged animals. Aging and the effects of hypoxia after transplantation decrease reproductive viability of the ovarian transplant; therefore, it is important to understand the additional effects of analgesics on aged animal models. The present study investigated the effects of two analgesics, buprenorphine, an opiate, and meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the reproductive indicators related to estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity after ovarian transplantation of young ovaries into aged CBA/J mice. These aged females did not show any different reproductive responses when treated with either buprenorphine or meloxicam. No significant differences were observed in estrous cycle length, the onset of estrous cycling, the regularity of estrous cycles, and the proportion of viable follicles and total number of follicles per ovarian sample across treatment groups. PMID:25153315

Le, Anna H.; Bonachea, Luis A.; Cargill, Shelley L.

2014-01-01

62

Buprenorphine for Cancer Pain: Is It Ready for Prime Time?  

PubMed

Buprenorphine (BUP) is a semisynthetic derivative of the opium alkaloid thebaine found in the poppy Papaver somniferum. Its chemical structure contains the morphine structure but differs by having a cyclopropylmethyl group. Buprenorphine is a potent µ opioid agonist. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver and gut. The development of a transdermal BUP formulation in 2001 led to its evaluation in cancer pain. This article provides the practitioner with an update on the current role of BUP in cancer care. It highlights data suggesting effectiveness in various types of cancer pain. The article reviews pharmacology, routes of administration, adverse effects, drug interactions, and cost considerations. PMID:25163678

Prommer, Eric

2014-08-27

63

Buprenorphine Decreases the CCL2-Mediated Chemotactic Response of Monocytes.  

PubMed

Despite successful combined antiretroviral therapy, ?60% of HIV-infected people exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV-infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9 were identified and had not been shown previously to be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Williams, Dionna W; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W

2015-04-01

64

Treatment of opioid-dependent adolescents and young adults with buprenorphine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rising rates of opioid use among teenagers and young adults are a public health concern. Despite short durations of opioid\\u000a use compared with those of adults, youth with opioid dependence have a host of co-occurring conditions, including polysubstance\\u000a abuse, psychiatric disorders, hepatitis C infection, HIV risk, and high-risk sexual and criminal behaviors. Opioid-dependent\\u000a youth typically are offered outpatient\\/residential treatment with

Geetha A. Subramaniam; Marc J. Fishman; George Woody

2009-01-01

65

Neonatal Neurobehavior Effects following Buprenorphine versus Methadone Exposure  

PubMed Central

Aim To determine the effects of in utero exposure to methadone or buprenorphine on infant neurobehavior. Design Three sites from the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study, a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized clinical trial participated in this sub-study. Setting Medical Centers that provided comprehensive maternal care to opioid-dependent pregnant women in Baltimore, MD, Providence, RI, and Vienna, Austria. Participants 39 full-term infants. Measurements The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) was administered to a subgroup of infants on postpartum days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14-15 and 28-30. Findings While neurobehavior improved for both medication conditions over time, infants exposed in utero to buprenorphine exhibited fewer Stress-Abstinence signs (P<0.001), were less Excitable (P<0.001) and less Over-Aroused (P<0.01), exhibited less Hypertonia (P<0.007), and had better Self-Regulation (P<0.04) and required less Handling (P<0.001) to maintain a quiet alert state relative to in utero methadone-exposed infants. Infants who were older when they began morphine treatment for withdrawal had higher Self-Regulation scores (P<0.01), and demonstrated the least amount of Excitability (P<0.02) and Hypertonia (P<0.02) on average. Quality of Movement was negatively correlated with peak NAS score (P<0.01), number of days treated with morphine for NAS (P<0.01) and total amount of morphine received (P<0.03). Excitability scores were positively related to total morphine dose (P<0.03). Conclusion While neurobehavior improves during the first month of postnatal life for in utero agonist-medication-exposed neonates, buprenorphine exposure results in superior neurobehavioral scores and less severe withdrawal than does methadone exposure. PMID:23106928

Coyle, Mara G.; Salisbury, Amy L.; Lester, Barry M.; Jones, Hendrée E.; Lin, Hai; Graf-Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Fisher, Gabriele

2015-01-01

66

A woman's experience of tapering from buprenorphine during pregnancy.  

PubMed

Although opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) is the treatment of choice for pregnant opioid-dependent patients, some professionals argue that tapering the medication dose will reduce the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). This case description is based on the patient's detailed blog, and medical records from her general practitioner and the hospital. The patient is an employed, 32-year-old drug-abstinent woman in OMT. Her taper from 24 mg of buprenorphine started at 14 weeks' gestation and is slow, with withdrawal symptoms increasing gradually. In pregnancy week 31, she is off buprenorphine but she has severe withdrawal symptoms. She chose to go back on 4 mg of buprenorphine. The patient's son was born in pregnancy week 38+3, weighs 2950 g and does not require pharmacological treatment for NAS. The fetus most probably did experience fetal stress during the patient's tapering. It was the right decision by the patient to go back on buprenorphine. PMID:25540212

Welle-Strand, Gabrielle Katrine; Kvamme, Odd; Andreassen, Andreas; Ravndal, Edle

2014-01-01

67

A combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone blocks compulsive cocaine intake in rodents without producing dependence.  

PubMed

Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both ? and ? opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at ? opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non-opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent ? opioid antagonist with weaker ? and ? antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block ? agonist-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction. PMID:22875830

Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Misra, Kaushik K; Schlosburg, Joel E; Koob, George F

2012-08-01

68

Psychiatric comorbidity, red flag behaviors, and associated outcomes among office-based buprenorphine patients following Hurricane Sandy.  

PubMed

In October 2012, Bellevue Hospital Center (Bellevue) in New York City was temporarily closed as a result of Hurricane Sandy, the largest hurricane in US history. Bellevue's primary care office-based buprenorphine program was temporarily closed and later relocated to an affiliate public hospital. Previous research indicates that the relationships between disaster exposure, substance use patterns, psychiatric symptoms, and mental health services utilization is complex, with often conflicting findings regarding post-event outcomes (on the individual and community level) and antecedent risk factors. In general, increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is associated with both greater disaster exposure and the development or exacerbation of other psychiatric symptoms and need for treatment. To date, there is limited published information regarding post-disaster outcomes among patients enrolled in office-based buprenorphine treatment, as the treatment modality has only been relatively approved recently. Patients enrolled in the buprenorphine program at the time of the storm were surveyed for self-reported buprenorphine adherence and illicit substance and alcohol use, as well as disaster-related personal consequences and psychiatric sequelae post-storm. Baseline demographic characteristics and insurance status were available from the medical record. Analysis was descriptive (counts and proportions) and qualitative, coding open-ended responses for emergent themes. There were 132 patients enrolled in the program at the time of the storm; of those, 91 were contacted and 89 completed the survey. Almost half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine supply. Unexpectedly, patients with psychiatric comorbidity were no more likely to report increased use/relapse as a result. Rather, major risk factors associated with increased use or relapse post-storm were: (1) shorter length of time in treatment, (2) exposure to storm losses such as buprenorphine supply disruption, (3) a pre-storm history of red flag behaviors (in particular, repeat opioid-positive urines), and (4) new-onset post-storm psychiatric symptoms. Our findings highlight the relative resilience of buprenorphine as an office-based treatment modality for patients encountering a disaster with associated unanticipated service disruption. In responding to future disasters, triaging patient contact and priority based on a history of red-flag behaviors, rather than a history of psychiatric comorbidity, will likely optimize resource allocation, especially among recently enrolled patients. Additionally, patients endorsing new-onset psychiatric manifestations following disasters may be an especially high-risk group for poor outcomes, warranting further study. PMID:24619775

Williams, Arthur R; Tofighi, Babak; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D; Grossman, Ellie

2014-04-01

69

Effectiveness of buprenorphine in double diagnosed patients. Buprenorphine as psychothropic drug  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Opiate drugs were first proposed for the treatment of dysphoric syndromes, depression and psychoses many years ago. Even so, the usefulness of these compounds in psychiatry is supported by only a small corpus of data. The reasons given for the restrictions placed on opiate use are based on prejudice rather than scientific evidence. Buprenorphine, with its unique pharmacological profile,

Icro Maremmani; Matteo Pacini; Pier Paolo Pani

70

Methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are effective in reducing illicit buprenorphine and other opioid use, and reducing HIV risk behavior – Outcomes of a Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

Aims Determine the extent to which buprenorphine injectors continue treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone or methadone, and the impact of these treatments on substance use and HIV risk in the Republic of Georgia. Methods Randomized controlled 12-week trial of daily-observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone followed by a dose taper, referral to ongoing treatment, and follow-up at week 20 at the Uranti Clinic in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. Eighty consenting treatment-seeking individuals (40/group) aged 25 and above who met ICD-10 criteria for opioid dependence with physiologic features and reported injecting buprenorphine 10 or more times in the past 30 days. Opioid use according to urine tests and self-reports, treatment retention, and HIV risk behavior as determined by the Risk Assessment Battery. Results Mean age of participants was 33.7 (SD5.7), 4 were female, mean history of opioid injection use was 5.8 years (SD4.6), none were HIV+ at intake or at the 12-week assessment and 73.4% were HCV+. Sixty-eight participants (85%) completed the 12-week medication phase (33 from methadone and 35 from buprenorphine/naloxone group); 37 (46%) were in treatment at the 20-week follow-up (21 from methadone and 16 from the buprenorphine/naloxone group). In both study arms, treatment resulted in a marked reduction in unprescribed buprenorphine, other opioid use, and HIV injecting risk behavior with no clinically significant differences between the two treatment arms. Conclusions Daily observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone are effective treatments for non-medical buprenorphine and other opioid use in the Republic of Georgia and likely to be useful for preventing HIV infection. PMID:23916321

Otiashvili, David; Piralishvili, Gvantsa; Sikharulidze, Zura; Kamkamidze, George; Poole, Sabrina; Woody, George E.

2013-01-01

71

New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine–naloxone  

PubMed Central

Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine–naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

Soyka, Michael

2015-01-01

72

Buprenorphine and cocaine effects on social behavior of monkeys.  

PubMed

We administered for 2 weeks intramuscular buprenorphine 0.3 mg/kg per day (and in a separate series, its vehicle) to each of 7 male, group-living Macaca fuscata (Japanese Snow Monkeys). Animals received one injection of cocaine 0.75 mg/kg and one of saline (about Days 9 and 14) in each series; after each of these doses ethologic observers recorded for 3 h the frequency of occurrence of 64 separate social, self-care, position and other behaviors. Cocaine alone changed the frequency of many behaviors. Buprenorphine alone only reduced the frequency of eating, yawning and ejaculation. The drugs had no interactive effects on behavior. In a dose reported to suppress monkeys' heroin and cocaine self-administration, buprenorphine showed remarkably few disruptions of normal group behavior. But it neither reversed nor enhanced cocaine's behavioral effects. PMID:8462413

Crowley, T J; Williams, E A; Mikulich, S K; Ingersoll, N C

1993-02-01

73

The Implementation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone in College Health Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Opiate abuse and dependence have become important concerns for college healthcare providers. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 and the approval of the combination buprenorphine/naloxone for office-based treatment of opiate dependence have increased the options available for college students and their healthcare providers. The…

DeMaria, Peter A., Jr.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

2008-01-01

74

Considerations on the role of buprenorphine in recovery from heroin addiction from a UK perspective.  

PubMed

The United Kingdom Drug Strategy emphasises recovery as a key focus in the treatment of drug dependence. A framework for recovery is defined in the Recovery-Orientated Drug Treatment report, written by an expert working group, and comprises four key phases: engagement and stabilisation, including the establishment of treatment goals; preparation for change, involving engagement in psychosocial and pharmacological interventions; active change, including detoxification and medical withdrawal; and completion, including interventions that strengthen community integration. A body of evidence supports the benefits of buprenorphine, a partial agonist at mu opioid receptors, in supporting individualised recovery based on this framework, specifically in relation to the potential for rapid stabilisation, flexibility to transition to other treatment options or achieve abstinence, effective blocking of on-top use of illicit drugs, the treatment of comorbidities through the minimisation of drug-drug interactions, and a good safety profile. In addition, the newer abuse-deterrent formulation of buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone is likely to strengthen recovery-orientated systems of care due to its potential to reduce misuse and diversion. Progress through the recovery journey and the ability to sustain recovery will depend on individual needs and goals and on the amount of recovery capital that individuals have developed. PMID:25389219

Nutt, David J

2015-01-01

75

Patient perspectives of an integrated program of medical care and substance use treatment.  

PubMed

The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y

2014-02-01

76

Patient Perspectives of an Integrated Program of Medical Care and Substance Use Treatment  

PubMed Central

Abstract The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y.

2014-01-01

77

Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

Greenwald, Mark K.

2008-01-01

78

Efficacy of daily and alternate-day dosing regimens with the combination buprenorphine–naloxone tablet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the efficacy of a combination tablet formulation of buprenorphine containing 8 mg of buprenorphine and 2 mg of naloxone for every other day treatment and whether increasing the daily maintenance dose was essential for maintaining an efficacious alternate-day treatment. Twenty-six opioid-dependent outpatients completing a 16-day baseline entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, triple crossover trial. Twenty-one days of daily

Leslie Amass; Jonathan B Kamien; Susan K Mikulich

2000-01-01

79

Urine specimen detection of concurrent nonprescribed medicinal and illicit drug use in patients prescribed buprenorphine.  

PubMed

Patients being treated with buprenorphine usually have a history of opioid dependence and may be predisposed to misuse of drugs. Concurrent drug misuse increases the risk of life-threatening drug interactions. This retrospective data analysis observed which nonprescribed and illicit drugs were most commonly detected in the urine of patients from pain management clinics taking buprenorphine with or without a prescription. GC, LC/MS and LC-MS-MS were used to quantify 20,929 urine specimens. The most prevalent illicit drug used in both the groups (prescribed and nonprescribed buprenorphine) was marijuana, followed by cocaine. The most prevalent nonprescribed medications abused by both the groups were benzodiazepines, followed by oxycodone and hydrocodone. The overall prevalence of illicit and nonprescribed drug use was significantly higher in subjects who used buprenorphine without a prescription versus prescribed use. Of the concurrent use of marijuana and cocaine with buprenorphine, cocaine is most concerning since it decreases exposure to buprenorphine (lower area under the concentration-time curve and maximum concentration). The concurrent use of nonprescribed benzodiazepines with buprenorphine can cause excess sedation leading to respiratory depression and even death. These findings highlight the importance of educating patients about these potential toxicities. Furthermore, pain providers should consider expanding the spectrum of drugs that they monitor in patients under treatment. PMID:24080973

Guo, Alexander Y; Ma, Joseph D; Best, Brookie M; Atayee, Rabia S

2013-01-01

80

Differences in the profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome signs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates  

PubMed Central

Aims To compare the profile of signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed infants. Design, setting and participants Secondary analysis of NAS data from a multi-site, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized clinical trial. Data from a total of 129 neonates born to opioid-dependent women who had been assigned to receive methadone or buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy were examined. Measurements For 10 days after delivery, neonates (methadone = 72, buprenorphine = 57) were assessed regularly using a 19-item modified Finnegan scale. Data from neonates who required pharmacological treatment (methadone = 41, buprenorphine = 27) were included up to the time treatment was initiated. The incidence and mean severity of the total NAS score and each individual sign of NAS were calculated and compared between medication conditions, as was the median time until morphine treatment initiation among treated infants in each condition. Findings Two NAS signs (undisturbed tremors and hyperactive Moro reflex) were observed significantly more frequently in methadone-exposed neonates and three (nasal stuffiness, sneezing, loose stools) were observed more frequently in buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Mean severity scores on the total NAS score and five individual signs (disturbed and undisturbed tremors, hyperactive Moro reflex, excessive irritability, failure to thrive) were significantly higher among methadone-exposed neonates, while sneezing was higher among buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Among treated neonates, methadone-exposed infants required treatment significantly earlier than buprenorphine-exposed infants (36 versus 59 hours postnatal, respectively). Conclusions The profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome differs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates, with significant differences in incidence, severity and treatment initiation time. Overall, methadone-exposed neonates have a more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome. PMID:23106927

Gaalema, Diann E.; Scott, Teresa Linares; Heil, Sarah H.; Coyle, Mara G.; Kaltenbach, Karol; Badger, Gary J.; Arria, Amelia M.; Stine, Susan M.; Martin, Peter R.; Jones, Hendrée E.

2014-01-01

81

Can the chronic administration of the combination of buprenorphine and naloxone block dopaminergic activity causing anti-reward and relapse potential?  

PubMed Central

Opiate addiction is associated with many adverse health and social harms, fatal overdose, infectious disease transmission, elevated health care costs, public disorder, and crime. Although community-based addiction treatment programs continue to reduce the harms of opiate addiction with narcotic substitution therapy such as methadone maintenance, there remains a need to find a substance that not only blocks opiate-type receptors (mu, delta, etc.) but also provides agonistic activity; hence the impetus arose for the development of a combination of narcotic antagonism and mu receptor agonist therapy. After three decades of extensive research the federal Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA) opened a window of opportunity for patients with addiction disorders by providing increased access to options for treatment. DATA allows physicians who complete a brief specialty-training course to become certified to prescribe buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone (Subutex, Suboxone) for treatment of patients with opioid dependence. Clinical studies indicate buprenorphine maintenance is as effective as methadone maintenance in retaining patients in substance abuse treatment and in reducing illicit opioid use. With that stated, we must consider the long-term benefits or potential toxicity attributed to Subutex or Suboxone. We describe a mechanism whereby chronic blockade of opiate receptors, in spite of only partial opiate agonist action, may ultimately block dopaminergic activity causing anti-reward and relapse potential. While the direct comparison is not as yet available, toxicity to buprenorphine can be found in the scientific literature. In considering our cautionary note in this commentary, we are cognizant that to date this is what we have available, and until such a time when the real magic bullet is discovered, we will have to endure. However, more than anything else this commentary should at least encourage the development of thoughtful new strategies to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention. PMID:21948099

Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas JH; Bailey, John; Bowirrat, Abdulla; Femino, John; Chen, Amanda LC; Simpatico, Thomas; Morse, Siobhan; Giordano, John; Damle, Uma; Kerner, Mallory; Braverman, Eric R.; Fornari, Frank; Downs, B.William; Rector, Cynthia; Barh, Debmayla; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

2013-01-01

82

[Necrosis of the glans penis: a complication of an injection of buprenorphin in a opioid abuser].  

PubMed

Necrosis of the penis glans is commonly described after circumcision or strangulation. We report the case of a patient, opioid abuser, who presented an isolated glans necrosis after an injection of buprenorphin. The buprenorphin (Subutex) is a sublingual partial mu-opioid agonist used for the treatment of heroin dependance. Its intravenous or subcutaneous abuse is associated with local infection. The patient require a surgical intervention. After the failure of a mucosal graft, a soft skin graft was done. PMID:19269730

Hornez, E; Laroche, J; Monchal, T; Bourgouin, S; Riviere, P; Fournier, R; Dantzer, E

2010-04-01

83

Electrically-assisted transdermal delivery of buprenorphine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to explore the electrically assisted transdermal delivery of buprenorphine. Oral delivery of buprenorphine, a synthetic opiate analgesic, is less efficient due to low absorption and large first-pass metabolism. While transdermal delivery of buprenorphine is expected to avoid the first-pass effect and thereby be more bioavailable, use of electrical enhancement techniques (iontophoresis and\\/or electroporation) could

Sagarika Bose; William R. Ravis; Yuh-Jing Lin; Lei Zhang; Günter A. Hofmann; Ajay K. Banga

2001-01-01

84

Discontinuation of buprenorphine maintenance therapy: perspectives and outcomes.  

PubMed

Buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) is increasingly the preferred opioid maintenance agent due to its reduced toxicity and availability in an office-based setting in the United States. Although BMT has been shown to be highly efficacious, it is often discontinued soon after initiation. No current systematic review has yet investigated providers' or patients' reasons for BMT discontinuation or the outcomes that follow. Hence, provider and patient perspectives associated with BMT discontinuation after a period of stable buprenorphine maintenance and the resultant outcomes were systematically reviewed with specific emphasis on pre-buprenorphine-taper parameters predictive of relapse following BMT discontinuation. Few identified studies address provider or patient perspectives associated with buprenorphine discontinuation. Within the studies reviewed providers with residency training in BMT were more likely to favor long term BMT instead of detoxification, and providers were likely to consider BMT discontinuation in the face of medication misuse. Patients often desired to remain on BMT because of fear of relapse to illicit opioid use if they were to discontinue BMT. The majority of patients who discontinued BMT did so involuntarily, often due to failure to follow strict program requirements, and 1month following discontinuation, rates of relapse to illicit opioid use exceeded 50% in every study reviewed. Only lower buprenorphine maintenance dose, which may be a marker for attenuated addiction severity, predicted better outcomes across studies. Relaxed BMT program requirements and frequent counsel on the high probability of relapse if BMT is discontinued may improve retention in treatment and prevent the relapse to illicit opioid use that is likely to follow BMT discontinuation. PMID:25601365

Bentzley, Brandon S; Barth, Kelly S; Back, Sudie E; Book, Sarah W

2015-05-01

85

Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation  

SciTech Connect

High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD{sub 5}) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD{sub 5} was 10 mg kg{sup -1}. Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg{sup -1} produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.9 versus 5.7 {+-} 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 {+-} 0.06 versus 7.44 {+-} 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 {+-} 0.6 versus 11.1 {+-} 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg{sup -1} norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use.

Megarbane, Bruno [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France) and Reanimation Medicale et Toxicologique, Hopital Lariboisiere, 2 Rue Ambroise Pare, 75010 Paris (France)]. E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Marie, Nicolas [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Pirnay, Stephane [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Prefecture de Police de Paris, 75012 Paris (France); Borron, Stephen W. [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France) and Departments of Emergency Medicine and Medicine - Occupational and Environmental Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC 22052 (United States); Gueye, Papa N. [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Risede, Patricia [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Monier, Claire [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Noble, Florence [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Baud, Frederic J. [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris VII, Hopital Fernand Widal, Paris (France); Reanimation Medicale et Toxicologique, Hopital Lariboisiere, 2 Rue Ambroise Pare, 75010 Paris (France)

2006-05-01

86

Using buprenorphine to facilitate entry into residential therapeutic community rehabilitation.  

PubMed

For opioid-dependent patients, the need for detoxification has been a barrier to entry into long-term residential treatment. This report describes a retrospective observational cohort study with the first 38 opioid-dependent patients entering First Step, a 14-day buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) detoxification regimen integrated into a long-term residential therapeutic community (TC) program. Eighty-nine percent (34 of 38) of First Step patients completed a 14-day buprenorphine taper protocol, 50% (19 of 38) completed an initial 3- to 4-week stay, and 39% (15 of 38) completed at least 3 months of residential treatment at the TC. Retention did not differ significantly in a demographically matched concurrently admitted control group without impending opioid withdrawal, in which 65% (24 of 37) completed an initial 3- to 4-week stay (p = .20) and 57% (21 of 37) completed at least 3 months of treatment (p = .14). Withdrawal symptoms were mild, and there were no instances of precipitated withdrawal. The findings suggest the potential for buprenorphine to serve as a bridge, improving the viability of long-term residential treatment for managing opioid dependence. PMID:17306725

Collins, Eric D; Horton, Terry; Reinke, Katherine; Amass, Leslie; Nunes, Edward V

2007-03-01

87

Combined buprenorphine and chlonidine for short-term opiate detoxification: patient perspectives.  

PubMed

The approval in 2003 for the use of buprenorphine in opiate addiction treatment has provided physicians with a new pharmacological tool to combat opiate addiction. We surveyed a sample of 100 inpatients who completed short-term opiate detoxification treatment utilizing a combination of buprenorphine and clonidine to assess patient perspectives regarding the usefulness and tolerability of this medication regimen and to compare it to their past opiate detox experiences, if any. Patients identified pain (63%), sleep problems (57%), and anxiety (56%) as the symptoms they perceived to be most helped with buprenorphine. Over 90% of patients with past detoxification treatments rated buprenorphine treatment to be as good as or better than their past treatments. Reports of a euphoric effect were minimal (7%) and no patients reported any generalized worsening of their opiate withdrawal symptoms. We conclude that based upon patient perspectives that combining buprenorphine with clonidine is a useful and well-tolerated medication regimen for the treatment of opiate withdrawal. PMID:16597570

Wallen, Mark C; Lorman, William J; Gosciniak, Joyce L

2006-01-01

88

Infections and obstetrical outcomes in opioid-dependent pregnant women maintained on methadone or buprenorphine  

PubMed Central

Aims To characterize infections and compare obstetrical outcomes in opioid-dependent pregnant women who participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing agonist medications, methadone and buprenorphine. Design Incidence of infections was identified as part of the screening medical assessment. As part of a planned secondary analysis, ANOVA and polytomous logistic regressions were conducted on obstetrical outcome variables using treatment randomization condition (maternal maintenance with either methadone or buprenorphine) as the predictor variable, controlling for differences between study sites. Setting Six United States sites and one European site that provided comprehensive treatment to opioid-dependent pregnant women. Participants Pregnant opioid-dependent women (n = 131) who delivered while participating in the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study. Measurements Obstetrical, infectious, and other maternal medical complications captured by medical records, physical exam, blood tests, and self-report. Neonatal medical complications captured by medical records. Findings Hepatitis C (HCV) was the most common infection (32.3%), followed by hepatitis B (7.6%) and Chlamydia (6.1%) among participants at study enrollment. Maternal methadone versus buprenorphine maintenance was associated with a higher incidence of preterm labor (P = 0.04) and a significantly higher percentage of signs of respiratory distress in neonates at delivery (P = 0.05). Other medical and obstetrical complications were infrequent in the total sample, as well as in both methadone and buprenorphine conditions. Conclusions Buprenorphine appears to have an acceptable safety profile for use during pregnancy. PMID:23106930

Holbrook, Amber M.; Baxter, Jason K.; Jones, Hendrée E.; Heil, Sarah H.; Coyle, Mara G.; Martin, Peter R.; Stine, Susan M.; Kaltenbach, Karol

2014-01-01

89

Preliminary Study of Buprenorphine and Bupropion for Opioid Dependent Smokers  

PubMed Central

In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, bupropion (BUPRO, 300 mg/day) was compared to placebo (PBO) for concurrent treatment of opioid and tobacco addiction in 40 opioid-dependent smokers stabilized on buprenorphine (BUPRE, 24 mg/day). Participants received contingent, monetary reinforcement for abstinence from smoking, illicit opioids, and cocaine. Significant differences in treatment retention were observed (BUPRE+BUPRO, 58%; BUPRE+PBO, 90%). BUPRO treatment was not more effective than placebo for abstinence from tobacco, opioids, or cocaine in BUPRE stabilized patients. These preliminary findings do not support the efficacy of BUPRO, in combination with BUPRE, for concurrent treatment of opioid and tobacco addiction. PMID:18612883

Mooney, Marc E.; Poling, James; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Gonsai, Kishor; Kosten, Thomas; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

2008-01-01

90

Benefits of using intrathecal buprenorphine  

PubMed Central

Background: General anesthesia draws attention to the most commonly used modalities for post cesarean delivery pain relief in systemic administration of opioids, while the administration of small dose of intrathecal opioid during spinal anesthesia can be a possible alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cesarean section prescribed intrathecally. Methods: This double blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted in patients for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. Case group (208 patients) received 65-70 mg of 5% lidocaine plus 0.2 ml of buprenorphine while the same amount of 5% lidocaine diluted with 0.2 ml of normal saline was given to 234 cases in the control group. Hemodynamic changes and neonatal APGAR scores (Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, Respiration) were recorded. Pain score was recorded according to the visual analog scale. This study was registered in the Iranian Registry of clinical Trials; IRCT2013022112552N1. Results: The mean age of case and control groups was 24.4±5.38 and 26.84±5.42 years, respectively. Systolic blood pressure was not significantly different until the 45th minute but diastolic blood pressure showed a significant difference at the 15th and the 60th minutes (P<0.001). Heart rate changes were significantly different between cases and controls at the initial 5th, 15th and after 60th minutes (P<0.001). Pain-free period was significantly different between two groups (1.25 h versus 18.73 h) (P<0.001). Conclusion: The results show that prescription of intratechal buprenorphine prolongs the duration of analgesia without any significant considerable side effects. PMID:25202441

Rabiee, Seyed Mozaffar; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Rostami, Sara

2014-01-01

91

A Double Blind, within Subject Comparison of Spontaneous Opioid Withdrawal from Buprenorphine versus Morphine  

PubMed Central

Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical ?-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those of buprenorphine withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0–100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation. PMID:24227768

Smith, Michael T.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Campbell, Claudia M.; Strain, Eric C.

2014-01-01

92

Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6- O-[ 11C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([11C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution

Igor Galynker; David J. Schlyer; Stephen L. Dewey; Joanna S. Fowler; Jean Logan; S. John Galley; Robert R. MacGregor; Richard A. Ferrieri; M. J. Holland; Jonathan Brodie; Eric Simon; Alfred P. Wolf

1996-01-01

93

Effect of buprenorphine on genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy.  

PubMed

In the view of animal welfare considerations, we investigated the suitability of modifying the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy to include administration of an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress as much as possible. The effects of the analgesic, buprenorphine, on the genotoxicity evaluation of structural chromosome aberration inducers (cyclophosphamide, diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were examined. The genotoxicants were given orally to 8-week-old male F344 rats a day before or after partial hepatectomy and hepatocytes were isolated 4 days after the partial hepatectomy. Buprenorphine was injected subcutaneously twice a day with at least a 6-hr interval for 2 days from just after partial hepatectomy. As results, buprenorphine caused neither change in clinical signs (except for one animal death) nor increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes of vehicle treated animals. In the case of concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and a genotoxicant, one out of 8 animals died in each group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide, carbendazim or colchicine (lower dose level only). Slight changes in clinical signs were noted in the group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide or carbendazim. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes was obtained in concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and genotoxicant compared with genotoxicant alone for 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, colchicine and carbendazim. It is concluded that use of buprenorphine as an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress for rats that are given partial hepatectomy is not appropriate under the present experimental conditions, because it could enhance the general toxicity and genotoxicity of the test chemical. PMID:25743750

Itoh, Satoru; Nagata, Mayumi; Hattori, Chiharu; Takasaki, Wataru

2015-02-01

94

The effects of buprenorphine on behaviour in the ACI and BN rat inbred strains.  

PubMed

Buprenorphine is a partial mu, kappa agonist that has been shown to influence spontaneous behaviour in animals. Previously, we have demonstrated significant differences in the analgesic response to buprenorphine between the August Copenhagen Irish (ACI)/SegHsd and the Brown Norway (BN)/RijHsd inbred rat strains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these strains also differed in their behavioural response to buprenorphine in order to provide an additional parameter for the genetic analysis and localization of genes involved in this response. Male and female rats of both strains were used (n = 6/strain/sex) for this study. Each rat was subjected, respectively, to three treatment regimens at 15:00 h: (A) unchallenged; (B) intravenous saline; (C) intravenous buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg) according to a crossover design. The relative duration (s/h) of locomotion, grooming, drinking and eating behaviour was subsequently determined from 15:30 to 07:00 h using the automatic registration system, Laboratory Animal Behaviour Registration and Analysis System(trade mark). Significant strain differences were observed in unchallenged behaviour between the ACI and the BN rats. ACI rats, but not BN rats, responded to buprenorphine treatment with decreased levels of locomotion, drinking and eating behaviour. The same treatment resulted in an increased grooming behaviour in both strains. Slight but significant sex differences were observed for locomotion and eating in the analysis of variance procedure, but did not reach the level of statistical significance in the multiple comparison procedure. The results of this study emphasize the possibility that strain-specific effects must be taken into account when using behavioural parameters for the assessment of the analgesic effects of buprenorphine in rats. PMID:18435875

Avsaroglu, H; Sommer, R; Hellebrekers, L J; van Zutphen, L F M; van Lith, H A

2008-04-01

95

Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Trial of Gabapentin During an Outpatient, Buprenorphine-Assisted Detoxification Procedure1  

PubMed Central

This pilot study examined the efficacy of the N-type calcium channel blocker gabapentin to improve outcomes during a brief detoxification protocol with buprenorphine. Treatment-seeking opioid-dependent individuals were enrolled in a 5-wk, double blind, placebo-controlled trial examining the effects of gabapentin during a 10-day outpatient detoxification from buprenorphine. Participants were inducted onto buprenorphine sublingual tablets during week 1, were randomized and inducted onto gabapentin or placebo during week 2, underwent a 10-day buprenorphine taper during weeks 3–4 and then were tapered off gabapentin/placebo during week 5. Assessments included thrice-weekly opioid withdrawal scales, vitals, and urine drug screens. Twenty-four individuals (13 male, 17 Caucasian, 3 African American, 4 Latino, mean age 29.7 yrs) participated in the detoxification portion of the study (gabapentin, N=11; placebo, N=13). Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between groups. Self-reported and observer-rated opioid withdrawal ratings were relatively low and did not differ between groups during the buprenorphine taper. Urine results showed a drug x time interaction, such that the probability of opioid-positive urines significantly decreased over time in the gabapentin versus placebo groups during weeks 3–4 (OR=0.73, p=0.004). These results suggest that gabapentin reduces opioid use during a 10-day buprenorphine detoxification procedure. PMID:23855333

Sanders, Nichole C.; Mancino, Michael J.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Guise, J. Benjamin; Bickel, Warren K.; Thostenson, Jeff; Oliveto, Alison H.

2014-01-01

96

Utilizing buprenorphine–naloxone to treat illicit and prescription-opioid dependence  

PubMed Central

Objectives To review current evidence on buprenorphine–naloxone (bup/nx) for the treatment of opioid-use disorders, with a focus on strategies for clinical management and office-based patient care. Quality of evidence Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Consensus reports, guidelines published, and other authoritative sources were also included in this review. Apart from expert guidelines, data included in this review constitute level 1 evidence. Findings Bup/nx is a partial ?-opioid agonist combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4:1 ratio. It has a lower abuse potential, carries less stigma, and allows for more flexibility than methadone. Bup/nx is indicated for both inpatient and ambulatory medically assisted withdrawal (acute detoxification) and long-term substitution treatment (maintenance) of patients who have a mild-to-moderate physical dependence. A stepwise long-term substitution treatment with regular monitoring and follow-up assessment is usually preferred, as it has better outcomes in reducing illicit opioid use, minimizing concomitant risks such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C transmission, retaining patients in treatment and improving global functioning. Conclusion Bup/nx is safe and effective for opioid detoxification and substitution treatment. Its unique pharmaceutical properties make it particularly suitable for office-based maintenance treatment of opioid-use disorder. PMID:24741316

Mauger, Sofie; Fraser, Ronald; Gill, Kathryn

2014-01-01

97

Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment and Care  

MedlinePLUS

... blood cholesterol. In the late nonproliferative stage, focal laser treatments may be used to seal leaking blood ... begin to appear in the proliferative stage, scatter laser treatment can be used to shrink them. Laser ...

98

Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a user’s drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for “self-medication” purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among young drug users is not a widespread problem in Sweden. Harm-reduction measures should target drug users with more severe problems, among whom illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common and pose a medical risk. Illicit use of other prescription drugs, which are less controlled and more widely used by young people, is an important issue for further research. PMID:24139199

2013-01-01

99

The effects of buprenorphine on fentanyl withdrawal in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale  Fentanyl is a potent mu-opioid receptor agonist that is widely used for the treatment of severe chronic pain. Discontinuation\\u000a of fentanyl administration has been shown to induce a negative emotional state.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  The aim of the present studies was to investigate the effects of the partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine on the\\u000a negative emotional state associated with precipitated and spontaneous fentanyl

Adrie W. Bruijnzeel; Catherine Marcinkiewcz; Shani Isaac; Matthew M. Booth; Donn M. Dennis; Mark S. Gold

2007-01-01

100

The reinforcing and subjective effects of intravenous and intranasal buprenorphine in heroin users.  

PubMed

Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

Jones, Jermaine D; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D

2014-07-01

101

Comparing Outcomes for Youth Served in Treatment Foster Care and Treatment Group Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared youth in the Florida Medicaid system prior to entry into treatment foster care or treatment group care, and compared outcomes in the 6 months after treatment. Florida Medicaid data from FY2003/04 through 2006/2007 along with Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Law Enforcement, and involuntary examination data were…

Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin

2011-01-01

102

Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.  

PubMed

Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

2012-01-01

103

Does buprenorphine maintenance improve the quality of life of opioid users?  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: The quality of life (QOL) of substance abusers is known to be severely impaired. Information on impact of opioid maintenance treatment on the QOL of opioid dependent subjects though available from the developed countries, is lacking from India. This study was carried out to assess the impact of buprenorphine maintenance treatment on the quality of life (QOL) of opioid dependent subjects at nine months follow up. Methods: Based on specified inclusion criteria a total of 231 subjects were recruited from five participating centres across India. They received sublingual buprenorphine as a directly observed therapy along with brief psychosocial intervention (provided in groups of 8-10 subjects) after intake in to the study. The WHOQOL-BREF scale domain scores obtained at baseline were compared to domain scores at nine months follow up. Results: At nine months follow up, among the 64.1 per cent retained in buprenorphine maintenance, there was a significant (P<0.001) decline in opioid use from 24.9 ± 10.1 days at baseline to 1.7 ± 4.7 days at nine months follow up and improvements in score of the four WHOQOL-BREF domains (Physical, Psychological, Social relationships and Environment). Interpretation & conclusions: The results showed the beneficial effects of buprenorphine maintenance treatment in improving the QOL of opioid-dependent subjects at nine month follow up. These results point towards the need for an expanded nation-wide provision of buprenorphine maintenance treatment as a harm reduction strategy for the opioid dependent population. PMID:23481062

Dhawan, A.; Chopra, A.

2013-01-01

104

[Home treatment - a treatment model of integrated care in hamburg].  

PubMed

Treatment models like "Crisis Resolution and Hometreatment (CRHT)" or "Assertive Community Treatment" (ACT), were found to be effective, enhancing the qualitative level of treatment for patients with severe mental disorders. In Germany, these are implemented only sporadically until today, often as part of a cross-sectoral Integrated Care (IC) treatment system. We will present the implementation of an "Assertive Community Treatment" embedded into an IC-treatment model in Hamburg and discuss the 3-year-outcomes. The IC-treatment model has been designed for severe mentally ill patients with psychotic disorders. Since May 2007 the model is financed by different health insurances as a managed-care "capitation-model" and its effectiveness gets continuously evaluated. The model proved to be effective in earlier studies were compared with standard care low rates of service disengagement were found as well as significantly improved psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, satisfaction with care and adherence, while being cost effective. The rates of involuntary admissions declined to 10% in comparison to the years before. In 2011 the model was specified to the indication "first-episode adolescents and young adults in the age of 12-29" in a government-funded study "Integrated Care in Early Psychosis, ICEP Study". In this study an interdisciplinary team of child, adolescent and adult psychiatrists was implemented and since 2012 it is financed by the involved health insurances throughout an expansion of the §140 SGB V agreement. PMID:25485599

Schöttle, Daniel; Ruppelt, Friederike; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

2015-04-01

105

[Osteoporosis: treatment and pharmaceutical care].  

PubMed

Osteoporosis is a chronic disease with an increasing prevalence due to the ageing of the population. The consequences of this disease are not negligible because of the morbidity and mortality associated with it. Osteoporotic fractures are often the cause of loss of independence in the elderly, requiring considerable resources in terms of health services. Osteoporosis can be prevented and treated. However, it remains underestimated, underdiagnosed and undertreated. Thanks to his frequent contact with the public, the pharmacist can play an important role at multiple levels: supporting patients in treatment, by providing information on the disease, its treatment, proper use of medication, adherence and persistence, as well as raising awareness for the prevention of osteoporosis and identifying patients at risk. PMID:25055452

Duquet, N

2014-06-01

106

Tobacco use disorder treatment in primary care  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To test a team-based, site-specific, multicomponent clinical system pathway designed for enhancing tobacco use disorder treatment by primary care physicians. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Sixty primary care sites in Alberta. Participants A convenience sample of 198 primary care physicians from the population of 2857. Main outcome measures Data collection occurred between September 2010 and February 2012 on 3 distinct measures. Twenty-four weeks after the intervention, audits of the primary care practices assessed the adoption and sustainability of 10 tobacco clinical system pathway components, a survey measured changes in physicians’ treatment intentions, and patient chart reviews examined changes in physicians’ consistency with the treatment algorithm. Results The completion rate by physicians was 89.4%. An intention-to-treat approach was undertaken for statistical analysis. Intervention uptake was demonstrated by positive changes at 4 weeks in how many of the 10 clinical system measures were performed (mean [SD] = 4.22 [1.60] vs 8.57 [1.46]; P < .001). Physicians demonstrated significant favourable changes in 9 of the 12 measures of treatment intention (P < .05). The 18 282 chart reviews documented significant increases in 6 of the 8 algorithm components. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the provision of a tobacco clinical system pathway that incorporates other members of the health care team and builds on existing office infrastructures will support positive and sustainable changes in tobacco use disorder treatment by physicians in primary care. This study reaffirms the substantive and important role of supporting how treatment is delivered in physicians’ practices. PMID:25022640

Kunyk, Diane; Els, Charl; Papadakis, Sophia; Selby, Peter

2014-01-01

107

Oral self-administration of buprenorphine in the diet for analgesia in mice.  

PubMed

Postsurgical oral self-administration of analgesics in rodents is an interesting technique of providing analgesia, avoiding the negative effects of manipulation. Several strategies, using gelatin or nutella, have already been described. However, rodents require some habituation period to reach a good intake because of their neophobic behavior. The current study aimed to explore whether buprenorphine when mixed with an extruded diet offers a potential treatment option in the pain management of mice using a triple approach: by measuring the spontaneous intake in healthy animals; by using the hot-plate test; and finally by assessing the drug's ability to provide postoperative analgesia in a surgical intervention of moderate severity (intra-utero electroporation). Mice consumed during 20 hours, similar amounts of extruded diet alone, mixed with glucosaline, and mixed with buprenorphine (0.03?mg per pellet) or meloxicam (0.25?mg per pellet) both of which were diluted in glucosaline, showing that no neophobia was associated with these administrations. Relative increase from baseline latency (% maximal possible effect) in the hot-plate test at 20?h of administration was significantly higher for oral buprenorphine in diet 0.03?mg/pellet, and diet 0.15?mg/pellet, compared with placebo and no differences were found between those oral administrations and subcutaneous buprenorphine 0.1?mg/kg measured 3?h later. The treatment was also effective in attenuating the reductions in food consumption and body weight that occur after surgery. These data suggest that providing buprenorphine with the diet is a feasible and effective way of self-administration of analgesia in mice and does not cause neophobia and may easily contribute to the refinement of surgical procedures. PMID:24759572

Molina-Cimadevila, M J; Segura, S; Merino, C; Ruiz-Reig, N; Andrés, B; de Madaria, E

2014-04-23

108

Late Effects of Treatment and Palliative Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Identifying late effects of treatment and integrating palliative care when appropriate, are increasingly recognized as important\\u000a elements of childhood tumor management. Patients with CNS tumors are at high risk for mortality, and survivors have high morbidity\\u000a rates related to the late effects of treatment. While intensified therapy has improved survival in patients with pediatric\\u000a brain tumors (Packer et al. 1999,

Denah Taggart; Robert Goldsby; Anuradha Banerjee

109

Postoperative Intensive Care Treatment after Esophageal Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article is to give a short review of problems associated with the intensive care treatment of patients after esophageal resection. Pulmonary dysfunction, supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, anastomotic leakage and mental disorders are the topics covered. Systemic inflammatory reaction and sepsis is the linking topic between these specific complications. Pulmonary dysfunction having an incidence of up to 40% is

Dirk L. Stippel; K. Tobias E. Beckurts

2004-01-01

110

The emerging buprenorphine epidemic in the United States.  

PubMed

The authors sampled for expanded drug testing of 1,061 urine specimens collected by Maryland Division of Parole and Probation staff. They found an increase in the percentage of individuals testing positive for buprenorphine and found that these specimens often contained other drugs, suggesting misuse. Subsequent interviews with 15 probationers and parolees in Baltimore, Maryland, showed wide-scale availability of buprenorphine on the street and in prisons. Medical examiners and drug testing programs should immediately initiate routine testing for buprenorphine to track a possible outbreak of buprenorphine diversion and misuse. Physician education programs should redouble their efforts to teach strategies to deter diversion and misuse of the drug. PMID:22356664

Wish, Eric D; Artigiani, Erin; Billing, Amy; Hauser, Wanda; Hemberg, Jordana; Shiplet, Myron; DuPont, Robert L

2012-01-01

111

The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of intranasal crushed buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone tablets in opioid abusers  

PubMed Central

Aims Sublingual buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are efficacious opioid dependence pharmacotherapies, but there are reports of their diversion and misuse by the intranasal route. The study objectives were to characterize and compare their intranasal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Setting An in-patient research unit at the University of Kentucky. Participants Healthy adults (n=10) abusing, but not physically dependent on, intranasal opioids. Measurements Six sessions (72 hours apart) tested five intranasal doses [0/0, crushed buprenorphine (2, 8 mg), crushed buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 mg)] and one intravenous dose (0.8 mg buprenorphine/0.2 mg naloxone for bioavailability assessment). Plasma samples, physiological, subject- and observer-rated measures were collected before and for up to 72 hours after drug administration. Findings Both formulations produced time- and dose-dependent increases on subjective and physiological mu-opioid agonist effects (e.g. ‘liking’, miosis). Subjects reported higher subjective ratings and street values for 8 mg compared to 8/2 mg, but these differences were not statistically significant. No significant formulation differences in peak plasma buprenorphine concentration or time-course were observed. Buprenorphine bioavailability was 38–44% and Tmax was 35–40 minutes after all intranasal doses. Naloxone bioavailability was 24% and 30% following 2/0.5 and 8/2 mg, respectively. Conclusions It is difficult to determine if observed differences in abuse potential between intranasal buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are clinically relevant at the doses tested. Greater bioavailability and faster onset of pharmacodynamic effects compared to sublingual administration suggests a motivation for intranasal misuse in non-dependent opioid abusers. However, significant naloxone absorption from intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone administration may deter the likelihood of intranasal misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, but not buprenorphine, in opioid-dependent individuals. PMID:21395892

Middleton, L.S.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Lofwall, M.R.; Moody, D.E.; Walsh, S.L.

2011-01-01

112

A non-rewarding, non-aversive buprenorphine/naltrexone combination attenuates drug-primed reinstatement to cocaine and morphine in rats in a conditioned place preference paradigm.  

PubMed

Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin is a major public health issue with no effective relapse prevention treatment currently available. To this purpose, a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone, a mixed very-low efficacy mu-opioid receptor agonist/kappa-opioid receptor antagonist/nociceptin receptor agonist, was investigated. The tail-withdrawal and the conditioned place preference (CPP) assays in adult Sprague Dawley rats were used to show that naltrexone dose-dependently blocked the mu-opioid receptor agonism of buprenorphine. Furthermore, in the CPP assay, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 3.0?mg/kg naltrexone was aversive. A combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone was neither rewarding nor aversive, but still possessed mu-opioid receptor antagonist properties. In the CPP extinction and reinstatement method, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone completely blocked drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 3?mg/kg cocaine, drug prime was 3?mg/kg cocaine) and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement in morphine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 5?mg/kg morphine, drug prime was 1.25?mg/kg morphine). These data add to the growing evidence that a buprenorphine/naltrexone combination may be protective against relapse in a polydrug abuse situation. PMID:23240906

Cordery, Sarah F; Taverner, Alistair; Ridzwan, Irna E; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P

2014-07-01

113

Comparison of Buprenorphine and Butorphanol Analgesia in the Eastern Red-Spotted Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens)  

PubMed Central

The experimental use of amphibian models in biomedical research increases yearly, but there is a paucity of reports concerning analgesic use in many of these species. In this study, buprenorphine given by intracoelomic injection and butorphanol added to the tank water were compared for analgesic effect in the eastern red-spotted newt after bilateral forelimb amputations. Newts undergoing anesthesia but not surgery and newts having surgery but not given analgesia postoperatively were used as control groups. Animals were tested for food consumption, spontaneous movement, response to tapping on the tank, response to being touched, and body posture. Both buprenorphine by intracoelomic injection and butorphanol in tank water significantly promoted resumption of normal behavior after bilateral surgical amputation of the forelimbs. The difference between analgesic treatment and no analgesic treatment was maintained until 72 h after surgery. PMID:19383214

2009-01-01

114

[Severe distal ischemic syndrome after buprenorphine volunteer intra-arterial injection].  

PubMed

High dosage buprenorphine (HDB) is a sublingual maintenance treatment of opioid dependence which have proved its substantial Public Health results, but it is also known to be frequently abused and diverted, in particular for intravenous injection, with deleterious consequences. Intra-arterial use is more rarely reported with this substance, just like its complications, mainly ischemic, potentially necrotic, phenomena. We report here such a case, with a 30 years-old man suffering from severe ischemia of the thumb, the forefinger and the middle finger few hours after direct injection of a suspension of buprenorphine crushed tablets in right radial arteria. A treatment combining surgery (video-thoracoscopic thoracic sympathectomy) and medicines (heparin, iloprost and piribedil mesilate), permitted a semi-complete digital rehabilitation (only forefinger pulp necrosis persisted and required a distal amputation), and the patient was discharged after 2 weeks. PMID:22186079

Glaizal, Mathieu; Lucciardi, Joseph; Tichadou, Lucia; Spadari, Michel; Hayek-Lanthois, Maryvonne; Micallef, Joëlle; de Haro, Luc

2011-01-01

115

Clinical pharmacology of buprenorphine: Ceiling effects at high doses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize the acute effects of buprenorphine, an opioid partial (?-agonist, across a wide range of doses in comparison to methadone.Method: Healthy adult male volunteers, who had experience with but were not physically dependent on opioids, participated while residing on a closed research unit. Four subjects received buprenorphine (0, 1, 2, 4, 8,

Sharon L Walsh; Kenzie L Preston; Maxine L Stitzer; Edward J Cone; George E Bigelow

1994-01-01

116

The treatment gap in mental health care.  

PubMed Central

Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

2004-01-01

117

Treatment of Depression in a Low-Income Primary Care Setting With Colocated Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to characterize depression treatment-as-usual in a large primary care practice in the United States with colocated mental health care, and to examine predictors of receiving any treatment and receiving adequate treatment, primary care patients were systematically approached in waiting rooms. Those with a minimum level of depression symptoms (n = 91) were asked to participate in a study

Lisa A. Uebelacker; Marcia Smith; Angelique W. Lewis; Ryan Sasaki; Ivan W. Miller

2009-01-01

118

Indicators of Buprenorphine and Methadone Use and Abuse: What Do We Know?  

PubMed Central

Abuse of prescription opioids is a growing problem. The number of methadone pain pills distributed now exceeds liquid methadone used in opioid treatment, and the increases in buprenorphine indicators provide evidence of the need to monitor and intervene to decrease the abuse of this drug. The need for additional and improved data to track trends is discussed, along with findings as to the characteristics of the users and combinations of drugs. Data on toxicities related to methadone or buprenorphine, particularly in combination with other prescribed drugs, are presented and clinical implications and considerations are offered. These findings underscore the need for physicians to be aware of potential toxicities and to educate their patients regarding these issues. PMID:20132124

Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

2013-01-01

119

Results of a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Buprenorphine For Opioid Dependent Women in the Criminal Justice System  

PubMed Central

Aims Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine when used with opioid dependent men transitioning from prison to the community, but no studies have been conducted with women in the criminal justice (CJ) system. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of buprenorphine for relapse prevention among opioid dependent women in the CJ system transitioning back to the community. Methods 36 women under CJ supervision were recruited from an inpatient drug treatment facility that treats CJ individuals returning back to the community. Nine were enrolled in an open label buprenorphine arm then 27 were randomized to buprenorphine (n=15) or placebo (n=12; double-blind). All women completed baseline measures and started study medication prior to release. Participants were followed weekly, provided urine drug screens (UDS), received study medication for 12 weeks, and returned for a 3 month follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses were performed for all time points through end-of-treatment (EOT). Results The majority of participants were Caucasian (88.9%), young (M±SD=31.8±8.4 years), divorced/separated (59.2%) women with at least a high school/GED education (M±SD =12±1.7 years). GEE analyses showed that buprenorphine was efficacious in maintaining abstinence across time compared to placebo. At End of Treatment, 92% of placebo and 33% of active medication participants were positive for opiates on urine drug screen (Chi-Square = 10.9, df=1; p<0.001). However, by the three month follow-up point, no differences were found between the two groups, with 83% of participants at follow-up positive for opiates. Conclusions Women in the CJ system who received buprenorphine prior to release from a treatment facility had fewer opiate positive UDS through the 12-weeks of treatment compared to women receiving placebo. Initiating buprenorphine in a controlled environment prior to release appears to be a viable strategy to reduce opiate use when transitioning back to the community. PMID:21782352

Cropsey, Karen L.; Lane, Peter S.; Hale, Galen J.; Jackson, Dorothy O.; Clark, C. Brendan; Ingersoll, Karen S.; Islam, M. Aminul; Stitzer, Maxine L.

2011-01-01

120

The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data  

PubMed Central

Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current “gold standard”, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a ?-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

2008-01-01

121

Clinician Beliefs and Attitudes about Buprenorphine/Naloxone Diversion  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives Concern about diversion of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) in the U.S. may affect prescribing patterns and policy decisions. This study examines addiction treatment clinician beliefs and attitudes regarding B/N diversion. Methods Participants (n=369) completed a 34-item survey in 2010 during two national symposia on opioid dependence. We conducted multivariable regression, examining the relationship of perceived danger from B/N diversion with clinician characteristics and their beliefs about B/N treatment and diversion. We compared causal beliefs about diversion among clinicians with and without B/N treatment experience. Results Forty percent of clinicians believed that B/N diversion is a dangerous problem. The belief that B/N diversion increases accidental overdoses in the community was strongly associated with perceived danger from B/N diversion. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Attitudes and beliefs, not education level, were associated with clinician’s perceived danger from B/N diversion. Clinicians with greater B/N patient experience were more likely to believe treatment access barriers are the major cause of B/N diversion. PMID:24131165

Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Connery, Hilary; Griffin, Margaret L.; Wyatt, Steve A.; Wartenberg, Alan A.; Borodovsky, Jacob; Renner, John A.; Weiss, Roger D.

2013-01-01

122

Hormone testing and treatment enters pain care.  

PubMed

A number of factors have recently coalesced to bring hormone testing and treatment to the field of pain care. Uncontrolled, severe pain as well as opioid drugs have a profound impact on the endocrine system. Because pain is a potent stressor, it initially causes pituitary, adrenal, and gonadal hormones to elevate in the serum. If severe pain goes uncontrolled for too long, however, hormone levels deplete in the serum. The finding of abnormal (too high or low) serum hormone levels serve as biomarker of endocrinopathies, which helps inform the clinician that enhanced analgesia as well as hormone replacement may be necessary. Adequate, physiologic levels of some specific hormones are necessary for optimal analgesia, neuroprotection, and neurogenesis. Although not a substitute for opioids, some hormone replacements may minimize their use. We know that the central nervous system produces a group of hormones called neurohormones whose natural function is neuroprotection and neurogenesis. Their clinical use in centralized pain states is new, and early reports indicate that they may have considerable benefit for treatment. PMID:25485913

Tennant, Forest

2014-12-01

123

Integrating Substance Use Treatment Into Adolescent Health Care  

PubMed Central

Substance use (SU) problems are common among adolescents, a serious health risk for them and a major public health problem, but are inadequately addressed in most pediatric health care settings. Primary care offers an excellent context for SU assessment and treatment for adolescents and their families, offering better access and a less stigmatized environment for receiving treatment than specialty programs. This paper examines the literature on the integration of substance use treatment with adolescent health care, focusing on 2 areas: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in Emergency Departments and Primary Care, and School- and College-Based Health Centers. PMID:22872492

Sterling, Stacy; Valkanoff, Tina; Hinman, Agatha; Weisner, Constance

2013-01-01

124

Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care: The Model of Care Thirty Years Later  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the early 1950s, trends in children's mental health have moved care from residential and office-based treatment to community-based interventions. The Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care (PRTFC) program was developed in 1981 in response to these trends. Currently, Pressley Ridge provides PR-TFC treatment in 15 programs in six states and the…

Trunzo, Annette C.; Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Strickler, Amy; Doncaster, James

2012-01-01

125

Improving Care for the Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Disorders  

PubMed Central

The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches alcohol and drug treatment programs to apply process improvement strategies and make organizational changes that improve quality of care. Participating programs reduce days to admission, increase retention in care and spread the application of process improvement within their treatment centers. More generally, NIATx provides a framework for addressing the Institute of Medicine’s six dimensions of quality care (i.e., safe, effective, patient-centered, efficient, timely and equitable) in treatments for alcohol, drug and mental health disorders. NIATx and its extensions illustrate how the behavioral health field can respond to the demand for higher quality treatment services. PMID:18259871

McCarty, Dennis; Gustafson, David; Capoccia, Victor A.; Cotter, Frances

2008-01-01

126

Role of buprenorphine in prolonging the duration of post-operative analgesia in percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Comparison between bupivacaine versus bupivacaine and buprenorphine combination  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the treatment of choice for large renal calculi. Pain around the nephrostomy tube is a clinical problem and we have previously reported alleviation of pain by peritubal block with bupivacaine, which lasted for 14 hours. The present study aimed to investigate the role of buprenorphine and bupivacaine combination in prolonging the duration of analgesia in peritubal block. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized controlled study was undertaken in 40 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II patients who were scheduled for PCNL. Group I patients received 20 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine and group II patients received 20 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine with 100 ?g of buprenorphine. Peritubal infiltration was given under fluoroscopic guidance along the nephrostomy tube from the renal capsule to the skin. Post-operative pain was assessed by Visual Analog Score (VAS), dynamic VAS (DVAS), sedation score, duration of analgesia and number of rescue analgesic demands. Rescue analgesia was inj tramadol 1 mg/kg IV if pain score exceeded 3. Results: Demographic data were comparable between the groups. Median duration of analgesia was 16 h in group I and 20 h in group II (P = 0.002). The maximum median VAS was 4 in group I and 2 in group II (P = 0.002). The median area under curve (AUC) for VAS was 7 and 5 in groups I and II, respectively (P = 0.047). The median maximum DVAS in group I was 6 and 4 in group II. The median AUC for DVAS in 24 h was 16 in group I and 15 in group II (P = 0.017). Conclusions: Peritubal infiltration of 0.25% bupivacaine with 100 ?g buprenorphine around a nephrostomy tube increased the duration of analgesia following PCNL without any side-effects. PMID:25878415

Nirmala, Jonnavithula; Kumar, Anil; Devraj, Rahul; Vidyasagar, Sriramoju; Ramachandraiah, Gunta; Murthy, Pisapati V. L. N.

2015-01-01

127

The pharmacological treatment of opioid addiction—a clinical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the main pharmacotherapies that are currently being used to treat opioid addiction. Treatments include\\u000a detoxification using tapered methadone, buprenorphine, adrenergic agonists such as clonidine and lofexidine, and forms of\\u000a rapid detoxification. In opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), methadone is most widely used. OMT with buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone\\u000a combination, or other opioid agonists is also discussed. The use of the

Philipp Lobmaier; Michael Gossop; Helge Waal; Jorgen Bramness

2010-01-01

128

Subnanogram-concentration measurement of buprenorphine in human plasma by electron-capture capillary gas chromatography: application to pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine.  

PubMed

We describe a sensitive and specific method for the measurement of buprenorphine in human plasma. The method involves a structural analog as an internal calibrator, careful control of pH during sample extraction to maximize drug recovery, and back-extraction into acid followed by reextraction to eliminate endogenous interferences. After evaporation, sample residues are derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride and analyzed by separation on a fused-silica polymethylsiloxane capillary column and electron-capture detection. Calibration curves were linear in the ranges 0.1-2.0 micrograms/L and 2.0-20 micrograms/L, with within-run CVs of 9.7% at 0.1 microgram/L to 5.0% at 20 micrograms/L, and total CVs of 15.9% at 0.1 microgram/L to 6.5% at 10 micrograms/L. The limit of quantification was 0.1 microgram/L. The method was utilized in studies to determine the absolute bioavailability of sublingual doses of 2 mg of buprenorphine in 1 mL of 300 mL/L ethanol and the bioequivalence of sublingual 8-mg tablet and 300 mL/L ethanol solution formulations. PMID:9439446

Everhart, E T; Cheung, P; Shwonek, P; Zabel, K; Tisdale, E C; Jacob, P; Mendelson, J; Jones, R T

1997-12-01

129

Depressive symptoms during buprenorphine vs. methadone maintenance: findings from a randomised, controlled trial in opioid dependence.  

PubMed

Research suggests that buprenorphine may possess antidepressant activity. The Beck Depression Inventory was completed at baseline and 3 months by heroin dependent subjects receiving either buprenorphine or methadone maintenance as part of a larger, pre-existing, double blind trial conducted by NDARC (Australia). Depressive symptoms improved in all subjects, with no difference between methadone and buprenorphine groups, suggesting no differential benefit on depressive symptoms for buprenorphine compared to methadone. PMID:15589713

Dean, Angela J; Bell, James; Christie, Macdonald J; Mattick, Richard P

2004-12-01

130

Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... home care services, nutrition counseling, physical therapy, pain management, and occupational or vocational therapy. Some patients may also need financial aid or assistance with transportation to and from ...

131

Depressive symptoms during buprenorphine vs. methadone maintenance: findings from a randomised, controlled trial in opioid dependence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research suggests that buprenorphine may possess antidepressant activity. The Beck Depression Inventory was completed at baseline and 3 months by heroin dependent subjects receiving either buprenorphine or methadone maintenance as part of a larger, pre-existing, double blind trial conducted by NDARC (Australia). Depressive symptoms improved in all subjects, with no difference between methadone and buprenorphine groups, suggesting no differential benefit on

James Bell

2004-01-01

132

Effects of HCV Seropositive Status on Buprenorphine Pharmacokinetics in Opioid-Dependent Individuals  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on buprenorphine pharmacokinetics in opioid-dependent, buprenorphine/naloxone-maintained adults. Methods A retrospective analysis of buprenorphine pharmacokinetics in HCV seropositive and seronegative buprenorphine/naloxone-maintained individuals (N = 49) was undertaken. Results Relative to HCV seronegative subjects, HCV seropositive subjects had higher buprenorphine exposure, as demonstrated by elevated buprenorphine AUC and Cmax values (p = .03 and .02, respectively) and corresponding elevations in the metabolites, buprenorphine-3-glucuronide AUC values (p = .03) and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide AUC and C24 values (p = .05 and .03, respectively). Discussion and Conclusions HCV infection was associated with higher plasma concentrations of buprenorphine and buprenorphine metabolites. Scientific Significance and Future Directions Findings suggest the potential for opioid toxicity among HCV-infected patients treated with buprenorphine/naloxone, and possible hepatotoxic effects related to increased buprenorphine exposure. HCV-infected patients receiving buprenorphine may need lower doses to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations. PMID:24313239

Masson, Carmen L.; Rainey, Petrie M.; Moody, David E.; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

2013-01-01

133

[Adapting treatments in therapeutic foster care].  

PubMed

Therapeutic foster care is a specific full-time hospitalisation method. It is designed to treat people of all ages suffering from mental problems within a stable substitutive family environment, in particular with a view to rebuilding their relational and autonomy skills. The acknowledgement by care staff and families of the patient's viewpoint and demands helps to adapt relational practices. PMID:20684472

Personne, Michel

2010-01-01

134

Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 ?g/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 ?g/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

2011-01-01

135

Involvement of cytochrome P450 3A4 in N-dealkylation of buprenorphine in human liver microsomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buprenorphine is a long acting analgesic of the opiate family. Recently, it has been proposed for the opioid dependency treatment at a large scale. The drug is extensively metabolized by the hepatic cytochrome P450 in man, yielding a N-dealkylated metabolite, norbuprenorphine. The specific forms of P450 involved in this oxidative N-demethylation were examined in a panel of 18 human liver

Christelle Iribarne; Daniel Picart; Yvonne Dréano; Jean-Pierre Bail; François Berthou

1997-01-01

136

Effect of ?-opioids morphine and buprenorphine on the development of adjuvant arthritis in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective and Design: On the basis that endogenous opioids play a role in the physiological response to inflammation, this\\u000a study tests the antiarthritic effects of a ?-opioid agonist, morphine and the partial ?-agonist, buprenorphine.\\u000a \\u000a Material: Male Lewis rats were used.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Treatment: Rats were innoculated subcutaneously with 0.05 ml of Freund's complete adjuvant (5 mg\\/ml) into the right hind paw\\u000a to

J. S. Walker; A. K. Chandler; J. L. Wilson; W. Binder; R. O. Day

1996-01-01

137

Protein Innovations Advance Drug Treatments, Skin Care  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dan Carter carefully layered the sheets of tracing paper on the light box. On each sheet were renderings of the atomic components of an essential human protein, one whose structure had long been a mystery. With each layer Carter laid down, a never-before-seen image became clearer. Carter joined NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in 1985 and began exploring processes of protein crystal growth in space. By bouncing intense X-rays off the crystals, researchers can determine the electron densities around the thousands of atoms forming the protein molecules, unveiling their atomic structures. Cultivating crystals of sufficient quality on Earth was problematic; the microgravity conditions of space were far more accommodating. At the time, only a few hundred protein structures had been mapped, and the methods were time consuming and tedious. Carter hoped his work would help reveal the structure of human serum albumin, a major protein in the human circulatory system responsible for ferrying numerous small molecules in the blood. More was at stake than scientific curiosity. Albumin has a high affinity for most of the world s pharmaceuticals, Carter explains, and its interaction with drugs can change their safety and efficacy. When a medication enters the bloodstream a cancer chemotherapy drug, for example a majority of it can bind with albumin, leaving only a small percentage active for treatment. How a drug interacts with albumin can influence considerations like the necessary effective dosage, playing a significant role in the design and application of therapeutic measures. In spite of numerous difficulties, including having no access to microgravity following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the image Carter had hoped to see was finally clarifying. In 1988, his lab had acquired specialized X-ray and detection equipment a tipping point. Carter and his colleagues began to piece together albumin s portrait, the formation of its electron densities coalescing on the sheets of tracing paper he arranged on the light box. While space-grown crystals were ultimately not involved in the achievement, a year later, Carter says, we were on the cover of Science magazine, having determined the atomic structure of albumin.

2012-01-01

138

Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

2006-01-01

139

Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared to the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques in implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider in treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

Cerimele, Joseph M.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Saxon, Andrew J.

2014-01-01

140

45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED...211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. (a)...

2011-10-01

141

45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED...211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. (a)...

2010-10-01

142

45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... true Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED...211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. (a)...

2013-10-01

143

45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... true Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED...211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. (a)...

2014-10-01

144

45 CFR 211.6 - Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. 211.6 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED...211.6 Reception; temporary care, treatment, and assistance. (a)...

2012-10-01

145

Treatment of depression in a low-income primary care setting with colocated mental health care.  

PubMed

In order to characterize depression treatment-as-usual in a large primary care practice in the United States with colocated mental health care, and to examine predictors of receiving any treatment and receiving adequate treatment, primary care patients were systematically approached in waiting rooms. Those with a minimum level of depression symptoms (n = 91) were asked to participate in a study in which they completed assessments of mental health service use, depression symptoms, and related problems. Results suggested that most patients with elevated depressive symptoms were receiving some type of mental health care, indicating they had been identified as depressed. However, only half were receiving "minimally adequate care." Minority patients were less likely to receive any care. Patients who were more depressed, demonstrated poorer problem-solving ability, and had poorer physical health were more likely to receive any treatment and to receive minimally adequate treatment for depression. These results suggest that, even in the context of colocated mental health care, there is still room for improving treatment of depressed patients. PMID:19630457

Uebelacker, Lisa A; Smith, Marcia; Lewis, Angelique W; Sasaki, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W

2009-06-01

146

Buprenorphine Response as a Function of Neurogenetic Polymorphic Antecedents: Can Dopamine Genes Affect Clinical Outcomes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)?  

PubMed Central

There is a plethora of research indicating the successful treatment of opioid dependence with either buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone (Suboxone®). However, we encourage caution in long-term maintenance with these drugs, albeit, lack of any other FDA approved opioid maintenance compound to date. Our concern has been supported by severe withdrawal (even with tapering of the dosage of for example Suboxone® which is 40 times more potent than morphine) from low dose of buprenorphine (alone or with naloxone). In addition our findings of a long-term flat affect in chronic Suboxone® patients amongst other unwanted side effects including diversion and suicide attempts provides impetus to reconsider long-term utilization. However, it seems prudent to embrace genetic testing to reveal reward circuitry gene polymorphisms especially those related to dopaminergic pathways as well as opioid receptor(s) as a way of improving treatment outcomes. Understanding the interaction of reward circuitry involvement in buprenorphine effects and respective genotypes provide a novel framework to augment a patient's clinical experience and benefits during opioid replacement therapy. PMID:25664200

Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Jacobs, William; McLaughlin, Thomas; Gold, Mark S.

2014-01-01

147

Treatment of Neurocritical Care Emergencies in Pregnancy.  

PubMed

OPINION STATEMENT: Neurologic emergencies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In part because the patient population is young, the nihilistic approach that often accompanies neurologically devastating disorders in other contexts is largely absent. A number of studies have demonstrated improved patient outcomes in the setting of aggressive care delivered by neurointensivists in a specialty-specific environment. It stands to reason that young, pregnant women who suffer from neurologically devastating disorders and who have a wide range of prognosis may also benefit from such specialized care. Close collaboration between obstetricians and neurointensivists is critical in this context. A number of unique considerations in diagnosis and management present dilemmas in the context of pregnancy, such as radiation dose from diagnostic neuroimaging, choice of pharmacotherapy for seizures, anticoagulation, and the method of delivery in the context of cerebral mass lesions and elevated intracranial pressure. Patients and their physicians are often faced with the additional challenge of balancing the relative risks and benefits of the impact of a management approach on both mother and fetus. In general, this balance tends to favor the interests of the mother, but the impact on the fetus becomes more relevant over the course of the pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. A low threshold for admission to an intensive care unit (ideally one that specializes in neurointensive care) should be used for pregnant patients. Because of the limited information regarding long-term outcomes in this population, rigid prognosis formation and early care limitations should be deferred in the immediate period. After the patient is stabilized and a plan has been charted for the remainder of the pregnancy, every effort should be made to engage patients in aggressive, urgent neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:22298283

Sheth, Sangini S; Sheth, Kevin N

2012-02-01

148

Reversal of opioid overdose syndrome in morphine-dependent rats using buprenorphine.  

PubMed

The method of choice for reversal of opioid-toxicity is administration of naloxone. This treatment can be accompanied by complications including acute lung-injury, myocardial infarction, or withdrawal-syndrome (in dependent-patients). We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of buprenorphine in reversal of opioid-overdose syndrome in dependent-rats. A prospective case-control study was designed, in which a total of 30 rats were put on opioid-dependency protocol with 10 mg/kg of intra-peritoneal morphine twice daily for 10 days. After confirmation of dependency by naloxone administration, the rats were overdosed by giving 16 mg/kg of intra-peritoneal methadone. They were divided into four groups receiving naloxone (n=7; 2 mg/kg) and buprenorphine(n=8, 8, and 7 with doses of 3 mg/kg, 6 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg), respectively. These four groups were compared regarding reversal of opioid signs/symptoms and development of withdrawal-syndrome. Rats in the first group showed signs/symptoms of opioid-withdrawal severely and with a higher frequency (P<0.001). In the groups 2-4, all doses recovered the intoxicated-rats without inducing signs/symptoms of withdrawal; however, the 3mg/kg dose reversed toxicity slower (P<0.001) and one rat in this group died later due to the re-development of signs of toxicity. Buprenorphine recovers opioid-overdose in morphine-dependent rats and bypasses the withdrawal-syndrome due to administration of naloxone. PMID:25510513

Zamani, Nasim; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Bayat, Amir Hossein; Haghparast, Abbas; Shadnia, Shahin; Rahimi, Mitra; Hashemi Demaneh, Behrouz; Assar, Nasim

2015-02-01

149

Comparing Outcomes for Youth in Treatment Foster Care and Family-style Group Care  

PubMed Central

Group care programs are often criticized for producing poor outcomes, especially in light of community-based alternatives like treatment foster care that have a stronger evidence base. In this study, data from Girls and Boys Town were used to compare outcomes of youth in treatment foster care (n=112) and group care (n=716) using propensity score matching, a method that can minimize selection bias in nonrandomized designs. Eighteen background covariates were used to develop propensity scores for the likelihood of receiving treatment foster care rather than group care. Several matching methods generated balanced samples on which the outcomes were compared. Results found that group care youth were more likely to be favorably discharged, more likely to return home, and less likely to experience subsequent placement in the first six months after discharge. Legal involvement and residing in a home-like environment at follow-up did not differ. Positive outcomes for group care youth suggest that family-style group care programs may promote effectiveness. PMID:19122763

Lee, Bethany R.; Thompson, Ron

2008-01-01

150

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

2011-01-01

151

Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project: can Suboxone be a viable outpatient option for heroin addiction?  

PubMed Central

Background Opioid dependence treatment traditionally involves methadone clinics, for which dispensing schedules can be cumbersome. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist of the mu receptor and antagonist of the kappa receptor, is a potential outpatient alternative to methadone. Funded by a grant from the State of Maryland's Community Health Resources Commission (CHRC), the Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project (BOOP) evaluates the outcome of Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) treatment on abstinence from heroin use, rates of emergency room visits and hospitalizations, legal issues, and quality of life. Methods Active heroin users were recruited between June 2007 and June 2010 and induction therapy with Suboxone was instituted during hospitalization. Once discharged, patients were followed as outpatients for maintenance treatment and counseling. Data were collected from electronic medical records, Maryland state legal records, and SF-36® Health Surveys regarding several parameters and patients were categorized according to duration of treatment with Suboxone into one of three groups: <1 month, 1–3 months, and >3 months. Results A total of 220 participants were included in the study. The age range of participants was 18–67 years with most being African American males. Eighty-three (38%) remained in the study for at least 1 month, with 37 of the 83 (45%) remaining in treatment for >3 months. Ten of the 37 (27%) never relapsed after their longest period of abstinence from heroin. During the first year after initiating treatment with Suboxone, hospitalization and emergency room visit rates for all 220 participants decreased by 45 and 23%, respectively, as compared to the year prior to starting treatment. The number of legal charges for drug possession decreased from 70 to 62. Anecdotally, the quality of life seemed to improve in those who were treated with Suboxone for longer periods of time and received regular counseling. Conclusion Overall, Suboxone is an effective treatment method for heroin addiction and is a viable outpatient therapy option. Individualized treatment plans and counseling must be implemented for maximum benefits to be seen. Retention of patients for a long duration of therapy was difficult, but for those who did remain, benefits were seen in overall health, abstinence from heroin use, cognition, and quality of life. PMID:24765257

Sittambalam, Charmian D.; Vij, Radhika; Ferguson, Robert P.

2014-01-01

152

Community-Based Treatment for Opioid Dependent Offenders: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care opioid substitution treatment (OST) has not been compared to program-based OST for community-supervised offenders. Objective To compare primary care to specialist supervised OST for opioid dependent offenders in terms of substance use and HIV risk outcomes. This project randomly assigned 15 jail diversion participants to either: (1) primary care buprenorphine OST, (2) specialist facility buprenorphine OST, or (3) specialist facility methadone OST. Participation lasted 13.5 months (12 month active treatment plus a post-participation visit). Results All subjects endorsed 0 days of opioid use in the previous 14 at follow-up. Specialty care reduced HIV risk (Risk Assessment Battery composite score) over 6 months (?0.24±0.17) compared to primary care (0.02±0.14; p=0.032). Conclusion Findings support primary care OST feasibility for a community-supervised offender sample. Specialist care may facilitate improvements in secondary outcomes, such as HIV risk behaviors. Scientific significance Further research is needed to clarify (1) the role of primary care in addicted offender management, and (2) the matching of offenders, based upon history and co-morbidity, to care coordination conditions. PMID:23952897

Brown, Randy; Gassman, Michele; Hetzel, Scott; Berger, Lisa

2013-01-01

153

[Application of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch in multimorbid patients on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefit of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain previously receiving long-term treatment with ibuprofen or diclofenac alone. Data of a subgroup of 703 patients were analysed which were part of a multicenter observational study with 3,295 patients. These patients had previously received ibuprofen or diclofenac and were characterized by older age,the presence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risk factors and the existence of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The switch to the seven-day buprenorphine patch resulted in a clinically significant decrease of the mean pain intensity at rest during the day from 5.3 to 2.9, on physical effort during the day from 7.1 to 3.3, and at night from 4.9 to 1.9 at the end of the study (11-point NRS scale, pbuprenorphine due to the lack of cardiac, renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. Constant analgesia, improvement of daily activities and reduction of tablets were reported as important advantages of the seven-day patch. In conclusion, the seven-day buprenorphine patch is a valuable therapeutic option for patients with insufficient analgesia on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac. PMID:21598463

Böhme, K; Heckes, B; Thomitzek, K

2011-01-13

154

Comparing total health care costs and treatment patterns of HIV patients in a managed care setting.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate total health care costs and time to occurrence of hospitalization in HIV-infected patients treated according to the 1998 DHHS guidelines in a managed care setting. The study also investigated which patients do not receive guideline treatment. We used a retrospective cross-sectional study design using medical and pharmacy claims data. Data from 1,791 HIV-infected patients using antiretroviral agents between 1 February 1998 and 31 July 1999, including demographic characteristics, medication guideline use, medication adherence and cost of care, were examined. Factors associated with total health care costs and time-to-inpatient admission (as a proxy for patient outcomes) were assessed. Patients receiving guideline (HAART) therapy (55%) had higher prescription and total health care costs but lower medical costs. Patients not receiving treatment according to guidelines were more likely to be female, older, have comorbidities, lower medication adherence and no AIDS-defining illness. Treatment with HAART guidelines was associated with longer time-to-inpatient admission controlling for other factors. In a short-term cross-sectional analysis, patients treated with HAART guidelines had better outcomes based on time-to-inpatient admission but higher prescription and total health care costs. Some patients are at risk for not receiving care according to national treatment guidelines and may be targeted for intervention programmes. PMID:15370064

Purdum, A G; Johnson, K A; Globe, D R

2004-08-01

155

Diabetic foot infection treatment and care.  

PubMed

Foot infections in diabetic patients are a common, complex and costly problem. They are potentially adverse with progression to deeper spaces and tissues and are associated with severe complications. The management of diabetic foot infection (DFI) requires a prompt and systematic approach to achieve more successful outcomes and to ultimately avoid amputations. This study reviews a multi-step treatment for DFIs. Between September 2010 and September 2012, a total of about 37 patients were consulted for DFI. The treatment algorithm included four steps, that is, several types of debridement according to the type of wound, the application of negative pressure therapy (NPT), other advanced dressings, a targeted antibiotic therapy local or systemic as the case may, and, if necessary, reconstructive surgery. This treatment protocol showed excellent outcomes, allowing us to avoid amputation in most difficult cases. Only about 8% of patients require amputation. This treatment protocol and a multidisciplinary approach with a specialised team produced excellent results in the treatment of DFI and in the management of diabetic foot in general, allowing us to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients and also to ensure cost savings. PMID:24725603

Cigna, Emanuele; Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria G; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

2014-04-14

156

Development of an enhanced formulation for delivering sustained release of buprenorphine hydrochloride  

PubMed Central

To control the minimum effective dose, and reduce the number and quantity of administered potent drugs are unique features of advanced drug delivery in situ forming gel formulation. The efficacy, consistency, and increasing the application of existing injection therapies can be enhanced through optimization of controlled released systems by using FDA approved biodegradable PLGA (poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. The purpose of this study was to develop different in situ forming implant (ISFI) formulations of buprenorphine hydrochloride for post treatment of drug addicts, acute and chronic pains. The drug releases from different ISFIs membranes with and without Tween 80 were compared over a period of time. Kinetic equation followed the Korsmeyer–Peppas model, as the plots showed high linearity. The influence of this additive on polymer properties was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the membranes structure was studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data revealed that Tween 80 modified the drug release pattern using diffusion mechanism and decreased the glass transition temperature (Tg) significantly. The degree of crystallinity was decreased after phase inversion which helps the dissolution of drug from membrane. The porosity of modified membranes was in accordance with release profiles. These findings suggest four different in situ forming implant formulations which can release various dose of the buprenorphine hydrochloride in a prolonged time. Also this surfactant can be an attractive additive for modifying the release rate of drugs from PLGA-based membrane drug delivery systems. PMID:23960766

Koocheki, S.; Madaeni, S.S.; Niroomandi, P.

2011-01-01

157

Primary care treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

Primary care physicians should consider the role of families of patients with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) not just in terms of their genetic relationship but also in terms of the role family can play in assisting in the treatment and management of the disorder. When first encountering a new case of ADHD, primary care physicians should confirm the diagnosis, identify comorbidities and other primary disorders, and develop a comprehensive assessment of the patient with ADHD that includes consideration of family-related influences. Management of multiple medical, mental health, and psychosocial problems over time will often be ineffective if ADHD is not adequately managed. The most effective management should be multimodal, with patients benefiting from caring professionals with special expertise in the treatment of ADHD as well as the primary care physician. Successful management of ADHD begins with establishing a therapeutic alliance with the patient and affected family that includes patient and family education and agreement on patient-specific goals, treatment, follow-up, and monitoring. As pharmacotherapy controls the core symptoms of ADHD, the primary care physician and treatment team should discuss with the patient other supportive interventions. PMID:16961431

Culpepper, Larry

2006-01-01

158

Potentiation of buprenorphine antinociception with ultra-low dose naltrexone in healthy subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous reports have demonstrated greater antinociception following administration of a buprenorphine\\/naloxone combination compared to buprenorphine alone among healthy volunteers. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether buprenorphine antinociception could be enhanced with the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone, using a range of dose ratios. A repeated-measures, double-blind, cross-over trial was undertaken with 10 healthy participants. The effects

J. L. Hay; S. F. La Vincente; A. A. Somogyi; C. B. Chapleo; J. M. White

2011-01-01

159

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2012-07-01

160

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2013-07-01

161

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2014-07-01

162

Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

2012-01-01

163

Factors related to treatment intensity in Swiss primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Questions about the existence of supplier-induced demand emerge repeatedly in discussions about governing Swiss health care. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the interrelationship between structural factors of supply and the volume of services that are provided by primary care physicians in Switzerland. Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional investigation, based on the complete claims data from all Swiss health care insurers for the year 2004, which covered information from 6087 primary care physicians and 4.7 million patients. Utilization-based health service areas were constructed and used as spatial units to analyze effects of density of supply. Hierarchical linear models were applied to analyze the data. Results The data showed that, within a service area, a higher density of primary care physicians was associated with higher mortality rates and specialist density but not with treatment intensity in primary care. Higher specialist density was weakly associated with higher mortality rates and with higher treatment intensity density of primary care physicians. Annual physician-level data indicate a disproportionate increase of supplied services irrespective of the size of the number of patients treated during the same year and, even in high volume practices, no rationing but a paradoxical inducement of consultations occurred. The results provide empirical evidence that higher densities of primary care physicians, specialists and the availability of out-patient hospital clinics in a given area are associated with higher volume of supplied services per patient in primary care practices. Analyses stratified by language regions showed differences that emphasize the effect of the cantonal based (fragmented) governance of Swiss health care. Conclusion The study shows high volumes in Swiss primary care and provides evidence that the volume of supply is not driven by medical needs alone. Effects related to the competition for patients between primary care physicians, specialists and out-patient hospital clinics and an association with the system of reimbursing services on a fee-for-service basis can not be excluded. PMID:19296846

Busato, André; Matter, Pius; Künzi, Beat

2009-01-01

164

Optimising pharmacological maintenance treatment for COPD in primary care.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-faceted disease that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and is a significant burden in terms of healthcare resource utilisation and cost. Despite the availability of national and international guidelines, and effective, well-tolerated pharmacological treatments, COPD remains substantially under-diagnosed and under-treated within primary care. As COPD is both preventable and treatable there is an urgent need to raise the awareness and profile of the disease among primary care physicians and patients. Increasing evidence suggests that initiation of long-acting bronchodilator treatment at an early stage can significantly improve the patient's long-term health and quality of life (QoL). Recent large-scale trials in COPD have confirmed the longterm benefits of maintenance treatment with long-acting bronchodilators. A wide range of benefits have been shown in selected patient groups including improved lung function and QoL, reduced exacerbations and, in some studies, delayed disease progression and improved survival. In this review, we consider recent developments in our understanding of COPD, including current and emerging pharmacological treatment options, and identify steps for optimising early diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of COPD within the primary care environment. PMID:21103801

Jones, Rupert; Østrem, Anders

2011-03-01

165

Palliative care and pain treatment in the global health agenda.  

PubMed

The Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life, published by the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance (WPCA) jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that every year >20 million patients need palliative care (PC) at the end of life. Six percent of these are children. According to the Atlas, in 2011, approximately 3 million patients received PC and only 1 in 10 people in need is currently receiving it. Although most PC is provided in high-income countries (HIC), almost 80% of the global need is in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Only 20 countries have PC well integrated into their health-care systems. In regards to opioids, >5 billion people (83% of the world's population) live in countries with low to nonexistent access, 250 million (4%) have moderate access, and only 460 million (7%) have adequate access. In order for PC and pain treatment strategies to be effective, they must be incorporated by governments into all levels of their health care systems. In 1990, the WHO pioneered a public health strategy to integrate PC into existing health care systems which includes four components: (1) appropriate policies, (2) adequate availability of medications, (3) education of health care workers and the public, and (4) implementation of PC services at all levels throughout the society. This topical review describes the current status of the field, and presents several initiatives by United Nations (UN) organizations and the civil society to improve access to PC and to pain treatment for patients in need. PMID:25789428

De Lima, Liliana

2015-04-01

166

The Impact of Managed Care on Substance Abuse Treatment Services  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the impact of managed care on the number and types of services offered by substance abuse treatment (SAT) facilities. Both the number and types of services offered are important factors to analyze, as research shows that a broad range of services increases treatment effectiveness. Data Sources The 2000 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (NSSATS), which is designed to collect data on service offerings and other characteristics of SAT facilities in the United States. These data are merged with data from the 2002 Area Resource File (ARF), a county-specific database containing information on population and managed care activity. We use data on 10,513 facilities, virtually a census of all SAT facilities. Study Design We estimate the impact of managed care (MC) on the number and types of services offered by SAT facilities using instrumental variables (IV) techniques that account for possible endogeneity between facilities' involvement in MC and service offerings. Due to limitations of the NSSATS data, MC and specific services are modeled as binary variables. Principal Findings We find that managed care causes SAT facilities to offer, on average, approximately two fewer services. This effect is concentrated primarily in medical testing services (i.e., tests for TB, HIV/AIDs, and STDs). We also find that MC increases the likelihood of offering substance abuse assessment and relapse prevention groups, but decreases the likelihood of offering outcome follow-up. Conclusion Our findings raise policy concerns that managed care may reduce treatment effectiveness by limiting the range of services offered to meet patient needs. Further, reduced onsite medical testing may contribute to the spread of infectious diseases that pose important public health concerns. PMID:15032957

Olmstead, Todd; White, William D; Sindelar, Jody

2004-01-01

167

Buprenorphine Alters Desmethylflunitrazepam Disposition and Flunitrazepam Toxicity in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-dosage buprenorphine (BUP) consumed concomitantly with benzodiazepines (BZDs) including flunitrazepam (FZ) may cause life-threatening respiratory depression despite a BUP ceiling effect and BZDs' limited effects on ventilation. However, the mechanism of BUP\\/FZ interaction remains unknown. We hypoth- esized that BUP may alter the disposition of FZ active metabolites in vivo, contributing to respiratory toxicity. Plasma FZ, desmethyl- flunitrazepam (DMFZ), and

Stephane Pirnay; Bruno Megarbane; Xavier Decleves; Patricia Risede; Stephen W. Borron; Stephane Bouchonnet; Berangere Perrin; Marcel Debray; Nathalie Milan; Tania Duarte; Ivan Ricordel; Frederic J. Baud

2008-01-01

168

Depression-Like Effect of Prenatal Buprenorphine Exposure in Rats  

PubMed Central

Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB) phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior. PMID:24367510

Hung, Chih-Jen; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

2013-01-01

169

Improving Depression Treatment for Women: Integrating a Collaborative Care Depression Intervention into OB-GYN Care  

PubMed Central

Background Women have higher rates of depression and often experience depression symptoms during critical reproductive periods, including adolescence, pregnancy, postpartum, and menopause. Collaborative care intervention models for mood disorders in patients receiving care in an OB-GYN clinic setting have not been evaluated. Study design and methodology for a randomized, controlled trial of collaborative care depression management versus usual care in OB-GYN clinics and the details of the adapted collaborative care intervention and model implementation are described in this paper. Methods Women over age 18 years with clinically significant symptoms of depression, as measured by a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) score ?10 and a clinical diagnosis of major depression or dysthymia, were randomized to the study intervention or to usual care and were followed for 18 months. The primary outcome assessed was change over time in the SCL-20 depression scale between baseline and 12 months. Baseline Results 205 women were randomized: 57% white, 20% African American, 9% Asian or Pacific Islander, 7% Hispanic, and 6% Native American. Mean age was 39 years. 4.6% were pregnant and 7.5% were within 12 months postpartum. The majority were single, (52%), and 95% had at least the equivalent of a high school diploma. Almost all patients met DSM IV criteria for major depression (99%) and approximately 33% met criteria for dysthymia. Conclusions An OB-GYN collaborative care team including a social worker, psychiatrist and OB-GYN physician who met weekly and used an electronic tracking system for patients were essential elements of the proposed depression care treatment model described here. Further study of models that improve quality of depression care that are adapted to the unique OB-GYN setting are needed. PMID:23939510

LaRocco-Cockburn, Anna; Reed, Susan D.; Melville, Jennifer; Croicu, Carmen; Russo, Joan; Inspektor, Michal; Edmondson, Eddie; Katon, Wayne

2013-01-01

170

Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note  

PubMed Central

Background While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. Methods We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12–14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1–2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. Findings At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized –placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct. PMID:24273683

Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

2013-01-01

171

Abuse liability of buprenorphine–naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buprenorphine (Subutex®) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone®) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables

Hannu Alho; David Sinclair; Erkki Vuori; Antti Holopainen

2007-01-01

172

Evaluation of a Combined Online and in Person Training in the Use of Buprenorphine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To evaluate buprenorphine training methodology, we surveyed physicians who had completed a combined online and in person buprenorphine curriculum. Of 53/70 (76%) survey respondents, 57% were psychiatrists and 40% generalists. On a scale of 1 (very poor) to 7 (superlative), the overall training rated a mean of 5.8. The online course (5.0) rated…

Gunderson, Erik W.; Levin, Frances R.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Fiellin, David A.; Sullivan, Lynn E.

2006-01-01

173

Continuing care in the treatment of addictive disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newer models of continuing care in the addictions are designed to improve the long-term management of substance use disorders\\u000a by engaging patients into flexible, or “adaptive,” treatment algorithms that change in focus and intensity as symptoms wax\\u000a and wane over time. This article describes some of these newer approaches to the management of substance use disorders and\\u000a presents recent research

James R. McKay

2006-01-01

174

[Inpatient care in the treatment of alcohol use disorders].  

PubMed

Inpatient treatment has long been considered the reference in the treatment of alcoholism. It may indeed have many conceptual advantages, but practically it is a method of treatment with high costs and long waiting period. Moreover, reviews of studies evaluating effectiveness of treatment settings for alcohol dependence suggest that no significant differences exist between inpatient and outpatient programs. Therefore, it seems useful to determine indications of inpatient detoxification programs. As we may see, the choice of inpatient detox should be primarily guided by the contra-indications of outpatient detox. However, it also depends very much on patients' preference, essential to success, since they are the lead actors. Some other situations require urgent residential care, regardless of readiness to change or type of alcohol disorder underlying. PMID:22288351

Balester Mouret, Sylvain

2011-12-01

175

Treatment-Resistant Depression in Primary Care Across Canada  

PubMed Central

Objective: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) represents a considerable global health concern. The goal of the InSight study was to investigate the prevalence of TRD and to evaluate its clinical characterization and management, compared with nonresistant depression, in primary care centres. Methods: Physicians completed a case report on a consecutive series of patients with major depressive disorder (n = 1212), which captured patient demographics and comorbidity, as well as current and past medication. Results: Using failure to respond to at least 2 antidepressants (ADs) from different classes as the definition of TRD, the overall prevalence was 21.7%. There were no differences in prevalence between men and women or among ethnicities. Patients with TRD had longer episode duration, were more likely to receive polypharmacy (for example, psychotropic, lipid-lowering, and antiinflammatory agents), and reported more AD related side effects. Higher rates of disability and comorbidity (axes I to III) were associated with treatment resistance. Obesity and being overweight were also associated with treatment resistance. While the selection and sequencing of pharmacotherapy by family physicians in this sample was in line with recommendations from evidence-based treatment guidelines, the wait time to make a change in treatment was 6 to 8 weeks in both groups, which exceeds guideline recommendations. Conclusions: These real-world data demonstrate the high prevalence of TRD in primary care settings, and underscore the substantial burden of illness associated with TRD. PMID:25007419

Rizvi, Sakina J; Grima, Etienne; Tan, Mary; Rotzinger, Susan; Lin, Peter; McIntyre, Roger S; Kennedy, Sidney H

2014-01-01

176

Prehospital stroke care: new prospects for treatment and clinical research.  

PubMed

Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time-outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

Audebert, Heinrich J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R; Endres, Matthias

2013-07-30

177

Treatment of depression in a low-income primary care setting with co-located mental health care  

PubMed Central

Objective To characterize depression treatment-as-usual in a large primary care practice in the U.S. with co-located mental health care, and to examine predictors of receiving any treatment and receiving adequate treatment. Methods Primary care patients were systematically approached in waiting rooms. Those with a minimum level of depression symptoms (n = 91) were asked to participate in a study in which they completed assessments of mental health service use, depression symptoms, and related problems. Results In this setting with co-located mental health care, most patients with elevated depressive symptoms were receiving some type of mental health care, indicating they had been identified as depressed. However, only half were receiving “minimally adequate care.” Minority patients were less likely to receive any care. Patients who were more depressed, demonstrated poorer problem-solving ability, and had poorer physical health were more likely to receive any treatment and to receive minimally adequate treatment for depression. Conclusion Even in the context of co-located mental health care, there is still room for improving treatment of depressed patients. For some depressed patients, an important first step will be to ensure they are receiving minimally adequate care. However, others may need more intensive care, including combined treatments. PMID:19630457

Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Smith, Marcia; Lewis, Angelique W.; Sasaki, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W.

2010-01-01

178

45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER... § 156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical...

2012-10-01

179

45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER... § 156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical...

2014-10-01

180

45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER... § 156.245 Treatment of direct primary care medical homes...may provide coverage through a direct primary care medical...

2013-10-01

181

Outreach education for integration of HIV\\/AIDS care, antiretroviral treatment, and tuberculosis care in primary care clinics in South Africa: PALSA PLUS pragmatic cluster randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate whether PALSA PLUS, an on-site educational outreach programme of non-didactic, case based, iterative clinical education of staff, led by a trainer, can increase access to and comprehensiveness of care for patients with HIV\\/AIDS.Design Cluster randomised trial.Setting Public primary care clinics offering HIV\\/AIDS care, antiretroviral treatment (ART), tuberculosis care, and ambulatory primary care in Free State province, South

Merrick Zwarenstein; Lara R Fairall; Carl Lombard; Pat Mayers; Angeni Bheekie; René G English; Simon Lewin; Max O Bachmann; Eric Bateman

2011-01-01

182

Behavioral treatments for migraine management: useful at each step of migraine care.  

PubMed

Migraine is a disabling and prevalent disorder. Migraine is most effectively treated with a stepped care approach, where patients initially receive a broad level of care (primary care) and proceed to receive increasingly specialized care throughout the course of treatment. Behavioral treatments for migraine modify behaviors of people with migraine with the intention to prevent migraine episodes and secondary consequence of migraine. Behavioral treatments can be incorporated into each level of the stepped care approach for migraine treatment. In this article, we provide a rationale for including behavioral treatment strategies in the treatment of migraine. We then describe and review the evidence for behavioral treatment strategies for migraine, including patient education, relaxation strategies, biofeedback, and cognitive behavioral treatment strategies. Finally, we describe how behavioral treatments can be integrated into a stepped care approach for migraine care. PMID:25708673

Singer, Alexandra B; Buse, Dawn C; Seng, Elizabeth K

2015-04-01

183

28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

2014-07-01

184

28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

2011-07-01

185

28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

2012-07-01

186

28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

2013-07-01

187

28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. 43.2 Section 43.2 Judicial...COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43...Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the...

2010-07-01

188

Budgetary impact analysis of buprenorphine-naloxone combination (Suboxone®) in Spain  

PubMed Central

Background Opioid addiction is a worldwide problem. Agonist opioid treatment (AOT) is the most widespread and frequent pharmacotherapeutic approach. Methadone has been the most widely used AOT, but buprenorphine, a partial ?-opiod agonist and a ?-opiod antagonist, is fast gaining acceptance. The objective was to assess the budgetary impact in Spain of the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone (B/N) combination. Methods A budgetary impact model was developed to estimate healthcare costs of the addition of B/N combination to the therapeutic arsenal for treating opioid dependent patients, during a 3-year period under the National Health System perspective. Inputs for the model were obtained from the specialized scientific literature. Detailed information concerning resource consumption (drug cost, logistics, dispensing, medical, psychiatry and pharmacy supervision, counselling and laboratory test) was obtained from a local expert panel. Costs are expressed in euros (€, 2010). Results The number of patients estimated to be prescribed B/N combination was 2,334; 2,993 and 3,589 in the first, second and third year respectively. Total budget is €85,766,129; €79,855,471 and €79,137,502 in the first, second and third year for the scenario without B/N combination. With B/N combination the total budget would be €86,589,210; €80,398,259 and €79,708,964 in the first, second and third year of the analyses. Incremental cost/patient comparing the addition of the B/N combination to the scenario only with methadone is €10.58; €6.98 and €7.34 in the first, second and third year respectively. Conclusion Addition of B/N combination would imply a maximum incremental yearly cost of €10.58 per patient compared to scenario only with methadone and would provide additional benefits. PMID:22828157

2012-01-01

189

Crushed and Injected Buprenorphine Tablets: Characteristics of Princeps and Generic Solutions  

PubMed Central

Self-injection of high-dose buprenorphine is responsible for well-described complications. In 2011, we have been alerted by unusual but serious cutaneous complication among injection buprenorphine users. A prospective data collection identified 30 cases of necrotic cutaneous lesions after injection of filtered buprenorphine solution, among which 25 cases occurred following injection of buprenorphine generics. The main goal of our study was to put forward particularities that could explain the cutaneous complications, by qualitatively and quantitatively confronting particles present in Subutex and generics solutions. We used the same protocol that injected-buprenorphine users: generic or subutex tablets were crushed in sterile water and filtered through 2 filters commonly used (cotton-pad and sterifilt). Solutions were analyzed by laser granulometry, flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy. We have highlighted the wide variation of the quantity and the size of the particles present in solution between the two drugs after cotton-pad filtration. The proportion of particles <10 µm is systematically higher in the generic solutions than with Subutex. All of the insoluble particles found in generic solutions contain silica, whereas non- organic element was to be identified in the insoluble particles of Subutex. One skin biopsy obtained from one patient who developed a necrotic lesion after intravenous injection of filtrated solution of buprenorphine generic, shows non-organic elements. Identification of particles in situ enables us to confirm the presence of silica in the biopsy. Actually the monitoring of patient receiving generic of buprenorphine must be strengthened. PMID:25474108

Bouquié, Régis; Wainstein, Laura; Pilet, Paul; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Deslandes, Guillaume; Clouet, Johann; Dailly, Eric; Jolliet, Pascale; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline

2014-01-01

190

Potentiation of buprenorphine antinociception with ultra-low dose naltrexone in healthy subjects.  

PubMed

Previous reports have demonstrated greater antinociception following administration of a buprenorphine/naloxone combination compared to buprenorphine alone among healthy volunteers. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether buprenorphine antinociception could be enhanced with the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone, using a range of dose ratios. A repeated-measures, double-blind, cross-over trial was undertaken with 10 healthy participants. The effects of each buprenorphine:naltrexone ratio (100:1, 133:1, 166:1, and 200:1) on cold pressor tolerance time and respiration were compared to the effects of buprenorphine only. The 166:1 ratio was associated with significantly greater tolerance time to cold pressor pain than buprenorphine alone. Minimal respiratory depression and few adverse events were observed in all conditions. These findings suggest that, as previously described with naloxone, the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone can enhance the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in humans. This potentiation is dose-ratio dependent and occurs without a concomitant increase in adverse effects. PMID:20728384

Hay, J L; La Vincente, S F; Somogyi, A A; Chapleo, C B; White, J M

2011-03-01

191

Safety studies of post-surgical buprenorphine therapy for mice.  

PubMed

The use of appropriate analgesia in laboratory mice may be suboptimal because of concerns about adverse events (AE). Target Animal Safety trials were conducted to determine the safety of an extended-release suspension of buprenorphine. Drug or control suspensions were injected subcutaneously in surgically-treated BALB/c mice anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine to mimic post-operative conditions in which the compound might commonly be administered. Single and repeat five-fold (5×) excesses of the 3.25?mg/kg intended dose were used to provoke potential AE. Trials included prospective measurements of weight changes, blood chemistry, hematology, and histopathology. Clinical and histopathology findings were similar in drug-treated and control mice in a four-day trial using a single 16.25?mg/kg, 5× overdose of the drug. In a 12-day trial, which used a total buprenorphine dose of 48.75?mg/kg, clinical and histopathology values were also similar in control and drug-treated female mice. In the male arm of the repeat-overdose trial, two of eight mice died on the morning of day 12, three days following the third 16.25?mg/kg overdose administration. Histopathology did not reveal a cause of death. In a 14-month trial using a single 3.25?mg/kg dose of the drug, no significant findings identified potential AE. These findings indicate a high tolerance to an extended-release buprenorphine suspension administered post-operatively in mice with appropriate husbandry. PMID:25305141

Traul, Karl A; Romero, Jennell B; Brayton, Cory; DeTolla, Louis; Forbes-McBean, Nadine; Halquist, Matthew S; Karnes, H Thomas; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Tomlinson, Michael J; Tyler, Betty M; Ye, Xiaobu; Zadnik, Patricia; Guarnieri, Michael

2014-10-10

192

Smoking cessation treatment in primary care: prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare the characteristics of smokers who do and do not receive smoking cessation treatment in primary care. Design: Prospective cohort study using practices registered with the pilot QRESEARCH database. Setting: 156 550 patients aged 18 years and over from 39 general practices located within four strategic health authorities, representing the former Trent Region, UK. Subjects: Patients registered with practices between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2003 aged 18 years and over who were identified as smokers before the two year study period. Outcome: Prescription for smoking cessation treatment (nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or bupropion) in the two year study period. Variables: Age, sex, deprivation score, co-morbidity. Results: Of the 29 492 patients recorded as current smokers at the start of the study period 1892 (6.4%) were given prescriptions for smoking cessation treatment during the subsequent two years. Of these, 1378 (72.8%) were given NRT alone, 406 (21.5%) bupropion alone, and 108 (5.7%) both treatments. Smokers were more likely to receive smoking cessation treatment if they lived in the most deprived areas (odds ratio (OR) for the most relative to the least deprived fifth, adjusted for sex, age, and co-morbidity, 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26 to 1.78), and if they were aged 25–74 years compared to 18–24 years or 75 and over. Smokers with co-morbidity were also more likely to receive smoking cessation treatment. Smokers were less likely to receive smoking cessation treatment if they were male (adjusted OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.75). Conclusion: The low proportion of smokers being prescribed these products strongly suggests that a major public health opportunity to prevent smoking related illness is being missed. PMID:16046686

Wilson, A; Hippisley-Cox, J; Coupland, C; Coleman, T; Britton, J; Barrett, S

2005-01-01

193

Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression  

SciTech Connect

In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg{sup -1} was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P < 0.001), without significant effects on the respiratory frequency, the tidal volume, the minute volume, or arterial blood gases. In dexamethasone-pretreated rats, there was no significant alteration in the respiratory parameters, despite CYP3A induction and significant increase of the ratio of plasma norbuprenorphine-to-buprenorphine concentrations. In conclusion, dexamethasone did not modify the effects of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts.

Hreiche, Raymond [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Megarbane, Bruno [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France) and Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Reanimation Medicale et Toxicologique, Universite Paris 7, 75010 Paris (France)]. E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Pirnay, Stephane [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Prefecture de Police de Paris, 75012 Paris (France); Borron, Stephen W. [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Department of Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Monier, Claire [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Risede, Patricia [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Milan, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Prefecture de Police de Paris, 75012 Paris (France); Descatoire, Veronique [INSERM U481, Faculte de Medecine Xavier Bichat, 75018 Paris (France); Pessayre, Dominique [INSERM U481, Faculte de Medecine Xavier Bichat, 75018 Paris (France); Baud, Frederic J. [INSERM U705, CNRS UMR 7157, Universite Paris 7, Universite Paris 5, Hopital Fernand Widal, 75010 Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Reanimation Medicale et Toxicologique, Universite Paris 7, 75010 Paris (France)

2006-12-15

194

Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care.  

PubMed

Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000-¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden. PMID:25060622

Isshiki, Takahiro

2014-12-01

195

Child-related dimensions of placement stability in treatment foster care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research shows increasing numbers of emotionally disturbed children entering foster care nationwide. As a result, there is growing interest in a special form of foster care known as therapeutic or treatment foster care. However, little information is currently available on the kinds of children who can benefit from this form of mental health care or on interactions between child characteristics

Martha Morrison Dore; Eleanor Eisner

1993-01-01

196

Patient, Provider, and Treatment Factors Associated with Poor-Quality Care for Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventions are needed to improve the quality of care for schizophrenia. However, in designing these interventions it would be helpful to understand better which patients are at highest risk for poor-quality care and why care for this disorder is often of poor quality. We study the extent to which patient and treatment factors are associated with poor-quality care in 224

Alexander S. Young; Greer Sullivan; Naihua Duan

1999-01-01

197

Correlates of social worker decisions to seek treatment-oriented out-of-home care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the results of a study of decisions by child welfare workers regarding the ideal placement type for 348 children placed in out-of-home care in California. The study examines factors associated with the preference to place a child in treatment foster care or group care as opposed to foster family or kinship care. Child age, behavior problems, and

Mark E. Courtney

1998-01-01

198

Problem-Solving Treatment and Coping Styles in Primary Care for Minor Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research was undertaken to compare problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) with usual care for minor depression and to examine whether treatment effectiveness was moderated by coping style. PST-PC is a 6-session, manual-based, psychosocial skills intervention. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 academic, primary care

Oxman, Thomas E.; Hegel, Mark T.; Hull, Jay G.; Dietrich, Allen J.

2008-01-01

199

Buprenorphine Medication versus Voucher Contingencies in Promoting Abstinence from Opioids and Cocaine  

PubMed Central

This study compared the relative efficacy of two contingency management (CM) interventions versus standard care. During a 12-week intervention, opioid dependent participants (N = 120) were maintained on thrice-a-week (M, W, F) buprenorphine plus therapist and computer-based counseling. They were randomized to receive: (a) medication contingencies (MC= thrice weekly dosing schedule vs. daily attendance and single-day 50% dose reduction imposed upon submission of an opioid and/or cocaine positive urine sample); (b) voucher contingency (VC=escalating schedule for opioid and/or cocaine negative samples with reset for drug-positive samples); or (c) standard care (SC), with no programmed consequences for urinalysis results. Voucher reinforcement resulted in better 12-week retention (85%) compared to contingent medication (58%; p=0.009), but neither differed from standard care (76% retained). The groups submitted a similar overall percentage of opioid and cocaine-free urines (MC = 79%, VC = 76%, SC = 69%). After adjusting for baseline differences in employment, the medication contingency group achieved 1.5 more continuous weeks of combined opioid/cocaine abstinence than standard care (p=0.030), while the voucher group had 2 more total weeks of abstinence than standard care (p=0.048). Drug use results suggest that the two interventions were both efficacious, with effects seen primarily in opioid rather than cocaine test results. Findings should be interpreted in light of the greater attrition associated with medication-based contingencies versus the greater monetary costs of voucher-based contingencies. PMID:19653788

Chopra, Mohit P.; Landes, Reid D.; Gatchalian, Kirstin M; Jackson, Lisa C.; Buchhalter, August R; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Marsch, Lisa A.; Bickel, Warren K.

2010-01-01

200

Primary care professional's perspectives on treatment decision making for depression with African Americans and Latinos in primary care practice.  

PubMed

Increasing interest has been shown in shared decision making (SDM) to improve mental health care communication between underserved immigrant minorities and their providers. Nonetheless, very little is known about this process. The following is a qualitative study of fifteen primary care providers at two Federally Qualified Health Centers in New York and their experience during depression treatment decision making. Respondents described a process characterized in between shared and paternalistic models of treatment decision making. Barriers to SDM included discordant models of illness, stigma, varying role expectations and decision readiness. Respondents reported strategies used to overcome barriers including understanding illness perceptions and the role of the community in the treatment process, dispelling stigma using cultural terms, orienting patients to treatment and remaining available regarding the treatment decision. Findings from this study have implications for planning SDM interventions to guide primary care providers through treatment engagement for depression. PMID:24104206

Patel, Sapana R; Schnall, Rebecca; Little, Virna; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Pincus, Harold Alan

2014-12-01

201

The effects of prenatal exposure to buprenorphine or methadone on infant visual evoked potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the neurological development of 4month old infants exposed to buprenorphine or methadone during pregnancy to that of a control group of non-exposed infants. Participants were 30 buprenorphine-maintained women, 22 methadone-maintained women and 33 non opioid-dependent controls, and their infants. Women were enrolled during pregnancy as part of an open-label non-randomised flexible-dosing longitudinal study. Groups were matched for

Justine N. Whitham; Nicola J. Spurrier; Michael G. Sawyer; Peter A. Baghurst; John E. Taplin; Jason M. White; Andrea L. Gordon

2010-01-01

202

Role of Behavioral Health Professionals in a Collaborative Stepped Care Treatment Model for Depression in Primary Care: Project IMPACT  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a new collaborative stepped care treatment model for depression in primary care that was recently tested in Project IMPACT, a multi-site, randomized, controlled study with older adults (Unutzer, Katon, Williams, Callahan, Harpole, Hunkeler, Hoffing, Arean, Hegel, Schoenbaum, Oishi, & Langston, 2001). We present in particular detail the role of the central figure in this model, the Depression Clinical

Mark T. Hegel; Jennifer Imming; Margaret Cyr-Provost; Polly Hitchcock Noel; Patricia A. Arean; Jurgen Unutzer

2002-01-01

203

The Effectiveness of an Experimental Treatment when Compared to Care as Usual Depends on the Type of Care as Usual  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In psychotherapy, effectiveness of an experimental treatment often is compared to care as usual. However, little if any attention has been paid to the heterogeneity of care as usual. The authors examined the effectiveness of manualized behavior therapy on school-aged disruptive behavior disordered (DBD) children in everyday clinical practice. A…

van de Wiel, Nicolle M. H.; Matthys, Walter; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Maassen, Gerard H.; Lochman, John E.; van Engeland, Herman

2007-01-01

204

The challenge: streamlining HIV treatment and care while improving outcomes  

PubMed Central

ART coverage among HIV-positive population varies, depending on the countries, between 10% (e.g. Indonesia) and 65% (Botswana). Death rates and new HIV infections have been linked to ART coverage. Therefore, streamlining tasks and roles to expand treatment and care and to provide quality and equitable health is an ongoing concern globally. One concept that has been applied to improve the delivery of HIV services is that of task shifting. Defined as the systematic delegation of tasks from doctors to cadre with less training such as nurses or lay workers, task shifting has been used as an effective strategy to address the current healthcare worker shortage in many African countries. A body of literature supports the use of task shifting as a successful approach in delivering healthcare services including HIV testing, counselling and ART treatment. In addition, in a time of economic burden and scare resources, task shifting may also help to relieve the situation. This concern is highlighted in recommendation of WHO to strengthen and expand human capacity among healthcare workers. The major issues that are raised are: How can task shifting be implemented in a way that is sustainable? How can clinical care services be organized to maximize the potential of the task-shifting approach while ensuring safety, efficiency and effectiveness? What preconditions must be met, what are the country-specific factors that will guide decision-making in the implementation of task shifting? In addition, task shifting should be implemented alongside other efforts to increase the numbers of skilled health workers. Quality assurances mechanisms should provide the necessary checks balances to protect both service users and health workers. PMID:25394002

Clumeck, Nathan

2014-01-01

205

The challenge: streamlining HIV treatment and care while improving outcomes.  

PubMed

ART coverage among HIV-positive population varies, depending on the countries, between 10% (e.g. Indonesia) and 65% (Botswana). Death rates and new HIV infections have been linked to ART coverage. Therefore, streamlining tasks and roles to expand treatment and care and to provide quality and equitable health is an ongoing concern globally. One concept that has been applied to improve the delivery of HIV services is that of task shifting. Defined as the systematic delegation of tasks from doctors to cadre with less training such as nurses or lay workers, task shifting has been used as an effective strategy to address the current healthcare worker shortage in many African countries. A body of literature supports the use of task shifting as a successful approach in delivering healthcare services including HIV testing, counselling and ART treatment. In addition, in a time of economic burden and scare resources, task shifting may also help to relieve the situation. This concern is highlighted in recommendation of WHO to strengthen and expand human capacity among healthcare workers. The major issues that are raised are: How can task shifting be implemented in a way that is sustainable? How can clinical care services be organized to maximize the potential of the task-shifting approach while ensuring safety, efficiency and effectiveness? What preconditions must be met, what are the country-specific factors that will guide decision-making in the implementation of task shifting? In addition, task shifting should be implemented alongside other efforts to increase the numbers of skilled health workers. Quality assurances mechanisms should provide the necessary checks balances to protect both service users and health workers. PMID:25394002

Clumeck, Nathan

2014-01-01

206

Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

2008-01-01

207

Comparative pharmacokinetics of intravenous fentanyl and buprenorphine in healthy greyhound dogs.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of two highly protein-bound, lipophilic opioid drugs. Fentanyl (10 ?g/kg) and buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) were administered intravenously (IV) to six healthy greyhound dogs (three males and three females). The doses were based on clinically administered doses for dogs. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetics were estimated with computer software. The volume of distribution (area) was larger for fentanyl (7.42 L/kg) compared to buprenorphine (3.54 L/kg). The plasma clearance of fentanyl (38.6 mL·min/kg) was faster than buprenorphine (10.3 mL·min/kg). The terminal half-life of fentanyl (2.22 h) was shorter than buprenorphine (3.96 h). Despite similar physicochemical properties including octanol-water partition coefficient and pKa, the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl and buprenorphine were not similar. Both fentanyl (84%) and buprenorphine (95-98%) are considered highly protein bound, but the differences in protein binding may contribute to the lack of similarity of pharmacokinetics in healthy dogs. PMID:24684621

KuKanich, B; Allen, P

2014-12-01

208

Pharmacokinetics of oral transmucosal and intramuscular dexmedetomidine combined with buprenorphine in cats.  

PubMed

Plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration of their combination in healthy adult cats were compared. According to a crossover protocol (1-month washout), a combination of dexmedetomidine (40 ?g/kg) and buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) was given OTM (buccal cavity) or i.m. (quadriceps muscle) in six female neutered cats. Plasma samples were collected through a jugular catheter during a 24-h period. Plasma dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma concentration-time data were fitted to compartmental models. For dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were significantly lower following OTM than following i.m. administration. For buprenorphine, time to reach Cmax was also significantly longer after OTM administration than after i.m. injection. Data suggested that dexmedetomidine (40 ?g/kg) combined with buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) is not as well absorbed from the buccal mucosa site as from the intramuscular injection site. PMID:25269566

Porters, N; de Rooster, H; Bosmans, T; Baert, K; Cherlet, M; Croubels, S; De Backer, P; Polis, I

2015-04-01

209

Hepatitis B prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care: a review.  

PubMed

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is associated with an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The likelihood of developing CHB is related to the age at which infection is acquired; the risk being lowest in adults and >90% in neonates whose mothers are hepatitis B e antigen positive. Treatment of CHB infection aims to clear HBV DNA and prevent the development of complications. There are currently seven drugs available for the treatment of CHB: five nucleos(t)ide analogues and two interferon-based therapies. Long-term treatment is often required, and the decision to treat is based on clinical assessment including the phase of CHB infection and the presence and extent of liver damage. A safe and effective HBV vaccine has been available since the early 1980s. Vaccination plays a central role in HBV prevention strategies worldwide, and a decline in the incidence and prevalence of HBV infection following the introduction of universal HBV vaccination programmes has been observed in many countries including the USA and parts of South East Asia and Europe. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with HBV vaccine +/- hepatitis B immunoglobulin is highly effective in preventing mother to child transmission and in preventing transmission following sharps injuries, sexual contact and other exposures to infected blood and body fluids. Transmission of HBV in the health care setting has become an increasingly rare event in developed nations. However, it remains a significant risk in developing countries reflecting the higher prevalence of CHB, limited access to HBV vaccination and PEP and a lack of adherence to standard infection control precautions. PMID:22114089

Aspinall, E J; Hawkins, G; Fraser, A; Hutchinson, S J; Goldberg, D

2011-12-01

210

A Clinical Trial Comparing Tapering Doses of Buprenorphine with Steady Doses for Chronic Pain and Co-existent Opioid Addiction  

PubMed Central

Objectives Effective strategies are needed to manage individuals with chronic non-cancer pain and coexistent opioid addiction. This study compared opioid discontinuation and opioid replacement protocols. Methods We planned to enroll 60 individuals into an open-label trial who had been treated with opioids for chronic non-cancer pain, and who also had opioid addiction. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two 6-month treatment protocols of buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablets: 1) tapering doses for opioid weaning or “detoxification” (active comparator group) or 2) steady doses for opioid replacement (experimental group). They were followed monthly for the study outcomes: completion of the 6-month treatment protocol and self-reported pain control, physical functioning, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use. Results Enrollment was terminated after enrolling 12 participants because none of the 6 assigned to receive tapering doses could successfully complete the protocol (5 were given steady doses and 1 was admitted to an inpatient chemical dependency treatment program); whereas, of the 6 assigned to receive steady doses, 5 completed the protocol (1 withdrew). This difference between the 2 treatment conditions was significant (P = 0.015). Of the 10 participants who completed the 6 month follow-up, 8 reported improved pain control and physical functioning and 5 used alcohol and/or illicit drugs. Conclusions We conclude that over 6 months, these participants with chronic pain and co-existent opioid addiction were more likely to adhere to an opioid replacement protocol than an opioid weaning protocol and that opioid replacement therapy with steady doses of buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with improved pain control and physical functioning. PMID:20959867

Blondell, Richard D.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Dambra, Christina M.; Foschio, Elisa M.; Zielinski, Amy L.; Salcedo, Daniel M.

2009-01-01

211

28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

2012-07-01

212

28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

2014-07-01

213

28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of...

2013-07-01

214

Illicit Use of Buprenorphine in a Community Sample of Young Adult Non-Medical Users of Pharmaceutical Opioids  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND There is growing evidence about illicit use of buprenorphine in the U.S. The study aims to: 1) identify prevalence and predictors of illicit buprenorphine use in a community sample of 396 young adult (18-23 years old) non-medical users of pharmaceutical opioids; 2) describe knowledge, attitudes and behaviors linked to illicit buprenorphine use as reported by a qualitative sub-sample (n=51). METHODS Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Qualitative interview participants were selected from the larger sample. The sample (n=396) was 54% male and 50% white; 7.8% reported lifetime illicit use of buprenorphine. RESULTS Logistic regression analysis results indicate that white ethnicity, intranasal inhalation of pharmaceutical opioids, symptoms of opioid dependence, and a greater number of pharmaceutical opioids used in lifetime were statistically significant predictors of illicit buprenorphine use. Qualitative interviews revealed that buprenorphine was more commonly used by more experienced users who were introduced to it by their “junkie friends.” Those who used buprenorphine to self-medicate withdrawal referred to it as a “miracle pill.” When used to get high, reported experiences ranged from “the best high ever” to “puking for days.” Participants reported using buprenorphine/naloxone orally or by intranasal inhalation. Injection of buprenorphine without naloxone was also reported. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that illicit buprenorphine use is gaining ground primarily among whites and those who are more advanced in their drug use careers. Continued monitoring is needed to better understand evolving patterns and trends of illicit buprenorphine use. PMID:22036303

Daniulaityte, Raminta; Falck, Russel; Carlson, Robert G.

2011-01-01

215

Pilot Study of Behavioral Treatment in Dementia Care Units.(practice Concepts)(author Abstract)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article reports on the development and use of behavioral treatment as a well-being intervention for individuals with dementia residing at special care units in a nursing home. Design and Methods: The project took place upon the construction and opening of two new homelike units for dementia care in a rural community-care center.…

Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Kemp-Havican, Julie; MacNeill, Susan E.; Johnson, Amanda Schafer

2005-01-01

216

Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

2011-01-01

217

Pregnancy Rates among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17…

Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

2009-01-01

218

A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders.  

PubMed

Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models--and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

Gastfriend, David R

2014-10-01

219

Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans.  

PubMed

Pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a ?-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N=48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs. PMID:25544740

Bershad, Anya K; Jaffe, Jerome H; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

2015-02-01

220

Comparative Trial to Study the Effectiveness of Clonidine Hydrochloride and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Opioid Withdrawal – A Hospital Based Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Prevalence of opioid addiction has alarmingly increased over the recent years. In South Asian region alone there are more than 10 million opioid abusers amounting to 2% of world population. Detoxification remains to be the first step for the successful treatment of opioid addiction. The present study was carried out to compare the relative efficacy and safety of buprenorphine –naloxone and clonidine hydrochloride in the detoxification of opioid-dependents. Materials and Methods: Present trial was conducted at De- addiction centre of Institute of Mental and Neurosciences (IMNS), GMC Srinagar. Fifty four (54) treatment seeking subjects, 15-50 years of age, fulfilling DSM-1V TR (American Psychiatric association`s Mental Disorders-1V text revision) criteria for opioid dependence were included and randomized into two groups. The groups received either clonidine hydrochloride (Group A) or buprenorphine- naloxone (Bup-Nax) (Group B) for the duration of 10 days. The efficacy of the two drugs in controlling the opioid withdrawal was evaluated by Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) and their effect on the desire for the abused substance was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The safety of the two drugs was measured by taking the side effect profile of the two compared drugs into consideration. Results: There was significant difference of COWS-score between the two groups which was evident from day 3 (14.85 ± 3.43 vs. 11.67 ± 2.40, p<0.005) and continued till day 6 (2.56 ± 1.40 vs. 0.30 ± 0.61, p<0.005), for Group A and group B respectively. The effect of two drugs in controlling the craving for the abused substance also showed significant difference from day 2 (66.30 ± 10.80 vs. 47.40 ± 12.90, p<0.005) till day 5 (7.78 ± 6.41 vs. 1.85 ± 6.22, p<0.005), for Group A and Group B respectively. Conclusion: Administration of buprenorphine-naloxone was more efficient in reducing the signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal and in controlling the craving for the abused substance during the first few days of detoxification. PMID:25738001

Farhat, Samina; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Abbas, Zaffar

2015-01-01

221

Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Methadone Effects on Laboratory Indices of Liver Health: a Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) and methadone (MET) are efficacious treatments for opioid dependence, although concerns about a link between BUP and drug-induced hepatitis have been raised. This study compares the effects of BUP and MET on liver health in opioid-dependent participants. METHODS This was a randomized controlled trial of 1269 opioid-dependent participants seeking treatment at 8 federally licensed opioid treatment programs and followed for up to 32 weeks between May 2006 and August 2010; 731 participants met “evaluable” criteria defined as completing 24 weeks of medication and providing at least 4 blood samples for transaminase testing. Participants were randomly assigned to receive BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Shift table analysis determined how many evaluable participants moved between categories of low and elevated transaminase levels. Predictors of moving from low to high transaminase levels were identified. RESULTS Changes in transaminase levels did not differ by medication condition. Baseline infection with hepatitis C or B was the only significant predictor of moving from low to elevated transaminase levels; 9 BUP and 15 MET participants showed extreme liver test elevations and were more likely than those without extreme elevations to have seroconverted to both hepatitis B and C during the study, or to use illicit drugs during the first 8 weeks of treatment. MET participants were retained longer in treatment than BUP participants. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated no evidence of liver damage during the initial 6 months of treatment in either condition. Physicians can prescribe either medication without major concern for liver injury. PMID:22921476

Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen; Thomas, Christie; Hasson, Albert; Ang, Alfonso; Doraimani, Geetha; Tasissa, Gudaye; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Leimberger, Jeff; Bruce, R. Douglas; McCarthy, John; Wiest, Katharina; McLaughlin, Paul; Bilangi, Richard; Cohen, Allan; Woody, George; Jacobs, Petra

2012-01-01

222

The Unique Supportive Care Needs of a Mother With Acute Myeloid Leukemia During Treatment  

PubMed Central

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the blood that is linked with poor survival. The disease requires immediate intensive chemotherapy treatment that leaves patients hospitalized for at least one month and often longer, depending on their supportive care needs. Mothers undergoing treatment for AML may benefit from having attention paid to their supportive care needs during that time. PMID:25689644

Albrecht, Tara; Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Bryant, Ashley Leak

2015-01-01

223

Public sector managed care for substance abuse treatment: Opportunities for health services research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of reduced utilization of alcohol and drug abuse treatment following the introduction of managed behavioral health care suggest that substance abuse services may be especially responsive to managed care restrictions and limits. In publicly funded treatment systems, patient attributes, system and provider characteristics, and financing mechanisms may heighten susceptibility to unintended effects. The State Substance Abuse and Mental Health

Dennis McCarty; Milton Argeriou; Gabrielle Denmead; Joan Dilonardo

2001-01-01

224

The unique supportive care needs of a mother with acute myeloid leukemia during treatment.  

PubMed

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the blood that is linked with poor survival. The disease requires immediate intensive chemotherapy treatment that leaves patients hospitalized for at least one month and often longer, depending on their supportive care needs. Mothers undergoing treatment for AML may benefit from having attention paid to their supportive care needs during that time. PMID:25689644

Albrecht, Tara; Walton, AnnMarie; Bryant, Ashley

2015-02-01

225

BUPRENORPHINE DOES NOT AFFECT ACUTE MURINE TOXOPLASMOSIS AND IS RECOMMENDED AS AN ANALGESIC IN TOXOPLASMA GONDII STUDIES IN MICE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Groups of mice were infected with tachyzoites of the RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii treated with the opioid analgesic buprenorphine, sodium sulfadiazine, a combination of buprenorphine and sodium sulfadiazine, or nothing in the drinking water on days –1 to 12 post-infection. Mice in T. gondii infect...

226

Benzodiazepines increase the reward effects of buprenorphine in a conditioned place preference test in the mouse.  

PubMed

Buprenorphine (BPN) is widely used as a substitution treatment for opioid addiction. Some cases of abuse and misuse, especially associated with various benzodiazepines (BZDs), have been described, and a previous study has shown that BZDs increase the sedative effect of BPN and decrease its anxiogenic properties. To investigate the reward effect that may lead to the abusive combination of BPN and BZD, we studied the influence of different doses of three BZDs extensively used with BPN by drug addicts on conditioned place preference behavior in mice. BPN (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously into male mice alone or in combination with a BZD administered intraperitoneally: dipotassium clorazepate (CRZ; 1, 4, 16 mg/kg), diazepam (DAZ; 0.5, 1, 5 mg/kg), or bromazepam (BMZ; 0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). Amphetamine (8 mg/kg) was used as a reference drug. Reward effects of BPN alone or in combination were measured in a conditioned place preference paradigm using an unbiased procedure. Our results showed that groups treated with BPN associated with different doses of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, spent significantly more time in the drug-paired compartment compared to the group treated with BPN alone. Our study shows that joint consumption of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, can increase the reward properties of BPN alone in mice. These results could help to explain the use of this type of drug combination in the drug addict population. PMID:24617653

Ma, Lin-Lin; Freret, Thomas; Lange, Mathilde; Bourgine, Joanna; Coquerel, Antoine; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique

2014-12-01

227

Prenatal buprenorphine versus methadone exposure and neonatal outcomes: systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Increasing rates of maternal opioid use during pregnancy and neonatal withdrawal, termed neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), are public health concerns. Prenatal buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) versus methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) may improve neonatal outcomes, but associations vary. To summarize evidence, we used a random-effects meta-analysis model and estimated summary measures of BMT versus MMT on several outcomes. Sensitivity analyses evaluated confounding, publication bias, and heterogeneity. Subjects were 515 neonates whose mothers received BMT and 855 neonates whose mothers received MMT and who were born from 1996 to 2012 and who were included in 12 studies. The unadjusted NAS treatment risk was lower (risk ratio=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 0.98) and mean length of hospital stay shorter (-7.23 days, 95% CI: -10.64, -3.83) in BMT-exposed versus MMT-exposed neonates. In treated neonates, NAS treatment duration was shorter (-8.46 days, 95% CI: -14.48, -2.44) and morphine dose lower (-3.60 mg, 95% CI: -7.26, 0.07) in those exposed to BMT. BMT-exposed neonates had higher mean gestational age and greater weight, length, and head circumference at birth. Fewer women treated with BMT used illicit opioids near delivery (risk ratio=0.44, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.70). Simulations suggested that confounding by indication could account for some of the observed differences. Prenatal BMT versus MMT may improve neonatal outcomes, but bias may contribute to this protective association. Further evidence is needed to guide treatment choices. PMID:25150272

Brogly, Susan B; Saia, Kelley A; Walley, Alexander Y; Du, Haomo M; Sebastiani, Paola

2014-10-01

228

Critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in family-team conflicts related to treatment plans.  

PubMed

Conflict over treatment plans is a cause of concern for those working in critical care environments. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in situations of conflict between family members and health-care providers in intensive care units. Using a qualitative descriptive design, 12 critical care nurses were interviewed individually and 4 experienced critical care nurses participated in focus group interviews. The roles described by the nurses were as follows: providing safe, competent, quality care to patients; building or restoring relationships of trust with families; and supporting other nurses. The nurses highlighted the level of stress when conflict arises, the need to be cautious in providing care and communicating with family members, and the need for support for nurses. More research related to working in situations of conflict is required, as is enhanced education for critical care nurses. PMID:22679845

Edwards, Marie Patricia; Throndson, Karen; Dyck, Felicia

2012-03-01

229

Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).  

PubMed

Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals. PMID:25831576

Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

2015-03-01

230

The effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution compared to buprenorphine for the control of postoperative pain in dogs in a randomized, multicentered clinical study.  

PubMed

A prospective, double-blinded, positive-controlled, multicenter, noninferiority clinical study was conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution (TFS) for the control of postoperative pain. Four hundred forty-five client-owned dogs of various breeds were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of TFS (2.6 mg/kg [?50 ?L/kg]) (N = 223) applied 2-4 h prior to surgery or buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) (N = 222) administered intramuscularly 2-4 h prior to surgery and every 6 h through 90 h. There were 159 (35.7%) males and 286 (64.3%) females ranging from 0.5 to 16 years of age and 3 to 98.5 kg enrolled. Pain was scored using the modified Glasgow Composite Pain Scale with an a priori dropout criteria of ? 8 (20 maximum score). The one-sided upper 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between fentanyl and buprenorphine treatment failures was 5.6%, which was not greater than the a priori selected margin difference of 15%. Adverse events attributed to either treatment were minimal in impact and were approximately equal between groups. Sustained plasma fentanyl concentrations provided by a single pre-emptive dose of TFS are safe and effective and are noninferior to repeated injections of buprenorphine in controlling postoperative pain over 4?days. This long-acting fentanyl formulation provides veterinarians with a novel, registered option for the control of postoperative pain in dogs that improves dosing compliance and potentially mitigates the disadvantages of oral, parenteral, and patch delivered opioids. PMID:22731776

Linton, D D; Wilson, M G; Newbound, G C; Freise, K J; Clark, T P

2012-08-01

231

Clinical efficacy of sustained-release buprenorphine with meloxicam for postoperative analgesia in beagle dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.  

PubMed

The goal of the current study was to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, and plasma buprenorphine concentrations of sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and buprenorphine after subcutaneous administration in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. In a prospective, randomized, blinded design, 20 healthy adult female Beagle dogs underwent routine ovariohysterectomy and received multimodal analgesia consisting of meloxicam and one of two buprenorphine formulations. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either SRB (0.2 mg/kg SC, once) or buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d). Blinded observers assessed all dogs by using sedation scores, pain scores, temperature, HR, RR, and general wellbeing. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia with 0.02 mg/kg buprenorphine SC if the postoperative pain score exceeded a prede- termined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison. Age, body weight, anesthetic duration, surgical duration, sevoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between groups. Dogs in both formulation groups had comparable postoperative sedation and pain scores. One dog from each formulation group had breakthrough pain requiring rescue analgesia. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations remained above a hypothesized therapeutic concentration of 0.6 ng/mL for 136.0 ± 11.3 and 10.67 ± 0.84 h for SRB and buprenorphine, respectively. Based on the results of this study, multimodal analgesic regimens consisting of meloxicam and either buprenorphine or SRB are equally efficacious in managing pain associated with an ovariohysterectomy and show comparable side effects. PMID:25255072

Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Wilsey, Amanda S; Jenkins, Gary J; Medina, Chris L

2014-09-01

232

Use of pharmacotherapies in the treatment of alcohol use disorders and opioid dependence in primary care.  

PubMed

Substance-related and addictive disorders are chronic relapsing conditions that substantially impact public health. Effective treatments for these disorders require addressing substance use/dependence comprehensively as well as other associated comorbidities. Comprehensive addressing of substance use in a medical setting involves screening for substance use, addressing substance use directly with the patient, and formulating an appropriate intervention. For alcohol dependence and opioid dependence, pharmacotherapies are available that are safe and effective when utilized in a comprehensive treatment paradigm, such as medication assisted treatment. In primary care, substance use disorders involving alcohol, illicit opioids, and prescription opioid abuse are common among patients who seek primary care services. Primary care providers report low levels of preparedness and confidence in identifying substance-related and addictive disorders and providing appropriate care and treatment. However, new models of service delivery in primary care for individuals with substance-related and addictive disorders are being developed to promote screening, care and treatment, and relapse prevention. The education and training of primary care providers utilizing approved medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorders and opioid dependence in a primary care setting would have important public health impact and reduce the burden of alcohol abuse and opioid dependence. PMID:25629034

Lee, Jinhee; Kresina, Thomas F; Campopiano, Melinda; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H Westley

2015-01-01

233

competency Course Objective 1 1a Apply current neuroscience knowledge to diagnosis and treatment questions in patient care.  

E-print Network

knowledge to diagnosis and treatment questions in patient care. 2 1c,1d Apply current clinical and translational sciences to diagnosis and treatment questions in patient care. 3 1e Apply current knowledge of disease prevention, risk factor

Myers, Lawrence C.

234

Development of sensitization to methamphetamine in offspring prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone and buprenorphine.  

PubMed

Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. However, there is lack of information on the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on their offspring. Our previous study demonstrated that prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring showed a marked change in the cross-tolerance to morphine compared with other groups. In the current study, this animal model was used to study effects of methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral sensitization in the offspring at their adulthood. The results showed no differences in either basal or acute METH-induced locomotor activity in any of the groups of animals tested. When male offspring received METH injections of 2?mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 5?days, behavioral sensitization was induced, as determined by motor activity. Furthermore, the distance and rate of development (slope) of locomotor activity and conditioned place preference induced by METH were significantly increased in the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed animals compared with those in other groups. The dopamine D1 R in the nucleus accumbens of the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring had lower mRNA expression; but no significant changes in the ?-, ?-opioid, nociceptin, D2 R and D3 R receptors were noted. Furthermore, significant alterations were observed in the basal level of cAMP and the D1 R agonist enhanced adenylyl cyclase activity in the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed group. Overall, the study demonstrates that D1 R and its downregulated cAMP signals are involved in enhancing METH-induced behavioral sensitization in prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring. The study reveals that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine caused long-term effects on offspring and affected the dopaminergic system-related reward mechanism. PMID:23551991

Chiang, Yao-Chang; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-Kang

2014-07-01

235

TRICARE; coverage of care related to non-covered initial surgery or treatment. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule revises the limitations on certain TRICARE basic program benefits. More specifically, it allows coverage for otherwise covered services and supplies required in the treatment of complications (unfortunate sequelae), as well as medically necessary and appropriate follow-on care, resulting from a non-covered incident of treatment provided pursuant to a properly granted Supplemental Health Care Program waiver. This final rule amends two provisions of the TRICARE regulations which limits coverage for the treatment of complications resulting from a non-covered incident of treatment, and which expressly excludes from coverage in the Basic Program services and supplies related to a non-covered condition or treatment. PMID:25562894

2014-12-31

236

Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone for Chronic Pain in At-Risk Patients: Development and Pilot Test of a Clinical Protocol  

PubMed Central

Objective Sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx) is approved for addiction treatment and may be useful for pain management, particularly in opioid-treated pain patients with nonadherence behaviors. The transition of opioid-treated pain patients to buprenorphine carries the risk of precipitated withdrawal and increased pain. This study convened pain and addiction specialists to develop and pilot a clinical protocol for safe transitioning to Bup/Nx. Design The protocol was revised three times based on outside expert review and pilot study observations. The pilot was conducted with a prospective cohort of 12 patients with moderate to severe chronic pain, who were receiving long-term opioid therapy with any full ?-agonist drug, and had exhibited one or more aberrant drug-related behaviors. Patients were followed up for 3 to 6 months with the expectation that they would experience few adverse events and report lower pain severity. Results The three patients on the highest baseline opioid dose (equivalent to 303–450 mg of oral morphine) and the three on the lowest doses (?20 mg) had early adverse events (AEs) when switched to Bup/Nx and did not complete the trial. Of the remaining six, one withdrew due to AEs; one responded well, then withdrew; and four completed a three-month trial. A mixed effects model controlling for dropouts found that average and worst pain significantly decreased after the switch to Bup/Nx (both p < .01). Conclusion Based on this experience, the protocol recommends Bup/Nx for pain only when baseline opioid doses are within bounds that reduce AEs at transition and incorporates dose flexibility to further reduce risks. This protocol warrants further testing. PMID:23264315

Rosenblum, Andrew; Cruciani, Ricardo A.; Strain, Eric C; Cleland, Charles M.; Joseph, Herman; Magura, Stephen; Marsch, Lisa A; McNicholas, Laura F; Savage, Seddon R; Sundaram, Arun; Portenoy, Russell K.

2013-01-01

237

Preliminary Support for Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care in Reducing Substance Use in Delinquent Boys  

PubMed Central

Although effective outpatient treatments have been identified for the well-documented negative outcomes associated with delinquency and substance use, effective treatments for youths in out-of-home care are rare. In this study, 12- and 18-month substance use outcomes were examined for a sample of 79 boys who were randomly assigned to Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (experimental condition) or to group care (comparison condition). The boys in the experimental condition had lower levels of self-reported drug use at 12 months and lower levels of tobacco, marijuana, and other drug use at 18 months. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:20953309

Smith, Dana K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Eddy, J. Mark

2009-01-01

238

Gonadal failure after treatment of hematologic malignancies: from recognition to management for health-care providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many cancer treatments induce gonadal failure, which can cause infertility and menopausal symptoms in women. Improvements in treatments for hematologic malignancies have extended survival, thus making treatment-induced gonadal failure (TIGF) a more widespread problem. We reviewed the published literature on TIGF with the goal of providing practical information for health-care providers engaged in the management of hematologic malignancies. We conclude

Kazutaka Nakayama; Andrea Milbourne; Leslie R Schover; Richard E Champlin; Naoto T Ueno

2008-01-01

239

Promoting continuing care adherence among substance abusers with co-occurring psychiatric disorders following residential treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiological data from treatment and community samples of individuals with substance use disorders indicate that the rates of co-occurring psychiatric disorders are high and that these disorders are associated with poor treatment adherence and outcomes. A growing body of research indicates that continuing care adherence interventions positively impact treatment outcome. However, it is unclear whether these interventions are effective for

Josephine M. DeMarce; Steven J. Lash; Robert S. Stephens; Steven C. Grambow; Jennifer L. Burden

2008-01-01

240

Antiretroviral HIV treatment and care for injecting drug users: an evidence-based overview  

E-print Network

1 COMMENTARY Antiretroviral HIV treatment and care for injecting drug users: an evidence the advent of highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). The overall benefit from antiretroviral HIV treatment has, however, been lesser in HIV-infected IDUs than in other patient groups (e.g. men who have sex

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

241

Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder versus Treatment as Usual in a Managed Care Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eighty clients enrolled in a managed care health plan who identified panic disorder as their primary presenting problem were randomly assigned to treatment by a therapist recently trained in a manual-based empirically supported psychotherapy (M. G. Craske, E. Meadows, & D. H. Barlow, 1994) or a therapist conducting treatment as usual (TAU).…

Addis, Michael E.; Hatgis, Christina; Krasnow, Aaron D.; Jacob, Karen; Bourne, Leslie; Mansfield, Abigail

2004-01-01

242

Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An Interorganizational Perspective  

E-print Network

of drug abuse and addiction have a more severe substance useAddiction Severity Index in community treatment programs. Journal of Substance Abuseaddiction treatment or rehabilitation. In the larger substance abuse

Spear, Suzanne Evelyn

2012-01-01

243

Edinburgh primary care depression study: treatment outcome, patient satisfaction, and cost after 16 weeks  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To compare the clinical efficacy, patient satisfaction, and cost of three specialist treatments for depressive illness with routine care by general practitioners in primary care. DESIGN--Prospective, randomised allocation to amitriptyline prescribed by a psychiatrist, cognitive behaviour therapy from a clinical psychologist, counselling and case work by a social worker, or routine care by a general practitioner. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--121 patients

A. I. Scott; C. P. Freeman

1992-01-01

244

Determinants of failure to access care in mothers referred to HIV treatment programs in Nairobi, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. As prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs and HIV treatment programs rapidly expand in parallel, it is important to determine factors that influence the transition of HIV-infected women from maternal to continuing care. Design. This study aimed to determine rates and co-factors of accessing HIV care by HIV-infected women exiting maternal care. A cross-sectional survey of women

Phelgona A. Otieno; Pamela K. Kohler; Rose K. Bosire; Elizabeth R. Brown; Steven W. Macharia; Grace C. John-Stewart

2010-01-01

245

Stepped care treatment for depression and anxiety in primary care. a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in general practice but not always treated adequately. Introducing stepped care\\u000a might improve this. In this randomized trial we examined the effectiveness of such a stepped care model.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The study population consisted of primary care attendees aged 18-65 years with minor or major DSM-IV depressive and\\/or anxiety\\u000a disorders, recruited through screening. We randomized 120

Wike Seekles; Annemieke van Straten; Aartjan Beekman; Harm van Marwijk; Pim Cuijpers

2011-01-01

246

Hip fracture treatments--what happens to patients from residential care?  

PubMed

Hip fractures are a growing problem and new models of care have been called for. However, patients from residential care are rarely considered in these discussions. Hip fracture is a common serious problem for older people in residential care with profound effects on subsequent mobility and quality-of-life. There are no Australian data documenting differences in hospital treatments offered to patients from the community and residential care to inform discussions. In a prospective audit we describe the treatment and 4 month outcomes of patients with fractured hips who were admitted to Flinders Medical Centre in South Australia from the community and residential care between August 1998 and June 1999. Information was collected on prefracture health, types of surgical and rehabilitation treatments and dependency. Of the 215 older adults who were admitted during this time, 183 agreed to participate (119 from community and 64 from residential care). Surgical management of the fracture was not affected by admission accommodation. Those from residential care had short hospital stays, less rehabilitation and access to physiotherapy. Although 61% of those from residential care were classified as independently mobile prefracture, by 4 months this had declined to 32% of survivors. Strategies to improve outcomes in those from residential care include: early identification of those walking independently prefracture with assessment by rehabilitation teams. Inclusion of liaison with community therapists in the clinical pathway and in selected cases use of 'rehabilitation at home' services to provide physiotherapy services should be considered. PMID:11207957

Crotty, M; Miller, M; Whitehead, C; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T

2000-12-01

247

Treatment Foster Care for Improving Outcomes in Children and Young People: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To assess the impact of treatment foster care (TFC) on psychosocial and behavioral outcomes, delinquency, placement stability, and discharge status for children and adolescents who, for reasons of severe medical, social, psychological and behavioural problems, were placed in out-of-home care in restrictive settings or at risk of…

Turner, William; Macdonald, Geraldine

2011-01-01

248

Antidepressant-like effects of buprenorphine in rats are strain dependent.  

PubMed

The prevalence of major depressive disorder and the limited efficacy of conventional drug treatments provide significant impetus to develop novel and more rapidly acting antidepressants for individuals with treatment resistant forms of depression. The primary goal of these studies was to ascertain whether buprenorphine (BPN), a medically available drug with mixed effects at opioid receptors, was effective in behavioral tests using the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a rodent model of exaggerated depressive and anxiety behaviors that demonstrates resistance to certain antidepressants. As WKY rats are maintained by different sources, we assessed the behavioral effects of BPN using the modified rat forced swim test (FST) and the emergence test in WKY rat colonies obtained from different vendors. BPN dose-dependently reduced immobility and increased swimming behavior in the FST and reduced emergence latencies in two WKY lines (Charles River (WKY/NCrl) and Harlan laboratories (WKY/NHsd)) that also showed high baseline immobility in the FST. WKY rats from Taconic (WKY/NTac) did not show high baseline immobility in the FST or anxiety as had been previously reported, suggesting a drift in the phenotype of rats from this supplier. Furthermore, BPN did not reduce immobility in the FST or reduce latencies in the emergence test in WKY rats from Taconic. BPN also failed to produce antidepressant-like effects in Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats. These results indicate a striking strain-selectivity for the effects of BPN, producing antidepressant and anxiolytic-like responses in WKY/NCrl and WKY/NHsd lines but not in the normosensitive control Wistar and Sprague-Dawley strains. PMID:25453747

Browne, Caroline A; van Nest, Duncan S; Lucki, Irwin

2015-02-01

249

42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...undergoing treatment may still be provided services for a limited period in the following circumstances; (1) Inpatients in IHS and IHS funded facilities and those receiving inpatient care under contract, including contract health services, may...

2013-10-01

250

42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...undergoing treatment may still be provided services for a limited period in the following circumstances; (1) Inpatients in IHS and IHS funded facilities and those receiving inpatient care under contract, including contract health services, may...

2014-10-01

251

42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...undergoing treatment may still be provided services for a limited period in the following circumstances; (1) Inpatients in IHS and IHS funded facilities and those receiving inpatient care under contract, including contract health services, may...

2011-10-01

252

42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...undergoing treatment may still be provided services for a limited period in the following circumstances; (1) Inpatients in IHS and IHS funded facilities and those receiving inpatient care under contract, including contract health services, may...

2010-10-01

253

42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...undergoing treatment may still be provided services for a limited period in the following circumstances; (1) Inpatients in IHS and IHS funded facilities and those receiving inpatient care under contract, including contract health services, may...

2012-10-01

254

The Impact of Publicly Funded Managed Care on Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares the 12-month changes in substance use following admission to substance abuse treatment in Massachusetts between adolescents enrolled in Medicaid managed care and other publicly funded adolescents. Two hun- dred and fifty-five adolescents were interviewed as they entered substance abuse treatment and at 6 and 12 month follow-ups. Medicaid enrollment data were used to determine the managed care

Brooke S. Harrow; Christopher P. Tompkins; Paul D. Mitchell; Kevin W. Smith; Stephen Soldz; Linda Kasten; Kathleen Fleming

2006-01-01

255

Care of the Stroke Patient: Routine Management to Lifesaving Treatment Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of the acute ischemic stroke patient spans the time course from the emergency evaluation and treatment period\\u000a through to the eventual discharge planning phase of stroke care. In this article we evaluate the literature and describe what\\u000a have become standard treatments in the care of the stroke patient. We will review the literature that supports the use of

George A. Lopez; Arash Afshinnik; Owen Samuels

2011-01-01

256

Predictor and Moderator Effects in the Treatment of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine predictors and moderators of parent-training outcomes for treatment of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) in pediatric primary care. Methods Parents of 117 children with ODD, ages 3-6 years, seen in primary care received either a minimal intervention bibliotherapy treatment (MIT), or a 12-session parenting program led by a nurse or psychologist. Results More initial total life stress, parenting

John V. Lavigne; Susan A. LeBailly; Karen R. Gouze; Colleen Cicchetti; Bryn W. Jessup; Richard Arend; Jonathan Pochyly; Helen J. Binns

2008-01-01

257

Diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis before and after admission to long-term care institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Bisphosphonate treatment rates were examined before and after admission to long-term residential care. Bisphosphonate treatment\\u000a rates were low (16%) pre-admission but doubled after long-term residential care admission (30%). Men were very undertreated\\u000a for osteoporosis, while a history of falls with injury was not associated with treatment.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  To determine the rates and independent correlates of bisphosphonate treatment in elderly residents before

L. A. Beaupre; S. R. Majumdar; S. Dieleman; A. Au; D. W. Morrish

258

Patient Perspectives on Tobacco Use Treatment in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Introduction Evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions increase quit rates, yet most smokers do not use them. Every primary care visit offers the potential to discuss such options, but communication can be tricky for patients and provider alike. We explored smokers’ personal interactions with health care providers to better understand what it is like to be a smoker in an increasingly smoke-free era and the resources needed to support quit attempts and to better define important patient-centered outcomes. Methods Three 90-minute focus groups, involving 33 patients from 3 primary care clinics, were conducted. Participants were current or recent (having quit within 6 months) smokers. Topics included tobacco use, quit attempts, and interactions with providers, followed by more pointed questions exploring actions patients want from providers and outcome measures that would be meaningful to patients. Results Four themes were identified through inductive coding techniques: 1) the experience of being a tobacco user (inconvenience, shame, isolation, risks, and benefits), 2) the medical encounter (expectations of providers, trust and respect, and positive, targeted messaging), 3) high-value actions (consistent dialogue, the addiction model, point-of-care nicotine patches, educational materials, carbon monoxide monitoring, and infrastructure), and 4) patient-centered outcomes. Conclusion Engaged patient-centered smoking cessation counseling requires seeking the patient voice early in the process. Participants desired honest, consistent, and pro-active discussions and actions. Participants also suggested creative patient-centered outcome measures to consider in future research. PMID:25654219

Vu, Maihan; Ripley-Moffitt, Carol; Gupta, Sachin K.; O’Meara, Christine; Goldstein, Adam O.

2015-01-01

259

Antitrust Treatment of Nonprofits: Should Hospitals Receive Special Care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonprofit institutions are required to provide socially beneficial activities in exchange for an exemption from taxation. Failure to recognize the interaction between competition and the ability to finance such socially beneficial activities may create a tension between the favored treatment of nonprofits under the tax code and their treatment under the antitrust laws. More specifically, nonprofit hospitals are expected to

Cory Capps; Dennis Carlton; Guy David

2010-01-01

260

Perioperative Pain Management for Patients on Chronic Buprenorphine: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Here we present a patient with a Type I Chiari malformation who was receiving buprenorphine for chronic pain who underwent two separate urogynecologic procedures for removal of vaginal mesh with two different pain management regimens. For the first procedure at an outside hospital, the patient’s usual dose of buprenorphine (8 mg sublingual every 8 hours) was continued up through her surgery and then a full opioid receptor agonist was used for postoperative pain management. The patient complained that this resulted in very poor pain control for her in the postoperative period. Prior to her second procedure, which was performed at our institution, buprenorphine was switched to a full opioid agonist (oral hydromorphone 4 mg every 4 to 6 hours, maximum 20 mg per day) for 5 days prior to surgery; postoperative pain was managed with full opioid receptor agonists. The patient again reported suboptimal pain control in spite of substantially increased doses of opioids. This case report highlights the difficulty of perioperative pain management for patients on chronic buprenorphine and emphasizes the need for additional investigation. PMID:24307971

Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Isserman, Rebecca; Chen, Linda; Ashburn, Michael; Liu, Renyu

2013-01-01

261

Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine: A review of the potential effects on cognitive development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amount of opioid users receiving opioid maintenance therapy has increased significantly over the last few years. As a result, an increasing number of children are prenatally exposed to long-lasting opioids such as methadone and buprenorphine. This article reviews the literature on the cognitive development of children born to mothers in opioid maintenance therapy. Topics discussed are the effects of

Carolien Konijnenberg; Annika Melinder

2011-01-01

262

Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.  

PubMed

In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues. PMID:25569708

Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

2015-03-01

263

Pathways to care: narratives of American Indian adolescents entering substance abuse treatment.  

PubMed

Using data from 89 American Indian adolescents and guided by the Network Episode Model, this paper analyses pathways to residential substance abuse treatment and their correlates. These adolescents were recruited at admission to a tribally-operated substance abuse treatment program in the southern United States from October 1998 to May 2001. Results from the qualitative analyses of these adolescent's pathways to care narratives indicated that 35% ultimately agreed with the decision for their entry into treatment; 41% were Compelled to enter treatment by others, usually by their parents, parole officers, and judges; and 24% did not describe a clear pathway to care. In the multinomial logistic regression model examining correlates of these pathways to care classifications, adolescents who described pathways indicative of agreement also reported greater readiness for treatment than the adolescents who described compelled or no clear pathways to care. Adolescents who described a Compelled pathway were less likely to meet diagnostic criteria for Conduct Disorder and described fewer social network ties. We were unable to find a relationship between pathways classifications and referral source, suggesting these narratives were subjective constructions of pathways to care rather than a factual representation of this process. In the final logistic regression model examining correlates of treatment completion, articulating a pathway to care, whether it was one of agreement or of being compelled into treatment, predicted a greater likelihood of completing treatment. Overall, these narratives and their correlates are highly consistent with the Network-Episode Model's emphasis on the interaction of self, situation, and social network in shaping the treatment seeking process, demonstrating the applicability of this model to understanding the treatment seeking process in this special population and suggests important considerations for understanding the dynamics of service utilization across diverse communities. PMID:22472275

Novins, Douglas K; Spicer, Paul; Fickenscher, Alexandra; Pescosolido, Bernice

2012-06-01

264

Primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment versus standard care: a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Summary Background The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity needs effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. We compared weight loss with standard treatment in primary care with that achieved after referral by the primary care team to a commercial provider in the community. Methods In this parallel group, non-blinded, randomised controlled trial, 772 overweight and obese adults were recruited by primary care practices in Australia, Germany, and the UK. Participants were randomly assigned with a computer-generated simple randomisation sequence to receive either 12 months of standard care as defined by national treatment guidelines, or 12 months of free membership to a commercial programme (Weight Watchers), and followed up for 12 months. The primary outcome was weight change over 12 months. Analysis was by intention to treat (last observation carried forward [LOCF] and baseline observation carried forward [BOCF]) and in the population who completed the 12-month assessment. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN85485463. Findings 377 participants were assigned to the commercial programme, of whom 230 (61%) completed the 12-month assessment; and 395 were assigned to standard care, of whom 214 (54%) completed the 12-month assessment. In all analyses, participants in the commercial programme group lost twice as much weight as did those in the standard care group. Mean weight change at 12 months was ?5·06 kg (SE 0·31) for those in the commercial programme versus ?2·25 kg (0·21) for those receiving standard care (adjusted difference ?2·77 kg, 95% CI ?3·50 to ?2·03) with LOCF; ?4·06 kg (0·31) versus ?1·77 kg (0·19; adjusted difference ?2·29 kg, ?2·99 to ?1·58) with BOCF; and ?6·65 kg (0·43) versus ?3·26 kg (0·33; adjusted difference ?3·16 kg, ?4·23 to ?2·11) for those who completed the 12-month assessment. Participants reported no adverse events related to trial participation. Interpretation Referral by a primary health-care professional to a commercial weight loss programme that provides regular weighing, advice about diet and physical activity, motivation, and group support can offer a clinically useful early intervention for weight management in overweight and obese people that can be delivered at large scale. Funding Weight Watchers International, through a grant to the UK Medical Research Council. PMID:21906798

Jebb, Susan A; Ahern, Amy L; Olson, Ashley D; Aston, Louise M; Holzapfel, Christina; Stoll, Julia; Amann-Gassner, Ulrike; Simpson, Annie E; Fuller, Nicholas R; Pearson, Suzanne; Lau, Namson S; Mander, Adrian P; Hauner, Hans; Caterson, Ian D

2011-01-01

265

Treatment of acute burn blisters in unscheduled care settings.  

PubMed

Many patients with minor burns present at emergency departments and urgent care centres, where their management is often undertaken by experienced nurses rather than experts in treating burns. This article describes a small study of the clinical decision making that underpins nurses' management of minor burns in these non-specialist settings. The results suggest that, due to a lack of relevant research, nurses base their decisions on previous experience or expert colleagues' opinions and advice rather than on the evidence. PMID:23256353

Payne, Sarah; Cole, Elaine

2012-09-01

266

Treatment of Osteoporosis in Long-Term Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major determinants of admission at longterm care institutions (LTCI) include severe disability, poor social\\/familial support,\\u000a advanced cognitive impairment, and either sequelae or end stages of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, diabetes,\\u000a and heart and renal failure. All these conditions have made elderly patients unable to cope with their life in the community\\u000a (1), requiring a higher amount of

Gustavo Duque; Louise Mallet

267

A costly separation between withdrawing and withholding treatment in intensive care  

PubMed Central

Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the Equivalence Thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this article we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse 5 arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively weak reasons to restrict rationing to treatment withholding. On the contrary, resource allocation provides a strong argument in favour of equivalence: non-equivalence causes preventable death in critically ill patients. We outline two proposals for increasing equivalence in practice: (1) reduction of the mortality threshold for treatment withdrawal, (2) time-limited trials of intensive care. These strategies would help to move practice towards more rational treatment limitation decisions. PMID:22762352

Wilkinson, DJC; Savulescu, J

2012-01-01

268

Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition.  

PubMed

Food security and nutrition play an important role in HIV and TB care and treatment, including for improving treatment outcomes, adherence and uptake of HIV and TB care. This AIDS and behaviour supplement on "Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition" provides an overview of the current evidence and knowledge about the barriers to uptake and retention in HIV and TB treatment and care and on whether and how food and nutrition assistance can help overcome these barriers. It contains nine papers on three topic areas discussing: (a) adherence and food and nutrition security in context of HIV and TB, their definitions, measurement tools and the current situation; (b) food and nutrition insecurity as barriers to uptake and retention; and (c) food and nutrition assistance to increase uptake and retention in care and treatment. Future interventions in the areas of food security, nutrition and social protection for increasing access and adherence should be from an HIV sensitive lens, linking the continuum of care with health systems, food systems and the community, complementing existing platforms through partnerships and integrated services. PMID:25092515

Claros, Joan M; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin W

2014-10-01

269

A role for health communication in the continuum of HIV care, treatment, and prevention.  

PubMed

: Health communication has played a pivotal role in HIV prevention efforts since the beginning of the epidemic. The recent paradigm of combination prevention, which integrates behavioral, biomedical, and structural interventions, offers new opportunities for employing health communication approaches across the entire continuum of care. We describe key areas where health communication can significantly enhance HIV treatment, care, and prevention, presenting evidence from interventions that include health communication components. These interventions rely primarily on interpersonal communication, especially individual and group counseling, both within and beyond clinical settings to enhance the uptake of and continued engagement in care. Many successful interventions mobilize a network of trained community supporters or accompagnateurs, who provide education, counseling, psychosocial support, treatment supervision, and other pragmatic assistance across the care continuum. Community treatment supporters reduce the burden on overworked medical providers, engage a wider segment of the community, and offer a more sustainable model for supporting people living with HIV. Additionally, mobile technologies are increasingly seen as promising avenues for ongoing cost-effective communication throughout the treatment cascade. A broader range of communication approaches, traditionally employed in HIV prevention efforts, that address community and sociopolitical levels through mass media, school- or workplace-based education, and entertainment modalities may be useful to interventions seeking to address the full care continuum. Future interventions would benefit from development of a framework that maps appropriate communication theories and approaches onto each step of the care continuum to evaluate the efficacy of communication components on treatment outcomes. PMID:25007201

Tomori, Cecilia; Risher, Kathryn; Limaye, Rupali J; Van Lith, Lynn M; Gibbs, Susannah; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Celentano, David D

2014-08-15

270

Acceptable care? Illness constructions, healthworlds, and accessible chronic treatment in South Africa.  

PubMed

Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas-conversely-these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating "disease" to responding to "illness" by acknowledging and incorporating patients' healthworlds in patient-provider interactions. PMID:25829509

Fried, Jana; Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

2015-05-01

271

The Continuing Care Model of Substance Use Treatment: What Works, and When Is “Enough,” “Enough?”  

PubMed Central

There is little disagreement in the substance use treatment literature regarding the conceptualization of substance dependence as a cyclic, chronic condition consisting of alternating episodes of treatment and subsequent relapse. Likewise, substance use treatment efforts are increasingly being contextualized within a similar disease management framework, much like that of other chronic medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.). As such, substance use treatment has generally been viewed as a process comprised of two phases. Theoretically, the incorporation of some form of lower intensity continuing care services delivered in the context of outpatient treatment after the primary treatment phase (e.g., residential) appears to be a likely requisite if all stakeholders aspire to successful long-term clinical outcomes. Thus, the overarching objective of any continuing care model should be to sustain treatment gains attained in the primary phase in an effort to ultimately prevent relapse. Given the extant treatment literature clearly supports the contention that treatment is superior to no treatment, and longer lengths of stay is associated with a variety of positive outcomes, the more prudent question appears to be not whether treatment works, but rather what are the specific programmatic elements (e.g., duration, intensity) that comprise an adequate continuing care model. Generally speaking, it appears that the duration of continuing care should extend for a minimum of 3 to 6 months. However, continuing care over a protracted period of up to 12 months appears to be essential if a reasonable expectation of robust recovery is desired. Limitations of prior work and implications for routine clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:24839597

Proctor, Steven L.; Herschman, Philip L.

2014-01-01

272

Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care  

E-print Network

Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care through NIMH) is to reduce the burden of mental illness and behavioral disorders on the people of the United States through of treatments for mental illnesses in the U.S. The NIMH, through the Division of Services and Intervention

Baker, Chris I.

273

Preliminary Support for Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care in Reducing Substance Use in Delinquent Boys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although effective outpatient treatments have been identified for the well-documented negative outcomes associated with delinquency and substance use, effective treatments for youths in out-of-home care are rare. In this study, 12- and 18-month substance use outcomes were examined for a sample of 79 boys who were randomly assigned to…

Smith, Dana K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Eddy, J. Mark

2010-01-01

274

Impact of Team Structure on Achieving Treatment Goals in a System of Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although some evidence suggests that providing treatment via service coordination teams is related to improved outcomes among youth in a system of care, the aspects of team structure that contribute to treatment effectiveness are not well understood. This study draws on team membership and attendance data to identify and describe the structure of…

Wright, Eric R.; Russell, Lisa A.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Kooreman, Harold E.; Wright, Dustin E.

2006-01-01

275

[Development and implementation of integrated health care in pain medicine : the nationwide German headache treatment network].  

PubMed

Integrated care builds interdisciplinary networks across the different healthcare sectors. A conjoint effort toward clearly defined treatment goals is crucial for medically effective and economically efficient care. Allowing creativity in the implementation of integrated care triggers competition for more effective ideas and better solutions. Based on a summary of the development of integrated care and the example of the nationwide German headache treatment network, the successful organization and implementation of this cross-sectoral care within pain medicine is illustrated. An interdisciplinary nationwide network of pain therapists working hand in hand across the sectors, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting, and employing modern treatment regimens results in optimal pain relief. The treatment quality is assessed by continuous accompanying research and sustainable cost efficiency in all sectors of healthcare is confirmed through analysis of both direct and indirect costs. The project was started in May 2007. In the meantime, almost all large statutory health insurance providers in Germany have joined this healthcare project. The large treatment network confirms the significant clinical and economic efficiency of pain medicine. It demonstrates that coordinated modern therapy effectively relieves pain, lowers costs sustainably, and reduces sick leave. Patient satisfaction is very high. The healthcare providers may directly participate in treatment success through risk-sharing. PMID:19921280

Göbel, H; Heinze, A; Heinze-Kuhn, K; Henkel, K; Roth, A; Rüschmann, H-H

2009-12-01

276

Can antiviral treatment for hepatitis C be safely and effectively delivered in primary care?  

PubMed Central

Background The burden of hepatitis C (HCV) treatment is growing, as is the political resolve to tackle the epidemic. Primary care will need to work more closely with secondary care to succeed in reducing the prevalence of chronic HCV. Aim To identify research relating to the provision of antiviral treatment for HCV in primary care. Design and setting A narrative systematic review of six databases. Method Medline, Embase, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Cochrane were searched. Relevant journals were searched by hand for articles to be included in the review. Reference lists of relevant papers were reviewed and full-text papers were retrieved for those deemed to potentially fulfil the inclusion criteria of the review. Results A total of 683 abstracts led to 77 full-text articles being retrieved, of which 16 were finally included in the review. An evidence base emerged, highlighting that community-based antiviral treatment provision is feasible and can result in clinical outcomes comparable to those achieved in hospital outpatient settings. Such provision can be in mainstream general practice, at community addiction centres, or in prisons. GPs must be trained before offering such a service and there is also a need for ongoing specialist supervision of primary care practice. Such training and supervision can be delivered by teleconference, although, even with such ready availability of training and supervision, only a minority of GPs are likely to want to provide antiviral treatment. Conclusion There is emerging evidence supporting the effectiveness of antiviral treatment provision for patients with chronic hepatitis C in a wide variety of primary care and wider community settings. Training and ongoing supervision of primary care practitioners by specialists is a prerequisite. There is an opportunity through future research activity to evaluate typologies of patients who would be best served by primary care-based treatment and those for whom hospital-based outpatient treatment would be most appropriate. PMID:24351500

Brew, Iain F; Butt, Christine; Wright, Nat

2013-01-01

277

Effect of primary medical care on addiction and medical severity in substance abuse treatment programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the availability of primary medical care on-site at addiction treatment programs or off-site by referral\\u000a improves patients’ addiction severity and medical outcomes, compared to programs that offer no primary care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients admitted to a purposive national sample of substance abuse treatment\\u000a programs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Substance abuse treatment programs

Peter D. Friedmann; Zhiwei Zhang; James Hendrickson; Michael D. Stein; Dean R. Gerstein

2003-01-01

278

[Treatment of fungus infection with diabetic foot--importance of the foot care].  

PubMed

Fungus infection is high frequently complicated of the diabetic foot. Especially onychomycosis make a injury neighbor toe skin or paronychia. This tiny lesion make a bacterial infection, and progress to foot gangrene unfortunately if patient delayed treatment. So it is important to do daily check of the foot and regularly foot care included nail care. Toenail onychomycosis need medicational treatment just after microscopically diagnosis. It is important to check the interaction between the antifungal medicine and other medicine, and side effect after started treatment. PMID:19069095

Shinjo, Takamichi

2008-12-01

279

The Perceived Effectiveness of Continuing Care and Group Support in the Long-Term Self-Help Treatment of Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Obesity is increasingly considered a chronic disease requiring continuing care, but professional long-term treatment for most patients is not available. This study examined treatment recipients’ perception of the effectiveness of different components of a group self-help, continuing-care treatment program for obesity.Research Methods and Procedures: Members (n = 120) and volunteer leaders (n = 66) of a self-help, continuing-care treatment

Janet D. Latner; Albert J. Stunkard; G. Terence Wilson; Mary L. Jackson

2006-01-01

280

Health care provider perceptions of pain treatment in Hispanic patients.  

PubMed

Despite increasing numbers of Hispanic patients in the United States, this group continues to face disparities in access and quality of pain treatment. Although previous surveys have examined treatment disparities experienced by minority patients, none have provided a provider-centric perspective on issues and concerns surrounding pain relief among pain patients of Hispanic/Latino origin. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between provider characteristics (ie, Spanish fluency, Hispanic caseload size, and experience with Hispanic pain patients) and their perceptions of pain treatment in these patients. One hundred eighty-seven health professionals completed an online survey. The major findings indicated that: (1) less than 20% of health professionals treating Hispanic pain patients reported Spanish proficiency at an advanced level; (2) surveyed health professionals were involved treating a significant proportion of Hispanic patients in their caseloads, but reported a lack of cultural competence training; (3) Spanish fluency and experience with Hispanic pain patients exerts a strong effect on the use of established pain treatment practices; (4) providers with greater Spanish fluency report a significantly greater effect of patients' cultural beliefs and attitudes on treatment; and (5) providers did not regard cultural or language barriers as significantly impacting opioid prescribing or patient compliance. PMID:21070592

Chiauzzi, Emil; Black, Ryan A; Frayjo, Kezia; Reznikova, Margarita; Grimes Serrano, Jill M; Zacharoff, Kevin; Wood, Mollie

2011-01-01

281

Stepping Down and Stepping In: Youth's Perspectives on Making the Transition from Residential Treatment to Treatment Foster Care.  

PubMed

Older youth preparing to emancipate from the foster care system are often served in residential treatment settings where they have limited opportunities to practice skills for independent living in a community setting. Stepping these youth down to less restrictive environments such as treatment foster care is a growing trend, especially for youth with mental health issues. Yet, few studies have explored the youth's perspective on making this transition. This study utilized qualitative interviews with youths who were participating in a treatment foster care intervention study (n=8) to gain their perspectives on the process of transitioning from residential care. Youths were interviewed right before they exited residential care and two months after placement in the new foster home. Youths reported hopes for gaining family in the new home as well as fears of placement disruption. Findings point to the need to enlist youths in discussion and problem solving about difficulties they anticipate in the new home and expectations for their relationship with the new foster parents. In addition, the struggles described after two months in the home point to the need for youths to build specific skills to better manage ongoing relationships with foster parents and for foster parent training on how to help build these skills. PMID:22247580

Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Fedoravicius, Nicole; McMillen, J Curtis; McNelly, David; Robinson, Debra R

2012-01-01

282

Stepping Down and Stepping In: Youth’s Perspectives on Making the Transition from Residential Treatment to Treatment Foster Care  

PubMed Central

Older youth preparing to emancipate from the foster care system are often served in residential treatment settings where they have limited opportunities to practice skills for independent living in a community setting. Stepping these youth down to less restrictive environments such as treatment foster care is a growing trend, especially for youth with mental health issues. Yet, few studies have explored the youth’s perspective on making this transition. This study utilized qualitative interviews with youths who were participating in a treatment foster care intervention study (n=8) to gain their perspectives on the process of transitioning from residential care. Youths were interviewed right before they exited residential care and two months after placement in the new foster home. Youths reported hopes for gaining family in the new home as well as fears of placement disruption. Findings point to the need to enlist youths in discussion and problem solving about difficulties they anticipate in the new home and expectations for their relationship with the new foster parents. In addition, the struggles described after two months in the home point to the need for youths to build specific skills to better manage ongoing relationships with foster parents and for foster parent training on how to help build these skills. PMID:22247580

Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Fedoravicius, Nicole; McMillen, J. Curtis; McNelly, David; Robinson, Debra R.

2011-01-01

283

Uncovering Treatment Burden as a Key Concept for Stroke Care: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with chronic disease may experience complicated management plans requiring significant personal investment. This has been termed ‘treatment burden’ and has been associated with unfavourable outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the qualitative literature on treatment burden in stroke from the patient perspective. Methods and Findings The search strategy centred on: stroke, treatment burden, patient experience, and qualitative methods. We searched: Scopus, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsycINFO. We tracked references, footnotes, and citations. Restrictions included: English language, date of publication January 2000 until February 2013. Two reviewers independently carried out the following: paper screening, data extraction, and data analysis. Data were analysed using framework synthesis, as informed by Normalization Process Theory. Sixty-nine papers were included. Treatment burden includes: (1) making sense of stroke management and planning care, (2) interacting with others, (3) enacting management strategies, and (4) reflecting on management. Health care is fragmented, with poor communication between patient and health care providers. Patients report inadequate information provision. Inpatient care is unsatisfactory, with a perceived lack of empathy from professionals and a shortage of stimulating activities on the ward. Discharge services are poorly coordinated, and accessing health and social care in the community is difficult. The study has potential limitations because it was restricted to studies published in English only and data from low-income countries were scarce. Conclusions Stroke management is extremely demanding for patients, and treatment burden is influenced by micro and macro organisation of health services. Knowledge deficits mean patients are ill equipped to organise their care and develop coping strategies, making adherence less likely. There is a need to transform the approach to care provision so that services are configured to prioritise patient needs rather than those of health care systems. Systematic Review Registration International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews CRD42011001123 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23824703

Gallacher, Katie; Morrison, Deborah; Jani, Bhautesh; Macdonald, Sara; May, Carl R.; Montori, Victor M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Batty, G. David; Eton, David T.; Langhorne, Peter; Mair, Frances S.

2013-01-01

284

Mechanism-based PK\\/PD Modeling of the Respiratory Depressant Effect of Buprenorphine and Fentanyl in Healthy Volunteers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic\\/pharmacodynamic (PK\\/PD) relationship of buprenorphine and fentanyl for the respiratory depressant effect in healthy volunteers. Data on the time course of the ventilatory response at a fixed PETCO2 of 50 mm Hg and PETO2 of 110 mm Hg following intravenous administration of buprenorphine and fentanyl were obtained from two phase I

A Yassen; E Olofsen; R Romberg; E Sarton; L Teppema; M Danhof; A Dahan

2007-01-01

285

Day Treatment for Delinquent Youth: An Alternative to Residential Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the day treatment program for adolescents at the Francis L. O'Brien Center for Youth Development in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Program components are (1) education, (2) "survival" skills, including employment preparation, and (3) leisure time activities. Interpersonal skills development permeates all program components. Youths demonstrating…

Schutjer, Marlys

1982-01-01

286

Stepped Care: A Promising Treatment Strategy for Mandated Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, there has been a steady increase in the number of mandated students who have been referred to campus alcohol programs for violating campus alcohol policies. However, the severity of alcohol use and problems varies widely in mandated students, indicating that a "one size fits all" delivery of treatment may be inappropriate.…

Borsari, Brian; Tevyaw, Tracy O'Leary

2005-01-01

287

Does Treatment Respond to Reimbursement Rates? Evidence from Trauma Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretical models of provider behavior generate ambiguous predictions regarding the effect of changes in reimbursement rates on treatment. We empirically test this relationship using data from inpatient hospitalizations surrounding a 2003 Colorado auto insurance reform. The reform shifted a large fraction of auto injury patients from auto-insurer based medical payment plans to less generous sources of reimbursement, such as health

Eric Helland; Paul Heaton

2008-01-01

288

Buprenorphine transdermal system for opioid therapy in patients with chronic low back pain  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The present randomized, double-blinded, crossover study compared the efficacy and safety of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) and placebo in patients with low back pain of moderate or greater severity for at least six weeks. METHODS: Prestudy analgesics were discontinued the evening before random assignment to 5 ?g/h BTDS or placebo, with acetaminophen 300 mg/codeine 30 mg, one to two tablets every 4 h to 6 h as needed, for rescue analgesia. The dose was titrated to effect weekly, if tolerated, to 10 ?g/h and 20 ?g/h BTDS. Each treatment phase was four weeks. RESULTS: Fifty-three patients (28 men, 25 women, mean [± SD] age 54.5±12.7 years) were evaluable for efficacy (completed two weeks or more in each phase). Baseline pain was 62.1±15.5 mm (100 mm visual analogue scale) and 2.5±0.6 (five-point ordinal scale). BTDS resulted in lower mean daily pain scores than in the placebo group (37.6±20.7 mm versus 43.6±21.2 mm on a visual analogue scale, P=0.0487; and 1.7±0.6 versus 2.0±0.7 on the ordinal scale, P=0.0358). Most patients titrated to the highest dose of BTDS (59% 20 ?g/h, 31% 10 ?g/h and 10% 5 ?g/h). There were improvements from baseline in pain and disability (Pain Disability Index), Pain and Sleep (visual analogue scale), Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale and Short-Form 36 Health Survey scores for both BTDS and placebo groups, without significant differences between treatments. While there were more opioid-related side effects with BTDS treatment than with placebo, there were no serious adverse events. A total of 82% of patients chose to continue BTDS in a long-term open-label evaluation, in whom improvements in pain intensity, functionality and quality of life were sustained for up to six months without analgesic tolerance. CONCLUSION: BTDS (5 ?g/h to 20 ?g/h) represents a new treatment option for initial opioid therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:20577660

Gordon, Allan; Rashiq, Saifudin; Moulin, Dwight E; Clark, Alexander J; Beaulieu, André D; Eisenhoffer, John; Piraino, Paula S; Quigley, Patricia; Harsanyi, Zoltan; Darke, Andrew C

2010-01-01

289

Early treatment of Parkinson's disease: opportunities for managed care.  

PubMed

The diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) typically occur when the disease has already progressed to a relatively advanced stage in which motor symptoms are clearly evident and substantial neurophysiological damage has already taken place. Nonmotor symptoms, which account for a large proportion of PD symptoms, usually emerge much earlier and offer both an early indication for treatment and a therapeutic target. A growing body of data from the medical literature points to several critical advantages that may be associated with early therapeutic intervention in PD. The most evident benefit of early intervention is a reduction in symptoms, particularly dyskinesia, and the delay of levodopa initiation. Clinical trials suggest but have yet to conclusively demonstrate that early treatment can slow disease progression. Both the diminishment of symptoms and the potential for slowing disease progression have large implications for improving patient quality of life. The enormous direct costs associated with PD would also likely be reduced over the long term with earlier treatment. The great majority of costs attributable to PD occur when the disease is at its most advanced stage and when symptoms are most severe. An early-treatment strategy that diminishes symptoms and that has the potential to slow disease progression could have a meaningful impact on PD expenditures. Adherence, too, must be taken into consideration, particularly since PD patients are generally poorly adherent to prescribed therapies, especially therapies with complex dosing schedules. Taking advantage of more convenient and adherencefriendly drug formulations may further help to improve outcomes and lower costs in PD. PMID:23039867

Murman, Daniel L

2012-09-01

290

Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment  

PubMed Central

Background The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia, but the same was not observed for the patients in standard outpatient treatment. We hope that these findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on the functioning of patients and the development of more effective therapeutic methods aimed at improving the patients’ quality of life. PMID:25784813

Mihanovi?, Mate; Restek-Petrovi?, Branka; Bogovi?, Anamarija; Ivezi?, Ena; Bodor, Davor; Požgain, Ivan

2015-01-01

291

[Supportive care in the management of treatment-resistant and chronic anorexia nervosa].  

PubMed

Although many patients face a long and severe evolution, there is no consensus regarding the definition of chronic and/or refractory anorexia nervosa. The multiplication of treatments and therapies lead to what could be called a total resistance to treatment in these patients. Cognitive impairment in anorexia nervosa, known to be worsened by deep denutrition, is a striking issue as it could limit the ability of the patients to consent to needed care. Constrained admission ruled by French July 5th 2011 psychiatric law could be decided given the aforementioned consent issues. When care given to patients involuntarily admitted are unsuccessful, supportive and palliative care could be an alternative in chronic and refractory anorexia nervosa. The goals of care would be shifted at this point to active comfort measures and better quality of life. PMID:23916570

Bauwens, Inès; Cottencin, Olivier; Rolland, Benjamin; Bonord, Alexandre; Guardia, Dewi

2014-03-01

292

Do Intensive Care Unit treatment modalities predict mortality in geriatric patients: An observational study from an Indian Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Background: Ageing being a global phenomenon, increasing number of elderly patients are admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICU). Hence, there is a need for continued research on outcomes of ICU treatment in the elderly. Objectives: Examine age-related difference in outcomes of geriatric ICU patients. Analyze ICU treatment modalities predicting mortality in patients >65 years of age. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted in 2317 patients admitted in a multi-specialty ICU of a tertiary care hospital over 2-year study period from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. A clinical database was collected which included age, sex, specialty under which admitted, APACHE-II and SOFA scores, patient outcome, average length of ICU stay, and the treatment modalities used in ICU including mechanical ventilation, inotropes, hemodialysis, and tracheostomy. Patients were divided into two groups: <65 years (Control group) and >65 years (Geriatric age group). Results: The observed overall ICU mortality rate in the study population was 19.6%; no statistical difference was observed between the control and geriatric age group in overall mortality (P > 0.05). Mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003, odds ratio [OR] =0.573, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.390–0.843) and use of inotropes (P = 0.018, OR = 0.661, 95% CI = 0.456–0.958) were found to be predictors of mortality in elderly population. On multivariate analysis, inotropic support was found to be an independent ICU treatment modality predicting mortality in the geriatric age group (? coefficient = 1.221, P = 0.000). Conclusion: Intensive Care Unit mortality rates increased in the geriatric population requiring mechanical ventilation and inotropes during ICU stay. Only inotropic support could be identified as independent risk factor for mortality. PMID:25538413

Sodhi, Kanwalpreet; Singla, Manender Kumar; Shrivastava, Anupam; Bansal, Namita

2014-01-01

293

Impact of HIV on clinical presentation and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment at primary care level.  

PubMed

Little is known on how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in primary care. We compared TB type, HIV care and case fatality rates between 5685 adults and 830 children with TB treated at primary care clinics in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Children represented a substantial burden (13%) of TB, and presented predominantly with difficult to diagnose smear-negative TB and extra-pulmonary TB. The HIV co-infection rate was lower in children than in adults, and fewer children than adults received antiretroviral therapy during anti-tuberculosis treatment. Case fatality was four times higher in HIV-infected than non-infected children. Child-friendly point-of-care TB diagnostics and decentralized pediatric TB-HIV care should receive greater attention. PMID:24125443

Henegar, C; Behets, F; Vanden Driessche, K; Tabala, M; Van Rie, A

2013-11-01

294

Preconception Care and Treatment with Assisted Reproductive Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Couples with fertility problems seeking treatment with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilization should receive preconception counseling on all factors that are provided when counseling patients without fertility\\u000a problems. Additional counseling should address success rates and possible risks from ART therapies. Success rates from ART\\u000a are improving, with the highest live birth rates averaging about 40% per

David A. Grainger; Linda M. Frazier; Courtney A. Rowland

2006-01-01

295

Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a revolution in care  

PubMed Central

A generation ago, children with arthritis faced a lifetime of pain and disability. Today, there are a multitude of treatment options, including a variety of biologics targeting key cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. While non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids were once the mainstay of therapy, they are now largely used as bridge or adjunctive therapies. Among the conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, methotrexate remains first-line therapy for most children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) due to its long track record of safety and effectiveness in the management of peripheral arthritis. Sulfasalazine and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA and likely in enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic JIA as well. There may be additional benefit in combining TNFi with methotrexate. Abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear. For the treatment of systemic JIA, while the TNFi are of less benefit, blockade of interleukin-1 or interleukin-6 is highly effective. Additionally, interleukin-1 blockade appears to be effective treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, one of the most dangerous complications of JIA; specifically, anakinra in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids may obviate the need for cytotoxic approaches. In contrast, methotrexate along with the TNFi and abatacept are effective agents for the management of uveitis, another complication of JIA. Overall, the biologics have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although children do need to be monitored for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of malignancy. Finally, there may be a window of opportunity during which children with JIA will demonstrate most optimal responses to aggressive therapy, underscoring the need for rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment. PMID:24782683

2014-01-01

296

ADEQUACY OF TREATMENT RECEIVED BY PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS WITH ANXIETY DISORDERS  

PubMed Central

Background We examined the adequacy of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders over up to 5 years of follow-up. Method Five hundred thirty-four primary care patients at 15 US sites, who screened positive for anxiety symptoms, were assessed for anxiety disorders. Those meeting anxiety disorder criteria were offered participation and interviewed again at six and 12 months postintake, and yearly thereafter for up to 5 years. We utilized existing definitions of appropriate pharmacotherapy and created definitions of potentially adequate psychotherapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Results At intake, of 534 primary care participants with anxiety disorders, 19% reported receiving appropriate pharmacotherapy and 14% potentially adequate CBT. Overall, 28% of participants reported receiving potentially adequate anxiety treatment, whether pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or both. Over up to five years of follow-up, appropriate pharmacotherapy was received by 60% and potentially adequate CBT by 36% of the sample. Examined together, 69% of participants received any potentially adequate treatment during the follow-up period. Over the course of follow-up, primary care patients with MDD, panic disorder with agoraphobia, and with medicaid/medicare were more likely to receive appropriate anxiety treatment. Ethnic minority members were less likely to receive potentially adequate care. Conclusions Potentially adequate anxiety treatment was rarely received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders at intake. Encouragingly, rates improved over the course of the study. However, potentially adequate CBT remained much less utilized than pharmacotherapy and racial-ethnic minority members were less likely to received care, suggesting much room for improved dissemination of quality treatment. PMID:24190762

Weisberg, Risa B.; Beard, Courtney; Moitra, Ethan; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B.

2014-01-01

297

Incorporating the treatment of medical and psychiatric disorders in the critical care area.  

PubMed

Critical care areas are fast moving, often chaotic, and therefore confusing, even frightening, to patients attempting to understand what has happened to them. The nurse acts to mitigate these reactions by understanding the range of possibilities that can occur with patients, including potential psychiatric issues, and serving as patient advocate to ensure that appropriate treatment is initiated. Certainly there may be other psychiatric problems not described in the preceding text. The main possibilities are covered in this article. Assessing and acting early are tools the critical care nurse uses to meet patient needs and prevent behavioral problems that can interfere with life-preserving care. PMID:22405712

Patusky, Kathleen L; Caldwell, Barbara; Unkle, David; Ruck, Bruce

2012-03-01

298

Perceptions of substance use, treatment options and training needs among Iranian primary care physicians  

PubMed Central

In order to be optimally effective, continuing training programmes for health-care professionals need to be tailored so that they target specific knowledge deficits, both in terms of topic content and appropriate intervention strategies. A first step in designing tailored treatment programmes is to identify the characteristics of the relevant health-care professional group, their current levels of content and treatment knowledge, the estimated prevalence of drug and alcohol problems among their patients and their preferred options for receiving continuing education and training. This study reports the results of a survey of 53 primary care physicians working in Iran. The majority were male, had a mean age of 44 years and saw approximately 94 patients per week. In terms of their patients' drug use, primary care physicians thought most patients with a substance use problem were male, women were most likely to use tobacco (52%), opium (32%) and marijuana/hashish and young people were most likely to use tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and heroin. Counselling and nicotine patches were the treatments most commonly provided. Although the majority (55%) reported referring patients to other services, more than a third did not. Most primary care physicians reported being interested in attending further training on substance abuse issues. The implications of these data for ongoing education and training of primary care physicians in Iran are discussed. PMID:15955255

Shakeshaft, Anthony; Nassirimanesh, Bijan; Day, Carolyn; Dolan, Kate A

2005-01-01

299

Perceptions of substance use, treatment options and training needs among Iranian primary care physicians.  

PubMed

In order to be optimally effective, continuing training programmes for health-care professionals need to be tailored so that they target specific knowledge deficits, both in terms of topic content and appropriate intervention strategies. A first step in designing tailored treatment programmes is to identify the characteristics of the relevant health-care professional group, their current levels of content and treatment knowledge, the estimated prevalence of drug and alcohol problems among their patients and their preferred options for receiving continuing education and training. This study reports the results of a survey of 53 primary care physicians working in Iran. The majority were male, had a mean age of 44 years and saw approximately 94 patients per week. In terms of their patients' drug use, primary care physicians thought most patients with a substance use problem were male, women were most likely to use tobacco (52%), opium (32%) and marijuana/hashish and young people were most likely to use tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and heroin. Counselling and nicotine patches were the treatments most commonly provided. Although the majority (55%) reported referring patients to other services, more than a third did not. Most primary care physicians reported being interested in attending further training on substance abuse issues. The implications of these data for ongoing education and training of primary care physicians in Iran are discussed. PMID:15955255

Shakeshaft, Anthony; Nassirimanesh, Bijan; Day, Carolyn; Dolan, Kate A

2005-06-15

300

Ambulatory tuberculosis treatment in post-Semashko health care systems needs supportive financing mechanisms.  

PubMed

The tuberculosis (TB) control strategy in the Republic of Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan, is being changed to decentralised out-patient care for most TB patients by the Government of Uzbekistan, in collaboration with the international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Ambulatory treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB from the first day of treatment has been recommended since 2011. Out-patient treatment of TB from the beginning of treatment was previously prohibited. However, the current Uzbek health financing system, which evolved from the Soviet Semashko model, offers incentives that work against the adoption of ambulatory TB treatment. Based on the 'Comprehensive TB Care for All' programme implemented in Karakalpakstan, we describe how existing policies for the allocation of health funds complicate the scale-up of ambulatory-based management of TB. PMID:25517802

Kohler, S; Asadov, D A; Bründer, A; Healy, S; Khamraev, A K; Sergeeva, N; Tinnemann, P

2014-12-01

301

Fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wastewater treatment plants -Conception of a database and first results  

E-print Network

1 Fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wastewater treatment plants - Conception of detection and removals of pharmaceutical products in wastewater treatment plants. Abstract: We created and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). From 117 scientific publications, we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

2011 Media Reports of Buprenorphine Diversion and Misuse U n i v e r s i t y o f M a r y l a n d , C o l l e g e P a r k  

E-print Network

of buprenorphine diversion/trafficking & buprenorphine in jail trafficking ("Drug Meant to Treat Heroin Users Being Suboxone, heroin, cocaine ("Heroin, Cocaine Seized in Traffic Stop," Frederick News-Post) 6/21/11 ME jail

Milchberg, Howard

303

Psychosexual Symptoms and Treatment of Peyronie's Disease Within a Collaborative Care Model  

PubMed Central

Introduction Peyronie's disease (PD) can be emotionally and sexually debilitating for patients and may negatively impact partner relationships. Aims This study aims to present an ongoing collaborative care model for patients with PD and to discuss the critical need for integration of patient care among sexual medicine physicians and mental health practitioners or sex therapists. Methods PubMed searches using the terms “Peyronie's disease” and “natural history,” “treatment,” “psychosexual,” “depression,” “relationship,” and “partner” were conducted. Expert opinion based on review of the relevant published literature and clinical experience was used to identify meaningful treatment targets for patients with PD within a collaborative care model. Main Outcome Measure Characteristics of PD, medical treatment, and important assessment and treatment targets, including physical, emotional, psychosexual, and relationship concerns, from peer-reviewed published literature and clinical experience. Results PD can result in significant patient and partner distress and relationship disruption. Sex therapy interventions may be directed at acute emotional, psychosexual, and relationship problems that occur during the initial diagnosis of PD, the period following minimally invasive or surgical treatment for PD, or recurring problems over the lifelong course of the disease. Sex therapy to improve self-acceptance, learn new forms of sexual intimacy, and improve communication with partners provides comprehensive treatment targeting emotional, psychosexual, and relationship distress. Ongoing communication between the mental health practitioner and physician working with the patient with PD about key assessments, treatment targets, and treatment responses is necessary for coordinated treatment planning and patient care. Conclusions Men with PD are more likely now than in the past to see both a sexual medicine physician and a mental health practitioner or sex therapist, and the integration of assessments and treatment planning is essential for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:25548648

Hartzell, Rose

2014-01-01

304

Erdheim–Chester disease: from palliative care to targeted treatment  

PubMed Central

Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a life-threatening multi-systemic non-Langerhans histiocytosis with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of death. ECD affects the kidneys in up to 30% of cases, with fibrotic tissue deposition in the perirenal fat and renal hilum. Diagnosis is usually based on histological analysis of the pathologic tissue, which typically shows xanthogranulomatous infiltrates of foamy CD68+/CD1a- histiocytes surrounded by fibrosis. A consistent percentage of patients affected by ECD develop renal failure and hypertension as a consequence of renal artery stenosis and hydronephrosis. These conditions have been generally treated with the placement of stents and nephrostomies that frequently led to disappointing outcomes. Before the introduction of interferon-alpha (IFN?) treatment, the mortality rate was as high as 57% in the long term. Recent studies have granted new insights into the pathogenesis of ECD, which seems to bear a dual component of clonal and inflammatory disease. These advances led to use specific therapies targeting either the oncogenes (BRAFV600E) or the effectors of the immune response implicated in ECD (IL-1, TNF?). Drugs such as anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), infliximab (monoclonal antibody against TNF?) and vemurafenib (inhibitor of mutant BRAF) showed promising results in small single-centre series. Although larger trials will be needed to address the impact of these drugs on ECD prognosis and to select the most effective treatment, targeted therapies hold the premises to drastically change the outcome of this condition.

Graziani, Giorgio; Podestà, Manuel A.; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Ponticelli, Claudio

2014-01-01

305

The Associations between Structural Treatment Characteristics and Post-Treatment Functioning in Compulsory Residential Youth Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In 2005 a new compulsory residential treatment program was developed for adolescents in need for protection against themselves or their environment. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the association of structural treatment characteristics of this new residential treatment program (i.e., duration of treatment,…

Nijhof, Karin S.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Veerman, Jan W.; van Dam, Coleta; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

2012-01-01

306

Instrumental support to facilitate hepatitis C treatment adherence: working around shortfalls in shared-care.  

PubMed

Adherence to treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the successful eradication of infection. However, patients often have difficulty adhering to HCV treatment because of factors such as the psychiatric side effects of regimens and social disadvantage. Commonly, health professionals including specialist physicians, nurses, social workers and psychologists work together under a multidisciplinary model of shared-care to support patients' adherence to HCV treatment. In some HCV treatment clinics, shared-care is not always available, or only partially implemented and this has implications for patient adherence. To explore the facilitators of adherence, an interview-based study was conducted in 2012 with a purposive sample of Australian physicians and nurses (N?=?20). The findings reveal that when comprehensive shared-care was limited or unavailable, physicians and nurses filled in the gaps by assuming roles outside of their expertise to help patients adhere to HCV treatment. Physicians and nurses applied instrumental support strategies based on psychosocial interventions, namely patient advocacy, pragmatic problem-solving, treatment engagement and emotional support. These strategies were provided by dedicated physicians and nurses to address shortfalls in multidisciplinary shared-care. Although these interventions were reported to assist adherence, there is an increased risk of complications when physicians and nurses move beyond the bounds of their disciplinary training, for example, to assess and manage patients' psychiatric side effects or advocate on their behalf for social services. Future research should measure the effectiveness of instrumental support strategies on HCV treatment adherence, and explore the costs associated with physicians and nurses providing instrumental support in the absence of comprehensive multidisciplinary shared-care. PMID:24998883

Sublette, Victoria A; Hopwood, Max; George, Jacob; Smith, Sian K; Perry, Kathryn Nicholson; McCaffery, Kirsten; Douglas, Mark W

2015-01-01

307

Symptom monitoring, alleviation, and self-care among Mexican Americans during cancer treatment.  

PubMed

Monitoring the occurrence and severity of symptoms among Mexican American adults undergoing cancer treatments, along with their self-care to alleviate symptoms, are understudied; the current study aimed to fill this gap in the literature. A total of 67 Mexican Americans receiving outpatient oncology treatments in the southwestern United States participated. Instruments included a patient-report checklist, the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist (TRSC), the Symptom Alleviation: Self-Care Methods tool, and a demographic and health information form. At least 40% of participants reported the occurrence of 12 symptoms: hair loss, feeling sluggish, nausea, taste change, loss of appetite, depression, difficulty sleeping, weight loss, difficulty concentrating, constipation, skin changes, and numb fingers and toes. More than a third also reported pain, vomiting, decreased interest in sexual activity, cough, and sore throat. The helpful self-care strategies reported included diet and nutrition changes; lifestyle changes; and mind, body control, and spiritual activities. Patient report of symptoms during cancer treatments was facilitated by the use of the TRSC. Patients use symptom alleviation strategies to help relieve symptoms during their cancer treatment. The ability to perform appropriate, effective self-care methods to alleviate the symptoms may influence adherence to the treatment regimen. PMID:25253108

Williams, Phoebe D; Lantican, Leticia S; Bader, Julia O; Lerma, Daniela

2014-10-01

308

Cold plasma treatment in wound care: efficacy and risk assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cold atmospheric plasma is an ideal medium for non-destructive modification of vulnerable surfaces. One of the most promising medical applications of cold plasma treatment is wound healing. Potential advantages in wound healing have been demonstrated in vitro: the plasma does not necrotize the cells and does not affect the extracellular matrix [1], has clear bactericidal or bacteriostatic effects [2], and stimulates fibroblast cells towards faster attachment and proliferation [3]. However, safety issues, such as the potential cytotoxicity of the plasma must be clarified prior to clinical implementation. This work comprises the recent facts on sub-lethal plasma effects on mammalian cells, as well as studies on apoptosis induction and quantitative assessment of DNA damage. Fibroblast, smooth muscle and endothelial cells were treated using the standard cold plasma needle [1,2]; intra- and extracellular oxidant levels as well as the influence of the plasma on intracellular antioxidant balance were monitored using appropriate fluorescent markers [1]. We have studied long-term cellular damage was monitored using flow cytometry to determine the DNA profiles in treated cells. Dose-response curves were obtained: increased proliferation as well as apoptosis were visualized under different treatment conditions. The results from the in vitro studies are satisfying. [1] I.E. Kieft, ``Plasma needle: exploring biomedical applications of non-thermal plasmas'', PhD Thesis, Eindhoven University of Technology (2005). [2] R.E.J. Sladek, ``Plasma needle: non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dentistry'' PhD Thesis, Eindhoven University of Technology (2006). [3] I.E. Kieft, D. Darios, A.J.M. Roks, E. Stoffels, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 34(4), 2006, pp. 1331-1336.

Stoffels, Eva

2007-10-01

309

Evaluation of drug-drug interaction between daclatasvir and methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone  

PubMed Central

Introduction Daclatasvir (DCV) is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A replication complex inhibitor with pangenotypic (1–6) activity in vitro. Methadone (MET) and buprenorphine (BUP) are opioid medications used to treat opioid addiction; patients on HCV therapy may require MET or BUP treatment. The effect of DCV on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of MET or BUP/naloxone (NLX) was assessed in subjects on stable MET or BUP. Materials and Methods An open-label, two-part study assessed the effect of steady-state oral administration of DCV on the PK of MET (Part 1, P1) or BUP/NAL (Part 2, P2). Safety/tolerability and pharmacodynamics (PD, opioid withdrawal scales/overdose assessment) were also assessed. Subjects (P1, N=14; P2, N=11) received daily single-dose oral MET (40–120mg) or BUP/NLX (8/2–24/6mg) based on their prescribed stable dose throughout, in addition to DCV (60mg QD) on Days 2–9. Serial PK sampling occurred predose and postdose till 24 hours on Day 1 (MET/BUP) and Day 10 (MET/BUP/DCV). Noncompartmental PK were derived. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) and 90% confidence intervals (90% CI) for MET/BUP/norBUP Cmax and AUCTAU were derived from linear mixed effects models. Results Subjects were aged 19–39 years, mostly white (P1, 93%; P2, 100%) and male (P1, 71%; P2, 91%). All subjects completed the study. No clinically meaningful effect was demonstrated as the GMR and 90% CIs fell within the prespecified interval (P1, 0.7–1.4; P2, 0.5–2.0: see Table 1). DCV coadministration was well-tolerated: overall, six (43%) subjects had adverse events (AEs) (all mild and resolved without treatment). DCV had no clinically significant effect on the PD of MET or BUP/NLX. Conclusions Steady-state administration of DCV 60mg QD had no clinically meaningful effect on the PK of MET or BUP/NLX and was generally well-tolerated, suggesting that no dose adjustments will be required. PMID:25394132

Garimella, Tushar; Wang, Reena; Luo, Wen-Lin; Wastall, Philip; Kandoussi, Hamza; Demicco, Michael; Bruce, Douglas; Hwang, Carey; Bertz, Richard; Bifano, Marc

2014-01-01

310

Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay with opiates: an Austrian phenomenon?  

PubMed

When testing the Microgenics CEDIA assay for immunological buprenorphine analysis, cross-reactivity between the buprenorphine reagents and opiates was observed at concentrations higher than 120 mg/l morphine, 320 mg/l methadone, 30 mg/l codeine, 60 mg/l dihydrocodeine and 520 mg/l morphine-3-glucuronide. The cross-reactivity with morphine has the greatest impact on routine screening as opiate maintenance therapy in Austria is also performed with slow-release oral morphine. The use of a second cutoff value of 30 mug/l for urine samples that are (immunologically) positive for opiates is therefore suggested, compared to the cutoff value of 5 microg/l proposed by the manufacturer. PMID:15834736

Pavlic, M; Libiseller, K; Grubwieser, P; Rabl, W

2005-11-01

311

Processes and outcomes of substance abuse treatment between two programs for clients insured under managed care.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research (N = 160) was to describe and compare substance abuse treatment in two programs under managed care: one residential (RT) and one outpatient (OP). Clients in both settings improved significantly from before to after treatment in relation to substance use and quality of life. However, intensity of treatment (hours of care/week) was much greater in RT and days of sobriety were significantly higher after treatment in RT than in OP (p = .04). Intensity was negatively related to incidents of substance use during treatment (SUdT), which predicted substance use after treatment; SUdT averaged .2 for RT, and 1.6 for OP (p = .0001). Importantly, treatment was completed by 74 patients (over 90%) from RT, with 8 dropping out, and 53 (almost 70%) of those in OP completed treatment while 25 dropped out. Intensity, as seen in the RT program, rather than duration, was more effective in substance use reduction and treatment completion. PMID:17613971

McNeese-Smith, Donna; Nyamathi, Adeline; Longshore, Douglas; Wickman, Mary; Robertson, Scott; Obert, Jeanne; McCann, Michael; Wells, Kenneth; Wenzel, Suzanne L

2007-01-01

312

Extended-release naltrexone for treatment of alcohol dependence in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of using extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX) to treat alcohol dependence in routine primary care settings is unknown. An open-label, observational cohort study evaluated 3-month treatment retention, patient satisfaction, and alcohol use among alcohol-dependent patients in two urban public hospital medical clinics. Adults seeking treatment were offered monthly medical management (MM) and three XR-NTX injections (380 mg, intramuscular). Physician-delivered

Joshua D. Lee; Ellie Grossman; Danae DiRocco; Andrea Truncali; Kathleen Hanley; David Stevens; John Rotrosen; Marc N. Gourevitch

2010-01-01

313

Treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients: The Calcium Acetate Renagel Evaluation (CARE Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients: The Calcium Acetate Renagel Evaluation (CARE Study).BackgroundHyperphosphatemia underlies development of hyperparathyroidism, osteodystrophy, extraosseous calcification, and is associated with increased mortality in hemodialysis patients.MethodsTo determine whether calcium acetate or sevelamer hydrochloride best achieves recently recommended treatment goals of phosphorus ?5.5 mg\\/dL and Ca × P product ?55 mg2\\/dL2, we conducted an 8-week randomized, double-blind study

Wajeh Y. Qunibi; Robert E. Hootkins; Laveta L. McDowell; Micah S. Meyer; Matthias Simon; Rodolfo O. Garza; Russell W. Pelham; Mark V. B. Cleveland; Larry R. Muenz; David Y. He; Charles R. Nolan

2004-01-01

314

Treatment of Active-Duty Military With PTSD in Primary Care: Early Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study presents early findings from an ongoing pilot study of a cognitive–behavioral treatment for assisting active-duty military members with deployment-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) designed for use by psychologists working in an integrated primary care clinic. Treatment protocol is based primarily on Prolonged Exposure but also includes elements of Cognitive Processing Therapy that were adapted for use in primary

Jeffrey A. Cigrang; Sheila A. M. Rauch; Laura L. Avila; Craig J. Bryan; Jeffrey L. Goodie; Ann Hryshko-Mullen; Alan L. Peterson

2011-01-01

315

Impact of Brief Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Insomnia on Health Care Utilization and Costs  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To examine health care utilization (HCU) and costs following brief cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (bCBTi). Methods: Reviewed medical records of 84 outpatients [mean age = 54.25 years (19.08); 58% women] treated in a behavioral sleep medicine clinic (2005-2010) based in an accredited sleep disorders center. Six indicators of HCU and costs were obtained: estimated total and outpatient costs, estimated primary care visits, CPT costs, number of office visits, and number of medications. All patients completed ? 1 session of bCBTi. Those who attended ? 3 sessions were considered completers (n = 37), and completers with significant sleep improvements were considered responders (n = 32). Results: For completers and responders, all HCU and cost variables, except number of medications, significantly decreased (ps < 0.05) or trended towards decrease at post-treatment. Completers had average decreases in CPT costs of $200 and estimated total costs of $75. Responders had average decreases in CPT costs of $210. No significant decreases occurred for non-completers. Conclusions: bCBTi can reduce HCU and costs. Response to bCBTi resulted in greater reduction of HCU and costs. While limited by small sample size and non-normal data distribution, the findings highlight the need for greater dissemination of bCBTi for several reasons: a high percentage of completers responded to treatment, as few as 3 sessions can result in significant improvements in insomnia severity, bCBTi can be delivered by novice clinicians, and health care costs can reduce following treatment. Insomnia remains an undertreated disorder, and brief behavioral treatments can help to increase access to care and reduce the burden of insomnia. Citation: McCrae CS; Bramoweth AD; Williams J; Roth A; Mosti C. Impact of brief cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia on health care utilization and costs. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):127-135. PMID:24532995

McCrae, Christina S.; Bramoweth, Adam D.; Williams, Jacob; Roth, Alicia; Mosti, Caterina

2014-01-01

316

The applicability of a gel delivery system for self-administration of buprenorphine to laboratory mice.  

PubMed

Oral administration of perioperative analgesia to laboratory mice is beneficial compared with administration by injection. The mice become less stressed when allowed to voluntarily ingest the drug in a palatable feed item and it results in high and long-lasting serum concentrations of the drug. We have previously demonstrated sticky nut and chocolate paste to be well-liked by mice and readily ingested in most cases. However, a disadvantage with nut and chocolate paste is its high content of fat and sugar, which may have undesirable effects in some experimental models. Alternatively, a delivery system using an aqueous gel may serve as a supplementary source of fluid post-operatively and as a vehicle for analgesic drugs. In the present study, we investigated the willingness of the mice to ingest a commercially available gel, by measuring the duration from introduction of the gel to first ingestion, as well as the amount ingested overnight. Furthermore, buprenorphine in two different concentrations (5 and 15?µg/mL) was mixed in the gel and the resulting serum concentrations of buprenorphine were investigated. The aqueous gel was ingested by the mice, but their willingness was low and did not increase over time. The serum concentrations of buprenorphine were similar to, or higher than, those following a subcutaneous injection (0.1?mg/kg body weight), but the variation was considerably higher. In conclusion, aqueous gel may serve as a relevant vehicle for the voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in mice, but the willingness of the mice to ingest the gel needs to be improved. PMID:25193176

Hovard, Amb; Teilmann, Ac; Hau, J; Abelson, Ksp

2015-01-01

317

When Depression Complicates Childbearing: Guidelines for Screening and Treatment during Antenatal and Postpartum Obstetric Care  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Prevalence studies show that one in five women experience an episode of major depressive disorder during their lifetime. The peripartum period constitutes a prime time for symptom exacerbation and relapse of depressive episodes. It is important for health care providers, specifically those in obstetric care, to be aware of (1) the frequency of depression in pregnant and postpartum women; (2) signs, symptoms, and appropriate screening methods; and (3) the health risks for the mother and growing fetus if depression is undetected or untreated. Because management of depressed peripartum women also includes care of a growing fetus or breastfeeding infant, treatment may be complex and requires input from a multidisciplinary team, including an obstetrician, psychiatrist, and pediatrician, to provide optimal care. PMID:19944300

Muzik, Maria; Marcus, Sheila M.; Heringhausen, Julie E.; Flynn, Heather

2015-01-01

318

The role of coping in depression treatment utilization for VA primary care patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the impact of Veterans’ coping strategies on mental health treatment engagement following a positive screen for depression. Methods A mixed methods observational study using a mailed survey and semi structured interviews. Sample included 271 Veterans who screened positive for depression during a primary care visit at one of three VA medical centers and had not received a diagnosis of depression or prescribed antidepressants 12 months prior to screening. A subsample of 23 Veterans was interviewed. Results Logistic regression models showed that Veterans who reported more instrumental support and active coping were more likely to receive depression or other mental health treatment within three months of their positive depression screen. Those who reported emotional support or self distraction as coping strategies were less likely to receive any treatment in the same time frame. Qualitative analyses revealed that how Veterans use these and other coping strategies can impact treatment engagement in a variety of ways. Conclusions The relationship between Veterans’ use of coping strategies and treatment engagement for depression may not be readily apparent without in depth exploration. Practice implications In VA primary care clinics, nurse care managers and behavioral health providers should explore how Veterans’ methods of coping may impact treatment engagement. PMID:24315160

Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Glickman, Mark E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Mueller, Nora M.; Dell, Natalie S.; Zhao, Shibei; Eisen, Susan V.; Elwy, A. Rani

2014-01-01

319

Improving Care for Depression & Suicide Risk in Adolescents: Innovative Strategies for Bringing Treatments to Community Settings  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the literature on interventions and services for depression and suicide prevention among adolescents, with the goals of placing this science within the context of current changing health care environments and highlighting innovative models for improving health and mental health. We examine the: challenges and opportunities offered by new initiatives and legislation designed to transform the U.S. health and mental healthcare systems; summarize knowledge regarding the treatment of depression and suicidality/self-harm in adolescents; and describe innovative models for partnering with health systems and communities. This review demonstrates that treatment models and service delivery strategies are currently available for increasing evidence-based care, particularly for depression, and concludes with recommendations for future research and quality improvement initiatives aimed at inspiring additional efforts to put science to work, bridge science and community practice, and develop strategies for partnering with communities to improve care, mental health, and well-being among adolescents. PMID:24437432

Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Miranda, Jeanne

2015-01-01

320

Dental case manager encounters: the association with retention in dental care and treatment plan completion.  

PubMed

Little is known about dental case managers as few programs have been scientifically evaluated. The goal of this study was to explore the impact of dental case manager on retention in dental care and completion of treatment plans, while specifically exploring the number of dental case manager encounters. Fourteen programs enrolled people with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in dental care and a longitudinal study between 2007 and 2009. The 758 participants had a total of 2715 encounters with a dental case manager over twelve months: 29% had a single encounter; 21% had two; 27% had 3-4 and; 23% had 5-29 encounters. Adjusting for baseline characteristics, participants receiving more encounters were significantly more likely to complete their Phase 1 treatment plan, be retained in dental care, and experience improvements in overall oral health status. Organizations considering efforts to improve the oral health of vulnerable, hard-to-engage populations should consider these findings when planning interventions. PMID:23451927

Lemay, Celeste A; Tobias, Carol; Umez-Eronini, Amarachi A; Brown, Carolyn; McCluskey, Amanda; Fox, Jane E; Bednarsh, Helene; Cabral, Howard J

2013-01-01

321

Algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 3-10%. in European studies. However, the diagnosis of RLS in primary care remains low and mistreatment is common. Methods The current article reports on the considerations of RLS diagnosis and management that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored task force consisting of experts and primary care practioners. The task force sought to develop a better understanding of barriers to diagnosis in primary care practice and overcome these barriers with diagnostic and treatment algorithms. Results The barriers to diagnosis identified by the task force include the presentation of symptoms, the language used to describe them, the actual term "restless legs syndrome" and difficulties in the differential diagnosis of RLS. Conclusion The EURLSSG task force reached a consensus and agreed on the diagnostic and treatment algorithms published here. PMID:21352569

2011-01-01

322

Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

2008-01-01

323

Music therapy—a complementary treatment for mechanically ventilated intensive care patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to ascertain whether music therapy had a measurable relaxing effect on patients who were temporarily on a respirator in an intensive care unit (ICU) and after completion of respirator treatment investigate those patients’ experiences of the music therapy. In the study both quantitative and qualitative measurements were applied. Twenty patients were included using consecutive

Sofia Almerud; Kerstin Petersson

2003-01-01

324

Deliberate Self-Harm among Children in Tertiary Care Residential Treatment: Prevalence and Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Few studies have examined deliberate self-harm (DSH) among children in residential treatment in Canada. Most of the existing studies examined adolescent students or children from pediatric emergency departments. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of DSH among children in tertiary care residential…

Stewart, Shannon L.; Baiden, Philip; Theall-Honey, Laura; den Dunnen, Wendy

2014-01-01

325

Spaces of abeyance, care and survival: The addiction treatment system as a site of ‘regulatory richness’  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses the changing landscape of the addiction treatment system as a way to understand broader trends in welfare state restructuring. Based on a case study of six detoxes in Winnipeg, Hamilton and Toronto (Canada), we seek to understand the degree to which the detox constitutes a space of care that reflects therapeutic aims of facility operators, a space

Geoffrey DeVerteuil; Robert Wilton

2009-01-01

326

Day Hospital and Residential Addiction Treatment: Randomized and Nonrandomized Managed Care Clients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Male and female managed care clients randomized to day hospital (n=154) or community residential treatment (n=139) were compared on substance use outcomes at 6 and 12 months. To address possible bias in naturalistic studies, outcomes were also examined for clients who self-selected day hospital (n=321) and for clients excluded from randomization…

Witbrodt, Jane; Bond, Jason; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Weisner, Constance; Jaeger, Gary; Pating, David; Moore, Charles

2007-01-01

327

Factors that predict outcome of intensive care treatment in very elderly patients: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Advanced age is thought to be associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients. This report reviews available data on factors that determine outcome, on the value of prognostic models, and on preferences regarding life-sustaining treatments in (very) elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients. METHODS: We searched the Medline database (January 1966 to January 2005) for English language articles.

Sophia E de Rooij; Ameen Abu-Hanna; Marcel Levi; Evert de Jonge

2005-01-01

328

A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

2007-01-01

329

Modification of empiric antibiotic treatment in patients with pneumonia acquired in the intensive care unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the frequency of and the reasons for changing empiric antibiotics during the treatment of pneumonia ac- quired in the intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective multicenter study of 1 year's duration. Setting: Medical and surgical ICUs in 30 hospitals all over Spain. Patients: Of a total of 16 872 patients initially enrolled into the study, 530 patients

F. Alvarez-Lerma; R. Jorda; F. Barcenilla; Arnau de Vilanova; B. Galvan; M. Palomar; J. Serra; B. Bermejo; M. Sanchez Palacios; R. Girat; F. Alvarez Lerma; Maria del Rosell; J. Martinez; J. Insausti; P. Olaechea; A. Gilabert; C. Junque; F. Palacios; R. Calvo; E. Mesalles; J. Nava; A. Santos

1996-01-01

330

Stability and Change: Initial Findings in a Study of Treatment Foster Care Placements.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the effectiveness of long-term treatment foster care placements. Results indicated that: much depends on change as well as stability in a family; a small number of children accounts for a disproportionate number of placement changes; supports after permanent placements into adoption or reunification are desirable; and a continuum of…

Staff, Ilene; Fein, Edith

1995-01-01

331

Staff Group Unanimity in the Care of Juveniles in Institutional Treatment: Routines, Rituals, and Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One prerequisite for effective institutional care is that staff agree on how to deliver treatment and have a unified view of how to achieve change--in other words, to have staff group unanimity (SGU). This study used the Correctional Program Assessment Inventory (CPAI) 2000, interviews with key staff, and observations of daily activities to…

Ahonen, Lia; Degner, Jurgen

2013-01-01

332

Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…

Schmidt, Michael A.

333

Development and Implementation of a Foster Parent Recruitment Strategy in a Treatment Foster Care Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A foster parent recruitment strategy was developed and implemented to increase the pool of potential foster parents in a treatment foster care program serving troubled children between 2 and 18 years in a south Florida community. Foster parents in this program were expected to implement a specific skill acquisition program for each child and…

Ronacher, Carol

334

Carprofen and buprenorphine prevent hyperalgesia in a model of inflammatory pain in cats.  

PubMed

A model of nociceptive threshold determination was developed for evaluation of NSAID analgesia in cats. In a crossover study, eight cats received carprofen (4 mg/kg), buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg) or saline (0.3 ml) subcutaneously before intradermal kaolin injection on the antebrachium to induce mild inflammation. Pressure thresholds were measured at the injected site using blunt-ended pins advanced by manual inflation of a bladder within a bracelet. Bladder pressure was recorded as threshold (PT) at the behavioural end point. Baseline PT were recorded before kaolin injection (time 0). PT was measured at 2-10 h intervals for 52 h. PT below the lower 95% confidence interval (CI) of baseline values indicated hyperalgesia. After saline, hyperalgesia was detected from 2-6 h, 22-26 h, and at 30 and 36 h. After carprofen, PT remained within the 95% CI. After buprenorphine, PT remained within the 95% CI except at 2h. Carprofen and to some extent buprenorphine, prevented inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:17363018

Taylor, P M; Steagall, P V M; Dixon, M J; Ferreira, T H; Luna, S P L

2007-12-01

335

Determination of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD in whole blood by UPLC-MS-MS.  

PubMed

A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantification of buprenorphine, fentanyl and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in whole blood. Sample preparation was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with methyl tert-butyl ether. UPLC-MS-MS analysis was performed with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate (pH 10.2) and methanol. Positive electrospray ionization MS-MS detection was performed with two multiple reaction monitoring transitions for each of the analytes and the deuterium labeled internal standards. Limit of detection values of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD were 0.28, 0.044 and 0.0097 ng/mL and limit of quantification values were 0.94, 0.14 and 0.036 ng/mL, respectively. Most phospholipids were removed during LLE. No or only minor matrix effects were observed. The method has been routinely used at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health since September 2011 for qualitative and quantitative detections of buprenorphine, fentanyl and/or LSD in more than 400 whole blood samples with two replicates per sample. PMID:23423312

Berg, Thomas; Jørgenrud, Benedicte; Strand, Dag Helge

2013-04-01

336

The effect of assertive continuing care on continuing care linkage, adherence and abstinence following residential treatment for adolescents with substance use disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims This study compared assertive continuing care (ACC) to usual continuing care (UCC) on linkage, retention and a measure of continuing care adherence. Outcome analyses tested the direct and indirect effects of both conditions and level of adherence on early (months 1-3) and longer-term (months 4-9) abstinence. Design Two-group randomized design. Setting Eleven counties surrounding a community-based residential treatment program

Mark D. Godley; Susan H. Godley; Michael L. Dennis; Rodney R. Funk; Lora L. Passetti

2007-01-01

337

The effect of medicaid policies on the diagnosis and treatment of children's mental health problems in primary care.  

PubMed

Primary care physicians play a substantial role in diagnosing and treating children's mental health disorders, but Medicaid managed care policies may limit these physicians' ability to serve low-income children. Using data from the universe of Medicaid recipients in three states, I evaluate how Medicaid managed care policies impact primary care diagnosis and treatment of children's mental health disorders. Specific policies examined include the presence of a behavioral carve-out, traditional health maintenance organization, or primary care case management program. To alleviate concerns of endogenous patient sorting, my preferred identification strategy uses variation in Medicaid policy penetration to instrument for individual plan choices. I show that while health maintenance organizations reduce diagnosis and non-drug treatment of mental health disorders, primary care case management program policies shift in diagnosis and treatment from within primary care to specialist providers such as psychiatrists, where serious mental health conditions are more likely to be identified. PMID:24123653

Turner, Lesley J

2015-02-01

338

Use of Naltrexone to Treat Opioid Addiction in a Country in Which Methadone and Buprenorphine Are Not Available  

PubMed Central

Opioid dependence is one of the most severe drug dependencies. Naltrexone is a medication that completely blocks the subjective and other effects of opioids and, when administered to detoxified opioid addicts and taken as directed, prevents relapse and helps maintain abstinence. The major problem with naltrexone is poor compliance, particularly in countries in which there is a treatment alternative based on substitution of illicit opioids such as heroin with orally administered opioid agonists (methadone) or partial agonist/antagonists (buprenorphine). In Russia, substitution therapy is forbidden by law, and naltrexone is the only available pharmacotherapy for heroin dependence. Due to the lack of alternatives to naltrexone and stronger family control of compliance (adherence), naltrexone is more effective for relapse prevention and abstinence stabilization in Russia than in Western countries. Long-acting, sustained-release formulations (injectable and implantable) seem particularly effective compared with oral formulations. This article summarizes the results of studies conducted in Russia during the past 10 years that demonstrate these points. PMID:20640538

Zvartau, Edwin; Woody, George

2011-01-01

339

Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.  

PubMed

Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment to follow-up care. PMID:24007941

Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

2013-10-01

340

Disorder specific impact of CALM treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care  

PubMed Central

Context Anxiety disorders commonly present in primary care where evidence-based mental health treatments often are unavailable or suboptimally delivered. Objective Compare evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders to usual care in primary care, for principal and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We hypothesized superiority of CALM for principal anxiety disorders and comorbid disorders. Design A randomized, controlled trial comparing CALM intervention with Usual Care, at baseline, 6-month, 12-month and 18-month follow-ups. Setting 17 primary care clinics in the United States. Patients Referred primary care sample, 1004 patients, with principal DSM-IV diagnoses of GAD (n=549), PD (n=262), SAD (n=132), or PTSD (n=61), mean 43.7 years (SD=13.7), 70.9% female,. 80% completed 18-month follow-up. Interventions CALM (computer-guided CBT and/or pharmacotherapy recommendations) and Usual Care. Main Outcome Measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale, Panic Disorder Severity-Self Report scale, Social Phobia Inventory, and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version. Results CALM was superior to Usual Care for principal GAD at 6-month (?1.61; 95% CI = ?2.42 to ?.79), 12-month (?2.34; 95% CI = ?3.22 to ?1.45) and 18-month (?2.37; 95% CI = ?3.24 to ?1.50), PD at 6-month (?2.00; 95% CI = ?3.55 to ?0.44) and 12-month (?2.71; 95% CI = ?4.29 to ?1.14), and SAD at 6-month (?7.05; 95% CI = ?12.11 to ?2.00) outcomes. CALM was superior to Usual Care for comorbid SAD at 6-month (?4.26; 95% CI = ?7.96 to ?0.56), 12-month (?8.12, 95% CI = ?11.84 to ?4.40) and 18- month (?6.23, 95% CI = ?9.90 to ?2.55) outcomes. Effect sizes favored CALM, but were not statistically significant for other comorbid disorders. Conclusions CALM (CBT and psychotropic recommendations) is more effective than Usual Care for principal anxiety disorders, and to a lesser extent, comorbid anxiety disorders that present in primary care. PMID:21464362

Craske, Michelle G.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Bystritsky, Alexander; Rose, Raphael D.; Lang, Ariel J.; Welch, Stacy; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Golinelli, Daniela; Roy-Byrne, Peter

2011-01-01

341

Tuberculosis Treatment Managed by Providers outside the Public Health Department: Lessons for the Affordable Care Act  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) requires at least six months of multidrug treatment and necessitates monitoring for response to treatment. Historically, public health departments (HDs) have cared for most TB patients in the United States. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides coverage for uninsured persons and may increase the proportion of TB patients cared for by private medical providers and other providers outside HDs (PMPs). We sought to determine whether there were differences in care provided by HDs and PMPs to inform public health planning under the ACA. Methods We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of California TB registry data. We included adult TB patients with culture-positive, pulmonary TB reported in California during 2007–2011. We examined trends, described case characteristics, and created multivariate models measuring two standards of TB care in PMP- and HD-managed patients: documented culture conversion within 60 days, and use of directly observed therapy (DOT). Results The proportion of PMP-managed TB patients increased during 2007–2011 (p?=?0.002). On univariable analysis (N?=?4,606), older age, white, black or Asian/Pacific Islander race, and birth in the United States were significantly associated with PMP care (p<0.05). Younger age, Hispanic ethnicity, homelessness, drug or alcohol use, and cavitary and/or smear-positive TB disease, were associated with HD care. Multivariable analysis showed PMP care was associated with lack of documented culture conversion (adjusted relative risk [aRR]?=?1.37, confidence interval [CI] 1.25–1.51) and lack of DOT (aRR?=?8.56, CI 6.59–11.1). Conclusion While HDs cared for TB cases with more social and clinical complexities, patients under PMP care were less likely to receive DOT and have documented culture conversion. This indicates a need for close collaboration between PMPs and HDs to ensure that optimal care is provided to all TB patients and TB transmission is halted. Strategies to enhance collaboration between HDs and PMPs should be included in ACA implementation. PMID:25340876

Ehman, Melissa; Flood, Jennifer; Barry, Pennan M.

2014-01-01

342

Depression Treatment for Impoverished Mothers by Point-of-Care Providers: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Objective Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman’s usual point-of-care, including home-visits or an ob-gyn office. Method Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician’s assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study’s participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from four study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared to women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. PMID:25486371

Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.

2015-01-01

343

Women in medium secure care: tracking treatment progress for changes in risk profiles and treatment engagement.  

PubMed

The treatment and risk management programmes in a women's medium secure service are described. Changes in risk profiles and its relationship to treatment engagement are examined in a cohort of women during their stay in a medium secure service. Findings show that clinically significant reductions in risk behaviours were paralleled by increases in treatment engagement. The clinical healthcare implications of these findings are discussed along with the need for further research. PMID:21539688

Long, C G; Dolley, O; Hollin, C R

2011-06-01

344

Peer knowledge and roles in supporting access to care and treatment.  

PubMed

People living with HIV (PLWHIV) have been involved in the continuum of HIV care since the early days of the epidemic providing education and prevention services. There is a growing interest in utilizing HIV positive peers to support access to care and treatment, but little is known about the range of roles these peers perform and what they need to know to do this work. This study of 186 HIV-positive peers currently providing community health services in eight states found that peers perform a wide range of roles, including assistance with care and treatment, emotional support, and service referrals. Over 80% discussed medications with clients. On average, experienced peers provided correct responses to 73% of questions about HIV and AIDS, and 65% of questions about the appropriate role of a peer. Peers living with HIV for more than 5 years, in paid employment with more than a high school education had higher HIV knowledge scores than volunteers. Higher education, length of time living with HIV, age and speaking English as the primary language were associated with higher peer knowledge scores. This study suggests that we cannot assume that peers already working in the field are fully knowledgeable about HIV care and treatment or peer roles. It is important to address gaps in knowledge through continuing education and to create common standards for the training and skills that peers who work in community health settings need to have. PMID:20300809

Tobias, Carol R; Rajabiun, Serena; Franks, Julie; Goldenkranz, Sarah B; Fine, David N; Loscher-Hudson, Brenda S; Colson, Paul W; Coleman, Sharon M

2010-12-01

345

Lung and colorectal cancer treatment and outcomes in the Veterans Affairs health care system  

PubMed Central

Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the second- and third-most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. While many studies have evaluated the treatment quality and outcomes of various aspects of VA LC and CRC care, there are no known reviews synthesizing this information across studies. The purpose of this literature review was to describe LC and CRC treatment (ie, surgical and nonsurgical) and outcomes (eg, mortality, psychosocial, and other) in the VA health care system as reported in the existing peer-reviewed scientific literature. We identified potential articles through a search of published literature using the PubMed electronic database. Our search strategy identified articles containing Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords addressing veterans or veterans’ health and LC and/or CRC. We limited articles to those published in the previous 11 years (January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2013). A total of 230 articles were retrieved through the search. After applying the selection criteria, we included 74 studies (34 LC, 47 CRC, and seven both LC and CRC). VA provides a full array of treatments, often with better outcomes than other health care systems. More work is needed to assess patient-reported outcomes. PMID:25609998

Zullig, Leah L; Williams, Christina D; Fortune-Britt, Alice G

2015-01-01

346

Orthodontic treatment of children/adolescents with special health care needs: an analysis of treatment length and clinical outcome  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the treatment time and differences between the pre- and post-treatment peer assessment rating (PAR) index and aesthetic component (AC) of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) scores in children/adolescents with special health care needs (SHCNs), compared to non-special health care needs (NSHCNs) controls. Methods Based on certain inclusion and exclusion criteria, medical records of SHCNs and randomly selected NSHCNs controls at the Department of Orthodontics, University Hospital Muenster were analysed retrospectively for the treatment time, number of appointments, chair time (“moderate” or “considerable”), PAR scores, and AC scores. Sample size calculation, descriptive statistics, and explorative analyses were performed using the Mann–Whitney U Test. Results Twenty-nine children with SHCNs (21 boys, 9 girls; median age: 11 years, pre-treatment) and 29 children with NSHCNs (12 boys, 17 girls; median age: 12 years, pre-treatment) were enrolled in this study. The overall treatment time did not differ between the patient groups. However, more “considerable chair time” was needed for the SHCNs group compared to the control group (p?treatment earlier, by a median of 1 year, compared to children in the NSHCNs group. The SHCNs group had significantly higher pre- and post-treatment PAR scores (median 21/median 6) and AC scores (median 9/median 3) compared to NSHCNs patients (PAR: median 17/median 0; AC: median 5/median 1). However, the overall treatment time and the overall PAR and AC score reduction did not differ significantly between the SHCNs and NSHCNs groups. Conclusions While the overall treatment time and number of appointments did not differ, the overall chair time was higher in the SHCNs group. The pre- and post-treatment PAR and AC scores were significantly higher in the SHCNs group. PMID:24915851

2014-01-01

347

Attrition through Multiple Stages of Pre-Treatment and ART HIV Care in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Introduction While momentum for increasing treatment thresholds is growing, if patients cannot be retained in HIV care from the time of testing positive through long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), such strategies may fall short of expected gains. While estimates of retention on ART exist, few cohorts have data on retention from testing positive through long-term ART care. Methods We explored attrition (loss or death) at the Themba Lethu HIV clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa in 3 distinct cohorts enrolled at HIV testing, pre-ART initiation, and ART initiation. Results Between March 2010 and August 2012 we enrolled 380 patients testing HIV+, 206 initiating pre-ART care, and 185 initiating ART. Of the 380 patients enrolled at testing HIV-positive, 38.7% (95%CI: 33.9–43.7%) returned for eligibility staging within ?3 months of testing. Of the 206 enrolled at pre-ART care, 84.5% (95%CI: 79.0–88.9%) were ART eligible at their first CD4 count. Of those, 87.9% (95%CI: 82.4–92.2%) initiated ART within 6 months. Among patients not ART eligible at their first CD4 count, 50.0% (95%CI: 33.1–66.9%) repeated their CD4 count within one year of the first ineligible CD4. Among the 185 patients in the ART cohort, 22 transferred out and were excluded from further analysis. Of the remaining 163, 81.0% (95%CI: 74.4–86.5%) were retained in care through two years on treatment. Conclusions Our findings from a well-resourced clinic demonstrate continual loss from all stages of HIV care and strategies to reduce attrition from all stages of care are urgently needed. PMID:25330087

Fox, Matthew P.; Shearer, Kate; Maskew, Mhairi; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Clouse, Kate; Sanne, Ian

2014-01-01

348

Scaling up antiretroviral treatment and improving patient retention in care: lessons from Ethiopia, 2005-2013  

PubMed Central

Background Antiretroviral treatment (ART) was provided to more than nine million people by the end of 2012. Although ART programs in resource-limited settings have expanded treatment, inadequate retention in care has been a challenge. Ethiopia has been scaling up ART and improving retention (defined as continuous engagement of patients in care) in care. We aimed to analyze the ART program in Ethiopia. Methods A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was used. Routine ART program data was used to study ART scale up and patient retention in care. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with program managers. Results The number of people receiving ART in Ethiopia increased from less than 9,000 in 2005 to more than 439, 000 in 2013. Initially, the public health approach, health system strengthening, community mobilization and provision of care and support services allowed scaling up of ART services. While ART was being scaled up, retention was recognized to be insufficient. To improve retention, a second wave of interventions, related to programmatic, structural, socio-cultural, and patient information systems, have been implemented. Retention rate increased from 77% in 2004/5 to 92% in 2012/13. Conclusion Ethiopia has been able to scale up ART and improve retention in care in spite of its limited resources. This has been possible due to interventions by the ART program, supported by health systems strengthening, community-based organizations and the communities themselves. ART programs in resource-limited settings need to put in place similar measures to scale up ART and retain patients in care. PMID:24886686

2014-01-01

349

Effective Recognition and Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Primary Care.  

PubMed

This Academic Highlights section of The Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry presents the highlights of the planning roundtable "Effective Recognition and Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in the Primary Care Setting," held December 11, 2003, in Pittsburgh, Pa. The planning roundtable and this Academic Highlights were supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer. The planning roundtable was chaired by Larry Culpepper, M.D., M.P.H., Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass. The faculty member was Kathryn M. Connor, M.D., Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C. PMID:15486599

2004-01-01

350

Influence of surgical treatment timing on mortality from necrotizing soft tissue infections requiring intensive care management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Surgical treatment is crucial in the management of necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). The aim of this study was to\\u000a determine the influence of surgical procedure timing on hospital mortality in severe NSTI.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective study including 106 patients was conducted in a medical intensive care unit equipped with a hyperbaric chamber.\\u000a Data regarding pre-existing conditions, intensive care and surgical

Alexandre Boyer; Frederic Vargas; Fanny Coste; Elodie Saubusse; Yves Castaing; Georges Gbikpi-Benissan; Gilles Hilbert; Didier Gruson

2009-01-01

351

Palliative Care  

MedlinePLUS

Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

352

Improving quality of care in substance abuse treatment using five key process improvement principles  

PubMed Central

Process and quality improvement techniques have been successfully applied in health care arenas, but efforts to institute these strategies in alcohol and drug treatment are underdeveloped. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches participating substance abuse treatment agencies to use process improvement strategies to increase client access to, and retention in, treatment. NIATx recommends five principles to promote organizational change: 1) Understand and involve the customer; 2) Fix key problems; 3) Pick a powerful change leader; 4) Get ideas from outside the organization; and 5) Use rapid-cycle testing. Using case studies, supplemented with cross-agency analyses of interview data, this paper profiles participating NIATx treatment agencies that illustrate application of each principle. Results suggest that the most successful organizations integrate and apply most, if not all, of the five principles as they develop and test change strategies. PMID:22282129

Hoffman, Kim A.; Green, Carla A.; Ford, James H.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Gustafson, David H.; McCarty, Dennis

2012-01-01

353

Parents' emotional and social experiences of caring for a child through cleft treatment.  

PubMed

Little is known about the experiences of parents caring for a child through long-term treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate. We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 parents with children between the ages of 20 weeks and 21 years to explore experiences across the treatment program. We analyzed the data using a constructivist grounded theory approach and present in detail in this article one subcategory from the analysis: managing emotions. Throughout childhood and adolescence, parents experienced conflicting emotions about their child's impairment, uncertainty about cleft treatment, and stigmatizing attitudes. Although parents attempted to manage emotional tensions by pursuing cleft treatments, the interventions could themselves be a source of conflict for them. We suggest that routine assessment of parents' emotional and social well-being should be included in cleft treatment programs, and access to psychosocial support made available. PMID:21890716

Nelson, Pauline A; Kirk, Susan A; Caress, Ann-Louise; Glenny, Anne-Marie

2012-03-01

354

Discrimination by health care workers versus discrimination by others: countervailing forces on HCV treatment intentions.  

PubMed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health burden. Despite recent advances in HCV treatment, uptake remains low, particularly amongst people who inject drugs. HCV-related stigma and discrimination are common, especially within the health care sector. This research examines a more nuanced approach for how HCV-related stigma and discrimination impacts treatment access and uptake. Based on a social identity framework, we explore whether perceived HCV-related discrimination is associated with attempts to remove the stigma of being HCV-positive via HCV treatment intentions. Based on the results of prior research it was also hypothesised that the source of discrimination (health care workers versus others), and whether the discrimination is perceived to be directed to oneself or to the HCV-positive group, will differentially impact treatment intentions. The sample consisted of 416 people living with HCV in New South Wales, Australia, who acquired HCV from injecting drugs. Participants were asked about their experiences of perceived discrimination directed towards themselves versus their HCV-positive group and perceived discrimination within the health care sector. Findings indicate that discrimination towards the self is a more powerful indicator of treatment intentions than discrimination aimed at the HCV-positive group. This finding is consistent with social identity theory suggesting that people from low status groups are motivated to change their stigmatised status when it is possible to do so. The source of the perceived discrimination also matters, however, as participants who report experiencing discrimination from health workers have lowered intentions to engage with HCV treatment in the future. In combination, the results indicate that while perceived discrimination is commonly understood to act as a barrier to treatment uptake, the relationship is actually more complex than previously conceptualised. PMID:24889417

Brener, Loren; Horwitz, Robyn; von Hippel, Courtney; Bryant, Joanne; Treloar, Carla

2015-01-01

355

Patient self-management in the primary care treatment of depression.  

PubMed

Efforts to improve primary care treatment of depression incorporate elements of the chronic illness care model, including patient self-management strategies. Case studies, focus groups and the literature suggest six key components of depression self-management programs: (1) implement behavioral change interventions, (2) plan for crisis and relapse prevention, (3) re-establish personal meaning, (4) attend to patients' experience, context and community, (5) build a patient-clinician partnership and (6) create an integrated, self-management support structure. Successful implementation of these components is facilitated by (1) the care system's collective and empathic understanding of the disease itself; (2) sufficient time; (3) adequate funding and (4) robust clinical information systems. PMID:16215659

Bachman, John; Swenson, Sara; Reardon, M Elizabeth; Miller, Doriane

2006-01-01

356

A sensitivity analysis of the Children’s Treatment Network trial: a randomized controlled trial of integrated services versus usual care for children with special health care needs  

PubMed Central

Background The value of integrated care through comprehensive, coordinated, and family-centered services has been increasingly recognized for improving health outcomes of children with special health care needs (CSHCN). In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the integrated care provided through the Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) was compared with usual care in improving the psychosocial health of target CSHCN. In this paper, we aimed to estimate the effect of CTN care by conducting multiple analyses to handle noncompliance in the trial. Methods The trial recruited target children in Simcoe County and York Region, ON, Canada. Children were randomized to receive CTN or usual care and were followed for 2 years. The CTN group received integrated services through multiple providers to address their specific needs while the usual care group continued to receive care directed by their parents. The outcome was change in psychosocial quality of life at 2 years. We conducted intention-to-treat, as-treated, per-protocol, and instrumental variable analyses to analyze the outcome. Results The trial randomized 445 children, with 229 in the intervention group and 216 in the control group. During follow-up, 52% of children in the intervention group did not receive complete CTN care for various reasons. At 2 years, we did not find a significant improvement in psychosocial quality of life among the children receiving CTN care compared with usual care (intention-to-treat mean difference 1.50, 95% confidence interval ?1.49 to 4.50; P = 0.32). Other methods of analysis yielded similar results. Conclusion Although the effect of CTN care was not significant, there was evidence showing benefits of integrated care for CSHCN. More RCTs are needed to demonstrate the magnitude of such an effect. The CTN study highlights the key challenges in RCTs when assessing interventions involving integrated care, and informs further RCTs including similar evaluations. PMID:24098089

Ye, Chenglin; Browne, Gina; Beyene, Joseph; Thabane, Lehana

2013-01-01

357

Public sector antiretroviral treatment programme in South Africa: health care workers' attention to mental health problems.  

PubMed

Although there is a high prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), many patients are not screened, diagnosed or referred for mental health problems. This study aims to determine whether public sector health care workers in South Africa observe, screen, diagnose and refer ART patients that show symptoms of common mental disorders. It also aims to ascertain the extent of mental health training received by public sector health care workers working in ART. The study was cross-sectional in design. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 40 nurses and structured interviews were conducted with 23 lay workers across the five districts in the Free State between July 2009 and October 2009. STATA version 12 was used to perform statistical data analysis. The health care workers reported observing a high frequency of symptoms of common mental disorders among public sector ART patients. While 70% of nurses screened and diagnosed, only 40% of lay workers screened and diagnosed patients on ART for a mental disorder. Health care workers who had received training in mental health were more likely to screen or diagnose a mental disorder, but only 14% of the workers had received such training. We recommend that health care workers should receive task-specific training to screen and/or diagnose patients on ART for common mental disorders using the guidelines of the South African HIV Clinicians Society. A positive diagnosis should be referred to a health care practitioner for appropriate evidence-based treatment in the form of medication or psychotherapy. PMID:25317991

Pappin, Michele; Wouters, Edwin; Booysen, Frederik L R; Lund, Crick

2015-04-01

358

Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care. A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of collaborative care for patients with major depressive disorder in primary care has been established. Assessing its cost-effectiveness is important for deciding on implementation. This review therefore evaluates the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for major depressive disorder in primary care. METHODS: A systematic search on economic evaluations of collaborative care was conducted in Pubmed and PsychInfo. Quality

Kirsten M van Steenbergen-Weijenburg; Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis; Eva K Horn; Harm WJ van Marwijk; Aartjan TF Beekman; Frans FH Rutten; Leona Hakkaart-van Roijen

2010-01-01

359

Care, control, or both? Characterizing major dimensions of the mandated treatment relationship.  

PubMed

Current conceptualizations of the therapeutic alliance may not capture key features of therapeutic relationships in mandated treatment, which may extend beyond care (i.e., bond and affiliation) to include control (i.e., behavioral monitoring and influence). This study is designed to determine whether mandated treatment relationships involve greater control than traditional treatment relationships, and if so, whether this control covaries with reduced affiliation. In this study, 125 mental health court participants described the nature of their mandated treatment relationships using the INTREX (Benjamin, L., 2000, SASB/INTREX: Instructions for administering questionnaires, interpreting reports, and giving raters feedback (Unpublished manual). Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah, Department of Psychology), a measure based on the interpersonal circumplex theory and assesses eight interpersonal clusters organized by orthogonal axes of affiliation and control. INTREX cluster scores were statistically compared to existing data from three separate voluntary treatment samples, and structural summary analyses were applied to distill the predominant theme of mandated treatment relationships. Compared with voluntary treatment relationships, mandated treatment relationships demonstrate greater therapist control and corresponding client submission. Nonetheless, the predominant theme of these relationships is affiliative and autonomy-granting. Although mandated treatment relationships involve significantly greater therapist control than traditional relationships, they remain largely affiliative and consistent with the principles of healthy adult attachment. PMID:23834388

Manchak, Sarah M; Skeem, Jennifer L; Rook, Karen S

2014-02-01

360

Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment  

PubMed Central

Objectives The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. Results There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. Conclusions It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which patients pay the bill themselves, that decision-making would be closer to an informed than a paternalistic model. Our research suggests that paternalistic decision-making is still practised and is influenced by assumptions about patient characteristics. Better tools and training may be required to support clinicians in this area of practice. PMID:25265369

Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

2015-01-01

361

Interdisciplinary palliative care, including massage, in treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal neurological disease that affects approximately 20,000 Americans. Symptoms include muscle weakness, fatigue, twitching, atrophy, spasticity, pain, oropharyngeal dysfunction, pseudobulbar affect, weight loss, and respiratory impairment. Death occurs within 3-5 yr after onset of symptoms, with diagnosis taking from 11 to 17.5 months. The only FDA-approved drug for ALS is Riluzole, which only increases the life expectancy by a few months. All other treatments for ALS provide symptom management to improve the patient's quality of life. An interdisciplinary palliative care team for the ALS patient helps to reduce the stress that the illness places on families. Massage can be a useful adjunctive treatment for spasticity and pain when medication side effects are unwanted. A holistic interdisciplinary palliative care team supports both the patient and the family improving their quality of life. PMID:19761955

Blatzheim, Kendra

2009-10-01

362

Unheard voices: outcomes of tertiary care for treatment-refractory psychosis  

PubMed Central

Aims and method In up to a quarter of patients, schizophrenia is resistant to standard treatments. We undertook a naturalistic study of 153 patients treated in the tertiary referral in-patient unit of the National Psychosis Service based at the Maudsley Hospital in London. A retrospective analysis of symptoms on admission and discharge was undertaken using the OPCRIT tool, along with preliminary economic modelling of potential costs related to changes in accommodation. Results In-patient treatment demonstrated statistically significant improvements in all symptom categories in patients already identified as having schizophrenia refractory to standard secondary care. The preliminary cost analysis showed net savings to referring authorities due to changes from pre- to post-discharge accommodation. Clinical implications Despite the enormous clinical, personal and societal burden of refractory psychotic illnesses, there is insufficient information on the outcomes of specialised tertiary-level care. Our pilot data support its utility in all domains measured. PMID:25237502

Sarkar, S. Neil; Tracy, Derek K.; Fernandez, Maria-Jesus Mateos; Nalesnik, Natasza; Dhillon, Gurbinder; Onwumere, Juliana; Prins, Anne-Marye; Schepman, Karen; Collier, Tracy; White, Thomas P.; Patel, Anita; Gaughran, Fiona; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

2014-01-01

363

A randomised, multicentre clinical trial of specialised palliative care plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for cancer patients with palliative care needs: the Danish palliative care trial (DanPaCT) protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Advanced cancer patients experience considerable symptoms, problems, and needs. Early referral of these patients to specialised palliative care (SPC) could improve their symptoms and problems. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) investigates whether patients with metastatic cancer, who report palliative needs in a screening, will benefit from being referred to ‘early SPC’. Methods/Design DanPaCT is a clinical, multicentre, parallel-group superiority trial with balanced randomisation (1:1). The planned sample size is 300 patients. Patients are randomised to specialised palliative care (SPC) plus standard treatment versus standard treatment. Consecutive patients from oncology departments are screened for palliative needs with a questionnaire if they: a) have metastatic cancer; b) are 18 years or above; and c) have no prior contact with SPC. Patients with palliative needs (i.e. symptoms/problems exceeding a certain threshold) according to the questionnaire are eligible. The primary outcome is the change in the patients’ primary need (the most severe symptom/problem measured with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30)). Secondary outcomes are other symptoms/problems (EORTC QLQ-C30), satisfaction with health care (FAMCARE P-16), anxiety and depression (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale), survival, and health care costs. Discussion Only few trials have investigated the effects of SPC. To our knowledge DanPaCT is the first trial to investigate screening based ‘early SPC’ for patients with a broad spectrum of cancer diagnosis. Trial registration Current controlled Trials NCT01348048 PMID:24152880

2013-01-01

364

Biodegradation and removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in treatment systems: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been the focus of much recent research as concerns rise about their\\u000a occurrence in bodies of water worldwide. In an effort to characterize the risk and determine the prevalence of these micropollutants\\u000a in lakes and rivers, many researchers are examining PPCP removal from impaired water during wastewater treatment and water\\u000a recycling (soil passage)

Kathryn M. Onesios; Jim T. Yu; Edward J. Bouwer

2009-01-01

365

Depression Diagnosis and Antidepressant Treatment among Depressed VA Primary Care Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the extent to which 3559 VA primary care patients with depression symptomatology received depression diagnoses\\u000a and\\/or antidepressant prescriptions. Symptomatology was classified as mild (13%), moderate (42%) or severe (45%) based on\\u000a SCL-20 scores. Diagnosis and treatment was related to depression severity and other patient characteristics. Overall, 44%\\u000a were neither diagnosed nor treated. Only 22% of those neither

Chuan-Fen Liu; Duncan G. Campbell; Edmund F. Chaney; Yu-Fang Li; Mary McDonell; Stephan D. Fihn

2006-01-01

366

[Early detection, negotiation and treatment of alcohol use disorders in primary care].  

PubMed

Subjects with alcohol dependence or alcohol-related health problems frequently use the primary care system without receiving the correct diagnosis or specific interventions. Stigma, lack of knowledge and know-how with regards to diagnosis and treatment of alcohol-related disorders on the site of the health care professionals may contribute to the treatment gap. General anamnesis, clinical evaluation, and laboratory parameters can serve as indicators, and validated screening tests can further corroborate the hypothesis. However, a diagnosis should only be made according to ICD-10 criteria. Adequate counselling techniques substantially contribute to successful physician-patient interaction. Motivational Interviewing combines a positive, appreciative attitude with communicative techniques to create a motivation to change. It includes general approaches as open questions, appreciation of the patient, active listening, summarizing results as well as specific approaches such as change and confidence talk and dealing with resistance. Within a positive relationship, the conversation can lead to change. Brief interventions cover four to five sessions with a duration between five and sixty minutes. Brief interventions based on an empathic attitude und reflection of findings, a brief advice leaving the responsibility on the patient's side and supporting self-efficacy can improve alcohol-related disorders. The transtheoretical model of change may help the health care provider to adapt intervention strategies to the patient's state. Primary health care provides an adequate framework for screening, diagnosis and intervention for alcohol-related disorders with the aim of reduction or abstinence. Further institutions in addiction treatment such as self-help and clinical institutions may complement the treatment system. PMID:24760716

Reimer, J; Cimander, K F; Reimer, C

2014-05-01

367

Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults  

PubMed Central

Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized) is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics. PMID:23032199

LEVIN, Liran; EINY, Shmuel; ZIGDON, Hadar; AIZENBUD, Dror; MACHTEI, Eli E.

2012-01-01

368

Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults.  

PubMed

Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized) is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics. PMID:23032199

Levin, Liran; Einy, Shmuel; Zigdon, Hadar; Aizenbud, Dror; Machtei, Eli E

2012-01-01

369

On the reporting of dental health, time for dental care, and the treatment panorama.  

PubMed

The thesis included five methodological studies and one caries epidemiological investigation, the general aim being to study how to measure and report dental health, time for dental care, treatment panorama, and dental care outcomes, within a Public Dental Service organization. The specific aims were to monitor dental clinic activities using a time study method, to apply time study results of a dental health-related patient group system for the 3-19 year age groups, and to compare time study results with corresponding results from computerized systems used for reporting dental care. Other specific aims were to compare longitudinal caries index data results between cohort and cross-sectional samples, to analyse caries index for extreme caries groups among adolescents leaving organized dental care, and--using time series methods--to analyse dental health development of the 15-19 year age groups. Results from the time studies portrayed the dental clinic as a working unit, showed that reported values can represent dental care only for intervention procedures, and indicated that clinic patterns were not adapted to the health situation of the patient groups. Longitudinal cohort attempts gave different values from those of the cross-sectional year classes, which should be the primary focus when presenting caries index mean values in dental health reviews. Caries-free groups from 15 to 19 years of age seem to be stable in their caries development in about 60%-80% of cases; while the 20% groups with the highest index values accounted for about 80% of all approximal lesions. In times of major economic adjustment, dental health for adolescents in Göteborg was an example of sustainable dental health development. A model system for monitoring, analysing, and reporting dental health and dental care outcomes within a dental care-giving organization calls for several conditions, for example, a dental health-related patient group system, and a rationale for the choice of dental team models. These areas could be gathered into a system where contemporary socio-economic factors and dental research results interact with performed dental care, and also with different methods for reporting and evaluating dental health, dental care costs, and the demand for dental care competence. PMID:10389234

Swedberg, Y

1999-01-01

370

Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment  

PubMed Central

In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

2015-01-01

371

Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment.  

PubMed

In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families' economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivitives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0. PMID:25393454

Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica; Hu, Shaoyan

2014-11-12

372

Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers.  

PubMed

Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

2012-01-01

373

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: Decision-Making in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Bipolar disorder is a chronic episodic illness, characterized by recurrent episodes of manic or depressive symptoms. Patients with bipolar disorder frequently present first to primary care, but the diversity of the potential symptoms and a low index of suspicion among physicians can lead to misdiagnosis in many patients. Frequently, co-occurring psychiatric and medical conditions further complicate the differential diagnosis. A thorough diagnostic evaluation at clinical interview, combined with supportive case-finding tools, is essential to reach an accurate diagnosis. When treating bipolar patients, the primary care physician has an integral role in coordinating the multidisciplinary network. Pharmacologic treatment underpins both short- and long-term management of bipolar disorder. Maintenance treatment to prevent relapse is frequently founded on the same pharmacologic approaches that were effective in treating the acute symptoms. Regardless of the treatment approach that is selected, monitoring over the long term is essential to ensure continued symptom relief, functioning, safety, adherence, and general medical health. This article describes key decision-making steps in the management of bipolar disorder from the primary care perspective: from initial clinical suspicion to confirmation of the diagnosis to decision-making in acute and longer-term management and the importance of patient monitoring. PMID:25317368

2014-01-01

374

Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers  

PubMed Central

Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

2012-01-01

375

competency Course Objective 1 1a Apply evidence based knowledge to diagnosis and treatment questions in ambulatory and geriatric patient care.  

E-print Network

knowledge to diagnosis and treatment questions in ambulatory and geriatric patient and treatment question in ambulatory and geriatric patient care. 3 1e Apply current knowledge of disease prevention, risk factor modification, end-of-life care and quality improvement

Myers, Lawrence C.

376

Costing Analysis of National HIV Treatment and Care Program in Vietnam  

PubMed Central

Background: Vietnam achieved rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), although external funds are declining sharply. To achieve and sustain universal access to HIV services, evidence-based planning is essential. To date, there had been limited HIV treatment and care cost data available in Vietnam. Methods: Cost data of outpatient and inpatient HIV care were extracted at 21 sentinel facilities (17 adult and 4 pediatric) that epitomize the national program. Step-down costing for administration costs and bottom-up resource costing for drugs, diagnostics, and labor were used. Records of 1401 adults and 527 pediatric patients were reviewed. Results: Median outpatient care costs per patient-year for pre-ART, first year ART, later year ART, and second-line ART were US $100, US $316, US $303, and US $1557 for adults; and US $171, US $387, US $320, and US $1069 for children, respectively. Median inpatient care cost per episode was US $162 for adults and US $142 for children. Non-antiretroviral (ARV) costs in adults at stand-alone facilities were 44% (first year ART) and 24% (later year ART) higher than those at integrated facilities. Adults who started ART with CD4 count ?100 cells per cubic millimeter had 47% higher non-ARV costs in the first year ART than those with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter. Adult ARV drug costs at government sites were from 66% to 85% higher than those at donor-supported sites in the first year ART. Conclusions: The study found that HIV treatment and care costs in Vietnam are economical, yet there is potential to further promote efficiency through strengthening competitive procurement, integrating HIV services, and promoting earlier ART initiation. PMID:23846564

Duong, Anh Thuy; Bales, Sarah; Do, Nhan Thi; Minh Nguyen, Thu Thi; Thanh Cao, Thuy Thi; Nguyen, Long Thanh

2014-01-01

377

Comparison of Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine with Buprenorphine as Adjuvant to Bupivacaine in Spinal Asnaesthesia  

PubMed Central

Background: The supplementation of local anaesthetics with adjuvants to improve the efficacy of subarachnoid block has been recognised since long. The most preferred drug has been opioids, but newer drugs like dexmedetomidine has also been introduced and investigated as an effective adjuvant. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the characteristics of subarachnoid blockade, hemodynamic stability and adverse effects of intrathecal buprenorphine and intrathecal dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine for lower abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: The present study included 60 patients aged between 18-60 years classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status (PS) I/II scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgeries. The patients were randomly allotted to two groups to receive intrathecal 3ml of 0.5% bupivacine with 60µg of buprenorphine (Group B; n=30) or 3ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with 5µg of dexmedetomidine (Group D; n=30). The onset time to peak sensory level, motor block, sedation, Haemodynamic variables, duration of motor block, analgesia and any adverse effects were noted. Results: There was no significant difference between groups regarding demographic characteristics and type of surgery. The motor, sensory blockade and time of rescue analgesia were significantly prolonged in Group D compared to Group B. The sedation level was higher in Group D compared to Group B. There was no significant difference in haemodynamic variables although Group B had lower Heart Rate (HR) than Group D. Conclusion: Intrathecal dexmedetomidine when compared to intrathecal buprenorphine causes prolonged anaesthesia and analgesia with reduced need for sedation and rescue analgesics. PMID:24701498

Gupta, Mahima; Shailaja, S.; Hegde, K. Sudhir

2014-01-01

378

Simultaneous Quantification of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine-Glucuronide and Norbuprenorphine-Glucuronide in Human Umbilical Cord by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

A LCMS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) in human umbilical cord. Quantification was achieved by selected ion monitoring of precursor ions m/z 468.4 for BUP; 414.3 for NBUP; 644.4 for BUP-Gluc and 590 for NBUP-Gluc. BUP and NBUP were identified by MS2, with m/z 396, 414 and 426 for BUP, and m/z 340, 364 and 382 for NBUP. Glucuronide conjugates were identified by MS3 with m/z 396 and 414 for BUP-Gluc and m/z 340 and 382 for NBUP-Gluc. The assay was linear 1–50 ng/g. Intra, inter-day and total assay imprecision (%RSD) were <14.5%, and analytical recovery ranged from 94.1% to 112.3% for all analytes. Extraction efficiencies were >66.3%, and process efficiency >73.4%. Matrix effect ranged, in absolute value, from 3.7% to 27.4% (CV<21.8%, n=8). The method was selective with no endogenous or exogenous interferences from 41 compounds evaluated. Sensitivity was high with limits of detection of 0.8 ng/g. In order to prove method applicability, an authentic umbilical cord obtained from an opioid-dependent pregnant woman receiving BUP pharmacotherapy was analyzed. Interestingly, BUP was not detected but concentrations of the other metabolites were NBUP-Gluc 13.4 ng/g, BUP-Gluc 3.5 ng/g and NBUP 1.2 ng/g. PMID:19406593

Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

2009-01-01

379

Musculoskeletal clinical assessment and treatment services at the primary-secondary care interface: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Management of musculoskeletal conditions in the UK is increasingly delivered in multidisciplinary clinical assessment and treatment services (CATS) at the primary–secondary care interface. However, there is little evidence concerning the characteristics and management of patients attending CATS. Aim To describe the characteristics, investigation, and treatment of adults attending a musculoskeletal CATS. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of cohort study baseline data from a musculoskeletal CATS in Stoke-on-Trent Primary Care Trust, UK. Method All patients referred from primary care between February 2008 and June 2009 were mailed a pre-consultation questionnaire concerning pain duration, general health status, anxiety, depression, employment status, and work absence due to musculoskeletal problems. At the consultation, clinical diagnoses, body region(s) affected, investigations, and treatment were recorded. Result A total of 2166 (73%) completed questionnaires were received. Chronic pain duration >1 year (55%), major physical limitation (76%), anxiety (49%), and depression (37%) were common. Of those currently employed, 516 (45%) had taken time off work in the last 6 months because of their musculoskeletal problem; 325 (29%) were unable to do their usual job. The most frequent investigations were X-rays (23%), magnetic resonance imaging (18%), and blood tests (14%): 1012 (48%) received no investigations. Injections were performed in 282 (13%) and 492 (23%) were referred to physiotherapy. Conclusion Although most patients presented with musculoskeletal problems suitable for CATS, chronic pain, physical limitation, anxiety, depression, and work disability were commonplace, highlighting the need for a biopsychosocial model of care that addresses psychological, social, and work-related needs, as well as pain and physical disability. PMID:23561693

Roddy, Edward; Zwierska, Irena; Jordan, Kelvin P; Dawes, Peter; Hider, Samantha L; Packham, Jon; Stevenson, Kay; Hay, Elaine M

2013-01-01

380

Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of depression affects beliefs about treatment seeking, and to identify the characteristics of help-seekers. Method One hundred eighteen aged care recipients were surveyed on their beliefs about the helpfulness of a variety of treatments/interventions for depression, on their actual help-seeking behaviors, and on their experience of depression (current and past). Results From the sample, 32.4% of the participants screened positive for depression on the Geriatric Depression Scale, and of these, 24.2% reported receiving treatment. Respondents believed the most helpful treatments for depression were increasing physical activity, counseling, and antidepressant medication. Help-seeking from both professional and informal sources appeared to be related to belief in the helpfulness of counseling and antidepressants; in addition, help-seeking from informal sources was also related to belief in the helpfulness of sleeping tablets and reading self-help books. In univariate analyses, lower levels of cognitive impairment and being in the two lower age tertiles predicted a greater likelihood of help-seeking from professional sources, and female sex and being in the lower two age tertiles predicted greater likelihood of help-seeking from informal sources. In multivariate analyses, only lower levels of cognitive impairment remained a significant predictor of help-seeking from professional sources, whereas both lower age and female sex continued to predict a greater likelihood of help-seeking from informal sources. Conclusion Beliefs in the helpfulness of certain treatments were related to the use of both professional and informal sources of help, indicating the possibility that campaigns or educational programs aimed at changing beliefs about treatments may be useful in older adults. PMID:25653512

Atkins, Joanna; Naismith, Sharon L; Luscombe, Georgina M; Hickie, Ian B

2015-01-01

381

Hepatitis C Treatment of Opioid Dependants Receiving Maintenance Treatment: Results of a Norwegian Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many physicians are still skeptic to treat opioid dependants, with or without maintenance treatment, for hepatitis C (HCV) because of concerns about psychiatric comorbidity, stability and adherence. In Norway, there are about 3,500 patients participating in the restrictive medication-assisted rehabilitation (LAR) programs in which all patients are given methadone or buprenorphine maintenance therapy. This study was undertaken to determine

Aud L. Krook; Dorthe Stokka; Bernt Heger; Egil Nygaard

2007-01-01

382

General Dentists' Perceptions of Educational and Treatment Issues Affecting Access to Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzed a data subset of a national survey of general dentists conducted in 2001 to determine their overall care of children with special health care needs (CSHCN). In the survey, dentists were asked to respond to questions in the following areas: did they provide care for CSHCN (children with cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and those who are medically

Paul S. Casamassimo; N. Sue Seale; Kelley Ruehs

383

Pharmacokinetic–Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Effectiveness and Safety of Buprenorphine and Fentanyl in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Respiratory depression is a serious and potentially life-threatening side-effect of opioid therapy. The objective of this\\u000a investigation was to characterize the relationship between buprenorphine or fentanyl exposure and the effectiveness and safety\\u000a outcome in rats.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data on the time course of the antinociceptive and respiratory depressant effect were analyzed on the basis of population\\u000a logistic regression PK–PD models using non-linear

Ashraf Yassen; Erik Olofsen; Jingmin Kan; Albert Dahan; Meindert Danhof

2008-01-01

384

Innovations to achieve excellence in COPD diagnosis and treatment in primary care.  

PubMed

Recognition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often missed or delayed in primary care. Once recognized, COPD is often undertreated or episodically treated, focusing on acute exacerbations without establishing maintenance treatment to control ongoing disease. Diagnostic and therapeutic pessimism result in missed opportunities to reduce exacerbations, maintain physical functioning, and reduce emergent health care requirements. Proactive diagnosis and evidence-based management can alleviate the impact of COPD on patients' lives. Smoking cessation has been proven to slow the rate of lung function decline. Maintenance pharmacotherapy and immunizations reduce exacerbations. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves respiratory symptoms and physical functioning and reduces rehospitalizations after exacerbations. Self-management education improves health-related quality of life and reduces inpatient and emergency care usage. Maintenance treatment with long-acting inhaled bronchodilators is appropriate beginning in moderate COPD to maintain airway patency and reduce exacerbations. Tiotropium is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat bronchospasm and reduce exacerbations in patients with COPD; salmeterol/fluticasone is FDA approved to treat airflow obstruction in COPD and reduce exacerbations in patients with a history of exacerbations. Other maintenance long-acting bronchodilators-salmeterol, formoterol, and budesonide/formoterol-are FDA approved to treat airway obstruction in COPD but lack an approved indication against exacerbations. FDA warnings on the use of long-acting beta-adrenergic agents (LABAs) in asthma specifically exempt COPD and do not apply to LABA/inhaled corticosteroid combinations used in COPD. The actual effectiveness achieved in practice with any COPD therapies depends on patients' inhaler technique, adherence, and persistence. Medication usage rates and inhaler proficiency may be improved by concordance, in which the health care provider and patient collaborate to make treatment plans sustainable in the patient's daily life. Practice redesign for whole-patient primary care provides additional tools for comprehensive COPD management. Innovations such as group visits and the patient-centered medical home provide newer ways to interact with COPD patients and their families. Patient-focused and evidence-based options enable primary care practices to manage COPD longitudinally and improve patient outcomes through the course of the disease. PMID:20861599

Fromer, Len; Barnes, Thomas; Garvey, Chris; Ortiz, Gabriel; Saver, Dennis F; Yawn, Barbara

2010-09-01

385

[The treatment of acid-base imbalance in the intensive care of respiratory diseases].  

PubMed

After giving an outline of pneumogenic respiratory insufficiency, signally that deriving from chronic obstructive bronchopulmonary disease, the Authors describe the intensive care of respiratory insufficiency, first from the anesthesiologist's point of view and then in a broader medical sense. In regard to the latter, the Authors emphasize the importance of material equipment and staff training and teamwork; they also list a number of possible iatrogenic disorders in intensive care. Next they discuss medical aids and more specifically the machinery designed to assist respiration, such as pulmonary ventilators and the "iron lung", as implements that can be used to advantage in medical wards. Then they describe the elements to be used for a correct assessmnet of the severity of respiratory insufficiency, under the following subheadings:--state of coma, if present;--state of acid-base balance, oxemia, and water and electrolyte balance;--circulatory compensation or failure;--need for correcting bronchial obstruction. Through several representative examples concerning the medical correction of alterations of CO2, pH, electrolyte composition, and water and blood volumes, they describe the therapeutic measures to be undertaken particularly as regards the metabolic sequels (alkalosis or acidosis) that may occur in the course of treatment. Coming next to intensive care utilizing mechanical devices, they stress the importance of monitoring the parameters of humoral balance during (and even more so, after) said treatment, in view of avoiding the emergence of iatrogenic disturbances such as the reventilation syndrome and the syndrome of post-hypercapnic metabolic alkalosis. PMID:34811

Pasargiklian, M; Fumagalli, G; Ferrara, A

1979-01-01

386

Prevalence of problem alcohol use among patients attending primary care for methadone treatment  

PubMed Central

Background Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health outcomes among current or former heroin users and primary care is providing methadone treatment for increasing numbers of this population. This study aimed todetermine the prevalence of problem alcohol use among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and to describe the socio-demographic characteristics and health service utilisation characteristics associated with problem alcohol uses. Methods We conducted a cross sectional survey of patients sampled from a national database of patients attending general practice for methadone treatment. Participants were recruited by their general practitioner and data was collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, which included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test ('AUDIT'), with a score of >7 considered abnormal (ie 'AUDIT positive cases') and socio-demographic, medical and substance use characteristics. Results We interviewed 196 patients (71% of those invited, 31% of those sampled, 11% of the national database). The median age was 32 years, 55% were hepatitis C positive, 79% had used illicit drugs in the previous month and 68% were male. Sixty-eight 'AUDIT positive' cases were identified (prevalence of 35%, 95% CI = 28–41%) and these were more likely to have attended a local Emergency Department in the previous year (p < 0.05) and less likely to have attended a hospital clinic in the previous year (p < 0.05). Twenty-seven (14%) scored 20 or higher indicating possible alcohol dependence. Conclusion Problem alcohol use has a high prevalence among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and interventions that address this issue should be explored as a priority. Interventions that address problem alcohol use in this population should be considered as a priority, although the complex medical and psychological needs of this population may make this challenging. PMID:19519882

Ryder, Niamh; Cullen, Walter; Barry, Joseph; Bury, Gerard; Keenan, Eamon; Smyth, Bobby P

2009-01-01

387

Consent and participation: ethical issues in the treatment of children in out-of-home care.  

PubMed

Mental health service (MHS) providers confront questions of informed consent for evaluation and treatment of children in state custody who are placed in residential or foster care programs, where legal responsibility is shared between state and parent. There are ethical issues encountered by MHS providers who work with this growing population of children in placement. Matters of informed consent and access to information about treatment influence relationships with the parents, legal guardians, Child Protective Service workers, and the child. These specific concerns are addressed: informed consent, the right to be informed, and the rights of parents or foster carers to participate in a child's treatment. Recommendations for resolving dilemmas faced by MHS providers are discussed. PMID:15709858

Molin, Ronald; Palmer, Sally

2005-01-01

388

Dissemination of an internet-based treatment for chronic insomnia into primary care.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effectiveness of two strategies (provider-targeted, consumer-targeted) in the dissemination of an insomnia treatment into primary care. Results of the study indicated that more patients from the provider-targeted, than the consumer-targeted, clinic followed up on the referral for insomnia treatment, but that overall there was limited uptake. These results did not seem to be associated with low levels of provider interest, although providers expressed need for more education about the insomnia program. Implications of these results are that future research efforts would benefit from expanding upon the education of providers in terms of treatment offered, perhaps teaching providers how to better motivate their patients for behavior change. PMID:24564299

Beaulac, Julie; Vincent, Norah; Walsh, Kate

2015-03-01

389

Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care  

PubMed Central

Background Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies associated with the report of the preferred way that limit the use of such data. Risk factors associated with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis still remain controversial. Methods/Design This work describes a protocol of a multicentric prospective observational study with one year follow up, to describe the women's reasons and preferences to choose the way of administration (oral vs topical) in the treatment of not complicated candidal vaginitis. The number of women required is 765, they are chosen by consecutive sampling. All of whom are aged 16 and over with vaginal discharge and/or vaginal pruritus, diagnosed with not complicated vulvovaginitis in Primary Care in Madrid. The main outcome variable is the preferences of the patients in treatment choice; secondary outcome variables are time to symptoms relief and adverse reactions and the frequency of recurrent vulvovaginitis and the risk factors. In the statistical analysis, for the main objective will be descriptive for each of the variables, bivariant analysis and multivariate analysis (logistic regression).. The dependent variable being the type of treatment chosen (oral or topical) and the independent, the variables that after bivariant analysis, have been associated to the treatment preference. Discussion Clinical decisions, recommendations, and practice guidelines must not only attend to the best available evidence, but also to the values and preferences of the informed patient. PMID:21281464

2011-01-01

390

TOWARDS PATIENT-CENTERED CARE FOR DEPRESSION: CONJOINT METHODS TO TAILOR TREATMENT BASED ON PREFERENCES  

PubMed Central

Background Although antidepressants and counseling have been shown to be effective in treating patients with depression, non-treatment or under-treatment for depression is common especially among the elderly and minorities. Previous work on patient preferences has focused on medication versus counseling, but less is known about the value patients place on attributes of medication and counseling. Objective Conjoint analysis has been recognized as a valuable means of assessing patient treatment preferences. We examine how conjoint analysis be used to determine the relative importance of various attributes of depression treatment at the group level as well as to determine the range of individual-level relative preference weights for specific depression treatment attributes. In addition we use conjoint analysis to predict what modifications in treatment characteristics are associated with a change in the stated preferred alternative. Study design 86 adults who participated in an internet-based panel responded to an on-line discrete choice task about depression treatment. Participants chose between medication and counseling based on choice sets presented first for a “mild depression” scenario and then for a “severe depression” scenario. Participants were given 18 choice sets which varied for medication based on type of side effect (nausea, dizziness, and sexual dysfunction) and severity of side effect (mild, moderate, and severe); and for counseling based on frequency of counseling sessions (once per week or every other week) and location of the sessions (mental health professional’s office, primary care doctor’s office or office of a spiritual counselor). Results Treatment type (counseling vs. medication) appeared to be more important in driving treatment choice than any specific attribute that was studied. Specifically counseling was preferred by most of the respondents. After treatment type, location of treatment and frequency of treatment were important considerations. Preferred attributes were similar in both the mild and severe depression scenarios. Side effect severity appeared to be most important in driving treatment choice as compared with the other attributes studied. Individual-level relative preferences for treatment type revealed a distribution that was roughly bimodal with 27 participants who had a strong preference for counseling and 14 respondents who had a strong preference for medication. Conclusion Estimating individual-level preferences for treatment type allowed us to see the variability in preferences and determine which participants had a strong affinity for medication or counseling. PMID:20671803

Wittink, Marsha N.; Cary, Mark; TenHave, Thomas; Baron, Jonathan; Gallo, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

391

The DOMUS study protocol: a randomized clinical trial of accelerated transition from oncological treatment to specialized palliative care at home  

PubMed Central

Background The focus of Specialized Palliative Care (SPC) is to improve care for patients with incurable diseases and their families, which includes the opportunity to make their own choice of place of care and ultimately place of death. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DOMUS) aims to investigate whether an accelerated transition process from oncological treatment to continuing SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer results in more patients reaching their preferred place of care and death. The SPC in this trial is enriched with a manualized psychological intervention. Methods/Design DOMUS is a controlled randomized clinical trial with a balanced parallel-group randomization (1:1). The planned sample size is 340 in- and outpatients treated at the Department of Oncology at Copenhagen University Hospital. Patients are randomly assigned either to: a) standard care plus SPC enriched with a standardized psychological intervention for patients and caregivers at home or b) standard care alone. Inclusion criteria are incurable cancer with no or limited antineoplastic treatment options. Discussion Programs that facilitate transition from hospital treatment to SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer can be a powerful tool to improve patients’ quality of life and support family/caregivers during the disease trajectory. The present study offers a model for achieving optimal delivery of palliative care in the patient’s preferred place of care and attempt to clarify challenges. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01885637 PMID:25242890

2014-01-01

392

Treatment Patterns and Adherence among Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus in a US Managed Care Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to document real-world treatment patterns, medication adherence, and the impact of adherence on disease-specific and all-cause health-care costs among chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients in a US managed care population.

Debanjali Mitra; Keith L. Davis; Cynthia Beam; Jasmina Medjedovic; Vinod Rustgi

2010-01-01

393

Impact of a policy of direct admission to a coronary care unit on use of thrombolytic treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because thrombolytic treatment is effective only if it is given within six hours of acute myocardial infarction it is vital to admit patients to the coronary care unit as soon as possible after the acute event. A policy of admitting patients to the coronary care unit at the request of the patient's general practitioner by a telephone line that is

J M Burns; K J Hogg; A P Rae; W S Hillis; F G Dunn

1989-01-01

394

Variables that influence diagnosis and treatment of the eating disorders within primary care settings: A vignette study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study examined the influence of clinical and nonclinical fea- tures of case presentation on the diagno- sis and treatment of eating disorders in primary care. Method: Family physicians from a defined region of the UK were provided with two vignettes, characterizing eating disorder presentations in primary care. Case gender, ethnicity, weight status, and diabetes history were experimentally manipulated.

Laura Currin; Ulrike Schmidt; Glenn Waller

2007-01-01

395

45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

2014-10-01

396

45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

2013-10-01

397

45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

2012-10-01

398

45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

2011-10-01

399

45 CFR 164.506 - Uses and disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...disclosures to carry out treatment, payment, or health care operations. 164.506 Section 164.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA... Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.506 Uses...

2010-10-01

400

Shared Decision-Making in the Primary Care Treatment of Late-Life Major Depression: A Needed New Intervention?  

PubMed Central

Objective We suggest that clinicians consider models of shared decision-making for their potential ability to improve the treatment of major depression in the primary care setting and overcome limitations of collaborative care and other interventions. Methods We explore the characteristics and techniques of patient-clinician shared decision-making, with particular emphasis on this model’s relevance to the unique treatment concerns of depressed older adults. Results We describe a shared decision-making intervention to engage older adults in depression treatment in the primary care sector. Conclusions It is timely to examine shared decision-making models for elderly depressed primary care patients given their potential ability to improve treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. PMID:19946872

Raue, Patrick J.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Hoffman, Amy S.; Bruce, Martha L.

2010-01-01