Science.gov

Sample records for care providers pesticides

  1. Review of Pesticide Education Materials for Health Care Providers Providing Care to Agricultural Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Quandt, Sara A.; Early, Julie; Jackson, David S.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Pesticide exposure is an important environmental and occupational health risk for agricultural workers and their families, but health care providers receive little training in it. Objective: To evaluate the medical resources available to providers caring for patients, particularly farmworkers, exposed to pesticides and to recommend a…

  2. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called OB) is a doctor who has special education and training to take care of pregnant women ... midwife is a health care provider who has special education and training to take care of women of ...

  3. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  4. Neonicotinoid pesticide exposure impairs crop pollination services provided by bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Dara A.; Garratt, Michael P. D.; Wickens, Jennifer B.; Wickens, Victoria J.; Potts, Simon G.; Raine, Nigel E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent concern over global pollinator declines has led to considerable research on the effects of pesticides on bees. Although pesticides are typically not encountered at lethal levels in the field, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to field-realistic levels can have sublethal effects on bees, affecting their foraging behaviour, homing ability and reproductive success. Bees are essential for the pollination of a wide variety of crops and the majority of wild flowering plants, but until now research on pesticide effects has been limited to direct effects on bees themselves and not on the pollination services they provide. Here we show the first evidence to our knowledge that pesticide exposure can reduce the pollination services bumblebees deliver to apples, a crop of global economic importance. Bumblebee colonies exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide provided lower visitation rates to apple trees and collected pollen less often. Most importantly, these pesticide-exposed colonies produced apples containing fewer seeds, demonstrating a reduced delivery of pollination services. Our results also indicate that reduced pollination service delivery is not due to pesticide-induced changes in individual bee behaviour, but most likely due to effects at the colony level. These findings show that pesticide exposure can impair the ability of bees to provide pollination services, with important implications for both the sustained delivery of stable crop yields and the functioning of natural ecosystems.

  5. Neonicotinoid pesticide exposure impairs crop pollination services provided by bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Dara A.; Garratt, Michael P.D.; Wickens, Jennifer B.; Wickens, Victoria J.; Potts, Simon G.; Raine, Nigel E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent concern over global pollinator declines has led to considerable research on the effects of pesticides on bees1-5. Although pesticides are typically not encountered at lethal levels in the field, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to field-realistic levels can have sub-lethal effects on bees affecting their foraging behaviour1,6,7, homing ability8,9 and reproductive success2,5. Bees are essential for the pollination of a wide variety of crops and the majority of wild flowering plants10-12, but until now research on pesticide impacts has been limited to direct effects on bees themselves and not on the pollination services they provide. Here we show the first evidence that pesticide exposure can reduce the pollination services bumblebees deliver to apples, a crop of global economic importance. Colonies exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide provided lower visitation rates to apple trees and collected pollen less often. Most importantly these pesticide exposed colonies produced apples containing fewer seeds demonstrating a reduced delivery of pollination services. Our results also suggest reduced pollination service delivery is not due to pesticide-induced changes in individual bee behaviour but most likely due to impacts at the colony level. These findings show that pesticide exposure can impair the ability of bees to provide pollination services, with important implications for both the sustained delivery of stable crop yields and the function of natural ecosystems. PMID:26580009

  6. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... are applied during farming and how much pesticide residue can remain in foods sold in stores. Exposure ... to pesticides at work should carefully clean any residue from their skin and remove their clothes and ...

  7. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning. PMID:26900113

  8. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  9. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... GYN as their primary care provider. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are nurses with graduate training. They can serve ... common concerns and routine screenings) and family planning. NPs can prescribe medications. A physician assistant (PA) can ...

  10. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... can give you a trusting, ongoing relationship with one medical professional over time. You can choose from ...

  11. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACMT Recognition Awards Annual Scientific Meeting Travel Scholarships Pesticides Public Health > Public > Toxicology FAQ's > Pesticides Pesticides What are pesticides ? How do pesticides work ? How ...

  12. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  13. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... trained to care for the sick. Advanced practice nurses have education and experience beyond the basic training and licensing ... include nurse practitioners (NPs) and the following: Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have training in a field such as cardiac, psychiatric, or ...

  14. Group Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Group family day care providers need to create high-quality programs where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the group family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care providers:…

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  18. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  19. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  20. Providing Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Catherine; Golub, Zola; Santa-Donato, Anne; Cockey, Carolyn Davis; Bingham, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve describes the core habits of character, also called virtues, that nurses can strive to incorporate into their care of women and newborns. This commentary provides background on the development of Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve, as well as inspiring examples of how nurses incorporate these virtues into their nursing practice. PMID:27067929

  1. [Reembursing health-care service provider networks].

    PubMed

    Binder, A; Braun, G E

    2015-03-01

    Health-care service provider networks are regarded as an important instrument to overcome the widely criticised fragmentation and sectoral partition of the German health-care system. The first part of this paper incorporates health-care service provider networks in the field of health-care research. The system theoretical model and basic functions of health-care research are used for this purpose. Furthermore already established areas of health-care research with strong relations to health-care service provider networks are listed. The second part of this paper introduces some innovative options for reimbursing health-care service provider networks which can be regarded as some results of network-oriented health-care research. The origins are virtual budgets currently used in part to reimburse integrated care according to §§ 140a ff. SGB V. Describing and evaluating this model leads to real budgets (capitation) - a reimbursement scheme repeatedly demanded by SVR-Gesundheit (German governmental health-care advisory board), for example, however barely implemented. As a final step a direct reimbursement of networks by the German sickness fund is discussed. Advantages and challenges are shown. The development of the different reimbursement schemes is partially based on models from the USA. PMID:25625796

  2. Compassion fatigue in pediatric palliative care providers.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Mary T

    2007-10-01

    The experience of compassion fatigue is an expected and common response to the professional task of routinely caring for children at the end of life. Symptoms of compassion fatigue often mimic trauma reactions. Implementing strategies that span personal, professional, and organizational domains can help protect health care providers from the damaging effects of compassion fatigue. Providing pediatric palliative care within a constructive and supportive team can help caregivers deal with the relational challenges of compassion fatigue. Finally, any consideration of the toll of providing pediatric palliative care must be balanced with a consideration of the parallel experience of compassion satisfaction. PMID:17933615

  3. Resources for the Family Day Care Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jeanne, Ed.; And Others

    The 34 brief articles in this sourcebook for family day care providers are presented mainly in two large sections: (1) management of family day care business, and (2) interaction with children. Many of these articles pose and provide answers to questions that are likely to occur to child caregivers, such as "Does the IRS really expect me to keep…

  4. Higher Education as Child Care Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everts, Joanne; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses employer-sponsored child care, specifically on college and university campuses and briefly reviews history and status of campus children's centers. Describes campus child care provided at University of Nevada, Reno. Shows how important it is for institutions to develop a corporate culture that is truly family friendly. Proposes agenda…

  5. Concussion management by primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  6. The Family Day Care Providers' Legal Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Lujuana Wolfe

    Designed specifically for family day care providers in Alameda County, California, this handbook provides legal and business advice thought to be useful as well to providers throughout the United States. A wide range of legal and business issues is covered in 15 brief chapters. Advice is offered on provider-parent contracts, planning for accidents…

  7. Preconception care by the nonobstetrical provider.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith A

    2002-05-01

    Clinicians who provide health care to women during their childbearing years have the opportunity to affect pregnancy outcomes positively through preconception care. The goal of preconception care is to identify medical and social conditions that may put the mother or fetus at risk. Key elements include screening for certain infectious diseases, obtaining genetic history, updating immunizations, providing specific nutritional advice, and optimizing health status. Some women, and their partners, may require additional care, including a prepregnancy consultation with an obstetrician or maternal-fetal medicine specialist. The clinician can also offer advice that may enhance conception and encourage either early prenatal care when a pregnancy is achieved or early evaluation for infertility. PMID:12004996

  8. Weight management practices among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, G M; Reifsnider, E; Allan, J D

    2000-04-01

    This pilot study examined how primary care providers manage patients with weight problems, an important component of primary care. A convenience sample of 17 nurse practitioners and 15 physicians were surveyed about assessments and interventions used in practice for weight management along with perceived barriers to providing effective weight management. Practice patterns between gender, profession and practice setting of the nurse practitioners were compared. PMID:11930414

  9. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. PMID:26199294

  10. Process utility from providing informal care: the benefit of caring.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Werner B F; van Exel, N Job A; van den Berg, Bernard; van den Bos, Geertruidis A M; Koopmanschap, Marc A

    2005-09-28

    Though economics is usually outcome-oriented, it is often argued that processes matter as well. Utility is not only derived from outcomes, but also from the way this outcome is accomplished. Providing care on a voluntary basis may especially be associated with such process utility. In this paper, we discuss the process utility from providing informal care. We test the hypothesis that informal caregivers derive utility not only from the outcome of informal care, i.e. that the patient is adequately cared for, but also from the process of providing informal care. We present empirical evidence of process utility on the basis of a large sample of Dutch caregivers (n=950). We measure process utility as the difference in happiness between the current situation in which the care recipient is cared for by the caregiver and the hypothetical situation that someone else takes over the care tasks, all other things equal. Other background characteristics on patient and caregiver characteristics, objective and subjective caregiver burden and quality of life are also presented and related to process utility. Our results show that process utility exists and is substantial and therefore important in the context of informal care. Almost half of the caregivers (48.2%) derive positive utility from informal care and on average happiness would decline if informal care tasks were handed over to someone else. Multivariate regression analysis shows that process utility especially relates to caregiver characteristics (age, gender, general happiness, relation to patient and difficulties in performing daily activities) and subjective caregiver burden, whereas it also depends on the number of hours of care provided (objective burden). These results strengthen the idea of supporting the use of informal care, but also that of keeping a close eye on the position of carers. PMID:16098415

  11. Should health care providers be accountable for patients' care experiences?

    PubMed

    Anhang Price, Rebecca; Elliott, Marc N; Cleary, Paul D; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Hays, Ron D

    2015-02-01

    Measures of patients' care experiences are increasingly used as quality measures in accountability initiatives. As the prominence and financial impact of patient experience measures have increased, so too have concerns about the relevance and fairness of including them as indicators of health care quality. Using evidence from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) surveys, the most widely used patient experience measures in the United States, we address seven common critiques of patient experience measures: (1) consumers do not have the expertise needed to evaluate care quality; (2) patient "satisfaction" is subjective and thus not valid or actionable; (3) increasing emphasis on improving patient experiences encourages health care providers and plans to fulfill patient desires, leading to care that is inappropriate, ineffective, and/or inefficient; (4) there is a trade-off between providing good patient experiences and providing high-quality clinical care; (5) patient scores cannot be fairly compared across health care providers or plans due to factors beyond providers' control; (6) response rates to patient experience surveys are low, or responses reflect only patients with extreme experiences; and (7) there are faster, cheaper, and more customized ways to survey patients than the standardized approaches mandated by federal accountability initiatives. PMID:25416601

  12. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  13. [Violent acts against health care providers].

    PubMed

    Irinyi, Tamás; Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Violence against health care providers is getting more awareness nowadays. These are usually deliberate actions committed by patients or family members of them resulting in short and long term physical or psychological debilitating harm in the staff members. The causes of the violent acts are usually rooted in patient-related factors, although some characteristics of the professionals and of the workplace may also play some role. The present article presents different definitions of violence and possible reasons for violence against health care providers based on relevant international and national literature. The paper discusses the different forms and frequency of violence, furthermore, details about the effects, consequences and some options for prevention in health care settings are also included. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1105-1109. PMID:27397422

  14. Resource measurement by health care providers.

    PubMed

    Suver, J D; Neumann, B R

    1986-01-01

    The need to use health care resources effectively and efficiently has led to increased interest in developing a "should cost" approach to performance measurement. The development of appropriate standards and the separation of fixed costs into surrogate variable and capacity components can provide a useful tool for managers to measure performance. This article develops a framework for evaluating the utilization of fixed costs in providing output. PMID:10280908

  15. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  16. Better Baby Care: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Margaret; Tate, Costella

    A resource for child caregivers providing family day care for infants and toddlers, this book is designed to provide information and suggestions in a format that is easy to follow, and in language that is easy to read. Chapter 1 gives tips on "baby-proofing" the home, as well as ideas for toys, equipment, and how to integrate a baby into the…

  17. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  18. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  19. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to ... effects of these pesticide residues. Results from the Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures ...

  20. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  1. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  2. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    ... will have to decide is what kind of health care provider you would like to care for you ... practice doctor Certified nurse-midwife Each of these health care providers is described below. Each one has different ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  4. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000596.htm Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth To use the ... will have to decide is what kind of health care provider you would like to care for you ...

  5. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  6. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  7. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... consultant to create a policy that fits your child care center or home. Safe Sleep Practices Practice SIDS reduction ... questions about safe sleep practices please contact Healthy Child Care America at the American Academy of Pediatrics at childcare@aap.org or 888/227-5409. Remember, if ...

  8. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  9. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  10. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  11. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  12. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  13. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  14. Root doctors as providers of primary care.

    PubMed

    Stitt, V J

    1983-07-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two "root doctors." These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  15. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  16. Baseline Management Practices at Providers in Better Jobs Better Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Amy L.; Brannon, S. Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H.; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of…

  17. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... doctor practices; or (2) Any other person determined by the Secretary to be capable of providing...

  18. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkon, Abbey; Kalmar, Evie; Leonard, Victoria; Flint, Mary Louise; Kuo, Devina; Davidson, Nita; Bradman, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Young children and early care and education (ECE) staff are exposed to pesticides used to manage pests in ECE facilities in the United States and elsewhere. The objective of this pilot study was to encourage child care programs to reduce pesticide use and child exposures by developing and evaluating an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Toolkit for…

  19. Interfaith Health Care Ministries, Providence, Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Parker, D

    1999-01-01

    We enjoy considerable freedom in the creation of programs that meet the spiritual needs of people in the community. We minister in diverse settings--a university medical school, hospital, hospice, eldercare center, mental health center, state hospital, and parish/congregation. We are guided by our deep commitment to make sure that individuals and families whose life journey is hard receive quality spiritual care. We are equally committed to preparing caregivers, whether clergy, physicians, nurses, or laypersons so that they are both clinically competent and spiritually informed. Our ambitions are high and our resources are limited. PMID:10977358

  20. Nail Disease for the Primary Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Fleckman, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Nail disorders are a common presenting complaint for both the primary care physician and the dermatologist. Nail diagnoses are broad in scope and include infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions. Onychomycosis is an especially common nail condition, and treatment should always be preceded by appropriate fungal studies for confirmation of diagnosis. Inflammatory conditions of the nail unit can mimic onychomycosis, and a dermatologist can assist with diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Likewise, subungual tumors often require biopsy, and should be evaluated by a dermatologist who is experienced in nail evaluation and treatment. PMID:26476249

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers often use a blood sample to diagnose ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose IDDs? Skip sharing on social media ... 1 This type of test will help the health care provider examine the ability of a person to ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers can check for Down syndrome during pregnancy ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose birth defects? Skip sharing on social ... to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening Health care providers recommend that certain pregnant women, including those ...

  11. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)? Skip sharing ... a "floppy" body and weak muscle tone, a health care provider may conduct genetic testing for Prader-Willi ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  14. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Skip sharing on social ... disabilities. 2 How are newborns tested for PKU? Health care providers conduct a PKU screening test using a ...

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  17. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... for high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, and diabetes. Health care providers can also offer tips on quitting smoking, ... lesbians experience violence in their intimate relationships. However, health care providers do not ask lesbians about intimate partner ...

  18. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... Sun—Not a good mix / Questions for Your Health Care Provider Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 4 ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on ... and urine tests. 1 Cushing’s Syndrome If a health care provider suspects Cushing’s syndrome, he or she may ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menkes Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Menkes disease? Skip sharing on social ... 3 months old. To diagnose Menkes disease, a health care provider will order blood tests to measure the ...

  2. Successful Reentry: The Perspective of Private Correctional Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Greifinger, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  3. Wholistic Health Care: Challenge to Health Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Susan

    1980-01-01

    Due to the increasing influence of the holistic health movement, health providers will increasingly be challenged to reexamine their roles in patient relationships, increase the extent of interdisciplinary teamwork, emphasize health education and positive health behaviors, examine the usefulness of various alternative therapies, and consider the…

  4. Expanding the School's Role as Care Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Ellen C.; Snowden, Petra E.

    1992-01-01

    One elementary school located in a depressed area (Norfolk, Virginia) created a computerized service directory and referral system providing immediate, accurate information on available children's services. The principal or counselor accesses the database by indicating individual student characteristics, such as low achievement or family problems,…

  5. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  6. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. 438.804... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Conditions for Federal Financial Participation § 438.804 Primary care provider payment increases. (a) For MCO, PIHP or PAHP contracts that...

  7. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  8. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heindel JJ, Zoeller RT. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and human disease. In: Jameson JL, ed. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 153. Karr CJ, Solomon GM, Brock-Utne AC. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides. Pediatr ...

  9. Generational considerations in providing critical care education.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    With the current and predicted nursing shortage, much emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention. With an aging workforce, we must recruit, educate, and retain nurses from many different generations. As leaders and educators, we must be aware of generational differences and work with staff to appreciate potential preferences in communication, approach to learning and motivational factors. We are aware that over the next 15 years, many experienced nurses will retire. We must do all we can to recruit and retain nurses from all generations in order to provide a workforce able to meet the needs of our patients and families. Generational preferences should be considered when developing nursing education and in welcoming and accepting new staff into the culture of the nursing unit. PMID:20019512

  10. Development of an educational module on provider self-care.

    PubMed

    Meadors, Patrick; Lamson, Angela; Sira, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Intensive care providers who care for traumatized populations often face multiple traumas for extended periods and are vulnerable to developing lasting symptoms of compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization. Symptoms are often not recognizable until compassion fatigue or secondary traumatization negatively affects the providers' ability to care for their patients. More attention needs to be given to the care of the provider to ensure high-quality patient care, decrease turnover in the profession, and increase productivity. This article provides a framework for the development of an educational module for healthcare providers' self-care. This educational module created the opportunity to share with providers (a) how to explore their own professional experience; (b) how to recognize the different symptoms of compassion fatigue, primary traumatization, and secondary traumatization; (c) factors related to grief reactions; and (d) personal and professional strategies to decrease compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization. PMID:20683299

  11. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  12. Principals, School Nurses and Other Health Care Providers: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Robert A.

    It has become increasingly important to collect information on the health care problems of students in Title 1 public schools. Information to help fill this need is provided here. The study opens with a discussion of children's and adolescents' health care needs. It describes how health care in public schools is delivered on a national level,…

  13. Difficult Children and Difficult Parents: Constructions by Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Erica; Ring, Gail

    2007-01-01

    As more mothers of young children work, concerns about child care have gained prominence. Analyses of this topic typically address availability, safety, and costs of care, or the impact of care on children's "outcomes." When providers' input is included, it is generally used as an assessment tool to reinforce the researcher's conceptual framework.…

  14. Nephrologists as primary care providers: a review of the issues.

    PubMed

    Holley, J L

    1998-04-01

    Considering the role of nephrologists as primary care providers for their chronic dialysis patients requires exploration of a number of factors. These factors include the definition of a primary care provider, the time and expertise needed to provide primary care, the expectations of nephrologists and dialysis patients who give and receive primary care, the appropriate preventive care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, and the current and future roles of nephrologists within a changing health care environment. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed these issues, and there is little objective information on which to base guidelines and recommendations about nephrologist-directed primary care of ESRD patients. Most nephrologists spend a significant portion (30% to 35%) of their time caring for dialysis patients, and 90% report providing primary care to dialysis patients. Most dialysis patients view their nephrologist as their primary care provider. The increasingly aged and ill ESRD population will undoubtedly necessitate additional time and expertise for care from an understaffed nephrology work force. The increased use of advanced practice nurses and alliances with health care delivery systems under global capitation programs may develop into effective strategies to provide care for an increasing population of dialysis patients. The nonnephrologic health care needs, including specific and appropriate cancer screening and preventive health care protocols for ESRD patients whose life expectancies are significantly less than the general population, are unclear. The issues involved in considering nephrologists as primary caregivers for ESRD patients include these and other related factors, and will be discussed in this review. PMID:9531172

  15. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  16. Providing adolescent sexual health care in the pediatric emergency department: views of health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa K.; Mollen, Cynthia J.; O’Malley, Donna; Owens, Rhea L.; Maliszewski, Genevieve A.; Goggin, Kathy; Patricia, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore health care providers’ (HCPs) attitudes and beliefs about adolescent sexual health care provision in the emergency department (ED) and to identify barriers to a role of a health educator-based intervention. Methods We conducted focused, semi-structured interviews of HCPs from the ED and Adolescent Clinic of a children’s hospital. The interview guide was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and its constructs: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to facilitate care. We used purposive sampling and enrollment continued until themes were saturated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using directed content analysis. Results Twenty-nine interviews were required for saturation. Participants were 12 physicians, 12 nurses, 3 nurse practitioners and 2 social workers; the majority (83%) were female. Intention to facilitate care was influenced by HCP perception of 1) their professional role, 2) the role of the ED (focused vs. expanded care), and 3) need for patient safety. HCPs identified three practice referents: patients/families, peers and administrators, and professional organizations. HCPs perceived limited behavioral control over care delivery because of time constraints, confidentiality issues, and comfort level. There was overall support for a health educator and many felt the educator could help overcome barriers to care. Conclusion Despite challenges unique to the ED, HCPs were supportive of the intervention and perceived the health educator as a resource to improve adolescent care and services. Future research should evaluate efficacy and costs of a health educator in this setting. PMID:24457494

  17. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a…

  18. The Pedagogical Experiences and Practices of Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ramona Gail; Vakil, Shernavaz

    2007-01-01

    The work in family child care is becoming increasingly more professional, moving from an image of "mothering" toward one of educare. The growing demand for expertise and competence in family child care providers can be examined in light of their pedagogical experiences and the ways in which children engage in learning in providers' homes. This…

  19. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  20. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-12 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  1. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-11 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  2. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-14 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  3. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-13 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  4. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health care provider - adult ... Questions you should ask: Can I eat dairy foods? What foods can make my problem worse? Can I have greasy or spicy foods? ...

  5. Reporting Child Abuse: Rights and Responsibilities for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Law Center, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet provides answers to 12 questions about the rights and responsibilities of child care providers in California concerning the issue of child abuse. The questions are (1) Who is a "Child Care Custodian?" (2) How do I decide whether or not to report? (3) How do I recognize 'abuse' and 'neglect'? (4) How and when should I tell the parent…

  6. The Role of Child Care Providers in Child Abuse Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibel, Nancy L.; Gillespie, Linda G.; Temple, Tabitha

    2008-01-01

    Child care providers are likely to be the professionals who most frequently interact with families with young children. Thus, infant and toddler child care providers are uniquely positioned to recognize and respond to families' needs for information and support. This article describes knowledge, skills, and strategies that support child care…

  7. Geographic Concentration Of Home-Based Medical Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nengliang; Ritchie, Christine; Camacho, Fabian; Leff, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    The United States faces a shortage of providers who care for homebound patients. About 5,000 primary care providers made 1.7 million home visits to Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries in 2013, accounting for 70 percent of all home-based medical visits. Nine percent of these providers performed 44 percent of visits. However, most homebound people live more than thirty miles from a high-volume provider. PMID:27503964

  8. Exploring care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Kevin T; Abbott, Amy A; Norris, Joan F

    2013-08-01

    Care transitions involve coordination of patient care across multiple care settings. Many problems occur during care transitions resulting in negative patient outcomes and unnecessary readmissions. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives in a single metropolitan Midwest city. A qualitative descriptive design was used to solicit patients', caregivers', and health-care providers' perceptions of care transitions, their role within the process, barriers to effective care transitions, and strategies to overcome these barriers. Five themes emerged: preplanned admissions are ideal; lack of needed patient information upon admission; multiple services are needed in preparing patients for discharge; rushed or delayed discharges lead to patient misunderstanding; and difficulties in following aftercare instructions. Findings illustrated provider difficulty in meeting multiple care needs, and the need for patient-centered care to achieve positive outcomes associated with quality measures, reduced readmissions, and care transitions. PMID:23113935

  9. Midwifery care and patient-provider communication in maternity decisions

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Attanasio, Laura B.; Yang, Tony; Avery, Melissa; Declercq, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize reasons women chose midwives as prenatal care providers and to measure the relationship between midwifery care and patient-provider communication in the U.S. context. Methods Retrospective analysis of data from a nationally-representative survey of women who gave birth in 2011–2012 to a single newborn in a U.S. hospital (n=2400). We used multivariate logistic regression models to characterize women who received prenatal care from a midwife, to describe the reasons for this choice, and to examine the association between midwife-led prenatal care and women’s reports about communication. Results Preference for a female clinician and having a particular clinician assigned was associated with higher odds of midwifery care (AOR=2.65, 95% CI=1.70, 4.14 and AOR=1.63, 95% CI=1.04, 2.58). A woman with midwifery care had lower odds of reporting that she held back questions because her preference for care was different from her provider’s recommendation (AOR=0.46, 95% CI=0.23, 0.89) or because she did not want to be perceived as difficult (AOR=0.48, 95% CI=0.28, 0.81). Women receiving midwifery care also had lower odds of reporting that the provider used medical words were hard for them to understand (AOR=0.58, 95% CI=0.37, 0.91) and not feeling encouraged to discuss all their concerns (AOR=0.54, 95% CI=0.34, 0.89). Conclusions Women whose prenatal care was provided by midwives report better communication compared with those cared for by other types of clinicians. Systems-level interventions, such as assigning a clinician, may improve access to midwifery care and the associated improvements in patient-provider communication in maternity care. PMID:25874874

  10. Providing cultural care behind the spotlight at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Morse, Janice M; Clark, Lauren; Haynes, Tracii; Noji, Ariko

    2015-03-01

    The Olympic Games constitutes the world's largest sporting event. Nurses play an important, but poorly discussed, role in emergency care, routine clinical care and preventive care for athletes from many cultures as well as an enormous influx of spectators. In this article, we discuss five important considerations when preparing nurses to provide safe care for Olympians: elite athletes as a cultural group; caring for the Olympic family; disaster preparedness and security; infection control; and principles of transcultural nursing. Because of the nature of the sports and types of injuries and the effects of climate, these challenges differ somewhat between the summer and winter Olympics. Nevertheless, the Olympic games provide a tremendous opportunity to experience transcultural nursing and to highlight how nurses play a significant role in the care of the athletes, the Olympic family, and the spectators. PMID:25759201

  11. Low-dose agrochemicals and lawn-care pesticides induce developmental toxicity in murine preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Anne R; Ellis, Tammy M; Berg, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposures to pesticides may increase parental risk of infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, and congenital anomalies. Less is known about residential use of pesticides and the risks they pose to reproduction and development. In the present study we evaluate environmentally relevant, low-dose exposures to agrochemicals and lawn-care pesticides for their direct effects on mouse preimplantation embryo development, a period corresponding to the first 5-7 days after human conception. Agents tested were those commonly used in the upper midwestern United States, including six herbicides [atrazine, dicamba, metolachlor, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)], pendimethalin, and mecoprop), three insecticides (chlorpyrifos, terbufos, and permethrin), two fungicides (chlorothalonil and mancozeb), a desiccant (diquat), and a fertilizer (ammonium nitrate). Groups of 20-25 embryos were incubated 96 hr in vitro with either individual chemicals or mixtures of chemicals simulating exposures encountered by handling pesticides, inhaling drift, or ingesting contaminated groundwater. Incubating embryos with individual pesticides increased the percentage of apoptosis (cell death) for 11 of 13 chemicals (p care herbicides reduced development to blastocyst and mean cell number per embryo (p pesticide-induced injury can occur very early in development, with a variety of agents, and at concentrations assumed to be without adverse health consequences for humans. PMID:15121514

  12. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  13. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past ... dermatitis worse? What are the most common irritants? Skin cancer What type of skin cancer do I ...

  14. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health ... medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  15. Providers' Perceptions of Challenges in Obstetrical Care for Somali Women

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jalana N.; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Davis, Olga I.; Shipp, Michele P.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. This pilot study explored health care providers' perceptions of barriers to providing health care services to Somali refugee women. The specific aim was to obtain information about providers' experiences, training, practices and attitudes surrounding the prenatal care, delivery, and management of women with Female Genital Cutting (FGC). Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 obstetricians/gynecologists and nurse midwives in Columbus, Ohio. Results. While providers did not perceive FGC as a significant barrier in itself, they noted considerable challenges in communicating with their Somali patients and the lack of formal training or protocols guiding the management of circumcised women. Providers expressed frustration with what they perceived as Somali patients' resistance to obstetrical interventions and disappointment with a perception of mistrust from patients and their families. Conclusion. Improving the clinical encounter for both patients and providers entails establishing effective dialogue, enhancing clinical and cultural training of providers, improving health literacy, and developing trust through community engagement. PMID:24223041

  16. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.125 Definition of health care provider. (a) The...

  17. Providing neurologic care in criminal systems and state mental hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Clark Alan; Wortzel, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Summary As health care laws and payment structures change in the near future, neurologists may pursue other practice settings in which to provide care as a way to diversify their practice. Here we describe the challenges and opportunities involved with working in correctional and state mental hospital systems compared to a typical private practice: logistical challenges, patient and provider safety, patient characteristics, and cultural differences. Neurologists may take these factors into consideration when choosing whether to add this health care setting to their current practice. PMID:26124981

  18. Providing long term care for sex offenders: liabilities and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Corson, Tyler Rogers; Nadash, Pamela

    2013-11-01

    The high risk for recidivism among sex offenders who need long term care (LTC) raises serious issues when they are cared for alongside frail, vulnerable adults. LTC providers must balance offenders' right to access care with other residents' right to be free from abuse and must assess and manage the risks associated with admitting offenders. This article identifies sources of legal liability that derive from sex offender management and discusses the need for the LTC community to develop reasonable, balanced guidance on how best to mitigate the risks associated with sex offenders, protect the rights of all residents, and reduce provider liabilities. PMID:24094899

  19. Effective Factors in Providing Holistic Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jasemi, Madineh; Valizadeh, Leila; Keogh, Brian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring. Previous studies have shown that most nurses do not apply this method. Examining the effective factors in nurses’ provision of holistic care can help with enhancing it. Studying these factors from the point of view of nurses will generate real and meaningful concepts and can help to extend this method of caring. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was used to identify effective factors in holistic care provision. Data gathered by interviewing 14 nurses from university hospitals in Iran were analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method and by using MAXQDA (professional software for qualitative and mixed methods data analysis) software. Results: Analysis of data revealed three main themes as effective factors in providing holistic care: The structure of educational system, professional environment, and personality traits. Conclusion: Establishing appropriate educational, management systems, and promoting religiousness and encouragement will induce nurses to provide holistic care and ultimately improve the quality of their caring. PMID:26009677

  20. Mexican-American Males Providing Personal Care for their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican-American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a female relative. The cases are selected from a federally-funded, descriptive, longitudinal, mixed methods study of 110 MA caregivers and their care recipients. In case-oriented research, investigators can generate propositions (connected sets of statements) that reflect their findings and conclusions, and can be tested against subsequent cases: Caregiving strain and burden in MA males may have more to do with physical and emotional costs than financial ones; MA males providing personal care for their mothers adopt a matter-of-fact approach as they act “against taboo”; and this approach is a new way to fulfill family obligations. PMID:21643486

  1. Strategies for providing cultural competent health care for Hmong Americans.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Torry Grantham

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1980's the United States gave the Hmong preferred refugee status and a large number immigrated to the U.S. The Hmong refugees brought with them their language, social structure and customs, religious beliefs and rituals as well as their health care beliefs and practices. They were uprooted from their community and social supports and now live where the culture, language and socioeconomics are vastly different. Despite having learned a great deal about the Hmong culture over the last three decades, providing culturally competent health care for this unique group continues to be a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to enumerate the barriers to providing health care to Hmong Americans and share strategies to respect Hmong culture when providing quality health care. Emphasis is placed on building relationships based on trust and mutual respect. Cultural exchange is encouraged as well as the need for basic cultural awareness. PMID:20860331

  2. Surrogate pregnancy: a guide for Canadian prenatal health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Dan R.

    2007-01-01

    Providing health care for a woman with a surrogate pregnancy involves unique challenges. Although the ethical debate surrounding surrogacy continues, Canada has banned commercial, but not altruistic, surrogacy. In the event of a custody dispute between a surrogate mother and the individual(s) intending to parent the child, it is unclear how Canadian courts would rule. The prenatal health care provider must take extra care to protect the autonomy and privacy rights of the surrogate. There is limited evidence about the medical and psychological risks ofsurrogacy. Whether theoretical concerns about these risks are clinically relevant remains unknown. In the face of these uncertainties, the prenatal health care provider should have a low threshold for seeking obstetrical, social work, ethical and legal support. PMID:17296962

  3. Surrogate pregnancy: a guide for Canadian prenatal health care providers.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Dan R

    2007-02-13

    Providing health care for a woman with a surrogate pregnancy involves unique challenges. Although the ethical debate surrounding surrogacy continues, Canada has banned commercial, but not altruistic, surrogacy. In the event of a custody dispute between a surrogate mother and the individual(s) intending to parent the child, it is unclear how Canadian courts would rule. The prenatal health care provider must take extra care to protect the autonomy and privacy rights of the surrogate. There is limited evidence about the medical and psychological risks of surrogacy. Whether theoretical concerns about these risks are clinically relevant remains unknown. In the face of these uncertainties, the prenatal health care provider should have a low threshold for seeking obstetrical, social work, ethical and legal support. PMID:17296962

  4. Providing home care services in a for-profit environment.

    PubMed

    Shamansky, S L

    1988-06-01

    It is no surprise that politics and ideology will determine the future of home health and long-term care. Those same forces will also dictate whether home care services will become more or less dependent upon federal support. At the moment the prospects are not promising. Over the last several years our national reimbursement policies have pointed toward more and more stringent use of Medicare home health care benefits, despite the assumptions (and the data) that prospective payment systems might legitimately increase their use. The implementation of tight cost limits, consolidation to ten regional fiscal intermediaries, and increased claim denials have signaled home care agencies that cost containment is the aim of the present conservative administration. Private insurance companies, however, have begun to examine the prospects for long-term care and home care policies. Presently, most home care benefits are available through employment-based policies, which, of course, are nearly useless to the elderly, the major users of home care services. But what if businesses provided more comprehensive health care policies so that their employees could have better protection in the case of long-term illnesses? What if the giant corporation such as IBM, Xerox, General Electric, General Motors, and so forth, established programs to underwrite the cost of long-term care? What if private insurance companies attempted to spread the risks among thousands of policy holders so that long-term care insurance premiums were affordable to most older Americans? Rather than new sources of funding, it is more reasonable to expect that the financing of home care services will be reshaped by innovative reimbursement strategies. The future will probably bring prospective, resource-sensitive, or capitated schemes. There are no easy remedies. We must secure the participation of all sectors of our country--both public and private--in a cooperative endeavor. And at the same time we are struggling

  5. Human Trafficking: The Role of the Health Care Provider

    PubMed Central

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. PMID:20732668

  6. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider.

    PubMed

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. PMID:20732668

  7. [Providing studies quality for pesticides risk evaluation in their use according to proper laboratory practice rules].

    PubMed

    Rakitskiy, V N; Bereznyak, I V

    2016-01-01

    The article covers experience of proper laboratory practice in hygienic studies examining air and workers' skin for assessment of exposure levels of pesticides in natural conditions of agricultural production. PMID:27265940

  8. Reducing Isolation of Family Child Care Providers by Participation in a Provider-Initiated Support Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherington, Patricia Reish

    Because of the difficulty of finding time for professional and personal development, many family child care (FCC) providers are isolated in their work environment. This practicum study developed a provider-initiated support network to reduce this isolation. The local FCC association provided advertising about the formation of the network. A group…

  9. Design and maintenance considerations for pesticide and fertilizer containment systems used in lawn care and golf course facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hurto, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    The design of pesticide and fertilizer containment facilities for lawn and golf course operations are similar to those designs used for most pesticide handling operations. In lawn care operations, service vehicles are filled from a centralized facility and the diluted mixtures are transported to residential and commercial sites where mixtures are applied to turfgrass areas. Golf course operations involve fewer vehicles and the volume and frequency of spray operations performed are much lower compared to lawn care operations. Rarely are spray mixtures used in golf course operations transported off-site. A golf course operation will involve spray applications to 100 to 200 acres of plantings. Typically, the amount of spray activity conducted averages 3 to 5 days per month, whereas commercial lawn care companies may be providing applications to 10 to 200 acres daily. Because of the potential risk of cross contamination of spray equipment, operations associated with tree and shrub plantings should be segregated from those associated with herbicide and other materials considered toxic to ornamental plants.

  10. Providing continuity of care to a specific population

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Andréanne; Breton, Mylaine; Loslier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the factors that influence newly licensed family physicians in their decision to provide continuity of care to a specific primary care population. Design Mixed-methods study that included a self-administered online questionnaire for family physicians followed by individual interviews. Setting Monteregie, the second-most populated region of Quebec, with rural and urban areas. Participants All family physicians with 10 or fewer years of work experience who were practising in Monteregie were contacted (366 physicians). Of this group, 118 completed the online questionnaire (response rate of 32.2%). Of the respondents, 10 physicians with varied continuity of care profiles were selected for individual interviews. Main outcome measures The percentage of work time spent on continuity of care analyzed in conjunction with factors that support or present barriers to continuity of care at the contextual and organizational levels and for family physicians and patients. Results The main factors that facilitate continuity of care are the physician-patient relationship, interest in clinical continuity of care activities, positive role models, working alongside a nurse, and adequate access to resources, specifically mental health resources. The main barriers are the scope of administrative duties, interest in a comprehensive practice, a negative experience of continuity of care during training, a sense of inadequacy with respect to continuity of care, a heavy case load, and a lack of support in the first years of practice. Conclusion Possible ways to encourage newly licensed family physicians to provide continuity of care to a specific population are offered. Areas for improvement include medical training, administrative support, and human resources. PMID:27255634

  11. Providing palliative care to older adults: context and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ross, M M; McDonald, B

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study aimed at understanding more fully the work of nurses who provide care to older adults who are dying at home. The method employed was qualitative in nature and involved the use of focus groups for data collection. Data were gathered from a total of 40 community-based nurses during four sessions lasting approximately two hours each. Analysis revealed that the provision of care occurred within a context of aging and dying characterized by clients' awareness of impending death, the presence of multiple pathologies, diminishing social support, and a lack of control. Challenges to providing care stemmed from an ethic of high expectation and a health care system experienced as fragmented, bureaucratic, and driven by cost efficiency. Challenges included working in isolation, achieving closure, securing personal support, working collaboratively with others, and keeping up to date. Findings from this study have implications for both education and practice. PMID:7535351

  12. Avoiding Unintended Bias: Strategies for Providing More Equitable Health Care.

    PubMed

    Van Ryn, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that unintentional bias on the part of physicians can influence the way they treat patients from certain racial and ethnic groups. Most physicians are unaware that they hold such biases, which can unknowingly contribute to inequalities in health care delivery. This article explains why a person's thoughts and behaviors may not align, and provides strategies for preventing implicit biases from interfering with patient care. PMID:27089675

  13. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  14. Educating primary care providers about HIV disease: multidisciplinary interactive mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A; Goosby, E; Barker, L; Volberding, P; Goldschmidt, R; Balano, K B; Williams, A; Hoenig, L; Gould, B; Daniels, E

    1994-01-01

    As HIV-related prophylactic and therapeutic research findings continue to evolve, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service has created multidisciplinary mechanisms to disseminate new treatment options and educate primary care providers at rural and urban sites throughout our nation's health care system. HRSA has implemented (a) the International State-of-the-Art HIV Clinical Conference Call Series, (b) the national network of AIDS Education and Training Centers, (c) the nationwide HIV Telephone Consultation Service, and (d) the Clinical Issues Subcommittee of the HRSA AIDS Advisory Committee. These collaborative and comprehensive efforts at HIV information dissemination target physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, clinical pharmacists, mental health care providers, case managers, and allied health professionals. The sites where they provide care include public health clinics; county, State and Federal correctional facilities; private practice offices; community and academic hospitals; military and Veterans Administration facilities; hemophilia centers; schools of medicine, nursing, and dentistry; departments of health; chronic care facilities; visiting nurse and home care agencies; health maintenance organizations; and Indian Health Service clinics and hospitals. PMID:8190853

  15. The role of primary care providers in managing falls.

    PubMed

    Demons, Jamehl L; Duncan, Pamela W

    2014-01-01

    Falls threaten the ability of older adults to live independently in the community. Fortunately, national and state organizations have created tools that allow primary care providers to easily assess fall risk, and small changes in practice patterns can provide patients with the resources necessary to prevent falls, thus helping to reverse a costly, deadly epidemic. PMID:25237872

  16. Strangulation forensic examination: best practice for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Faugno, Diana; Waszak, Daria; Strack, Gael B; Brooks, Melodie Ann; Gwinn, Casey G

    2013-01-01

    Strangulation is one of the most dangerous forms of interpersonal violence (IVP), yet it is often not reported and missed by the health care provider because of lack of visible injury. The victim of strangulation can have critical injuries and a late onset symptoms. Victims of IVP should be directly asked whether they were choked or whether during the assault they felt like they could not breathe because of pressure on their neck. The objective of this article is to summarize "best practice" for health care providers so that they are better prepared to care for victims who report a history of strangulation. A summary of how to perform a forensic examination of the strangled patient is provided along with important documentation takeaways and useful forms to ensure that the severity of the strangulation is assessed, that critical injuries are identified, and that all injuries and findings are accurately documented for legal proceedings. PMID:24176831

  17. A tele-otology course for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Eikelboom, Robert H; Weber, Susanna; Atlas, Marcus D; Dinh, Quan; Mbao, Mathew N; Gallop, Mark A

    2003-01-01

    The shortage of otolaryngologists and the high incidence of ear disease in remote areas are major problems in Australia. We have developed a multimedia course for primary care providers that incorporates material about ear anatomy and physiology, ear disease, video-otoscopy and telemedicine software. The computer-based course was followed by a practical one-day course. A multiple-choice test was given to participants before and at the end of the course and a form was used to record feedback. The course was conducted with 30 aboriginal health workers. The participants were able to obtain images of reasonable to good quality after a short period of training. There was an average improvement of about 25% in the test scores, and the feedback regarding the course was extremely positive. The CD-ROM and the Website provide a valuable resource to assist primary care providers in their care of patients with ear disorders. PMID:14728751

  18. Guidelines for providing medical care to Southeast Asian refugees.

    PubMed

    Hoang, G N; Erickson, R V

    1982-08-13

    Almost 500,000 Southeast Asian refugees have arrived in the United States since 1975. While these refugees have not presented substantial public health problems, they have important personal health problems frequently requiring medical attention. Medical care providers in this country need to be aware of disease patterns and prevalence among these refugees. As well, they need to be aware of the cultural and religious backgrounds and previous medical practices of this refugee population, particularly as these practice influence the refugees' ability to obtain and maintain medical services provided in this country. Historical, cultural, religious, ethical, and medical information is provided to help US health care facilities develop culturally appropriate medical care services for Southeast Asian refugees. PMID:7097923

  19. Care providers' needs and perspectives on suffering and care in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Cambodia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Laura; Mollica, Richard F; Douglas Kelley, Susan; Tor, Svang; Halilovic, Majda

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study aimed to obtain insight into field-level care providers' views on suffering and healing as well as existing obstacles and needs related to providing care to their clients. This research provides a "snapshot" for a better understanding of existing care systems in two post-conflict settings. By identifying existing approaches to care and the needs of the care provider community, this research might be useful in guiding psychosocial assistance programming in post-conflict settings. Utilizing a semi-structured questionnaire, 45 care providers were interviewed, including local health care practitioners, traditional/ spiritual healers, and humanitarian relief workers, in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Cambodia. This study found that the majority of care providers in both settings perceived poverty and violence as significant causes and consequences of human suffering and, at the same time, felt ill-equipped in addressing these issues and related problems. Other issues that hindered these healers in providing care included: limited government/institutional support; lack of training; material resources and funding. Study findings point to a new framework for developing effective interventions and the need for further emphasis on supporting care providers in their work, and most specifically, in identifying and responding to poverty and violence. PMID:23331393

  20. Guide to providing mouth care for older people.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Susan; Preshaw, Philip

    2011-12-01

    The authors provide an overview of oral health, why it is important for older people and how poor oral health can affect nutritional status and quality of life. Practical advice is given on assessment of oral health; cleaning of natural teeth and dentures; and care of oral problems that commonly affect older people. An oral healthcare education session is recommended to provide hands-on advice to caregivers. The article is not intended as an exhaustive reference and the reader should always ask for professional dental advice and assistance if in doubt about any aspect of oral care. PMID:22256725

  1. The Journey from Babysitter to Child Care Professional: Military Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Dianne Miller

    2002-01-01

    Describes the transformation of women from babysitters to child care professionals as a result of becoming a family child care provider in the U.S. military Family Child Care (FCC) program. Discusses application process, orientation training, the use of peer mentors, initial setup, inspections, enrollment, caregiver training, and accreditation.…

  2. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  3. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients. PMID:26033108

  4. Transforming health care service delivery and provider selection.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2011-06-01

    Commoditization pressures in medicine have risked transforming service provider selection from "survival of the fittest" to "survival of the cheapest." Quality- and safety-oriented mandates by the Institute of Medicine have led to the creation of a number of data-driven quality-centric initiatives including Pay for Performance and Evidence-Based Medicine. A synergistic approach to creating quantitative accountability in medical service delivery is through the creation of consumer-oriented performance metrics which provide patients with objective data related to individual service provider quality, safety, cost-efficacy, efficiency, and customer service. These performance metrics could in turn be customized to the individual preferences and health care needs of each individual patient, thereby providing an objective methodology for service provider selection while empowering health care consumers. PMID:21468775

  5. Agents for change: nonphysician medical providers and health care quality.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Nathan A; Mcmillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization's quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts. PMID:25663213

  6. Private Companies Providing Health Care Price Data: Who Are They and What Information do They Provide?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Labno, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is interest in making health care price information more transparent given the increase in enrollment in high-deductible and consumer-directed health plans, and as policy efforts intensify to engage consumers to obtain high value care. We examine the role of private companies that market price transparency tools, primarily to self-insured employers – an important yet understudied topic. What companies exist? How did they emerge? What information do they provide? Where do they get that information? How does the price and quality information provided compare across companies? PMID:25678764

  7. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  8. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  9. Growing Healthy Bodies: Nutrition Education for Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viebrock, Margaret A.; Berry, Holly

    This booklet discusses the important role that day care providers can play in ensuring that children eat healthy snacks and meals and learn good eating habits. Section one of the booklet examines snack foods, discusses the difference between nutritious and less-nutritious snacks, and recommends snack foods appropriate for different age groups.…

  10. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  11. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  12. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  13. Infant Childrearing: Beliefs of Parents and Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Gwendolyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined differences in childrearing beliefs and changes in mothers' and fathers' beliefs over a six-month period. Results of Luster Parental Beliefs Survey and Personal Style Inventory indicated significant differences between mothers and fathers in beliefs about spoiling, and between mothers and care providers in beliefs about discipline.…

  14. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  15. Primary Care Providers' Views regarding Assessing and Treating Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ryan D.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) usually do not explore patient suicidality during routine visits. Factors that predict PCP attitudes toward the assessment and treatment of suicidality were examined via an online survey of 195 practicing PCPs affiliated with medical schools in the United States. PCPs who perceived themselves as competent to work with…

  16. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under State law; (3) Christian Science Practitioners listed with the First Church of Christ, Scientist... Science practitioner, an employee may not object to any requirement from an employer that the employee or... a health care provider other than a Christian Science practitioner except as otherwise...

  17. AIDS in Rural Areas: Challenges to Providing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined the development and provision of social services to persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and their families in rural areas and barriers to the delivery of care. Subjects (N=15) were persons who coordinated or provided services to AIDS victims. Found structural factors, confidentiality, fear of contagion, and homophobia…

  18. Michigan Day Care Provider Training Project, Year One: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Melissa G.; And Others

    A Title XX funded statewide training program offering 20 hours of instruction for 1,662 licensed center and home child care providers who served Title XX eligible children in Michigan was evaluated at the end of its first year of operation. The first three chapters of this evaluation report discuss (1) the history, philosophy, and goals of the…

  19. Provider workload and quality of care in primary care settings: moderating role of relational climate.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Benzer, Justin K; Young, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly under pressure to do more with fewer resources. We examined the effect of workload on patients' experiences of quality of care, measured through approximately 44,000 patient experience surveys in a sample of 222 primary care clinics in the Veterans Health Administration. We tested the extent to which relational climate, a measure of teamwork, moderated the relationship between workload and patient ratings of quality of care. Our outcome measures included patient complaints, time spent with provider, and overall visit quality. Workload was negatively associated with patients' quality of care ratings and relational climate moderated the relation between workload and quality of care ratings. Patients seen in clinics with higher workload and greater relational climate reported better care compared with patients in clinics with higher workload but lower relational climate. Findings highlight the importance of relational climate as an important teamwork factor when managing and developing clinic policies, practices, and procedures in resource-constrained settings. PMID:23222471

  20. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  1. Providing care to children in times of war.

    PubMed

    Cole, Will; Edwards, Mary J; Burnett, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    The Geneva Conventions stipulate that an occupying power must ensure adequate health care delivery to noncombatants. Special emphasis is given to children, who are among the most vulnerable in a conflict zone. Whether short-term pediatric care should be provided by Military Treatment Facilities to local nationals for conditions other than combat-related injury is controversial. A review of 1,197 children without traumatic injury cared for during 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan was conducted. Mortality rates were less than 1% among patients with surgical conditions and resource utilization was not excessive. In view of international humanitarian law and these outcomes, children with nontraumatic conditions can and should be considered for treatment at Military Treatment Facilities. The ability to correct the condition and availability of resources necessary to do so should be taken into account. PMID:26032375

  2. Monitoring Pesticides and Personal Care Chemicals in Water by Immunoassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the increasing number and quantity of organic pollutants, regulatory authorities require implementation of rapid, reliable, and cost-effective technologies for monitoring of water quality. Immunoassays provide a simple, powerful and inexpensive method for monitoring organic contaminants in bo...

  3. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  4. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  5. The ABCs of Safe and Healthy Child Care: A Handbook for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Cynthia M.; Polder, Jacquelyn A.

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining a safe and healthy child care setting, this manual for home or center child care providers contains information and guidelines to help providers maintain child health and reduce sickness and injuries. Part 1, "Introduction," describes how diseases are spread and how to prevent and prepare for unintentional…

  6. Psychology and primary care: New collaborations for providing effective care for adults with chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lawrence; Dickinson, W Perry

    2014-01-01

    The rapid transformation of primary care in the United States provides an opportunity for psychologists to become actively involved as integrated members of primary care teams in the provision of services for adults with chronic disease. The differences between primary care clinicians and psychologists with respect to education, culture, practice styles, reimbursement, and roles, however, pose notable barriers to effective integration. In this report we review models of collaboration, barriers to effective integration of services, and potential areas in which psychologists can make major contributions both to direct service delivery and to primary care practice, with special reference to the care of adults with chronic conditions. PMID:24820685

  7. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  8. Providing primary health care with non-physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1984-04-01

    The definition of primary health care is basically the same, but the wide variety of concepts as to the form and type of worker required is largely due to variations in economic, demographic, socio-cultural and political factors. Whatever form it takes, in many parts of the developing world, it is increasingly clear that primary health care must be provided by non-physicians. The reasons for this trend are compelling, yet it is surprisingly opposed by the medical profession in many a developing country. Nonetheless, numerous field trials are being conducted in a variety of situations in several countries around the world. Non-physician primary health care workers vary from medical assistants and nurse practitioners to aide-level workers called village mobilizers, village volunteers, village aides and a variety of other names. The functions, limitations and training of such workers will need to be defined, so that an optimal combination of skills, knowledge and attitudes best suited to produce the desired effect on local health problems may be attained. The supervision of such workers by the physician and other health professionals will need to be developed in the spirit of the health team. An example of the use of non-physicians in providing primary health care in Sarawak is outlined. PMID:6497324

  9. Are Primary Care Providers Prepared To Care For Breast Cancer Survivors In The Safety Net?

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron J.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Nguyen, David K.; Sacks, Greg D.; Clayton, Sheilah; Cope, Jacqueline; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the growing number of breast cancer survivors outpacing the capacity of oncology providers, there is pressure to transition patients back to primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) working in safety-net settings may have less experience treating survivors, and little is known about their knowledge and views on survivorship care. Objective To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and confidence of PCPs in the safety net at delivering care to breast cancer survivors. Participants A modified version of the National Cancer Institute’s Survey of Physician Attitudes Regarding Care of Cancer Survivors (SPARCCS) was given to providers at 2 county hospitals and 5 associated clinics (n=59). Focus groups were held to understand barriers to survivorship care. Results While most providers believed PCPs have the skills necessary to provide cancer-related follow-up, the vast majority were not comfortable providing these services themselves. Providers were adherent to American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for mammography (98%) and physical exam (87%); less than 1/3 were guideline-concordant for lab testing and only 6 providers (10%) met all recommendations. PCPs universally requested additional training on clinical guidelines and the provision of written survivorship care plans prior to transfer. Concerns voiced in qualitative sessions included unfamiliarity with the management of endocrine therapy and confusion regarding who would be responsible for certain aspects of care. Conclusion Safety-net providers currently lack knowledge and confidence at providing survivorship care to breast cancer patients. Opportunities exist for additional training in evidence-based guidelines and improved coordination of care between PCPs and oncology specialists. PMID:25536301

  10. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  11. Deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care for ethnic minority children: a qualitative assessment among care providers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma outcomes are generally worse for ethnic minority children. Cultural competence training is an instrument for improving healthcare for ethnic minority patients. To develop effective training, we explored the mechanisms in paediatric asthma care for ethnic minority patients that lead to deficiencies in the care process. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews on care for ethnic minority children with asthma (aged 4-10 years) with paediatricians (n = 13) and nurses (n = 3) in three hospitals. Interviews were analysed qualitatively with a framework method, using a cultural competence model. Results Respondents mentioned patient non-adherence as the central problem in asthma care. They related non-adherence in children from ethnic minority backgrounds to social context factors, difficulties in understanding the chronic nature of asthma, and parents’ language barriers. Reactions reported by respondents to patients’ non-adherence included retrieving additional information, providing biomedical information, occasionally providing referrals for social context issues, and using informal interpreters. Conclusions This study provides keys to improve the quality of specialist paediatric asthma care to ethnic minority children, mainly related to non-adherence. Care providers do not consciously recognise all the mechanisms that lead to deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care they provide to ethnic minority children (e.g. communicating mainly from a biomedical perspective and using mostly informal interpreters). Therefore, the learning objectives of cultural competence training should reflect issues that care providers are aware of as well as issues they are unaware of. PMID:22551452

  12. Vaccination campaigns in postsocialist Ukraine: health care providers navigating uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bazylevych, Maryna

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination anxieties grew into a public health issue during the 2008 failed measles and rubella immunization campaign in Ukraine. Here I explore how health care providers bend official immunization policies as they navigate media scares about vaccines, parents' anxieties, public health officials' insistence on the need for vaccination, and their own sense of expertise and authority. New hierarchies are currently being renegotiated, and I follow health care providers as they attempt to parcel out their new position in the Ukrainian society and beyond. Public health control is reframed in a postsocialist context as a condition of acceptance into the European community as a sanitary democracy, and a contestation point between citizens and state. I untangle how relationships between citizens and states shape the construction of medical risk. PMID:22338289

  13. Patients in acute care settings. Which health-care services are provided?

    PubMed

    Dugan, J; Mosel, L

    1992-07-01

    Studies have shown that early discharge planning, multidisciplinary care, and a focus on functional abilities for older adults do reduce acute care hospital readmissions. Of the 101 records reviewed of acute care admissions 75 years of age and older, 36 had no multidisciplinary service documented and 75 had no discharge planning documented within 48 hours of admission. Eleven functional activities were assessed and documented in one record with a range of 4 to 11 activities assessed in the remaining 100 documents. Identifying and filling gaps in care provided to this age group might provide substantial cost savings, improve care, and decrease complications. Advocacy, coordination of care, and greater knowledge may be keys to narrowing these service gaps. PMID:1629531

  14. Halogenated hydrocarbon pesticides and other volatile organic contaminants provide analytical challenges in global trading.

    PubMed

    Budnik, Lygia T; Fahrenholtz, Svea; Kloth, Stefan; Baur, Xaver

    2010-04-01

    Protection against infestation of a container cargo by alien species is achieved by mandatory fumigation with pesticides. Most of the effective fumigants are methyl and ethyl halide gases that are highly toxic and are a risk to both human health and the environment. There is a worldwide need for a reliable and robust analytical screening procedure for these volatile chemicals in a multitude of health and environmental scenarios. We have established a highly sensitive broad spectrum mass spectrometry method combined with thermal desorption gas chromatography to detect, identify and quantify volatile pesticide residues. Using this method, 1201 random ambient air samples taken from freight containers arriving at the biggest European ports of Hamburg and Rotterdam were analyzed over a period of two and a half years. This analytical procedure is a valuable strategy to measure air pollution from these hazardous chemicals, to help in the identification of pesticides in the new mixtures/formulations that are being adopted globally and to analyze expired breath samples after suspected intoxication in biomonitoring. PMID:20383375

  15. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  16. Treatment essentials and training for health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunil M.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of awareness among health care providers (HCPs) is one of the biggest challenges for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in India. Major challenges faced by HCPs include lack of awareness about the disease among general physicians and inadequately trained staff to deal with children with T1DM. The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is helping in overcoming these barriers faced by HCPs. CDiC provides treatment, monitoring tools, and education to children affected with T1DM and has been instrumental is developing various education and awareness tools. PMID:25941641

  17. Integrated transitional care: patient, informal caregiver and health care provider perspectives on care transitions for older persons with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Mairs, Katie; Hinton, Stephanie; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complex older adults, such as those with hip fracture, frequently require care from multiple professionals across a variety of settings. Integrated care both between providers and across settings is important to ensure care quality and patient safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the core factors related to poorly integrated care when hip fracture patients transition between care settings. Methods A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used to guide data collection and analysis. Patients, their informal caregivers and health care providers were interviewed and observed at each care transition. A total of 45 individual interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were coded and analysed to uncover emerging themes in the data. Results Four factors related to poorly integrated transitional care were identified: confusion with communication about care, unclear roles and responsibilities, diluted personal ownership over care, and role strain due to system constraints. Conclusions Our research supports a broader notion of collaborative practice that extends beyond specific care settings and includes an appropriate, informed role for patients and informal caregivers. This research can help guide system-level and setting-specific interventions designed to promote high-quality, patient-centred care during care transitions. PMID:22977426

  18. Payment system reform for health care providers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonman

    2003-03-01

    Since its introduction in 1977, the national health insurance programme in Korea has paid health care providers on a fee-for-service basis. Regulated fee-for-service payment has resulted in an increased volume and intensity of medical care. It has also distorted the input mix of treatment because physicians have substituted more profitable and uninsured (no coverage) medical services for those with lower margins, as is evidenced by the sharp increase in the caesarean delivery rate. This paper examines two recent supply-side reforms in Korea: Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) and Resource-based Relative Value (RBRV). Since 1997, through a pilot programme covering a selected group of diseases for voluntarily participating health care institutions, the DRG-based prospective payment system has proven to be effective in containing cost with little negative effect on quality. RBRV-based payment was implemented in 2001, but led to an almost uniform increase in fees for physician services without a mechanism to control the volume and expenditure. Challenges and future issues in the reform of the payment system in Korea include the expansion of benefit coverage, quality monitoring and improvement, strategic plans to overcome the strong opposition of providers and the introduction of global budgeting. PMID:12582111

  19. Dermatomyositis: a contemporary review for oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takako Imai; Geist, Shin-Mey Rose Y

    2012-11-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is an autoimmune muscle disorder characterized by skin rashes and progressive muscle weakness. This disease is a subset of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and affects both children and adults. Increased incidence of malignancy has been observed in adult DM, making early diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring crucial. In the past, limitations of these diagnostic criteria and classifications often made it difficult to identify the disease in the early stages. However, in recent years a new understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical features of DM has developed, which enables clinicians to distinguish DM from other autoimmune disorders and other subsets of IIM. Many signs and symptoms of DM involve the orofacial regions. This paper reviews and updates the disease process, orofacial manifestations, and dental considerations for patients with DM. Understanding new knowledge of DM helps oral health care providers coordinate care for patients with this disease. PMID:23036799

  20. Contraceptive choice and patient compliance. The health care provider's challenge.

    PubMed

    Branden, P S

    1998-01-01

    Contraceptive compliance is a multifaceted issue that is influenced by many factors. These factors can directly affect the level of patient compliance, thereby affecting contraceptive method efficacy rates. A review of the literature reveals many studies about contraceptive compliance but a dearth of studies addressing how to change noncompliant behaviors. This article describes the contraceptive methods currently available and their efficacy rates. Patient characteristics and the components of compliance are described as they affect contraceptive efficacy and patient care. Suggestions are made for the use of alternative terminology to include adherence to or continuance of a contraceptive method. Health care providers should realize the impact they can have on a patient's education, decision-making process, and ultimate compliance with a contraceptive method. It is the patient, however, who ultimately makes the decision, either actively or passively, to comply or not and whether to have an unplanned pregnancy. PMID:9871380

  1. Providing Orthopaedic Care for the Incarcerated: Obstacles and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sraj, Shafic A

    2016-09-01

    Scant information on healthcare delivery to inmates is available in the medical literature. Healthcare provision to inmates has different rules than that for the general population and presents particular challenges for orthopaedic surgeons because of the nature of this population and restrictions imposed by their confinement. This population is typically of a lower socioeconomic status and is less well educated, has accumulated injuries over a lifetime, and has a considerable prevalence of communicable and blood-borne diseases, along with a high prevalence of smoking and high-risk behavior, such as drug-seeking, abuse, and self-inflicted injury. These variables add levels of complexity of care, including the determination of medical necessity for orthopaedic referral, the logistics of transportation and follow-up, access to durable medical equipment and ancillary services, and the choices the orthopaedic provider must make to optimize care within these limitations. PMID:27479830

  2. A Framework for Fibromyalgia Management for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Lesley M.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Dunegan, L. Jean; Turk, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting. PMID:22560527

  3. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A Continuing Education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers’ practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence, intentions, and behaviors regarding depression management at three time points: immediately prior to the CE program (baseline), immediately after the CE program (posttest) and six-weeks after the CE program (follow-up). Results Ninety eight providers attended the CE program; 71 completed the baseline assessment; 66 completed the posttest assessment, and 37 completed the 6-week follow-up. Compared to baseline, at posttest providers reported significantly more favorable attitudes, fewer negative attitudes, greater confidence, and greater intention to address depression with their diabetes patients. At six weeks follow-up, there was a marginally significant increase in educating patients about depression, but no other depression management practices changed. Intention to change and confidence predicted some depression practice patterns at follow-up. Fewer barriers were a consistent predictor of depression practice patterns at follow-up. Discussion In the short-term, provider attitudes, confidence, and intentions to address depression with their patients improved. Intention, confidence, and especially barriers are important intervention targets. Lessons for Practice Depression is a common comorbidity of diabetes. Healthcare providers must be better prepared to manage depression in their diabetes patients. Educating health professionals is one approach to improving depression care. Healthcare systems must address barriers to providers’ efforts to manage depression. Continuing education programs should aim to enhance providers’ intentions, confidence, and skills to overcome barriers to addressing depression in clinical care. PMID

  4. Quality of Care Provided by a Comprehensive Dementia Care Comanagement Program.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Lee A; Tan, Zaldy; Wenger, Neil S; Cook, Erin A; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather E; Serrano, Katherine S; Roth, Carol P; Reuben, David B

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that quality of care for dementia in primary care is poor, with physician adherence to dementia quality indicators (QIs) ranging from 18% to 42%. In response, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Health System created the UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care (ADC) Program, a quality improvement program that uses a comanagement model with nurse practitioner dementia care managers (DCM) working with primary care physicians and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive dementia care. The objective was to measure the quality of dementia care that nurse practitioner DCMs provide using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE-3) and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement QIs. Participants included 797 community-dwelling adults with dementia referred to the UCLA ADC program over a 2-year period. UCLA is an urban academic medical center with primarily fee-for-service reimbursement. The percentage of recommended care received for 17 dementia QIs was measured. The primary outcome was aggregate quality of care for the UCLA ADC cohort, calculated as the total number of recommended care processes received divided by the total number of eligible quality indicators. Secondary outcomes included aggregate quality of care in three domains of dementia care: assessment and screening (7 QIs), treatment (6 QIs), and counseling (4 QIs). QIs were abstracted from DCM notes over a 3-month period from date of initial assessment. Individuals were eligible for 9,895 QIs, of which 92% were passed. Overall pass rates of DCMs were similar (90-96%). All counseling and assessment QIs had pass rates greater than 80%, with most exceeding 90%. Wider variation in adherence was found among QIs addressing treatments for dementia, which patient-specific criteria triggered, ranging from 27% for discontinuation of medications associated with mental status changes to 86% for discussion about acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Comprehensive

  5. Responding to health care reform: how managed health care providers can manage major change overload.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, J J

    1994-02-01

    Multiple pressures for clinical, administrative, economical, and political change face providers today. To cope with a changing society and health care delivery system, change management skills have become essential for survival. However, implementing and managing organizational change demands a level of expertise that is, unfortunately, not readily found in many managed health care organizations. In this article, the author addresses the importance for providers to understand the process of change implementation. PMID:10132445

  6. Ranked motives of long-term care providing family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, Deirdre; Tellings, Agnes; Gelissen, John; Garretsen, Henk; Bongers, Inge

    2008-03-01

    Family caregivers provide long-term care to their chronically ill loved ones and as a consequence they experience physical, relational and financial problems. This study investigates how long-term family caregivers rank 12 motives for caregiving. Motives are derived from the views of four philosophical anthropologists and are related to self-reported stress and joy and to several different background characteristics of respondents. Motives that focus on feelings concerning the relationship between caregiver and care recipient are more popular as a first choice than motives stemming from feelings of obligation or a general feeling of happiness and are also more popular than more self-directed motives. An analysis of full ranking data shows that two groups can be distinguished, one group of family caregivers with mixed motives and one group of family caregivers with motives that focus on reciprocal mutually equal relationships. The latter are mainly women taking care for a partner or a child, the former report high levels of stress. Implications for intervention programmes and health policy are being discussed. PMID:18269420

  7. A primer on EVA for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Grant, James L

    2007-01-01

    Unlike accounting earnings, economic profit (EVA) is a measure of a company's true earnings because it fully "accounts" for the costs of all forms of financing, including debt and equity. In the EVA view, a company is not truly profitable unless it earns a return on capital that bests the opportunity cost of capital. That being said, the question addressed here is how to measure the economic profit of providers in the health care sector, which is largely comprised of not-for-profit organizations such as clinics, laboratories, and hospitals. PMID:19175230

  8. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  9. High and rising health care costs. Part 3: the role of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2005-06-21

    One commonly held explanation for high and rising health care costs in the United States points to the market power of health care providers. This third article of a 4-part series examines how the prices and quantities of health care services interact to influence health care expenditures. The article also reviews cost-containment strategies that are designed to reduce prices and quantities of services. One major difference between the costs of care in the United States and those in other developed nations is the price per unit of care--physician fees, payments per hospital day, and pharmaceutical prices. Greater quantities of high-priced innovative technologies in the United States also contribute to higher expenditures in the United States compared with other nations. During the 1990s, payers were partially successful in slowing cost growth by reducing the prices of physician and hospital payments, but more recently, hospitals increased their market power by consolidation and could demand higher prices. Quantities and costs of services for Medicare beneficiaries vary markedly among geographic regions, with research showing an association between health care costs and the supply of hospital beds and specialist physicians. These findings suggest that limiting the supply of resources may reduce the quantity, and thereby the costs, of health services. Shifting the financial risk of health care costs from insurers to providers, as has been done with the Medicare diagnosis-related-group payment and capitation reimbursement, can also be effective in containing costs. PMID:15968014

  10. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  11. Provider and clinic cultural competence in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-03-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  12. Provider and Clinic Cultural Competence in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA. completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  13. Improving education and resources for health care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, M; Welch, L

    1993-01-01

    Workers and citizens are turning increasingly to the health care system for information about occupational and environmental reproductive hazards, yet most primary care providers and specialists know little about the effects of occupational/environmental toxicants on the reproductive system or how to evaluate and manage patients at potential risk. Although it is unrealistic to expect all clinicians to become experts in this area, practitioners should know how to take a basic screening history, identify patients at potential risk, and make appropriate referrals. At present, occupational and environmental health issues are not well integrated into health professional education in the United States, and clinical information and referral resources pertaining to reproductive hazards are inadequate. In addressing these problems, the conference "Working Group on Health Provider Education and Resources" made several recommendations that are detailed in this report. Short-term goals include enhancement of existing expertise and resources at a regional level and better integration of information on occupational/environmental reproductive hazards into curricula, meetings, and publications of medical and nursing organizations. Longer term goals include development of a comprehensive, single-access information and referral system for clinicians and integration of occupational and environmental medicine into formal health professional education curricula at all levels. PMID:8243391

  14. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome: review for the obstetric care provider.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Julie My; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2013-10-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. In this article, we review risk factors that may predispose infants to increased vulnerability. Maternal characteristics, including nonmodifiable and modifiable factors, antenatal medical conditions, labor and delivery events, and infant characteristics, are reviewed, with the purpose of helping obstetric care providers target risk reduction efforts. We have reviewed over 85 case-control, retrospective, and prospective cohort studies published between 1975 and 2011. Major modifiable risk factors include maternal and paternal smoking, drug use, alcohol use, and insufficient prenatal care. Infants at increased risk include males, premature infants, infants of low birth weight or growth-restricted infants, and infants in multiple gestations. By targeting modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors, it may be possible to decrease the incidence of SIDS. Efforts should be put on decreasing high-risk behaviors and encouraging sufficient antenatal follow-up. In view of recent increases in ethnic and social disparity with SIDS, it is essential that risk reduction guidelines, which have recently been expanded by the American Association of Pediatrics, be explained in a culturally sensitive manner. PMID:23292938

  16. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care...

  17. Chinese health care providers' attitudes about HIV: a review.

    PubMed

    Webber, G C

    2007-05-01

    China has one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in the world with an increase in reported cases of about 30% yearly (UNAIDS, 2004). As the epidemic has grown, there have been several studies of health care provider attitudes towards HIV in China over the last 15 years. While attitudes have evolved, misconceptions about transmission of HIV, low levels of support for people living with HIV/AIDS and stigmatized groups, and a poor understanding of the importance of condoms in HIV prevention, remain. The studies are limited by a weakness of survey instruments and an absence of focus on the gendered nature of the HIV epidemic. Recommendations for future research in this area include development of a theoretical base, consideration of gender and stigma, and incorporation of these issues into the survey instruments. PMID:17505931

  18. Cost-accounting techniques for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Pelfrey, S

    1995-12-01

    The author reviews cost-accounting techniques and systems used by manufacturing companies. Some of the concepts and techniques used by for-profit companies can be implemented for health care institutions. Nurse executives can learn many lessons in product cost accounting from these for-profit companies. Understanding the various cost-accounting methodologies and techniques that are available can help nurse executives design, implement, and use a cost accounting system that will identify the costs associated with products and services provided. The author also reviews and explains standard costing systems. These systems can serve as valuable tools for budgeting, evaluating, and controlling departmental costs. When used in these instances, they can prove useful, and they furnish important information that is necessary for pricing products, determining alternatives or substitute services, and controlling costs. PMID:10153619

  19. Vietnamese Health Care Providers' Preferences Regarding Recommendation of HPV Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Kremers, Walter K; Ngo, Quang V; Nguyen, Nguyen V; Barenberg, Benjamin J; Tran, Vinh D; Dinh, Tri A

    2015-01-01

    Physician recommendation is an important predictor of HPV vaccine acceptance; however, physician willingness and preferences regarding HPV vaccination may be influenced by factors including patient age, vaccine type, and cost. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers in Da Nang, Vietnam, to evaluate awareness, perceptions about HPV and HPV vaccines, and willingness to vaccinate a female patient. Willingness to vaccinate was evaluated using a full-factorial presentation of scenarios featuring the following factors: vaccine cost (free vs 1,000,000 VND), patient age (12, 16, or 22 years), and HPV vaccine type (bivalent vs quadrivalent). Responses from 244 providers were analyzed; providers had a mean age of 34±11.9 years; a majority were female, married, and had children of their own. Thirty-six percent specialized in obstetrics/gynecology and 24% were providers in family medicine. Of the three factors considered in conjoint analysis, vaccine cost was the most important factor in willingness to vaccinate, followed by patient age, and vaccine type. The most favorable scenario for vaccinating a female patient was when the vaccine was free, the patient was 22 years of age, and the HPV4 vaccine was described. In multivariable analysis, older age, being a physician, being married, and having children were all associated with increased willingness to recommend HPV vaccination (p<0.05). Provider willingness is an important aspect of successful HPV vaccination programs; identifying preferences and biases in recommendation patterns will highlight potential areas for education and intervention. PMID:26163611

  20. Care of nestlings by wild female starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Powell, G.V.N.; McChesney, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    (1) Our objective was to determine the effect of exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (OP), dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-scrotonamide dimethyl phosphate), on care of nestlings by wild female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)....(2) We selected twelve pairs of active nests based on synchrony in the reproductive cycle. When nestlings were 10 days old (day 10), adult males were captured and killed and brood size was adjusted to four. The frequency and temporal distribution of sorties made by each pair of females to feed their young were recorded for 2 h at 18.00 hours on day 11 and 06.00 hours on day 12. One female from each pair was given a single oral dose of dicrotophos (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) dissolved in corn oil; the second female received an equivalent exposure of pure corn oil. Birds were released and their nestlings weighed. Parental care was again monitored between 18.00 and 20.00 hours on day 12 and 06.00 and 08.00 hours on day 13. Females were then captured and they with their young were weighed and killed. Changes in parental care in OP-dosed and control females were compared using paired t-tests. ....(3) The OP-dosed females made significantly (P < 0.5) fewer sorties to feed their young and remained away from their boxes for longer periods of time than controls. Nestlings of OP-treated females lost significantly more weight (X = 9.3%) than nestlings of controls (X = 3.2%). Brain ChE activity in OP-treated females was inhibited an average of 50.7% compared with controls. Weight changes in OP-dosed (X = -8.9%) and control females (X = -8.3%) were similar.....(4) Results indicate that parental care may be significantly reduced in songbirds receiving severe but sublethal exposure to organophosphate pesticides. The potential for a reduction or modification in parental care to alter reproductive success in passerines is discussed..... (5) Techniques utilized, or modifications thereof, may be useful in collecting the additional data needed to

  1. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Crul, B J; van Weel, C

    2001-10-20

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally ill patients with a progressive fatal disease, especially cancer patients. Due to increasing national and international criticism of both the practice of euthanasia (assumed to be too liberal) and the lack of attention devoted to structured palliative care in the Netherlands, the Dutch government decided to improve the structure of palliative care. The government's viewpoint is based on the assumption that good palliative care that includes adequate pain control benefits patient care and might eventually lead to fewer requests for euthanasia. The improvements to palliative care should be realised by means of improvements in the structure, training and knowledge. Six academic medical clusters have been designated as Centres for the Development of Palliative Care (Dutch acronym: COPZ) for a 5-year period. Each COPZ must develop the various aspects needed to improve palliative care within the region it serves and ensure that its activities are carefully coordinated with those in the other centres. Research will focus on measuring the efficacy of palliative care as well as ethical and epidemiological aspects. A government committee will assess the appropriateness of the activities undertaken by each of the centres. PMID:11695096

  2. Pregnant at work: time for prenatal care providers to act.

    PubMed

    Karkowsky, Chavi Eve; Morris, Liz

    2016-09-01

    Fifty years ago, when a woman became pregnant, she was expected to stop working. Today, however, most women who work are the primary, sole, or co-breadwinner for their families, and their earnings during pregnancy are often essential to their families' economic well-being. Medical data about working during pregnancy are sparse but generally show that both low-risk and high-risk women can tolerate work-related duties well, although some work accommodations (eg, providing a chair for sitting, allowing snacks, or modifying the work schedule) may be necessary. However, some employers refuse to accommodate pregnant women who need adjustments. This can result in a woman being forced to make the choice between working without accommodations and losing her income and health insurance or even her job. Prenatal care providers can play an important role by implementing changes in their own practice, shaping public policy, and conducting research to increase protections for pregnant women and to ensure that they receive medically recommended accommodations while continuing to earn income for their growing families. PMID:27255471

  3. Transitions: A Guide to Teens Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Guide to Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers (HCP’s) Posted under Health Guides . Updated 8 ... help me plan my transition to adult health care? Your pediatrician or other health care provider Your ...

  4. Reframing Conscientious Care: Providing Abortion Care When Law and Conscience Collide.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara; Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    Much of the debate on conscience has addressed the ethics of refusal: the rights of providers to refuse to perform procedures to which they object and the interests of the patients who might be harmed by their refusals. But conscience can also be a positive force, grounding decision about offering care. PMID:27120281

  5. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  6. From Triple to Quadruple Aim: Care of the Patient Requires Care of the Provider

    PubMed Central

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Sinsky, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Triple Aim—enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs—is widely accepted as a compass to optimize health system performance. Yet physicians and other members of the health care workforce report widespread burnout and dissatisfaction. Burnout is associated with lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes, and it may increase costs. Burnout thus imperils the Triple Aim. This article recommends that the Triple Aim be expanded to a Quadruple Aim, adding the goal of improving the work life of health care providers, including clinicians and staff. PMID:25384822

  7. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine for children's asthma: satisfaction, care provider responsiveness, and networks of care.

    PubMed

    Freidin, Betina; Timmermans, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We explain why some caretakers opt for alternative medicine for the treatment of children's asthma whereas others do not. In the past 15 years, asthma care has been standardized, with clinical practice guidelines centered on advanced pharmacological regimes. Clinicians argue that with proper biomedical treatment and environmental control, asthma should be a manageable chronic disease. Yet many patients forego available pharmacological treatments for alternative medicine or complement prescribed drugs with unconventional treatments. On the basis of open-ended, in-depth qualitative interviews with 50 mothers of children with asthma, we argue that the experience with biomedical treatments, social influence in mother's network of care, concerns about adverse and long-term effects, health care providers' responsiveness to such concerns, and familiarity with alternative treatments explain why some families rely on alternative medicine and others do not. PMID:18174534

  9. Challenges of Providing Confidential Care to Adolescents in Urban Primary Care: Clinician Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M. Diane; Rubin, Susan E.; Campos, Giselle; O’Sullivan, Lucia F.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinician time alone with an adolescent has a major impact on disclosure of risk behavior. This study sought to describe primary care clinicians’ patterns of delivering time alone, decision making about introducing time alone to adolescents and their parents, and experiences delivering confidential services. METHODS We undertook qualitative interviews with 18 primary care clinicians in urban health centers staffed by specialists in pediatrics, family medicine, and adolescent medicine. RESULTS The annual preventive care visit is the primary context for provision of time alone with adolescents; clinicians consider the parent-child dynamic and the nature of the chief complaint for including time alone during visits for other than preventive care. Time constraints are a major barrier to offering time alone more frequently. Clinicians perceive that parental discomfort with time alone is rare. Many clinicians wrestle with internal conflict about providing confidential services to adolescents with serious health threats and regard their role as facilitating adolescent-parent communication. Health systems factors can interfere with delivery of confidential services, such as inconsistent procedures for determining whether unaccompanied youth would be seen. CONCLUSION Despite competing time demands, clinicians report commitment to offering time alone during preventive care visits and infrequently offer it at other times. Experienced clinicians can gain skills in the art of managing complex relationships between adolescents and their parents. Office systems should be developed that enhance the consistency of delivery of confidential services. PMID:21242559

  10. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland. PMID:27610908

  11. Derivative financial instruments and nonprofit health care providers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Louis J; Owhoso, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the extent of derivative financial instrument use among US nonprofit health systems and the impact of these financial instruments on their cash flows, reported operating results, and financial risks. Our examination is conducted through a case study of New Jersey hospitals and health systems. We review the existing literature on interest rate derivative instruments and US hospitals and health systems. This literature describes the design of these derivative financial instruments and the theoretical benefits of their use by large health care provider organizations. Our contribution to the literature is to provide an empirical evaluation of derivative financial instruments usage among a geographically limited sample of US nonprofit health systems. We reviewed the audited financial statements of the 49 community hospitals and multi-hospital health systems operating in the state of New Jersey. We found that 8 percent of New Jersey's nonprofit health providers utilized interest rate derivatives with an aggregate principle value of $229 million. These derivative users combine interest rate swaps and caps to lower the effective interest costs of their long-term debt while limiting their exposure to future interest rate increases. In addition, while derivative assets and liabilities have an immaterial balance sheet impact, derivative related gains and losses are a material component of their reported operating results. We also found that derivative usage among these four health systems was responsible for generating positive cash flows in the range of 1 percent to 2 percent of their total 2001 cash flows from operations. As a result of our admittedly limited samples we conclude that interest rate swaps and caps are effective risk management tools. However, we also found that while these derivative financial instruments are useful hedges against the risks of issuing long-term financing instruments, they also expose derivative users to credit, contract

  12. Women and managed care: satisfaction with provider choice, access to care, plan costs and coverage.

    PubMed

    Wyn, R; Collins, K S; Brown, E R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on differences in satisfaction with provider choice, access to care, and plan costs and coverage between women enrolled in fee-for-service and those in managed car plans. It also examines differences in satisfaction, access, and costs and coverage between higher and lower income women and between those in reported fair or poor health and those in excellent or good health, among women in managed care plans. The data for this study are from The Commonwealth Fund's 1994 Managed Care Survey, which included 1,544 women with employer- or union-sponsored insurance in Boston, Los Angeles, and Miami. The study found that women in managed care were less satisfied with provider choice and access to services, but more satisfied with out-of-pocket costs for services and the range of services covered. Both low-income women and those in fair to poor health reported more problems with access barriers than did either higher income women or those in excellent or good health. PMID:9127994

  13. The Impact of Technology on Patients, Providers, and Care Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagerhaugh, Shizuko; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examines the problems technical innovation has brought to health care professionals, administrators, and patients from the standpoints of increased specialization, equipment obsolescence, bureaucracy, retraining, regulations, high costs of services, depersonalization, and ethical dilemmas. (CT)

  14. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  15. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the availability of the Model Health Care...

  16. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care...

  17. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care...

  18. Making It Happen: Training health-care providers in emergency obstetric and newborn care.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Charles A; van den Broek, Nynke

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 289,000 maternal deaths, 2.6 million stillbirths and 2.4 million newborn deaths occur globally each year, with the majority occurring around the time of childbirth. The medical and surgical interventions to prevent this loss of life are known, and most maternal and newborn deaths are in principle preventable. There is a need to build the capacity of health-care providers to recognize and manage complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the post-partum period. Skills-and-drills competency-based training in skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and early newborn care (EmONC) is an approach that is successful in improving knowledge and skills. There is emerging evidence of this resulting in improved availability and quality of care. To evaluate the effectiveness of EmONC training, operational research using an adapted Kirkpatrick framework and a theory of change approach is needed. The Making It Happen programme is an example of this. PMID:25911056

  19. Creating a safer workplace to provide quality care.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J C

    2001-04-01

    In recent years, increasing interest has been placed on how health care workers can be trained and equipped to better protect them from possible workplace accidents and injuries while improving the care they deliver. Better workplace safety also means better customer and employee satisfaction, improved workforce retention and recruitment, and cost savings. Workplace safety is constantly evolving and addresses a whole host of issues ranging from needles and sharps injuries to moving patients to human factor analyses. This issue takes a cross-sectional look at how hospitals and health systems are addressing problem areas--and sharing information and best practices--to strengthen their quality of care at the workplace level. PMID:11330227

  20. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Your Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ... is designed to help you talk with your health care provider(s) about your complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) ...

  1. Training Staff To Provide Developmentally Appropriate Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazier, R. Elaine

    The director of a proprietary child care center implemented a practicum designed to train child caregivers in child development and developmentally appropriate practices. The practicum consisted of three evening workshops and used supplementary reading materials, discussion groups, classroom observations, and individual conferences. After…

  2. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCHS Publications and Electronic Media Errata List Listservs Data and Statistics Data Visualization Gallery FastStats MMWR QuickStats ... care, other nonsurgical procedures, and other surgical procedures. Data sources and methods All estimates are from NAMCS— ...

  3. Effects of Guided Care on Providers' Satisfaction with Care: A Three-Year Matched-Pair Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yea-Jen; Wen, Mei; Wolff, Jennifer; Frick, Kevin; Reider, Lisa; Scharfstein, Daniel; Boyd, Cynthia; Leff, Bruce; Schwartz, Lindsay; Karm, Lya; Boult, Chad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract It is important to understand the effects of a new care model on health professionals' satisfaction, which may help inform organizations' decisions regarding the adoption of the model. This study evaluates the effect of the Guided Care model of primary care on physicians', Guided Care Nurses' and practice staff satisfaction with processes of care for chronically ill older patients. In Guided Care, a specially educated registered nurse works with 2–5 primary care physicians, performing 8 clinical activities for 50–60 chronically ill older patients. This model was tested in a 3-year matched-pair cluster-randomized controlled trial with 14 pods (teams of physicians and staff) randomly assigned, within pairs, to provide Guided Care or usual care. Physicians and Guided Care Nurses were surveyed at baseline and annually for 3 years. Staff were surveyed at baseline and 2 years later. Physicians' satisfaction with chronic care processes, knowledge of patients, and care coordination were measured, as well as Guided Care Nurses' satisfaction with chronic care processes and staff perceptions of quality of care. Findings suggest that Guided Care improved physician satisfaction with patient/family communication and management of chronic care, and it may bolster staff beliefs that care is patient oriented. Differences in other aspects of care were not statistically significant. (Population Health Management 2013;16:317–325) PMID:23560515

  4. Training Programs for Family Child Care Providers: An Analysis of Ten Curricula. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy

    This report analyzes the following 10 curricula for training programs for family child care providers: (1) Child Care, a family day home care provider program developed by Texas A&M's Agricultural Extension Service; (2) the Family Day Care Education Series, a coordinated resource manual and independent study course, the Active Learning Series, and…

  5. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy…

  6. Are we providing the best possible care for dementia patients?

    PubMed

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Chen, Kathryn; Borson, Soo

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare for patients with dementia is often reactive, poorly organized and fragmented. We discuss opportunities for improvements in the care of individuals living with dementia at home that can be implemented by physicians in their practices today. In particular, we argue that systematic identification and diagnosis of cognitive impairment and dementia in their early stages, coupled with a coherent, evidence-informed management framework, would benefit patients with dementia substantially and ease the burden of their caregivers. We emphasize that dementia influences all aspects of patient care, and each medical decision must be passed through the filter of knowledge that patients with dementia have special needs that can be identified and addressed. PMID:26107320

  7. Uncompensated care provided by private practice physicians in Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, K E; Miller, M K; Dwyer, J W; Nissen, D

    1991-01-01

    While a great deal of attention has been paid in recent years to establishing the magnitude and characteristics of uncompensated care in hospitals, comparatively little research has been undertaken to study physician uncompensated care. This article reports the results of a prospective patient-specific study of uncompensated care in Florida. Of 4,042 cases examined, 26.2 percent had charges voluntarily reduced below the usual and customary charge at the time of service. However, only 13.5 percent of those reductions were attributed to charity. Overall, 10.4 percent of the total billed amount was left unresolved. When payment source was considered, it was found that self-pay patients accounted for 30.6 percent of the cases but accounted for 52.0 percent of the unresolved amounts. Further analysis indicated that the self-pay patients were 35.5 times more likely to leave an outstanding balance than individuals with some type of insurance coverage. Odds of unresolved balances were also calculated as a function of income, specialty type, practice size, and type of visit. PMID:1669686

  8. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  9. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  10. Family Child Care Providers' Perspectives regarding Effective Professional Development and Their Role in the Child Care System: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines family child care providers' perspectives regarding effective professional development and their role in the early learning and care system. Four focus groups were conducted annually for 3 years involving a total of 54 licensed family child care providers. Supportive social relationships emerged as an important dimension of…

  11. Transition Planning for Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs and Disabilities: A Guide for Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephanie; Freeman, Linda; Griffin, Lynne Reeves

    Designed for Massachusetts health care providers, this booklet provides information on transition planning for adolescents with special health care needs and disabilities. It includes resources and strategies to guide interventions with families and to focus their attention on four key facets of adulthood: health care, education, employment, and…

  12. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  13. Primary care professionals providing non-urgent care in hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Jaspreet K; Flodgren, Gerd; Perera, Rafael; Rowe, Brian H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries emergency departments (EDs) are facing an increase in demand for services, long-waits and severe crowding. One response to mitigate overcrowding has been to provide primary care services alongside or within hospital EDs for patients with non-urgent problems. It is not known, however, how this impacts the quality of patient care, the utilisation of hospital resources, or if it is cost-effective. Objectives To assess the effects of locating primary care professionals in the hospital ED to provide care for patients with non-urgent health problems, compared with care provided by regular Emergency Physicians (EPs), Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialized register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane library, 2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to March 21 2012); EMBASE (1980 to April 28 2011); CINAHL (1980 to April 28 2011); PsychINFO (1967 to April 28 2011); Sociological Abstracts (1952 to April 28 2011); ASSIA (1987 to April 28 2011); SSSCI (1945 to April 28 2011); HMIC (1979 to April 28 2011), sources of unpublished literature, reference lists of included papers and relevant systematic reviews. We contacted experts in the field for any published or unpublished studies, and hand searched ED conference abstracts from the last three years. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, non-randomised studies, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies that evaluated the effectiveness of introducing primary care professionals to hospital EDs to attend to non-urgent patients, as compared to the care provided by regular EPs. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for each included study. We contacted authors of included studies to obtain additional data. Dichotomous outcomes are presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous

  14. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... THE HIPAA P RIVACY R ULE : When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved In Your Care U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • Office ...

  15. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of ...

  16. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose precocious puberty & delayed puberty? Skip sharing ... and analyzing his or her medical history, a health care provider may perform tests to diagnose precocious puberty, ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip ... social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider should check a pregnant woman's blood pressure ...

  19. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  20. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... you do? Always ask your provider what your cholesterol numbers are and write them down. Discuss these ... provider may prescribe medicine to help lower your cholesterol. y y Take your medicine every day, or ...

  1. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care.

    PubMed

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-12-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties. PMID:14645743

  2. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  3. 76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Care Providers AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: The Office of Refugee... Shelter Care Providers. CFDA Number: 93.676. Statutory Authority: Awards announced in this notice are... supplement grants to seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total of $5,016,218....

  4. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  5. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of and Experiences with an Integrated Healthcare Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westheimer, Joshua M.; Steinley-Bumgarner, Michelle; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined the experiences of primary care providers participating in an integrated healthcare service between mental health and primary care in a university health center. In this program, behavioral health providers work collaboratively with primary care providers in the treatment of students. Participants…

  6. Virtual Dementia Tour helps sensitize health care providers.

    PubMed

    Beville, P K

    2002-01-01

    A review of the literature on sensitivity training among caregivers for the elderly revealed that no programs focused specifically on the cognitive changes that occur due to aging. Second Wind Dreams, a national nonprofit organization committed to improving society's perception of aging, conducted a study in which degenerative physical symptoms common for this population, such as impaired vision and motor skills, were simulated in a group of 146 subjects who worked in the field of elder care to give them a broader sense of the patient's perspective. Overwhelmingly, participants in the study came away with heightened awareness of the plight of confused elders and a strong sense that the high behavioral expectations caregivers have for dementia patients are unrealistic and need to change. PMID:12083349

  7. Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer.

    PubMed

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2010-04-01

    The multi-billion dollar organic food industry is fueled by consumer perception that organic food is healthier (greater nutritional value and fewer toxic chemicals). Studies of the nutrient content in organic foods vary in results due to differences in the ground cover and maturity of the organic farming operation. Nutrient content also varies from farmer to farmer and year to year. However, reviews of multiple studies show that organic varieties do provide significantly greater levels of vitamin C, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus than non-organic varieties of the same foods. While being higher in these nutrients, they are also significantly lower in nitrates and pesticide residues. In addition, with the exception of wheat, oats, and wine, organic foods typically provide greater levels of a number of important antioxidant phytochemicals (anthocyanins, flavonoids, and carotenoids). Although in vitro studies of organic fruits and vegetables consistently demonstrate that organic foods have greater antioxidant activity, are more potent suppressors of the mutagenic action of toxic compounds, and inhibit the proliferation of certain cancer cell lines, in vivo studies of antioxidant activity in humans have failed to demonstrate additional benefit. Clear health benefits from consuming organic dairy products have been demonstrated in regard to allergic dermatitis. PMID:20359265

  8. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  9. Child Care for Children with and without Disabilities: The Provider, Observer, and Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Lisa; Peterson, Carla A.; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2006-01-01

    This three-phase study, part of a larger study conducted by the Midwest Child Care Research Consortium (MCCRC), investigated the characteristics of child care providers in inclusive and non-inclusive center-based classrooms and family child care homes, the observed quality of care in a subset of these programs, and families' perceptions of quality…

  10. A pilot study: Reiki for self-care of nurses and healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Brathovde, Angela

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Reiki energy therapy, level I, was taught as a self-care practice to healthcare providers, would their caring perceptions change? Methodological triangulation technique, including a self-report caring scale and interviews, was used, demonstrating positive changes in perceptions of participants' caring behaviors. PMID:16518156

  11. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  12. Substitute Care Providers: Helping Abused and Neglected Children. The User Manual Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kenneth

    This manual for child welfare staff and foster/adoptive parents is intended to provide guidelines for serving abused and neglected children who are in family foster care and adoption. The first section is on substitute care and permanency planning and offers an historical perspective on substitute care and definitions of family foster care and…

  13. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Mkenda, Prisila; Mwanauta, Regina; Stevenson, Philip C; Ndakidemi, Patrick; Mtei, Kelvin; Belmain, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders). Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin) and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A). Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides. PMID:26599609

  14. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Mkenda, Prisila; Mwanauta, Regina; Stevenson, Philip C.; Ndakidemi, Patrick; Mtei, Kelvin; Belmain, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders). Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin) and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A). Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides. PMID:26599609

  15. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study)

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients’ needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Design Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers’ views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. Participants 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Results Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an ‘ideal’ model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a ‘real’ model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants’ ‘ideal’ model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, ‘real’ care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients’ needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Conclusions Service providers envisage an ‘ideal’ model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap

  16. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... mean? Blood pressure is measured by two numbers. systolic pressure 120 80 diastolic pressure Your provider will ... 120 over 80” The first (or top) number—“systolic”—is the pressure in your blood vessels when ...

  17. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication. PMID:21328212

  18. Benchmarking facilities providing care: An international overview of initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Thonon, Frédérique; Watson, Jonathan; Saghatchian, Mahasti

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review of existing benchmarking projects of health facilities to explore (1) the rationales for those projects, (2) the motivation for health facilities to participate, (3) the indicators used and (4) the success and threat factors linked to those projects. We studied both peer-reviewed and grey literature. We examined 23 benchmarking projects of different medical specialities. The majority of projects used a mix of structure, process and outcome indicators. For some projects, participants had a direct or indirect financial incentive to participate (such as reimbursement by Medicaid/Medicare or litigation costs related to quality of care). A positive impact was reported for most projects, mainly in terms of improvement of practice and adoption of guidelines and, to a lesser extent, improvement in communication. Only 1 project reported positive impact in terms of clinical outcomes. Success factors and threats are linked to both the benchmarking process (such as organisation of meetings, link with existing projects) and indicators used (such as adjustment for diagnostic-related groups). The results of this review will help coordinators of a benchmarking project to set it up successfully. PMID:26770800

  19. Survival Strategies for Michigan's Health Care Safety Net Providers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Peter D; Dalton, Vanessa K; Berson-Grand, Julie; Weisman, Carol S

    2005-01-01

    Objective To understand key adaptive strategies considered by health care safety net organizations serving uninsured and underinsured populations in Michigan. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected through interviews at community-based free clinics, family planning clinics, local public health departments, and Federally Qualified Health Centers from 2002 to 2003. Research Design In each of six service areas in Michigan, we conducted a multiple-site case study of the four organizations noted above. We conducted interviews with the administrator, the medical or clinical director, the financial or marketing director, and a member of the board of directors. We interviewed 74 respondents at 20 organizations. Principal Findings Organizations perceive that unmet need is expanding faster than organizational capacity; organizations are unable to keep up with demand. Other threats to survival include a sicker patient population and difficulty in retaining staff (particularly nurses). Most clinics are adopting explicit business strategies to survive. To maintain financial viability, clinics are: considering or implementing fees; recruiting insured patients; expanding fundraising activities; reducing services; or turning away patients. Collaborative strategies, such as partnerships with hospitals, have been difficult to implement. Clinics are struggling with how to define their mission given the environment and threats to survival. Conclusions Adaptive strategies remain a work in progress, but will not be sufficient to respond to increasing service demands. Increased federal funding, or, ideally, a national health insurance program, may be the only viable option for expanding organizational capacity. PMID:15960698

  20. PESTICIDE INFORMATION NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Information Network (PIN) is an interactive database containing information about pesticides. PIN is a free service offered by the USEPAs Office of Pesticide Programs which provides contacts on pesticide issues, has a bulletin board network for public and private us...

  1. Challenges facing providers caring for HIV/HCV-coinfected patients

    PubMed Central

    Lekas, Helen-Maria; Siegel, Karolynn; Leider, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among injection drug users also infected with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the synergistic adverse effect of the two diseases on patients' health and survival, the research on the clinical management of these patients and particularly the low uptake of HCV therapy is limited. We conducted qualitative interviews with 17 HIV providers from two urban public hospitals. We discovered that the limitations of the current state of medical knowledge, the severe side effects of HIV and HCV therapies, and the psychosocial vulnerability of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients combined with their resistance to becoming informed about HCV posed significant challenges for providers. To contend with these challenges, providers incorporated key dimensions of patient-centered medicine in their practice such as considering their patients' psychosocial profiles and the meaning patients assign to being coinfected, and finding ways to engage their patients in a therapeutic alliance. PMID:21825278

  2. Why are employers prodding health-care providers to adopt new management systems?: reducing the cost of health care.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Joseph A

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly concerned about the escalating costs of health-care insurance coverage, the quality of health-care delivery, and the escalating costs of delivering clinical services, employers are taking action. They are prodding health-care providers and insurers to adopt breakthrough management systems aimed at reducing costs related to poorly performing services and processes--and at the same time improving clinical outcomes. Doing this will require all members of the health-care value chain to work together to improve each and every process and procedure, whether clinical or administrative. This development presents formidable challenges to all health-care providers, insurers, employees, and patients. PMID:15085703

  3. My Daddy Takes Care of Me! Fathers as Care Providers. Current Population Reports. Household Economic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Lynne M.

    1997-01-01

    This report examines statistical data on fathers caring for their children during mothers' working hours and which types of fathers are the most likely to take care of their children. Data are taken from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, a longitudinal survey conducted at four-month intervals by the Census Bureau. Care by fathers is…

  4. Taking Care of the Kids: The Corporate Role in Providing Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.

    1985-01-01

    More and more people are beginning to look to their employers for a solution to the child care dilemma. Various types of employer supported child care are described, including day care centers, after school programs, summer day camps, financial assistance, flexible benefit plans, and information and referral services. (CB)

  5. Pathways of Adult Children Providing Care to Older Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Amanda E.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by life course and stress process theory, this study investigated pathways of adult child caregivers' family (caregiving, marital, parenting) and nonfamily (employment) roles. Eight waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study were analyzed for 1,300 adult child caregivers. Latent class analysis provided strong evidence for a 4-class…

  6. Pesticide-related illness reported to and diagnosed in Primary Care: implications for surveillance of environmental causes of ill-health

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Lesley; Mann, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Background In Great Britain (GB), data collected on pesticide associated illness focuses on acute episodes such as poisonings caused by misuse or abuse. This study aimed to investigate the extent and nature of pesticide-related illness presented and diagnosed in Primary Care and the feasibility of establishing a routine monitoring system. Methods A checklist, completed by General Practitioners (GP) for all patients aged 18+ who attended surgery sessions, identified patients to be interviewed in detail on exposures and events that occurred in the week before their symptoms appeared. Results The study covered 59320 patients in 43 practices across GB and 1335 detailed interviews. The annual incidence of illness reported to GPs because of concern about pesticide exposure was estimated to be 0.04%, potentially 88400 consultations annually, approximately 1700 per week. The annual incidence of consultations where symptoms were diagnosed by GPs as likely to be related to pesticide exposure was 0.003%, an annual estimate of 6630 consultations i.e. about 128 per week. 41% of interviewees reported using at least one pesticide at home in the week before symptoms occurred. The risk of having symptoms possibly related to pesticide exposure compared to unlikely was associated with home use of pesticides after adjusting for age, gender and occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.51 – 2.35). Conclusion GP practices were diverse and well distributed throughout GB with similar symptom consulting patterns as in the Primary Care within the UK. Methods used in this study would not be feasible for a routine surveillance system for pesticide related illness. Incorporation of environmental health into Primary Care education and practice is needed. PMID:19580646

  7. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  8. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers... Administrative Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.56 Classes of health care services and providers... health care items or services: (1) Inpatient hospital services; (2) Outpatient hospital services;...

  9. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers... Administrative Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.56 Classes of health care services and providers... health care items or services: (1) Inpatient hospital services; (2) Outpatient hospital services;...

  10. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AO57 Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care... agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans...

  11. Time To Talk with Your Health Care Providers: 4 Tips to Start the Conversation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y Z 4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches Share: When patients ... fully informed and can help patients make wise health care decisions. Here are 4 tips to help you ...

  12. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels

  13. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  14. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine. PMID:26610628

  15. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers regarding their Latino patients, particularly, issues impacting their patients’ access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with eight primary care providers—and analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods. In addition, observations were conducted of the primary care setting to contextualize providers’ perspectives. Providers indicated that care for Latinos was impacted by several domains: (a) practical/instrumental factors that influence access to care; (b) cultural and personal factors that shape patients’ presentations and views about physical and mental health and treatment practices; (c) provider cultural competence; and (d) institutional factors which highlight the context of care. In addition to recommendations for research and practice, the need for interdisciplinary collaboration between psychology and medicine in reducing ethnic minority disparities was proposed. PMID:21643446

  16. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities. PMID:26207904

  17. Health care for pesticide applicators in a locust eradication campaign in Kuwait (1988-1989).

    PubMed

    Al-Shatti, A K; El-Desouky, M; Zaki, R; Abu Al-Azem, M; Al-Lagani, M

    1997-01-01

    Pesticide applicators in the Plant Protection Department of the Agriculture Affairs and Fish Resources Authority are monitored regularly by the Occupational Health Section of the Ministry of Health. The aim is to protect them from the adverse effects of pesticides and to prevent acute poisoning by removing from exposure those who have low cholinesterase (ChE) activity levels or low white blood cell counts. Thirty-eight workers routinely examined in July 1988 were reexamined at the onset of the locust invasion in Kuwait in November 1988; also examined were 36 farmers recruited for the first time to fight locusts and a matched control group of 38 firefighters. After 2 to 3 months, when the locust invasion decreased markedly and pesticide spraying nearly stopped, the exposed workers were reexamined. The pesticides used to control locusts were five organophosphates and one organochlorine (lindane). Sixty percent of normal for red blood cell (RBC) ChE activity and 50% of normal for plasma ChE activity were used as threshold levels for removing workers from continued exposure to ChE-inhibiting pesticides. The different reactions of study groups during the locust control period are described, including results from tests of pulmonary function, RBC and plasma ChE activity, and nerve conduction velocity. PMID:9311551

  18. Enhancing Shared Decision Making Through Carefully Designed Interventions That Target Patient And Provider Behavior.

    PubMed

    Tai-Seale, Ming; Elwyn, Glyn; Wilson, Caroline J; Stults, Cheryl; Dillon, Ellis C; Li, Martina; Chuang, Judith; Meehan, Amy; Frosch, Dominick L

    2016-04-01

    Patient-provider communication and shared decision making are essential for primary care delivery and are vital contributors to patient experience and health outcomes. To alleviate communication shortfalls, we designed a novel, multidimensional intervention aimed at nudging both patients and primary care providers to communicate more openly. The intervention was tested against an existing intervention, which focused mainly on changing patients' behaviors, in four primary care clinics involving 26 primary care providers and 300 patients. Study results suggest that compared to usual care, both the novel and existing interventions were associated with better patient reports of how well primary care providers engaged them in shared decision making. Future research should build on the work in this pilot to rigorously examine the comparative effectiveness and scalability of these interventions to improve shared decision making at the point of care. PMID:27044959

  19. Child Care Arrangements of Language-Minority Children: Care Provider's Language Use. CSE Technical Report 674

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishizawa, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In the United States, child care arrangements serve increasingly linguistically diverse populations of children. However, little is known about patterns of childcare arrangements for language-minority children and the linguistic environment of child care arrangements. Using the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey of the 2001 National…

  20. A Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Approach to Providing Health Care for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Steven D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes ENHANCE (Excellence in Health Care for Abused and Neglected Children) of Onondaga County, New York, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary clinic for children in out-of-home care involving pediatrics, child psychology, nursing, child development, and child welfare components. Also presents profiles of the health, mental health, and…

  1. Training the Primary Care Internist to Provide Care in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of California, Davis, that incorporated skilled nursing facility training into the required curriculum of their primary care internal medicine residency is described. The goal was to increase the residents' knowledge in the care of geriatric patients. (MLW)

  2. Conflicting values and the patient-provider relationship in managed care.

    PubMed

    Stone, T T; Mantese, A

    1999-01-01

    By definition, value in health care is a function of the quality of care received and the costs associated with providing the care. One method used to optimize the value function is managed care. Unfortunately, some mechanisms of managed care have created an environment where the values of primary stakeholders are in conflict with one another. One such area is the patient-provider relationship. We first explore five patient-provider relationship models and review pressures created by managed care and their impact on the patient-provider relationship. Finally, examples of proposed, pending, and passed legislation to protect the patient-provider relationship are reviewed along with characteristics of the ideal model of patient-provider interaction. PMID:10497751

  3. Caring for Children in Your Home: A Business Guide for Unregulated Providers. Redleaf Business Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tom

    Addressed to individuals providing unregulated child care in their homes, this booklet presents basic recordkeeping and tax rules. The booklet discusses the following topics: (1) child care regulations, focusing on the benefits of being regulated; (2) the business of child care, listing possible tax deductions; (3) the tax consequences of caring…

  4. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contain an approved current home study. (c) An off-reservation foster home, or residential care facility... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must...

  5. Circle of Love: Relationships between Parents, Providers, and Children in Family Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Amy C.; Manfredi-Petitt, Lynn A.

    Children need loving bonds with caring adults to develop trusting relationships, solid self-esteem, and a readiness to learn. This book draws on caregivers' personal experience, as well as interviews and conversations, and questionnaires completed by child care providers to explore the issue of love in child care settings and how family child care…

  6. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... emergency medical care. 203.11 Section 203.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation for emergency medical care shall be submitted to the director of the FDA District Office in the district...

  7. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... emergency medical care. 203.11 Section 203.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation for emergency medical care shall be submitted to the director of the FDA District Office in the district...

  8. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... emergency medical care. 203.11 Section 203.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation for emergency medical care shall be submitted to the director of the FDA District Office in the district...

  9. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  10. More than Motherhood: Reasons for Becoming a Family Day Care Provider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines motivations for entering family day care work as they relate to responsibilities of motherhood and the prominence of these motivations for the women providing day care within and across groups of workers. Using data from a large-scale representative survey of family day care workers in Illinois, the author examines the range…

  11. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers concerning their Latino patients, in particular issues affecting their patients' access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with…

  12. Mapping a Research Agenda for Home Care Safety: Perspectives from Researchers, Providers, and Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be…

  13. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  14. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 108... Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions AGENCY: Centers for... section 2702 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which directs the Secretary of Health...

  15. Assessing protection against OP pesticides and nerve agents provided by wild-type HuPON1 purified from Trichoplusia ni larvae or induced via adenoviral infection.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Sean M; Kasten, Shane A; Harrison, Joshua; Otto, Tamara C; Oliver, Zeke P; Rezk, Peter; Reeves, Tony E; Chilukuri, Nageswararao; Cerasoli, Douglas M

    2013-03-25

    Human paraoxonase-1 (HuPON1) has been proposed as a catalytic bioscavenger of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents. We assessed the potential of this enzyme to protect against OP poisoning using two different paradigms. First, recombinant HuPON1 purified from cabbage loopers (iPON1; Trichoplusia ni) was administered to guinea pigs, followed by exposure to at least 2 times the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of the OP nerve agents tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), and cyclosarin (GF), or chlorpyrifos oxon, the toxic metabolite of the OP pesticide chlorpyrifos. In the second model, mice were infected with an adenovirus that induced expression of HuPON1 and then exposed to sequential doses of GD, VX, or (as reported previously) diazoxon, the toxic metabolite of the OP pesticide diazinon. In both animal models, the exogenously added HuPON1 protected animals against otherwise lethal doses of the OP pesticides but not against the nerve agents. Together, the results support prior modeling and in vitro activity data which suggest that wild-type HuPON1 does not have sufficient catalytic activity to provide in vivo protection against nerve agents. PMID:23123254

  16. Promoting Wellness: A Nutrition, Health and Safety Manual for Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Pam S.

    This manual provides a reference source for use by sponsor organizations of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in training family child care providers. The manual begins with separate introductory sections for trainers and for providers. The trainer's section includes materials on: how adults learn, strengths and limitations of various…

  17. Health Care Providers: A Missing Link in Understanding Acceptability of the Female Condom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, Joanne E.; West, Brooke S.; Sue, Kimberly; Hoffman, Susie; Exner, Theresa M.; Kelvin, Elizabeth; Stein, Zena A.

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers can play a key role in influencing clients to initiate and maintain use of the female condom, an underused method for HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention. In 2001-2002, based on semistructured interviews with 78 health care providers from four types of settings in New York City, we found that most providers had seen the female…

  18. Applying justice and commitment constructs to patient–health care provider relationships

    PubMed Central

    Holmvall, Camilla; Twohig, Peter; Francis, Lori; Kelloway, E. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine patients’ experiences of fairness and commitment in the health care context with an emphasis on primary care providers. Design Qualitative, semistructured, individual interviews were used to gather evidence for the justice and commitment frameworks across a variety of settings with an emphasis on primary care relationships. Setting Rural, urban, and semiurban communities in Nova Scotia. Participants Patients (ages ranged from 19 to 80 years) with varying health care needs and views on their health care providers. Methods Participants were recruited through a variety of means, including posters in practice settings and communication with administrative staff in clinics. Individual interviews were conducted and were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A modified grounded theory approach was used to interpret the data. Main findings Current conceptualizations of justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, informational) and commitment (affective, normative, continuance) capture important elements of patient–health care provider interactions and relationships. Conclusion Justice and commitment frameworks developed in other contexts encompass important dimensions of the patient–health care provider relationship with some exceptions. For example, commonly understood subcomponents of justice (eg, procedural consistency) might require modification to apply fully to patient–health care provider relationships. Moreover, the results suggest that factors outside the patient–health care provider dyad (eg, familial connections) might also influence the patient’s commitment to his or her health care provider. PMID:22423030

  19. The role of Advanced Practice Providers in interdisciplinary oncology care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Rae Brana; McCoy, Kimberly

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and Physician Assistants (PAs), generally referred to as Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), are fundamental to interdisciplinary oncology care. As the projected demand for oncology services is anticipated to outpace the supply of oncologists, APPs will become increasingly vital in the delivery of oncology care and services. The training, education, and scope of practice for APPs gives the interdisciplinary care team professionals that deliver high-quality clinical services and provide valuable contributions and leadership to health care quality improvement initiatives. Optimizing the integration of APPs in oncology care offers immense advantages towards improvement of clinical outcomes. PMID:27197514

  20. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this care. Qualitative data were gathered by phone using a structured interview guide and analyzed using the framework approach. Challenges to providing care were identified at the systems, practice and provider, and education and training levels. Solutions and interventions targeting needed changes at each level were also proposed. The findings have implications for health care reform, medical school and residency training programs, and the development of best practices. PMID:25724445

  1. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. PMID:27350095

  2. California Early Care and Education Workforce Study: Licensed Child Care Centers and Family Child Care Providers. Statewide Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing the critical role that early childhood educators play in the lives of California's children and families, First 5 California commissioned in 2004 a statewide and regional study of the early care and education (ECE) workforce in licensed child care centers and licensed family child care homes. The overall goal of the study was to…

  3. What Should Primary Care Providers Know About the Changes in DSM-5?

    PubMed

    Kronish, Ian M; Shah, Ravi N; Moise, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly involved in the management of patients with mental disorders, particularly as integrated models of care emerge. The recent publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) represents a shift in the classification of several mental disorders commonly encountered by primary care providers. With the advent of ICD-10 and the movement toward diagnostic specificity, it is crucial that primary care providers understand the rationale behind these changes. This paper provides an overview of the changes in the classification of mental disorders in DSM-5, a description of how these changes relate to frequently used screening tools in the primary care setting, and a critique of how these changes will affect mental health practice from a primary care perspective. PMID:26838728

  4. Identifying Care Coordination Interventions Provided to Community-Dwelling Older Adults Using Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Youn; Marek, Karen D; Coenen, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Although care coordination is a popular intervention, there is no standard method of delivery. Also little is known about who benefits most, or characteristics that predict the amount of care coordination needed, especially with chronically ill older adults. The purpose of this study was to identify types and amount of nurse care coordination interventions provided to 231 chronically ill older adults who participated in a 12-month home care medication management program in the Midwest. For each participant, the nurse care coordinator spent an average of 134 min/mo providing in-person home care, 48 min/mo of travel, and 18 min/mo of indirect care occurring outside the home visit. This accounted for 67.2%, 23.8%, and 9.0% of nursing time, respectively, for home visits, travel, and indirect care. Four of 11 nursing interventions focused on medication management were provided to all participants. Seven of the 11 main interventions were individualized according to each person's special needs. Wide variations were observed in time provided with in-person home care and communications with multiple stakeholders. Study findings indicate the importance of individualizing interventions and the variability in the amount of nursing time needed to provide care coordination to chronically ill older adults. PMID:26985762

  5. Provider connectedness and communication patterns: extending continuity of care in the context of the circle of care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuity is an important aspect of quality of care, especially for complex patients in the community. We explored provider perceptions of continuity through a system’s lens. The circle of care was used as the system. Methods Soft systems methodology was used to understand and improve continuity for end of life patients in two communities. Participants: Physicians, nurses, pharmacists in two communities in British Columbia, involved in end of life care. Two debates/discussion groups were completed after the interviews and initial analysis to confirm findings. Interview recordings were qualitatively analyzed to extract components and enablers of continuity. Results 32 provider interviews were completed. Findings from this study support the three types of continuity described by Haggerty and Reid (information, management, and relationship continuity). This work extends their model by adding features of the circle of care that influence and enable continuity: Provider Connectedness the sense of knowing and trust between providers who share care of a patient; a set of ten communication patterns that are used to support continuity across the circle of care; and environmental factors outside the circle that can indirectly influence continuity. Conclusions We present an extended model of continuity of care. The components in the model can support health planners consider how health care is organized to promote continuity and by researchers when considering future continuity research. PMID:23941179

  6. The challenge of providing palliative care to terminally ill prison inmates in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felicity Juliette

    2007-03-01

    Terminally ill prison inmates have a right to all aspects of health care including palliative care provision. However, there are numerous difficulties in providing palliative care to high-security prisoners in the UK. Local community hospices may be reluctant to admit terminally ill prisoners and therefore initiatives must be established to provide appropriate palliative care within the prison itself. Dying prisoners need companionship and to be shown respect and compassion to avoid feelings of loneliness and hopelessness. Inmate volunteers can provide an invaluable source of support and friendship for the terminally ill prisoner, helping to improve quality of life. PMID:17505406

  7. Implementing a care coordination program for children with special healthcare needs: partnering with families and providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, April; Lizzi, Michele; Marx, Alison; Chilkatowsky, Maryann; Trachtenberg, Symme W; Ogle, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination has been a key theme in national forums on healthcare quality, design, and improvement. This article describes the characteristics of a care coordination program aimed at supporting families in building care coordination competencies and providers in the coordination of care across multiple specialties. The program included implementation of a Care Coordination Counselor (CC Counselor) and several supporting tools-Care Binders, Complex Scheduling, Community Resources for Families Database, and a Care Coordination Network. Patients were referred by a healthcare provider to receive services from the CC Counselor or to receive a Care Binder organizational tool. To assess the impact of the counselor role, we compared patient experience survey results from patients receiving CC Counselor services to those receiving only the Care Binder. Our analysis found that patients supported by the CC Counselor reported greater agreement with accessing care coordination resources and identifying a key point person for coordination. Seventy-five percent of CC Counselor patients have graduated from the program. Our findings suggest that implementation of a CC Counselor role and supporting tools offers an integrative way to connect patients, families, and providers with services and resources to support coordinated, continuous care. PMID:22913270

  8. Co-care: Producing better health outcome through interactions between patients, care providers and information and communication technology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The demands on healthcare are shifting, from caring for patients with acute conditions managed in a single-care episode to caring for patients with chronic and often complex conditions. With this shift comes a recognition that healthcare requires an interaction between patients and care providers, and of the interdependencies between these actors for achieving a positive outcome – that the results are co-produced. This paper introduces co-care, which stresses that the role of healthcare providers is to complement people’s own resources for managing their health so that patients’ and healthcare providers’ resources combined leads to the best possible outcome. This is done using tools and artifacts such as information and communication technology that enable knowledge to be created, shaped, shared and applied across the actors. Thus, in co-care, knowledge is not attributed to a single entity but distributed between them in line with the theory of distributed cognition. To put co-care into practice, several challenges must be addressed. This includes moving from profession-centeredness to patient-centeredness and from approaching care as a transformation of input to products to viewing care as linking needs and knowledge, as well as a substantial attitude and behavior change across healthcare stakeholders.

  9. Increasing Family Child Care Providers' Professionalism through Certification and a Professional Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Louester A. S.

    Noting that in many areas, family child care providers lack both available training to enhance their professional skills and an organized professional network for continual support, this practicum project implemented and evaluated the effectiveness of a curriculum to prepare family child care providers for state certification through a community…

  10. Security of Children's Relationships with Nonparental Care Providers: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahnert, Lieselotte; Pinquart, Martin; Lamb, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analysis aggregated results of 40 investigations involving 2,867 children who averaged 29.6 ("SD" = 8.6) months of age when their attachments to care providers were assessed using either the Strange Situation (SS) or the Attachment Q-Set (AQS). As opposed to parents, secure attachments to nonparental care providers were less likely (using SS)…

  11. Establishing a Successful Family Day Care Home: A Resource Guide for Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Office for Children, Boston.

    A resource guide for family day care providers in Massachusetts was developed as an initiative of the state Office for Children. Chapters are as follows: (1) Getting Ready to Do Family Day Care (e.g., definitions, provider qualifications, preparing your home, assistants, complaints); (2) Partnership with Parents (e.g., interviews, trial period,…

  12. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  13. Child Care Providers' Strategies for Supporting Healthy Eating: A Qualitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Meghan; Batal, Malek

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed child care settings and providers to be important influences on children's developing behaviors. Yet most research on children's nutritional development has focused on home settings and parents. Thus, through semistructured interviews with child care providers, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of the…

  14. License-Exempt Child Care Providers: A Needs Assessment for Designing an Implementation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseburr, Linda Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Many children from low-income families appear to be not receiving quality child care from their license-exempt subsidized child-care providers. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to obtain data from a sample of license-exempt providers/caregivers and parents from a mailed self-administered survey and telephone interview. Four research…

  15. Child-Care Provider Survey Reveals Cost Constrains Quality. Research Brief. Volume 96, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 414 child care providers in southeastern Wisconsin reveals that cost as well as low wages and lack of benefits for workers can constrain providers from pursuing improvements to child-care quality. Of survey respondents, approximately half of whom are home-based and half center-based, 13% have at least three of five structural factors…

  16. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired... amounts expended for providing medical assistance for health care-acquired conditions. It would also... Federal financial participation FY Fiscal year HAC Hospital-acquired condition HCAC Health...

  17. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  18. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. 203.11 Section 203.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation...

  19. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. 203.11 Section 203.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation...

  20. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care in communities. Participants Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Measurements Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Results Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94–1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98–1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84– 0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79– 0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21–1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48–1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67–2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Conclusion Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline–concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. PMID:26480967

  1. Mapping a research agenda for home care safety: perspectives from researchers, providers, and decision makers.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be described; consequently, gaining insight from various stakeholders about safety issues relevant to the home care sector is necessary in order to inform strategic directions for future research. To begin to map a research agenda, a three-part environmental scan was conducted: (a) a pilot study with home care recipients and providers; (b) key informant interviews with researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers; and (c) a review of literature in three topic areas. Only the results of the key informant interviews are reported here. PMID:24650672

  2. Satisfaction with the Health Care Provider and Regimen Adherence in Minority Youth with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cortney J; La Greca, Annette; Valenzuela, Jessica M; Hsin, Olivia; Delamater, Alan M

    2016-09-01

    To assess whether satisfaction with the health-care provider is related to regimen adherence among primarily minority youth with type 1 diabetes. Youth with type 1 diabetes (n = 169; M age = 13.88; 52 % female; 70 % Hispanic) and their parents completed questionnaires that assessed their own satisfaction with the health-care provider and youths' adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors. Higher youth and parent patient-provider relationship satisfaction was associated with higher regimen adherence. Gender affected the relationship between satisfaction and regimen adherence, such that for girls, greater satisfaction was associated with better adherence; this was not the case for boys. Patient satisfaction with the health care provider is important for regimen adherence among primarily minority youth with type 1 diabetes, particularly for girls. Future research might focus on improving youths' relationships with their health care providers as a potential pathway to improve regimen adherence. PMID:27365095

  3. Best practices for pediatric palliative cancer care: a primer for clinical providers.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deena; Lam, Catherine G; Cunningham, Melody J; Remke, Stacy; Chrastek, Jody; Klick, Jeffrey; Macauley, Robert; Baker, Justin N

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in children and adolescents. Pediatric patients with cancer suffer greatly at the end of life. However, palliative care interventions can reduce suffering and significantly improve the care of these patients and their families. A large percentage of pediatric deaths occur outside of the hospital setting where pediatric palliative resources may not be readily available. Patients in the home setting may be cared for by community hospice programs, which are typically staffed for adult populations. Increasingly, nonpediatric providers are asked to provide palliative care for children and adolescents at the end of life, yet they receive little formal training in this area. This review focuses on the principles of best practice in the provision of palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer. Our intent is to aid clinical providers in delivering optimal care to this patient population. Topics unique to pediatric palliative care that are addressed include: providing pain and symptom management in the broad pediatric range from neonate to adolescent; caring for and interacting with developmentally distinct groups; engaging in shared decision making with parents and adolescents; providing accommodations for prognoses that are often more uncertain than in adult patients; and delivering concurrent disease-directed therapy with palliative care. PMID:24400391

  4. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  5. Attitudes about providing HIV care: voices from publicly funded clinics in California

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Revery; Koester, Kimberly A; Waldura, Jessica F

    2014-01-01

    Background. As the enactment of health care reform becomes a reality in the USA, it has been widely predicted that HIV+ patients will increasingly be cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs), many of whom lack the experience to deliver full-spectrum HIV care. Objective. To describe PCPs’ preparedness for an influx of HIV+ patients. Methods. This qualitative study included interviews with 20 PCPs from community health centres in California. We inquired about clinicians’ experiences with HIV, their strategies for dealing with unfamiliar aspects of medicine and their management of complicated patients. We also identified the clinicians’ preferred types of information and consultation resources. Results. PCPs are not yet comfortable as providers of comprehensive HIV care; however, they are dedicated to delivering excellent care to all of their patients, regardless of disease process. Although they prefer to refer HIV+ patients to centres of excellence, they are willing to adopt full responsibility when necessary and believe they can deliver high-quality HIV care if provided with adequate consultation and informational resources. Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act will insure an estimated 20000 more HIV+ patients in California. With a dwindling supply of HIV specialists, many of these patients will be principally cared for by PCPs. PCPs will go to great lengths to ensure that HIV+ patients receive superior care, but they need the support of HIV specialists to expand their skills. Priority should be given to ensuring that expert consultation is widely available to PCPs who find themselves caring for HIV+ patients. PMID:25121978

  6. The language of sedation in end-of-life care: The ethical reasoning of care providers in three countries.

    PubMed

    Seale, Clive; Raus, Kasper; Bruinsma, Sophie; van der Heide, Agnes; Sterckx, Sigrid; Mortier, Freddy; Payne, Sheila; Mathers, Nigel; Rietjens, Judith

    2015-07-01

    The application of ethically controversial medical procedures may differ from one place to another. Drawing on a keyword and text-mining analysis of 156 interviews with doctors and nurses involved in end-of-life care ('care providers'), differences between countries in care providers' ethical rationales for the use of sedation are reported. In the United Kingdom, an emphasis on titrating doses proportionately against symptoms is more likely, maintaining consciousness where possible. The potential harms of sedation are perceived to be the potential hastening of social as well as biological death. In Belgium and the Netherlands, although there is concern to distinguish the practice from euthanasia, rapid inducement of deep unconsciousness is more acceptable to care providers. This is often perceived to be a proportionate response to unbearable suffering in a context where there is also greater pressure to hasten dying from relatives and others. This means that sedation is more likely to be organised like euthanasia, as the end 'moment' is reached, and family farewells are organised before the patient is made unconscious for ever. Medical and nursing practices are partly responses to factors outside the place of care, such as legislation and public sentiment. Dutch guidelines for sedation largely tally with the practices prevalent in the Netherlands and Belgium, in contrast with those produced by the more international European Association for Palliative Care whose authors describe an ethical framework closer to that reportedly used by UK care providers. PMID:25389235

  7. Providers' Perspectives of Survivorship Care for Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

    PubMed

    Berg, Carla; Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2016-03-01

    We examined healthcare providers' perceptions of the goals of survivorship care and survivor programs, systems-level barriers and individual patient-level barriers to engaging patients in survivorship care, and potential resources for increasing engagement. In 2012, we recruited 21 healthcare providers of young adult survivors of childhood cancers from a children's hospital and a cancer center in the Southeastern USA to complete telephone-based semi-structured interviews. The sample was 45.95 years old (SD = 7.57) on average, 52.4 % female, and 81.0 % MDs. The major goals of survivorship programs identified were medical care management (e.g., addressing late and long-term effects, providing survivorship care plans (SCPs), assisting in transition of care) and holistic care including addressing psychosocial issues and promoting healthy lifestyles. Systems-level barriers to engagement in survivorship care included limited resources (e.g., time), role confusion (e.g., within cancer centers, from treatment team to survivorship care, role of primary care providers), communication challenges within the medical system (e.g., limited tracking of patients, lack of understanding of the role of survivorship clinic), communication challenges with patients (e.g., setting expectations regarding transition to survivorship care), and lack of insurance coverage. Perceived patient-level factors included psychological barriers (e.g., fear, avoidance), resistance to survivorship care, and physical barriers (e.g., distance from survivorship clinics). Resources to address these barriers included increased access to information, technology-based resources, and ensuring valuable services. There are several systems-level and patient-level barriers to survivorship care, thus requiring multilevel interventions to promote engagement in care among young adult survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:25943901

  8. What matters most for end-of-life care? Perspectives from community-based palliative care providers and administrators

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Bina; Bainbridge, Daryl; Bryant, Deanna; Tan Toyofuku, Sue; Seow, Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There has been little research conducted to understand the essential meaning of quality, community-based, end-of-life (EOL) care, despite the expansion of these services. The purpose of this study was to define what matters most for EOL care from the perspective of a diverse range of palliative care providers in the community who have daily encounters with death and dying. Methods We used interviews to explore the perceptions of providers and administrators from 14 specialised palliative care teams in Ontario, Canada. Participants were prompted with the question ‘What matters most for EOL care?’ Responses were analysed using a phenomenological approach to derive themes depicting the universal essence of EOL care. Results Data from 107 respondents were obtained and analysed, from which 40 formulated concepts emerged; these were further grouped into 9 themes. Of the respondents, 39% were nurses, 19% physicians, 27% were supervisors or executives and 15% other. The most predominate concept was that Patient's Wishes are Fulfilled, cited by almost half the respondents. The most prominent themes were Addressing the Non-physical Needs, Healthcare Teams’ Nature of Palliative Care Delivery, Patient Wishes are Honoured, Addressing the Physical Needs, Preparing for and Accepting Death, Communication and Relationship Development, and Involving and Supporting the Family. Conclusions 9 critical domains of EOL care evolved from the interviews, indicating that quality EOL care extends beyond managing physical pain, but includes a holistic perspective of care, a healthcare team dedicated to the EOL journey and a patient-centred pathway. Tailoring the provision of care to consider these important elements plays a critical role in supporting a positive EOL experience for patients and families. PMID:26124510

  9. Factors Associated with Providers' Perceptions of Mental Health Care in Santa Luzia's Family Health Strategy, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela R; Pinto, Rogerio M; Rahman, Rahbel; Spector, Anya Y

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has a unique mental health care system, characterized by universal coverage delivered by interdisciplinary teams both in the community and in specialized centros de atenção psicossocial (CAPS-psychosocial care centers). Provision of patient-centered mental health care is an important principle of Brazilian mental health care, but this topic has not been well-studied. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of 151 community health workers (CHWs), nurses, and physicians in Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Chi-squares, t-tests and multivariate regression analyses examined differences in socio-demographics, caseload, engagement in evidence-based practices (EBPs), and transdisciplinary collaboration between providers who reported providing high levels of patient-centered mental health care and those who did not. In multivariate regression models, components of transdisciplinary collaboration were significantly associated with providers' perceptions of patient-centered mental health care (p < 0.05). CHWs were also significantly more likely to report providing patient-centered care than physicians and nurses. EBP engagement and sociodemographics were not associated with perceptions. Results suggest that training efforts to improve patient-centered mental health care in Brazil could build upon CHWs' skills and focus on transdisciplinary collaboration. Findings may inform practice in other countries with similar health care systems. PMID:26703644

  10. The experiences of risk managers in providing emotional support for health care workers after adverse events.

    PubMed

    Edrees, Hanan; Brock, Douglas M; Wu, Albert W; McCotter, Patricia I; Hofeldt, Ron; Shannon, Sarah E; Gallagher, Thomas H; White, Andrew A

    2016-04-01

    Risk managers often meet with health care workers who are emotionally traumatized following adverse events. We surveyed members of the American Society for Health care Risk Management (ASHRM) about their training, experience, competence, and comfort with providing emotional support to health care workers. Although risk managers reported feeling comfortable and competent in providing support, nearly all respondents prefer to receive additional training. Risk managers who were comfortable listening to and supporting health care workers were more likely to report prior training. Health care organizations implementing second victim support programs should not rely solely on risk managers to provide support, rather engage and train interested risk managers and provide them with opportunities to practice. PMID:27088771

  11. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  12. New approaches to providing individualized diabetes care in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Powell, Priscilla W; Corathers, Sarah D; Raymond, Jennifer; Streisand, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Building from a foundation of rapid innovation, the 21(st) century is poised to offer considerable new approaches to providing modern diabetes care. The focus of this paper is the evolving role of diabetes care providers collaboratively working with patients and families toward the goals of achieving optimal clinical and psychosocial outcomes for individuals living with diabetes. Advances in monitoring, treatment and technology have been complemented by trends toward patient-centered care with expertise from multiple health care disciplines. The evolving clinical care delivery system extends far beyond adjustment of insulin regimens. Effective integration of patient-centered strategies, such as shared-decision making, motivational interviewing techniques, shared medical appointments, and multidisciplinary team collaboration, into a dynamic model of diabetes care delivery holds promise in reaching glycemic targets and improving patients' quality of life. PMID:25901504

  13. Maternal stress in caring for children with feeding disabilities: implications for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Adams, R A; Gordon, C; Spangler, A A

    1999-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the stress experienced by mothers of children with feeding disorders to the stress experienced by mothers of children with other childhood disabilities, to compare the stress experienced by mothers of children who are tube-fed with that of mothers of children with disabilities who do not require tube feeding, to ascertain the types of stressors that mothers in both groups experience, and to determine their coping resources. Subjects were mothers of children with disabilities who had recently been discharged or were receiving outpatient care from a private rehabilitation facility in a Midwestern city. The Short Form of the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress instrument and open-ended questions developed by the researchers were used. Results were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results indicate that mothers of children requiring tube feeding experienced significantly greater stress than mothers of children with disabilities who do not require tube feedings. Mothers of children requiring tube feeding also receive less support from family and friends. To assist dietitians, other health care professionals, and university instructors in developing family-centered treatment programs, we recommend including fathers, friends, or relatives in the care and feeding process; discovering ways to include the tube-fed child in family mealtime activities; increasing public awareness of tube-feeding issues; organizing support groups; and educating dietetics students about the unique stresses experienced by mothers of children who are tube-fed. PMID:10450312

  14. Auditing the needs of recovery room staff providing care for the child in an acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Nicholas-Holley, J

    2016-05-01

    This article examines the results of an audit into recovery nurse knowledge and understanding of paediatric care standards. It will critically analyse the availability of current standards for children's services in the recovery room and discuss the need for a national document specifically dedicated to standards of practise for the care of the child in the recovery room providing immediate post operative care. The article will also look at the development of such a document. PMID:27400487

  15. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics. PMID:24761922

  16. HIPAA administrative simplification: standard unique health identifier for health care providers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-01-23

    This final rule establishes the standard for a unique health identifier for health care providers for use in the health care system and announces the adoption of the National Provider Identifier (NPI) as that standard. It also establishes the implementation specifications for obtaining and using the standard unique health identifier for health care providers. The implementation specifications set the requirements that must be met by "covered entities": Health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers who transmit any health information in electronic form in connection with a transaction for which the Secretary has adopted a standard (known as "covered health care providers"). Covered entities must use the identifier in connection with standard transactions. The use of the NPI will improve the Medicare and Medicaid programs, and other Federal health programs and private health programs, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care industry in general, by simplifying the administration of the health care system and enabling the efficient electronic transmission of certain health information. This final rule implements some of the requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle F of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). PMID:14968800

  17. Creating a continuum. The goal is to provide an integrated system of care.

    PubMed

    Evashwick, C J

    1989-06-01

    The idea of a continuum of care is hardly new. In its purest form, it is simply the essence of good patient care. Today, the complex U.S. healthcare organization has emerged as a highly sophisticated but fragmented collection of service providers. We now must put energy and resources into rebuilding the comprehensiveness and continuity that represent high-quality care. The rationale for a continuum of care is that it is appropriate for patients' needs, demanded by today's consumers, an organized way of maximizing use of healthcare resources, and cost-effective for providers, patients, and payers. A continuum of care comprises services and integrating mechanisms. The services can be broken into seven basic categories: extended care, acute hospital care, ambulatory care, home care, outreach, wellness, and housing. The four basic integrating mechanisms are interentity planning and management, care coordination, case-based financing, and integrated information systems. Shaping a continuum mandates translating broad principles into pragmatic application suitable for the organization and community. The organization should define goals and objectives, identify a target population, assess services, evaluate integrating mechanisms, communicate, and prepare a business plan. PMID:10293328

  18. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Context It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose This study examined whether higher malpractice burden on obstetric providers was associated with an increased likelihood of discontinuing obstetric care and whether there were rural-urban differences in the relationship. Methods Data on 500 obstetrician-gynecologists and family physicians who had provided obstetric care at some point in their career (either currently or previously) were obtained from a statewide survey in Michigan. Statistical tests and multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the interrelationship among malpractice burden, rural location, and discontinuation of obstetric care. Findings After adjusting for other factors that might influence a physician’s decision about whether to stop obstetric care, our results showed no significant impact of malpractice burden on physicians’ likelihood to discontinue obstetric care. Rural-urban location of the practice did not modify the nature of this relationship. However, family physicians in rural Michigan had a nearly four fold higher likelihood of withdrawing obstetric care when compared to urban family physicians. Conclusions The higher likelihood of rural family physicians to discontinue obstetric care should be carefully weighed in future interventions to preserve obstetric care supply. More research is needed to better understand the practice environment of rural family physicians and the reasons for their withdrawal from obstetric care. PMID:19166559

  19. The Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law: selected issues in providing home care services to the frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Hillel

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes and analyses selected issues related to the provision of home care services to frail elderly people following the Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law (1988). The goals and principles of the Law, which mandates the provision of home care services to frail elderly people, are presented. The paper also evaluates its contribution toward enhancing the well-being of elderly clients. Several major dilemmas that arose following implementation of the Law are analysed and evaluated in comparison with other countries that have enacted and implemented similar laws. These dilemmas are community vs institutional care; services in kind vs monetary allowances; service provision through contracting out with nongovernmental agencies; unstable and unskilled labour force; and service quality. Finally, policy implications are discussed, mainly in the following areas: investment in human resources as a condition for achieving high service quality, and the need for coordination between the agencies that provide long-term care services to elderly people. PMID:15819740

  20. From Dyadic Ties to Information Infrastructures: Care-Coordination between Patients, Providers, Students and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, S.; Biswas, R.; Jai Ganesh, A.U.; Otero, P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To share how an effectual merging of local and online networks in low resource regions can supplement and strengthen the local practice of patient centered care through the use of an online digital infrastructure powered by all stakeholders in healthcare. User Driven Health Care offers the dynamic integration of patient values and evidence based solutions for improved medical communication in medical care. Introduction This paper conceptualizes patient care-coordination through the lens of engaged stakeholders using digital infrastructures tools to integrate information technology. We distinguish this lens from the prevalent conceptualization of dyadic ties between clinician-patient, patient-nurse, clinician-nurse, and offer the holistic integration of all stakeholder inputs, in the clinic and augmented by online communication in a multi-national setting. Methods We analyze an instance of the user-driven health care (UDHC), a network of providers, patients, students and researchers working together to help manage patient care. The network currently focuses on patients from LMICs, but the provider network is global in reach. We describe UDHC and its opportunities and challenges in care-coordination to reduce costs, bring equity, and improve care quality and share evidence. Conclusion UDHC has resulted in coordinated global based local care, affecting multiple facets of medical practice. Shared information resources between providers with disparate knowledge, results in better understanding by patients, unique and challenging cases for students, innovative community based research and discovery learning for all. PMID:26123908

  1. Patient Perceptions and Expectations From Primary Health-care Providers in India

    PubMed Central

    Ardey, Rashmi; Ardey, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study of patient satisfaction at the primary care level has been mostly neglected in India. Aim: This objective of this study was to assess indices of Patient Satisfaction at the level of the family physician which is usually the first point of contact between the patient and the health-care system. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out at a Private Primary Health-Care Center in a semirural area in New Delhi, by exit interviews in the form of a questionnaire from patients randomly selected from people visiting the center during the study period. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results: The findings revealed that 83.58% of the patients were satisfied with the general experience and the behavior of the health-care provider and 85.9% were satisfied with the treatment and care provided, only 65.5% were satisfied with the physical environment of the clinic. However, the percentage of patients who would recommend the facility to their friends was overwhelming (94.6%). Conclusion: These results show that private health-care providers are still the first choice for any form of medical care. However, there was definitely a gap between the increasing expectations of the patients for more information, better Patient–Provider interaction, more control over the treatment process and better amenities even at the Primary Care level. It is this gap, which needs to be fulfilled to facilitate better utilization of Primary Health-Care Services in the community and reduce pressure on tertiary care services in order to ensure Universal Health Coverage. This study would also help us understand the challenges for Primary Care service providers, private and public, in a low socioeconomic urban setting. PMID:25810990

  2. Emerging contaminants (pharmaceuticals, personal care products, a food additive and pesticides) in waters of Sydney estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Drage, D S; Thompson, K; Eaglesham, G; Mueller, J F

    2015-08-15

    The current investigation of marine water from 30 sites adjacent to stormwater outlets across the entire Sydney estuary is the first such research in Australia. The number of analytes detected were: 8/59 pharmaceutical compounds (codeine, paracetamol, tramadol, venlafaxine, propranolol, fluoxetine, iopromide and carbamazepine), 7/38 of the pesticides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 3,4-dichloroaniline, carbaryl, diuron, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), mecoprop and simazine) and 0/3 of the personal care products (PCPs) analysed. An artificial sweetener (acesulfame) was detected, however none of the nine antibiotics analysed were identified. Sewage water is not discharged to this estuary, except infrequently as overflow during high-precipitation events. The presence of acesulfame (a recognised marker of domestic wastewater) and pharmaceuticals in water from all parts of the estuary after a dry period, suggests sewage water is leaking into the stormwater system in this catchment. The pesticides are applied to the environment and were discharged via stormwater to the estuary. PMID:26130525

  3. New care model targets high-utilizing, complex patients, frees up emergency providers to focus on acute care concerns.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN, has developed a new model of care, designed to meet the needs of high-utilizing hospital and ED patients with complex medical, social, and behavioral needs.The Coordinated Care Center (CCC) provides easy access to patients with a history of high utilization, and delivers multidisciplinary care in a one-stop-shop format. In one year, the approach has slashed ED visits by 37%, freeing up emergency providers to focus on patients with acute needs. In-patient care stays are down by 25%. The CCC focuses on patients with diagnoses that are primarily medical, such as CHF [congestive heart failure], COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], or diabetes. ED-based clinical coordinators keep an eye out for patients who world be good candidates for the CCC, and facilitate quick transitions when their needs would be better served in that setting. Administrators describe CCC as an ambulatory intensive care unit, with an on-site pharmacist, social worker, psychologist, and chemical health counselor as well as physicians, nurse practitioners, LPNs, and patient navigators--enough personnel to comprise two full care teams. While the model does not pay for itself under current payment models, administrators anticipate that the approach will work well under future payment reforms that focus on total cost of care. PMID:24195142

  4. Health care providers' attitudes towards termination of pregnancy: A qualitative study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Jane; Stinson, Kathryn; Orner, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite changes to the abortion legislation in South Africa in 1996, barriers to women accessing abortion services still exist including provider opposition to abortions and a shortage of trained and willing abortion care providers. The dearth of abortion providers undermines the availability of safe, legal abortion, and has serious implications for women's access to abortion services and health service planning. In South Africa, little is known about the personal and professional attitudes of individuals who are currently working in abortion service provision. Exploring the factors which determine health care providers' involvement or disengagement in abortion services may facilitate improvement in the planning and provision of future services. Methods Qualitative research methods were used to collect data. Thirty four in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted during 2006 and 2007 with health care providers who were involved in a range of abortion provision in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Complex patterns of service delivery were prevalent throughout many of the health care facilities, and fragmented levels of service provision operated in order to accommodate health care providers' willingness to be involved in different aspects of abortion provision. Related to this was the need expressed by many providers for dedicated, stand-alone abortion clinics thereby creating a more supportive environment for both clients and providers. Almost all providers were concerned about the numerous difficulties women faced in seeking an abortion and their general quality of care. An overriding concern was poor pre and post abortion counselling including contraceptive counselling and provision. Conclusion This is the first known qualitative study undertaken in South Africa exploring providers' attitudes towards abortion and adds to the body of information addressing the

  5. Surgical management for Hirschsprung disease: A review for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Holly L; Rizzolo, Denise; Austin, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Primary care providers may encounter infants and children with Hirschsprung disease, a congenital colonic defect. Although primarily a surgical problem, the disease requires extensive supportive care and a multidisciplinary approach that often extends beyond surgical correction. This article reviews the management of Hirschsprung disease. PMID:26945276

  6. Ethnicity and Health: Mexican Americans. A Guide for Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Robert E.

    Several characteristics and perspectives of how Mexican Americans regard health care are presented for health care providers. Following a brief discussion of culture and health, the guide describes the traditional and modern value orientations of Hispanics and the external forces that contribute to their adoption. Four key concepts to…

  7. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  8. Continuing Education Needs of Ohio Optometrists. A Comparison with Other Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escovitz, Alan; Augsburger, Arol

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 1,775 Ohio health care providers in 5 disciplines concerning the demand for professional continuing education is reported. Results indicate that program content, date, time, and location are the most important factors influencing program attendance. Specific comparisons are made between optometry and other health care professions. (MSE)

  9. Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings presents unique challenges for the administrators, teachers, and staff who are responsible for the education, rehabilitation, and welfare of youths committed to their care. The United States departments of Education (ED) and Justice (DOJ) recognize that while these…

  10. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  11. Grandparents Providing Care to Grandchildren: A Population-Based Study of Continuity and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ye; LaPierre, Tracey A.; Hughes, Mary Elizabeth; Waite, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines transitions in grandchild care and the characteristics of grandparents making these transitions, using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 13,626 grandparents in the 1998-2008 Health and Retirement Study. More than 60% of grandparents provided grandchild care over the 10-year period; more than 70% of…

  12. Child Care Provider Awareness and Prevention of Cytomegalovirus and Other Infectious Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Magnusson, Brianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Child care facilities are prime locations for the transmission of infectious and communicable diseases. Children and child care providers are at high risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection which causes severe birth defects and developmental delays. Objective: The goals of study were: (1) to determine the level of cytomegalovirus…

  13. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  14. The Relationship between Practices and Child Care Providers' Beliefs Related to Child Feeding and Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between child care practices and child care provider knowledge and beliefs about their role in supporting children's healthful eating. Design: Longitudinal design using survey and observation data from baseline and year 1 of the Encouraging Healthy Activity and Eating in Childcare Environments (ENHANCE) pilot…

  15. The Nursing Dimension of Providing Palliative Care to Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Sharron L.; Thaxton, Cheryl; Allison, Courtney; Barfield, Raymond C.; Tamburro, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer includes interventions that focus on the relief of suffering, optimization of function, and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. This care is most effectively provided by a multidisciplinary team. Nurses perform an integral role on that team by identifying symptoms, providing care coordination, and assuring clear communication. Several basic tenets appear essential to the provision of optimal palliative care. First, palliative care should be administered concurrently with curative therapy beginning at diagnosis and assuming a more significant role at end of life. This treatment approach, recommended by many medical societies, has been associated with numerous benefits including longer survival. Second, realistic, objective goals of care must be developed. A clear understanding of the prognosis by the patient, family, and all members of the medical team is essential to the development of these goals. The pediatric oncology nurse is pivotal in developing these goals and assuring that they are adhered to across all specialties. Third, effective therapies to prevent and relieve the symptoms of suffering must be provided. This can only be accomplished with accurate and repeated assessments. The pediatric oncology nurse is vital in providing these assessments and must possess a working knowledge of the most common symptoms associated with suffering. With a basic understanding of these palliative care principles and competency in the core skills required for this care, the pediatric oncology nurse will optimize quality of life for children and adolescents with cancer. PMID:23641169

  16. Reproductive disorders associated with pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Linda M

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of men or women to certain pesticides at sufficient doses may increase the risk for sperm abnormalities, decreased fertility, a deficit of male children, spontaneous abortion, birth defects or fetal growth retardation. Pesticides from workplace or environmental exposures enter breast milk. Certain pesticides have been linked to developmental neurobehavioral problems, altered function of immune cells and possibly childhood leukemia. In well-designed epidemiologic studies, adverse reproductive or developmental effects have been associated with mixed pesticide exposure in occupational settings, particularly when personal protective equipment is not used. Every class of pesticides has at least one agent capable of affecting a reproductive or developmental endpoint in laboratory animals or people, including organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, herbicides, fungicides, fumigants and especially organochlorines. Many of the most toxic pesticides have been banned or restricted in developed nations, but high exposures to these agents are still occurring in the most impoverished countries around the globe. Protective clothing, masks and gloves are more difficult to tolerate in hot, humid weather, or may be unavailable or unaffordable. Counseling patients who are concerned about reproductive and developmental effects of pesticides often involves helping them assess their exposure levels, weigh risks and benefits, and adopt practices to reduce or eliminate their absorbed dose. Patients may not realize that by the first prenatal care visit, most disruptions of organogenesis have already occurred. Planning ahead provides the best chance of lowering risk from pesticides and remediating other risk factors before conception. PMID:18032334

  17. Gender Differences in Rural and Urban Practice Location among Mid-Level Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Context: Mid-level providers comprise an increasing proportion of the health care workforce and play a key role in providing health services in rural and underserved areas. Although women comprise the majority of mid-level providers, they are less likely to work in a rural area than men. Maldistribution of health providers between urban and rural…

  18. Getting what we pay for: innovations lacking in provider payment reform for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Ann; Draper, Debra A

    2008-06-01

    Despite wide recognition that existing physician and hospital payment methods used by health plans and other payers do not foster high-quality and efficient care for people with chronic conditions, little innovation in provider payment strategies is occurring, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) commissioned by the California HealthCare Foundation. This is particularly disconcerting because the nation faces an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, resulting in continued escalation of related health care costs and diminished quality of life for more Americans. To date, most efforts to improve care of patients with chronic conditions have focused on paying vendors, such as disease management firms, to intervene with patients or redesigning care delivery without reforming underlying physician and hospital payment methods. While there is active discussion and anticipation of physician and hospital payment reform, current efforts are limited largely to experimental or small-scale pilot programs. More fundamental payment reform efforts in practice are virtually nonexistent. Existing payment systems, primarily fee for service, encourage a piecemeal approach to care delivery rather than a coordinated approach appropriate for patients with chronic conditions. While there is broad agreement that existing provider payment methods are not well aligned with optimal chronic disease care, there are significant barriers to reforming payment for chronic disease care, including: (1) fragmented care delivery; (2) lack of payment for non-physician providers and services supportive of chronic disease care; (3) potential for revenue reductions for some providers; and (4) lack of a viable reform champion. Absent such reform, however, efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of care for chronically ill patients are likely to be of limited success. PMID:18630402

  19. Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence. PMID:25438362

  20. Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence. PMID:25507879

  1. Curriculum resources for training direct care providers in public sector mental health.

    PubMed

    Styron, Thomas H; Shaw, Matthew; McDuffie, Ebony; Hoge, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    Direct care personnel who do not have graduate-level professional degrees provide a substantial amount of client care in mental health organizations across the nation. Training for them is minimal in many settings. This shortcoming may negatively affect client care, staff recruitment and retention, and the effective use of scarce resources. In this paper, we identify and review curriculum resources available to mental health organizations interested in implementing or enhancing training programs for direct care personnel. These include two relevant competency sets and six portable training curricula, as well as information on how to access these resources. PMID:16082799

  2. Crisis of conscience: reconciling religious health care providers' beliefs and patients' rights.

    PubMed

    White, K A

    1999-07-01

    In this note, Katherine A. White explores the conflict between religious health care providers who provide care in accordance with their religious beliefs and the patients who want access to medical care that these religious providers find objectionable. Specifically, she examines Roman Catholic health care institutions and HMOs that follow the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services and considers other religious providers with similar beliefs. In accordance with the Directives, these institutions maintain policies that restrict access to "sensitive" services like abortion, family planning, HIV counseling, infertility treatment, and termination of life-support. White explains how most state laws protecting providers' right to refuse treatments in conflict with religious principles do not cover this wide range of services. Furthermore, many state and federal laws and some court decisions guarantee patients the right to receive this care. The constitutional complication inherent in this provider-patient conflict emerges in White's analysis of the interaction of the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment and patients' right to privacy. White concludes her note by exploring the success of both provider-initiated and legislatively mandated compromise strategies. She first describes the strategies adopted by four different religious HMOs which vary in how they increase or restrict access to sensitive services. She then turns her focus to state and federal "bypass" legislation, ultimately concluding that increased state supervision might help these laws become more viable solutions to provider-patient conflicts. PMID:10558539

  3. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo; Lucatorto, Michelle A; Hawthorne, Kara; Hersh, Janis; Myers, Raquel; Elwy, A Rani; Graham, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP) and the primary care provider (PCP) is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1) what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2) how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively) to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts. PMID:25653538

  4. Providing quality skin and wound care for the bariatric patient: an overview of clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, (defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥30), and especially morbid obesity (defined as BMI ≥40), has a profound impact on the health and integrity of the patient's integumentary system and on the caregivers who strive to provide care for larger, heavy patients. The purpose of this overview is to address some common skin and wound care issues faced by bariatric patients in order to inform clinicians, patients, and caregivers and enable them to optimize care. For bariatric patients, extra attention must be paid to skin care, cleanliness, skin fold management, perigenital care, odor management, and effective pressure redistribution. Despite these interventions, the multifactorial challenges presented by morbid obesity increase patient risk for serious skin diseases and wound conditions. Implications for practice include how best to educate patients and caregivers for optimal problem prevention. Future research should target improving bariatric care equipment and decreasing risk indices. PMID:24434162

  5. Current issues in providing primary medical care to people with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Lester, Helen

    2006-01-01

    This article explores some of the current issues in providing primary care for people with serious mental illness. In contrast to many patients in the United States, up to half of patients with serious mental illness in the United Kingdom are seen only by the primary care team. However many General Practitioners feel that the care of this patient group is beyond their remit. In the United Kingdom during the last decade, there have been a variety of policy initiatives, influenced by the generic principle of "partnership working" and the increasing recognition of the importance of patient choice, that have aimed to increase the role of primary care in the delivery of health care to people with serious mental illness. On the ground, these policy imperatives have been realised through different models of shared care and schemes to encourage better communication across the primary/secondary interface. Most recently, and perhaps most effectively, the introduction of a type of performance related pay into primary care may lead to changes to the way in which General Practitioners think and act in terms of their roles and responsibilities with this patient group. Theoretically, therefore the United Kingdom may be entering a new "golden age" of primary care based mental health services for people with serious mental illness, where holistic care, preventive care and health promotion are increasingly seen not as the gold standard, but the norm. PMID:16927575

  6. Criteria for clinical audit of women friendly care and providers' perception in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Eugene J; van den Broek, Nynke

    2008-01-01

    Background There are two dimensions of quality of maternity care, namely quality of health outcomes and quality as perceived by clients. The feasibility of using clinical audit to assess and improve the quality of maternity care as perceived by women was studied in Malawi. Objective We sought to (a) establish standards for women friendly care and (b) explore attitudinal barriers which could impede the proper implementation of clinical audit. Methods We used evidence from Malawi national guidelines and World Health Organisation manuals to establish local standards for women friendly care in three districts. We equally conducted a survey of health care providers to explore their attitudes towards criterion based audit. Results The standards addressed different aspects of care given to women in maternity units, namely (i) reception, (ii) attitudes towards women, (iii) respect for culture, (iv) respect for women, (v) waiting time, (vi) enabling environment, (vii) provision of information, (viii) individualised care, (ix) provision of skilled attendance at birth and emergency obstetric care, (x) confidentiality, and (xi) proper management of patient information. The health providers in Malawi generally held a favourable attitude towards clinical audit: 100.0% (54/54) agreed that criterion based audit will improve the quality of care and 92.6% believed that clinical audit is a good educational tool. However, there are concerns that criterion based audit would create a feeling of blame among providers (35.2%), and that manager would use clinical audit to identify and punish providers who fail to meet standards (27.8%). Conclusion Developing standards of maternity care that are acceptable to, and valued by, women requires consideration of both the research evidence and cultural values. Clinical audit is acceptable to health professionals in Malawi although there are concerns about its negative implications to the providers. PMID:18647388

  7. Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of prenatal visits to non-ob/gyn providers did not differ by race and ethnicity group in ... Generally, women of different race and ethnicity groups did not differ in the percentage of prenatal care ...

  8. Elements of patient-health-care provider communication related to cardiovascular rehabilitation referral.

    PubMed

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-health-care provider interactions regarding cardiovascular rehabilitation and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their health-care providers. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 health-care providers and 50 patients were recorded. Cardiovascular rehabilitation referral was related to greater health-care provider interactivity (odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.86) and less patient concern and worry (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. PMID:24740975

  9. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  10. Talking about complementary and alternative medicine with your health care provider: A workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  11. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with your Health Care Provider: A workbook and tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  12. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  13. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... q What are my chances of having a heart attack? q Would I benefit from taking aspirin? q ... Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks Did you know that aspirin can be an ...

  14. Regulation for the enforcement of federal health care provider conscience protection laws. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-02-23

    The Department of Health and Human Services issues this final rule which provides that enforcement of the federal statutory health care provider conscience protections will be handled by the Department's Office for Civil Rights, in conjunction with the Department's funding components. This Final Rule rescinds, in part, and revises, the December 19, 2008 Final Rule entitled "Ensuring That Department of Health and Human Services Funds Do Not Support Coercive or Discriminatory Policies or Practices in Violation of Federal Law" (the "2008 Final Rule"). Neither the 2008 final rule, nor this final rule, alters the statutory protections for individuals and health care entities under the federal health care provider conscience protection statutes, including the Church Amendments, Section 245 of the Public Health Service Act, and the Weldon Amendment. These federal statutory health care provider conscience protections remain in effect. PMID:21351680

  15. Medical and psychological aspects of infertility and assisted reproductive technology for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, A S; Reed, S A

    2001-11-01

    Couples attempting to conceive are requiring more assisted reproductive technology. Infertility may be associated with delayed onset of marriage and childbearing, smoking and alcohol excess, physiological factors such as endometriosis and varicocele, or a cause that is not identified. The psychological needs of couples, however, are often overlooked. Primary care providers can serve as the initial information source and guide for the couple struggling with infertility. In a managed care environment, a primary care provider can provide a considerable amount of education, referral for stress management and counseling, and a small portion of the medical evaluation before referring to a reproductive specialist. This overview is intended to help primary care providers and couples achieve an educated and less stressful assisted reproductive technology experience. It is not meant to circumvent the need for immediate referral to a reproductive specialist for evaluation and treatment of this very complex intervention. PMID:11725314

  16. Ten Things Transgender Persons Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Newsroom Support GLMA Site Search Ten Things Transgender Persons Should discuss with Their Healthcare Care Provider ( ... have identified as most commonly of concern for transgender persons. While not all of these items apply ...

  17. Early experience of a safety net provider reorganizing into an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Karen; Santos, Palmira; Thompson, Douglas; Stout, Somava S; Bearse, Adriana; Mechanic, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Although safety net providers will benefit from health insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act, they also face significant challenges in the postreform environment. Some have embraced the concept of the accountable care organization to help improve quality and efficiency while addressing financial shortfalls. The experience of Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA) in Massachusetts, where health care reform began six years ago, provides insight into the opportunities and challenges of this approach in the safety net. CHA's strategies include care redesign, financial realignment, workforce transformation, and development of external partnerships. Early results show some improvement in access, patient experience, quality, and utilization; however, the potential efficiencies will not eliminate CHA's current operating deficit. The patient population, payer mix, service mix, cost structure, and political requirements reduce the likelihood of financial sustainability without significant changes in these factors, increased public funding, or both. Thus the future of safety net institutions, regardless of payment and care redesign success, remains at risk. PMID:24842968

  18. Triggers, bundles, protocols, and checklists--what every maternal care provider needs to know.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Shields, Larry E; Grobman, William A; D'Alton, Mary E; Lappen, Justin R; Mercer, Brian M

    2016-04-01

    The rise in maternal morbidity and mortality has resulted in national and international attention at optimally organizing systems and teams for pregnancy care. Given that maternal morbidity and mortality can occur unpredictably in any obstetric setting, specialists in general obstetrics and gynecology along with other primary maternal care providers should be integrally involved in efforts to improve the safety of obstetric care delivery. Quality improvement initiatives remain vital to meeting this goal. The evidence-based utilization of triggers, bundles, protocols, and checklists can aid in timely diagnosis and treatment to prevent or limit the severity of morbidity as well as facilitate interdisciplinary, patient-centered care. The purpose of this document is to summarize the pertinent elements from this forum to assist primary maternal care providers in their utilization and implementation of these safety tools. PMID:26478105

  19. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26622911

  20. [Nursing Experience With Providing Wound Care for a Newborn With Epidermolysis Bullosa].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Yi; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare hereditary, chromosomal disease of the skin. Life-threatening septicemia may result if appropriate care is not provided to alleviate the extensive skin irritation that is the main symptom of this disease. This case report describes the experience of the author in nursing a wound area on a newborn that was suspected of being caused by EB. This wound area comprised blisters and peeling skin that covered 30% of the entire skin area of the infant. A holistic assessment conducted from December 1st, 2013 to January 7th, 2014 revealed that this large of an area of damage to the skin and mucosa considerably complicated the task of wound care and caused severe pain to the infant. In response to the special needs of this case, our medical team conducted a literature review of wound care for this rare disease. Based on the suggestions of previous empirical studies, nursing measures for the skin, mucosa, and wounds of the newborn were then administered through inter-team cooperation. These actions effectively reduced the pain, controlled the infection, and accelerated wound healing. In addition, progressive contact was used to guide the primary caregivers of the newborn, which alleviated their physical and psychological stresses effectively. The caregivers were educated systematically on wound care and guided to learn techniques for nursing and dressing wounds. Thus, these caregivers were better prepared to continue providing wound care at home. We suggest that healthcare professionals reference empirical studies when providing care to EB newborns during the acute-care period and provide wound care and supportive therapies to control the occurrence of complications using a multidisciplinary team-care model. In addition, social resources should be used effectively in nursing care plans to mitigate the effect of this rare disease on families. PMID:26645451

  1. Civilian field surgery in the rural trauma setting: a proposal for providing optimal care.

    PubMed Central

    Foil, M. B.; Cunningham, P. R.; Hale, J. C.; Benson, N. H.; Treurniet, S.

    1992-01-01

    Rural trauma presents unique problems for surgical care. While military surgeons are prepared to provide care at or near the scene of battle, civilian literature is devoid of reports for care provided by surgeons at sites of injury occurrences. Although these injuries are infrequent, they are more likely to occur in rural trauma settings. This article describes two cases of extremity injury that required amputation at the scene and presents a proposal for swift mobilization of appropriately trained surgeons to the scene with adequate instrumentation and lighting, which can significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of these victims. PMID:1404476

  2. Milwaukee County Child Care Providers Appear Ready for YoungStar: Local Providers Compare Favorably to State as a Whole. Research Brief. Volume 99, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the Wisconsin Early Childhood Association (WECA), the Public Policy Forum surveyed 1,425 child care center directors, center employees, and family child care providers statewide. The survey was designed to provide a picture of the status of Wisconsin's child care workforce in terms of educational attainment, experience,…

  3. Home Care Providers to the Rescue: A Novel First-Responder Programme

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steen M.; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe; Rasmussen, Susanne R.; Kvist, Birgitte; Christensen, Anette; Lyng, Charlotte; Lindberg, Jan; Lauritsen, Torsten L. B.; Lippert, Freddy K.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Poul A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. Results Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases and shock was delivered in one case. For 26 of the 28 cases, the cardiac arrest occurred in a private home. Ninety-five per cent of the providers who had been dispatched to a cardiac arrest reported feeling prepared for managing the initial resuscitation, including use of AED. Conclusion Home care providers are suited to act as first-responders in predominantly rural and residential districts. Future follow-up will allow further evaluation of home care provider arrivals and patient survival. PMID:26509532

  4. Integrating family planning into HIV care in western Kenya: HIV care providers' perspectives and experiences one year following integration.

    PubMed

    Newmann, Sara J; Zakaras, Jennifer M; Tao, Amy R; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Steinfeld, Rachel; Grossman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With high rates of unintended pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa, integration of family planning (FP) into HIV care is being explored as a strategy to reduce unmet need for contraception. Perspectives and experiences of healthcare providers are critical in order to create sustainable models of integrated care. This qualitative study offers insight into how HIV care providers view and experience the benefits and challenges of providing integrated FP/HIV services in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Sixteen individual interviews were conducted among healthcare workers at six public sector HIV care facilities one year after the implementation of integrated FP and HIV services. Data were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory methods and Atlas.ti. Providers reported a number of benefits of integrated services that they believed increased the uptake and continuation of contraceptive methods. They felt that integrated services enabled them to reach a larger number of female and male patients and in a more efficient way for patients compared to non-integrated services. Availability of FP services in the same place as HIV care also eliminated the need for most referrals, which many providers saw as a barrier for patients seeking FP. Providers reported many challenges to providing integrated services, including the lack of space, time, and sufficient staff, inadequate training, and commodity shortages. Despite these challenges, the vast majority of providers was supportive of FP/HIV integration and found integrated services to be beneficial to HIV-infected patients. Providers' concerns relating to staffing, infrastructure, and training need to be addressed in order to create sustainable, cost-effective FP/HIV integrated service models. PMID:26406803

  5. Pesticides and health risks.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Robyn C; Huffling, Katie; Sattler, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Pesticides are a category of chemicals formulated to kill or repel a pest or halt its reproduction. In this article we review the toxicological and epidemiological literature; describe common potential pesticide exposures; and focus on the associated health risks to fetal development. Clinical implications are reviewed, and recommendations are made regarding the integration of this environmental health concern into nursing education, practice, research, and policy/advocacy work. Recommendations for pesticide elimination and reduction in health care settings are included. PMID:20409108

  6. Quality of care provided by mid-level health workers: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Zohra S; Cometto, Giorgio; Huicho, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers. Methods Experimental and observational studies comparing mid-level health workers and higher level health workers were identified by a systematic review of the scientific literature. The quality of the evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria and data were analysed using Review Manager. Findings Fifty-three studies, mostly from high-income countries and conducted at tertiary care facilities, were identified. In general, there was no difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers in the areas of maternal and child health and communicable and noncommunicable diseases and that provided by higher level health workers. However, the rates of episiotomy and analgesia use were significantly lower in women giving birth who received care from midwives alone than in those who received care from doctors working in teams with midwives, and women were significantly more satisfied with care from midwives. Overall, the quality of the evidence was low or very low. The search also identified six observational studies, all from Africa, that compared care from clinical officers, surgical technicians or non-physician clinicians with care from doctors. Outcomes were generally similar. Conclusion No difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers and that provided by higher level health workers was found. However, the quality of the evidence was low. There is a need for studies with a high methodological quality, particularly in Africa – the region with the greatest shortage of health workers. PMID:24347706

  7. Performance of the measures of processes of care for adults and service providers in rehabilitation settings

    PubMed Central

    Bamm, Elena L; Rosenbaum, Peter; Wilkins, Seanne; Stratford, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, client-centered care has been embraced as a new philosophy of care by many organizations around the world. Clinicians and researchers have identified the need for valid and reliable outcome measures that are easy to use to evaluate success of implementation of new concepts. Objective The current study was developed to complete adaptation and field testing of the companion patient-reported measures of processes of care for adults (MPOC-A) and the service provider self-reflection measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Design A validation study Settings In-patient rehabilitation facilities. Main outcome measures MPOC-A and measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Results Three hundred and eighty-four health care providers, 61 patients, and 16 family members completed the questionnaires. Good to excellent internal consistency (0.71–0.88 for health care professionals, 0.82–0.90 for patients, and 0.87–0.94 for family members), as well as moderate to good correlations between domains (0.40–0.78 for health care professionals and 0.52–0.84 for clients) supported internal reliability of the tools. Exploratory factor analysis of the MPOC-SP(A) responses supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaire. Conclusion MPOC-A and MPOC-SP(A) are valid and reliable tools to assess patient and service-provider accounts, respectively, of the extent to which they experience, or are able to provide, client-centered service. Research should now be undertaken to explore in more detail the relationships between client experience and provider reports of their own behavior. PMID:26089710

  8. The challenges of providing eye care for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Li, Josephine Ch; Wong, Katrina; Park, Adela Sy; Fricke, Timothy R; Jackson, A Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    This review is intended to raise awareness of the importance of providing high-quality eye care for people with intellectual disabilities and the increasing need for this eye care to be community-based. We describe the challenges to the provision of high-quality community-based eye care for people with intellectual disabilities and ideas, evidence and methods for overcoming them. The prevalence of visual impairment in people with intellectual disabilities has been reported to be at least 40 per cent, rising to as high as 100 per cent in those with profound and severe disabilities. A progressive move toward deinstitutionalisation has shifted the provision of care for people with intellectual disabilities. Individuals can have the freedom to access health-care services of their choice. This has posed challenges to the health-care system, including how to deliver high-quality community-based eye care, creating a current significant unmet need for eye-care services. Undiagnosed refractive error and under-prescription of spectacles are major reasons for avoidable visual impairment among people with disabilities. There is an apparent reluctance of optometrists to engage in this work due to the perceived difficulties of working with people with intellectual and multiple disabilities. There are challenges associated with diagnosis and management of ocular conditions in people with intellectual disabilities and the demand is clear. Small shifts in training, knowledge and awareness would place optometry well to meet the challenges of this specialised area of eye care. PMID:26390904

  9. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    PubMed

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data. PMID:20659837

  10. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations. PMID:27111680

  11. A survey of Alabama eye care providers in 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background State level information regarding eye care resources can provide policy makers with valuable information about availability of eye care services. The current study surveyed ophthalmologists, optometrists and vision rehabilitation providers practicing in Alabama. Methods Three mutually exclusive provider groups were identified, i.e., all ophthalmologists, optometrists, and vision rehabilitation providers working in Alabama in 2010. Eligible providers were contacted in 2010 and 2011 and information was requested regarding provider demographics and training, practice type and service characteristics, and patient characteristics. Descriptive statistics (e.g., means, proportions) were used to characterize provider groups by their demographic and training characteristics, practice characteristics, services provided and patients or clients served. In addition, county level figures demonstrate the numbers and per capita ophthalmologists and optometrists. Results Ophthalmologists were located in 24 of Alabama’s 67 counties, optometrists in 56, and 10 counties had neither an ophthalmologist nor an optometrist. Overall, 1,033 vision care professionals were identified as eligible to participate in the survey: 217 ophthalmologists, 638 optometrists, and 178 visual rehabilitation providers. Of those, 111 (51.2%) ophthalmologists, 246 (38.6%) optometrists, and 81 (45.5%) rehabilitation providers participated. Most participating ophthalmologists, optometrists, and vision rehabilitation providers identified themselves as non-Hispanic White. Ophthalmologists and optometrists estimated that 27% and 22%, respectively, of their patients had diabetes but that the proportion that adhered to eye care guidelines was 61% among ophthalmology patients and 53% among optometry patients. Conclusions A large number of Alabama communities are isolated from eye care services. Increased future demand for eye care is anticipated nationally given the aging of the population and decreasing

  12. Finding the Primary Care Providers in the Specialist-Dominant Primary Care Setting of Korea: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Yong; Eun, Sang Jun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify private clinics that have a potential to perform the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in a primary care setting in Korea where private specialists are dominant. Methods The 2013 National Patient Sample claim data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in Korea was used. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using characteristics of private clinics, and patient and utilization characteristics of 27,797 private clinics. External validation of clusters was performed by assessing the association among clusters and outcomes of care provided by private clinics. Stability of clusters was cross-validated using discriminant analysis. Results The result classified more than a half of private clinics into a potential PCP cluster. These were private clinics with specialties considered to be those of primary care physicians and were more likely to be located in non-metropolitan areas than specialized PCPs were. Compared to specialized PCPs, they had a higher percentage of pediatric and geriatric patients, patients with greater disease severity, a higher percentage of patients with complex comorbidities or with simple or minor disease groups, a higher number of patients and visits, and the same or higher quality of primary care. The most important factor in explaining variations between PCP clusters was the number of simple or minor disease groups per patient. Conclusion This study identified potential PCPs and suggested the identifying criteria for PCPs. It will provide useful information for formulation of a primary care strengthening policy to policy makers in Korea as well as other countries with similar specialist-dominant primary care settings. PMID:27560181

  13. A mixed logit model of health care provider choice: analysis of NSS data for rural India.

    PubMed

    Borah, Bijan J

    2006-09-01

    In order to address the persistent problems of access to and delivery of health care in rural India, a better understanding of the individual provider choice decision is required. This paper is an attempt in this direction as it investigates the determinants of outpatient health care provider choice in rural India in the mixed multinomial logit (MMNL) framework. This is the first application of the mixed logit to the modeling of health care utilization. We also use the multiple imputation technique to impute the missing prices of providers that an individual did not visit when she was ill. Using data from National Sample Survey Organization of India, we find the following: price and distance to a health facility play significant roles in health care provider choice decision; when health status is poor, distance plays a less significant role in an adult's provider choice decision; price elasticity of demand for outpatient care varies with income, with low-income groups being more price-sensitive than high-income ones. Furthermore, outpatient care for children is more price-elastic than that for adults, which reflects the socio-economic structure of a typical household in rural India where an adult's health is more important than that of a child for the household's economic sustenance. PMID:16929482

  14. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: clinicians’ views, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Yoxall, Charles W; Ayers, Susan; Sawyer, Alexandra; Bertullies, Sophia; Thomas, Margaret; D Weeks, Andrew; Duley, Lelia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to assess clinicians’ views and experiences of providing immediate neonatal care at birth beside the mother, and of using a mobile trolley designed to facilitate this bedside care. Design Qualitative interview study with semistructured interviews. Results The results were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting A large UK maternity unit. Participants Clinicians (n=20) from a range of disciplines who were present when the trolley was used to provide neonatal care at birth at the bedside. Five clinicians provided/observed advanced resuscitation by the bedside. Results Five themes were identified: (1) Parents’ involvement, which included ‘Contact and involvement’, ‘Positive emotions for parents’ and ‘Staff communication’; (2) Reservations about neonatal care at birth beside the mother, which included ‘Impact on clinicians’ and ‘Impact on parents’; (3) Practical challenges in providing neonatal care at the bedside, which included ‘Cord length’ and ‘Caesarean section’; (4) Comparison of the trolley with usual resuscitation equipment and (5) Training and integration of bedside care into clinical routine, which included ‘Teething problems’ and ‘Training’. Conclusions Overall, most clinicians were positive about providing immediate neonatal care at the maternal bedside, particularly in terms of the clinicians’ perceptions of the parents’ experience. Clinicians also perceived that their close proximity to parents improved communication. However, there was some concern about performing more intensive interventions in front of parents. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at the bedside requires staff training and support. PMID:26423852

  15. Substitution of physicians and other providers in outpatient mental health care.

    PubMed

    Deb, P; Holmes, A M

    1998-06-01

    This paper evaluates the extent to which patients may substitute physician and non-physician outpatient mental health services in response to insurance coverage which differs by provider type. Using data from the National Medical Expenditure Survey, a semi-flexible two-stage demand specification is used to estimate substitution elasticities. Our results indicate that insurance coverage significantly affects the choice of provider from whom care is sought and, for individuals who seek care from both provider types, that physician and non-physician services are substitutes. Our elasticity estimates provide a welfare economic argument supporting coverage parity of physician and non-physician mental health services. PMID:9683095

  16. Performance of new alternative providers of primary care services in England: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Anthony A; Pape, Utz; Ratneswaren, Anenta; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Health system reforms in England are opening broad areas of clinical practice to new providers of care. As part of these reforms, new entrants – including private companies – have been allowed into the primary care market under ‘alternative provider of medical services’ contracting mechanisms since 2004. The characteristics and performance of general practices working under new alternative provider contracts are not well described. We sought to compare the quality of care provided by new entrant providers to that provided by the traditional model of general practice. Design Open cohort study of English general practices. We used linear regression in cross-sectional and time series analyses, adjusting for practice and population characteristics, to compare quality in practices using alternative provider contracts to traditional practices. We created regression models using practice fixed effects to estimate the impact of practices changing to the new contract type. Setting The English National Health Service. Participants All general practices open from 2008/2009 to 2012/2013. Main outcome measures Seventeen established quality indicators – covering clinical effectiveness, efficiency, access and patient experience. Results In total, 4.1% (347 of 8300) of general practices in England were run by alternative contract providers. These practices tended to be smaller, and serve younger, more diverse and more deprived populations than traditional providers. Practices run by alternative providers performed worse than traditional providers on 15 of 17 indicators after adjusting for practice and population characteristics (p < 0.01 for all). Switching to a new alternative provider contract did not result in improved performance. Conclusions The introduction of new alternative providers to deliver primary care services in England has not led to improvements in quality and may have resulted in worse care. Regulators should ensure that new

  17. Awareness, Interest, and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Using Point-of-Care Cancer Screening Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chloe S.; Vanture, Sarah; Cho, Margaret; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Wang, Catharine; Huang, Franklin W.

    2016-01-01

    Well-developed point-of-care (POC) cancer screening tools have the potential to provide better cancer care to patients in both developed and developing countries. However, new medical technology will not be adopted by medical providers unless it addresses a population’s existing needs and end-users’ preferences. The goals of our study were to assess primary care providers’ level of awareness, interest, and preferences in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice and to provide guidelines to biomedical engineers for future POC technology development. A total of 350 primary care providers completed a one-time self-administered online survey, which took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A $50 Amazon gift card was given as an honorarium for the first 100 respondents to encourage participation. The description of POC cancer screening technology was provided in the beginning of the survey to ensure all participants had a basic understanding of what constitutes POC technology. More than half of the participants (57%) stated that they heard of the term “POC technology” for the first time when they took the survey. However, almost all of the participants (97%) stated they were either “very interested” (68%) or “somewhat interested” (29%) in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice. Demographic characteristics such as the length of being in the practice of medicine, the percentage of patients on Medicaid, and the average number of patients per day were not shown to be associated with the level of interest in using POC. These data show that there is a great interest in POC cancer screening technology utilization among this population of primary care providers and vast room for future investigations to further understand the interest and preferences in using POC cancer technology in practice. Ensuring that the benefits of new technology outweigh the costs will maximize the likelihood it will be used by medical providers and

  18. A conceptual framework for understanding and reducing overuse by primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Powell, Adam A; Bloomfield, Hanna E; Burgess, Diana J; Wilt, Timothy J; Partin, Melissa R

    2013-10-01

    Primary care providers frequently recommend, administer, or prescribe health care services that are unlikely to benefit their patients. Yet little is known about how to reduce provider overuse behavior. In the absence of a theoretically grounded causal framework, it is difficult to predict the contexts under which different types of interventions to reduce provider overuse will succeed and under which they will fail. In this article, we present a framework based on the theory of planned behavior that is designed to guide overuse research and intervention development. We describe categories of primary care provider beliefs that lead to the formation of intentions to assess the appropriateness of services, and propose factors that may affect whether the presence of assessment intentions results in an appropriate recommendation. Interventions that have been commonly used to address provider overuse behavior are reviewed within the context of the framework. PMID:23916984

  19. Accountable Communities for Health: Moving From Providing Accountable Care to Creating Health.

    PubMed

    Tipirneni, Renuka; Vickery, Katherine Diaz; Ehlinger, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Lessons from community-oriented primary care in the United States can offer insights into how we could improve population health by integrating the public health, social service, and health care sectors to form accountable communities for health (ACHs). Unlike traditional accountable care organizations (ACOs) that address population health from a health care perspective, ACHs address health from a community perspective and consider the total investment in health across all sectors. The approach embeds the ACO in a community context where multiple stakeholders come together to share responsibility for tackling multiple determinants of health. ACOs using the ACH model provide a roadmap for embedding health care in communities in a way that uniquely addresses local social determinants of health. PMID:26195684

  20. Disclosure of HIV Status to Health Care Providers in the Netherlands: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Stutterheim, Sarah E; Sicking, Lenneke; Baas, Ineke; Brands, Ronald; Roberts, Hilde; van Brakel, Wim H; Lechner, Lilian; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2016-01-01

    We qualitatively investigated perspectives on HIV disclosure to health care providers (HCP) by people living with HIV (PLWH). Perspectives varied across PLWH and between PLWH and HCP. Some PLWH felt they should always disclose so that HCP could take necessary precautions or because disclosure optimized care. Others felt that disclosure was not an obligation but a courtesy. Still others felt that disclosure was unnecessary as all HCP should apply universal precautions or because HIV status was not relevant to care. Most HCP claimed they should be informed about patients' HIV status as this would reduce occupational risk of infection and improve care. HCP also felt that disclosure concerns by PLWH were unnecessary given the HCP' duty of professional confidentiality. Some acknowledged that disclosure was not always necessary but still indicated wanting to be informed. Perspectives on HIV disclosure in health care settings differed substantially between PLWH and HCP. PMID:27005783

  1. Patient safety attitude among health care providers in family health care centers in Cairo governorate.

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Mohsen Abdalhamed; Abouseif, Hasnaa Abdalaal; Boulos, Dina Nabih Kamel; Elharoni, Hanaa Hassan Abdallah

    2014-08-01

    Two hundred and eighty Health care; physicians, nurses and technicians were included in the study, 133 (47.5) from 6th discrete HCF, 54 (19.3%) from Duwaiqa and 93 (33.2%) from Al Haggana. Ages ranged between 22 and 59 years (35.14 ± 10.13), years of experience in the study group ranged between 1 and 35 years (8.72 ± 8.18) and years of work in group ranged between 1 & 40 years (10.43 ± 8.33). Doctors and nurses were males (72.55%) & females (86%) respectively while technicians were mostly males (60%). The teamwork climate score was 3.98 ± 0.87, 64.0% answered high or very high, 16.4% answered inadequate and 18% had answered few or very few. Safety climate score was 3.61 ± 0.63, 49.28% had high or very high score, 17.14% answered inadequate and 32.15% had answered few or very few. Job satisfaction score was 3.91 ± 0.80, 32.15% had answered few or very few, 17.14% answered inadequate and 49.28% answered high or very high. Stress recognition score was 3.61 ± 0.79, 25% had answered few or very few, 28.6% answered inadequate and 45.7% answered high or very high. Perception of management score was 3.48 ± 0.80, 23.2% had answered few or very few, 17.8% answered inadequate and 57.6% answered high or very high. Working condition score was 3.51 ± 0.84, 46.8% had answered few or very few, 17.1% answered inadequate and 35.7% answered high or very high. A significant difference regarding team work score, safety climate score, perception of management score, working condition score with highest value in doctors and lowest in technicians. On the other hand no significant difference was detected regarding job satisfaction score and stress recognition score. A significant difference regarding team work score, safety climate score and perception of management score with high values among older groups. No significant difference was detected regarding job satisfaction score, stress recognition score and working condition score. Also, a significant difference regarding team

  2. Review: Increasing Awareness and Education on Health Disparities for Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna; Palomarez, Rigo Estevan

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this review is to highlight health care disparities and trends in several common diseases in selected populations while offering evidence-based approaches to mitigating health care disparities. Health care disparities cross many barriers and affect multiple populations and diseases. Ethnic minorities, the elderly, and those of lower socioeconomic status (SES) are more at-risk than others. However, many low SES Whites and higher SES racial minorities have poorer health than their racial or SES peers. Also, recent immigrant groups and Hispanics, in particular, maintain high health ratings. The so-called Hispanic Paradox provides an example of how culture and social background can be used to improve health outcomes. These groups have unique determinants of disparity that are based on a wide range of cultural and societal factors. Providing improved access to care and reducing the social determinants of disparity is crucial to improving public health. At the same time, for providers, increasing an understanding of the social determinants promotes better models of individualized care to encourage more equitable care. These approaches include increasing provider education on disparities encountered by different populations, practicing active listening skills, and utilizing a patient's cultural background to promote healthy behaviors. PMID:27103768

  3. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities. PMID:25265763

  4. Adult Health in Child Care: Health Status, Behaviors, and Concerns of Teachers, Directors, and Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratz, Rene R.; Claffey, Anne

    1996-01-01

    A statewide survey examined health status, behaviors, and concerns of 446 randomly selected early childhood professionals--directors, teachers, and family day care providers. Found dramatic changes in perceived frequency of various symptoms and becoming ill since working with children. Found significant differences between groups for number of…

  5. Medical provider attitudes about behavioral health consultants in integrated primary care: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Nicole D; Mueller, Anne E; Ilem, Allison A; Renn, Brenna N; DeSantis, Brian; Segal, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    Integrated behavioral health increases service utilization and treatment success, particularly with high-risk populations. This study assessed medical personnel's attitudes and perceptions of behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) in primary care using a brief self-report measure. A 6-item survey was given to medical providers (n = 45) from a health care system that includes integrated behavioral health services. Survey items assessed providers' attitudes and perceptions about BHCs. Attitudes about behavioral health were largely favorable. For all items, 73.3% to 100% of participants endorsed strongly agree or agree. Chi-square analyses revealed that those who interacted more frequently with BHCs were more comfortable discussing behavioral health issues with their patients, χ²(6, n = 45) = 13.43, p < .05, and that physicians believe that BHCs help patients effectively address their behavioral health problems, χ²(2, n = 45) = 6.36, p < .05. Age, gender, and health center in which the providers worked were not significantly related to any survey items. Medical providers surveyed believe that BHCs are valuable members of integrated health care, improving their abilities to provide care and to address their patients' physical and behavioral health problems. Although these preliminary results are promising, the setting surveyed has well-integrated behavioral health care services and thus might not be representative of other settings without such integration. Future studies should address medical providers' opinions of BHCs in a variety of settings with larger samples. PMID:25329753

  6. Mental Health Services in Rural China: A Qualitative Study of Primary Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenyu; Huang, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Faqin; Abdullah, Abu S.; Nie, Guanghui; Feng, Qiming; Wei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the challenges that primary health care providers faced in the process of delivering mental healthcare and assess their attitudes towards patients with mental health problems. In-depth interviews were conducted among 42 primary health care providers in two counties of Guangxi province, China. All interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically. Primary health care providers in both counties faced the same difficulties: lack of professional knowledge, fear of patients' attack, more extra work, and less subsidies. However, most of primary health care providers (30/42) were still willing to do mental healthcare management. All the interviewees considered that communication skills with patients and their family members, proper attitude (without discrimination), and the professional knowledge of mental health are required. There are still several participants (15/42) who showed negative attitude toward mental disorders. Nearly all the respondents (39/42) emphasized the importance of increasing their income or subsidies by the government. This qualitative study provides insights into mental health services in rural communities of Guangxi and identified issues that could be considered in engaging primary health care providers in the management of mental disorders. PMID:26819947

  7. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients’ homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Results Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Conclusions Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority

  8. Providing care for migrant farm worker families in their unique sociocultural context and environment.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ann; Layne, Laura; Thomisee, Karen

    2010-04-01

    This article highlights the Farm Worker Family Health Program's (FWFHP) strategies for providing care to migrant farm workers residing within a unique social and cultural context. The care provided by health professions students from a variety of disciplines extends and augments the work of the local migrant farm worker clinic that is pushed beyond capacity during peak growing and harvest times. Nursing's social responsibility to care for underserved populations is a guiding principle of the FWFHP and shapes how the work is translated into action. The FWFHP is a community-academic partnership that began in the rural southeastern United States in 1993. Challenges facing migrant farm worker families include access to health care, language, health literacy, housing and sanitation, family and community integrity, and workplace safety. The nursing practice strategies used to address these health challenges may be adapted to strengthen health programs serving other populations who live in poverty or reside in low-resource settings. PMID:20301816

  9. Health care providers under pressure: making the most of challenging times.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott B; Robinson, Phillip J

    2010-01-01

    Whether the slowing economic recovery, tight credit markets, increasing costs, or the uncertainty surrounding health care reform, the health care industry faces some sizeable challenges. These factors have put considerable strain on the industry's traditional financing options that the industry has relied on in the past--bonds, banks, finance companies, private equity, venture capital, real estate investment trusts, private philanthropy, and grants. At the same time, providers are dealing with rising costs, lower reimbursement rates, shrinking demand for elective procedures, higher levels of charitable care and bad debt, and increased scrutiny of tax-exempt hospitals. Providers face these challenges against a back ground of uncertainty created by health care reform. PMID:21294438

  10. PESTICIDE RESULTS FROM AN INTERAGENCY EFFORT TO CHARACTERIZE CONTAMINANTS IN CHILD CARE CENTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 13 million children are placed in non-parental child care during the work day; but, children's exposures to chemicals in child care centers have not been characterized. To address this data gap, three federal agencies teamed to characterize contaminants in child ...

  11. PESTICIDE MEASUREMENT RESULTS FROM THE FIRST NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEY OF CHILD CARE CENTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 13 million children are placed in non-parental child care during the work day; however, children's exposures to chemicals in child care centers have not been characterized. To address this data gap, three federal agencies teamed to characterize contaminants in child...

  12. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism. PMID:25683782

  13. Developing personal values: trainees' attitudes toward strikes by health care providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Ting T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Kravitz, Richard L; Wilkes, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, health care providers use strikes and job actions to influence policy. For health care providers, especially physicians, strikes create an ethical tension between an obligation to care for current patients (e.g., to provide care and avoid abandonment) and an obligation to better care for future patients by seeking system improvements (e.g., improvements in safety, to access, and in the composition and strength of the health care workforce). This tension is further intensified when the potential benefit of a strike involves professional self-interest and the potential risk involves patient harm or death. By definition, trainees are still forming their professional identities and values, including their opinions on fair wages, health policy, employee benefits, professionalism, and strikes. In this article, the authors explore these ethical tensions, beginning with a discussion of reactions to a potential 2005 nursing strike at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. The authors then propose a conceptual model describing factors that may influence health care providers' decisions to strike (including personal ethics, personal agency, and strike-related context). In particular, the authors explore the relationship between training level and attitudes toward taking a job action, such as going on strike. Because trainees' attitudes toward strikes continue to evolve during training, the authors maintain that open discussion around the ethics of health care professionals' strikes and other methods of conflict resolution should be included in medical education to enhance professionalism and systems-based practice training. The authors include sample case vignettes to help initiate these important discussions. PMID:21436671

  14. Financial health and customer satisfaction in private health care providers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schiozer, Rafael Felipe; Saito, Cristiana Checchia; Saito, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the financial health and organizational form of private health care providers in Brazil. It also examines the major determinants of customer satisfaction associated with the provider's organizational form. An adjusted Altman's z-score is used as an indicator of financial health. A proxy variable based on customer complaints filed at the Brazilian National Agency for Supplementary Health is used as an indicator for customer satisfaction. The study uses a sample of 270 private health care providers and their operations over the period 2003-2005. Panel data analysis includes control variables related to market, operations, and management. Principal results indicate that: (1) private health care providers benefit from economies of scale; (2) self-funded health plans have better financial health; (3) spending on marketing does not have a significant impact on customer satisfaction in Brazil; (4) weak empirical evidence exists showing that good financial performance enhances customer's satisfaction. PMID:22124495

  15. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  16. Medical Respite and Linkages to Outpatient Health Care Providers among Individuals Experiencing Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Zur, Julia; Linton, Sabriya; Mead, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Medical respite programs provide nursing care and case management to individuals experiencing homelessness following hospitalization for an acute medical problem. One goal of these programs is to link clients to outpatient providers to decrease their reliance on hospital services. Through qualitative interviews with staff members (n = 8) and clients (n = 14) at a medical respite program, we explored processes of, and challenges associated with, linking clients to outpatient care. Six themes were identified, which offer insight about important considerations when linking clients to outpatient providers and highlight the value of medical respite programs for this population. PMID:27074404

  17. Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Thomas B.; White, Mary C.; Caraballo, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an update on lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and its implications for primary care providers. One of the unique features of lung cancer screening is the potential complexity in patient management if an LDCT scan reveals a small pulmonary nodule. Additional tests, consultation with multiple specialists, and follow-up evaluations may be needed to evaluate whether lung cancer is present. Primary care providers should know the resources available in their communities for lung cancer screening with LDCT and smoking cessation, and the key points to be addressed in informed and shared decision-making discussions with patients. PMID:24830610

  18. Care provider perspectives on medical travel: A three-country study of destination hospitals.

    PubMed

    Garman, Andrew N; Johnson, Tricia J; Lynch, Elizabeth B; Satjapot, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the current and potential role of medical travel in U.S. patient care, very little research has been conducted on clinician and other provider organizations' perspectives on providing international patient care. The present study sought to gain formative insights about medical travel from the providers' perspectives, by conducting structured interviews and focus groups in six hospitals from three countries catering to patients traveling from the United States. Findings highlighted the surprising role of international events and policies in the evolution of medical travel, as well as both the desire and need for more transparent quality standards. PMID:26950538

  19. Providing Outcomes Information to Nursing Homes: Can It Improve Quality of Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether providing outcomes information to 120 nursing homes facilitated improvements in quality over a 12-month period, as compared with 1,171 facilities not receiving this information. The outcomes information provided consisted of a report mailed to administrators that examined six measures of care quality. These…

  20. Keeping Kids Safe: A Guide for Safe Food Handling & Sanitation for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Because children under age 5 are susceptible to food-borne illnesses and children in diapers present special sanitation and health problems, food safety and sanitation are emerging as important issues for child care providers. This booklet is designed to give providers and parents a quick and easy reference for food safety and sanitation. The…

  1. Addressing Needs of Rural Health Care Providers via Distance Learning. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemi, Gloria; And Others

    This document describes a distance learning program designed to meet the needs of rural health care providers. The program allows students to complete an Associate of Applied Science (AS) in the Meramec Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program through St. Louis Community College (SLCC). The first section of the document provides a draft of the…

  2. Factors Affecting Turnover among Family Child Care Providers: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Christine M., Deery-Schmitt, Deanna M.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated 57 family child caregivers longitudinally to identify turnover precursors. Providers most likely to leave had more education, less training, and more stress than providers who stayed. Training and caring for one's own children indirectly affected turnover through job stress. Job satisfaction was unrelated to turnover. Job…

  3. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  4. What Role Can School Health Providers Play in Health Care Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Robin

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama is wasting no time in unfolding his plan to provide health coverage for all Americans. He started in February by signing legislation to reinstate the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which expands eligibility criteria to provide 4 million more children access to health care. This first step is one of many needed to…

  5. Infections in Children: A Sourcebook for Educators and Child Care Providers. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Richard D.; And Others

    Noting the rapid changes occurring in the world of infectious diseases, this book provides updated information for care providers, educators, and parents on the increasingly complex issues of childhood infection. The book is organized into two parts. The first part discusses general considerations for group settings. Chapter 1 introduces the…

  6. Combat health care providers and resiliency: adaptive coping mechanisms during and after deployment.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Shafer, Michaela; Aramanda, Larry; Hickling, Edward J; Benedek, David M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand the varied health care provider responses to traumas by identifying perceptions of control and self-efficacy, appraisal styles, and postevent coping strategies in active duty military nurses and physicians deployed to combat/terrorist regions. Twenty purposively sampled military health care providers completed a descriptive questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a recorded semistructured interview that was later transcribed and content analyzed. Cognitive-behavioral determinants of healthy response to trauma were used to frame this descriptive interpretive study and to assist with developing a model for healthy adaptation in trauma-exposed health care providers. Participants felt they had the greatest control over their health care provider role in theater, and most expressed a belief that a sense of control and a sense of purpose were important to their coping. All used some form of social support to cope and many found calming activities that allowed for self-reflection to be helpful. Results from this analysis can be used to inform interventions and promote postevent coping behaviors that increase social support, strengthen important bonds, and enhance involvement in activities that elicit positive emotions. Health care providers experienced positive outcomes despite considerable traumatic exposure by using coping strategies that map closely to several principles of psychological first aid. This suggests a need to train all medical personnel in these concepts as they appear helpful in mitigating responses to the stress of combat-related exposures. PMID:23855421

  7. “They told me to leave”: How health care providers address intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S.; Lafleur, Ross; Fogarty, Colleen T.; Mittal, Mona; Cerulli, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) victims frequently seek medical treatment though rarely for IPV. Recommendations for health care providers (HCPs) include: IPV screening, counseling, and safety referral. Objective Report women’s experiences discussing IPV with HCPs. Design Structured interviews with women reporting IPV HCP discussions; descriptive analyses; bivariate and multivariate analyses and association with patient demographics and substance abuse. Participants Women from family court, community-based, inner-city primary care practice, and tertiary care-based outpatient psychiatric practice. Key Results A total 142 women participated: family court (N=44; 31%), primary care practice (N=62; 43.7%), and psychiatric practice (N=36; 25.4%) Fifty-one percent (n=72) reported HCPs knew of their IPV. Of those, 85% (n=61) told a primary care provider. Regarding IPV attitudes, 85% (n=61) found their HCP open, and 74% (n=53) knowledgeable. Regarding approaches, 71% (n= 51) believed their HCP advocated leaving the relationship. While 31% (n=22) received safety information, only 8% (n=6) received safety information and perceived their HCP as not advocating leaving the abusive relationship. Conclusions Half of participants disclosed IPV to their HCP’s but if they did, most perceived their provider advocated them leaving the relationship. Only 31% reported HCPs provided safety planning despite increased risks associated with leaving. We suggest healthcare providers improve safety planning with patients disclosing IPV. PMID:22570397

  8. Patient-provider perceptions on engagement in HIV care in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bofill, Lina Margarita; Lopez, Maria; Dorigo, Analia; Bordato, Alejandra; Lucas, Mar; Cabanillas, Graciela Fernandez; Sued, Omar; Cahn, Pedro; Cassetti, Isabel; Weiss, Stephen; Jones, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients participating in the national antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in Argentina fail to achieve an undetectable viral load, and approximately 25% are not retained in care. This qualitative study was designed to explore and identify factors associated with engagement and retention in public and private health care in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Qualitative data from key informants (n = 12) and focus groups (n = 4 groups) of patients and providers from private and public HIV treatment facilities were recorded and transcribed. Predetermined and arising themes related to adherence, engagement, and retention in care were coded and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Reasons identified for patients' lack of adherence or engagement in care differed between patients and providers, and patients attributed limitations to low self-efficacy, fear and concerns about HIV, and lack of provider involvement in treatment. In contrast, providers viewed themselves as decision-makers in patient care and patients as responsible for their own nonadherence due to lack of commitment to their own health or due to medication side effects. Patients reported health care system limitations and HIV concerns contributed to a lack of engagement, and providers identified limited HIV literacy and stigma as additional problems. Both agreed that chronic illness and substance addiction impacted adherence and retention, and agreed on the importance of trust, honesty, and communication in the patient-provider relationship. Results support the incorporation of system-, provider-, and patient-focused components into interventions to facilitate patient engagement, adherence, and retention in public and private settings in Argentina. PMID:24138788

  9. Client Factors Affect Provider Adherence to Clinical Guidelines during First Antenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Kayode, Gbenga A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Ansah, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    Background The first antenatal clinic (ANC) visit helps to distinguish pregnant women who require standard care, from those with specific problems and so require special attention. There are protocols to guide care providers to provide optimal care to women during ANC. Our objectives were to determine the level of provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines in the Safe Motherhood Protocol (SMP), and assess patient factors that determine complete provider adherence. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study that recruited women who delivered in eleven health facilities and who had utilized antenatal care services during their pregnancy in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A record review of the first antenatal visit of participants was carried out to assess the level of adherence to the SMP, using a thirteen-point checklist. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and previous pregnancy history was collected using a questionnaire. Percentages of adherence levels and baseline characteristics were estimated and cluster-adjusted odds ratios (OR) calculated to identify determinants. Results A total of 948 women who had delivered in eleven public facilities were recruited with a mean age (SD) of 28.2 (5.4) years. Overall, complete adherence to guidelines pertained to only 48.1% of pregnant women. Providers were significantly more likely to completely adhere to guidelines when caring for multiparous women [OR = 5.43 (1.69–17.44), p<0.01] but less likely to do so when attending to women with history of previous pregnancy complications [OR = 0.50 (0.33–0.75), p<0.01]. Conclusion Complete provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines is low across different facility types in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and is determined by parity and history of previous pregnancy complication. Providers should be trained and supported to adhere to the guidelines during provision of care to all pregnant women. PMID:27322643

  10. Comparing the quality of preconception care provided in healthcare centers in Mashhad in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sardasht, Fatemeh Ghaffari; Shourab, Nahid Jahani; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving the quality of healthcare services is considered as the main strategy to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Providing appropriate healthcare for mothers and their newborn children is facilitated significantly by considering the mothers’ health and welfare before pregnancy occurs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the quality of preconception care provided to women of reproductive age provided by five health centers in Mashhad in 2012 and 2013. Methods: Multi-stage sampling was used to select the participants in this descriptive study. As a result, 360 women of reproductive age and 39 healthcare providers from 24 healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected to participate. The data gathering tool was a checklist based on the Donabedian model that includes the three dimensions of structure, process, and outcome. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5), Kruskal-Wallis tests, ANOVA, and Spearman rank correlation. Results: The results showed that preconception care at the 24 healthcare centers had essentially the same conditions. But in the process and outcome components, the quality of the preconception care at five of the health centers was significantly different (p=0.008). The highest quality of care processes was identified at health center number 3. The difference in the component of outcomes being followed up by the healthcare providers at five of the health centers was statistically significant (p=0.000); however, there were no significant differences found among the satisfaction and awareness of the women who participated at the five health centers. Conclusion: The results showed that the performance of health personnel in providing preconception care and providing follow-up care was not satisfactory. PMID:26120412

  11. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers). Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider) interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection), based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and secondary outcomes are the

  12. Ethical and Practical Considerations in Providing Critical Care to Patients With Ebola Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Richard T.; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Chertow, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease epidemics in the past have given rise to psychologic and emotional responses among health-care workers (HCWs), stemming from fear of infection during patient care. Early experiences in the AIDS epidemic provide an example where fear of contagion resulted in differential treatment of patients infected with HIV. However, with a deeper understanding of AIDS pathogenesis and treatment, fear and discrimination diminished. Parallels exist between early experiences with AIDS and the present outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, particularly regarding discussions of medical futility in seriously ill patients. We provide a historical perspective on HCWs’ risk of infection during the provision of CPR, discuss physicians’ duty to treat in the face of perceived or actual HCW risk, and, finally, present the protocols implemented at the National Institutes of Health to reduce HCW risk while providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care. PMID:25764372

  13. Ethical and professional considerations providing medical evaluation and care to refugee asylum seekers.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Smith, Clyde L

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of asylum seekers who largely survived torture live in the United States. Asylum seekers have complex social and medical problems with significant barriers to health care access. When evaluating and providing care for survivors, health providers face important challenges regarding medical ethics and professional codes. We review ethical concerns in regard to accountability, the patient-physician relationship, and moral responsibilities to offer health care irrespective of patient legal status; competing professional responsibility toward society and the judiciary system; concerns about the consistency of asylum seekers' claims; ethical concerns surrounding involving trainees and researching within the evaluation setting; and the implication of broader societal views towards rights and social justice. We discuss contributing factors, including inadequate and insufficient provider training, varying and inadequate institutional commitment, asylum seekers' significant medical and social problems, and the broader health and social system issues. We review existing resources to address these concerns and offer suggestions. PMID:23767428

  14. Transition of pediatric patients to adult care: an analysis of provider perceptions across discipline and role.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan-Oliveira, Joanne; Fernandes, Susan M; Borges, Lawrence F; Fishman, Laurie N

    2014-01-01

    The importance of successfully transitioning pediatric patients to adult care is increasingly recognized as more children with chronic diseases are living to adulthood. The aim of this study was to investigate the current state of provider perceptions across disciplines regarding transition of pediatric patients to adult care. Focus groups made up of providers of various roles and experience levels were conducted. A total of six major themes were identified. We conclude that pediatric providers share common concerns about transitioning pediatric patients to adult care. We reinforce many of the issues raised in the literature and also discuss a sense of professional ego that was identified as a barrier to successful transition, which is not widely reported in other studies. PMID:25134224

  15. Ethical and practical considerations in providing critical care to patients with Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Davey, Richard T; Suffredini, Anthony F; Chertow, Daniel S

    2015-06-01

    Infectious disease epidemics in the past have given rise to psychologic and emotional responses among health-care workers (HCWs), stemming from fear of infection during patient care. Early experiences in the AIDS epidemic provide an example where fear of contagion resulted in differential treatment of patients infected with HIV. However, with a deeper understanding of AIDS pathogenesis and treatment, fear and discrimination diminished. Parallels exist between early experiences with AIDS and the present outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, particularly regarding discussions of medical futility in seriously ill patients. We provide a historical perspective on HCWs' risk of infection during the provision of CPR, discuss physicians' duty to treat in the face of perceived or actual HCW risk, and, finally, present the protocols implemented at the National Institutes of Health to reduce HCW risk while providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care. PMID:25764372

  16. Beliefs of Health Care Providers, Lay Health Care Providers and Lay Persons in Nigeria Regarding Hypertension. A Systematic Mixed Studies Review

    PubMed Central

    Akinlua, James Tosin; Meakin, Richard; Fadahunsi, Philip; Freemantle, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a major health risk factor for mortality globally, resulting in about 13% of deaths worldwide. In Nigeria, the high burden of hypertension remains an issue for urgent attention. The control of hypertension, among other factors, is strongly determined by personal beliefs about the illness and recommended treatment. Objective The aim of this review is to systematically synthesize available data from all types of studies on beliefs of the Nigerian populace about hypertension Methods We searched the following electronic databases; Medline, EMBase, PsycInfo, AMED from their inception till date for all relevant articles. A modified Kleinman’s explanatory model for hypertension was used as a framework for extraction of data on beliefs about hypertension. Results The search yielded a total of 3,794 hits from which 16 relevant studies (2 qualitative, 11 quantitative and 3 mixed methods studies) met the inclusion criteria for the review. Overall, most health care providers (HCPs) believe that stress is a major cause of hypertension. Furthermore, reported cut-off point for uncomplicated hypertension differed widely among HCPs. Lay Health Care Providers such as Patent Medicine Vendors’ beliefs about hypertension seem to be relatively similar to health care professionals in areas of risk factors for hypertension, course of hypertension and methods of treatment. Among Lay persons, misconception about hypertension was quite high. Although some Nigerians believed that life style habits such as alcohol intake, exercise levels, cigarette smoking were risk factors for developing hypertension, there was discordance between belief and practice of control of risk factors. However, beliefs across numerous ethnic groups and settings (urban/rural) in Nigeria have not been explored. Conclusion In order to achieve control of hypertension in Nigeria, interventions should be informed, among other factors, by adequate knowledge of beliefs regarding hypertension

  17. 76 FR 55570 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... veteran receiving nursing home care, domiciliary care, and adult day health care in State home facilities... document published in the Federal Register on March 23, 2011 (76 FR 16354), VA proposed to amend those... continues to provide care. VA provided a 60-day comment period that ended May 23, 2011. VA received...

  18. Irish midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care to non-Irish women seeking asylum

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Carolyn L; Murphy-Lawless, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Background Immigration and asylum seeking has been an important social and political phenomenon in Ireland since the mid 1990s. Inward migration to Ireland was seen in unprecedented numbers from 1995 onward, peaking in 2002 with 11,634 applications for refugee status. Asylum and immigration is an issue of national and international relevance as the numbers of displaced people worldwide continues to grow, reaching the highest level in 20 years at 45.2 million in 2012. Midwives provide the majority of care to childbearing women around the world, whether working as autonomous practitioners or under the direction of an obstetrician. Limited data currently exist on the perspectives of midwives who provide care to childbearing women while they are in the process of seeking asylum. Such data are important to midwifery leaders, educators, and policy-makers. The aims of this study were to explore midwives’ perceptions and experiences of providing care to women in the asylum process and to gain insight into how midwives can be equipped and supported to provide more effective care to this group in the future. Methods Data were collected via indepth unstructured interviews with a purposive sample of ten midwives from two sites, one a large urban inner city hospital, and the second, a smaller more rural maternity hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Five themes emerged from the data, barriers to communication, understanding cultural difference, challenges of caring for women who were unbooked, the emotional cost of caring, and structural barriers to effective care. Conclusion Findings highlight a need to focus on support and education for midwives, improved maternity services for immigrant women, and urgent policy revision. PMID:24516340

  19. Provider expectations and consumer perceptions of the importance and value of dental care.

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, P J; Jenny, J; Bagramian, R A; Robinson, E; Proshek, J M

    1977-01-01

    Seventy-eight inner city mothers of third and fourth grade children in three racial groups--white, black, and American Indian--known to need dental treatment for disease on permanent teeth, were interviewed at home by a trained community resident interviewer. Sixty-two per cent of the mothers were on public assistance. Information relating to the mothers' perceptions of the importance and value of dental care both for herself and for her children were collected. Utilization data were obtained via two dental examinations conducted one year apart. Data were also collected from a sample of provider dentists via mail questionnaire. A yield of 315 usable questionnaires was obtained, a return rate of 53 per cent. Provider-dentists felt that low socioeconomic consumers do not value dental services, as compared to other types of consumer goods and services, and that they do not believe dental care is important. Low income mothers in the same city reported that they did value dental care and believed it important. Expectations of and orientations toward the importance of dental care were found discongruent between the two groups of respondents. These discongruities on the dentist-patient relationship are discussed as a barrier to utilization. Although financial resources were available to many of the study families, only 49 per cent of these children received the needed care. It is suggested that the psychological cost to a patient of seeking care in inhospitable settings may act as a barrier to utilization. PMID:318810

  20. Improving care for women with a history of gestational diabetes: a provider perspective.

    PubMed

    Oza-Frank, Reena; Ko, Jean Y; Wapner, Andrew; Rodgers, Loren; Bouchard, Jo M; Conrey, Elizabeth J

    2014-09-01

    To identify perceived roles with regard to care for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) history and resources for improving care among women with a history of GDM from the perspective of obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), certified nurse midwives (CNM), family practitioners, and internists. In 2010, a survey was sent to a random sample of OB/GYNs, CNM, family practitioners, and internists (n = 2,375) in Ohio to assess knowledge, attitudes, and postpartum practices regarding diabetes prevention for women with a history of GDM. A total of 904 practitioners completed the survey (46 %). Over 70 % of CNMs strongly agreed it is part of their job to help women with GDM history improve diet and increase exercise, compared with 60 % of family practitioners/internists and 55 % of OB/GYNs (p < 0.001). More OB/GYNs and CNMs identified a need for more local nutrition specialists and patient education materials, compared with family practitioners/ internists. Between 60 and 70 % of OB/GYNs and CNMs reported lifestyle modification programs and corresponding reimbursement would better support them to provide improved care. Health care providers giving care to women with GDM history have varying perceptions of their roles, however, there was agreement on resources needed to improve care. PMID:24343308

  1. Providing more than health care: the dynamics of humanitarian surgery efforts on the local microeconomy.

    PubMed

    Nagengast, Eric S; Caterson, E J; Magee, William P; Hatcher, Kristin; Ramos, Margarita S; Campbell, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Humanitarian cleft surgery has long been provided by teams from resource-rich countries traveling for short-term missions to resource-poor countries. After identifying an area of durable unmet need through surgical missions, Operation Smile constructed a permanent center for cleft care in Northeast India. The Operation Smile Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) uses a high-volume subspecialized institution to provide safe, quality, comprehensive, and cost-effective cleft care to a highly vulnerable patient population in Assam, India. The purpose of this study was to profile the expenses of several cleft missions carried out in Assam and to compare these to the expenditures of the permanent comprehensive cleft care center. We reviewed financial data from 4 Operation Smile missions in Assam between December 2009 and February 2011 and from the GCCCC for the 2012-2013 fiscal year. Expenses from the 2 models were categorized and compared. In the studied period, 33% of the mission expenses were spent locally compared to 94% of those of the center. The largest expenses in the mission model were air travel (48.8%) and hotel expenses (21.6%) for the team, whereas salaries (46.3%) and infrastructure costs (19.8%) made up the largest fractions of expenses in the center model. The evolution from mission-based care to a specialty hospital model in Guwahati incorporated a transition from vertical inputs to investments in infrastructure and human capital to create a sustainable local care delivery system. PMID:25162554

  2. Job Satisfaction of Primary Health-Care Providers (Public Sector) in Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Age and education level of health care providers don’t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi. PMID:24479088

  3. Health Care Provider-Delivered Adherence Promotion Interventions: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ahna L.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Improving medical regimen adherence is essential for maximizing the therapeutic potential of treatments for pediatric chronic illness. Health care providers are uniquely positioned to deliver adherence promotion interventions. However, no studies have summarized the effectiveness of health care provider-delivered adherence interventions. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of health care provider-delivered adherence promotion interventions in improving adherence among children who have chronic illness. Data sources include PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus. Studies were included if they were randomized-controlled trials of pediatric interventions aiming to increase adherence to the primary regimen for a chronic illness and at least 1 health care provider delivered the intervention. RESULTS: A total of 35 randomized-controlled studies including 4616 children were included. Greater improvements in adherence were observed immediately after health care provider-delivered interventions (d = 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.66) than at longer-term follow-up (d = 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.54). Treatment effect sizes differed across the adherence behaviors measured. There was significant heterogeneity in treatment effects; however, no moderators of treatment effectiveness were identified. This meta-analysis focused on the published literature. In addition, the majority of studies involved children who had asthma and younger children. CONCLUSIONS: Health care provider-delivered interventions for children who have chronic illness can be effective in improving adherence. Gains in adherence are highest immediately after intervention. Future interventions and studies should include multiple methods of assessing adherence, include active comparators, and address long-term maintenance of adherence gains. PMID:24799545

  4. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    PubMed

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed. PMID:27484777

  5. Mediated consumer-provider communication in cancer care: the empowering potential of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Street, Richard L

    2003-05-01

    New communication technologies represent a potentially valuable resource for cancer care and education. With the Internet and multimedia programs (e.g. CD-ROMs), health care consumers have access to a wealth of information about cancer and its treatment, can participate in online support groups, and can interact with medical experts across the globe. To be most effective, these interventions must be designed, developed, implemented, and evaluated using a sound conceptual framework that connects factors affecting utilization, the user's experience within the media environment, and post interaction outcomes. This essay presents two health communication frameworks, an expanded model of health care consumer-provider communication and a three-stage model of health promotion using interactive media, to help guide future research and development of innovative technologies for cancer care and education. PMID:12767594

  6. Qualitative evaluation of a Positive Prevention training for health care providers in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Gutin, Sarah A; Cummings, Beverley; Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Johnson, Kelly; Mbofana, Francisco; Dawson Rose, Carol

    2014-04-01

    The rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment in Mozambique has provided an opportunity to reach people living with HIV (PLHIV) with prevention interventions in HIV care and treatment settings. A three-day Positive Prevention (PP) training intervention for health care providers that focused on pressing issues for PLHIV in Mozambique was adapted and delivered at sites in three provinces. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 providers trained in the PP curriculum. Qualitative data were used to assess the appropriateness of the training materials and approach, which lessons providers learned and were able to implement and which PP messages were still difficult to deliver. Providers reported gaining numerous insights from the training, including how to conduct a risk assessment and client-centered counseling, negotiating disclosure, partner testing, condom use, PMTCT, treatment adherence and approaches for positive living. Training topics not commonly mentioned included discordance counseling, STIs, family planning, alcohol and drug use, and frank sexual risk discussions. While areas for improvement exist, the PP training was useful in transferring skills to providers and is a viable component of HIV care. This evaluation helps identify areas where future PP trainings and specific strategies and messages can be refined for the Mozambican context. PMID:24291214

  7. Recent developments in false claims enforcement: a minefield for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Glenn V; Walton, Victor A

    2007-01-01

    Actions under the False Claims Act represent potentially billions of dollars in damages returned to the state and federal governments each year for fraud recovery. Over the past several years, health care providers have been the target of about half of the FCA suits filed and have paid out an even greater percentage of the damages recovered. Because of the enumerable opportunities for fraud, waste, and abuse in the health care industry, it will likely continue to be a prominent target of FCA suits. Key provisions of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, effective on January 1, 2007, will only increase the reach of the FCA. Providers beware. PMID:19175229

  8. Compassion fatigue: a review of the research to date and relevance to cancer-care providers.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Nadine; Davis, Louanne W; Beck-Coon, Kathleen; Carney Doebbeling, Caroline

    2009-03-01

    Fifty-seven studies were reviewed to identify the prevalence of compassion fatigue among cancer-care providers, instruments used to detect it and means of prevention and treatment. Conclusions were limited by an ambiguous definition of compassion fatigue that fails to adequately differentiate it from related constructs (e.g. burnout, secondary traumatic stress) and the modest number of cancer-related studies found. However, evidence suggests that compassion fatigue takes a toll not only on cancer-care providers but also on the workplace. These findings highlight the need to understand more clearly the link between the empathic sensitivity of healthcare professionals and their vulnerability to compassion fatigue. PMID:19237494

  9. The Quality of Care Provided to Hospitalized Patients at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Anne M.; Asch, Steven M.; Lorenz, Karl A.; Roth, Carol P.; Barry, Tod; Kahn, Katherine L.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients in American hospitals receive intensive medical treatments. However, when lifesaving treatments are unsuccessful, patients often die in the hospital with distressing symptoms while receiving burdensome care. Systematic measurement of the quality of care planning and symptom palliation is needed. Methods Medical records were abstracted using sixteen Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators within the domains of end of life care and pain management designed to measure the quality of the dying experience for adult decedents hospitalized for at least 3 days between April 2005 and April 2006 (n=496) at a university medical center recognized for providing intensive care for the seriously ill. Results Over half of the patients (mean age 62, 47% female), were admitted to the hospital with end stage disease and 28% were age 75 or older. One third of the patients required extubation from mechanical ventilation prior to death and 15% died while receiving CPR. Overall, patients received recommended care for 70% of applicable indicators (range 25%–100%). Goals of care were addressed in a timely fashion for patients admitted to the ICU approximately half of the time, while pain assessments (94%) and treatments for pain (95%) and dyspnea (87%) were performed with fidelity. Follow-up for distressing symptoms was performed less well than initial assessment and 29% of patients extubated in anticipation of death had documented dyspnea assessments. Conclusions A practical, chart-based assessment identified discrete deficiencies in care planning and symptom palliation that can be targeted to improve care for patients dying in the hospital. PMID:20585072

  10. Health Care Provider Adoption of eHealth: Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khoei, Amir; Seale, Holly; Ray, Pradeep; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2013-01-01

    Background eHealth is an application of information and communication technologies across the whole range of functions that affect health. The benefits of eHealth (eg, improvement of health care operational efficiency and quality of patient care) have previously been documented in the literature. Health care providers (eg, medical doctors) are the key driving force in pushing eHealth initiatives. Without their acceptance and actual use, those eHealth benefits would be unlikely to be reaped. Objective To identify and synthesize influential factors to health care providers’ acceptance of various eHealth systems. Methods This systematic literature review was conducted in four steps. The first two steps facilitated the location and identification of relevant articles. The third step extracted key information from those articles including the studies’ characteristics and results. In the last step, identified factors were analyzed and grouped in accordance with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT). Results This study included 93 papers that have studied health care providers’ acceptance of eHealth. From these papers, 40 factors were identified and grouped into 7 clusters: (1) health care provider characteristics, (2) medical practice characteristics, (3) voluntariness of use, (4) performance expectancy, (5) effort expectancy, (6) social influence, and (7) facilitating or inhibiting conditions. Conclusions The grouping results demonstrated that the UTAUT model is useful for organizing the literature but has its limitations. Due to the complex contextual dynamics of health care settings, our work suggested that there would be potential to extend theories on information technology adoption, which is of great benefit to readers interested in learning more on the topic. Practically, these findings may help health care decision makers proactively introduce interventions to encourage acceptance of eHealth and may also assist health policy makers

  11. Primary Care Providers' Views of Recent Trends in Health Care Delivery and Payment. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund/Kaiser Family Foundation 2015 National Survey of Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    A new survey from The Commonwealth Fund and The Kaiser Family Foundation asked primary care providers--physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants--about their experiences with and reactions to recent changes in health care delivery and payment. Providers' views are generally positive regarding the impact of health information technology on quality of care, but they are more divided on the increased use of medical homes and accountable care organizations. Overall, providers are more negative about the increased reliance on quality metrics to assess their performance and about financial penalties. Many physicians expressed frustration with the speed and administrative burden of Medicaid and Medicare payments. An earlier brief focused on providers' experiences under the ACA's coverage expansions and their opinions about the law. PMID:26288866

  12. Effects of a Late Life Suicide Risk Assessment Training on Multidisciplinary Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Huh, J.W. Terri; Weaver, Christopher M.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Caskey, Nicholas H.; O’Riley, Alisa; Kramer, B. Josea

    2016-01-01

    Older adults are among the highest at risk group for completing suicide, and they are more likely to seek mental health services from providers outside of traditional mental healthcare. However, providers across the spectrum of care have limited training in suicide risk assessment and management and particularly lack training in suicide prevention for older adults. An educational program was developed to increase awareness and improve suicide risk assessment and management training for a range of health care providers who may see older adults in their care settings. One hundred and thirty two participants from two VA Medical Centers participated in a 6.5 hour long workshop in the assessment and management of suicide risk among older adults. Participants were asked to complete pre- and- post workshop case notes and report on subjective changes in knowledge, attitude, and confidence in assessment and managing suicide risk in older adults. Participants included social workers, nurses, physicians, psychologists, and occupational therapists coming from a variety of care settings including outpatient and inpatient medical, outpatient and inpatient mental health, specialty clinics, and home and community. Following the workshop, participants demonstrated improvement in the overall quality of case notes (p<.01), increased ability to recognize important conceptual suicide risk categories (p<.05), and reported heightened awareness of the importance of late life suicide. Results suggested that educational training may have beneficial impact on multidisciplinary care providers’ ability to identify and manage suicide risk in the elderly. PMID:22288717

  13. Smartphones Enable Teledermatology in South Dakota: An Overview and Primer for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Emily E; Chabra, Indy; Burrish, Gene F

    2015-10-01

    Timely access to specialty care by dermatologists is a significant problem in South Dakota. This is especially germane to patients in rural areas, the elderly, and those with socioeconomic barriers. Implementation of a modality utilizing smartphone technology called mobile teledermatology (MTD) should improve access to dermatologic care. MTD provides location- and time-independent dermatologic care and is currently being used successfully across the U.S. MTD has the potential to benefit both patients and providers in South Dakota; however, barriers to its implementation currently exist. Expanding insurance coverage and reimbursement for teledermatology, facilitating multi-state telemedicine licensure, and educating primary care providers and patients about teledermatology would facilitate widespread utilization of teledermatology in South Dakota. Current legislation addressing licensure may soon come to fruition, making it easier for dermatologists to practice teledermatology across state lines. In addition to pay-for-service, Medicaid is currently the only insurer in South Dakota that reimburses for store-and-forward teledermatology. We propose MTD as an apt solution for enabling prompt access to dermatologic care in South Dakota and emphasize the need for greater insurance coverage, improved licensure policy, and user education to fully realize the benefits of this technology for our patients. PMID:26630834

  14. Challenges to HIV prevention in psychiatric settings: Perceptions of South African mental health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Pamela Y.

    2009-01-01

    Mental health services in South Africa increasingly feel the brunt of the AIDS epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of infection in the psychiatric setting, HIV risk reduction interventions targeting South Africans with psychiatric illness remain few and far between. The attitudes of mental health care providers about sexual relations and HIV among people with mental illness continue to influence the extent to which these issues are addressed in care settings. This study examines these attitudes through the use of a semi-structured interview administered to 46 mental health care providers in four provinces of South Africa. I found that personal, contextual and political factors in the clinic and the hospital create barriers to integrating prevention activities. In particular, providers face at least three challenges to intervening in the epidemic among their patients: their own views of psychiatric illness, the transitions occurring in the mental health care system, and shifting social attitudes toward sexuality. Barriers operate at the individual level, the institutional level, and the societal level. At the individual level providers’ perceptions of psychiatric symptoms shape their outlook on intervention with psychiatric patients. At the institutional level disruptive transitions in service delivery relegate HIV services to lesser importance. At the societal level, personal beliefs about sexuality and mental illness have remained slow to change despite major political changes. Minimizing barriers to implementing HIV prevention services requires institutional and health care policies that ensure adequate resources for treating people with mental illness and for staff development and support. PMID:16647793

  15. Barriers to treatment: the unique challenges for physicians providing dementia care.

    PubMed

    Foster, N L

    2001-01-01

    Evaluating and treating dementia is intellectually demanding and enormously satisfying. However, physicians providing dementia care also confront unique challenges that cause discomfort and overwhelming frustration unless they are recognized and overcome. Physicians must care for individuals who do not adopt the "sick role." They must establish and maintain rapport with patients while also approaching collateral sources to obtain a complete history. They must develop a complex alliance with the patient, caregivers, community agencies, and other health professionals to provide effective treatment. Physicians must relate "bad news" to several people at once who are unequally prepared for it, while dealing with their own diagnostic uncertainty. Furthermore, physicians must honor patient autonomy and balance it with the needs of caregivers. Since the demands of providing dementia care are not typical of most medical practice, the special attributes needed are often not taught to students or adequately reimbursed by health insurance. The quality of dementia care will improve when strategies that address these aspects of care for patients with dementia are widely adopted. PMID:11794447

  16. Perceptions of Obesity Treatment Options Among Healthcare Providers and Low-Income Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Kennedy, Kathleen B.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary care is a key component of medical care delivery and has a role to play in reducing obesity in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes and perceptions about obesity in low-income primary care patients and to identify preferences for weight management interventions from the patient and healthcare provider perspectives. Methods: A convenience sample of 28 patients and 6 healthcare providers from across the state of Louisiana participated in 1 of 5 structured focus groups. Demographic information was collected from both the patients and healthcare providers using survey instruments. Results: Patients and healthcare providers were more similar than dissimilar in their perceptions of obesity in that both groups selected referral to a nutritionist, use of medication, and prescribed exercise as the top 3 strategies that would have the greatest impact on losing weight. Referral to a nutritionist was selected as the easiest strategy to implement. Conclusion: Receiving feedback from both patients and healthcare providers gives researchers the opportunity to acquire useful knowledge that may be beneficial in designing and conducting interventions suitable for patients desiring to lose weight, especially those in primary care settings. PMID:27303227

  17. How do health care providers perceive technologies for monitoring older adults?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Thielke, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring and assistive technologies for the older adults, by sensing and recording activities and status, provide an objective record of a patient's functioning within natural environments. Yet the data derived from these technologies do not directly address the clinical aims of health care providers. We conducted focus groups with health care providers who work with older adults to elicit their perspectives on monitoring technologies. Identified themes centered around the benefits and risks of technologies, patient needs, the clinical utility of information, and specific monitoring domains that might improve the health care of older adults. Providers highlighted the primary importance of involving families and caregivers, and of sustaining human interactions. They explored the difficulties with how to use information for clinical ends, and challenged the notion that more objective information would automatically improve their heath care. Designers, developers, and researchers might improve the utility and uptake of health-related technologies for older adults and their families by eliciting the viewpoints of clinical providers. PMID:19964352

  18. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, Rob J; Edwards, Todd C; Merlin, Jessica S; Gibbons, Laura E; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Crane, Paul K; Crane, Heidi M; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers, and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlight the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  19. The Association between Trust in Health Care Providers and Medication Adherence among Black Women with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Willie M.; Efird, Jimmy T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Black women have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the world. Reasons for this disparity are poorly understood. The historical legacy of medical maltreatment of Blacks in the U.S. provides some insight into distrust in the medical profession, refusal of treatment, and poor adherence to treatment regimens. Methods: Black women (N = 80) who were prescribed antihypertensive medications were recruited from urban communities in North Carolina. Study participants completed the Trust in Physician and Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy questionnaires. An exact discrete-event model was used to examine the relationship between trust and medication adherence. Results: Mean age of study participants was 48 ± 9.2 years. The majority of participants (67%) were actively employed and 30% had incomes at or below the federal poverty level. Increasing levels of trust in the health care provider was independently associated with greater medication adherence (PTrend = 0.015). Conclusion: Black women with hypertension who trusted their health care providers were more likely to be adherent with their prescribed antihypertensive medications than those who did not trust their health care providers. Findings suggest that trusting relationships between Black women and health care providers are important to decreasing disparate rates of hypertension. PMID:24350234

  20. A proposal to provide care to the uninsured through a network of community health centers.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, D S; Lukomnik, J E; Hawkins, D R

    1993-01-01

    While a national health insurance plan is needed, this alone will not provide access for approximately 30 million persons who face geographic, cultural, language, or health care system barriers, or who live in areas with provider shortages. These barriers often coexist with lack of insurance coverage, but they also affect millions who have public, or even private, coverage. Moreover, large segments of this population suffer from health problems not adequately addressed by the traditional medical model: teenage pregnancy, AIDS, injury, substance abuse, and the like. To provide appropriate care for these underserved persons, we propose to expand the existing network of community health centers over the next 10 years to a total of approximately 3,000. Such an expansion would provide a cost-effective approach to improving provider distribution, increasing consumer input, combining personal health services with health promotion, and removing both financial and nonfinancial barriers to care. This model can be implemented either independent of or in conjunction with other health care system reform efforts. PMID:8353219

  1. Providing end-of-life care in care homes for older people: a qualitative study of the views of care home staff and community nurses.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Cassie; Stewart, Frances; Thompson, Genevieve; Hall, Sue

    2013-02-01

    The study aimed to explore the views of care home staff (CHS) and community nurses (CNs) on providing end-of-life care (EOLC) in care homes. Participants were randomly selected and qualitative interviews conducted with 80 CHS and 10 CNs. Themes emerging from the data included the following: The meaning of EOLC; starting EOLC; dying in the care home; stress of providing EOLC; improving EOLC; and the role of the CN. CHS felt that planning for the end of life was important before residents reached the dying phase, which some found difficult to determine. Although CHS wished to avoid residents being transferred to hospital to die, they acknowledged that improvements in their skills and the resources available to them were needed to manage EOLC effectively. CNs were critical of the EOLC provided in some care homes, reporting tensions over their relationship with CHS. As the number of older people who die in care homes increases, there is a need to overcome these barriers to provide good EOLC. PMID:25473926

  2. Factors affecting the motivation of healthcare professionals providing care to Emiratis with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alhyas, Layla; Nielsen, Jessica D Jones; Dawoud, Dalia; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify facilitators of and barriers to healthcare professionals' motivation in a diabetes centre in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design A qualitative research approach was employed using semistructured interviews to assess perception of and attitudes regarding healthcare professionals' motivation in providing good quality diabetes care. Setting A diabetes centre located in Abu-Dhabi, UAE. Participants Healthcare professionals including specialist physicians, dieticians, podiatrists, health educators and nurses were recruited through purposive sampling. Main outcome measures After data collection, the audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to content analysis. Results Nine semistructured interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals of various professional backgrounds. Important facilitators and barriers related to patient, professional, organization and cultural factors were identified. Barriers that related to heavy workload, disjointed care, lack of patient compliance and awareness, and cultural beliefs and attitudes about diabetes were common. Key facilitators included the patient's role in achieving therapeutic outcomes as well as compliance, cooperation and communication. Conclusion This qualitative study provides some unique insights about factors affecting healthcare professionals' motivation in providing good quality care. To improve the motivation of healthcare professionals in the management of diabetes and therefore the quality of diabetes care, several steps are needed. Importantly, the role of primary care should be reinforced and strengthened regarding the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, privacy of the consultation time should be highly protected and regulated, and awareness of the Emirate culture and its impact on health should be disseminated to the healthcare professionals providing care to Emirates with diabetes. Also, greater emphasis should be placed on educating Emiratis with

  3. Retained in HIV Care But Not on Antiretroviral Treatment: A Qualitative Patient-Provider Dyadic Study

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, Katerina A.; Olender, Susan; Lopez, Andrea M.; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Jaiswal, Jessica; Mellman, Will; Geng, Elvin; Koester, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients retained in HIV care but not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) represent an important part of the HIV care cascade in the United States. Even in an era of more tolerable and efficacious ART, decision making in regards to ART offer and uptake remains complex and calls for exploration of both patient and provider perspectives. We sought to understand reasons for lack of ART usage in patients meeting the Health Resources Services Administration definition of retention as well as what motivated HIV primary care appointment attendance in the absence of ART. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative study consisting of 70 in-depth interviews with ART-naïve and ART-experienced patients off ART and their primary care providers in two urban safety-net HIV clinics in San Francisco and New York. Twenty patients and their providers were interviewed separately at baseline, and 15 dyads were interviewed again after at least 3 mo and another clinic visit in order to understand any ART use in the interim. We applied dyadic analysis to our data. Nearly all patients were willing to consider ART, and 40% of the sample went on ART, citing education on newer antiretroviral drugs, acceptance of HIV diagnosis, social support, and increased confidence in their ability to adhere as facilitators. However, the strength of the provider recommendation of ART played an important role. Many patients had internalized messages from providers that their health was too good to warrant ART. In addition, providers, while demonstrating patient-centered care through sensitivity to patients experiencing psychosocial instability, frequently muted the offer of ART, at times unintentionally. In the absence of ART, lab monitoring, provider relationships, access to social services, opiate pain medications, and acute symptoms motivated care. The main limitations of this study were that treatment as prevention was not explored in depth and that participants were recruited from academic

  4. Knowledge and confidence of South African health care providers regarding post-rape care: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In South Africa, providers are trained on post-rape care by a multitude of organisations, resulting in varied knowledge and skills. In 2007, a national training curriculum was developed and piloted in the country. The objectives of this paper are to identify the factors associated with higher knowledge and confidence in providers at the commencement of the training and to reflect on the implications of this for training and other efforts being made to improve services. Methods A cross-sectional study using questionnaires was conducted. Providers who attended the training provided information on socio-demographic background, service provision, training, attitudes, and confidence. Knowledge was measured through multiple choice questions. Bi-variable analysis was carried out in order to test for factors associated with high knowledge and confidence. Variables with a p value of <0.20 were then included in backward selection to develop the final multivariable models. Results Of the 124 providers, 70% were female and 68% were nurses. The mean age of the providers was 41.7 (24 – 64) years. About 60% of providers were trained in providing post-rape care. The median percentage knowledge score was 37.3% (0% - 65.3%) and the median percentage confidence score was 75.4% (10% - 100%). Having a more appropriate attitude towards rape was associated with higher knowledge, while older providers and nurses had lower odds of having high knowledge levels. Working in a crisis centre in the facility, having examined a survivor in the last 3 months, and seeing more than 60% of survivors who came to the facility were associated with higher confidence. Higher confidence was not associated with greater knowledge. Conclusion The study indicated that although confidence was high, there was poor knowledge in providers, even in those who were previously trained. Knowledge seems to be critically dependant on attitude, which highlights the need for educating providers on rape and

  5. WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR NON-AGRICULTURAL PESTICIDE APPLICATORS: EPA'S POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is preparing a guide to be published later this year for non-agricultural pesticide applicators which will provide specific information about waste minimization for pesticide users in industries such as commercial lawn care, structura...

  6. Continuing Medical Education and Attitudes of Health Care Providers toward Treating Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Lisa K.; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    Health care providers who attended a continuing education program on type 2 diabetes (n=315) completed pre/post assessments; 146 completed 3-month follow-ups. Physicians had significantly more positive attitude changes than physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. All groups had more positive attitudes toward treating diabetes, but…

  7. The State of Diabetes Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries Living in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingarten, Joseph P.; Brittman, Susan; Hu, Wenrong; Przybyszewski, Chris; Hammond, Judith M.; FitzGerald, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Diabetes poses a growing health burden in the United States, but much of the research to date has been at the state and local level. Purpose: To present a national profile of diabetes care provided to Medicare beneficiaries living in urban, semirural, and rural communities. Methods: Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes aged 18-75 were…

  8. Development of a Fall Prevention Survey to Determine Educational Needs for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, B. Josea; Ganz, David A.; Vivrette, Rebecca L.; Harker, Judith O.; Josephson, Karen R.; Saliba, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Quality indicators are standardized measures of health care quality. We designed a survey to assess how knowledge, attitude, and organizational practices might affect healthcare provider behaviors in meeting quality indicators for fall prevention to plan curricula for a continuing educational intervention. The survey was pilot tested in the…

  9. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162.406 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  10. Characteristics of and Services Provided to Youth in Secure Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Joseph C.; Barber, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Youth who are incarcerated in secure detention and commitment settings display a complex array of educational, behavioral, and mental health issues that affect the services they require, as well as their responsiveness to interventions. Yet, seldom are these needs understood or taken into account when providing services in secure care settings. In…

  11. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162.406 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  12. Medical Spanish Training Program for the Education of Health Care Providers: Communicative Needs and Cultural Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonsson-Devillers, Edith

    It is important to give medical personnel being trained in second languages and cultures access to information necessary to their specific immediate needs. The University of California, San Diego, is used as an example of a communicative approach to helping health care providers establish an appropriate relationship with their Latino patients and…

  13. Providing Outreach Services in a Rural Setting Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team: The CARES Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Charles M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The CARES project (Coordinated Ambulatory Rehabilitation Evaluation Services) presents a model to provide multidisciplinary services for multiply disabled children in rural settings. Background, information about model components, and descriptive data are presented to illustrate project evolution and operation. Nearly 400 children with multiple…

  14. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers defined. 433.56 Section 433.56 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION General Administrative Requirements State...

  15. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam. PMID:27489749

  16. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure…

  17. How do urban organized health care delivery systems link with rural providers?

    PubMed

    Christianson, J B; Wellever, A; Radcliff, T; Knutson, D J

    2000-01-01

    Organized delivery systems are becoming an increasingly important component of urban health care markets and are expanding their influence in rural areas as well. They also are developing new linkages with rural providers. This article, based on the experiences of 20 diverse organizations, identifies and describes the strategies being used by urban systems to redefine linkages with rural hospitals and, particularly, physicians. PMID:10937336

  18. 45 CFR 1356.30 - Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers. 1356.30 Section 1356.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER...

  19. Assessing an Infant Feeding Web Site as a Nutrition Education Tool for Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Alena; Anderson, Jennifer; Adams, Elizabeth; Baker, Susan; Barrett, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Determine child care providers' infant feeding knowledge, attitude and behavior changes after viewing the infant feeding Web site and determine the effectiveness of the Web site and bilingual educational materials. Design: Intervention and control groups completed an on-line pretest survey, viewed a Web site for 3 months, and completed…

  20. Naptime Data Meetings to Increase the Math Talk of Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trawick-Smith, Jeffrey; Oski, Heather; DePaolis, Kim; Krause, Kristen; Zebrowski, Alyssa

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversations about mathematics--math talk--between early care and education providers and young children have been associated with growth in mathematical thinking. However, professional development opportunities to learn about math teaching and learning are limited in many community-based child development centers. New approaches that…

  1. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162.406 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  2. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162.406 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  3. Mandating Education of Dental Graduates to Provide Care to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, The Commission on Dental Accreditation adopted new standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs to ensure the preparation of practitioners to provide oral health services for persons with special health care needs. The course of action leading to the adoption of the new standards, together with the continuing obstacles of…

  4. Characteristics of Swedish Preschools That Provide Education and Care to Children with Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Johanna; Westling, Mara Allodi; Siljehag, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool inclusion is embraced and preschools are open for children both with and without special educational needs. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of a number of preschool units in Sweden that provide education and care to children with special educational needs with regard to organisation, resources and…

  5. Characteristics of Genomic Test Consumers Who Spontaneously Share Results with Their Health Care Provider

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Burcu F.; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J.; Topol, Eric J.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Methods Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Results Of 2024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post-testing, a total of 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p<.001), had a higher income (p=.01), were more likely to be married (p=.005), and more likely to identify with a religion (p=.004). As assessed prior to undergoing testing, sharers also showed higher exercise (p=.003) and lower fat intake (p=.02), and expressed fewer overall concerns about testing (p=.001) and fewer concerns related to the privacy of their genomic information (p=.03). The genomic disease risk estimates disclosed were not associated with sharing. Conclusion In a DTC genomic testing context, physicians and other health care providers may be more likely to encounter patients who are more health conscious and have fewer concerns about the privacy of their genomic information. Genomic risk itself does not appear to be a primary determinant of sharing behavior among consumers. PMID:23384116

  6. Bacterial flora on cell phones of health care providers in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Omran, Ammar K; Azam, Quamar; Bukari, Huda; Al-Zahrani, AlHussain J; Al-Turki, Rasha A; Al-Omran, Abdallah S

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study involving culture of cell phones of 288 health care providers (HCP) during a 6-month period. One hundred nine (43.6%) HCP carried infective organisms on their cell phones. It is recommended that cell phones be cleaned regularly. PMID:20363049

  7. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  8. Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect: Parent-Provider Partnerships in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibel, Nancy; Britt, Donna; Gillespie, Linda Groves; Parlakian, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This book is an innovative approach to the primary prevention of child maltreatment. It focuses on the impact that child care providers can make in helping to reduce the risk of abuse and neglect in families with very young children. This research- and practice-based curriculum offers concepts, information, strategies, and practices focused on…

  9. The Impact of an AIDS Symposium on Attitudes of Providers of Pediatric Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feit, Lloyd R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A symposium was designed in 1987 to demonstrate to health-care providers at 3 hospitals in the Bronx, New York, the low risk of occupational HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection and techniques for avoiding infection. Twenty-nine of 100 responders reported that the symposium had increased their concerns regarding their risk. (Author/MLW)

  10. School Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy in Providing Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kelly L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure school nurses' perceived self-efficacy in providing diabetes care and education to children and to identify factors that correlate with higher self-efficacy levels in the performance of these tasks. The results of this study revealed that the surveyed school nurses perceived a moderate level of…

  11. Characteristics of genomic test consumers who spontaneously share results with their health care provider.

    PubMed

    Darst, Burcu F; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J; Bloss, Cinnamon S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Of 2,024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post testing, 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p < .001), had a higher income (p = .01), were more likely to be married (p = .005), and were more likely to identify with a religion (p = .004). As assessed prior to undergoing testing, sharers also reported higher levels of exercise (p = .003), lower fat intake (p = .02), fewer overall concerns about testing (p = .001), and fewer concerns related to the privacy of their genomic information (p = .03). The genomic disease risk estimates disclosed were not associated with sharing. Thus, in a DTC genomic testing context, physicians and other health care providers may be more likely to encounter patients who are more health conscious and have fewer concerns about the privacy of their genomic information. Genomic risk itself does not appear to be a primary determinant of sharing behavior among consumers. PMID:23384116

  12. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  13. The impact of child care providers' feeding on chidren's food consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In young children, the eating environment is an important social context within which eating behaviors develop. Among many low-income young children, the responsibility for feeding may have shifted from family members to child care providers because these children spend the majority of their day in...

  14. Web-Based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness…

  15. Challenges Faced by Preceptors Serving in Dual Roles as Health Care Providers and Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Thomas; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Preceptors play an integral role in training athletic training students (ATSs). Balancing roles as health care providers and educators can often be challenging. Role strain is a documented concern for the preceptor, yet limited information is available regarding other issues faced while supervising ATSs. Objective: To explore preceptor…

  16. Planning and Providing End-of-life Care in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Justice, Christopher; Sheps, Sam; Thomas, Roger; Reid, Pam; Leibovici, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Context: Approximately 20% of North Americans and 25% of Europeans reside in rural areas. Planning and providing end-of-life (EOL) care in rural areas presents some unique challenges. Purpose: In order to understand these challenges, and other important issues or circumstances, a literature search was conducted to assess the state of science on…

  17. Making Their Voices Heard: A Conversation with Two Child Care Providers Serving the Legislature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with two child care providers who are also legislators, Representative Shannon Erickson and Representative Mary Jane Wallner. Shannon Erickson is a Republican member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 124 in Beaufort County. While coming to office in a special election in…

  18. Word of mouth and physician referrals still drive health care provider choice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; Lauer, Johanna R

    2008-12-01

    Sponsors of health care price and quality transparency initiatives often identify all consumers as their target audiences, but the true audiences for these programs are much more limited. In 2007, only 11 percent of American adults looked for a new primary care physician, 28 percent needed a new specialist physician and 16 percent underwent a medical procedure at a new facility, according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Among consumers who found a new provider, few engaged in active shopping or considered price or quality information--especially when choosing specialists or facilities for medical procedures. When selecting new primary care physicians, half of all consumers relied on word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and relatives, but many also used doctor recommendations (38%) and health plan information (35%), and nearly two in five used multiple information sources when choosing a primary care physician. However, when choosing specialists and facilities for medical procedures, most consumers relied exclusively on physician referrals. Use of online provider information was low, ranging from 3 percent for consumers undergoing procedures to 7 percent for consumers choosing new specialists to 11 percent for consumers choosing new primary care physicians PMID:19054900

  19. Is there a difference between center and home care providers' training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention?

    PubMed

    Kim, Juhee; Shim, Jae Eun; Wiley, Angela R; Kim, Keunsei; McBride, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    To compare the obesity related training, practices, and perceptions of home child care providers and center care providers. A self-administered survey was collected from child care providers who attended local child care training workshops in east central Illinois from March 2009 to August 2010. Study results were based on responses from 88 home care providers and 94 center providers. The survey questions addressed child care providers' training in the prior year, their obesity prevention practices including written policies, their perceptions of influences on children's health, and factors determining food menu selection. Paired t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference by child care type. 81.9% of home care providers and 58.6% of center care providers received nutrition training, while 66.7 and 43.0% of these providers received physical activity training, respectively. Nutrition content, guidelines or state regulations, and food availability were the most important factors that influenced both types of care providers' food service menus. Both care provider types perceived they have less influence on children's food preferences, eating habits, and weight status compared to the home environment. However, home care providers perceived a smaller discrepancy between the influences of child care and home environments compared to center care providers. Compared to center providers, home care providers were more likely to have had training, be involved with health promotion activities, and rate their influence higher on children's health behaviors. Findings underscore the need for obesity prevention efforts in both types of child care settings. PMID:21877239

  20. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The maximum support distance is the distance from the health...