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Sample records for care unit molecular

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  2. Biomarkers and Molecular Analysis to Improve Bloodstream Infection Diagnostics in an Emergency Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Loonen, Anne J. M.; de Jager, Cornelis P. C.; Tosserams, Janna; Kusters, Ron; Hilbink, Mirrian; Wever, Peter C.; van den Brule, Adriaan J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular pathogen detection from blood is still expensive and the exact clinical value remains to be determined. The use of biomarkers may assist in preselecting patients for immediate molecular testing besides blood culture. In this study, 140 patients with ≥ 2 SIRS criteria and clinical signs of infection presenting at the emergency department of our hospital were included. C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels were determined. One ml EDTA blood was obtained and selective pathogen DNA isolation was performed with MolYsis (Molzym). DNA samples were analysed for the presence of pathogens, using both the MagicPlex Sepsis Test (Seegene) and SepsiTest (Molzym), and results were compared to blood cultures. Fifteen patients had to be excluded from the study, leaving 125 patients for further analysis. Of the 125 patient samples analysed, 27 presented with positive blood cultures of which 7 were considered to be contaminants. suPAR, PCT, and NLCR values were significantly higher in patients with positive blood cultures compared to patients without (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves of the 4 biomarkers for differentiating bacteremia from non-bacteremia showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) for PCT (0.806 (95% confidence interval 0.699–0.913)). NLCR, suPAR and CRP resulted in an AUC of 0.770, 0.793, and 0.485, respectively. When compared to blood cultures, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for SepsiTest and MagicPlex Sepsis Test were 11%, 96%, 43%, 80%, and 37%, 77%, 30%, 82%, respectively. In conclusion, both molecular assays perform poorly when one ml whole blood is used from emergency care unit patients. NLCR is a cheap, fast, easy to determine, and rapidly available biomarker, and therefore seems most promising in differentiating BSI from non-BSI patients for

  3. Molecular epidemiological characterization of respiratory isolates of Moraxella catarrhalis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Matlow, Anne G; Low, Donald E; Paret, Gideon; Jarrett, Scott; Bohn, Desmond; Barker, Geoffrey; Boulanger, Jean; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    1992-01-01

    A perceived increase in the number of isolates of Moraxella catarrhalis from the respiratory secretions of patients intubated in the pediatric intensive care unit prompted a review of the clinical profiles of such patients and restriction enzyme analysis of the strains involved. Over two months, of 192 patients admitted to the unit, 154 were intubated. Of the 46 for whom endotracheal tube specimens were submitted to the laboratory, M catarrhalis was isolated in 12. M catarrhalis was not felt to be a significant respiratory pathogen by the attending medical staff in any of the patients from whom it was isolated. In only two patients (17%) could nosocomial acquisition be firmly invoked. Restriction enzyme analysis of the 12 strains ruled out the presence of an epidemic strain. Isolation of M catarrhalis from intubated children does not necessarily imply pathogenicity nor an outbreak situation. PMID:22514369

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Candida species isolated from urine at an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ergon, M C; Gülay, Z

    2005-03-01

    Candida spp. has been the leading microorganism isolated from the urine specimens of patients hospitalized at the Anesthesiology and Reanimation intensive care unit (ICU) of Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Izmir, since 1998. This study was undertaken to investigate the clonal relationship of Candida urine isolates in order to find the mode of spread among the patients. Epidemiological surveillance of 38 Candida albicans, 15 Candida tropicalis and 12 Candida glabrata recovered from the urine specimens of patients who were hospitalized in the ICU between June 11, 2000 and October 15, 2001 was carried out by antifungal susceptibility testing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Two short primers [Cnd3 (5'-CCAGATGCAC-3') and Cnd4 (5'-ACGGTACACT-3')] were used for RAPD. None of the isolates had high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (>1 microg ml(-1)) against amphotericin B with MIC50 values of 0.5 microg ml(-1), 0.5 microg ml(-1) and 0.125 microg ml(-1) for C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. However, three C. glabrata isolates were resistant and one C. albicans and five C. glabrata isolates were dose-dependent susceptible (D-DS) to fluconazole. Among C. albicans isolates 19 and 20 patterns were detected with primers Cnd3 and Cnd4, respectively. When primers Cnd3 and Cnd4 were evaluated together, three and four genotypes were identified for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. Our results suggest that the source of C. albicans isolates was mostly endogenous. It is difficult to interpret the mode of spread of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata urine isolates as we obtained insufficient banding patterns for these species. PMID:15743431

  5. Molecular Characterization of Carbapenem Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in An Intensive Care Unit of A Tertiary Care Centre at Central India

    PubMed Central

    Praharaj, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Mahadevan; Grover, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect genes encoding carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. Methods: A. baumannii isolates were recovered from various clinical specimens of hospitalized patients admitted to the Medical and Surgical intensive care units of a tertiary care centre in Pune. Bacterial identification was performed by routine conventional microbial culture and biochemical tests using standard recommended techniques. Antibiotic sensitivity test was performed by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion technique. PCR amplification and automated sequencing was carried out. Results: A total of 155 /368 (42.11%) isolates A. baumannii were found to have reduced susceptibility to imipenem (diameter of zones of inhibition ≤13mm) by disc diffusion method. Among these 155 isolates tested 130 (83.87%) isolates showed MIC values for imipenem and meropenem ranging from16-64 mg/L as per CLSI breakpoints. Among these 155 isolates, Carbapenemase production was confirmed by Modified Hodge test for 93 (60%) isolates. Out of 155 isolates, DDST was positive for 89 (57.41%), CDST was positive for 73(47.09%) and MBL (IP/IPI) E-test was positive for 105 (67.74%). blaOXA-51 gene was detected in 47/105 (44.76%), blaOXA-23 gene in 55/105 (52.38%) and blaOXA-58 like gene in 15/105 (14.28%). Conclusion: MBL production along with co- production of OXA enzymes are considered to be the important reason for resistance to imipenem in Acinetobacter in our health care settings. Hence, early detection of these drug resistant genes by molecular methods is essential in limiting the spread of infection due to these organisms. PMID:24995182

  6. Molecular tracking of Candida albicans in a neonatal intensive care unit: long-term colonizations versus catheter-related infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Diez, B; Martinez, V; Alvarez, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1997-01-01

    Nosocomial neonatal candidiasis is a major problem in infants requiring intensive therapy. The subjects of this retrospective study were nine preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between March 1993 and August 1994. The infants were infected with or colonized by Candida albicans. Five patients developed C. albicans bloodstream infections. A total of 36 isolates (including isolates from catheters and parenteral nutrition) were examined for molecular relatedness by PCR fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The core sequence of phage M13 was used as a single primer in the PCR-based fingerprinting procedure, and RFLP analysis was performed with C. albicans-specific DNA probe 27A. Both techniques were evaluated with a panel of eight C. albicans reference strains, and each technique showed eight different patterns. With the 36 isolates from neonates, each technique enabled us to identify by PCR and RFLP analysis seven and six different patterns, respectively. The combination of these two methods (composite DNA type) identified eight different profiles. A strain with one of these profiles was present in three patients and in their respective catheters. Patients infected with or colonized by this isolate profile were clustered in time. Among the other patients, each patient was infected over time and at multiple anatomic sites with a C. albicans strain with a distinct DNA type. We conclude that C. albicans was most commonly producing long-term colonizations, although horizontal transmission probably due to catheters also occurred. PMID:9399489

  7. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a university hospital Intensive Care Unit in Greece.

    PubMed

    Koratzanis, Evangelos; Souli, Maria; Galani, Irene; Chryssouli, Zoi; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Giamarellou, Helen

    2011-11-01

    The molecular epidemiology of VIM-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the beginning of an epidemic in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital in Athens, Greece, was studied. All Gram-negative organisms isolated from March 2004 to November 2005 positive for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production were submitted to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing, to repetitive sequence-based PCR (Rep-PCR) for molecular typing, and to S1 nuclease digestion for plasmid DNA characterisation. Conjugation experiments and isoelectric focusing were performed to identify co-existing β-lactamases. Amongst 23 patients, 12 suffered one or more clinical infections. Eighty-two isolates representing one isolate per clone, source and ICU patient were studied, including Klebsiella pneumoniae (77), Enterobacter cloacae (2), Citrobacter freundii (1) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2). High clonal diversity was detected amongst the K. pneumoniae, with 10 distinct clones identified. Conjugation was successful in 54.5% of K. pneumoniae, and five different-sized plasmids were detected. All K. pneumoniae and both E. cloacae isolates shared the same bla(VIM-1)-containing class 1 integron structure also carrying aacA7, dhfrI and aadA1 gene cassettes. The C. freundii isolate carried a different integron that included bla(VIM-1) and aac(6')-IIc. Both P. aeruginosa isolates were positive for bla(VIM-2). It was not possible to identify specific clones with the potential to cause clinical infections. In conclusion, a multiclonal cluster of MBL-producers was responsible for the first cases of colonisation and/or infection in the ICU. A single integron structure, common in Greek hospitals, efficiently disseminated between clones and species, suggesting that the epidemic was mainly the result of successful horizontal transfer of mobile genetic material rather than the result of horizontal transfer of one or a few clones. PMID:21873034

  8. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  9. The Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Colonization in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Logan, Latania K.; Carroll, Karen C.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Simner, Patricia J.; Rudin, Susan D.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Tekle, Tsigereda; Ross, Tracy; Tamma, Pranita D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated AmpCs (pAmpCs), and carbapenemases (“MDR Enterobacteriaceae”) colonizing children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). DESIGN Prospective study. SETTING 40-bed PICU. METHODS Admission and weekly thereafter rectal surveillance swabs were collected on all pediatric patients during a 6-month study period. Routine phenotypic identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing were performed. Enterobacteriaceae displaying characteristic resistance profiles underwent further molecular characterization to identify genetic determinants of resistance likely to be transmitted on mobile genetic elements and to evaluate relatedness of strains including DNA microarray, multilocus sequence typing, repetitive sequence-based PCR, and hsp60 sequencing typing. Results Evaluating 854 swabs from unique children, the overall prevalence of colonization with an MDR Enterobacteriaceae upon admission to the PICU based on β-lactamase gene identification was 4.3% (n = 37), including 2.8% ESBLs (n =24), 1.3% pAmpCs (n =11), and 0.2% carbapenemases (n =2). Among 157 pediatric patients contributing 603 subsequent weekly swabs, 6 children (3.8%) acquired an incident MDR Enterobacteriaceae during their PICU stay. One child acquired a pAmpC (E. coli containing blaDHA) related to an isolate from another patient. Conclusions Approximately 4% of children admitted to a PICU were colonized with MDR Enterobacteriaceae (based on β-lactamase gene identification) and an additional 4% of children who remained in the PICU for at least 1 week acquired 1 of these organisms during their PICU stay. The acquired MDR Enterobacteriaceae were relatively heterogeneous, suggesting that a single source was not responsible for the introduction of these resistance mechanisms into the PICU setting. PMID:26856439

  10. Molecular evidence of person-to-person transmission of a pigmented strain of Corynebacterium striatum in intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, R B; Nowowiejski, D J; Warren, J J; Finn, D J; Coyle, M B

    1994-01-01

    During a 14-month period, a unique strain of Corynebacterium striatum that produces a diffusible brown pigment was isolated from purulent sputa of nine patients and from nonrespiratory sites of two additional patients. Seven nonpigmented clinical isolates from the same period and three reference strains of C. striatum were compared with the brown isolates. Most patients had multiple sputum cultures with no coryneforms before the brown strain emerged, suggesting that the organism was hospital acquired. DNA restriction fragment patterns and Southern hybridization with the att site probe of Corynebacterium diphtheriae indicated that the brown isolates were a single strain which was distinct from the heterogeneous nonpigmented strains. A common source for the brown C. striatum was not recognized, although all of these patients were located in two adjoining intensive care units. All of the brown isolates, three of the nonpigmented clinical isolates, and two reference strains had positive CAMP reactions with Staphylococcus aureus, which has not been reported for C. striatum prior to this study. Images PMID:7907342

  11. Molecular epidemiology of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus carriage in neonates admitted to an intensive care unit in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal colonization with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) has been described as a risk factor for subsequent systemic infection. In this study, we evaluated the genetic profile of CoNS isolates colonizing the nares of children admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods We assessed CoNS carriage at admittance and discharge among newborns admitted to a NICU from July 2007 through May 2008 in one of the major municipalities of Brazil. Isolates were screened on mannitol salt agar and tryptic soy broth and tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the disc diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the species, the presence of the mecA gene, and to perform SCCmec typing. S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolated from the same child at both admission and discharge were characterized by PFGE. Results Among 429 neonates admitted to the NICU, 392 (91.4%) had nasal swabs collected at both admission and discharge. The incidence of CoNS during the hospitalization period was 55.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50.9-60.7). The most frequently isolated species were S. haemolyticus (38.3%) and S.epidermidis (38.0%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected in 2.2% and 29.9% of the CoNS isolates, respectively at admittance and discharge (p = 0.053). The mecA gene was more prevalent among strains isolated at discharge (83.6%) than those isolated at admission (60%); overall, SCCmec type I was isolated most frequently. The length of hospitalization was associated with colonization by MDR isolates (p < 0.005). Great genetic diversity was observed among S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus. Conclusions NICU represents an environment of risk for colonization by MDR CoNS. Neonates admitted to the NICU can become a reservoir of CoNS strains with the potential to spread MDR strains into the community. PMID:24308773

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  13. The Correlation Between Candida Colonization of Distinct Body Sites and Invasive Candidiasis in Emergency Intensive Care Units: Statistical and Molecular Biological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Cen; Dong, Danfeng; Zhang, Lihua; Tian, Yuan; Ni, Qi; Mao, Enqiang; Peng, Yibing

    2016-08-01

    Both statistical and molecular biological methods were used to evaluate the association between Candida colonization of different body sites and invasive candidiasis (IC) and analyse the potential infection sources of IC. Candida surveillance cultures from the urine, sputum, rectum and skin were performed on patients admitted to an emergency intensive care units (EICU) of a tertiary care hospital in Shanghai, China, from February 2014 to January 2015. Specimens were collected once a week at admission and thereafter. The patients' clinical data were collected, and Candida isolates were genotyped using polymorphic microsatellite markers. A total of 111 patients were enrolled. Patients with positive urine (23.3 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.001) and rectal swab (13.6 vs. 0 %, p = 0.010) cultures were more likely to develop IC. However, the risk for IC was not significantly different among patients with and without respiratory (10.0 vs. 5.8 %, p = 0.503) and skin (33.3 vs. 6.5 %, p = 0.056) colonization. Gene microevolution frequently occurred at rectal swab and urine sites, and IC with possible source of infection was caused by rectal isolates (2/7), urine isolates (4/7) and sputum isolate (1/7).The colonization of gut and urinary tract maybe more relevant indicators of IC, which should be taken into consideration when selecting practical body sites for Candida surveillance cultures. PMID:26886444

  14. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected. PMID:26321006

  15. Setting up terminal care units *

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Bridget

    1980-01-01

    From my experience the main problems found by developing terminal care units have been: initial acceptance from existing medical disciplines; communication difficulties and misunderstandings because of them; mistakes in planning and design, possibly due to lack of experience or attention to detail; occasionally, the appointment of staff that have proved unsuitable; problems in the siting of a unit, usually due to shortage of available land. The ideal site is centrally placed in the community it serves and easily accessible to public transport. PMID:7452580

  16. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the Decade following Implementation of an Active Detection and Isolation Program

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Melissa U.; Bizzarro, Matthew J.; Baltimore, Robert S.; Dembry, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent source of infection in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), often associated with significant morbidity. Active detection and isolation (ADI) programs aim to reduce transmission. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of MRSA in an NICU between 2003 and 2013, in the decade following the implementation of an MRSA ADI program. Molecular analyses included strain typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, mec and accessory gene regulator group genotyping by multiplex PCR, and identification of toxin and potential virulence factor genes via PCR-based assays. Of 8,387 neonates, 115 (1.4%) had MRSA colonization and/or infection. The MRSA colonization rate declined significantly during the study period from 2.2 to 0.5/1,000 patient days (linear time, P = 0.0003; quadratic time, P = 0.006). There were 19 cases of MRSA infection (16.5%). Few epidemiologic or clinical differences were identified between MRSA-colonized and MRSA-infected infants. Thirty-one different strains of MRSA were identified with a shift from hospital-associated to combined hospital- and community-associated strains over time. Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive USA300 strains caused 5 of the last 11 infections. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types II and IVa and agr groups 1 and 2 were most predominant. One isolate possessed the gene for toxic shock syndrome toxin; none had genes for exfoliative toxin A or B. These results highlight recent trends in MRSA colonization and infection and the corresponding changes in molecular epidemiology. Continued vigilance for this invasive pathogen remains critical, and specific attention to the unique host, the neonate, and the distinct environment, the NICU, is imperative. PMID:26019206

  17. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of a clone of Burkholderia cenocepacia responsible for nosocomial pulmonary tract infections in a French intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Arnault; Menard, Aymeric; Neto, Manuelle; Bouvet, Claude; Miollan, Roger; Gaillard, Sandrine; de Montclos, Henri; Laurent, Frédéric; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Clustered cases of nosocomial pulmonary infections were observed in a French intensive care unit. Biochemical tests showed the etiologic agents to be part of the Bcc (Bcc). recA polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and molecular phylogeny positioned the isolates into Burkholderia cenocepacia. Their recA sequences were found identical to those of ET12 strains responsible of necrotic pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients. Analyses of a multi locus sequence typing genes set confirmed this proximity and suggested a wide distribution among occidental countries but could not resolve their phylogenetic position unambiguously. A novel marker, ecfB, indicated a significant phylogenetic divergence from ET12 strains. Pulse field gel electrophoresis analysis of SpeI-restricted total genomic DNA of the strains showed a unique profile indicative of a clonal outbreak. Environmental hospital screenings indicated cross-contamination between staff and patients. Bcc strains from outdoor environments were not related to this clone but indicated the presence of Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia vietnamiensis. PMID:19716254

  18. Risk Factors of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection and Correlation With Nasal Colonization Based on Molecular Genotyping in Medical Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Kuo-Chin; Chen, Chun-Bing; Hu, Han-Chung; Chang, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chung-Chi; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common and important cause of colonization and infection in medical intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to assess association factors between MRSA nasal colonization and subsequent infections in medical ICU patients by clinical investigation and molecular genotyping. A prospective cohort observational analysis of consecutive patients admitted to medical ICUs between November 2008 and May 2010 at a tertiary teaching hospital were included. To detect MRSA colonization, the specimens from the nares were obtained within 3 days of admission to the ICU and again 1 week following admission to the ICU. Genetic relatedness for colonized and clinical isolates from each study patient with MRSA infection were analyzed and compared. A total of 1266 patients were enrolled after excluding 195 patients with already present MRSA infections. Subsequent MRSA infection rates were higher in patients with nasal colonization than in those without (39.1% versus 14.7%, respectively). Multivariate Poisson regression analysis demonstrated that nasal MRSA colonization (relative risk [RR]: 2.50; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90–3.27; P < 0.001) was independent predictors for subsequent MRSA infections. History of tracheostomy, however, was a protective predictor in all patients (RR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18–0.79; P = 0.010) and in patients with MRSA nasal colonization (RR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.55–0.91; P = 0.037). Molecular genetics studies revealed that most MRSA isolates were healthcare-associated clones and that nasal and clinical isolates exhibited up to 75% shared identity. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization was significantly associated with subsequent MRSA infection among medical ICU patients. Previous MRSA infection was associated with subsequent MRSA infections, and history of tracheostomy associated with reducing this risk. Most MRSA isolates were healthcare-associated strains

  19. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... special care units offered dementia-specific activities and programming (91%) and had doors with alarms (90%) ( Figure ... special care units had dementia-specific activities and programming, while only 19% had closed circuit TV monitoring. ...

  20. [Care grading in Intensive Medicine: Intermediate Care Units].

    PubMed

    Castillo, F; López, J M; Marco, R; González, J A; Puppo, A M; Murillo, F

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate Care Units are created for patients who predictably have low risk of requiring therapeutic life support measures but who require more monitoring and nursing cares than those received in the conventional hospitalization wards. Previous studies have demonstrated that Intermediate Care Units may promote hospital care grading, allowing for better classification in critical patients, improving efficacy and efficiency of the ICUs and thus decreasing costs and above all mortality in the conventional hospitalization wards. This document attempts to group the currently existing knowledge that served as a base for the consensus meeting on the application of them in the establishment of future ICUs in our hospital setting. PMID:17306139

  1. Antibiotic stewardship in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Heather M; Micek, Scott T; Skrupky, Lee P; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship encompasses the optimization of agent selection, dose, and duration leading to the best clinical outcome in the treatment or prevention of infection. Ideally, these goals are met while producing the fewest side effects and lowest risk for subsequent resistance. The concept of antimicrobial stewardship can be directly applied to the prescription of empirical antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU) because it is well described that inappropriate initial regimens lead to increased mortality. As such, care should be taken to identify factors that place patients at risk for infection with pathogens demonstrating reduced susceptibility or multidrug resistance. Research efforts have concentrated on molecular diagnostic techniques to aid in more rapid organism detection and thus potential for earlier therapy appropriateness and deescalation, although limitations prohibiting widespread implementation of this technology exist. Also of great importance with regard to stewardship efforts is infection prevention. Effective prophylactic strategies reduce the occurrence of nosocomial infections and may therefore improve patient outcomes while obviating the need for otherwise necessary antimicrobial exposure. PMID:21506058

  2. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d) decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e) end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f) ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g) other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b) family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d) end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e) ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Conclusion: Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care. PMID:27076710

  3. On the palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    As a physician working in palliative care, the author is often privileged to share special moments with patients and their families at the end of life. This haiku poem recalls one such moment in that precious space between life and death, as an elderly woman, surrounded by her adult daughters, takes her last breath. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270255

  4. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  5. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  6. End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Engelberg, Ruth A.; Bensink, Mark E.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and costs of critical illness are increasing in the United States at a time when there is a focus both on limiting the rising costs of healthcare and improving the quality of end-of-life care. More than 25% of healthcare costs are spent in the last year of life, and approximately 20% of deaths occur in the intensive care unit (ICU). Consequently, there has been speculation that end-of-life care in the ICU represents an important target for cost savings. It is unclear whether efforts to improve end-of-life care in the ICU could significantly reduce healthcare costs. Here, we summarize recent studies suggesting that important opportunities may exist to improve quality and reduce costs through two mechanisms: advance care planning for patients with life-limiting illness and use of time-limited trials of ICU care for critically ill patients. The goal of these approaches is to ensure patients receive the intensity of care that they would choose at the end of life, given the opportunity to make an informed decision. Although these mechanisms hold promise for increasing quality and reducing costs, there are few clearly described, effective methods to implement these mechanisms in routine clinical practice. We believe basic science in communication and decision making, implementation research, and demonstration projects are critically important if we are to translate these approaches into practice and, in so doing, provide high-quality and patient-centered care while limiting rising healthcare costs. PMID:22859524

  7. [Delirium and intensive care unit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muhl, E

    2006-05-01

    Delirium and intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome are frequently seen postoperatively, especially in intensive care. Hospital mortality and complication rates are higher in patients with these disorders. Delirium is characterized by disturbance of consciousness and cognition and short development time. Drugs, drug withdrawal, and manifold metabolic syndromes may be causative. Knowledge of differential diagnosis and causality is essential for curative therapy. Drug therapy is recommended for the treatment of psychotic symptoms and vegetative disorders. PMID:16521003

  8. Ethics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is the most common place to die. Also, ethical conflicts among stakeholders occur frequently in the ICU. Thus, ICU clinicians should be competent in all aspects for ethical decision-making. Major sources of conflicts are behavioral issues, such as verbal abuse or poor communication between physicians and nurses, and end-of-life care issues including a lack of respect for the patient's autonomy. The ethical conflicts are significantly associated with the job strain and burn-out syndrome of healthcare workers, and consequently, may threaten the quality of care. To improve the quality of care, handling ethical conflicts properly is emerging as a vital and more comprehensive area. The ICU physicians themselves need to be more sensitive to behavioral conflicts and enable shared decision making in end-of-life care. At the same time, the institutions and administrators should develop their processes to find and resolve common ethical problems in their ICUs. PMID:26175769

  9. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. PMID:26412408

  10. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Birinder S.; Paul, Gunchan

    2013-01-01

    Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives. PMID:23956563

  11. Managing malaria in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

  12. From the coronary care unit to the cardiovascular intensive care unit: the evolution of cardiac critical care.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Umesh K; Kini, Annapoorna S

    2013-11-01

    This article presents an overview of the evolution of cardiac critical care in the past half century. It tracks the rapid advances in the management of cardiovascular disease and how the intensive care area has kept pace, improving outcomes and incorporating successive innovations. The current multidisciplinary, evidence based unit is vastly different from the early days and is expected to evolve further in keeping with the concept of 'hybrid' care areas where care is delivered by the 'heart team'. PMID:24188215

  13. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-07-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced. PMID:26382713

  14. Hospital readmission from a transitional care unit.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Tyler, Denice; Helms, Lelia B; Hanson, Kathleen S; Sparbel, Kathleen J H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize patients readmitted to the hospital during a stay in a transitional care unit (TCUT). Typically, readmitted patients were females, widowed, with 8 medical diagnoses, and taking 12 different medications. Readmission from the TCU occurred within 7 days as a result of a newly developed problem. Most patients did not return home after readmission from the TCU. Understanding high-risk patients' characteristics that lead to costly hospital readmission during a stay in the TCU can assist clinicians and healthcare providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and help facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues. PMID:15686074

  15. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  16. Adoption of intensive care unit telemedicine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cicero, Brandon D.; Wallace, David J.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine is a novel approach for providing critical care services from a distance. We sought to study the extent of use and patterns of adoption of this technology in United States ICUs. Design Retrospective study combining a systematic listing of ICU telemedicine installations with hospital characteristic data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. We examined adoption over time and compared hospital characteristics between facilities that have adopted ICU telemedicine and those that have not. Setting United States hospitals from 2003 to 2010. Measurements and main results The number of hospitals using ICU telemedicine increased from 16 (0.4% of total) to 213 (4.6% of total) between 2003 and 2010. The number of ICU beds covered by telemedicine increased from 598 (0.9% of total) to 5,799 (7.9% of total). The average annual rate of ICU bed coverage growth was 101% per year in the first four study years but slowed to 8.1% per year over the last four study years (p<0.001 for difference in linear trend). Compared to non-adopting hospitals, hospitals adopting ICU telemedicine were more likely to be large (percentage with >400 beds: 11.1% vs. 3.7%, p<0.001), teaching (percentage with resident coverage: 31.4% vs. 21.9%, p=0.003) and urban (percentage located in metropolitan statistical areas with over one million residents: 45.3% vs. 30.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions ICU telemedicine adoption was initially rapid but recently slowed. Efforts are needed to uncover the barriers to future growth, particularly regarding the optimal strategy for using this technology most effectively and efficiently. PMID:24145839

  17. Molecular Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Intensive Care Units in Iran: ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 Emerges as the Major Clone

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sá Figueiredo, Agnes Marie; Udo, Edet E.; Fazeli, Maryam; Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in different patient populations is a major public health concern. This study determined the prevalence and distribution of circulating molecular types of MRSA in hospitalized patients in ICU of hospitals in Tehran. Materials and Methods A total of 70 MRSA isolates were collected from patients in eight hospitals. Antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined using the disk diffusion method. The presence of toxin encoding genes and the vancomycin resistance gene were determined by PCR. The MRSA isolates were further analyzed using multi-locus sequence, spa, SCCmec, and agr typing. Results The MRSA prevalence was 93.3%. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a high resistance rate (97.1%) to ampicillin and penicillin. The rate of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested was 30% to 71.4%. Two isolates belonging to the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) had intermediate resistance to vancomycin. The majority of MRSA isolates (24.3%) were associated with the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone; the other MRSA clones were ST859-SCCmec IV/t969 (18.6%), ST239-SCCmec III/t037 (17.1%), and ST291-SCCmec IV/t030 (8.6%). Conclusions The circulating MRSA strains in Iranian hospitals were genetically diverse with a relatively high prevalence of the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone. These findings support the need for future surveillance studies on MRSA to better elucidate the distribution of existing MRSA clones and detect emergence of new MRSA clones. PMID:27171373

  18. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. Materials and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient’s reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Results: Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Conclusions: Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges. PMID:26734480

  19. Does the presence of oral care guidelines affect oral care delivery by intensive care unit nurses? A survey of Saudi intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ahmed K; Alshayiqi, Mohammed; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients rely on nurses for their oral care needs, signifying the importance of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral care guidelines on the oral care delivered to mechanically ventilated patients by ICU nurses. A total of 215 nurses were enrolled. Demographic data and oral care practices were recorded through a self-administered survey. Participants governed by oral care guidelines had significantly higher oral care practice scores than their counterparts from ICUs without similar guidelines (P = .034; t = 2.13). Oral care guidelines in ICUs can contribute to reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:25087146

  20. Continuous haemofiltration in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was first described in 1977 for the treatment of diuretic-unresponsive fluid overload in the intensive care unit (ICU). Since that time this treatment has undergone a remarkable technical and conceptual evolution. It is now available in most tertiary ICUs around the world and has almost completely replaced intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in some countries. Specially made machines are now available, and venovenous therapies that use blood pumps have replaced simpler techniques. Although, it remains controversial whether CRRT decreases mortality when compared with IHD, much evidence suggests that it is physiologically superior. The use of CRRT has also spurred renewed interest in the broader concept of blood purification, particularly in septic states. Experimental evidence suggests that this is a promising approach to the management of septic shock in critically ill patients. The evolution and use of CRRT is likely to continue and grow over the next decade. PMID:11123877

  1. Hepatorenal syndrome in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wadei, Hani M; Gonwa, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a functional form of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with advanced liver cirrhosis or fulminant hepatic failure. Various new concepts have emerged since the initial diagnostic criteria and definition of HRS was initially published. These include better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in HRS, identification of bacterial infection (especially spontaneous bacterial peritonitis) as the most important HRS-precipitating event, recognition that insufficient cardiac output plays a role in the occurrence of HRS, and evidence that renal failure reverses with pharmacotherapy. Patients with HRS are often critically ill and, by definition, have multiorgan failure. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel advances in HRS, with emphasis on the different aspects of management of these patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:21859679

  2. Intensive care unit syndrome: a dangerous misnomer.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B E; Basten, C J; Ryan, C J; Gallagher, J

    2000-04-10

    The terms intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome and ICU psychosis have been used interchangeably to describe a cluster of psychiatric symptoms that are unique to the ICU environment. It is often postulated that aspects of the ICU, such as sleep deprivation and sensory overload or monotony, are causes of the syndrome. This article reviews the empirical support for these propositions. We conclude that ICU syndrome does not differ from delirium and that ICU syndrome is caused exclusively by organic stressors on the central nervous system. We argue further that the term ICU syndrome is dangerous because it impedes standardized communication and research and may reduce the vigilance necessary to promptly investigate and reverse the medical cause of the delirium. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:10761954

  3. [Delirium in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    von Haken, R; Gruss, M; Plaschke, K; Scholz, M; Engelhardt, R; Brobeil, A; Martin, E; Weigand, M A

    2010-03-01

    In recent years delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has internationally become a matter of rising concern for intensive care physicians. Due to the design of highly sophisticated ventilators the practice of deep sedation is nowadays mostly obsolete. To assess a ventilated ICU patient for delirium easy to handle bedside tests have been developed which permit a psychiatric scoring. The significance of ICU delirium is equivalent to organ failure and has been proven to be an independent prognostic factor for mortality and length of ICU and hospital stay. The pathophysiology and risk factors of ICU delirium are still insufficiently understood in detail. A certain constellation of pre-existing patient-related conditions, the current diagnosis and surgical procedure and administered medication entail a higher risk for the occurrence of ICU delirium. A favored hypothesis is that an imbalance of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine serotonin results in an unpredictable neurotransmission. Currently, the administration of neuroleptics, enforced physiotherapy, re-orientation measures and appropriate pain treatment are the basis of the therapeutic approach. PMID:20127059

  4. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and analytical-descriptive study that has done in Iran. All nurses (n = 400) who was working in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014 were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using a researcher–made questionnaire which its validity and reliability were confirmed through getting the opinions of experts and using composite reliability and internal consistency (α = 0.89). The collected data were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. Results: Twenty-five factors were divided into three major categories through EFA, including structure, process, and activity. The following factors among the structure, process and activity components had the greatest importance: lack of clear responsibilities and authorities and performing unnecessary tasks (by a coefficient of 0.709), mismatch between the capacity of wards and the number of patients (by a coefficient of 0.639), and helping the students and newly employed staff (by a coefficient of 0.589). Conclusions: The nursing workload is influenced by many factors. The clear responsibilities and authorities of nurses, patients' admission according to the capacity of wards, use of the new technologies and equipment, and providing basic training for new nurses can decrease the workload of nurses. PMID:25389493

  5. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients. PMID:18664900

  6. United States Air Force Child Care Center Infant Care Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Ardyn; And Others

    Intended to guide Air Force infant caregivers in providing high quality group care for infants 6 weeks to 6 months of age, this infant care guide must be used in conjunction with other Air Force regulations on day care, such as AFR 215-1, Volume VI (to be renumbered AFR 215-27). After a brief introductory chapter (Chapter I), Chapter II indicates…

  7. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  8. Conflicts in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wujtewicz, Maria; Wujtewicz, Magdalena Anna; Owczuk, Radosław

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts in intensive care units (ICUs) are common and concern all professional groups, patients and their families. Both intra- and inter-team conflicts occur. The most common conflicts occur between nurses and physicians, followed by those within nursing teams and between ICU personnel and family members. The main causes of conflicts are considered to be unsatisfactory quality of the information provided, inappropriate ways of communication and improper approach towards treatment of patients. ICU conflicts can have serious consequences not only for families but also for patients, physicians, nurses and wider society. Lack of communication among ICU teams is likely to impair cooperation and ICU team-family contacts. From the point of view of patients and their families, communication skills, as one of the factors affecting the satisfaction of families with treatment, are essential to ensure high quality of ICU treatment. While conflicts are generally unfavourable, they can also have positive implications for the parties involved, depending on their prevalence and management, as well as the community they concern. PMID:26401743

  9. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  10. Nosocomial infections in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Baltimore, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections are a major complication of serious illnesses. Severely ill patients have a greater risk of acquiring nosocomial infections, so this problem is greatest in intensive care units. Studies have demonstrated that nosocomial infections are largely preventable. Adherence to recommended techniques for patient care will have the greatest benefit in the intensive care unit. In this paper the background epidemiology of nosocomial infections is reviewed and related to pediatrics and intensive care units. Types of diseases, assistance equipment, and monitoring devices which are associated with a high risk of nosocomial infections are emphasized and specific steps for lowering this risk are listed. PMID:6382835

  11. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. PMID:26365640

  12. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  13. Is managed care closing substance abuse treatment units?

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Harris Lemak, Christy; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Roddy, Brian L; Nahra, Tammie A

    2007-03-01

    Despite high levels of unmet need for outpatient substance abuse treatment, a significant percentage of outpatient units have closed over the past several years. This study drew on 1999-2000 and 2005 national surveys to determine if managed care was associated with outpatient substance abuse treatment units' likelihood of surviving. Each substance abuse unit director was asked about the presence of any managed care contracts, percentage revenues from managed care, percentage of clients for whom prior authorization was required, and percentage of clients for whom concurrent review was required. A multiple logistic regression revealed that none of these factors was associated with substance abuse treatment unit survival. At this point, neither the presence nor the structure of managed care appears to affect the survival of outpatient substance abuse treatment units. Given the need for these facilities, however, and their vulnerability to closure, continued attention to managed care's potential influence is warranted. PMID:17458479

  14. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. Methods This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. Results The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning. PMID:24213086

  15. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  16. Healthcare assistants in the children's intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    King, Peter; Crawford, Doreen

    2009-02-01

    Recruiting and retaining qualified nurses for children's intensive care units is becoming more difficult because of falling numbers of recruits into the child branch and inadequate educational planning and provision. Meeting the staffing challenge and maintaining the quality of children's intensive care services requires flexible and creative approaches, including considered evolution of the role of healthcare assistants. Evidence from adult services indicates that the addition of healthcare assistants to the intensive care team can benefit patient care. The evolution of the healthcare assistant role to support provision of safe, effective care in the children's intensive care setting requires a comprehensive strategy to ensure that appropriate education, training and supervision are in place. Career development pathways need to be in place and role accountability clearly defined at the different stages of the pathway. Experience in one unit in Glasgow suggests that healthcare assistants make a valuable contribution to the care of critically ill children and young people. PMID:19266786

  17. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients". PMID:26155009

  18. Health care data in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rice, D P

    1983-06-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the following article, An Inventory of U.S. Health Care Data Bases. As an introduction, this article-reviews the characteristics of U.lS. Health Care Data. These characteristics include a lack of common definition and uniformity of reporting of observations, systems that are sometimes duplicative, and a resistance to data sharing on the part of collecting agencies, arising from the pluralistic American health care economy. Yet federal, state, and local governments as well as private organizations need health data to operate and evaluate their programs. Moreover, recent shifts to block grants and cutbacks in federal funding without accountability requirements will adversely affect our ability to adequately monitor the impact of these programs on the nation's health. The article discusses these data issues, but also emphasizes the need for coordination between the government and private sectors. PMID:10261971

  19. [Asthma in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Bautista Bautista, Edgar Gildardo

    2009-01-01

    All asthma patients are at risk of suffering an asthma attack in the course of their life, which can eventually be fatal. Hospitalizations and attention at critical care services are a fundamental aspect of patient care in asthma, which invests a significant percentage of economic contributions to society as a whole does, therefore it is particularly important establish plans for prevention, treatment education and rationalization in the primary care level to stabilize the disease and reduce exacerbations. The severity of exacerbations can range from mild to crisis fatal or potentially fatal asthma; there is a fundamental link between mortality and inadequate assessment of the severity of the patient, which results in inadequate treatment for their condition. PMID:20873061

  20. Supporting families of dying patients in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Family support in the intensive care units is a challenge for nurses who take care of dying patients. This article aimed to determine the Iranian nurses' experience of supporting families in end-of-life care. Using grounded theory methodology, 23 critical care nurses were interviewed. The theme of family support was extracted and divided into 5 categories: death with dignity; facilitate visitation; value orientation; preparing; and distress. With implementation of family support approaches, family-centered care plans will be realized in the standard framework. PMID:25099985

  1. Neuromuscular Disease in the Neurointensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Veronica; James, Michael L Luke

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular diseases are syndromic disorders that affect nerve, muscle, and/or neuromuscular junction. Knowledge about the management of these diseases is required for anesthesiologists, because these may frequently be encountered in the intensive care unit, operating room, and other settings. The challenges and advances in management for some of the neuromuscular diseases most commonly encountered in the operating room and neurointensive care unit are reviewed. PMID:27521200

  2. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, TK; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP. PMID:26955317

  3. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  4. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  5. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    PubMed

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  6. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. PMID:26975787

  7. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  8. Year in review 2007: Critical Care – intensive care unit management

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Clayton; Carson, Shannon S; Amaral, André Carlos

    2008-01-01

    With the development of new technologies and drugs, health care is becoming increasisngly complex and expensive. Governments and health care providers around the world devote a large proportion of their budgets to maintaining quality of care. During 2007, Critical Care published several papers that highlight important aspects of critical care management, which can be subdivided into structure, processes and outcomes, including costs. Great emphasis was given to quality of life after intensive care unit stay, especially the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder. Significant attention was also given to staffing level, optimization of intensive care unit capacity, and drug cost-effectiveness, particularly that of recombinant human activated protein C. Managing costs and providing high-quality care simultaneously are emerging challenges that we must understand and meet. PMID:18983704

  9. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  10. [Decubitus ulcers in intensive care units. Analysis and care].

    PubMed

    Arrondo Díez, I; Huizi Egileor, X; Gala de Andrés, M; Gil Alvarez, G; Apaolaza Garayalde, C; Berridi Puy, K; Sarasola Lujambio, M J

    1995-01-01

    The fact that intensive care patients suffer from ulcera is a daily evidence which has a negative repercussion. We have analysed prospectively a sample of 215 patients to know the incidence, prevalence, levels, and placement of the decubit ulceras to observe whether there is an association between the variables age, sex, staying end, diagnosis, diabetes, risk level and postural changes and ulceration incidence. To do so, we have created a nursing care protocol for decubit ulceras to unify criteria and norm the performances. One out of every five I.C.U. patients suffers from ulcera and 30% of them show four or more ulceras, being the sacro and the heels the most usual places. There is an association between the patient's age, number of days staying in I.C.U. and diabetes and a higher incidence of ulceration. On the other hand, patients with politraumatisms diagnosis, infections and respiratory pathologies suffer from ulcera more than others. There is a clear association between the time of staying without postural changes and the incidence of ulceration. The same thing happens with the high risk stay. Our population is over 61% of I.C.U. stay in high risk, and its incidence of ulceration is 21%. Comparing both parametres we obtain an idea of the prevention which nursing professionals perform. PMID:8715359

  11. Emergency care for children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, James M; Krug, Steven; Shaw, Kathy N

    2013-12-01

    A formal emergency care system for children in the United States began in the 1980s with the establishment of specialized training programs in academic children's hospitals. The ensuing three decades have witnessed the establishment of informal regional networks for clinical care and a federally funded research consortium that allows for multisite research on evidence-based practices. However, pediatric emergency care suffers from problems common to emergency departments (EDs) in general, which include misaligned incentives for care, overcrowding, and wide variation in the quality of care. In pediatric emergency care specifically, there are problems with low-volume EDs that have neither the experience nor the equipment to treat children, poor adherence to clinical guidelines, lack of resources for mental health patients, and a lack of widely accepted performance metrics. We call for policies to address these issues, including providing after-hours care in other settings and restructuring payment and reimbursement policies to better address patients' needs. PMID:24301393

  12. Health and Medical Care: A Functional Content Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memory, David; Lamarre, Marilyn

    The functional content unit on health and medical care is part of a system developed for tutor training and support for adult literacy programs. A key component of the system is the Tutor Support Library, consisting of Instructional Concept Guides (designed as training and reference aids for tutors) and Functional Content Units (intended to help…

  13. Intensive care unit telemedicine: review and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Joseph; Krsek, Cathleen; Vermoch, Kathy; Matuszewski, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Intensive care unit telemedicine involves nurses and physicians located at a remote command center providing care to patients in multiple, scattered intensive care units via computer and telecommunication technology. The command center is equipped with a workstation that has multiple monitors displaying real-time patient vital signs, a complete electronic medical record, a clinical decision support tool, a high-resolution radiographic image viewer, and teleconferencing for every patient and intensive care unit room. In addition to communication functions, the video system can be used to view parameters on ventilator screens, infusion pumps, and other bedside equipment, as well as to visually assess patient conditions. The intensivist can conduct virtual rounds, communicate with on-site caregivers, and be alerted to important patient conditions automatically via software-monitored parameters. This article reviews the technology's background, status, significance, clinical literature, financial effect, implementation issues, and future developments. Recommendations from a University HealthSystem Consortium task force are also presented. PMID:17656728

  14. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    PubMed Central

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Scott, Shannon; Squires, Janet E; Stevens, Bonnie; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Watt-Watson, Judy; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; McGilton, Kathy; Golden-Biddle, Karen; Lander, Janice; Donner, Gail; Boschma, Geertje; Humphrey, Charles K; Williams, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units) in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta). Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education), environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work), and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit level influences research

  15. Global monitoring in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Andrew Kofke, W; O'Phelan, Kristine; Gupta, Puneet K; Figueroa, Stephen A; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Leroux, Peter D; Suarez, Jose I

    2015-06-01

    Effective methods of monitoring the status of patients with neurological injuries began with non-invasive observations and evolved during the past several decades to include more invasive monitoring tools and physiologic measures. The monitoring paradigm continues to evolve, this time back toward the use of less invasive tools. In parallel, the science of monitoring began with the global assessment of the patient's neurological condition, evolved to focus on regional monitoring techniques, and with the advent of enhanced computing capabilities is now moving back to focus on global monitoring. The purpose of this session of the Second Neurocritical Care Research Conference was to collaboratively develop a comprehensive understanding of the state of the science for global brain monitoring and to identify research priorities for intracranial pressure monitoring, neuroimaging, and neuro-electrophysiology monitoring. PMID:25846709

  16. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  17. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  18. 76 FR 35017 - United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Antitrust Division United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response... States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System, Civil Action No. 7:11-cv- 00030-0, which.... United Regional Health Care System, Defendant. Case No.: 7:11-cv-00030 Response Of Plaintiff...

  19. Cultural differences with end-of-life care in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Doolen, Jessica; York, Nancy L

    2007-01-01

    Critical care nurses are providing healthcare for an increasingly multicultural population. This ever-increasing diversity in cultures and subcultures presents a challenge to nurses who want to provide culturally competent care. It is common for patients and families to face difficult decisions about end-of-life care in critical care units, and minority cultures do not always believe in the Westerner's core values of patient autonomy and self-determination. Knowledge of these cultural differences is fundamental if critical care nurses wish to provide appropriate and culturally competent information regarding end-of-life decisions. PMID:17704674

  20. Ethical issues and palliative care in the cardiovascular intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Swetz, Keith M; Mansel, J Keith

    2013-11-01

    Medical advances over the past 50 years have helped countless patients with advanced cardiac disease or who are critically ill in the intensive care unit (ICU), but have added to the ethical complexity of the care provided by clinicians, particularly at the end of life. Palliative care has the primary aim of improving symptom burden, quality of life, and the congruence of the medical plan with a patient's goals of care. This article explores ethical issues encountered in the cardiac ICU, discusses key analyses of these issues, and addresses how palliative care might assist medical teams in approaching these challenges. PMID:24188227

  1. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  2. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  3. Microdialysis unit for molecular weight separation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Liu, C.

    1999-09-21

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, or (4) any combination of (1), (2), and (3).

  4. Microdialysis unit for molecular weight separation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Liu, Chuanliang

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, or (4) any combination of (1), (2), and (3).

  5. [Pain, delirium and sedation in intensive unit care].

    PubMed

    Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Brozović, Gordana; Goranović, Tatjana

    2012-03-01

    Delirium is a complication of intensive care treatment associated with permanent cognitive decline and increased mortality after hospital discharge. In several studies, postoperative pain was found as a possible precipitating factor. Aggressive pain treatment is part of current multicompartment protocols for delirium prevention after hip fracture. Protocol based sedation, pain and delirium management in intensive care units have been shown to have clinical and economic advantages. PMID:23088085

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak in a pediatric oncology care unit caused by an errant water jet into contaminated siphons.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henriette; Geginat, Gernot; Hogardt, Michael; Kramer, Alexandra; Dürken, Matthias; Schroten, Horst; Tenenbaum, Tobias

    2012-06-01

    We analyzed an outbreak of invasive infections with an exotoxin U positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain within a pediatric oncology care unit. Environmental sampling and molecular characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains led to identification of the outbreak source. An errant water jet into the sink within patient rooms was observed. Optimized outbreak management resulted in an abundance of further Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections within the pediatric oncology care unit. PMID:22333699

  7. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients’ conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours’ policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords “visiting policy”, “visiting hours” and “intensive care unit” with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses’ perspectives, patients’ preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  8. Controversies and Misconceptions in Intensive Care Unit Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2015-09-01

    The early initiation of enteral nutrition remains a fundamental component of the management of critically ill and injured patients in the intensive care unit. Trophic feeding is equivalent, if not superior, to full-dose feeding. Parenteral nutrition has no proved benefit over enteral nutrition, which is the preferred route of nutritional support in intensive care unit patients with a functional gastrointestinal tract. Continuous enteral and parental nutrition inhibits the release of important enterohormones. These changes are reversed with intermittent bolus feeding. Whey protein, which is high in leucine, has a greater effect on insulin release and protein synthesis than does a soy- or casein-based enteral formula. PMID:26304278

  9. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  10. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States. PMID:21439669

  11. Family experience survey in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Bridget; Manasia, Anthony; Bassily-Marcus, Adel; Oropello, John; Gayton, Matthew; Gaffney, Christine; Kohli-Seth, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    The experience of critical care is stressful for both patients and their families. This is especially true when patients are not able to make their own care decisions. This article details the creation of a Family Experience Survey in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) to capture and improve overall experience. Kolcaba's "Enhanced Comfort Theory" provided the theoretical basis for question formation, specifically in regards to the four aspects of comfort: "physical," "psycho-spiritual," "sociocultural" and "environmental." Survey results were analyzed in real-time to identify and implement interventions needed for issues raised. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction reported especially with quality of care provided to patients, communication and availability of nurses and doctors, explanations from staff, inclusion in decision making, the needs of patients being met, quality of care provided to patients and cleanliness of the unit. It was noted that 'N/A' was indicated for cultural needs and spiritual needs, a chaplain now rounds on all patients daily to ensure these services are more consistently offered. In addition, protocols for doctor communication with families, palliative care consults, daily bleach cleaning of high touch areas in patient rooms and nurse-led progressive mobility have been implemented. Enhanced comfort theory enabled the opportunity to identify and provide a more 'broad' approach to care for patients and families. PMID:26608426

  12. Integrating palliative care in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit: A report from the Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit (IPAL-ICU) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosenthal, Anne C.; Weissman, David E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Hays, Ross M.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Nelson, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although successful models for palliative care delivery and quality improvement in the intensive care unit have been described, their applicability in surgical intensive care unit settings has not been fully addressed. We undertook to define specific challenges, strategies, and solutions for integration of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception to May 2011 for all English language articles using the term “surgical palliative care” or the terms “surgical critical care,” “surgical ICU,” “surgeon,” “trauma” or “transplant,” and “palliative care” or “end-of- life care” and hand-searched our personal files for additional articles. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary expert Advisory Board, we prepared this report. Data Extraction and Synthesis We critically reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit setting focusing on challenges, strategies, models, and interventions to promote effective integration of palliative care for patients receiving surgical critical care and their families. Conclusions Characteristics of patients with surgical disease and practices, attitudes, and interactions of different disciplines on the surgical critical care team present distinctive issues for intensive care unit palliative care integration and improvement. Physicians, nurses, and other team members in surgery, critical care and palliative care (if available) should be engaged collaboratively to identify challenges and develop strategies. “Consultative,” “integrative,” and combined models can be used to improve intensive care unit palliative care, although optimal use of trigger criteria for palliative care consultation has not yet been demonstrated. Important components of an improvement effort include attention to efficient work systems and practical tools and to

  13. Primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the United States of America.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, P

    1995-01-01

    Recent reform in the National Health Service has moved general practice towards a more intense market and competition structure. Meanwhile in the United States of America there has been an attempt to modify the free enterprise approach to medical care towards a more socially responsive system. This discussion paper provides a family doctor's perspective of primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the USA. The cultural, economic and organizational issues underlying the need for reform are considered in turn, and the current situation with regard to health care provision, medical research, medical education and primary care are outlined. General practitioners in the United Kingdom would do well to pay attention to the effects of market reform occurring in general practice among their American counterparts. PMID:7576850

  14. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  15. [Benefits of aromatherapy in dementia special care units].

    PubMed

    Bilien, Corinne; Depas, Nathalie; Delaporte, Ghislaine; Baptiste, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aromatherapy is classed as a non-pharmacological treatment, recognised as a therapy for certain disorders. This practice was the subject of a study in a special care unit for patients with dementia. The objective was to demonstrate the benefit of aromatherapy diffusion on major behavioural disorders. PMID:27173630

  16. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  17. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  18. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  19. Optimizing patient care in the pediatric epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Amy M; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R

    2006-12-01

    In the pediatric epilepsy monitoring unit (PEMU) of a large midwestern hospital, patient care is optimized through the design of the unit, nurse and family education, communication, and medication administration. Four years after the PEMU was developed, the hospital held multidisciplinary discussions and surveyed nurses working in the PEMU to identify areas of nursing confidence. On the basis of the findings, the hospital refined some aspects of patient care, implemented an educational program for nurses who work in the PEMU, and established of a core group of PEMU nurses. Descriptions of the education and communication procedures and of the design features introduced to provide optimal patient care may be useful to other facilities seeking to design and implement PEMUs. PMID:17233511

  20. 78 FR 43055 - Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 15, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013-17478 Filed 7-17-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative By...

  1. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient information extant in the participating units, there was considerable reluctance to replace the paper-based logbook. The project's success can be attributed to the use of feedback from the clinical users in the development and implementation process to create accessible, high quality data. These data provide clinicians with the capability to monitor trends in a variety of patient groups. Advantages of the electronic logbook include more efficient data access, higher data quality and increased ability to conduct quality improvement and clinical research activities. PMID:12463943

  2. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. PMID:23939721

  3. Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned From the United States

    PubMed Central

    WAN, HONGWEI; YU, FANG; KOLANOWSKI, ANN

    2009-01-01

    After two birth peaks and the “one child per family” policy, China is facing unprecedented challenges with regard to its aging population. This article analyzes the problems associated with three traditional ways of caring for older Chinese, the current health care system, and social supports available to older Chinese. The “4-2-1” family structure and the “empty nest” undermine family support, the prevalence of chronic illnesses and lack of money reduce older adults’selfcare abilities, and insufficient care facilities threaten social support. Lessons learned from the United States show that community-based nursing models, nursing curriculum reforms with a gerontology focus, and reformed health care systems are pivotal for addressing China’s crisis. PMID:18239066

  4. Breaking bad news and discussing goals of care in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hollyday, Sheryl L; Buonocore, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a high-stakes environment in which nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), often assist patients and families to navigate life and death situations. These high-stakes situations often require discussions that include bad news and discussions about goals of care or limiting aggressive care, and APRNs must develop expertise and techniques to be skilled communicators for conducting these crucial conversations. This article explores the art of communication, the learned skill of delivering bad news in the health care setting, and the incorporation of this news into a discussion about goals of care for patients. As APRNs learn to incorporate effective communication skills into practice, patient care and communication will ultimately be enhanced. PMID:25898881

  5. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  6. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  7. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  8. The hostile environment of the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Donchin, Yoel; Seagull, F Jacob

    2002-08-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) were developed for patients with special needs and include an array of technology to support medical care. However, basic lessons in ergonomics, human factors, and human performance fail to propagate in this complex medical environment. Complicated, error-prone devices are commonly used. There are too many patient data for one person to process effectively. Lighting, ambient noise, and scheduling all result in provider and patient stress. These difficult working conditions make errors more probable and are risk factors for provider burnout and negative outcomes for patients. Auditory alarms on ICU equipment, ICU syndrome, and needle sticks are discussed as examples of such problems. PMID:12386492

  9. Giving a nutritional fast hug in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Monares Zepeda, Enrique; Galindo Martín, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing a nutrition support protocol in critical care is a complex and dynamic process that involves the use of evidence, education programs and constant monitoring. To facilitate this task we developed a mnemonic tool called the Nutritional FAST HUG (F: feeding, A: analgesia, S: stools, T: trace elements, H: head of bed, U: ulcers, G: glucose control) with a process also internally developed (both modified from the mnemonic proposed by Jean Louis Vincent) called MIAR (M: measure, I: interpret, A: act, R: reanalysis) showing an easy form to perform medical rounds at the intensive care unit using a systematic process. PMID:25929396

  10. The changing face of critical care medicine: nurse practitioners in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Thompson, Lisa; Milonovich, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, healthcare has undergone countless changes. Some of the important changes in recent years have been budget cuts, decreased resident work hours, and increased patient acuity. The need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside has resulted in nurse practitioners becoming an integral part of the healthcare delivery team. To date, little has been published regarding the role of the nurse practitioners in intensive care units. This article outlines how one pediatric hospital has successfully utilized nurse practitioners in the intensive care unit. PMID:15876885

  11. The obese child in the Intensive Care Unit. Update.

    PubMed

    Donoso Fuentes, Alejandro; Córdova L, Pablo; Hevia J, Pilar; Arriagada S, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Given that childhood obesity is an epidemic, the frequency of critically-ill patients who are overweight or obese seen at intensive care units has increased rapidly. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes a number of protein hormones, including leptin, which stands out because it regulates adipose tissue mass. The presence of arterial hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease may become apparent and complicate the course of obese pediatric patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Obesity management is complex and should involve patients, their families and the medical community. It should be coordinated with comprehensive government health policies and implemented in conjunction with a change in cultural context. PMID:27164340

  12. Workflow: a new modeling concept in critical care units.

    PubMed

    Yousfi, F; Beuscart, R; Geib, J M

    1995-01-01

    The term Groupware concerns computer-based systems that support groups of people engaged in a common task (goal) and that provide an interface to a shared environment [1]. The absence of a common tool for exchanges between physicians and nurses causes a multiplication of paper supports for the recording of information. Our objective is to study software architectures in particular medical units that allow task coordination and managing conflicts between participants within a distributed environment. The final goal of this research is to propose a computer solution that could answer the user requirements in Critical Care Units (CCUs). This paper describes the Workflow management approach [5] for supporting group work in health care field. The emphasis is especially on asynchronous cooperation. This approach was applied to CCUs through the analysis and the proposal of a new architecture [6]. We shall limit ourselves to explaining control board and analyzing the message management we support. PMID:8591248

  13. [Phthalate exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fischer Fumeaux, C J; Stadelmann Diaw, C; Palmero, D; M'Madi, F; Tolsa, J-F

    2015-02-01

    There are growing concerns on long-term health consequences, notably on fertility rates, of plasticizers such as phthalates. While di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is currently used in several medical devices, newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit are both more exposed and more vulnerable to DEHP. The objectives of this study were to identify, count, and describe possible sources of DEHP in a neonatal care unit. Our method consisted in the listing and the inspection of the information on packaging, complemented by contact with manufacturers when necessary. According to the results, 6% of all products and 10% of plastic products contained some DEHP; 71% of these involved respiratory support devices. A vast majority of the items showed no information on the content of DEHP. Further research is needed, particularly to determine the effects of such an early exposure and to study and develop safer alternatives. PMID:25554670

  14. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  15. The perinatal: special care unit: expert care for high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Meagher, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Labor and delivery units are often used to provide care for nonlaboring patients requiring intensive medical and nursing care. The utilization of labor beds in this manner, however, can result in a shortage of beds for those patients who are truly in labor. Unfortunately, patient dissatisfaction, use of supplemental staffing, and ill-prepared, overworked nurses can then become the result of this practice. Clearly, an improved, innovative model of providing care for high-risk perinatal patients is needed. The purpose of this article is to describe how one hospital and its interdisciplinary team met the challenge of providing expert care for complex perinatal patients by creating a unique model of patient care delivery, the perinatal special care unit (PSCU). An advanced practice nursing role, the perinatal nurse practitioner (PNNP) was implemented to provide collaborative care for these patients. This article includes a discussion of positive and negative outcomes that occurred after the PSCU became a reality. Overall, housing patients on the PSCU has eliminated inappropriate use of labor and delivery beds and has led to a more satisfying childbearing experience for all involved. PMID:15867684

  16. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  17. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based Workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10384452

  18. Markets and Medical Care: The United States, 1993–2005

    PubMed Central

    White, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate “market-oriented” measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States' labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want. PMID:17718663

  19. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  20. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions. PMID:24896556

  1. Markets and medical care: the United States, 1993-2005.

    PubMed

    White, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate "market-oriented" measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States' labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want. PMID:17718663

  2. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  3. Clinical observation units help manage costs and care.

    PubMed

    Lenox, A C; New, H

    1997-04-01

    Clinical observation units were created to avoid questionable admissions and short inpatient stays that were likely to result in Medicare payment denials. With the rise of managed care, these units also can contribute to ensuring optimal reimbursement by helping manage patient flow. Hermann Hospital, a facility affiliated with the University of Texas, Houston, initially opened an improved observation unit in 1992, but recorded a 13 percent Medicare payment denial rate and operating losses of as much as $20,000 per month during the first five months of the unit's operation. A multidisciplinary team was formed to address the observation unit's low utilization and payment denial problems. The problems identified included missed opportunities for admissions, inappropriate admissions, and extended stays. The facility took corrective measures based on the quality team's assessment and corrective measures developed by the utilization management committee and quality teams. The clinical observation unit now sustains a zero denial rate and steady revenue increases resulting from improved utilization of the unit. PMID:10166283

  4. [Creating baby-friendly neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Most expectant parents anticipate giving birth to a healthy newborn. Admission of a neonate to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is thus nearly always a significant and negative shock to parents and family members. We derived core concepts for this article from the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund (WHO/UNICEF)'s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, updated, and expanded for integrated care (2009). This framework document advocates expanding to NICUs guidelines that were originally developed for maternity units. This paper reviews the importance of breastfeeding to the mother-baby dyad and family integration. We suggest how to build a breastfeeding-friendly environment within the NICU using 10 steps that adhere to the NEO-BFHI's three "Guiding Principles". The proposed environment gives special emphasis to providing continued and unlimited kangaroo care, creating a family-centered NICU design, implementing an effective milk expression and monitoring plan, and respecting mothers' individual needs. Suggestions are provided as a reference to government policymakers and medical centers to facilitate the creation of breastfeeding-friendly environments in NICUs. PMID:23386520

  5. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  6. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  7. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  8. Sudden Death in Hospital after Discharge from Coronary Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter; Sloman, Graeme

    1971-01-01

    In a group of 339 patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in a coronary care unit, 273 left the unit while improving and were expected to leave hospital alive; 23 had a cardiac arrest or died suddenly while still in hospital—17 died immediately or after temporary resuscitation and six were resuscitated to leave hospital alive. Ventricular fibrillation was found in 13 of the 20 patients attended by the cardiac arrest team. The incidents were scattered from the 4th to the 24th day after the onset of infarction. Risk factors in these “late sudden death” patients were compared with the 250 patients who left the unit while improving and did not die or suffer cardiac arrest. The patients susceptible to late sudden death were characterized early in their hospital course by the findings of severe, predominantly anterior infarction, left ventricular failure, persistent sinus tachycardia, and frequent ventricular arrhythmias. It is suggested that such patients be chosen for prolonged observation in a second-stage coronary care unit. PMID:5113015

  9. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  10. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  11. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe. PMID:25463004

  12. [Evaluation of respiratory intensive care units at pneumology services].

    PubMed

    Vergnenègre, A

    2001-10-01

    Audits should be conducted in respiratory intensive care units (ICU) as in all other ICU using patient-specific indicators to assess medical activity and quality of care. However, other criteria, such as those developed by the SRLF ("Société de Réanimation de Langue Française"), should also be used. These criteria include the description of the patients previous health status, prognosis of underlying diseases, the SAPS I or SAPS II severity score at admission, the omega or TISS therapeutic scores, and the PRN index of health care burden. Medial and administrative audits are conducted using diagnosis-related groups (DRG) and case mix classification. The DRGs are used to establish an aggregate index of activity (ISA points) which contribute to the complex mechanism of budget allowance. Unfortunately, the French DRG case mix system does not provide an appropriate description of the costs of ICU stays. One of the special features of respiratory ICUs is related to patient flow. Patients are referred from a respiratory unit and discharged to a respiratory unit or a respiratory rehabilitation center. Readmissions are frequent. Many patients are also admitted only for diagnosis or a respiratory procedure requiring close surveillance. The SRLF criteria, which take into consideration all of these features, should always be used for the evaluation of quality of care. The French Society of Lung Disease (SPLF) has proposed specific standards of quality for respiratory ICU. We present here examples issuing for the ICU of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris. The results show that non-specific national indicators, in combination with other indicators specific for respiratory ICU, provide appropriate audit data. PMID:11887768

  13. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

  14. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  15. Staff training and turnover in Alzheimer special care units: comparisons with non-special care units.

    PubMed

    Grant, L A; Kane, R A; Potthoff, S J; Ryden, M

    1996-01-01

    Nursing facility staff may not be properly trained to deal with behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. We collected data about specialized dementia training and turnover among licensed nurses and nursing assistants in 400 nursing units in 124 Minnesota nursing facilities. Staff training may affect the retention of paraprofessional and professional nursing staff. A diversity of training methods, including workshops or seminars, films or videos, outside consultants, reading materials, training manuals, in-house experts, role playing techniques, or an orientation program for new staff, might be used to develop more effective training programs and reduce rates of nursing assistant turnover. PMID:9060276

  16. [Introduction of Hemodynamic Monitoring in Critical Care Units].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Wei; Wang, Shiao-Pei

    2016-02-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a very important treatment in intensive care units. Measurements taken during monitoring include pulmonary artery catheter (PAC), pulse-induced contour output (PiCCO), and non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring. PAC measures cardiopulmonary parameters using the thermodilution principle. PiCCO uses transpulmonary thermodilution and pulse contour analysis to measure cardiopulmonary parameters and extra-vascular lung water, to predict lung edema, and to differentiate between cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic respiratory failure. Non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring uses the thoracic electrical bioimpedance principle to measure electrical conductivity and then calculates stroke volume and cardiopulmonary parameters using the arrangement of red blood cells. The author is a nurse in an intensive care unit who is familiar with the various methods used in hemodynamic monitoring, with preparing the related devices, with briefing patients and family members prior to procedures, with related aseptic skills, with preventing complications during the insertion procedure, and with analyzing and interpreting those parameters accurately. The issues addressed in this paper are provided as a reference for nurses and other medical personnel to choose appropriate treatments when caring for critical patients. PMID:26813070

  17. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects. PMID:25716122

  18. Obesity in the intensive care unit: risks and complications.

    PubMed

    Selim, Bernardo J; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The steady growing prevalence of critically ill obese patients is posing diagnostic and management challenges across medical and surgical intensive care units. The impact of obesity in the critically ill patients may vary by type of critical illness, obesity severity (obesity distribution) and obesity-associated co-morbidities. Based on pathophysiological changes associated with obesity, predominately in pulmonary reserve and cardiac function, critically ill obese patients may be at higher risk for acute cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal complications in comparison to non-obese patients. Obesity also represents a dilemma in the management of other critical care areas such as invasive mechanical ventilation, mechanical ventilation liberation, hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacokinetics dose adjustments. However, despite higher morbidity associated with obesity in the intensive care unit (ICU), a paradoxical lower ICU mortality ("obesity paradox") is demonstrated in comparison to non-obese ICU patients. This review article will focus on the unique pathophysiology, challenges in management, and outcomes associated with obesity in the ICU. PMID:27098774

  19. Costing of consumables: use in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Mann, S A

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Middlemore Hospital manually costed the treatment and care of asthmatic patients. This was long-winded and labour-intensive, but provided hard data to support anecdotal beliefs that intensive care patients are more expensive than was currently believed or accepted. It is a known problem that funder and provider organizations see a huge disparity on the funding issue. With additional accurate information on the actual cost of individual patients, which can be grouped into disease categories, funding applications can be backed with accurate, up-to-date quantitative data. After a long preparation time, we are now costing individual patient stays in the ICU. Each individual resource was established, costed and entered into an MS ACCESS computerized database. Schedules have been prepared for updating prices, as these change. The final report available gives a detailed list of resource use within certain categories. Some items proved to be impractical to cost on an individual patient basis, and these have been grouped together, costed, and divided by the number of patient days for the last year, and assigned to each individual patient as an hourly unit cost. Believed to be a world-first, this information now forms the basis for variance reporting and pricing. PMID:10786509

  20. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nelson, J E; Danis, M

    2001-02-01

    A growing body of evidence and experience has effaced what were once thought to be clear distinctions between "critical illness" and "terminal illness" and has exposed the problems of postponing palliative care for intensive care patients until death is obviously imminent. Integration of palliative care as a component of comprehensive intensive care is now seen as more appropriate for all critically ill patients, including those pursuing aggressive treatments to prolong life. At present, however, data on which to base practice in this integrated model remain insufficient, and forces of the healthcare economy and other factors may constrain its application. The purpose of this article is to map where we are now in seeking to improve palliative care in the intensive care unit. We review existing evidence, which suggests that both symptom management and communication about preferences and goals of care warrant improvement and that prevailing practices for limitation of life-sustaining treatments are inconsistent and possibly irrational. We also address the need for assessment tools for research and quality improvement. We discuss recent initiatives and ongoing obstacles. Finally, we identify areas for further exploration and suggest guiding principles. PMID:11228566

  1. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  2. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, P.A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; Papadimitriou, K.; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W.

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs and breast cancer” and “benchmarking and breast cancer care”, and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  3. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  4. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients1

    PubMed Central

    Hamze, Fernanda Luiza; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8%) caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients. Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients. PMID:26487127

  5. Antimicrobial stewardship: application in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    Critical-care units can be barometers for appropriate antimicrobial use. There, life and death hang on empirical antimicrobial therapy for treatment of infectious diseases. With increasing therapeutic empiricism, triple-drug, broad-spectrum regimens are often necessary, but cannot be continued without fear of the double-edged sword: a life-saving intervention or loss of life following Clostridium difficile infection, infection from a resistant organism, nephrotoxicity, cardiac toxicity, and so on. While broadened initial empirical therapy is considered a standard, it must be necessary, dosed according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic principles, and stopped when no longer needed. Antimicrobial stewardship interventions shepherd these considerations in antimicrobial therapy. With pharmacists and physicians trained in infectious disease and critical care, clear-cut interventions can be focused on beginning or growing a stewardship program, or proposing future studies. PMID:19665090

  6. [Management of decompensated liver cirrhosis in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Lerschmacher, O; Koch, A; Streetz, K; Trautwein, C; Tacke, F

    2013-11-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the end-stage of long-standing chronic liver diseases. The occurrence of complications from liver cirrhosis increases the mortality risk, but the prognosis can be improved by optimal management in the intensive care unit (ICU). Defined diagnostic algorithms allow the etiology and presence of typical complications upon presentation to the ICU to be identified. Acute variceal bleeding requires endoscopic intervention, vasoactive drugs, antibiotics, supportive intensive care measures and, where necessary, urgent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis needs to be diagnosed and immediately treated in patients with ascites. Hepatorenal syndrome should be treated by albumin and terlipressin. In case of respiratory failure, differential diagnosis should not only consider pneumonia, pulmonary embolism and cardiac failure, but also hepatic hydrothorax, portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The feasibility of liver transplantation should be always discussed in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Artificial liver support devices may only serve as a bridging procedure until transplant. PMID:24030843

  7. Psycho-affective disorder in intensive care units: a review.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2002-09-01

    This paper reviews the literature related to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Syndrome. The intention of the paper is to explore the range of psychotic and affective phenomena that may be observed in practice, together with the management of contributory stressors. Patients experience a range of psycho-affective disturbances that may be triggered by drugs, the environment, dehumanizing practices and sleep deprivation. Symptoms do not always disappear following discharge and further research is required to determine the long-term psychological effects of an ICU. Comprehensive assessment of the patient's psychological state, using an appropriate tool, is necessary and should form an integral part of ongoing care. Interventions identified include eradication of dehumanizing behaviour, modification of environmental stimuli, effective communication and therapeutic touch. Where possible, communication needs should be addressed prior to admission, and patients and their families prepared for the unfamiliar world of the ICU. PMID:12201884

  8. Financing health care in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Taha, Nabila Fahed; Sharif, Amer Ahmad; Blair, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Newcomers to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) health care system often enquire about the way in which UAE health services are financed particularly when funding issues affect eligibility for treatment. The UAE ranks alongside many western counties on measures of life expectancy and child mortality but because of the unique population structure spends less of its national income on health. In the past as a wealthy country the UAE had no difficulty ensuring universal access to a comprehensive range of services but the health needs of the UAE population are becoming more complex and like many countries the UAE health system is facing the twin challenges of quality and cost. To meet these challenges new models of health care financing are being introduced. In this brief article we will describe the evolution of UAE health financing, its current state and likely future developments. PMID:24228347

  9. Principles of ethics: in managing a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dan R

    2007-02-01

    Managing a critical care unit can present many challenges for those whose roles have been only as clinicians. The administrative position presents many new ethical issues that challenge both traditional medical and nursing ethics. The use of the basic ethical principles in these administrative issues may be less familiar. Ethical principles that guide the practice of professionals and their new position are explored and their use described in both positions. Traditional ethical issues include: utilitarianism, natural law, autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, paternalism, justice, duty, rationing, informed consent, and withdrawing treatment. Conflicts in ethical issues are a natural consequence of the dual role of the professional. PMID:17242602

  10. [Occurrence and prevention of errors in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Valentin, A

    2012-05-01

    Recognition and analysis of error constitutes an essential tool for quality improvement in intensive care units (ICUs). The potential for the occurrence of error is considerably high in ICUs. Although errors will never be completely preventable, it is necessary to reduce frequency and consequences of error. A system approach needs to consider human limitations and to design working conditions, workplace, and processes in ICUs in a way that promotes reduction of error. The development of a preventive safety culture must be seen as an essential task for ICUs. PMID:22476763

  11. Mobile intensive care unit. Present conception and realisation.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, H; Hanegreefs, G; Hanquet, M; Rolly, G; de Temmerman, P; Van De Walle, J; Delooz, H

    1976-01-01

    A new Mobile Intensive Care Unit has been put in use at the "Service 900" of the Ministry of Health in Belgium. Its size was decided to enable efficient treatment of one patient. The type of suspension was chosen to give the patient adequate protection against untoward effects of travelling sickness. Radio-communication with the control center and hospital is ensured. The O2 supply-system provides an autonomy of 11 hours. Besides an electric distribution of 12 V. DC, a 220 V. AC is also available. PMID:1070899

  12. Centralized vs. Distributed PACS for Intensive Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Paul S.; Huang, H. K.; Tillisch, Jan

    1989-05-01

    One clinical environment which can immediately benefit from the implementation of a radiologic PACS is the intensive care unit (ICU). Our previous study has demonstrated the feasibility and timeliness of routine image transmission to an ICU. In anticipation of future expansion of this service, we have investigated two different models for a hospital-wide ICU PACS. These models included a centralized and a distributed processing PACS configuration. Their comparison indicated that although the distributed model offers some major advantages over the centralized model, the latter may hold a rightful place in the inter-departmental service, especially if the cost issue is a critical factor.

  13. Improving Congestive Heart Failure Care with a Clinical Decision Unit.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jo Ellen; Short, Nancy; Williams, Tracy E; Yandell, Ben; Bowers, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting the development of Clinical Decision Units (CDUs) to impact congestive heart failure readmission rates comes from several categories of the literature. In this study, a pre-post design with comparison group was used to evaluate the impact of the CDU. Early changes in clinical and financial outcome indicators are encouraging. Nurse leaders seek ways to improve clinical outcomes while managing the current financially challenging environment. Implementation of a CDU provides many opportunities for nurse leaders to positively impact clinical care and financial performance within their institutions. PMID:26625578

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Holme, G

    1994-06-01

    This study reviewed all patients (N = 37) treated with ECT in a psychiatric intensive care unit during 1989-91. Diagnoses were: psychotic depression (8); bipolar disorder, manic phase (13); schizoaffective disorder (14); and schizophrenia (2). All patients were very severely disturbed and had failed to respond to medication given at highest levels judged to be safe, usually over 3-4 weeks. Response to ECT was generally rapid and marked, allowing substantial reductions in medication. To achieve the same clinical outcome for each course of ECT, 50% more unilateral than bilateral treatments were required, suggesting that bilateral ECT has a more rapid effect in this highly disturbed population. PMID:7993281

  15. Assessment of brain death in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, David Y; Gilmore, Emily J; Greer, David M

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews current guidelines for death by neurologic criteria and addresses topics relevant to the determination of brain death in the intensive care unit. The history of brain death as a concept leads into a discussion of the evolution of practice parameters, focusing on the most recent 2010 update from the American Academy of Neurology and the practice variability that exists worldwide. Proper transition from brain death determination to possible organ donation is reviewed. This review concludes with a discussion regarding ethical and religious concerns and suggestions on how families of patients who may be brain dead might be optimally approached. PMID:23809039

  16. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs. PMID:23224803

  17. Different Nursing Care Methods for Prevention of Keratopathy Among Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Ehsani, Sohrab; Daneshgar, Farid; Ashtarian, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with reduced consciousness level suffer from eye protection disorder and Keratopathy. This study was conducted to compare effect of three eye care techniques in prevention of keratopathy in the patients hospitalized in intensive care unit of Kermanshah. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013 with sample size of 96 persons in three random groups. Routine care included washing of eyes with normal saline and three eye care methods were conducted with poly ethylene cover, liposic ointment, and artificial tear drop randomly on one eye of each sample and a comparison was made with the opposite eye as the control. Eyes were controlled for 5 days in terms of keratopathy. Data collection instrument was keratopathy severity index. Data statistical analysis was performed with SPSS-16 software and chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Findings: The use of poly ethylene cover (0.59±0.665) was significantly more effective in prevention of keratopathy than other methods (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between two care interventions of liposic ointment and artificial tear drop (P=0.844) but the results indicated the more effective liposic ointment (1.13±0.751) than the artificial tear drop (1.59±0.875) in prevention of corneal abrasion (P<0.001). Conclusion: Results of the study suggest the use of poly ethylene cover as a non-aggressive and non-pharmaceutical nursing and therapeutic method for prevention of keratopathy in the patient hospitalized in intensive care unit.

  18. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1999-01-01

    Co-operation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. We have concentrated on three main points usually proposed in the workflow models, suffering from a lack of dynamicity: static links between roles and actors, global notification of information changes, lack of human control on the system. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system. We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10193884

  19. [Factors causing stress in patients in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Ciriza, A; Otamendi, S; Ezenarro, A; Asiain, M C

    1996-01-01

    Intensive care units have been considered stress generating areas. Knowing the causes why this happens will allow us to take specific measures to prevent or minimize it. This study has been performed with the aim to identify stress raising factors, as they are perceived by intensive care patients. The study has been performed in 49 patients most of whom were being attended in postoperatory control. The valuation of the degree of stress was performed using the "Scale of Environmental Stressors in Intensive Care" by Ballard in 1981, modified and adapted to our environment, with a result of 43 items distributed in six groups; Immobilization, Isolation, Deprivation of sleep, Time-spacial disorientation, Sensorial deprivation and overestimulation, and depersonalization and loss of autocontrol. The level of stress perceived by patients was low. The factors considered as most stressing were those related to physical aspects; presence of tubes in nose and mouth, impossibility to sleep and presence of noise, whereas those less stressing referred to Nursing attention. We conclude that patients perceive ICU as a little stressing place in spite of the excessive noise, remark the presence of invasive tubes and the difficulty to sleep as the most stressing factors, and in the same way, express a high degree of satisfaction about the attention received. PMID:8997954

  20. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented. PMID:27104301

  1. Postanesthesia care unit visitation decreases family member anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carter, Amy J; Deselms, JoAnn; Ruyle, Shelley; Morrissey-Lucas, Marcella; Kollar, Suzie; Cannon, Shelly; Schick, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Despite advocacy by professional nursing organizations, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated the response of family members to a visit with an adult patient during a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Therefore, the purpose of this RCT was to evaluate the impact of a brief PACU visitation on the anxiety of family members. The study was conducted in a phase I PACU of a large community-based hospital. Subjects were designated adult family members or significant others of an adult PACU patient who had undergone general anesthesia. A pretest-posttest RCT design was used. The dependent variable was the change in anxiety scores of the visitor after seeing his or her family member in the PACU. Student t test (unpaired, two tailed) was used to determine if changes in anxiety scores (posttest score-pretest score) were different for the PACU visit and no visit groups. A total of 45 participants were studied over a 3-month period, with N=24 randomly assigned to a PACU visit and N=21 assigned to usual care (no PACU visit). Participants in the PACU visit group had a statistically significant (P=.0001) decrease in anxiety after the visitation period (-4.11±6.4); participants in the usual care group (no PACU visit) had an increase in anxiety (+4.47±6.6). The results from this study support the value and importance of PACU visitation for family members. PMID:22264615

  2. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  3. Radiologic assessment in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, R. I.

    1984-01-01

    The severely ill infant or child who requires admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often presents with a complex set of problems necessitating multiple and frequent management decisions. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role, not only in the initial assessment of the patient's condition and establishing a diagnosis, but also in monitoring the patient's progress and the effects of interventional therapeutic measures. Bedside studies obtained using portable equipment are often limited but can provide much useful information when a careful and detailed approach is utilized in producing the radiograph and interpreting the examination. This article reviews some of the basic principles of radiographic interpretation and details some of the diagnostic points which, when promptly recognized, can lead to a better understanding of the patient's condition and thus to improved patient care and management. While chest radiography is stressed, studies of other regions including the upper airway, abdomen, skull, and extremities are discussed. A brief consideration of the expanding role of new modality imaging (i.e., ultrasound, CT) is also included. Multiple illustrative examples of common and uncommon problems are shown. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 14 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 18 FIG. 19 FIG. 20 FIG. 21 FIG. 22 FIG. 23 FIG. 24 FIG. 25 FIG. 26 FIG. 27 FIG. 28 FIG. 29 FIG. 30 FIG. 31 FIG. 32 FIG. 33 PMID:6375164

  4. Monitoring and evaluation in the special care unit: the JCAHO ten-step process.

    PubMed

    Claflin, N

    1991-02-01

    Monitoring and evaluating the quality and appropriateness of patient care in the special care unit is the basis for quality assurance activities. To make the monitoring and evaluation process helpful, health care professionals in special care units must be involved in each step of the process. The focus must be on patient care, specifically on clinical aspects of care rather than on structural specifications or technical processes. In addition to assisting the special care unit to meet accreditation requirements, ongoing monitoring and evaluation assist that unit to assure high-quality care. Monitoring and evaluation activities also assist the special care unit manager in responding to demands of state and federal regulators by providing an objective assessment of the care provided to Medicare and Medicaid patients. These activities also can provide assistance in responding to concerns about lawsuits involving alleged negligence in provision of special care; and in meeting pressures from third-party payers to reduce costs associated with unnecessary treatment in special care units. This chapter describes how the ten-step monitoring and evaluation process can be used to help assure high-quality patient care in the special care unit. PMID:1995014

  5. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. Methods We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. Results At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Conclusions Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing

  6. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  7. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  8. Strategies for appropriate antibiotic use in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Delfino Ribeiro; Silva, Moacyr

    2015-01-01

    The comsumption of antibiotics is high, mainly in intensive care units. Unfortunately, most are inappropriately used leading to increased multi-resistant bacteria. It is well known that initial empirical therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce mortality rates. However the prolonged and irrational use of antimicrobials may also increase the risk of toxicity, drug interactions and diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile. Some strategies to rational use of antimicrobial agents include avoiding colonization treatment, de-escalation, monitoring serum levels of the agents, appropriate duration of therapy and use of biological markers. This review discusses the effectiveness of these strategies, the importance of microbiology knowledge, considering there are agents resistant to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and reducing antibiotic use and bacterial resistance, with no impact on mortality. PMID:26132360

  9. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dinic, Vesna; Markovic, Danica; Savic, Nenad; Kutlesic, Marija; Jankovic, Radmilo J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a systolic heart failure that occurs during the last month of pregnancy or within 5 months after delivery. It is an uncommon disease of unknown etiopathogenesis and has a very high rate of maternal mortality. Because of similarity between symptoms of PPCM and physiological discomforts during pregnancy, the early diagnosis of PPCM presents a major challenge. Since hemodynamic changes during PPCM can vitally jeopardize the mother and the fetus, patients with severe forms of PPCM require a multidisciplinary approach in intensive care units. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the diagnosis, monitoring, and the treatment of PPCM. Having reviewed the recent researches, it gives insight into the new treatment strategies of this rare disease. PMID:26636086

  10. Standardization of pain management in the postanesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Knowles, R

    1996-12-01

    A project is described in which a standard in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) for managing patients with acute pain was implemented. The nurses' documentation and their perceptions concerning pain management were assessed. The data collected from the pre-questionnaires showed misconceptions about pain medication, lack of knowledge about measurement tools, and value systems that were inconsistent with recognizing a comfortable and safe "comfort level" of pain for patients. The pre-audit of PACU nursing documents showed that the assessment of pain was noted in terms of presence or absence but not quantified by the use of a measurement standard. After the implementation of a pain standard, results of the post-questionnaires showed changes in behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge that showed significant increases in the use of a numerical or visual pain tool, and an increase in documented evaluation of pain. PMID:9069862

  11. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, A; Fappiano, S; Lipsett, P

    2002-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. MRSA strains are endemic in many American and European hospitals and account for 29%–35% of all clinical isolates. Recent studies have documented the increased costs associated with MRSA infection, as well as the importance of colonisation pressure. Surveillance strategies have been proposed especially in high risk areas such as the intensive care unit. Pneumonia and bacteraemia account for the majority of MRSA serious clinical infections, but intra-abdominal infections, osteomyelitis, toxic shock syndrome, food poisoning, and deep tissue infections are also important clinical diseases. The traditional antibiotic therapy for MRSA is a glycopeptide, vancomycin. New antibiotics have been recently released that add to the armamentarium for therapy against MRSA and include linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but cost, side effects, and resistance may limit their long term usefulness. PMID:12151652

  12. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional support, including enteral, peripheral, and central parenteral nutrition are discussed in detail. Appropriate formulas are given for different age groups. Electrolyte, vitamin, and mineral supplements are discussed. Guidelines are provided for choosing between peripheral and central total parenteral nutrition. A monitoring protocol is suggested and complications of nutritional therapy are reviewed. Safe and effective nutritional support requires considerable investment of time and effort by members of the nutrition team. PMID:6433586

  13. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  14. A Tale of 2 Units: Lessons in Changing the Care Delivery Model.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Glenda; Berger, Jill; Williams, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    In response to patient care quality and satisfaction concerns, a hospital determined the need to change the care delivery model on some inpatient units. Two pilot units adopted 2 different models of care. The authors describe the change project, successful outcomes, and lessons learned. PMID:26963441

  15. Pilot Study of Behavioral Treatment in Dementia Care Units.(practice Concepts)(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Kemp-Havican, Julie; MacNeill, Susan E.; Johnson, Amanda Schafer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development and use of behavioral treatment as a well-being intervention for individuals with dementia residing at special care units in a nursing home. Design and Methods: The project took place upon the construction and opening of two new homelike units for dementia care in a rural community-care center.…

  16. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  17. Compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guideline in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Zoafa, Aniyehsadat; Marofi, Maryam; Badiee, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical guidelines are important instruments for increasing the quality of clinical practice in the treatment team. Compilation of clinical guidelines is important due to special condition of the neonates and the nurses facing critical conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With 98% of neonatal deaths occurring in NICUs in the hospitals, it is important to pay attention to this issue. This study aimed at compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines in NICU. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with multistage comparative strategies with localization in Isfahan in 2013. In the first step, the components of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines were determined by searching in different databases. In the second stage, the level of expert group's consensus with each component of neonatal palliative care in the nominal group and focus group was investigated, and the clinical guideline was written based on that. In the third stage, the quality and applicability were determined with the positive viewpoints of medical experts, nurses, and members of the science board of five cities in Iran. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics through SPSS. Results: In the first stage, the draft of neonatal palliative care was designed based on neonates’, their parents’, and the related staff's requirements. In the second stage, its rank and applicability were determined and after analyzing the responses, with agreement of the focus group, the clinical guideline was written. In the third stage, the means of indication scores obtained were 75%, 69%, 72%, 72%, and 68% by Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. Conclusions: The compilation of the guideline can play an effective role in provision of neonatal care in nursing. PMID:26120329

  18. Communication of mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Carina Isabel Ferreira; Rodrigues, Inês Tello Rato Milheiras

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to translate and culturally and linguistically adapt the Ease of Communication Scale and to assess the level of communication difficulties for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation with orotracheal intubation, relating these difficulties to clinical and sociodemographic variables. Methods This study had three stages: (1) cultural and linguistic adaptation of the Ease of Communication Scale; (2) preliminary assessment of its psychometric properties; and (3) observational, descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study, conducted from March to August 2015, based on the Ease of Communication Scale - after extubation answers and clinical and sociodemographic variables of 31 adult patients who were extubated, clinically stable and admitted to five Portuguese intensive care units. Results Expert analysis showed high agreement on content (100%) and relevance (75%). The pretest scores showed a high acceptability regarding the completion of the instrument and its usefulness. The Ease of Communication Scale showed excellent internal consistency (0.951 Cronbach's alpha). The factor analysis explained approximately 81% of the total variance with two scale components. On average, the patients considered the communication experiences during intubation to be "quite hard" (2.99). No significant correlation was observed between the communication difficulties reported and the studied sociodemographic and clinical variables, except for the clinical variable "number of hours after extubation" (p < 0.05). Conclusion This study translated and adapted the first assessment instrument of communication difficulties for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units into European Portuguese. The preliminary scale validation suggested high reliability. Patients undergoing mechanical ventilation reported that communication during intubation was "quite hard", and these communication difficulties apparently existed regardless of the

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Raquel; Nunes, António; Sousa, Cristina; Moura, Fausto; Gouveia, João; Ramos, Armindo

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care. We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 - 31st December 2006. We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75) years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9.75). Mean SAPS II was 51.18 (18.05), with a predicted mortality of 47.27%. Aetiology was identified in 42.1% of the patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent aetiological agent, but the group of aetiological agents more frequently identified was Gram-negative enteric bacilli. Levofloxacine was the most frequently previously used antibio tic. The most frequently used antibiotherapy scheme was the association ceftriaxone - azithromicine. It was possible to evaluate suitability of treatment in 32 patients; 27 were on suitable antibiotherapy regimes. 66 patients (86.8%) were on respirators, with a median length of 4 days. The median length of stay was 5.3 days. ICU mortality was 36.8% and hospital mortality 55.26%. SAPS II, CRP (C-reactive protein), potassium and initial unsuitable antibiotherapy were related to mortality. After multivariate analysis, only SAPS II maintained statistical significance. Use of antibiotics should be judicious, taking the most frequent agents and their susceptibility into consideration. PMID:20437001

  20. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  1. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child. PMID:25354987

  2. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees. PMID:2720515

  3. The intensive care unit psychosocial care scale: Development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Meena; Chivukula, Usha; Rana, Suvashisa

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of the current study was to construct a new self-report scale - ICU-PC Scale - to measure the psychosocial care (PC) of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and examine different psychometric issues in the development and initial validation of this scale. The findings indicate that the ICU-PC Scale has established high internal consistency. A three-factor structure - protection of human dignity and rights, transparency for decision making and care continuity and sustained patient, family orientation - has been identified with a substantial number of subjects (N=250) in hospital settings. The three oblique factor solutions are found to be interrelated and interdependent with good indices of internal consistency and content validity. This new instrument is the first of its kind to measure the psychosocial care to be provided to patients in the ICU. The present findings indicate that the ICU-PC scale, with additional factor analytic research, could become an established and clinical tool. PMID:26321092

  4. Small subdural hemorrhages: is routine intensive care unit admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-03-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of subdural hematoma (SDH) continues to improve. In some cases, the finding is limited to one or 2 images of the CT examination. At our institution, all patients with an SDH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that patients with a small traumatic SDH on their presenting CT examination do not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU and can instead be managed on a hospital unit with a lower level of monitoring. This is a retrospective study of patients evaluated and treated at a level I trauma center for acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage between 2011 and 2014. The clinical and imaging profile of 87 patients with traumatic SDH were studied. Patients with small isolated traumatic subdural hemorrhage (tSDH) (<10cm(3) blood volume) spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurologic and medical stability during hospitalization, and did not require any neurosurgical intervention. It is our recommendation that patients with isolated tSDH (<10cm(3)) do not require ICU monitoring. Patients with small tSDH and additional intracranial hemorrhages overall show low rates of medical decline (4%) and neurologic decline (4%) but may still benefit from ICU observation. Patients with tSDH greater than 10cm(3) overall demonstrated poor clinical courses and outcome and would benefit ICU monitoring. PMID:26795895

  5. 29 CFR 103.30 - Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry. 103.30 Section 103.30 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD OTHER RULES Appropriate Bargaining Units § 103.30 Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry. (a)...

  6. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit

    PubMed Central

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C.; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Design Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. Setting St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Participants One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Main outcome measures Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients’ hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Results Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients’ ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the

  7. The Evolving Practice of Developmental Care in the Neonatal Unit: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legendre, Valerie; Burtner, Patricia A.; Martinez, Katrina L.; Crowe, Terry K.

    2011-01-01

    Many neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are experiencing changes in their approaches to preterm infant care as they consider and incorporate the philosophy of individualized developmental care. The aim of this systematic review is to research current literature documenting the short-term effects of developmental care and the Newborn…

  8. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; de Paula, Renata Monteiro; de Castro Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages). A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3%) working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%); about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05). Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3%) or only toothbrushes (28.2%) with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3%) to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01). Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). However, most professionals (56.4%) reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs. PMID:27275074

  9. Ten years of asthma admissions to adult critical care units in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Gibbison, Ben; Griggs, Kathryn; Mukherjee, Mome; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the patient demographics, outcomes and trends of admissions with acute severe asthma admitted to adult critical care units in England and Wales. Design 10-year, retrospective analysis of a national audit database. Setting Secondary care: adult, general critical care units in the UK. Participants 830 808 admissions to adult, general critical care units. Primary and secondary outcome measures Demographic data including age and sex, whether the patient was invasively ventilated or not, length of stay (LOS; both in the critical care unit and acute hospital), survival (both critical care unit and acute hospital) and time trends across the 10-year period. Results Over the 10-year period, there were 11 948 (1.4% of total) admissions with asthma to adult critical care units in England and Wales. Among them 67.5% were female and 32.5% were male (RR F:M 2.1; 95% CI 2.0 to 2.1). Median LOS in the critical care unit was 1.8 days (IQR 0.9–3.8). Median LOS in the acute hospital was 7 days (IQR 4–14). Critical care unit survival rate was 95.5%. Survival at discharge from hospital was 93.3%. There was an increase in admissions to adult critical care units by an average of 4.7% (95% CI 2.8 to 6.7)/year. Conclusions Acute asthma represents a modest burden of work for adult critical care units in England and Wales. Demographic patterns for admission to critical care unit mirror those of severe asthma in the general adult community. The number of critical care admissions with asthma are rising, although we were unable to discern whether this represents a true increase in the incidence of acute asthma or asthma severity. PMID:24056484

  10. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Genetic Disease Diagnosis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Carol Jean; Miller, Neil Andrew; Soden, Sarah Elizabeth; Dinwiddie, Darrell Lee; Noll, Aaron; Alnadi, Noor Abu; Andraws, Nevene; Patterson, Melanie LeAnn; Krivohlavek, Lisa Ann; Fellis, Joel; Humphray, Sean; Saffrey, Peter; Kingsbury, Zoya; Weir, Jacqueline Claire; Betley, Jason; Grocock, Russell James; Margulies, Elliott Harrison; Farrow, Emily Gwendolyn; Artman, Michael; Safina, Nicole Pauline; Petrikin, Joshua Erin; Hall, Kevin Peter; Kingsmore, Stephen Francis

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are frequent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and disease presentations are often undifferentiated at birth. More than 3500 monogenic diseases have been characterized, but clinical testing is available for only some of them and many feature clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Hence, an immense unmet need exists for improved molecular diagnosis in infants. Because disease progression is extremely rapid, albeit heterogeneous, in newborns, molecular diagnoses must occur quickly to be relevant for clinical decision-making. We describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) that features automated bioinformatic analysis and is intended to be a prototype for use in neonatal intensive care units. Retrospective 50-hour WGS identified known molecular diagnoses in two children. Prospective WGS disclosed potential molecular diagnosis of a severe GJB2-related skin disease in one neonate; BRAT1-related lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome in another infant; identified BCL9L as a novel, recessive visceral heterotaxy gene (HTX6) in a pedigree; and ruled out known candidate genes in one infant. Sequencing of parents or affected siblings expedited the identification of disease genes in prospective cases. Thus, rapid WGS can potentially broaden and foreshorten differential diagnosis, resulting in fewer empirical treatments and faster progression to genetic and prognostic counseling. PMID:23035047

  11. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hisham, Mohamed; Sivakumar, Mudalipalayam N.; Veerasekar, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420), drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152), drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149), Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135), drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47), drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45), and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38). Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9%) renal dose, 62 (5.2%) hepatic dose, 17 (1.4%) pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8%) insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities. PMID:27076707

  12. Developing a Simulation to Study Conflict in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; Schuster, Rachel A.; Ernecoff, Natalie C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although medical simulation is increasingly being used in healthcare education, there are few examples of how to rigorously design a simulation to evaluate and study important communication skills of intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians. Objectives: To use existing best practice recommendations to develop a medical simulation to study conflict management in ICUs, then assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation among ICU clinicians. Methods: The setting was a medical ICU of a tertiary care, university hospital. Participants were 36 physicians who treat critically ill patients: intensivists, palliative medicine specialists, and trainees. Using best-practice guidelines and an iterative, multidisciplinary approach, we developed and refined a simulation involving a critically ill patient, in which the patient had a clear advance directive specifying no use of life support, and a surrogate who was unwilling to follow the patient’s preferences. ICU clinicians participated in the simulation and completed surveys and semistructured interviews to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation. Measurements and Main Results: All participants successfully completed the simulation, and all perceived conflict with the surrogate (mean conflict score, 4.2 on a 0–10 scale [SD, 2.5; range, 1–10]). Participants reported high realism of the simulation across a range of criteria, with mean ratings of greater than 8 on a 0 to 10 scale for all domains assessed. During semistructured interviews, participants confirmed a high degree of realism and offered several suggestions for improvements. Conclusions: We used existing best practice recommendations to develop a simulation model to study physician–family conflict in ICUs that is feasible, acceptable, and realistic. PMID:25643166

  13. Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a Brazilian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Rezende, Ederlon Alves de Carvalho; Mendes, Ciro Leite; Silva Jr., João Manoel; Sanches, Joel Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are no data on the preferences of intensivists regarding hemodynamic monitoring methods. The present study aimed to identify the methods used by national intensivists, the hemodynamic variables they consider important, the regional differences, the reasons for choosing a particular method, and the use of protocols and continued training. Methods National intensivists were invited to answer an electronic questionnaire during three intensive care events and later, through the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira portal, between March and October 2009. Demographic data and aspects related to the respondent preferences regarding hemodynamic monitoring were researched. Results In total, 211 professionals answered the questionnaire. Private hospitals showed higher availability of resources for hemodynamic monitoring than did public institutions. The pulmonary artery catheter was considered the most trusted by 56.9% of the respondents, followed by echocardiograms, at 22.3%. Cardiac output was considered the most important variable. Other variables also considered relevant were mixed/central venous oxygen saturation, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. Echocardiography was the most used method (64.5%), followed by pulmonary artery catheter (49.3%). Only half of respondents used treatment protocols, and 25% worked in continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring. Conclusion Hemodynamic monitoring has a greater availability in intensive care units of private institutions in Brazil. Echocardiography was the most used monitoring method, but the pulmonary artery catheter remains the most reliable. The implementation of treatment protocols and continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring in Brazil is still insufficient. PMID:25607264

  14. Evaluation of forensic cases admitted to pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Duramaz, Burcu Bursal; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yeşilbaş, Osman; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of pediatric forensic cases to contribute to the literature and to preventive health care services. Material and Methods: Pediatric forensic cases hospitalized in our pediatric intensive care unit below the age of 17 years were reviewed retrospectively (January 2009–June 2014) . The patients were evaluated in two groups as physical traumas (Group A) and poisonings (Group B). The patients’ age, gender, complaints at presentation, time of presentation and referral (season, time) and, mortality rates were determined. Cases of physical trauma (Group A) were classified as traffic accidents, falling down from height, falling of device, drowning, electric shock, burns and child abuse. Poisonings (Group B) were classified as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, other chemicals and unknown drug poisonings. Results: Two hundred twenthy cases were included. The mean age was 5.1+3.1 years. One hundred fifteen (%52.5) of the cases were male and 105 (%47.5) were female. Group A consisted of 62 patients and Group B consisted of 158 patients. The patients presented most frequently in summer months. The most common reason for presentation was falling down from height (12.7%) in Group A and accidental drug poisoning (most frequently antidepressants) in Group B. The mortality rate was 5%. Conclusion: Forensic cases in the pediatric population (physical trauma and poisoning) are preventable health problems. Especially, preventive approach to improve the environment for falling down from height must be a priority. Increasing the awareness of families and the community on this issue, in summer months during which forensic cases are observed most frequently can contribute to a reduction in the number of cases. PMID:26568689

  15. Intensive care unit management of fever following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Kirkness, Catherine J; Mitchell, Pamela H

    2007-04-01

    Fever, in the presence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), is associated with worsened neurologic outcomes. Studies prior to the publication of management guidelines revealed an undertreatment of fever in patients with neurologic insults. Presently the adult TBI guidelines state that maintenance of normothermia should be a standard of care therefore improvement in management of fever in these patients would be expected. The specific aims of the study were to: (1) determine the incidence of fever (T>or=38.5 degrees C) in a population of critically ill patients with TBI; (2) describe what interventions were recorded by intensive care unit (ICU) nurses in managing fever; (3) ascertain the rate of adherence with published normothermia guidelines. Medical record review of available hospital records was conducted on patients admitted to a level I trauma center following severe TBI (N=108) from the parent study. Temperature data was abstracted and contemporaneous nursing documentation was examined for evidence of intervention for fever and adherence with published standards. Data analyses were performed that included descriptive statistics. Seventy-nine percent of TBI patients (85/108) had at least one recorded fever event while in the ICU. However in only 31% of events did the patient receive any documented intervention by nursing staff for the elevated temperature. The most frequently documented intervention was pharmacologic (358/1166 elevations). Other nursing actions (e.g. use of fan) accounted for a minority (<1%) of nursing interventions documented. Patients were more likely to have a high temperature that exceeded 40 degrees C (13%) than a temperature that was normothermic (5%). There continues to be an under treatment of fever in patients with TBI by critical care nurses despite our knowledge of its negative effects on outcomes. There remains a gap in translation between patient outcomes research and bedside practice that needs to be overcome, thus research efforts

  16. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  17. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water. PMID:26156485

  18. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water. PMID:26156485

  19. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu; Wang, Lee-Ping; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-07-07

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  20. Framing the issue of ageing and health care spending in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    PubMed

    Gusmano, Michael K; Allin, Sara

    2014-07-01

    Political debates about the affordability of health care programmes in high-income countries often point to population ageing as a threat to sustainability. Debates in the United States, in particular, highlight concerns about intergenerational equity, whereby spending on older people is perceived as a threat to spending on the young. This paper compares how the problem of health spending is defined in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States by presenting the results of a content analysis of print media during the period 2005-2010. We found that population ageing was cited as an important source of health care cost increases in all three countries but was cited less frequently in Canadian newspapers than in the UK or US papers. Direct claims about intergenerational equity are infrequent among the articles we coded, but newspaper articles in the United States were more likely than those in Canada and the United Kingdom to claim that of high health care spending on older people takes resources away from younger people. In Canada a much larger percentage of articles in our sample either claimed that high health care spending is crowding out other types of government expenditure. Finally, we found that almost no articles in the United States challenged the view that population ageing causes health care spending, whereas in both Canada and the United Kingdom a small, but steady stream of articles challenged the idea that population ageing is to blame for health care spending increases. PMID:24759155

  1. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  2. Delivering Perinatal Psychiatric Services in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Kessler, Ann; Yang, Sarah Nagle; Parsons, Sarah; Friedman, Harriet; Martin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe characteristics of mothers who would likely benefit from on-site short-term psychiatric services while their infant is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods For 150 consecutive mothers who were referred for psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapeutic intervention in an innovative NICU mental health program, baseline information was collected. Data regarding their referrals, diagnosis, treatments, and their infants was analyzed. Results Most mothers were referred because of depression (43%), anxiety (44%), and/ or difficulty coping with their infant's medical problems and hospitalization (60%). Mothers of VLBW infants were disproportionately more likely to be referred. A majority of mothers accepted the referral and were treated; most only required short-term psychotherapy. A minority resisted or refused psychiatric assessment; a quarter of these had more difficult interactions with staff or inappropriate behaviors. In these cases the role of the psychiatrist was to work with staff to promote healthy interactions and to foster maternal-infant bonding. Conclusion Overall, on-site psychiatric services have been accepted by a majority of referred NICU mothers, and most did not require long-term treatment. A considerable need exists for psychiatric services in the NICU to promote optimal parenting and interactions. PMID:23772977

  3. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Suh, Robert D; Genshaft, Scott J; Kirsch, Jacobo; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Chung, Jonathan H; Donnelly, Edwin F; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Henry, Travis S; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; McComb, Barbara L; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2015-11-01

    Portable chest radiography is a fundamental and frequently utilized examination in the critically ill patient population. The chest radiograph often represents a timely investigation of new or rapidly evolving clinical findings and an evaluation of proper positioning of support tubes and catheters. Thoughtful consideration of the use of this simple yet valuable resource is crucial as medical cost containment becomes even more mandatory. This review addresses the role of chest radiography in the intensive care unit on the basis of the existing literature and as formed by a consensus of an expert panel on thoracic imaging through the American College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26439890

  4. Oxygen therapy in neonatal intensive care units in Khartoum State

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Ibrahim, Nada G; Nasr, Abdalhalim M A

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a drug that is essential in the treatment and prevention of neonatal hypoxia. The goal of oxygen therapy is to deliver sufficient oxygen to tissues while minimizing oxygen toxicity and oxidative stress. Improvement in monitoring technology of oxygen therapy has helped to improve clinicians’ ability to appropriately apply and deliver oxygen. The objectives of this prospective observational descriptive hospital based study were: to evaluate the practice of oxygen therapy in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Khartoum State, to identify guidelines of oxygen therapy in NICUs, to determine the mode of oxygen delivery to the neonates, and to assess the practice of long term follow up of patients who used oxygen. During the period January – June 2014, 139 neonates were included. Oxygen was delivered to the neonates in the study depending on the clinical assessment. Saturation was not measured at the time of oxygen administration in 119 (85.6%) neonates. Oxygen was delivered by central device in 135 neonates (97.1%). The majority of the staff did not know the practice of long-term follow up. Hundred and sixteen (83.5%) of the nursing staff knew that oxygen has complications but the majority didn’t know the nature of the complications and what causes them. The study showed that there is lack of guidelines of oxygen therapy in the NICUs and lack of monitoring procedures, which is important to be highlighted to overcome the complications and to improve the practice of oxygen therapy.

  5. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:23292914

  6. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  7. Antibiotic Stewardship Challenges in a Referral Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Kimberly D; Chiang, Tracy; Karasick, Stephanie; Quick, Kayla; Nguyen, Sean T; Cantey, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    Background Antibiotic overuse in neonates is associated with adverse outcomes. Data are limited to guide antibiotic stewardship in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Our objective was to identify areas for antibiotic stewardship improvement in a referral NICU. Methods Retrospective review of antibiotic use administered to infants admitted to a referral NICU compared with an inborn NICU. Antibiotic use was quantified by days of therapy (DOT) per 1,000 patient-days (PD). Results A total of 78% of referral NICU infants received ≥ 1 course of antibiotics. Infants in the referral NICU received more antibiotic DOT/1,000 PD than in the inborn NICU (558.9 vs. 343.2, p < 0.001), with a higher proportion of broad-spectrum therapy. For infants in the referral NICU, 39% of antibiotic courses were started at the transferring hospital; these were broader in spectrum (28 vs. 20%, p < 0.001) and less likely to be de-escalated or discontinued at 48 to 72 hours (58 vs. 87%, p < 0.001) than courses started after transfer. Conclusions Compared with the inborn NICU, suspected sepsis in the referral NICU accounted for more antibiotic utilization, which was broad-spectrum and less likely to be de-escalated. Stewardship interventions should include reserving broad-spectrum therapy for infants with risk factors and de-escalating promptly once culture results become available. PMID:26683603

  8. Sexual incidents in an extended care unit for aged men.

    PubMed

    Szasz, G

    1983-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the nursing staff of a 400-bed extended-care unit for aged men by questionnaire to find out what patient behaviors were identified as sexual by the staff and how they reacted to these behaviors. Three types of behavior were identified as sexual and as "causing problems": sex talk (e.g., using foul language); sexual acts (e.g., touching or grabbing, exposing genitalia); and implied sexual behavior (e.g., openly reading pornographic magazines). As many as 25 per cent of the residents were thought to create such incidents. Acceptable sexual behavior identified by the staff were limited to hugging and kissing on the cheek, although their answers implied that residents could need more intimate touching and affection. The survey raised questions about the nature and causes of different types of sexual behavior in the institutionalized elderly and about the roles nursing staff, physicians, and administrators can play in recognizing individual needs while safeguarding both the residents and the staff from the consequences of unacceptable incidents. PMID:6863791

  9. Value of positive myocardial infarction imaging in coronary care units.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S P; Pereira-Prestes, A V; Ell, P J; Donaldson, R; Somerville, W; Emanuel, R W

    1979-01-01

    Positive myocardial imaging was undertaken on 120 unselected patients admitted to a coronary care unit with clinical suspicion of acute myocardial infarction. Multipurpose mobile gamma-cameras were used for serial imaging after administration of 99mtechnetium-labelled imidodiphosphonate, a low-cost radiopharmaceutical that is 97% specific for myocardial necrosis, with myocardial uptake and blood clearance most suitable for myocardial imaging. The sensitivty of detection was 94% for patients whose infarction was unequivocal on the ECG; when the presence of raised enzyme concentrations was also used as a criterion for myocardial necrosis, the overall sensitivity for all 120 patients remained 94%. In 73 patients (61%), whose ECGs were unhelpful or difficult to interpret, scintigraphy allowed infarction to be diagnosed in 11 (15%) and to be excluded in five (7%). In 32 (44%) of this group whose ECGs were totally uninterpretable due to previous myocardial damage or disorders of electrical activation, scintigraphy provided confirmation of a diagnosis that otherwise rested only on whether enzyme concentrations were raised. Myocardial imaging is thus a useful technique that permits more definite diagnosis in patients for whom ECG and enzyme data are uncertain. PMID:761017

  10. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  11. Computer assisted management of information in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cereijo, E

    1992-10-01

    In order to use the capability of computers for handling large amounts of information, we developed a program for the acquisition, handling, storage and retrieval of administrative and clinical information generated in the 20 bedded multidisciplinary critical care unit of a University Hospital. At an initial phase a personal computer (PC) was used to collect information from 4362 patients, that included registration data, coded admission problems, techniques and special treatments, and final diagnosis. This information combined with free text provided a discharge report. Complementary programs allowed calculation and storage of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. This experience led to a second phase in which a computer with microprocessor Intel 80386 at 25 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 310 MB hard disk and a streamer for 150 MB cartridge tape back up, using UNIX operating system, permitted multiple users working simultaneously through 1 central console and 7 ASCII terminals. Data input included demographic data, previous and admission problems in coded form, present history and physical examination in free text, list of present problems in coded form, comments on evolution, record of special techniques and treatments, laboratory data, treatment, final diagnosis and facility for using all the information to elaborate the final report. Side modules provide help for drugs dosing, protocols for specific conditions and clerical routines. The system is open for connection to other areas of the Hospital. Data from more than 2000 patients have been included so far.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1447538

  12. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care. PMID:26384798

  13. Critical care management of major disasters: a practical guide to disaster preparation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Shawn P; Niven, Alexander S; Reese, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Recent events and regulatory mandates have underlined the importance of medical planning and preparedness for catastrophic events. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief summary of current commonly identified threats, an overview of mass critical care management, and a discussion of resource allocation to provide the intensive care unit (ICU) director with a practical guide to help prepare and coordinate the activities of the multidisciplinary critical care team in the event of a disaster. PMID:21220272

  14. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  15. Program evaluation of a unit reengineered for patient-focused care.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A; Dougherty, M; Martin, S

    1997-04-01

    A quasi-experimental research design was used to determine how successful a work redesign project based on the philosophy of patient-focused care was in meeting the established goals of increased multidisciplinary collaboration, improved satisfaction for health care clients and providers, decreased cost of care, and decreased length of stay. Results indicate that multidisciplinary collaboration decreased for all health care providers, especially the health care employee group that underwent a major role revision. Patient and health care provider satisfaction increased. The cost of care was budget neutral as a result of the shift of employee costs from centralized departments to units. Length of stay decreased. PMID:9165785

  16. [Guidelines for treatment of pneumonia in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Emmi, V

    2005-01-01

    Patients affected by pneumonia can be admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) independently by the setting where the infection has been acquired (community, hospital, long-term care facilities); even more frequently pneumonia can develop in patients already hospitalized in ICU especially in those requiring mechanical ventilation for different reasons. Within the severe community acquired pneumonia requiring admission in ICU, the most frequently responsible micro-organisms are mainly represented by Streptococcus pneumoniae, but also by Legionella and Haemophilus. Pseudomonas aeruginona, anyway, cannot be excluded. The most recent Canadian and American guidelines for treatment of the above mentioned infections suggest the use of a combination therapy with beta-lactams (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam) and a new generation macrolide or respiratory fluoroquinolone. In case of allergy to beta-lactams, the association fluoroquinolone-clindamycin should be preferred. Whenever a Pseudomonas etiology is suspected because of the presence of risk factors such as COPD, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, previous and/or frequent therapies with antibiotics and/or steroids, the same guidelines suggest the use of an anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam (such as piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, cefepime) associated with an anti-pseudomonas fluoroquinolone (high doses ciprofloxacin). An anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam plus an aminoglycoside or aminoglicosyde plus fluoroquinolone can be an alternative. Early onset Hospital Acquired Pneumonia (HAP) and early onset Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) in patients without risk factors for multi-resistant etiological agents are generally sustained by S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, methicillin-susceptible Staphylocccus aureus e Gram negative enteric rods. These infections can be treated with one of the following antibiotics: ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin or ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin) or

  17. Etiology and outcomes for patients infected with HIV in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiang; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Yingxiu; Tian, Yunfei; Su, Wenjing; Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Wei; Han, Ning; Yang, Di; Zhao, Hongxin

    2015-03-01

    Although the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program (NFATP) has resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of AIDS-defining illnesses in China, severe complications in patients infected with HIV may require aggressive treatment and critical care support. The objective for this study was to investigate the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units in Ditan Hospital, China. The evaluation of the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units was conducted using the clinical data from 122 patients infected with HIV (129 occasions) admitted to the Beijing Ditan hospital from January 1, 2009, to October 1, 2013. Over the five-year study period, 129 occasions occurred for 122 patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units. Respiratory failure was the most common condition (53.4%) among the 129 occasions analyzed. This was followed by pneumothorax (12.4%), infectious shock (8.5%), neurological problems (8.5%), renal failure (7.8%), post-operative complications and trauma (5.4%), coronary heart disease (3.1%), adverse effects of HAART (3.1%), lymphoma (2.4%), and liver failure (0.8%). Mortality in intensive care units was 64.5% while in-hospital mortality was 65.9%. The strongest protective predictor for in-hospital mortality was earlier admission to an intensive care unit (OR = 0.050, CI = 0.020-0.126, P < 0.001). Respiratory failure was the most common condition in patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units, and the outcome for the patients was poor. Mortality was negatively associated with earlier admission to an intensive care unit, but was not associated with HAART. PMID:25154318

  18. Preliminary report of the integration of a palliative care team into an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Sean; McHenry, Janet; Blank, Arthur E; Snow, Daniel; Eti Karakas, Serife; Santoro, Gabriella; Selwyn, Peter; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    Nearly half of Americans who die in hospitals spend time in the intensive care unit (ICU) in the last 3 days of life. Minority patients who die in the ICU are less likely to formalize advance directives and surviving family members report lower satisfaction with the provision of information and sensitivity to their cultural traditions at the end-of-life. This is a descriptive report of a convenience sample of 157 consecutive patients served by a palliative care team which was integrated into the operations of an ICU at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, from August 2005 until August 2007. The team included an advance practice nurse (APN) and social worker. A separate case-control study was conducted comparing the length of hospital stay for persons who died in the ICU during the final 6 months of the project, prior to and post-palliative care consultation for 22 patients at the hospital campus where the project team was located versus 24 patients at the other campus. Pharmaco-economic data were evaluated for 22 persons who died with and 43 who died without a palliative care consultation at the intervention campus ICU to evaluate whether the project intervention was associated with an increase in the use of pain medications or alterations in the use of potentially non-beneficial life-prolonging treatments in persons dying in the ICU. Data was abstracted from the medical record with a standardized chart abstraction instrument by an unblinded research assistant. Interviews were conducted with a sample of family members and ICU nurses rating the quality of end-of-life care in the ICU with the Quality of Dying and Death in the ICU instrument (ICUQODD), and a family focus group was also conducted. Forty percent of patients were Caucasian, 35% were African American or Afro-Caribbean, 22% Hispanic and 3% were Asian or other. Exploration of the patients' and families' needs identified significant spiritual needs in 62.4% of cases. Education on the death

  19. Focusing on Nutrition, Housing and Health Care: Retirement. High School Teaching Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuecher, Ron; Myers, John

    These teaching units, designed for use at the high school level, focus on nutrition, housing, health care, and retirement. The purpose of the unit on nutrition, housing, and health care is to provide an inquiry approach by which the student may become more aware of certain problems of the aged members of the community. The student, upon completion…

  20. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    PubMed

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems. PMID:26809413

  1. The ignored diversity: complex bacterial communities in intensive care units revealed by 16S pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Oberauner, Lisa; Zachow, Christin; Lackner, Stefan; Högenauer, Christoph; Smolle, Karl-Heinz; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Indoor microbial communities play an important role in everyday human health, especially in the intensive care units (ICUs) of hospitals. We used amplicon pyrosequencing to study the ICU microbiome and were able to detect diverse sequences, in comparison to the currently used standard cultivation technique that only detected 2.5% of the total bacterial diversity. The phylogenetic spectrum combined species associated with the outside environment, taxa closely related to potential human pathogens, and beneficials as well as included 7 phyla and 76 genera. In addition, Propionibacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Burkholderia spp. were identified as important sources of infections. Despite significantly different bacterial area profiles for floors, medical devices, and workplaces, similarities by network analyses and strains with identical molecular fingerprints were detected. This information will allow for new assessment of public health risks in ICUs, help create new sanitation protocols, and further our understanding of the development of hospital-acquired infections. PMID:23475210

  2. DANGER IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: DAMPS IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Kim; Kox, Matthijs; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Pickkers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are released by injured, threatened, or dead cells, or that originate from the extracellular matrix, influence the immune system. This is of great relevance in critically ill patients, in whom trauma or surgery-related cell damage, hypoxia, ischemia, and infections can result in extensive release of DAMPs. As many patients at the intensive care unit suffer from immune system-related complications, DAMPs could serve as markers for the prognosis of these patients and represent possible therapeutic targets. In the present review, we provide an overview of several well known DAMPs (high-mobility group box 1, heat-shock proteins, s100 proteins, nucleic acids, and hyaluronan) and their effects on the immune system. Furthermore, we discuss the role of DAMPs as markers or therapeutic targets in several conditions frequently encountered in critically ill patients, such as sepsis, trauma, ventilator-induced lung injury, and cardiac arrest. PMID:26513703

  3. Consumer Education: A Teaching-Learning Unit on Consumer Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville.

    This health education handbook covers the following topics: (1) the consumer and health care; (2) diet and nutrition; (3) additives, supplements, and health foods; (4) prescription drugs; (5) over-the-counter drugs; (6) doctors, hospitals, and surgery; and (7) providing and paying for health care. A teacher's supplement health care unit is…

  4. Use of primary care data for detecting impetigo trends, United kingdom, 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Laura J; Petersen, Irene; Rosenthal, Joe; Johnson, Anne M; Freemantle, Nick; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    Using a primary care database, we identified a major increase in impetigo in the United Kingdom during 1995-2010. Despite a doubled rate of primary care consultations, this increase was not identified by routine surveillance. Primary care databases are a valuable and underused source of surveillance data on infectious diseases. PMID:24047615

  5. Applying Lean Six Sigma for innovative change to the post-anesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Haenke, Roger; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-04-01

    Many healthcare organizations are building or renovating patient care facilities. Using Lean Six Sigma methods, nurse leaders can eliminate unnecessary waste and improve work and patient care environments. Starting with a key department like the post-anesthesia care unit is a good way to expose staff and leaders to the potential of Lean. PMID:25803797

  6. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  7. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  8. Pneumothoraces in a Neonatal Tertiary Care Unit: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rehan; Ahmed, Shakeel; Qadir, Maqbool; Maheshwari, Prem; Khan, Rehan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neonatal pneumothoraces are associated with high mortality. Prompt recognition to minimize its complications is paramount for ultimate outcome of these babies. Methods A retrospective case series study was carried out at Aga khan University Hospital, from January 2010 to December 2010 to determine the etiology and outcome of neonates with pneumothorax in a neonatal tertiary care unit. Results Ten neonates diagnosed radiologically with pneumothoraces were included. M: F ratio was 1:2.3. Birth weight ranged from 1750-3600 grams with a mean of 2100 grams. The occurrence of pneumothoraces was 50% on the left side, 20% on right, and 30% were bilateral. Primary etiology included pneumonia and sepsis (30%), hyaline membrane disease (20%), meconium aspiration syndrome (20%) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (10%). Spontaneous pneumothoraces were present in 20% of cases. In our study, the incidence of neonatal pneumothoraces was 2.5/1000 births compared to 10-15/1000 in Denmark, 10-20/1000 in Turkey and 6.3/1000 from Vermont Oxford Group. Despite the small number of cases, one incidental finding was the occurrence of pneumothorax, which declined in elective cesarean section after 37 weeks gestation i.e., 1.3 of 1000 births. Mortality was 60% determined mainly by the primary etiology and other co-morbid conditions. Conclusion The study showed a higher number of mortality cases (60%). Although, it was difficult to draw a conclusion from the limited number of cases, there may be a benefit on neonatal respiratory outcome to be obtained by better selection of mothers and by waiting until 37 weeks before performing elective cesarean section. Adequate clinician training in soft ventilation strategies will reduce the occurrence of pneumothoraces. PMID:23386951

  9. [ASSESSMENT OF PULMONARY VENTILATION FUNCTION AT INTENSIVE CARE UNIT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Mustafin, R; Bakirov, A

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the functional characteristics of lung tissue in reanimation profile patients with different pathologies with forced ventilation and auxiliary support on the background. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics properties of lung tissue in intensive care unit patients with symptoms of severe violations of restrictive lung tissue being on ventilatory support. Results were subjected to analysis of acid-base status and dynamics of the main indicators of the biomechanical properties of the lung in 32 patients with severe concomitant injury (n=21), acute bilateral community-acquired pneumonia (n=7), septic shock (n=4) during the entire period of the respiratory "prosthetics "(before and after the beginning of mechanical ventilation). Using during ventilatory support of patients with initial symptoms of the syndrome of acute lung damage and reduced lung function restrictive positive end-expiratory pressure of 6-10 cm of water column when the conventional (1:2; 1:2.5 at p≤0.05) and invert (2:1 at p≤0,1) ratio inhale/exhale, relatively low tidal volume (6-8 ml/kg) allows increase the compliance of the lung tissue to 11-29%. Increased expiratory time constant has a direct correlation with the value of airway resistance was due not only to the maintenance of optimal parameters for MVV (mechanical voluntary ventilation), but regular lavage of the tracheobronchial tree, which allows to maintain patency of the lower respiratory tract. The main areas during mechanical ventilation of lungs in patients with a sharp decline in restrictive lung function (ARDS, pneumonia), regardless of the reason it was summoned, optimal value is the observance of the positive end-expiratory pressure, the ratio of inhale/exhale (depending on the degree of hypoxemia), to maintain sufficient blood oxygen saturation and partial pressure of oxygen in the blood plasma. PMID:26355312

  10. Molecular analysis for bacterial contamination in dental unit water lines.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akari; Tamaki, Naofumi; Matsuyama, Miwa; Kokeguchi, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial contamination in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) was evaluated by molecular techniques in addition to the conventional culture method. Water samples (n=8) from DUWLs were investigated for heterotrophic bacteria by culture method using R2A agar. The selected bacterial antibiotic-resistance genes and Legionella species-specific 16SrDNA were identified by PCR. The profiles of bacterial contamination in DUWLs were further identified by PCR-DGGE. In this study, no antibiotic-resistant or Legionella genes were detected. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, Novosphingobium sp. was the most prevalent in DUWLs. Conventional PCR and PCR-DGGE were shown to be potentially useful for monitoring of bacterial contamination in DUWLs. PMID:27196554

  11. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  12. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly. PMID:24811627

  13. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  14. Using Technology to Create a More Humanistic Approach to Integrating Palliative Care into the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christopher E; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-02-01

    A decade ago, the major obstacles to integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) were the limited number of providers trained in palliative care, an immature evidence base, and a lack of appreciation for the importance of palliative care in the ICU. In 2016, the palliative care workforce has expanded markedly and there is growing appreciation of the benefits of palliative care, whether provided by a generalist (intensivist, nurse, social worker) or palliative care specialist. However, there is evidence that the quality of ICU-based palliative care is often suboptimal. A major barrier to more broadly addressing this quality problem is the lack of scalable ICU-based palliative care models that use technology to deliver efficient, collaborative palliative care in the ICU setting to the right patient at the right time. To address these challenges, we first review strengths and limitations of current care models as the basis for our novel conceptual framework that uses the electronic health record as a platform on which external innovations can be built, including: (1) screening for patients at risk for poor outcomes, (2) integrating patient- and family-reported needs, (3) personalizing care, and (4) directing generalist versus specialist triage algorithms. In the approaches considered, we describe current challenges and propose specific solutions that use technology to improve the quality of the human interaction in a stressful, complex environment. PMID:26599829

  15. Primary care groups in the United Kingdom: quality and accountability.

    PubMed

    Bindman, A B; Weiner, J P; Majeed, A

    2001-01-01

    With the introduction of primary care groups (PCGs), the British National Health Service has attempted to integrate delivery, finance, and quality improvement into a locally directed care system with a strong sense of community accountability. PCGs will eventually hold the budgets for primary care, specialist, hospital, and community-based services and have the flexibility to reapportion these budgets. Through clinical governance, PCGs are attempting to coordinate education, guidelines, audit and feedback, and other quality improvement approaches around health problems that are relevant to their patient panels and local communities. PCGs offer other nations attempting to improve the quality and accountability of health care an innovative approach that merits consideration. PMID:11585160

  16. Telemedicine in the intensive care unit: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Critical care medicine is at a crossroads in which limited numbers of staff care for increasing numbers of patients as the population ages and use of ICUs increases. Also at this time health care spending must be curbed. The high-intensity intensivist staffing model has been linked to improved mortality, complications, and costs. Tele-ICU uses technology to implement this high-intensity staffing model in areas that are relatively underserved. When implemented correctly and in the right populations this technology has improved outcomes. Future studies regarding implementation, organization, staffing, and innovation are needed to determine the optimal use of this critical care professional enhanced technology. PMID:25814449

  17. Investigation of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Ağca, Harun; Topaç, Tuncay; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Çelebi, Solmaz; Köksal, Nilgün; Hacımustafaoğlu, Mustafa; Cilo, Burcu Dalyan; Sınırtaş, Melda; Özakın, Cüneyt

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains lead to severe infections in immunosupressive patients, geriatric population and premature infants. 27 MRSA strains isolated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was considered as an outbreak and it was aimed to investigate the genetic and epidemiologic relation of the MRSA outbreak. MecA gene was investigated in the S. aureus strains and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to investigate the genetic relation between outbreak strains. MecA gene was showed in all isolates. PFGE revealed that there were two different strains and most of the isolates (25/27) were owing to same clone. One of the samples were found closely related with the common strain and the other sample was found genetically unrelated. To terminate the outbreak; liquid baby food was gained to the baby food kitchen, no more new patient was imported to the neonatal unit and none of the patients were exported from neonatal unit to other clinics during outbreak, education about infection control precautions was given to all the staff and nursing bottle dishwasher was obtained. To manage and terminate the outbreak, besides the infection control precautions, tests to determine the genetic relation between outbreak strains which are done in the microbiology laboratory are needed. Molecular analysis of outbreak strains will contribute to prove the epidemiologic and evolution of outbreaks. PMID:25232409

  18. Coping with Poor Prognosis in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, David A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The intensive care pediatrician who prophesies to parents that their child's illness is irreversible may encounter denial and hostility. Four cases are reported in which parents rejected their child's hopeless prognosis, counterprophesied miraculous cures, resolved to obtain exorcism, criticized the care, or accused nurses of neglect. Journal…

  19. Hospice Care in the United States: The Process Begins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    The hospice concept represents a return to humanistic medicine, to care within the patient's community, for family-centered care, and the view of the patient as a person. Medical, governmental, and educational institutions have recognized the profound urgency for the advocacy of the hospice concept. (Author)

  20. Child Care in the United States, 1970 to 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofferth, Sandra L.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    1987-01-01

    Used trends in proportion of children with working mothers and trends in numbers of children to project proportion of children with employed mothers in 1990 and 1995, by age of child. Profiles distribution of children in nonparental care, examining trends since 1965. Discusses supply of child care and trends in supply. Examines future supply and…

  1. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. PMID:25852202

  2. Implementation of Mental Health Huddles on Dementia Care Units.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Laura M; Huijbregts, Maria; Sokoloff, Lisa G; Wisniewski, Renee; Walsh, Leenah; Feldman, Sid; Conn, David K

    2014-09-01

    Client-responsive behaviours occur commonly among residents in long-term care (LTC) settings; direct-care staff, however, receive little education, support, or opportunities to discuss and collaborate on managing such behaviours. Our participatory action project introduced mental health huddles to support staff in discussing and managing client-responsive behaviours in long-term care. This research project engaged direct-care staff (e.g., personal support workers, registered practical nurses, housekeeping staff, and registered nurses) in learning how to use these huddles. Staff workers used huddles as a forum to stay informed, review work, problem solve, and develop person-centered action plans. Fifty-six huddles occurred over a 12-week period; two to seven direct-care staff participated in each huddle. Focus groups indicated improved staff collaboration, teamwork, support, and communication when discussing specific responsive behaviours. Huddles provided LTC staff with the opportunity to collaborate and discuss strategies to optimize resident care. Further research on how huddles affect resident care outcomes is needed. PMID:26261887

  3. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  4. Training in Family-Focused Developmental Care: Bridging the Gap between Traditional and Family-Centered Care in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walburn, Kathleen S.; Balsillie, Lois J.; Heermann, Judith A.

    1997-01-01

    An educational program developed to prepare health professionals in a neonatal intensive care unit to initiate family-focused developmental care (FFDC) is described. The program was designed to support families with preterm infants. Findings suggest that the program was cost-efficient, prepared nurses to efficiently initiate FFDC, and improved…

  5. The establishment of a primary spine care practitioner and its benefits to health care reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the dramatic increase in health care costs in the United States has not led to a corresponding improvement in the health care experience of patients or the clinical outcomes of medical care. In no area of medicine is this more true than in the area of spine related disorders (SRDs). Costs of medical care for SRDs have skyrocketed in recent years. Despite this, there is no evidence of improvement in the quality of this care. In fact, disability related to SRDs is on the rise. We argue that one of the key solutions to this is for the health care system to have a group of practitioners who are trained to function as primary care practitioners for the spine. We explain the reasons we think a primary spine care practitioner would be beneficial to patients, the health care system and society, some of the obstacles that will need to be overcome in establishing a primary spine care specialty and the ways in which these obstacles can be overcome. PMID:21777444

  6. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2003-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:12511390

  7. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2008-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:18687625

  8. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. 2005. Spillman BC, Black KJ. The size ...

  9. Caring for our youngest: public attitudes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, K

    2001-01-01

    Families make choices about employment and care for their children in a context that is shaped by public policies and colored by public opinion. Debates over whether the government should increase funding for child care or do more to help parents stay home with their children reflect tensions among strongly held ideas about family life, work, and the role of government. This article summarizes the results of public opinion polls that probe attitudes about parent and government roles and responsibilities with respect to children's care. The polling findings yield three main lessons: The American public believes that parents should be the primary influence in their children's lives and that it is best if mothers can be home to care for the very young. The public also values family self-sufficiency and understands that low-income families may need child care assistance to balance child rearing and employment responsibilities. However, skepticism about the appropriateness of government involvement in family life limits public support for proposals that the government act directly to provide or improve child care. From these lessons, the author draws several conclusions for policymakers: Policies focused on caregiving should respect the rights of parents to raise their children by ensuring that an array of options is available. Public programs should help families who are struggling economically to balance their obligations to work and family. Rather than directly providing child care services, government should fund community-based child care programs, and provide flexible assistance to help families secure the services they need and want. PMID:11712455

  10. Understanding health-care access and utilization disparities among Latino children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Langellier, Brent A; Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Inkelas, Moira; Ortega, Alexander N

    2016-06-01

    It is important to understand the source of health-care disparities between Latinos and other children in the United States. We examine parent-reported health-care access and utilization among Latino, White, and Black children (≤17 years old) in the United States in the 2006-2011 National Health Interview Survey. Using Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition, we portion health-care disparities into two parts (1) those attributable to differences in the levels of sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., income) and (2) those attributable to differences in group-specific regression coefficients that measure the health-care 'return' Latino, White, and Black children receive on these characteristics. In the United States, Latino children are less likely than Whites to have a usual source of care, receive at least one preventive care visit, and visit a doctor, and are more likely to have delayed care. The return on sociodemographic characteristics explains 20-30% of the disparity between Latino and White children in the usual source of care, delayed care, and doctor visits and 40-50% of the disparity between Latinos and Blacks in emergency department use and preventive care. Much of the health-care disadvantage experienced by Latino children would persist if Latinos had the sociodemographic characteristics as Whites and Blacks. PMID:25395597

  11. Nursing care quality: comparison of unit-hired, hospital float pool, and agency nurses.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, A; Havens, D S

    1996-07-01

    As fiscal constraints and hospital downsizing become driving forces in the health care arena, nurse administrators are challenged to satisfy fluctuating staffing needs while ensuring high-quality care. Hospital in-house nurses and agency nurses are two solutions often used to supplement unit staffing. The article reports a study that examined the quality of care administered on one unit by unit-hired, float pool, and agency nurses through a comparison of the groups' documentation on nine clinical quality indicators. Findings suggested significant differences among the three groups on these indicators. Implications for nurse administrators are discussed. PMID:8783546

  12. Communication and Culture in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Boundary Production and the Improvement of Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Haas, Barbara; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Amaral, Andre C; Coburn, Natalie; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-06-01

    This ethnography explores communication around critically ill surgical patients in three surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Canada. A boundary framework is used to articulate how surgeons', intensivists', and nurses' communication practices shape and are shaped by their respective disciplinary perspectives and experiences. Through 50 hours of observations and 43 interviews, these health care providers are found to engage in seven communication behaviors that either mitigate or magnify three contested symbolic boundaries: expertise, patient ownership, and decisional authority. Where these boundaries are successfully mitigated, experiences of collaborative, high-quality patient care are produced; by contrast, boundary magnification produces conflict and perceptions of unsafe patient care. Findings reveal that high quality and safe patient care are produced through complex social and cultural interactions among surgeons, intensivists, and nurses that are also expressions of knowledge and power. This enhances our understanding of why current quality improvement efforts targeting communication may be ineffective. PMID:26481945

  13. Parent Involvement in End-of-Life Care and Decision Making in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Eden, Lacey M.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2010-01-01

    Survival rates for very preterm and critically ill infants are increasing, raising complex ethical issues for health-care providers and parents who face the challenge of making end-of-life decisions for newborns. The purpose of this integrative literature review was to evaluate parental involvement in end-of-life care and decision making for their infant in the newborn intensive care unit. Findings revealed that establishing good relationships and clear communication between health-care providers and parents builds trust and eases stress placed on parents making decisions about the care of their infant. Palliative care programs provide support for parents and facilitate their decision making. Parents can be educated about how to communicate with health-care providers. Educating nurses on how to provide end-of-life care may also help improve support for parents during this difficult time. Additional research is recommended to examine parents' needs during and after end-of-life care decisions for their newborn. PMID:21197127

  14. Chronic care model strategies in the United States and Germany deliver patient-centered, high-quality diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Pitcavage, James M; Simic, Dusan; Altin, Sibel; Graf, Christian; Feng, Wen; Graf, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Improving the quality of care for chronic diseases is an important issue for most health care systems in industrialized nations. One widely adopted approach is the Chronic Care Model (CCM), which was first developed in the late 1990s. In this article we present the results from two large surveys in the United States and Germany that report patients' experiences in different models of patient-centered diabetes care, compared to the experiences of patients who received routine diabetes care in the same systems. The study populations were enrolled in either Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania or Barmer, a German sickness fund that provides medical insurance nationwide. Our findings suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in the care models that exhibited key features of the CCM were more likely to receive care that was patient-centered, high quality, and collaborative, compared to patients who received routine care. This study demonstrates that quality improvement can be realized through the application of the Chronic Care Model, regardless of the setting or distinct characteristics of the program. PMID:25201658

  15. [Perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ceci Figueredo; Souza, Dalila Melo; Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; dos Santos, Manuela Ribeiro; Faustino, Tássia Nery

    2013-09-01

    The scope of this paper was to analyze the perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in an adult intensive care unit. An exploratory-descriptive study using a qualitative approach was conducted with 14 health professionals from a public teaching hospital. The information was collected between February and April 2012, by means of semi-structured interviews and non-participatory observation interpreted using content analysis. Three thematic categories were identified: Care for terminal patients in an ICU fostering physical comfort; Lack of preparation of the team in dealing with terminal patients; and Challenges of palliative care practices in the intensive care environment. The interviewed parties reported having some knowledge of the proposal for palliative care though divergences were observed in the therapeutic conduct of the team in the care provided, demonstrating a lack of interaction and communication among the professionals. The drafting of a national policy to promote care for terminally ill patients is necessary, as well as ongoing training of professionals and the creation of care protocols for promoting the comfort of the patients and their families during the end of life phase. PMID:23989566

  16. The challenges of diabetes care in the dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Stephen D

    2003-01-01

    Nephrologists, dialysis facilities, and payers are confronted with a new and more difficult set of challenges to effectively care for the steadily increasing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data suggest that the current care of patients with DM on dialysis is suboptimal. Recently published reports have confirmed the value of HbA1C measurements in the diabetic dialysis population, that control of blood glucose lowers mortality, and that a program of care management and diabetes education can have a significant impact on patient outcomes. As leader of the nephrology team, the nephrologist should, at a minimum, be accountable for defining who is managing the diabetes. A more systematic and educated approach to DM and its complications needs to be developed by the renal community. PMID:12753677

  17. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  18. Dignity in Practice: Day-to-Day Life in Intensive Care Units in Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Koksvik, Gitte H

    2015-01-01

    Dignity is a key concept in contemporary health care ethics, but the practical meaning of dignity in care remains unclear. In this article, I show that in practice, different and possibly conflicting notions of what dignity means are engaged simultaneously in the care of critical patients. The empirical data is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in three separate intensive care units in three European countries, Spain, Norway, and France, in the spring of 2014. Four weeks were spent at each site. Using participant observations and semi-structured interviews with 24 intensive care unit staff, I illustrate how the ideal of patient dignity is carried out in practice in the daily life of these units. PMID:26106928

  19. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care... such costs. (b) Total grant awards within any State to units of local government and public...

  20. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care... such costs. (b) Total grant awards within any State to units of local government and public...

  1. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care... such costs. (b) Total grant awards within any State to units of local government and public...

  2. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care... such costs. (b) Total grant awards within any State to units of local government and public...

  3. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care... such costs. (b) Total grant awards within any State to units of local government and public...

  4. Next-generation sequencing for diagnosis of rare diseases in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Daoud, Hussein; Luco, Stephanie M.; Li, Rui; Bareke, Eric; Beaulieu, Chandree; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Graham, Gail E.; Richer, Julie; Armour, Christine; Bulman, Dennis E.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael; Lines, Matthew A.; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M.; Dyment, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rare diseases often present in the first days and weeks of life and may require complex management in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Exhaustive consultations and traditional genetic or metabolic investigations are costly and often fail to arrive at a final diagnosis when no recognizable syndrome is suspected. For this pilot project, we assessed the feasibility of next-generation sequencing as a tool to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases in newborns in the NICU. Methods: We retrospectively identified and prospectively recruited newborns and infants admitted to the NICU of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, who had been referred to the medical genetics or metabolics inpatient consult service and had features suggesting an underlying genetic or metabolic condition. DNA from the newborns and parents was enriched for a panel of clinically relevant genes and sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing platform (Illumina Inc.). The data were interpreted with a standard informatics pipeline and reported to care providers, who assessed the importance of genotype–phenotype correlations. Results: Of 20 newborns studied, 8 received a diagnosis on the basis of next-generation sequencing (diagnostic rate 40%). The diagnoses were renal tubular dysgenesis, SCN1A-related encephalopathy syndrome, myotubular myopathy, FTO deficiency syndrome, cranioectodermal dysplasia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, autosomal dominant intellectual disability syndrome type 7 and Denys–Drash syndrome. Interpretation: This pilot study highlighted the potential of next-generation sequencing to deliver molecular diagnoses rapidly with a high success rate. With broader use, this approach has the potential to alter health care delivery in the NICU. PMID:27241786

  5. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    PubMed

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area. PMID:15321622

  6. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  7. Burn unit care of Stevens Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: A survey.

    PubMed

    Le, Hong-Gam; Saeed, Hajirah; Mantagos, Iason S; Mitchell, Caroline M; Goverman, Jeremy; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a systemic disease that can be associated with debilitating acute and chronic complications across multiple organ systems. As patients with acute SJS/TEN are often treated in a burn intensive care unit (BICU), we surveyed burn centers across the United States to determine their approach to the care of these patients. The goal of our study was to identify best practices and possible variations in the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN. We demonstrate that the method of diagnosis, use of systemic therapies, and involvement of subspecialists varied significantly between burn centers. Beyond supportive care provided to every patient, our data highlights a lack of standardization in the acute care of patients with SJS/TEN. A comprehensive guideline for the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN is indicated. PMID:26810444

  8. Genome Sequence of a Clostridium neonatale Strain Isolated in a Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Cassir, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium neonatale is a Gram-positive endospore-forming obligate anaerobe first isolated from the feces of premature neonates during an intensive care unit outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit. Here, we announce the genome draft sequence of this bacterium. It is composed of 4,710,818 bp and contains 4,169 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes, including 11 rRNA genes. PMID:26798088

  9. Ethical issues in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Conway, Alison; Moloney-Harmon, Patricia A

    2004-06-01

    The case of Baby Y presented a difficult and complex ethical dilemma for the family and the staff involved. The issues of religious beliefs and law, up-holding these beliefs in the center of a religious community, financial concerns, and health care workers disagreeing about carrying out treatments made this case one that few will forget. When asked after Baby Y died how they felt, many members of the staff answered that it should not have gone on as long as it did and that they learned a lot from the family and the experience. Palliative care has been well associated with the adult cancer population in the form of hospice care. It is the hope that this well-integrated aspect of care crosses over to the NICU population. Many of the patients in the types of cases mentioned previously stay in the NICU for extended periods of time until a decision is made clear or the infant expires on his own time. The hustle and bustle of a busy, open, and not-so-private NICU is not the place for this to take place. The NICU should have a designated place where these infants can be cared for better in a more family-centered and staff-friendly environment. Pain management is another important aspect of palliative care. Comfort of the infant is of utmost importance, as it helps the family believe the suffering is under control. During the last few days or weeks of life, the family should have time that is peaceful and restful, and, eventually, the infant should have a pain-free death.Lastly, a part of the palliative care philosophy and approach includes providing treatments that may ap-pear to prolong the inevitable but in fact help the process along to resolution. In the case of Baby Y, surgery to repair some of the defects may have allowed her to go home with her family and spend her short life with them. This was the wish of the mother,especially, and it never happened. It may well be the"what if" she continues to ask for the rest of her life. PMID:15145372

  10. Spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units in the state of Santa Catarina

    PubMed Central

    Cirino, Silviana; Lima, Fabiana Santos; Gonçalves, Mirian Buss

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the methodology used for assessing the spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units. METHODS A modeling and simulation method was adopted for the practical application of cardiac care service in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, using the p-median model. As the state is divided into 21 health care regions, a methodology which suggests an arrangement of eight intermediate cardiac care units was analyzed, comparing the results obtained using data from 1996 and 2012. RESULTS Results obtained using data from 2012 indicated significant changes in the state, particularly in relation to the increased population density in the coastal regions. The current study provided a satisfactory response, indicated by the homogeneity of the results regarding the location of the intermediate cardiac care units and their respective regional administrations, thereby decreasing the average distance traveled by users to health care units, located in higher population density areas. The validity of the model was corroborated through the analysis of the allocation of the median vertices proposed in 1996 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS The current spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units is more homogeneous and reflects the demographic changes that have occurred in the state over the last 17 years. The comparison between the two simulations and the current configuration showed the validity of the proposed model as an aid in decision making for system expansion. PMID:26039394

  11. Health Risk Behaviors in Family Caregivers During Patients’ Stay in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of family caregivers of the critically ill have mainly focused on the psychological impact of the patients’ stay in the intensive care unit and related stress. Despite known associations between stress and physical health, limited attention has been paid to the need to promote and maintain physical health in these caregivers. Objective To explore how family caregivers’ health risk behaviors are associated with patients’ preexisting care needs and the caregivers’ depressive symptoms and burden. Methods During the intensive-care-unit stay of critically ill patients (who required mechanical ventilation for ≥4 days), 50 family caregivers were surveyed to determine the caregivers’ depressive symptoms, burden, and health risk behaviors. Data were also collected on patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. Results One or more health risk behaviors were reported by 94% of family caregivers. More than 90% of caregivers reported depressive symptoms above the score indicating risk for clinical depression. A high level of burden was reported by 36% of caregivers. More health risk behaviors were associated with higher scores of depressive symptoms and burden (P<.001 for both). Caregivers’ responses did not differ according to patients’ preexisting care needs. Conclusion Health risk behaviors of family caregivers are associated with greater perceptions of burden and/or depressive symptoms but not with patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. PMID:23283087

  12. An Ecological Understanding of Kinship Foster Care in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jun Sung; Algood, Carl L.; Chiu, Yu-Ling; Lee, Stephanie Ai-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We review empirical studies on kinship foster care in the United States. We conceptualize kinship foster care within the context of Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1994) most recent ecological systems theory. Because there are multiple levels of influences on the developmental outcomes of children placed in kinship foster home, understanding the…

  13. Financing Child Care in the United States: An Illustrative Catalog of Current Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; Stoney, Louise; Dichter, Harriet

    This catalog provides information on innovative financing strategies, primarily state and community strategies, being used successfully to fund child care in the United States. Five sections of the manual are devoted to profiles of programs using the following categories of strategies: (1) generating new public revenue for child care, including…

  14. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  15. Financing Child Care in the United States: An Expanded Catalog of Current Strategies. 2001 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; Stoney, Louise; Dichter, Harriet

    This catalog provides information on innovative financing strategies, primarily state and community strategies, being used to successfully fund child care in the United States. Four chapters of the catalog are devoted to profiles of 78 programs using the following categories of strategies: (1) "Generating Public Revenue for Child Care," addressing…

  16. The Creation of a Biocontainment Unit at a Tertiary Care Hospital. The Johns Hopkins Medicine Experience.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; Kelen, Gabor D; Brower, Roy G; Bova, Gregory; Ernst, Neysa; Reimers, Mallory; Langlotz, Ronald; Gimburg, Anatoly; Iati, Michael; Smith, Christopher; MacConnell, Sally; James, Hailey; Lewin, John J; Trexler, Polly; Black, Meredith A; Lynch, Chelsea; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A; Sokoll, Lori J; Carroll, Karen C; Parish, Nicole M; Dionne, Kim; Biddison, Elizabeth L D; Gwon, Howard S; Sauer, Lauren; Hill, Peter; Newton, Scott M; Garrett, Margaret R; Miller, Redonda G; Perl, Trish M; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2016-05-01

    In response to the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine created a biocontainment unit to care for patients infected with Ebola virus and other high-consequence pathogens. The unit team examined published literature and guidelines, visited two existing U.S. biocontainment units, and contacted national and international experts to inform the design of the physical structure and patient care activities of the unit. The resulting four-bed unit allows for unidirectional flow of providers and materials and has ample space for donning and doffing personal protective equipment. The air-handling system allows treatment of diseases spread by contact, droplet, or airborne routes of transmission. An onsite laboratory and an autoclave waste management system minimize the transport of infectious materials out of the unit. The unit is staffed by self-selected nurses, providers, and support staff with pediatric and adult capabilities. A telecommunications system allows other providers and family members to interact with patients and staff remotely. A full-time nurse educator is responsible for staff training, including quarterly exercises and competency assessment in the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment. The creation of the Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit required the highest level of multidisciplinary collaboration. When not used for clinical care and training, the unit will be a site for research and innovation in highly infectious diseases. The lessons learned from the design process can inform a new research agenda focused on the care of patients in a biocontainment environment. PMID:27057583

  17. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  18. Parent perspectives from a neonatal intensive care unit: a missing piece of the culturally congruent care puzzle.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Adrienne; Young, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The majority of existing theoretical models and tools of culturally competent and congruent care have been developed from the health care provider perspective. Recently, the Culturally Congruent Care Puzzle proposed a model in the form of a three-dimensional puzzle with a provider level and a client level that interact to create the outcome level, which is culturally congruent care. However, the constructs that comprise the client, or patient, level, have not yet been clearly articulated. This study explored parent (client/patient) perceptions of culturally congruent care within a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit based on interviews with culturally diverse families with hospitalized infants (n = 21). The findings identified four primary constructs in the client/patient level: (a) a provider-client relationship of caring and trust, (b) respectful and appropriate communication, (c) culturally responsive and accessible social and spiritual supports, and (d) a welcoming and flexible organizational environment. These four interconnecting pieces are infused with the sociopolitical history and dynamics of culture, ethnicity, immigration, and colonization that clients/patients bring to their experience of health and health care. These elements of the client/patient level also interact with the provider level in various ways. PMID:20592061

  19. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine. PMID:26610628

  20. Empowering family members in end-of-life care decision making in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Browning, Annette M

    2009-01-01

    Critical care nurses are often faced with working with families during the end-of-life care of a loved one. Often there is indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients when faced with making these difficult decisions. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe origins of indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients who are faced with end-of-life care decisions. Strategies to empower family members during this crucial time are also discussed. PMID:19104247

  1. Basic Competence of Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Suominen, Tarja; Ritmala-Castrén, Marita; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Critical care patients benefit from the attention of nursing personnel with a high competence level. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the self-assessed basic competence of intensive care unit nurses and related factors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A basic competence scale (Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Competence Scale version 1, Likert scale 1-5, 1 = poor and 5 = excellent) was employed among Finnish intensive care unit nurses (n = 431). Intensive care unit nurses' self-assessed basic competence was good (mean 4.19, SD 0.40). The attitude and value base of basic competence was excellent whereas experience base was the poorest compared to the knowledge base and skill base of intensive and critical care nursing. The strongest factor explaining nurses' basic competence was their experience of autonomy in nursing care (F value 60.85, β 0.11, SE 0.01, and P ≤ 0.0001). Clinical competence was self-rated as good. Nurses gave their highest competence self-ratings for ICU patient care according to the principles of nursing care. The ICU nurses also self-rated their professional competence as good. Collaboration was self-rated as the best competence. In basic and continuing education and professional self-development discussions it is meaningful to consider and find solutions for how to improve nurses' experienced autonomy in nursing. PMID:26557676

  2. Regional brain monitoring in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer; Ziai, Wendy; O'Phelan, Kristine; Leroux, Peter D; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Diringer, Michael N; Suarez, Jose I

    2015-06-01

    Regional multimodality monitoring has evolved over the last several years as a tool to understand the mechanisms of brain injury and brain function at the cellular level. Multimodality monitoring offers an important augmentation to the clinical exam and is especially useful in comatose neurocritical care patients. Cerebral microdialysis, brain tissue oxygen monitoring, and cerebral blood flow monitoring all offer insight into permutations in brain chemistry and function that occur in the context of brain injury. These tools may allow for development of individual therapeutic strategies that are mechanistically driven and goal-directed. We present a summary of the discussions that took place during the Second Neurocritical Care Research Conference regarding regional brain monitoring. PMID:25832349

  3. Importance of radiant flux in the treatment of hyperbilirubinemia: failure of overhead phototherapy units in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bonta, B W; Warshaw, J B

    1976-04-01

    Prior to 1972, radiation used to treat neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was based upon the photometric unit, the foot-candle, a measure of light illumination. Measurements in terms of microwatts per square centimeter for selective wavelengths is more precise. We compared the effectiveness of phototherapy provided by overhead phototherapy units in intensive care modules vs. conventional phototherapy units. Forty-two infants were studied over a six-month period and divided into three groups based upon radiant flux measurements as follows: Group 1 (No. = 6), 1.0 muw to 1.9 muw/sq cm/nm; group 2 (No. = 15), 2.0 muw to 3.9 muw/sq cm/nm; group 3 (No. = 21), 4.0 muw to 6.0 muw/sq cm/nm. All flux determinations were made within the 400- to 500-nm range. All infants in group 1 were treated with overhead phototherapy units in the intensive care modules. Because of multiple factors known to increase the risk of kernicterus, evaluation of effectiveness of phototherapy at low radiant flux was limited in group 1. Significant changes in bilirubin were noted by 48 hours when comparing group 3 with groups 1 and 2. A minimum of 4.0 muw/sq cm/nm appears necessary for effective phototherapy. As designed, phototherapy units in intensive care modules are ineffective in delivering this therapeutic level of radiant flux. PMID:1264545

  4. Burden and viral aetiology of influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infection in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Napoli, Giuseppe; Mammina, Caterina; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cala', Cinzia; Amodio, Emanuele; Vitale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the viral aetiology of influenza-like illness (ILI) and acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) among patients requiring intensive care unit admission. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out in Sicily over a 4-year period. A total of 233 respiratory samples of patients with ILI/ARTI admitted to intensive care units were molecularly analyzed for the detection of a comprehensive panel of aetiologic agents of viral respiratory infections. About 45% of patients was positive for at least one pathogen. Single aetiology occurred in 75.2% of infected patients, while polymicrobial infection was found in 24.8% of positive subjects. Influenza was the most common aetiologic agent (55.7%), especially among adults. Most of patients with multiple aetiology (76.9%) were adults and elderly. Mortality rates among patients with negative or positive aetiology did not significantly differ (52.4% and 47.6%, respectively). Highly transmissible respiratory pathogens are frequently detected among patients with ILI/ARTI admitted in intensive care units, showing the occurrence of concurrent infections by different viruses. The knowledge of the circulation of several types of microorganisms is of crucial importance in terms of appropriateness of therapies, but also for the implication in prevention strategies and hospital epidemiology. PMID:26706819

  5. An Innovative Model for the Provision of Practice Learning Opportunities in Family and Child Care: Newry Student Unit, Southern Health and Social Care Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, Marion; Hayes, David

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the work of Newry Student Unit, which operates in the Southern Health and Social Care Trust. The background to the unit is outlined and its development is discussed in the context of practice learning provision in Northern Ireland. The operation of the unit in providing Family and Child Care practice learning opportunities…

  6. Comparisons of Health Care Systems in the United States, Germany and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ridic, Goran; Gleason, Suzanne; Ridic, Ognjen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to compare health care systems in three highly advanced industrialized countries: The United States of America, Canada and Germany. The first part of the research paper will focus on the description of health care systems in the above-mentioned countries while the second part will analyze, evaluate and compare the three systems regarding equity and efficiency. Finally, an overview of recent changes and proposed future reforms in these countries will be provided as well. We start by providing a general description and comparison of the structure of health care systems in Canada, Germany and the United States. PMID:23678317

  7. Alternatives for the Care of Mildly Ill Children: United States Air Force Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Linda J.

    Information related to day care center policies for dealing with mildly ill children is provided in this document. Data cited in the report indicate wide inconsistencies at the present time in policies and procedures for screening ill children in Air Force child care centers and in the policies followed for admitting and readmitting children who…

  8. SUM (Service Unit Management): An Organizational Approach To Improved Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinek, Richard C.; And Others

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Service Unit Management (SUM) in reducing costs, improving quality of care, saving professional nursing time, increasing personnel satisfaction, and setting a stage for further improvements, a national questionnaire survey identified the characteristics of SUM units, and compared the performance of a total of 55…

  9. Glucose control in the intensive care unit: a roller coaster ride or a swinging pendulum?

    PubMed

    Comi, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    Many studies of tight control of blood glucose in critically ill patients are associated with poor outcomes. However, randomized studies of tight glucose control in patients admitted to coronary care or surgical intensive care units showed a reduction in mortality rates; supported by recommendations from professional organizations, many intensive care units implemented protocols for tight glucose control. More recent studies in medical intensive care units did not confirm the benefits of tight control, however, and the most recent study suggests that tight control increases mortality rates. Furthermore, tight control significantly increases episodes of hypoglycemia. The sum of the recent literature suggests that a degree of glucose control lies between the extremes of the adverse outcomes related to poor glucose control and those related to overly aggressive glucose control. PMID:19487715

  10. Viral Respiratory Infections of Adults in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christopher; Kaku, Shawn; Tutera, Dominic; Kuschner, Ware G; Barr, Juliana

    2016-08-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are an underappreciated cause of critical illness in adults. Recent advances in viral detection techniques over the past decade have demonstrated viral LRTIs are associated with rates of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization comparable to those of seen with bacterial community acquired and nosocomial pneumonias. In this review, we describe the relationship between viral LRTIs and critical illness, as well as discuss relevant clinical features and management strategies for the more prevalent respiratory viral pathogens. PMID:25990273

  11. Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

  12. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    PubMed

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing. PMID:26262049

  13. Radiation exposure of nurses in a coronary care unit.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, C B

    1984-01-01

    In response to increasing awareness of radiation as a possible occupational hazard, nursing personnel staffing a hospital CCU were monitored over a 3-year period to determine occupational exposure. Portable x-ray machines, fluoroscopic units, and patients injected with radiopharmaceuticals were all potential radiation sources on such a unit. Whole-body TLD badges, exchanged monthly, indicated no cumulative exposures over 80 mR during the entire study period. The minimal exposures reported do not justify regular use of dosimeters. Adherence to standard protective measures precludes most exposure to machine-produced radiation. Close, prolonged contact with a patient after an RVG study that utilizes 99mTc may account for some exposure. The data indicate that radiation is not a significant occupational hazard for CCU nurses at this hospital; similar minimal exposures would be expected of other nonoccupationally exposed nursing personnel in like environments. PMID:6559185

  14. Radiation exposure of nurses in a coronary care unit

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    In response to increasing awareness of radiation as a possible occupational hazard, nursing personnel staffing a hospital CCU were monitored over a 3-year period to determine occupational exposure. Portable x-ray machines, fluoroscopic units, and patients injected with radiopharmaceuticals were all potential radiation sources on such a unit. Whole-body TLD badges, exchanged monthly, indicated no cumulative exposures over 80 mR during the entire study period. The minimal exposures reported do not justify regular use of dosimeters. Adherence to standard protective measures precludes most exposure to machine-produced radiation. Close, prolonged contact with a patient after an RVG study that utilizes /sup 99m/Tc may account for some exposure. The data indicate that radiation is not a significant occupational hazard for CCU nurses at this hospital; similar minimal exposures would be expected of other nonoccupationally exposed nursing personnel in like environments.

  15. Sedation and delirium in the intensive care unit: an Australian and New Zealand perspective.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, Y; Botha, J A; Boyle, M S; Ernest, D; Freebairn, R C; Jenkins, I R; Roberts, B L; Seppelt, I M

    2008-07-01

    A survey was conducted to determine sedation and delirium practices in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. The survey was in two parts, comprising an online survey of reported sedation and delirium management (unit survey) and a collection of de-identified data about each patient in a unit at a given time on a specified day (patient snapshot survey). All intensive care units throughout Australia and New Zealand were invited by email to participate in the survey. Twenty-three predominantly metropolitan, level III Australian and New Zealand intensive care units treating adult patients participated. Written sedation policies were in place in 48% of units, while an additional 44% of units reported having informal sedation policies. Seventy percent of units routinely used a sedation scale. In contrast, only 9% of units routinely used a delirium scale. Continuous intravenous infusion is the primary means of patient sedation (74% of units). While 30% of units reported routinely interrupting sedation, only 10% of sedated patients in the snapshot survey had had their sedation interrupted in the preceding 12 hours. Oversedation appears to be common (46% of patients with completed sedation scales). Use of neuromuscular blockade is low (10%) compared to other published studies. Midazolam and propofol were the most frequently used sedatives. The proportion of patients developing delirium was 21% of assessable patients. Failed and self-extubation rates were low: 3.2% and 0.5% respectively. In Australian and New Zealand intensive care units, routine use of sedation scales is common but not universal, while routine delirium assessment is rare. The use of a sedation protocol is valuable and should be encouraged. PMID:18714628

  16. Police in an intensive care unit: what can happen?

    PubMed

    Lynøe, Niels; Leijonhufvud, Madeleine

    2013-12-01

    During spring 2009 a Swedish senior paediatric intensivist and associate professor was detained and later prosecuted for mercy-killing a child with severe brain damage. The intensivist was accused of having used high doses of thiopental after having withdrawn life-sustaining treatment when the child was imminently dying. After more than 2.5 years of investigation the physician was acquitted by the Stockholm City Court. The court additionally stated that the physician had provided good end-of-life care. Since the trial it has become evident that the accusation was based on a problematic medicolegal report. Nevertheless, the event has had severe negative consequences for the physician personally and professionally, and probably also, in general, for patients in the final stage of life. This case illustrates, together with other cases, that there is a lack of correspondence between ethical soft law/healthcare law and the Penal Code. To optimise medical practice we suggest that the criminal law be carefully examined and if possible changed. Furthermore, we suggest a peer-review system for assessing medicolegal reports in cases of suspected homicide. PMID:23900291

  17. End of Life Issues in the Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rashmi; Chaturvedi, R.; Rudra, A.; Jaideep, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    A structured discussion of End-of-Life (EOL) issues is a relatively new phenomenon in India. Personal beliefs, cultural and religious influences, peer, family and societal pressures affect EOL decisions. Indian law does not provide sanction to contentious issues such as do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders, living wills, and euthanasia. Finally, published data on EOL decisions in Indian ICUs is lacking. What is needed is a prospective determination of which patients will benefit from aggressive management and life-support. A consensus regarding the concept of Medical Futility is necessary to give impetus to further discussion on more advanced policies including ideas such as Managed Care to restrict unnecessary health care costs, euthanasia, the principle of withhold and/or withdraw, ethical and moral guidelines that would govern decisions regarding futile treatment, informed consent to EOL decisions and do-not-resuscitate orders. This review examines the above concepts as practiced worldwide and looks at some landmark judgments that have shaped current Indian policy, as well as raising talking points for possible legislative intervention in the field. PMID:24532934

  18. End-of-life care beliefs among Hindu physicians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya Sivalingam; Saeed, Fahad; Sinnakirouchenan, Ramapriya; Holley, Jean L; Srinivasan, Sinnakirouchenan

    2015-02-01

    Several studies from the United States and Europe showed that physicians' religiosity is associated with their approach to end-of-life care beliefs. No such studies have focused exclusively on Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. A 34-item questionnaire was sent to 293 Hindu physicians in the United States. Most participants believed that their religious beliefs do not influence their practice of medicine and do not interfere with withdrawal of life support. The US practice of discussing end-of-life issues with the patient, rather than primarily with the family, seems to have been adopted by Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. It is likely that the ethical, cultural, and patient-centered environment of US health care has influenced the practice of end-of-life care by Hindu physicians in this country. PMID:24052431

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Cats in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Iturriza-Gómara, M.; Dove, W.; Sandrasegaram, M.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakagomi, O.; Cunliffe, N.; Radford, A. D.; Morgan, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  20. Nurse-led implementation of a ventilator-associated pneumonia care bundle in a children's critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charlotte

    2016-05-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of death with hospital-acquired infections, and preventing it is one of the Saving Lives initiatives ( Department of Health 2007 ). This article discusses the implementation of a purpose-designed VAP care bundle in a children's intensive care unit and examines the unique role of nurses in the management of the change process. A nurse-led VAP education, implementation and surveillance programme was set up. Nurse education was paramount, as nursing staff acceptance and involvement was a key feature. A multi-method training strategy was implemented, providing staff with multiple training opportunities and introducing VAP project education as a routine part of staff induction. Bundle compliance was monitored regularly and graphs of the results produced quarterly; feedback proved to be useful in keeping staff informed and engaged in VAP reduction. Comparison of VAP incidence before and after introduction of the care bundle showed a reduction after its implementation. With a co-ordinated, multidisciplinary approach, VAP care bundles can result in significant and sustained reductions in VAP rates in the paediatric intensive care unit. Effective co-ordination and leadership is crucial to successful implementation of the VAP bundle, and nurses are well placed to undertake this role. PMID:27156419

  1. "Where Withstanding is Difficult, and Deserting Even More": Head Nurses’ Phenomenological Description of Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Roghieh; Vanaki, Zohre; Kermanshahi, Sima; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The intensive care unit is one of the specialized units in hospitals where head nurses are responsible for both motivating the personnel and providing high quality care. Understanding of the lived experiences of head nurses could help develop new assumptions of the ICU. The present study was therefore conducted to describe the lived experiences of head nurses working in ICU. Methods: In this phenomenological study, data were collected through unstructured in-depth interviews with 5 ICU head nurses in Northern Iran and then analyzed using 7 steps Colaizzi’s method. Results: Despite the "distressing atmosphere of the ICU", the "difficulty of managing the ICU" and the "difficulty of communication in the ICU", which encourages the "desire to leave the unit" among ICU head nurses, the "desire to stay in the unit" is stronger and head nurses are highly motivated to stay in the unit because the unit "develops a feeling of being extraordinary", "creates an interest in providing complicated care to special patients", "facilitates the spiritual bond", "develops a professional dynamism" and "creates an awareness about the nature of intensive care" among them. Conclusion: According to the result, ICU head nurses are still inclined to work in the unit and achieve success in spite of the problems that persist in working in the ICU. As the individuals’ motivation can be the backbone of organizations, and given that individuals with a high enthusiasm for success are productive, hospital managers can take advantage of this strength in choosing their head nurses. PMID:27354977

  2. Computerized Management of Patient Care in a Complex, Controlled Clinical Trial in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.

    1987-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is often not responsive to conventional supportive therapy and the mortality rate may exceed 90%. A new form of supportive care, Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal (ECCO2R), has shown a dramatic increase in survival (48%). A controlled clinical trial of the new ECCO2R therapy versus conventional Continuous Positive Pressure Ventilation (CPPV) is being initiated. Detailed care protocols have been developed by “expert” critical care physicians for the management of patients. Using a blackboard control architecture, the protocols have been implemented on an existing hospital information system and will direct patient care and help manage the controlled clinical trial. Therapeutic instructions are automatically generated by the computer from data input by physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the computerized protocol system can direct therapy for acutely ill patients.

  3. Infection Prevention and Control for Ebola in Health Care Settings - West Africa and United States.

    PubMed

    Hageman, Jeffrey C; Hazim, Carmen; Wilson, Katie; Malpiedi, Paul; Gupta, Neil; Bennett, Sarah; Kolwaite, Amy; Tumpey, Abbigail; Brinsley-Rainisch, Kristin; Christensen, Bryan; Gould, Carolyn; Fisher, Angela; Jhung, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas; Moran, Kerri; Delaney, Lisa; Dowell, Chad; Bell, Michael; Srinivasan, Arjun; Schaefer, Melissa; Fagan, Ryan; Adrien, Nedghie; Chea, Nora; Park, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    The 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa underscores the need for health care infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to be implemented properly and consistently to interrupt transmission of pathogens in health care settings to patients and health care workers. Training and assessing IPC practices in general health care facilities not designated as Ebola treatment units or centers became a priority for CDC as the number of Ebola virus transmissions among health care workers in West Africa began to affect the West African health care system and increasingly more persons became infected. CDC and partners developed policies, procedures, and training materials tailored to the affected countries. Safety training courses were also provided to U.S. health care workers intending to work with Ebola patients in West Africa. As the Ebola epidemic continued in West Africa, the possibility that patients with Ebola could be identified and treated in the United States became more realistic. In response, CDC, other federal components (e.g., Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response) and public health partners focused on health care worker training and preparedness for U.S. health care facilities. CDC used the input from these partners to develop guidelines on IPC for hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola, which was updated based on feedback from partners who provided care for Ebola patients in the United States. Strengthening and sustaining IPC helps health care systems be better prepared to prevent and respond to current and future infectious disease threats.The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S. and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html). PMID:27390018

  4. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors’ offices, clinics, and at home. PMID:27306491

  5. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Hackett, Brent A; Cherry, Sara; Bau, Haim H; Liu, Changchun

    2016-07-19

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors' offices, clinics, and at home. PMID:27306491

  6. Haemodynamic monitoring of morbidly obese intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Lagrand, W K; van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E R; Schultz, M J

    2013-06-01

    Because of technical and practical difficulties in relation to increased body size, haemodynamic monitoring of morbidly obese critically ill patients (i.e. body mass index ≥40 kg÷m2) may be challenging. Obese and non-obese patients are not so different with respect to haemodynamic monitoring and goals. The critical care physician, however, should be aware of the basic principles of the monitoring tools used. The theoretical assumptions and calculations of these tools could be invalid because of the high body weight and fat distribution. Although the method of assessing haemodynamic data may be more complex in morbidly obese patients, its interpretation should not be different from that in non-obese patients. Indeed, when indexed for body surface area or (predicted) lean body mass, reliable haemodynamic data are comparable etween obese and non-obese individuals. PMID:23799309

  7. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  8. Compliance with processes of care in intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand--a point prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Hewson-Conroy, K M; Burrell, A R; Elliott, D; Webb, S A R; Seppelt, I M; Taylor, C; Glass, P

    2011-09-01

    There are indications that compliance with routine clinical practices in intensive care units (ICU) varies widely internationally, but it is currently unknown whether this is the case throughout Australia and New Zealand. A one-day point prevalence study measured the prevalence of routine care processes being delivered in Australian and New Zealand ICUs including the assessment and/or management of: nutrition, pain, sedation, weaning from mechanical ventilation, head of bed elevation, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, stress ulcer prophylaxis, blood glucose, pressure areas and bowel action. Using a sample of 50 adult ICUs, prevalence data were collected for 662 patients with a median age of 65 years and a median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 18. Wide variations in compliance were evident in several care components including: assessment of nutritional goals (74%, interquartile range [IQR] 51 to 89%), pain score (35%, IQR 17 to 62%), sedation score (89%, IQR 50 to 100%); care of ventilated patients e.g. head of bed elevation > 30 degrees (33%, IQR 7 to 62%) and setting weaning plans (50%, IQR 28 to 78%); pressure area risk assessment (78%, IQR 18 to 100%) and constipation management plan (43%, IQR 6 to 87%). Care components that were delivered more consistently included nutrition delivery (100%, IQR 100 to 100%), deep venous thrombosis (96%, IQR 89 to 100%) and stress ulcer (90%, IQR 78 to 100%) prophylaxis, and checking blood sugar levels (93%, IQR 88 to 100%). This point prevalence study demonstrated variability in the delivery of 'routine' cares in Australian and New Zealand ICUs. This may be driven in part by lack of consensus on what is best practice in intensive care units, prompting the need for further research in this area. PMID:21970141

  9. Time-Motion Analysis of Health Care Workers’ Contact With Patients and Workers’ Hand Hygiene: Open vs Closed Units

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Babar A.; Hui, Ken Yon; Hui, Siu L.; Gulati, Rajesh; Tricker, Jason; Campbell, Noll L.; Farber, Mark O.; Boustani, Malaz A.; Buckley, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of open (care provided by general medicine teams with a pulmonary intensivist consultant) vs closed (care provided by a dedicated critical care team) intensive care units on health care workers’ contact with patients and their hand hygiene is uncertain. Objective To determine if closed intensive care units have fewer visits of patients by health care providers and greater hand-washing compliance among providers than do open units. Methods Time-motion analysis was used to observe 2 rooms in a medical intensive care unit at a teaching hospital affiliated with Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, for 96 hours before and after closure of the unit. The main outcome measures were frequency of health care providers’ visits and their hand-washing hygiene compliance rates. Results Mean number of visits per room per hour by physicians (1.53 in the open unit vs 1.27 in the closed unit; P = .93) and nurses (3.98 in open unit vs 4.14 in closed unit; P = .60) did not differ. No differences were observed in gold-standard hand washing among physicians (0.00% in open unit vs 2.63% in closed unit; P = .11) or nurses (2.50% in open unit vs 3.49% in closed unit; P = .51). However, hand washing decreased significantly in nurses in the closed unit (40.94% in open unit vs 29.84% in closed unit; P = .002). Conclusion Closing the intensive care unit did not decrease the number of contacts between health care providers and patients nor did it increase the providers’ compliance with hand hygiene. PMID:21532037

  10. Investigation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium outbreak in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cilo, Burcu Dalyan; Ağca, Harun; Efe, Kadir; Sınırtaş, Melda; Çelebi, Solmaz; Özkan, Hilal; Köksal, Nilgün; Hacımustafaoğlu, Mustafa; Özakın, Cüneyt

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the major agents of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. In this study we aimed to analyze the clonal relation of the vancomycin-resistant Enterococci outbreak seen at the Neonate Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Uludag University Hospital. Vancomycin resistance gene was investigated in the Enterococcus faecium strains and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to investigate the genetic relation between outbreak strains. Enterococci grown in all patient samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium by BD Phoenix 100 (Becton Dickinson, USA). We found vanA resistance gene in all of the swab samples by Xpert VanA/B test on Cepheid (Cepheid, USA). PFGE band patterns revealed two different strains, of which the majority of them (22/24) had the same clonal origin. The common clonal origin was also isolated from rectal probes. Perianal swab culture positivity was evaluated as colonization but culture growth in two blood cultures, two urine cultures and one wound culture was evaluated as infection and treated with linezolid. All of the patients survived the outbreak. Besides the infection control precautions determining the genetic relation between outbreak strains which can be done in the microbiology laboratory is necessary to control an outbreak. PFGE is a reliable method in the microbiologic analysis of outbreaks. Molecular microbiologic analysis of outbreak strains will contribute to prove the epidemiologic and evolution of outbreaks. PMID:25664041

  11. Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Cortegiani, Andrea; Graziano, Giorgio; Saporito, Laura; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Mammina, Caterina; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%–50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:26300651

  12. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility testing of Trichosporon asahii isolated of Intensive Care Units patients

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Silva, Rosana Bellan; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Matsumoto, Marcelo Teruyuki; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Benaducci, Tatiane; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2008-01-01

    Trichosporon asahii is an opportunistic pathogen, associated with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, ten isolates, recovered from oral cavity and urine of patients in Intensive Care Units (ICU) over six months, were identified by classical and molecular methods, typed by RAPD and tested in vitro for susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. A total agreement between the identification of Trichosporon sp by PCR based on sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions (ITS) and on the sequences of small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was found. Randomly amplified of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), with primers P6 and M13, was used to determine the genomic profiles. The dendogram analysis indicated that almost all strains showed similarity >0.9 among them and all strains were multidrug-resistant. This study brings new results on the identification and genotyping of T. asahii isolated from Brazilian ICU patients and information about their antifungal drugs susceptibility. PMID:24031270

  13. Urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in severely ill patients in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Mattede, Maria das Graças Silva; Piras, Cláudio; Mattede, Kelly Dematte Silva; Ferrari, Aline Trugilho; Baldotto, Lorena Simões; Assbu, Michel Silvestre Zouain

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in an intensive care unit. Methods This descriptive observational study was conducted in an intensive care unit between 2007 and 2009. All consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a confirmed diagnosis were evaluated. Results Twenty patients presented with urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. The prevalence was higher among men (65%) and among individuals > 70 years of age (55%). The mortality rate was 20%. The average intensive care unit stay was 19.8 days. The onset of infection was associated with prior use of antibiotics and was more frequent in the fall and winter. Conclusion Infection due to Trichosporon spp. was more common in men and among those > 70 years of age and was associated with the use of an indwelling urinary catheter for more than 20 days and with the use of broadspectrum antibiotics for more than 14 days. In addition, patients with urinary infection due to Trichosporon spp. were most often hospitalized in intensive care units in the fall and winter periods. PMID:26465246

  14. A 10-year history of perinatal care at the Brockington Mother and Baby Unit Stafford.

    PubMed

    Green, Debra J; Hofberg, Kristina; Carr, Caroline; Fanneran, Tina; Sumathipala, Athula

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal mother and baby units are an essential service for women suffering from perinatal mental illness by allowing the baby to stay with the mother whilst receiving inpatient mental health care. Such units enable the mother to develop a relationship with her baby in a safe and supportive environment whilst caring for her mental health needs and allow her to gain confidence in her role as a mother. This article presents the development of the Brockington Mother and Baby unit and its progressive advancement towards an exemplary service for women suffering from perinatal mental illness. The Brockington Mother and Baby unit (MBU) at South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare Foundation Trust (SSSFT) is celebrating its 10th anniversary and is one of six MBUs accredited as excellent by the Royal College of Psychiatry (RCPsych). The unit is a member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Quality Care Network and thereby adheres to their national standard of care. This article describes the journey from a single lone worker in perinatal mental health to an exemplary service caring for women with perinatal mental illness during the first 12 months following the birth of their child. PMID:26439484

  15. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. PMID:26187519

  16. End-of-life care for patients with dementia in the United States: institutional realities.

    PubMed

    Gusmano, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Few are satisfied with end-of-life care in the United States. For families and friends of people with dementia, end-of-life care is particularly frustrating. Providing better end-of-life care to people with dementia is urgent because the prevalence of the disease is increasing rapidly. Dementia is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and fifth leading cause of death among people aged 65 years and older. By 2050, there will be around 19 million people with Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews ethical and policy challenges associated with providing end-of-life care for people with dementia in the United States. I explain how disagreements about the meaning of futility lead to poor care for people with dementia. Most people agree that we should not provide care that is futile, but there is little agreement about how futility should be defined. US policies and politics clearly tip the balance in the direction of treatment, even in the face of strong evidence that such care does more harm than good. Although we may never reach a consensus, it is important to address these questions and think about how to develop policies that respect the different values. PMID:23079305

  17. Evaluation of functional independence after discharge from the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Curzel, Juliane; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello

    2013-01-01

    Objective 1) To evaluate the functional independence measures immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit and to compare these values with the FIMs 30 days after that period. 2) To evaluate the possible associated risk factors. Methods The present investigation was a prospective cohort study that included individuals who were discharged from the intensive care unit and underwent physiotherapy in the unit. Functional independence was evaluated using the functional independence measure immediately upon discharge from the intensive care unit and 30 days thereafter via a phone call. The patients were admitted to the Hospital Santa Clara intensive care unit during the period from May 2011 to August 2011. Results During the predetermined period of data collection, 44 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.4±10.5 years. Twenty-seven of the subjects were female, and 15 patients were admitted due to pulmonary disease. The patients exhibited an functional independence measure of 84.1±24.2. When this measure was compared to the measure at 30 days after discharge, there was improvement across the functional independence variables except for that concerned with sphincter control. There were no significant differences when comparing the gender, age, clinical diagnosis, length of stay in the intensive care unit, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the presence of sepsis during this period. Conclusion Functional independence, as evaluated by the functional independence measure scale, was improved at 30 days after discharge from the intensive care unit, but it was not possible to define the potentially related factors. PMID:23917973

  18. Unfolding Physiological State: Mortality Modelling in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Naumann, Tristan; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Brimmer, Nicole; Joshi, Rohit; Rumshisky, Anna; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of a patient’s disease state and trajectory is critical in a clinical setting. Modern electronic healthcare records contain an increasingly large amount of data, and the ability to automatically identify the factors that influence patient outcomes stand to greatly improve the efficiency and quality of care. We examined the use of latent variable models (viz. Latent Dirichlet Allocation) to decompose free-text hospital notes into meaningful features, and the predictive power of these features for patient mortality. We considered three prediction regimes: (1) baseline prediction, (2) dynamic (time-varying) outcome prediction, and (3) retrospective outcome prediction. In each, our prediction task differs from the familiar time-varying situation whereby data accumulates; since fewer patients have long ICU stays, as we move forward in time fewer patients are available and the prediction task becomes increasingly difficult. We found that latent topic-derived features were effective in determining patient mortality under three timelines: inhospital, 30 day post-discharge, and 1 year post-discharge mortality. Our results demonstrated that the latent topic features important in predicting hospital mortality are very different from those that are important in post-discharge mortality. In general, latent topic features were more predictive than structured features, and a combination of the two performed best. The time-varying models that combined latent topic features and baseline features had AUCs that reached 0.85, 0.80, and 0.77 for in-hospital, 30 day post-discharge and 1 year post-discharge mortality respectively. Our results agreed with other work suggesting that the first 24 hours of patient information are often the most predictive of hospital mortality. Retrospective models that used a combination of latent topic features and structured features achieved AUCs of 0.96, 0.82, and 0.81 for in-hospital, 30 day, and 1-year mortality prediction. Our

  19. Tracheostomy in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: When and Where?

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Ilker; Kesici, Selman; Bayrakci, Benan; Unal, Omer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheostomy was first observed in Egyptian drawings in 3600 BC and performed frequently during the 1800’s diphtheria epidemic. Objectives: The aim of this study was to elucidate the indications, complications, mortality rate, and the effect of pediatric tracheostomy on length of PICU or hospital stay. Materials and Methods: Demographic characteristics, diagnosis at admission, duration of ventilation of 152 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The most common tracheostomy indication was prolonged intubation. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation before tracheostomy was 23.8 days. Forty five percent of the tracheostomy procedures were performed at bedside. Neither the place nor the age had any effect on the development of complications (P = 0.701, P = 0.622). The procedure enabled 62% of the patients to be discharged from hospital. Conclusions: Tracheostomy facilitates discharge and weaning of mechanical ventilation. Although the timing of tracheostomy has to be determined for each individual patient, three weeks of ventilation seems to be a suitable period for tracheostomy. Tracheostomy can be performed at bedside safely but patient selection should be made carefully. PMID:26848369

  20. [Care provided by nursing students in a neonatal intensive care unit from the mother's point of view].

    PubMed

    Pacheco, S T; do Valle, E R; Simões, S M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the perspective of mothers regarding the care given by academics of nursing to their newborn in a neonatal intensive therapy unit. This is a qualitative research based on a phenomenological approach which has as its philosophical framework the thought of Martin Heidegger expressed in his book Being and Time. The data used in the investigation were interviews given by ten mothers who had their newborns in a neonatal intensive therapy unit of a university hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The interpretation of the data collected revealed that mothers viewed the nursing academics as solicitous beings regarding the care given to their newborns. They also acknowledged that these students were engaged in the assistance given and concerned with what was being done and to whom it was being done. PMID:12098862

  1. Cost-benefit analysis: patient care at neurological intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kopacević, Lenka; Strapac, Marija; Mihelcić, Vesna Bozan

    2013-09-01

    Modern quality definition relies on patient centeredness and on patient needs for particular services, continuous control of the service provided, complete service quality management, and setting quality indicators as the health service endpoints. The health service provided to the patient has certain costs. Thus, one can ask the following: "To what extent does the increasing cost of patient care with changes in elimination improve the quality of health care and what costs are justifiable?" As stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and worldwide, attention has been increasingly focused on stroke prevention and providing quality care for stroke patients. One of the most common medical/nursing problems in these patients is change in elimination, which additionally affects their mental health. PMID:24558761

  2. Changing personnel behavior to promote quality care practices in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dominic; Farmery, Keith; Johnson, Martin; Harper, Christine; Clarke, Fiona L; Holton, Phillip; Wilson, Susan; Rayson, Paul; Bence, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of safe high quality patient care is a major issue in clinical settings. However, the implementation of evidence-based practice and educational interventions are not always effective at improving performance. A staff-led behavioral management process was implemented in a large single-site acute (secondary and tertiary) hospital in the North of England for 26 weeks. A quasi-experimental, repeated-measures, within-groups design was used. Measurement focused on quality care behaviors (ie, documentation, charting, hand washing). The results demonstrate the efficacy of a staff-led behavioral management approach for improving quality-care practices. Significant behavioral change (F [6, 19] = 5.37, p < 0.01) was observed. Correspondingly, statistically significant (t-test [t] = 3.49, df = 25, p < 0.01) reductions in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained. Discussion focuses on implementation issues. PMID:18360574

  3. Optimising the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unit to Improve Quality of Care: Expert Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dotan, Iris; Ghosh, Subrata; Mlynarsky, Liat; Reenaers, Catherine; Schreiber, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The best care setting for patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] may be in a dedicated unit. Whereas not all gastroenterology units have the same resources to develop dedicated IBD facilities and services, there are steps that can be taken by any unit to optimise patients’ access to interdisciplinary expert care. A series of pragmatic recommendations relating to IBD unit optimisation have been developed through discussion among a large panel of international experts. Methods: Suggested recommendations were extracted through systematic search of published evidence and structured requests for expert opinion. Physicians [n = 238] identified as IBD specialists by publications or clinical focus on IBD were invited for discussion and recommendation modification [Barcelona, Spain; 2014]. Final recommendations were voted on by the group. Participants also completed an online survey to evaluate their own experience related to IBD units. Results: A total of 60% of attendees completed the survey, with 15% self-classifying their centre as a dedicated IBD unit. Only half of respondents indicated that they had a defined IBD treatment algorithm in place. Key recommendations included the need to develop a multidisciplinary team covering specifically-defined specialist expertise in IBD, to instil processes that facilitate cross-functional communication and to invest in shared care models of IBD management. Conclusions: Optimising the setup of IBD units will require progressive leadership and willingness to challenge the status quo in order to provide better quality of care for our patients. IBD units are an important step towards harmonising care for IBD across Europe and for establishing standards for disease management programmes. PMID:25987349

  4. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way.

    PubMed

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R S

    2015-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  5. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    PubMed Central

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  6. Clinical review: Fever in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael; Levy, Mitchell M

    2003-01-01

    Fever is a common response to sepsis in critically ill patients. Fever occurs when either exogenous or endogenous pyrogens affect the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in the pre-optic nucleus. Prostaglandin E2 slows the rate of firing of warm sensitive neurons and results in increased body temperature. The febrile response is well preserved across the animal kingdom, and experimental evidence suggests it may be a beneficial response to infection. Fever, however, is commonly treated in critically ill patients, usually with antipyretics, without good data to support such a practice. Fever induces the production of heat shock proteins (HSPs), a class of proteins critical for cellular survival during stress. HSPs act as molecular chaperones, and new data suggest they may also have an anti-inflammatory role. HSPs and the heat shock response appear to inhibit the activation of NF-κβ, thus decreasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. The anti-inflammatory effects of HSPs, coupled with improved survival of animal models with fever and infection, call into question the routine practice of treating fever in critically ill patients. PMID:12793871

  7. Posttraumatic stress syndrome associated with stays in the intensive care unit: importance of nurses' involvement.

    PubMed

    Warlan, Heather; Howland, Lois

    2015-06-01

    More patients in the intensive care unit are surviving their critical illnesses because of advances in medical care. This change in survival has led to an increased awareness of the emotional consequences of being critically ill. Posttraumatic stress disorder has been identified in approximately 9% to 27% of critically ill patients compared with 7% of the general US population. Risk factors such as treatment with mechanical ventilation, sedation, delusional memories, and agitation are associated with development of posttraumatic stress disorder in patients in the intensive care unit. Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder are more likely to experience negative physical and psychiatric health outcomes and a lower quality of life than are patients without the disorder. Early identification and treatment of patients experiencing these signs and symptoms may reduce these physical and psychological comorbid conditions. Through careful monitoring of medications, early mobilization, sleep promotion, and pain management, nurses may be able to reduce signs and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:26033100

  8. Quality improvement initiatives in neonatal intensive care unit networks: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vibhuti; Warre, Ruth; Lee, Shoo K

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit networks that encompass regions, states, and even entire countries offer the perfect platform for implementing continuous quality improvement initiatives to advance the health care provided to vulnerable neonates. Through cycles of identification and implementation of best available evidence, benchmarking, and feedback of outcomes, combined with mutual collaborative learning through a network of providers, the performance of health care systems and neonatal outcomes can be improved. We use examples of successful neonatal networks from across North America to explore continuous quality improvement in the neonatal intensive care unit, including the rationale for the formation of neonatal networks, the role of networks in continuous quality improvement, quality improvement methods and outcomes, and barriers to and facilitators of quality improvement. PMID:24268090

  9. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. Method an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. Results the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. Conclusion the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied. PMID:26107842

  10. Perceptions and experiences with nursing care: a study of Pakistani (Urdu) communities in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Cortis, J D

    2000-04-01

    The population of the United Kingdom reflects rich cultural diversity. Hence, nursing must respond to the challenges of meeting the needs of different ethnic groups and fulfilL the requirements of the Code of Professional Conduct. This article presents the findings of a study using grounded theory to explore the lived experience of Pakistani (Urdu-speaking) communities that received nursing care in a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. The study reflects national initiatives toward "consumer led" health care delivery. The findings illustrate a lack of congruence between the group's expectations and their experiences. Nurses were perceived to have a poor understanding of ethnic needs, portraying ethnocentric attitudes and behaviour. The participants attributed the lack of congruence mainly to the presence of racism in British health care systems. The author suggests possible changes at the strategic, managerial, and educational levels of health care delivery. PMID:11982043

  11. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and Health Care Reform in the United States.

    PubMed

    McCanne, Don R

    2009-01-01

    Among OECD nations, the United States is an outlier in having the highest per capita health care costs in a system that unnecessarily exposes many individuals to financial hardship, physical suffering, and even death. President Obama and Congress are currently involved in a process to reform the flawed health care system. The OECD has contributed to that process by releasing a paper, "Health Care Reform in the United States," which describes some of the problems that must be addressed, but then provides proposed solutions that omit consideration of a more equitable and efficient universal public insurance program. The same omission is taking place in Washington, DC. By reinforcing proposals that support the private insurance industry, the source of much of the waste and inequities in health care, the authors of the OECD paper have failed in their responsibility to inform on policies rather than politics. PMID:19927410

  12. An overview of end–of–life issues in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Papadimos, Thomas J; Maldonado, Yasdet; Tripathi, Ravi S; Kothari, Deven S; Rosenberg, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    The population of the earth is aging, and as medical techniques, pharmaceuticals, and devices push the boundaries of human physiological capabilities, more humans will go on to live longer. However, this prolonged existence may involve incapacities, particularly at the end-of-life, and especially in the intensive care unit. This arena involves not only patients and families, but also care givers. It involves topics from economics to existentialism, and surgery to spiritualism. It requires education, communication, acceptance of diversity, and an ultimate acquiescence to the inevitable. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of issues in the care of patients at the end-of-life stage that may cause physicians and other healthcare providers, medical, ethical, social, and philosophical concerns in the intensive care unit. PMID:22229139

  13. Certification in molecular pathology in the United States: an update from the Association for Molecular Pathology Training and Education Committee.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Alexander C; Wang, Y Lynn; Sahota, Amrik; Yeung, Cecilia C; Weck, Karen E

    2012-11-01

    The past 25 years have witnessed the field of molecular pathology evolving from an imprecisely defined discipline to a firmly established medical subspecialty that plays an essential role in patient care. During this time, the training, certification, and licensure requirements for directing and performing testing in a molecular pathology or molecular diagnostics laboratory have become better defined. The purpose of this document is to describe the various board certifications available to individuals seeking certification in molecular diagnostics at the level of laboratory director, supervisor, or technologist. Several national organizations offer certification in molecular pathology or molecular diagnostics for doctoral-level clinical scientists to function as the director of a molecular diagnostics laboratory. Furthermore, 12 states and Puerto Rico require licensing of medical technologists, including those working in molecular diagnostic laboratories. The information provided here updates a 2002 document by the Training and Education Committee of the Association for Molecular Pathology and has been expanded to include certification and licensing requirements for laboratory technologists. PMID:22925695

  14. Head of the bed elevation angle recorder for intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefft, Maciej; Zamaro-Michalska, Aleksandra; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Zaworski, Wojciech; Grzanka, Antoni; Łazowski, Tomasz; Tavola, Mario; Siewiera, Jacek; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a recording system optimized for long term measurement of bed headrest elevation angle in the Intensive Care Unit. The continuous monitoring of this parameter allows to find the correlation between the patient's position in bed and the risk of the Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), a very serious problem in therapy of critically ill patients. Recorder might be be an important tool to evaluate the "care bundles" - sets of preventive procedures recommended for treatment of patients in the ICU.

  15. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources. PMID:26810953

  16. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit 1

    PubMed Central

    Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. Results: there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05) and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041) and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050). There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048). Conclusion: the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress. PMID:27508921

  17. A Patient-Centered Understanding of the Referral System in Ethiopian Primary Health Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Abrahim, Orit; Linnander, Erika; Mohammed, Halima; Fetene, Netsanet; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa have undergone substantial development in an effort to expand access to appropriate facilities through a well-functioning referral system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current patterns of seeking prior care before arriving at a health center or a hospital as a key aspect of the referral system of the primary health care unit (PHCU) in three regions in Ethiopia. We examined what percentage of patients had either sought prior care or had been referred to the present facility and identified demographic and clinical factors associated with having sought prior care or having been referred. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews in the local language with 796 people (99% response rate) seeking outpatient care in three primary health care units serving approximately 100,000 people each and reflecting regional and ethnic diversity; 53% (N = 418) of the sample was seeking care at hospital outpatient departments, and 47% of the sample was seeking care at health centers (N = 378). We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to identify factors associated with having been referred or sought prior care. Our findings indicated that only 10% of all patients interviewed had been referred to their current place of care. Among those in the hospital population, 14% had been referred; among those in the health center population, only 6% had been referred. Of those who had been referred to the hospital, most (74%) had been referred by a health center. Among those who were referred to the health center, the plurality portion (32%) came from a nearby hospital (most commonly for continued HIV treatment or early childhood vaccinations); only 18% had come from a health post. Among patients who had not been formally referred, an additional 25% in the hospital sample and 10% in the health center sample had accessed some prior source of care for their present

  18. Advanced Technology in Pediatric Intensive Care Units: Have They Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frederick, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    In medicine, providers strive to produce quality outcomes and work to continually improve those outcomes. Whether it is reducing cost, decreasing length of stay, mitigating nosocomial infections, or improving survival, there are a myriad of complex factors that contribute to each outcome. One of the greatest challenges to outcome improvement is in pediatric intensive care units, which tend to host the sickest, most complex, smallest, and frailest of pediatric patients. This article highlights some studies and advances in informatics that have influenced intensive care unit outcomes. PMID:27017036

  19. [The end of life in a long-term care unit].

    PubMed

    Roche, Pauline; Bailly, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Following the principles of Leonetti's Law and to improve practices in long-term care units, caregivers decided to create a decision aid to help in the process to determine whether to limit care, adapted to the profile of the unit's residents. The aid is the fruit of a collective and ethical approach which helps caregivers decide on the action to take in the event of an acute crisis and enables the patient to express their wishes concerning the end of life. PMID:25597066

  20. Job Stress and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Workers of Endoscopy Units in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-Joo; Chun, Hoon Jai; Moon, Jeong Seop; Park, Sung Chul; Hwang, Young-Jae; Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The management of job-related stress among health-care workers is critical for the improvement of healthcare services; however, there is no existing research on endoscopy unit workers as a team. Korea has a unique health-care system for endoscopy unit workers. In this study, we aimed to estimate job stress and job satisfaction among health-care providers in endoscopy units in Korea. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey of health-care providers in the endoscopy units of three university-affiliated hospitals in Korea. We analyzed the job stress levels by using the Korean occupational stress scale, contributing factors, and job satisfaction. Results: Fifty-nine workers completed the self-administered questionnaires. The job stress scores for the endoscopy unit workers (46.39±7.81) were relatively lower compared to those of the national sample of Korean workers (51.23±8.83). Job stress differed across job positions, with nurses showing significantly higher levels of stress (48.92±7.97) compared to doctors (42.59±6.37). Job stress and job satisfaction were negatively correlated with each other (R2=0.340, p<0.001). Conclusions: An endoscopy unit is composed of a heterogeneous group of health-care professionals (i.e., nurses, fellows, and professors), and job stress and job satisfaction significantly differ according to job positions. Job demand, insufficient job control, and job insecurity are the most important stressors in the endoscopy unit. PMID:26898513

  1. Preventing intensive care unit delirium: a patient-centered approach to reducing sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Amy; Clark, Mary Jo; Connelly, Cynthia D

    2011-01-01

    Delirium in the intensive care unit is a disorder with multifactorial causes and is associated with poor outcomes. Sleep-wake disturbance is a common experience for patients with delirium. Care processes that disrupt sleep can lead to sleep deprivation, contributing to delirium. Patient-centered care is a concept that considers what is best for each individual. How can clinicians use a patient-centered approach to alter processes to decrease patient disruptions and improve sleep and rest? Could timing of blood draws and soothing music work to promote sleep? PMID:21983504

  2. Linkage to Care for HIV-Infected Heterosexual Men in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jeannia J.; Nunn, Amy; Beckwith, Curt G.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic among heterosexual men disproportionately affects individuals involved with the criminal justice system, injection drug and other substance users, and racial and ethnic minorities. These overlapping populations confront similar social and structural disparities that contribute to HIV risk and limit access to HIV testing, treatment, and care. In this review, we discuss barriers to linkage to comprehensive HIV care for specific subpopulations of heterosexual men and examine approaches for enhancing linkage to care for this diverse population. PMID:21342911

  3. Bonding with books: the parent-infant connection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience one of the most stressful events of their lives. At times, they are unable to participate fully, if at all, in the care of their infant. Parents in the NICU have a need to participate in the care of their infant to attain the parental role. Parental reading to infants in the NICU is an intervention that can connect the parent and infant and offers a way for parents to participate in caregiving. This intervention may have many benefits and may positively affect the parent-infant relationship. PMID:23477977

  4. The Influence of Nursing Unit Characteristics on RN Vacancies in Specialized Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C; Mixer, Sandra J; Cozad, Melanie J

    2016-07-01

    The nursing shortage is projected to intensify in the United States. Organizations providing specialized hospice and palliative care will be particularly hard hit. The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of the nursing unit on registered nurse (RN) vacancies and test the moderating role of recruitment strategies in perinatal hospices. We estimated the association between the nursing unit and RN vacancies and tested the interaction effects of recruitment strategies (signing bonus and recruitment bonus). Our findings showed that increasing RN unit size and nursing leadership directly affected vacancies and that recruitment bonuses had stronger influence on reducing vacancies than signing bonuses. The findings offer critical insights for hospice administrators in attracting nurses among specialized hospice and palliative care providers. PMID:25747671

  5. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country. PMID:27288625

  6. Organizational characteristics of the austere intensive care unit: the evolution of military trauma and critical care medicine; applications for civilian medical care systems.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Kurt W; Venticinque, Steven G

    2008-07-01

    Critical care in the U.S. military has significantly evolved in the last decade. More recently, the U.S. military has implemented organizational changes, including the use of multidisciplinary teams in austere environments to improve outcomes in severely injured polytrauma combat patients. Specifically, organizational changes in combat support hospitals located in combat zones during Operation Iraqi Freedom have led to decreased intensive care unit mortality and length of stay as well as resource use. These changes were implemented without increases in logistic support or the addition of highly technologic equipment. The mechanism for improvement in mortality is likely attributable to the adherence of basic critical care medicine fundamentals. This intensivist-directed team model provides sophisticated critical care even in the most austere environments. To optimize critically injured patients' outcomes, intensive care organizational models similar to the U.S. military, described in this article, can possibly be adapted to those of civilian care during disaster management to meet the challenges of emergency mass critical care. PMID:18594253

  7. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: The New Must Have Tool in the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed

    Green, Michael Stuart; Sehgal, Sankalp; Tariq, Rayhan

    2016-09-01

    Standard hemodynamic monitoring such as blood pressure and pulse oximetry may only provide a crude estimation of organ perfusion in the critical care setting. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the same principle as a pulse oximeter and allows continuous noninvasive monitoring of hemoglobin oxygenation and deoxygenation and thus tissue saturation "StO2" This review aims to provide an overview of NIRS technology principles and discuss its current clinical use in the critical care setting. The study selection was performed using the PubMed database to find studies that investigated the use of NIRS in both the critical care setting and in the intensive care unit. Currently, NIRS in the critical care setting is predominantly being used for infants and neonates. A number of studies in the past decade have shown promising results for the use of NIRS in surgical/trauma intensive care units during shock management as a prognostic tool and in guiding resuscitation. It is evident that over the past 2 decades, NIRS has gone from being a laboratory fascination to an actively employed clinical tool. Even though the benefit of routine use of this technology to achieve better outcomes is still questionable, the fact that NIRS is a low-cost, noninvasive monitoring modality improves the attractiveness of the technology. However, more research may be warranted before recommending its routine use in the critical care setting. PMID:27206637

  8. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient’s Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Masel, Eva K; Kitta, Anna; Huber, Patrick; Rumpold, Tamara; Unseld, Matthias; Schur, Sophie; Porpaczy, Edit; Watzke, Herbert H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine a) patients’ knowledge of palliative care, b) patients’ expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c) patient’s concept of a good palliative care physician. Methods The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques. Results The results revealed four themes: (1) information about palliative care, (2) supportive care needs, (3) being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4) qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient’s language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment. Conclusions The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient’s needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care. PMID:27389693

  9. A tale of 2 countries: the cost of my mother's cardiac care in the United States and India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sowmya R

    2014-01-01

    When my mother fell ill while visiting me in the United States, I had the opportunity to compare costs of surgical cardiac care in the United States and India. I faced challenges in making well-informed decisions in the United States due to the lack of cost transparency and the minimal flexibility offered in choice of care, whereas in India costs are readily available and allow most people to freely choose their preferred type of care. PMID:25354412

  10. Multinational Corporations and Health Care in the United States and Latin America: Strategies, Actions, and Effects*

    PubMed Central

    JASSO-AGUILAR, REBECA; WAITZKIN, HOWARD; LANDWEHR, ANGELA

    2010-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations’ access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector. PMID:15779471

  11. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector PMID:15779471

  12. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Jason; Du, Bin; Tang, Yao-Qing; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Tan, Cheng Cheng; Gomersall, Charles D; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Shrestha, Babu Raja; Gia Binh, Nguyen; Arabi, Yaseen M; Salahuddin, Nawal; Wahyuprajitno, Bambang; Tu, Mei-Lien; Wahab, Ahmad Yazid Haji Abd; Hameed, Akmal A; Nishimura, Masaji; Procyshyn, Mark; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. Participants 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients’ baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Main outcome measure Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Results Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. Conclusions While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures

  13. The History of Care of Premature Infants: From Neonate Intensive Care to Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douret, L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the history of and reviews the literature on the care of premature infants. Focuses on the medicalization of birth; early neonatology; the effect of advances in medicine on the survival and safety of neonates; and the importance of early mother-neonate interactions. (BC)

  14. Molecular Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi Isolates, United States

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Emily L.; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Steurer, Frank J.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have characterized Trypanosoma cruzi from parasite-endemic regions. With new human cases, increasing numbers of veterinary cases, and influx of potentially infected immigrants, understanding the ecology of this organism in the United States is imperative. We used a classic typing scheme to determine the lineage of 107 isolates from various hosts. PMID:18598637

  15. Interprofessional rhetoric and operational realities: an ethnographic study of rounds in four intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the success of MIRs. We conducted a year-long comparative ethnographic study of interprofessional collaboration and patient and family involvement in four ICUs in tertiary academic hospitals in two American cities. The study included 576 h of observation of team interactions, 47 shadowing sessions and 40 clinician interviews. In line with best practices in ethnographic research, data collection and analysis were done iteratively using the constant comparative method. Member check was conducted regularly throughout the project. MIRs were implemented on all units with the explicit goals of improving team-based and patient-centered care. Operational conditions on the units, despite interprofessional commitment and engagement, appeared to thwart ICU teams from achieving these goals. Specifically, time constraints, struggles over space, and conflicts between MIRs' educational and care-plan-development functions all prevented teams from achieving collaboration and patient-involvement. Moreover, physicians' de facto control of rounds often meant that they resembled medical rounds (their historical predecessors), and sidelined other providers' contributions. This study suggests that the MIRs model, as presently practiced, might not be well suited to the provision of team-based, patient-centered care. In the interest of interprofessional collaboration, of the optimization of clinicians' time, of high-quality medical education and of patient-centered care, further research on interprofessional rounds models is needed. PMID:26704051

  16. Molecular characterization of turkey enteric coronaviruses circulating in the United States in 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of molecular diagnostic assays has allowed ongoing periodic monitoring of United States turkey flocks for suspected viral enteric pathogens such as reovirus, rotavirus, parvovirus, and astrovirus. Beginning in early 2012, monitoring of commercial turkey flocks in the Southeastern United Stat...

  17. Integrating Preexposure Prophylaxis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Into Women's Health Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Dominika; Weber, Shannon

    2016-07-01

    Women comprise one in five new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses in the United States. Trials and implementation projects demonstrate preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention is effective in women. Preexposure prophylaxis is a method of preventing HIV acquisition by having an HIV-negative individual take antiretroviral medication before exposure. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate coformulated with emtricitabine as preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention in 2012. Preexposure prophylaxis is highly dependent on adherence for effectiveness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends offering preexposure prophylaxis to individuals at significant risk of infection and estimates 468,000 women in the United States are eligible for preexposure prophylaxis. Although variable individual and structural forces affect each woman's medication adherence, and therefore the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis, women's health care providers are uniquely positioned to screen, counsel about, and offer preexposure prophylaxis. Shared decision-making provides a framework for these clinical encounters, allowing patients and clinicians to make health care decisions together based on scientific evidence and patient experiences. By incorporating fertility desires and contraceptive needs, health care providers effectively integrate sexual and reproductive health care. Including preexposure prophylaxis in women's health services requires health care provider training and attention to lessons learned from family planning and HIV prevention. Nevertheless, obstetrician-gynecologists have an opportunity to play a critical role in reducing sexual transmission of HIV in the United States by integrating preexposure prophylaxis education and provision into their practices. PMID:27275793

  18. The reality of waste management in primary health care units in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sergiane B; e Souza, Adenícia C S; Tipple, Anaclara F V; Rezende, Keyti C A D; de Resende, Fabiana R; Rodrigues, Érika G; Pereira, Milca S

    2014-09-01

    A large number of users are serviced in primary health care units in Brazil, both in health facilities and in households. These services generate waste that must be managed safely, but there is no legislation that regulates this type of waste management in Brazil. The objective of this study was to analyse the production and management of waste in primary health care. A direct observation was performed of the stages in the handling and weighing of waste generated in primary health care units in the municipality of Goiânia (Brazil). The units generated infectious, chemical, and common waste, as well as sharp objects. The generation of waste ranged between 0.027 and 0.075 kg user-day. The generated waste was classified mostly as common and recyclable. Flaws were observed in the management of all types of waste. The critical point is segregation. Only 34.1% of the waste disposed of as infectious actually belonged to this group, the rest was ordinary waste. Flaws at this stage increase the volume of infectious waste, the occupational and environmental risks, and associated costs. Intervention to change this reality is needed and it requires the careful preparation of a waste management plan, corroborating structural changes to the implementation of this plan, and professional training and public policies to guide waste management in primary care, especially those generated in households. PMID:25034368

  19. Is German long-term care insurance a model for the United States?

    PubMed

    Schunk, M V; Estes, C L

    2001-01-01

    German long-term care insurance, implemented in 1995, significantly extends the coverage of care-related risks. Given the similarities of German and U.S. institutional features, the German social insurance approach has been put forward as a possible model for long-term care in the United States. Using a political economy framework, the authors conducted a policy analysis that compares the main shortfalls of long-term care (LTC) provision in the United States and Germany, examines the responses provided by LTC insurance in Germany, and relates them to broader trends and proposals for change in welfare policy in both countries. German LTC insurance includes a high degree of consumer direction and compensation and protection for informal caregivers; it supports the extension of community-based services. Its shortfalls include the continued split between health and LTC insurance. In both countries, decentralization and institutional and financial fragmentation are some of the characteristics responsible for the failure to promote egalitarian social policy and substantially expand social protection to family- and care-related risks. The German LTC program is a good model for the United States. With a social insurance approach to LTC, costs are spread across the largest possible risk pool. Major goals that can be reached with such a program include establishment of universal entitlements to LTC benefits, consumer choice, and equitability and uniformity. PMID:11562009

  20. Frequency and Outcome of Meningitis in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Amna; Bano, Surriya; Haque, Anwar Ul; Arif, Khubaib

    2016-08-01

    Meningitis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in intensive care settings. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and outcome in children with meningitis through a retrospective chart review done in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital from January 2000 to December 2014. During these 14 years, 64 patients were admitted with meningitis in pediatric intensive care unit. Out of 64, 36 were diagnosed with pyogenic meningitis, 18 patients with viral meningitis, and 10 with tuberculous meningitis. Most complications were observed in the initial 48 hours. Most common presentation was altered level of consciouness in 50 (78.1%), seizure in 38 (59.4%), and shock in 23 (35.9%) patients. Ventilatory support was required in 30 (46.9%) patients and inotropic support in 26 (40.6%). During stay in pediatric intensive care unit, there was 7.8% mortality. Although meningitis was an infrequent cause of hospitalization at the study centre, but it was an important infectious cause of mortality and morbidity in pediatric age group and associated with high neurological sequelae. PMID:27539773

  1. Health Care Expenditures of Immigrants in the United States: A Nationally Representative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sarita A.; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U.; Pati, Susmita; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Bor, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the health care expenditures of immigrants residing in the United States with health care expenditures of US-born persons. Methods. We used the 1998 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey linked to the 1996–1997 National Health Interview Survey to analyze data on 18398 US-born persons and 2843 immigrants. Using a 2-part regression model, we estimated total health care expenditures, as well as expenditures for emergency department (ED) visits, office-based visits, hospital-based outpatient visits, inpatient visits, and prescription drugs. Results. Immigrants accounted for $39.5 billion (SE=$4 billion) in health care expenditures. After multivariate adjustment, per capita total health care expenditures of immigrants were 55% lower than those of US-born persons ($1139 vs $2546). Similarly, expenditures for uninsured and publicly insured immigrants were approximately half those of their US-born counterparts. Immigrant children had 74% lower per capita health care expenditures than US-born children. However, ED expenditures were more than 3 times higher for immigrant children than for US-born children. Conclusions. Health care expenditures are substantially lower for immigrants than for US-born persons. Our study refutes the assumption that immigrants represent a disproportionate financial burden on the US health care system. PMID:16043671

  2. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  3. Using Infant Massage Following a Mother's Unfavorable Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the synchronous behaviors enacted by mother and infant with blindness. In the study, a mother's less than optimal experience with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a profound effect not only on her and her infant son, who was born 3 months prematurely and was visually impaired, but also on…

  4. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... appropriately trained provider within 4 weeks or sooner, if required, and within 1-hour travel time from the beneficiary's residence. The geographic area that represents 1-hour travel time surrounding an MTF is referred... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care...

  5. Optimizing Health Care for Foreign Students in the United States and American Students Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. Health Association, Evanston, IL.

    This workbook is organized around 15 guidelines for improving health care for foreign students in the United States and U.S. students abroad. Each guideline is described in a chapter followed by self-assessment questions enabling the evaluation of the adequacy of campus health programs. Each chapter concludes with an invitation to outline goals…

  6. Brief Report: Incidence of and Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ohtani, Yasuyo; Ornitz, Edward; Kuriya, Norikazu; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of autistic disorder (AD) among 5,271 children in a neonatal intensive care unit in Japan found that 18 children were later diagnosed with AD, an incidence more than twice as high as previously reported. Children with AD had a significantly higher history of the meconium aspiration syndrome than the controls. (Author/DB)

  7. Who administers? Who cares? Medical administrative and clinical employment in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, D U; Lewontin, J P; Woolhandler, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. We compared US and Canadian health administration costs using national medical care employment data for both countries. METHODS. Data from census surveys on hospital, nursing home, and outpatient employment in the United States (1968 to 1993) and Canada (1971 and 1986) were analyzed. RESULTS. Between 1968 and 1993, US medical care employment grew from 3.976 to 10.308 million full-time equivalents. Administration grew from 0.719 to 2.792 million full-time equivalents, or from 18.1% to 27.1% of the total employment. In 1986, the United States deployed 33,666 health care full-time equivalent personnel per million population, and Canada deployed 31,529. The US excess was all administrative; Canada employed more clinical personnel, especially registered nurses. Between 1971 and 1986, hospital employment per capita grew 29% in the United States (mostly because of administrative growth) and fell 14% in Canada. In 1986, Canadian hospitals still employed more clinical staff per million. Outpatient employment was larger and grew faster in the United States. Per capita nursing home employment was substantially higher in Canada. CONCLUSIONS. If US hospitals and outpatient facilities adopted Canada's staffing patterns, 1,407,000 fewer managers and clerks would be necessary. Despite lower medical spending, Canadians receive slightly more nursing and other clinical care than Americans, as measured by labor inputs. PMID:8633732

  8. Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Graduates Show Persistent Difficulties in an Intradimensional Shift Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rossi, Vanessa; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Gardner, Judith M.; Flory, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) graduates, a group at risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, performed an intradimensional shift card sort at 34, 42, 51, and 60 months to assess executive function and to examine effects of individual risk factors. In the "silly" game, children sorted cards…

  9. The use of laryngeal mask airway Supreme™ in rescue airway situation in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla; Seet, Edwin; Chan, Wing Yan

    2014-12-01

    We herein report a witnessed cardiopulmonary collapse of a patient with difficult mask ventilation and near-impossible laryngoscopy-cum-intubation in the critical care unit. The airway was successfully rescued with a laryngeal mask airway Supreme™, followed by an open, crash tracheostomy by the otolaryngologist. PMID:25630328

  10. Factors Affecting Code Status in a University Hospital Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoy, Lauren Jodi; Sherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors collected data on diagnosis, hospital course, and end-of-life preparedness in patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) with "full code" status (defined as receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation), compared with those who didn't. Differences were analyzed using binary and stepwise logistic regression. They found…

  11. Examining the Needs of Bereaved Parents in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Briller, Sherylyn H.; Myers Schim, Stephanie; Thurston, Celia; Kabel, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a high-tech setting aimed at restoring health to critically ill children. When childhood death occurs in the PICU, it constitutes a special context for parent bereavement. The purpose of this interdisciplinary qualitative research was to gain a deeper understanding of parents' needs around the time of…

  12. Determination of the patient safety culture among nurses working at intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zuhal; Goris, Songul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the patient safety culture among nurses working at intensive care units. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at intensive care units of Health Practice and Research Center of Erciyes University and Kayseri Education and Research Hospital in the city center of Kayseri in Turkey. Three hundred sixteen nurses working at intensive care units at these hospitals were included in the study. Data were collected by using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC), developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Percentage distribution and Mann Whitney U Test were used to analyze the data. Results: About 13.6% of the nurses working at intensive care units stated that they faced incidents of potential threat to the patient safety and that 48.8% of these cases were falls. Although a great majority of the nurses (88%) indicated that they never documented a case report, they assessed the patient safety in their institution as acceptable (43%). Out of the 12 dimensions of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the percentage of positive responses was the highest for “teamwork within units” dimension and lowest for the “non-punitive response to error” dimension. Conclusion: Awareness of the nurses regarding patient safety should be raised and their related knowledge should be kept up-to-date through more frequent in-service trainings. PMID:26150851

  13. Environmental Correlates to Behavioral Health Outcomes in Alzheimer's Special Care Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeisel, John; Silverstein, Nina M.; Hyde, Joan; Levkoff, Sue; Lawton, M. Powell; Holmes, William

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We systematically measured the associations between environmental design features of nursing home special care units and the incidence of aggression, agitation, social withdrawal, depression, and psychotic problems among persons living there who have Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder. Design and Methods: We developed and tested a…

  14. Measuring the quality of care: using patient experience trackers in a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Johnette; Aladangady, Narendra

    Measuring patient experience is a crucial part of improving care. This article describes how a neonatal unit used patient experience trackers to measure and record relatives' views on whether their needs were met. It outlines how the survey was undertaken, the obstacles encountered, and how the process could be improved. PMID:20334015

  15. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  16. 77 FR 65581 - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Register on January 24, 2012 (77 FR 3501). At the request of a worker, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit... Healthcare, and Pro Unlimited, East Hanover, NJ and Off-Site Workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals...

  17. Early Childhood Education and Care Policy in the United States of America. OECD Country Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This paper is the result of an intensive case study by an Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) review team, whose purpose was to investigate early childhood education and care (ECEC) in the United States, 1 of 12 countries participating in the OECD review between 1998 and 2000. The paper draws on information provided by a…

  18. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  19. Postdischarge Service Use by Families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Chia-Ling; Peterson, Carla A.; Shelley, Mack C., II

    2002-01-01

    A study examined patterns and predictors of service use by 85 families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) graduates, specifically premature infants. Enabling variables (NICU contacts and follow-up services) and parents' perceptions of children's problems were major predictors of service use. No demographic characteristics predicted service…

  20. Access to Care for Methadone Maintenance Patients in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettema, Jennifer E.; Sorensen, James L.

    2009-01-01

    This policy commentary addresses a significant access to care issue that faces methadone maintenance patients seeking residential treatment in the United States. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has demonstrated strong efficacy in the outpatient treatment of opiate dependence. However, many opiate dependent patients are also in need of more…

  1. The evolution of an acute care hospital unit to a DRG-exempt rehabilitation unit. A preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Parfenchuck, T A; Parziale, J R; Liberman, J R; Butcher, R P; Ahern, D K

    1990-02-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration's decision to adopt a prospective based payment system has caused many institutions to implement new policies and practices. A recent area of interest for many hospitals has been the creation of diagnosis-related group (DRG) exempt units to maximize reimbursement practices. We analyzed changes which occurred when an eight bed acute care stroke unit (SU) was converted to a DRG exempt eight bed rehabilitation unit (RU). The time period involved was 1 1/2 months before and 1 1/2 months after the transition occurred. Analysis of data from the pre- and posttransition periods revealed that: (1) length of stay increased significantly from 11.7 to 15.3 days (P less than 0.001); (2) functional independence measure (FIM) score improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for RU patients (0.84/day) than for SU patients (0.39/day); (3) disposition to home v other facilities increased significantly from 50 to 81% (P less than 0.05); (4) the overall occupancy increased from 94 to 100% and all beds were filled with rehabilitation patients; (5) the proportion of patients with Medicare as their primary insurer was comparable before (64%) and after (67%) unit conversion; (6) gross income from rehabilitation patients increased by 43%. Indirect savings via reduction of acute hospital length of stay for Medicare patients increased total income from operation of this unit. We conclude that patients on the RU stayed longer, had greater daily improvements in functional status, and were more likely to be discharged to home. This appears to be due to a more efficient use of rehabilitation beds and a concomitant overall improvement in reimbursement to the hospital.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2105736

  2. Considerations for Implementation of Cancer Molecular Diagnostics Into Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Physicians have provided personalized care with as much precision as possible for several centuries. However, increasingly sophisticated understanding of the human genome and of cancer biology has permitted identification of genetic and phenotypic distinctions that might permit development of new tumor biomarker tests for risk categorization, screening, differential diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and monitoring. Both commercial and academic laboratories are offering tests for single analytes, panels of tests of single analytes, multiparameter assays coalesced into a signature, and total genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic analyses. However, the absence of a consistent regulatory environment has led to marketing of assays without proven analytic validity or clinical utility. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval or clearance does not necessarily imply that use of the test will improve patient outcomes, and FDA discretion to permit laboratory-developed tests results in unknown benefit, or harm, of others. In this regard, a "bad tumor marker is as bad as a bad drug." Caveat emptor is not a satisfactory approach to delivering high-quality care. Rather, adoption of tumor biomarker tests should be based on high levels of evidence generated in scientifically rigorous studies that demonstrate both analytical validity and clinical utility. Doing so will ensure that clinicians and patients are confident that a tumor biomarker test is likely to improve their outcomes. PMID:27249708

  3. Physical and Visual Accessibilities in Intensive Care Units: A Comparative Study of Open-Plan and Racetrack Units.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub; Khan, Nayma; Jones, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    This study compared physical and visual accessibilities and their associations with staff perception and interaction behaviors in 2 intensive care units (ICUs) with open-plan and racetrack layouts. For the study, physical and visual accessibilities were measured using the spatial analysis techniques of Space Syntax. Data on staff perception were collected from 81 clinicians using a questionnaire survey. The locations of 2233 interactions, and the location and length of another 339 interactions in these units were collected using systematic field observation techniques. According to the study, physical and visual accessibilities were different in the 2 ICUs, and clinicians' primary workspaces were physically and visually more accessible in the open-plan ICU. Physical and visual accessibilities affected how well clinicians' knew their peers and where their peers were located in these units. Physical and visual accessibilities also affected clinicians' perception of interaction and communication and of teamwork and collaboration in these units. Additionally, physical and visual accessibilities showed significant positive associations with interaction behaviors in these units, with the open-plan ICU showing stronger associations. However, physical accessibilities were less important than visual accessibilities in relation to interaction behaviors in these ICUs. The implications of these findings for ICU design are discussed. PMID:27575795

  4. Withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care unit: guidance for practice

    PubMed Central

    Laddie, Joanna; Craig, Finella; Brierley, Joe; Kelly, Paula; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the work of one tertiary paediatric palliative care service in facilitating planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting, with the purpose of developing local guidance for practice. Methods Retrospective 10-year (2003–2012) case note review of intensive care patients whose parents elected to withdraw ventilation in another setting. Demographic and clinical data revealed common themes and specific incidents relevant to local guideline development. Results 18 children (aged 2 weeks to 16 years) were considered. Three died prior to transfer. Transfer locations included home (5), hospice (8) and other (2). Primary pathologies included malignant, neurological, renal and respiratory diseases. Collaborative working was evidenced in the review including multidisciplinary team meetings with the palliative care team prior to discharge. Planning included development of symptom management plans and emergency care plans in the event of longer than anticipated survival. Transfer of children and management of extubations demonstrated the benefits of planning and recognition that unexpected events occur despite detailed planning. We identified the need for local written guidance supporting healthcare professionals planning and undertaking extubation outside the intensive care setting, addressing the following phases: (i) introduction of withdrawal, (ii) preparation pretransfer, (iii) extubation, (iv) care postextubation and (v) care postdeath. Conclusions Planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting is challenging and resource intensive. The development of local collaborations and guidance can enable parents of children dependent on intensive care to consider a preferred place of death for their child, which may be outside the intensive care unit. PMID:24951460

  5. I Brazilian guidelines for respiratory physiotherapy in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Cíntia; Zanetti, Nathalia Mendonça; Comaru, Talitha; Ribeiro, Simone Nascimento Dos Santos; Andrade, Lívia Barboza de; Santos, Suzi Laine Longo Dos

    2012-06-01

    Developing guidelines for the role of the physiotherapist in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is essential because these professionals are responsible for the rehabilitation of critically ill patients. Rehabilitation includes the evaluation and prevention of functional kinetic alterations, application of treatment interventions (respiratory and/or motor physiotherapy), control and application of medical gases, care of mechanical ventilation, weaning and extubation, tracheal gas insufflation, inflation/deflation of the endotracheal cuff protocol, and surfactant application, aiming to allow patients to have a full recovery and return to their functional activities. In this article, we present guidelines that are intended to guide the physiotherapist in some of the prevention/treatment interventions in respiratory therapy (airway clearance, lung expansion, position in bed, airway suction, drug inhalation, and cough assist), which help in the rehabilitation process of newborns and children in intensive care units during mechanical ventilation and up to 12 hours following extubation. PMID:23917758

  6. Cultural competence and health care: Japanese, Korean, and Indian patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Andresen, J

    2001-01-01

    Cultural competence requires sensitivity to the diverse ethnic, religious, and cultural expectations of patients in our health care system. In the increasingly multicultural world of the city hospital, patients will benefit from increased cultural competency on the part of health care providers. This study interviews Japanese, Korean, and Indian immigrants to the United States, showing that these individuals hold vastly different expectations concerning: 1) when to seek medical assistance; 2) the role of the doctor in the community; 3) the role of the patient and the patient's family in conversations with the medical specialist; 4) the roles of doctors versus nurses; 5) issues of privacy and disclosure to patient and family; 6) organ donation; and 7) end-of-life care. The paper concludes with immigrants' views on what would make their medical experience in the United States more comfortable, and hence, potentially more beneficial to their mental and physical health. PMID:11908075

  7. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections (CR-BSI) in Geriatric Patients in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Chernecky, Cynthia; Macklin, Denise; Blackburn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are bloodstream infections that, through specific laboratory testing, identify the intravascular catheter as the source of the bloodstream infection. By 2015, the rate of elderly patients 80 years of age and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) will represent 1 in 4 admissions. Approximately 80 000 CR-BSIs occur in ICUs annually, potentially resulting in as many as 56 000 CR-BSIs occurring in the geriatric ICU patient, with 20% of these cases resulting in death. To minimize the occurrence of CR-BSIs in these patients, specific knowledge about the geriatric patient will have to be factored into the ICU health care professional's practice, including the development of a vascular access plan, which includes selection of the correct device and proper insertion of that device along with an evidence-based care and maintenance program. Intensive care unit health care professionals may be at a loss when it comes to navigating the vast array of vascular access medical devices available today. The Healthcare and Technology Synergy framework can assist the ICU health care professional to logically review each vascular access device and select those devices that best meet patient needs. PMID:26039650

  8. Sparing of muscle mass and function by passive loading in an experimental intensive care unit model.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Guillaume; Llano-Diez, Monica; Ravara, Barbara; Gorza, Luisa; Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, Jian-Ping; Cacciani, Nicola; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ochala, Julien; Corpeno, Rebeca; Li, Meishan; Hedström, Yvette; Ford, G Charles; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Larsson, Lars

    2013-03-01

    The response to mechanical stimuli, i.e., tensegrity, plays an important role in regulating cell physiological and pathophysiological function, and the mechanical silencing observed in intensive care unit (ICU) patients leads to a severe and specific muscle wasting condition. This study aims to unravel the underlying mechanisms and the effects of passive mechanical loading on skeletal muscle mass and function at the gene, protein and cellular levels. A unique experimental rat ICU model has been used allowing long-term (weeks) time-resolved analyses of the effects of standardized unilateral passive mechanical loading on skeletal muscle size and function and underlying mechanisms. Results show that passive mechanical loading alleviated the muscle wasting and the loss of force-generation associated with the ICU intervention, resulting in a doubling of the functional capacity of the loaded versus the unloaded muscles after a 2-week ICU intervention. We demonstrate that the improved maintenance of muscle mass and function is probably a consequence of a reduced oxidative stress revealed by lower levels of carbonylated proteins, and a reduced loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. A complex temporal gene expression pattern, delineated by microarray analysis, was observed with loading-induced changes in transcript levels of sarcomeric proteins, muscle developmental processes, stress response, extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins and metabolism. Thus, the results from this study show that passive mechanical loading alleviates the severe negative consequences on muscle size and function associated with the mechanical silencing in ICU patients, strongly supporting early and intense physical therapy in immobilized ICU patients. PMID:23266938

  9. The Development and Evaluation of Delirium Assessment and Nursing Care Decision-Making Assistant Mobile Application for Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangyu; Ji, Meihua; Ding, Shu; Wu, Ying; Chang, Polun; Lin, Chiawei; Yang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Delirium is a common complication among patients in ICU settings. Although it has been repeatedly confirmed that Confusion Assessment Model for Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU), one of the most commonly used ICU delirium assessment tool, is highly accurate in validation studies, it's sensitivity and specificity is relatively low during routine practice among bedside nurses. The aim of this study is to develop a mobile application (app) to detect delirium and to test its reliability and validity both by research nurses and among ICU bedside nurses. The app was programmed with Java and installed on a mobile device with Android system. After completion of reliability and validity testing, the app will be integrated into the existing Hospital Information System in order to automatically retrieve essential information for risk factor identification and formulation of care plan accordingly to prevent or manage ICU delirium. PMID:27332299

  10. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Alyeshmerni, Daniel; Froehlich, James B.; Lewin, Jack; Eagle, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25120917

  11. Intensive Care Unit Cultures and End-of-Life Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.; Dombeck, Mary T.; Sellers, Craig R.; Quinn, Jill R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Prior researchers studying end-of-life decision making (EOLDM) in intensive care units (ICUs) often have collected data retrospectively and aggregated data across units. There has been little research, however, about how cultures differ among ICUs. This research was designed to study limitation of treatment decision making in real time, to evaluate similarities and differences in the cultural contexts of four ICUs and the relationship of those contexts to EOLDM. Materials and Methods: Ethnographic field work took place in four adult ICUs in a tertiary care hospital. Participants were health care providers (e.g., physicians, nurses, and social workers), patients and their family members. Participant observation and interviews took place 5 days/week for 7 months in each unit. Results: The ICUs were not monolithic. There were similarities, but important differences in EOLDM were identified in formal and informal rules, meaning and uses of technology, physician roles and relationships, processes such as unit rounds, and timing of initiation of EOLDM. Conclusions: As interventions to improve EOLDM are developed, it will be important to understand how they may interact with unit cultures. Attempting to develop one intervention to be used in all ICUs is unlikely to be successful. PMID:17548028

  12. Interprofessional Implementation of a Pain/Sedation Guideline on a Trauma Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Tara L; LaRiccia, Brenton

    2016-01-01

    Trauma patients experience pain and agitation during their hospitalization. Many complications have been noted both in the absence of symptom management and the in presence of oversedation/narcotization. To combat noted untoward effects of pain and sedation management, an interprofessional team convened to develop a pain and sedation guideline for use in a trauma intensive care unit. Guideline development began with a comprehensive review of the literature. With the input of unit stakeholders, a nurse-driven analgosedation guideline was implemented for a 6-month trial. During this time, unit champions were integral to successful trial execution. Outcome measurement included patient and unit outcomes, nursing satisfaction, and a pre- and postimplementation patient comparison. Following implementation, unit length of stay decreased by 4.16% and there was a 17.81% decrease in average time on the ventilator following the initiation of weaning. Patient reports of nurse sensitivity and responsiveness to pain increased from 93.7 to 94.9. Nurses reported satisfaction with the practice change and improvements in care. In comparing pre- and postimplementation patient data, there was a significant decrease in mean analgesic treatment duration and an increase in the use of antipsychotics for delirium management. Following the trial period, this guideline was permanently adopted across the adult critical care service. The development of a nurse-driven analgosedation guideline was noted to be both feasible and successful. PMID:27163223

  13. Accelerating molecular docking calculations using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Korb, Oliver; Stützle, Thomas; Exner, Thomas E

    2011-04-25

    The generation of molecular conformations and the evaluation of interaction potentials are common tasks in molecular modeling applications, particularly in protein-ligand or protein-protein docking programs. In this work, we present a GPU-accelerated approach capable of speeding up these tasks considerably. For the evaluation of interaction potentials in the context of rigid protein-protein docking, the GPU-accelerated approach reached speedup factors of up to over 50 compared to an optimized CPU-based implementation. Treating the ligand and donor groups in the protein binding site as flexible, speedup factors of up to 16 can be observed in the evaluation of protein-ligand interaction potentials. Additionally, we introduce a parallel version of our protein-ligand docking algorithm PLANTS that can take advantage of this GPU-accelerated scoring function evaluation. We compared the GPU-accelerated parallel version to the same algorithm running on the CPU and also to the highly optimized sequential CPU-based version. In terms of dependence of the ligand size and the number of rotatable bonds, speedup factors of up to 10 and 7, respectively, can be observed. Finally, a fitness landscape analysis in the context of rigid protein-protein docking was performed. Using a systematic grid-based search methodology, the GPU-accelerated version outperformed the CPU-based version with speedup factors of up to 60. PMID:21434638

  14. Leadership-organizational culture relationship in nursing units of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The phenomena of leadership and organizational culture (OC) has been defined as the driving forces in the success or failure of an organization. Today, nurse managers must demonstrate leadership behaviors or styles that are appropriate for the constantly changing, complex, and turbulent health care delivery system. In this study, researchers explored the relationship between nurse managers' leadership styles and OC of nursing units within an acute care hospital that had achieved excellent organizational performance as demonstrated by a consistent increase in patient satisfaction ratings. The data from this study support that transformational and transactional contingent reward leaderships as nurse manager leadership styles that are associated with nursing unit OC that have the ability to balance the dynamics of flexibility and stability within their nursing units and are essential for maintaining organizational effectiveness. It is essential for first-line nursing leaders to acquire knowledge and skills on organizational cultural competence. PMID:18389837

  15. Using data envelopment analysis to analyse the efficiency of primary care units.

    PubMed

    Deidda, Manuela; Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Codagnone, Cristiano; Maghiros, Ioannis

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the efficiency of primary care centres (PCCs) adopting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices, using a new database on primary care centres in the Basque Region in Spain. Using a four-stage Data Envelopment Analysis methodology, we are able to explicitly take into account the role of ICT in affecting the efficiency of primary care centres. We understand that this is the first time that ICT enters into the determination of efficiency of the health sector. The role of exogenous factors is explicitly considered in this analysis and shows that including these variables is not neutral to the efficiency evaluation, but leads to an efficiency indicator that only encompasses the effect of managerial skills. The paper provides some useful policy implications regarding the role of ICT in improving the efficiency of primary care units. PMID:25123457

  16. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 4. Abdominal crisis in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gregor, P; Prodger, J D

    1988-09-01

    Abdominal crises are common in critically ill patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit for problems unrelated to the abdomen. General surgeons may be asked to assess these patients for such reasons as pain, distension, possible sepsis, radiologic or laboratory abnormalities. Since many of the diagnostic signs and symptoms of acute abdomen are blunted or absent in critically ill patients who may be comatose or have been given analgesics or steroids, frequent thorough physical examination and close cooperation with the service admitting the patient are necessary to ensure early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the abdominal crisis. PMID:3046730

  17. Skills for Health Care Assistants Vol. II. Supplemental Units for Health Care and Nurse Assistants Programs. Student Guide. Instructor Key. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This student guide for courses for health care assistants and nurse assistants contains 16 self-paced units with simplified line drawings, controlled text, vocabulary development, and mathematics practice exercises. Units consist of the following: objectives, introduction to the unit, content outline, steps of the procedure, skill sheets, written…

  18. Errors in administration of parenteral drugs in intensive care units: multinational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Capuzzo, Maurizia; Guidet, Bertrand; Moreno, Rui; Metnitz, Barbara; Bauer, Peter; Metnitz, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess on a multinational level the frequency, characteristics, contributing factors, and preventive measures of administration errors in parenteral medication in intensive care units. Design Observational, prospective, 24 hour cross sectional study with self reporting by staff. Setting 113 intensive care units in 27 countries. Participants 1328 adults in intensive care. Main outcome measures Number of errors; impact of errors; distribution of error characteristics; distribution of contributing and preventive factors. Results 861 errors affecting 441 patients were reported: 74.5 (95% confidence interval 69.5 to 79.4) events per 100 patient days. Three quarters of the errors were classified as errors of omission. Twelve patients (0.9% of the study population) experienced permanent harm or died because of medication errors at the administration stage. In a multiple logistic regression with patients as the unit of analysis, odds ratios for the occurrence of at least one parenteral medication error were raised for number of organ failures (odds ratio per increase of one organ failure: 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.34); use of any intravenous medication (yes v no: 2.73, 1.39 to 5.36); number of parenteral administrations (per increase of one parenteral administration: 1.06, 1.04 to 1.08); typical interventions in patients in intensive care (yes v no: 1.50, 1.14 to 1.96); larger intensive care unit (per increase of one bed: 1.01, 1.00 to 1.02); number of patients per nurse (per increase of one patient: 1.30, 1.03 to 1.64); and occupancy rate (per 10% increase: 1.03, 1.00 to 1.05). Odds ratios for the occurrence of parenteral medication errors were decreased for presence of basic monitoring (yes v no: 0.19, 0.07 to 0.49); an existing critical incident reporting system (yes v no: 0.69, 0.53 to 0.90); an established routine of checks at nurses’ shift change (yes v no: 0.68, 0.52 to 0.90); and an increased ratio of patient turnover to the size of the

  19. Critical care medicine in the United States: addressing the intensivist shortage and image of the specialty.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A; Pastores, Stephen M; Oropello, John M; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    Intensivists are increasingly needed to care for the critically ill and manage ICUs as ICU beds, utilization, acuity of illness, complexity of care and costs continue to rise. However, there is a nationwide shortage of intensivists that has occurred despite years of well publicized warnings of an impending workforce crisis from specialty societies and the federal government. The magnitude of the intensivist shortfall, however, is difficult to determine because there are many perspectives of optimal ICU administration, patient coverage and intensivist availability and a lack of national data on intensivist practices. Nevertheless, the intensivist shortfall is quite real as evidenced by the alternative solutions that hospitals are deploying to provide care for their critically ill patients. In the midst of these manpower struggles, the critical care environment is dynamically changing and becoming more stressful. Severe hospital bed availability and fiscal constraints are forcing ICUs to alter their approaches to triage, throughput and unit staffing. National and local organizations are mandating that hospitals comply with resource intensive and arguably unproven initiatives to monitor and improve patient safety and quality, and informatics systems. Lastly, there is an ongoing sense of professional dissatisfaction among intensivists and a lack of public awareness that critical care medicine is even a distinct specialty. This article offers proposals to increase the adult intensivist workforce through expansion and enhancements of internal medicine based critical care training programs, incentives for recent graduates to enter the critical care medicine field, suggestions for improvements in the critical care profession and workplace to encourage senior intensivists to remain in the field, proactive marketing of critical care, and expanded engagement by the critical care societies in the challenges facing intensivists. PMID:24132037

  20. Social work in primary care: a demonstration student unit utilizing practice research.

    PubMed

    Rock, B D; Cooper, M

    2000-01-01

    A neighborhood primary health care program serving a socially and economically oppressed community, and a graduate school of social work have collaborated to create a social work student field work unit in a primary health care setting, to demonstrate emerging and innovative social work roles in an ever-increasing managed care environment. Patients with high levels of psychosocial stress make large demands on the primary care system and consume considerable laboratory and diagnostic treatment resources. Development of social services in primary care settings is a relatively new concept, however it has been clearly demonstrated that primary care physicians need the skills of social workers to handle the psychosocial and environmental aspects of illness. The principal goal was to demonstrate social work practice in a primary care health setting, utilizing practice research approaches. Validation of effectiveness was noted, as depression, anxiety, adjustment reactions (to name a few) were decreased, resulting in fewer physician visits, less somatization and improved compliance with medical and diet/nutrition regimens. The case examples and single subject data presented provide qualitative evidence, in the context of a natural experiment, for the profession to pursue this model further in both program development and research. PMID:10989871

  1. The role of preceptor and nurse leader in developing intensive care unit competency.

    PubMed

    Elmers, Coleen R

    2010-01-01

    In the past, only experienced nurses were hired to work in critical care areas. With the prolonged nursing shortage, more and more facilities are hiring recent nursing graduates to work in these fast paced critical care units. How does this impact the orientation process in critical care? What competencies and skills are necessary in a nurse that will be working in a critical care setting? Are there specific competencies all critical care nurses must possess, even those with little or no previous experience? How do you help new registered nurses develop critical-thinking skills during orientation? These are very important questions that need to be addressed in order to get the outcome we want by the end of orientation: a competent critical care registered nurse. This article will explore significant factors that have the capacity to negatively or positively influence the success of an orientation program. During my years of nursing practice, I have found 4 factors that are especially crucial to the success of a critical care orientation program. These factors include: 1. strong leadership support throughout the comprehensive orientation process. 2. appropriate preceptor selection. 3. focus on developing critical-thinking skills. 4. use of a competency-based orientation plan. PMID:20019505

  2. A gap between Need and Reality: Neonatal Nursing Staff Requirements on a German Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Patry, Christian; Schindler, Monika; Reinhard, Julia; Hien, Steffen; Demirakca, Süha; Böhler, Thomas; Schaible, Thomas

    2014-02-17

    Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care) of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive days once a day in a combined pediatric and neonatal ICU of a metropolitan academic medical center in southwest Germany. Each day, 18.9±0.98 patients (mean±standard deviation) were assessed (14.26±1.21 neonatal, 4.65±0.98 pediatric). Among neonates, 9.94±2.56 received intensive therapy, 3.77±1.85 intensive surveillance, and 0.65±0.71 special care. Average nursing staff requirement was 12.10±1.81 full time equivalents (FTE) per shift. Considering additional pediatric patients in the ICU and actual nursing staff availability (8.97±0.87 FTE per shift), this ICU seems understaffed. PMID:24711913

  3. Relocating care: negotiating nursing skillmix in a mental health unit for older adults.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; Curren, David; Walter, Bonnie; Toffoli, Luisa; O'Kane, Debra

    2011-03-01

    Mental health care in Australia in the last 20 years has moved from stand-alone psychiatric hospitals to general hospitals and the community. This paper reports an action research project exploring the experiences of nurses on an acute mental health unit for older adults staffed with a skillmix of mental health and general nurses, which recently transitioned from a psychiatric to a general hospital. The new service provides comprehensive health care, including the management of physical co-morbidity and a recovery orientation. Recovery acknowledges the role and rights of consumers and carers in planning and management of care, choice and individual strengths (Shepherd). The new ward received additional resources to establish the model of care, including a broader skillmix. The paper explores the dynamics of development of a new model of care and of bringing together staff with different professional orientations, cultures and priorities. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 18 staff. Analysis resulted in three themes relating to the impact of competing goals and foci of care upon professional boundaries; competing organisational cultures and the impact of service change upon work practices. The findings are explored in relation to ideas about health care delivery associated with neoliberalism. PMID:21281396

  4. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

  5. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D.K.; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. Results: The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care. PMID:27377508

  6. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed. PMID:27555693

  7. Health care providers and direct-to-consumer access and advertising of genetic testing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Marketing pressures, regulatory policies, clinical guidelines, and consumer demand all affect health care providers' knowledge and use of health-related genetic tests that are sold and/or advertised to consumers. In addition, clinical guidelines, regulatory policies, and educational efforts are needed to promote the informed use of genetic tests that are sold and advertised to consumers and health care providers. A shift in culture regarding the regulation of genetic tests that are sold directly to consumers is suggested: by recent actions taken by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including letters sent to direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies stating that their tests meet the definition of medical devices; by public meetings held by the FDA to discuss laboratory developed tests; and by the convening of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel to gather input on scientific issues concerning DTC genetic tests that make medical claims. This review provides a brief overview of DTC advertising and the regulation of pharmaceuticals and genetic tests in the United States. It highlights recent changes in the regulatory culture regarding genetic tests that are sold to consumers, and discusses the impact on health care providers of selling and advertising genetic tests directly to consumers. PMID:22204616

  8. Health care providers and direct-to-consumer access and advertising of genetic testing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Myers, Melanie F

    2011-01-01

    Marketing pressures, regulatory policies, clinical guidelines, and consumer demand all affect health care providers' knowledge and use of health-related genetic tests that are sold and/or advertised to consumers. In addition, clinical guidelines, regulatory policies, and educational efforts are needed to promote the informed use of genetic tests that are sold and advertised to consumers and health care providers. A shift in culture regarding the regulation of genetic tests that are sold directly to consumers is suggested: by recent actions taken by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including letters sent to direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies stating that their tests meet the definition of medical devices; by public meetings held by the FDA to discuss laboratory developed tests; and by the convening of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel to gather input on scientific issues concerning DTC genetic tests that make medical claims. This review provides a brief overview of DTC advertising and the regulation of pharmaceuticals and genetic tests in the United States. It highlights recent changes in the regulatory culture regarding genetic tests that are sold to consumers, and discusses the impact on health care providers of selling and advertising genetic tests directly to consumers. PMID:22204616

  9. A visit to the intensive cares unit: a family-centered culture change to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Julie Boyer; Piazza, Julie

    2012-01-01

    To guide family adjustment, an effort was made to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit (ICU). Goals were to improve customer satisfaction and to raise staff comfort level with child visitation. After implementing an open visitation policy, concerns around pediatric visitation in the ICU remained. Fears centered on risks to both patient and child. Literature was reviewed before a book was written entitled A Visit to the ICU. It contained information about what a child visiting the ICU would see, hear, and feel when visiting a loved one. The book provided reassurance for caregivers and children, informing them about what to expect when visiting. The goal of the book was to provide caregivers with a framework for age-appropriate education. Staff education was provided on developmental stages, including a child's understandings of illness and death. Nursing interventions were reviewed and resources provided. A survey demonstrated that the book increased staff comfort level with children visiting the unit, was a positive tool for patients and families, and eased fears among children while helping to facilitate coping mechanisms. The article will describe the practice change of pediatric visitation in an ICU and how it could be applied to other critical care settings. PMID:22157497

  10. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  11. Access to care for Chagas disease in the United States: a health systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Reich, Michael R; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2015-07-01

    There are 300,000 estimated cases of Chagas disease in the United States but limited data on access to care. This study analyzed trends in access to care for Chagas disease in the United States and assessed the national and state barriers to access. Data on cases in blood donors and drug releases were obtained from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), respectively. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 key informants at the national level and in five states where treatment had been released. Interview responses were analyzed according to the health systems dimensions of regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data indicate that 1,908 cases were identified in the blood donation system from 2007 to 2013 and that CDC released 422 courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox during this period. The barriers to access at the national level include limited diagnostic and institutionalized referral and care processes, lack of financing for patient-care activities, and limited awareness and training among providers. This study demonstrates that access to treatment of Chagas disease in the United States is limited. The lack of licensing is only one of several barriers to access, highlighting the need for a health systems perspective when scaling up access to these essential medicines. PMID:25986581

  12. What can Europe learn from the managed care backlash in the United States?

    PubMed

    Duijmelinck, Daniëlle; van de Ven, Wynand

    2016-05-01

    Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland have taken steps toward regulated competition on the health insurance market to enhance efficiency and consumer responsiveness. The rationale of giving the consumer a periodic choice of health insurer is that individual risk-bearing insurers are stimulated to effectively purchase and manage the care on behalf of their enrollees. For Europe this is largely a terra incognita, while the United States have at least fifty years of relevant experience. Twenty years ago the United States were confronted with a substantial backlash against managed care. Based on the US experience we come to the following lessons for Europe. First, the greatest backlash against managed care can be expected from the healthcare providers. Second, consumers are willing to give up to some extent their free choice of healthcare provider in return for a lower premium. Third, insurers should (be allowed to) offer consumers a choice between an insurance product with free choice of provider and lower-priced products with restricted reimbursement for non-contracted providers. Fourth, insurers should use input from consumers, provide them in a timely manner with relevant information about the (non-) contracted providers, and reassure consumers that in-network providers offer good quality care. Fifth, the development of national guidelines and quality indicators, with input from the medical profession, can increase the acceptance of managed care. PMID:27055353

  13. Accountable Care Organizations in the United States: Market and Demographic Factors Associated with Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Carluzzo, Kathleen L; Kler, Sarah E; Fisher, Elliott S

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Accountable Care Organization (ACO) model is rapidly being implemented by Medicare, private payers, and states, but little is known about the scope of ACO implementation. Objective. To determine the number of accountable care organizations in the United States, where they are located, and characteristics associated with ACO formation. Study Design, Methods, and Data. Cross-sectional study of all ACOs in the United States as of August 2012. We identified ACOs from multiple sources; documented service locations (practices, clinics, hospitals); and linked service locations to local areas, defined as Dartmouth Atlas hospital service areas. We used multivariate analysis to assess what characteristics were associated with local ACO presence. We examined demographic characteristics (2010 American Community Survey) and health care system characteristics (2010 Medicare fee-for-service claims data). Principal Findings. We identified 227 ACOs located in 27 percent of local areas. Fifty-five percent of the US population resides in these areas. HSA-level characteristics associated with ACO presence include higher performance on quality, higher Medicare per capita spending, fewer primary care physician groups, greater managed care penetration, lower poverty rates, and urban location. Conclusions. Much of the US population resides in areas where ACOs have been established. ACO formation has taken place where it may be easier to meet quality and cost targets. Wider adoption of the ACO model may require tailoring to local context. PMID:24117222

  14. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  15. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses’ ethical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients’ conditions and prognoses, their families’ emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families’ peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25512830

  16. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses' ethical approaches.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients' conditions and prognoses, their families' emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families' peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25512830

  17. Informational Support to Family Members of Intensive Care Unit Patients: The Perspectives of Families and Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The receiving information about the patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is classified among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. Meeting the informational needs of families is a major goal for intensive care workers. Delivering honest, intelligible and effective information raises specific challenges in the stressful setting of the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this qualitative study was to explain perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. Method: Using a conventional content analysis approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants to explore their perspectives of providing informational support to families of ICU patients. A purposeful sampling method was used to recruit nineteen family members of thirteen patients hospitalized in the ICU and twelve nurses from three teaching hospitals. In general, 31 persons participated in this study. Data collection continued to achieve data saturation. Findings: A conventional content analysis of the data produced three categories and seven sub-categories. The three main categories were as followed, a) providing information, b) handling information and c) using information. Providing information had three sub-categories consisting of “receiving admission news”, “receiving truthful and complete information” and receiving general information. Handling information had two sub-categories consisting ‘keeping information” and “gradual revelation”. Lastly, using information has two sub-categories consisting of “support of patient” and “support of family members”. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. It also determines the nurses’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive role on family’s ICU patients informing. In addition, the results of present

  18. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    PubMed

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn. PMID:27293033

  19. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team 1

    PubMed Central

    Tomazoni, Andréia; Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; de Souza, Sabrina; Anders, Jane Cristina; de Malfussi, Hamilton Filipe Correia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units. METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121. RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument. CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:25493670

  20. Psychosocial factors and mental work load: a reality perceived by nurses in intensive care units1

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Vásquez, Paula; Rolo-González, Gladys; Hérnandez-Fernaud, Estefanía; Díaz-Cabrera, Dolores; Paravic-Klijn, Tatiana; Burgos-Moreno, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the perception of psychosocial factors and mental workload of nurses who work in intensive care units. It is hypothesised that nurses in these units could perceive psychosocial risks, manifesting in a high mental work load. The psychosocial dimension related to the position's cognitive demands is hypothesised to mostly explain mental work load. METHOD: Quantitative study, with a descriptive, cross-sectional, and comparative design. A total of 91% of the intensive care unit populations of three Chilean hospitals was surveyed, corresponding to 111 nurses. The instruments utilised included (A) a biosociodemographic history questionnaire; (b) the SUSESO-ISTAS 21 questionnaire; and (c) the Mental Work Load Subjective Scale (ESCAM, in Spanish). RESULTS: In total, 64% and 57% of participants perceived high levels of exposure to the psychosocial risks Psychosocial demands and Double shift, respectively. In addition, a medium-high level of overall mental load was observed. Positive and significant correlations between some of the SUSESO-ISTAS 21 and ESCAM dimensions were obtained. Using a regression analysis, it was determined that three dimensions of the psychosocial risk questionnaire helped to explain 38% of the overall mental load. CONCLUSION: Intensive care unit nurses felt that inadequate psychosocial factors and mental work overload existed in several of the tested dimensions. PMID:26039303

  1. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients. PMID:27249962

  2. 'Take me away from all this' ... can reminiscence be therapeutic in an intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Jones, C

    1995-12-01

    'Stuart had been with us in the ICU for 4 weeks; weaning attempts from his artificial ventilation were difficult, leaving him frightened, exhausted and despondent. Depression, hopelessness and apathy were beginning to take a hold on him ... until one day something changed everything. A way had been found to help him escape, temporarily, from his intensive care situation. Three days later Stuart was breathing spontaneously and was being prepared for discharge from the ICU.' In this paper potential benefits of reminiscence sessions with patients in a critical care unit are discussed. Background and context are reviewed, leading to some suggestions for practice. PMID:8574086

  3. Patterns of clinical care in radiation therapy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.

    1984-06-01

    Results of the first nationwide evaluation of radiation therapy in the United States with respect to its quality and accessibility are presented. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) is financially supported by the National Cancer Institute and has served as a model for other oncology-related disciplines. The PCS has determined criteria by which to evaluate radiation therapy care in 10 disease sites in which curative radiation therapy plays a major role. The sampling design identified the institution to be surveyed and included all types of practice in the U.S. This paper examines results related to carcinomas of the cervix, larynx and prostate.

  4. Principles of Neuro-anesthesia in Neurosurgery for Intensive Care Unit Nurses.

    PubMed

    Feil, Marian; Irick, Nicole A

    2016-03-01

    As neurosurgical interventions and procedures are advancing, so is the specialty of neuro-anesthesia. The neurosurgeon and the neuro-anesthetist are focused on providing each patient with the best possible outcome. Throughout the surgery, the main priorities of the neuro-anesthetist are patient safety, patient well-being, surgical field exposure, and patient positioning. Potential postoperative complications include nausea and vomiting. Postoperative visual loss is a complication of neurosurgery, most specifically spine surgery, whose origins are unknown. Postoperative considerations for the intensive care unit nurse should include receiving a thorough clinical handoff from the anesthesia provider to ensure care continuity and patient safety. PMID:26873761

  5. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma. PMID:25390460

  6. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting. PMID:21655513

  7. The Child Care Arrangements of Preschool Children in Immigrant Families in the United States. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Peter D.

    Noting that no national-level or population-based information has depicted child care use among children in immigrant families and compared their patterns of child care use with those of children of U.S.-born parents, this study sought to determine if non-maternal care is the norm for children of immigrant families in the United States. The study…

  8. Ethical Issues in Surgical Critical Care: The Complexity of Interpersonal Relationships in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sur, Malini D; Angelos, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in the era of shared medical decision making is the navigation of complex relationships between the physicians, patients, and surrogates who guide treatment plans for critically ill patients. This review of ethical issues in adult surgical critical care explores factors influencing interactions among the characters most prominently involved in health care decisions in the surgical intensive care unit: the patient, the surrogate, the surgeon, and the intensivist. Ethical tensions in the surgeon-patient relationship in the elective setting may arise from the preoperative surgical covenant and the development of surgical complications. Unlike that of the surgeon, the intensivist's relationship with the individual patient must be balanced with the need to serve other acutely ill patients. Due to their unique perspectives, surgeons and intensivists may disagree about decisions to pursue life-sustaining therapies for critically ill postoperative patients. Finally, although surrogates are asked to make decisions for patients on the basis of the substituted judgment or best interest standards, these models may underestimate the nuances of postoperative surrogate decision making. Strategies to minimize conflicts regarding treatment decisions are centered on early, honest, and consistent communication between all parties. PMID:25990272

  9. [The process of death in the intensive care unit (ICU). From a medical, thanatological and legislative point of view].

    PubMed

    Kaneko-Wada, Francisco de J Takao; Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Colmenares-Vásquez, Ariadna Marcela; Santana-Martínez, Paola; Gutiérrez-Mejía, Juan; Arroliga, Alejandro C

    2015-01-01

    Traditional goals in the intensive care unit are to reduce morbidity and mortality. Despite medical and technological advances, death in the intensive care unit remains commonplace and the modern critical care team should be familiar with palliative care and legislation in Mexico. Preserving the dignity of patients, avoiding harm, and maintaining communication with the relatives is fundamental. There is no unique, universally accepted technical approach in the management of the terminal critical care patient, so it is important to individualize each case and define objectives together under the legal framework in Mexico. PMID:26526477

  10. Voluntary peer review as innovative tool for quality improvement in the intensive care unit – a retrospective descriptive cohort study in German intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Kumpf, Oliver; Bloos, Frank; Bause, Hanswerner; Brinkmann, Alexander; Deja, Maria; Marx, Gernot; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Dubb, Rolf; Muhl, Elke; Greim, Clemens-A.; Weiler, Norbert; Chop, Ines; Jonitz, Günther; Schaefer, Henning; Felsenstein, Matthias; Liebeskind, Ursula; Leffmann, Carsten; Jungbluth, Annemarie; Waydhas, Christian; Pronovost, Peter; Spies, Claudia; Braun, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Quality improvement and safety in intensive care are rapidly evolving topics. However, there is no gold standard for assessing quality improvement in intensive care medicine yet. In 2007 a pilot project in German intensive care units (ICUs) started using voluntary peer reviews as an innovative tool for quality assessment and improvement. We describe the method of voluntary peer review and assessed its feasibility by evaluating anonymized peer review reports and analysed the thematic clusters highlighted in these reports. Methods: Retrospective data analysis from 22 anonymous reports of peer reviews. All ICUs – representing over 300 patient beds – had undergone voluntary peer review. Data were retrieved from reports of peers of the review teams and representatives of visited ICUs. Data were analysed with regard to number of topics addressed and results of assessment questionnaires. Reports of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT reports) of these ICUs are presented. Results: External assessment of structure, process and outcome indicators revealed high percentages of adherence to predefined quality goals. In the SWOT reports 11 main thematic clusters were identified representative for common ICUs. 58.1% of mentioned topics covered personnel issues, team and communication issues as well as organisation and treatment standards. The most mentioned weaknesses were observed in the issues documentation/reporting, hygiene and ethics. We identified several unique patterns regarding quality in the ICU of which long-term personnel problems und lack of good reporting methods were most interesting Conclusion: Voluntary peer review could be established as a feasible and valuable tool for quality improvement. Peer reports addressed common areas of interest in intensive care medicine in more detail compared to other methods like measurement of quality indicators. PMID:25587245

  11. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed. PMID:25829909

  12. Establishing an acute care nursing bed unit size: employing a decision matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Terry; Pati, Debajyoti

    2008-01-01

    Determining the number of patient rooms for an acute care (medical-surgical) patient unit is a challenge for both healthcare architects and hospital administrators when renovating or designing a new patient tower or wing. Discussions on unit bed size and its impact on hospital operations in healthcare design literature are isolated, and clearly there is opportunity for more extensive research. Finding the optimal solution for unit bed size involves many factors, including the dynamics of the site and existing structures. This opinion paper was developed using a "balanced scorecard" concept to provide decision makers a framework for assessing and choosing a customized solution during the early planning and conceptual design phases. The context of a healthcare balanced scorecard with the quadrants of quality, finance, provider outcomes, and patient outcomes is used to compare the impact of these variables on unit bed size. PMID:22973617

  13. Patient Preferences and Surrogate Decision Making in Neuroscience Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuemei; Robinson, Jennifer; Muehlschlegel, Susanne; White, Douglas B; Holloway, Robert G; Sheth, Kevin N; Fraenkel, Liana; Hwang, David Y

    2015-08-01

    In the neuroscience intensive care unit (NICU), most patients lack the capacity to make their own preferences known. This fact leads to situations where surrogate decision makers must fill the role of the patient in terms of making preference-based treatment decisions, oftentimes in challenging situations where prognosis is uncertain. The neurointensivist has a large responsibility and role to play in this shared decision-making process. This review covers how NICU patient preferences are determined through existing advance care documentation or surrogate decision makers and how the optimum roles of the physician and surrogate decision maker are addressed. We outline the process of reaching a shared decision between family and care team and describe a practice for conducting optimum family meetings based on studies of ICU families in crisis. We review challenges in the decision-making process between surrogate decision makers and medical teams in neurocritical care settings, as well as methods to ameliorate conflicts. Ultimately, the goal of shared decision making is to increase knowledge amongst surrogates and care providers, decrease decisional conflict, promote realistic expectations and preference-centered treatment strategies, and lift the emotional burden on families of neurocritical care patients. PMID:25990137

  14. Unintentional injuries in child care centers in the United States: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Andrew N; Newton, Manya F; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Stevens, Martha W

    2015-03-01

    The study systematically reviewed all types of unintentional injury and injury prevention research studies occurring within child care centers in the United States. A total of 2 reviewers searched 11 electronic databases to identify 53 articles meeting inclusion criteria. No studies used trauma registries or randomized control trials. Data were not pooled for further analysis because studies lacked standardized definitions for injury, rates, severity, exposure, and demographics. The following child care center injury rates were reported: (0.25-5.31 injuries per 100,000 child-hours); (11.3-18 injuries per 100 children per year); (6-49 injuries per 1000 child-years); (2.5-8.29 injuries per child-year); (2.6-3.3 injuries per child); (3.3-6.3 injuries per 100 observations); (635-835 medically attended injuries per year per 100,000 children and 271-364 child care center playground injuries per year per 100,000 children); and (3.8 injuries per child per 2000 exposure hours). Child care center injury rates were comparable to injury rates published for schools, playground, and summer camp. Most injuries were minor, while most severe injuries (fractures and concussions) were falls from playground structures. Future studies need to use standardized injury definitions and injury severity scales, focus efforts on preventing severe playground injuries in child care centers, and report child care parameters for inclusion in national injury databases. PMID:24092867

  15. Methods of surveillance for HIV infection in primary care outpatients in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, L R; Calonge, N B; Chamberland, M E; Engel, R H; Herring, N C

    1990-01-01

    Primary care outpatients provide a good sentinel population for monitoring levels and trends of HIV infection in the United States. Because a broad cross section of the population seeks primary medical care, excess blood from specimens routinely collected for other purposes is available for anonymous, unlinked HIV testing, and all age groups and both sexes can be sampled. The CDC family of surveys includes two surveys of primary care outpatients: (a) a survey of 100,000 blood specimens per year submitted by more than 6,000 primary care physicians to a national diagnostic laboratory for complete blood count or hematocrit and (b) a survey of approximately 10,000 blood specimens per year from a network of 242 primary care physicians. Each survey has different advantages: the laboratory-based survey has a large sample from a large population base, and the physician network survey has a well-defined patient population in which each patient's clinical condition can be determined. In the primary care physician network, a concurrent study of clinical patterns of disease in patients with recognized HIV infection provides additional information on the clinical syndromes associated with HIV infection and estimates of the occurrence of unrecognized HIV infection. PMID:2108462

  16. Patient Preferences and Surrogate Decision Making in Neuroscience Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xuemei; Robinson, Jennifer; Muehlschlegel, Susanne; White, Douglas B.; Holloway, Robert G.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Fraenkel, Liana; Hwang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the neuroscience intensive care unit (NICU), most patients lack the capacity to make their own preferences known. This fact leads to situations where surrogate decision makers must fill the role of the patient in terms of making preference-based treatment decisions, oftentimes in challenging situations where prognosis is uncertain. The neurointensivist has a large responsibility and role to play in this shared decision making process. This review covers how NICU patient preferences are determined through existing advance care documentation or surrogate decision makers and how the optimum roles of the physician and surrogate decision maker are addressed. We outline the process of reaching a shared decision between family and care team and describe a practice for conducting optimum family meetings based on studies of ICU families in crisis. We review challenges in the decision making process between surrogate decision makers and medical teams in neurocritical care settings, as well as methods to ameliorate conflicts. Ultimately, the goal of shared decision making is to increase knowledge amongst surrogates and care providers, decrease decisional conflict, promote realistic expectations and preference-centered treatment strategies, and lift the emotional burden on families of neurocritical care patients. PMID:25990137

  17. [Potential uses of AP-DRG to describe the health care profile in hospital units].

    PubMed

    Noronha, Marina Ferreira de; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2004-01-01

    The All Patient Diagnosis Related Groups (AP-DRG) provide a classification system for general hospital inpatients, aggregating hospitalizations based on resource use and clinical criteria. The different versions of the AP-DRG have been applied to inpatient care management and reimbursement. This paper aimed to describe the classification and explore the potential for generating information on inpatient care management based on data from the Ribeirão Preto region (Sao Paulo State, Brazil) in 1997, including public, private, and charity hospitals. We compared average length of stay related to DRGs in the Ribeirão Preto region and the United States. Using the relative cost weights of the AP-DRGs constructed for New York State, we verified the profile of inpatient care provided by 30 hospitals in the Ribeirão Preto region, and reimbursement for hospital care provided to patients referred from other municipalities and covered by the Unified National Health System (SUS). Our findings indicate the applicability of the classification to inform the decision-making process on inpatient care regionalization and organization in levels of complexity, as well as for improvement of inpatient care monitoring and reimbursement. PMID:15608938

  18. A study protocol for performance evaluation of a new academic intensive care unit facility: impact on patient care

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Mauricio; Zygun, David A; Harrison, Alexandra; Stelfox, Henry T

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare facility construction is increasing because of population demand and the need to replace ageing infrastructure. Research suggests that there may be a relationship between healthcare environment and patient care. To date, most evaluations of new healthcare facilities are derived from techniques used in other industries and focus on physical, financial and architectural performance. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of healthcare facility design on processes and outcomes of patient care. Study aims The primary objective of this study was to investigate the impact of relocation to a new intensive care unit (ICU) facility on clinical performance measures. This study also proposes to develop and test a framework for facility performance evaluation using accepted ICU design guidelines and Donabedian's model for healthcare quality. Methods and analysis We will utilise a mixed-methods, observational, retrospective, controlled, before-and-after design to take advantage of the quasiexperimental conditions created with the construction of a new ICU facility in Calgary, Canada. For the qualitative substudy, we will conduct individual interviews with end-users to understand their impressions and experiences with the new environment and perform thematic analysis. For the quantitative substudy, we will compare process of care indicators and patient outcomes for the 12-month period before and after relocation to the new facility. Two other local ICU facilities that did not undergo structural change during the study period will serve as controls. We will triangulate qualitative and quantitative results utilising a novel framework. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will contribute in understanding the impact of new ICU facilities on clinical performance measures centred on patients, their families and healthcare providers. The framework will complement existing building performance evaluation techniques and help healthcare

  19. 3D web based learning of medical equipment employed in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Aydın

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, both synchronous and asynchronous web based learning of 3D medical equipment models used in hospital intensive care unit have been described over the moodle course management system. 3D medical equipment models were designed with 3ds Max 2008, then converted to ASE format and added interactivity displayed with Viewpoint-Enliven. 3D models embedded in a web page in html format with dynamic interactivity-rotating, panning and zooming by dragging a mouse over images-and descriptive information is embedded to 3D model by using xml format. A pilot test course having 15 h was applied to technicians who is responsible for intensive care unit at Medical Devices Repairing and Maintenance Center (TABOM) of Turkish High Specialized Hospital. PMID:20703738

  20. Dantrolene: mechanisms of neuroprotection and possible clinical applications in the neurointensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Muehlschlegel, Susanne; Sims, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Calcium plays a central role in neuronal function and injury. Dantrolene, an inhibitor of the ryanodine receptor, inhibits intracellular calcium release from the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum and might serve as novel agent for neuroprotection and other applications in the Neurointensive Care Unit. Methods We reviewed the available data of dantrolene as a potential neuroprotective agent through literature searches on Ovid, Pubmed and Google Scholar. Results Dantrolene provides neuroprotection in multiple in vitro models and some in vivo models of neural injury. Its efficacy has an early and narrow time-window of protection. We briefly summarize its other pharmacologic effects that may have potential applications for patients in the neurointensive care unit. Areas with the need for continued research are identified. Conclusion Targeted use of dantrolene in selected ICU disease models of anticipated neural injury, such as impending ischemia from vasospastic syndromes, might provided neuroprotection. PMID:18696266

  1. Real-time data acquisition system for monitoring patients in an intensive care unit (ICU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed

    2003-04-01

    In Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient"s physiological variables such as heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, ventilation and brain activity are constantly monitored on-line, and medicine doses are given to ensure that these variables remain within desired limits. Such data are vital not only for on-line but also for off-line analyses and for medical staff training. Furthermore, in cases of deceased patients it is very important to retrieve these data in order to investigate the causes of deaths. This paper is introducing a design of a Real-Time Data Acquisition System for monitoring patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The proposed design is implemented on a standard personal computer (PC) and operating system without using any sophisticated hardware or interface devices.

  2. Prophylactic use of dressings for pressure ulcer prevention in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Elaine

    2016-06-23

    Multiple comorbidities and intensive therapy increase the risk of pressure ulcer (PU) development in critical care unit (CCU) patients. Given the high number of risk factors that CCU patients present with, it is important to acknowledge that not all PUs are entirely preventable, and incidence is thought to be between 14% and 42%. The consequences of acquiring a PU in critical care include increased mortality, morbidity and longer length of stay. Implementing prevention strategies as soon as the patient enters the unit can significantly reduce incidence. By adopting a proactive versus reactive mind-set, one CCU abandoned traditional PU risk assessment and implemented a number of intensive interventions, including the use of a prophylactic sacral dressing as an adjunct. As a result, PU incidence fell from 19.9 per 1000 patient population to 0.84 per 1000 patient population in 2014. In addition, 310 PU-free days were achieved. PMID:27345087

  3. Platelet transfusion in the neonatal intensive care unit: benefits, risks, alternatives.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Platelet transfusions were introduced into clinical medicine about 60 years ago when they were shown to reduce the mortality rate of patients with leukemia who were bleeding secondary to hyporegenerative thrombocytopenia. In modern neonatology units, platelet transfusions are integral and indeed lifesaving for some neonates. However, the great majority of platelet transfusions currently administered in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are not given in the original paradigm to treat thrombocytopenic hemorrhage, but instead are administered prophylactically with the hope that they will reduce the risk of spontaneous bleeding. Weighing the risks and benefits of platelet transfusion, although imprecise, should be attempted each time a platelet transfusion is ordered. Adopting guidelines specific for platelet transfusion will improve consistency of care and will also generally reduce transfusion usage, thereby reducing costs and conserving valuable blood bank resources. Initiating specific programs to improve compliance with transfusion guidelines can further improve NICU transfusion practice. PMID:21986337

  4. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  5. A laminar flow unit for the care of critically ill newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose MR; Golombek, Sergio G; Fajardo, Carlos; Sola, Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Medical and nursing care of newborns is predicated on the delicate control and balance of several vital parameters. Closed incubators and open radiant warmers are the most widely used devices for the care of neonates in intensive care; however, several well-known limitations of these devises have not been resolved. The use of laminar flow is widely used in many fields of medicine, and may have applications in neonatal care. Objective To describe the neonatal laminar flow unit, a new equipment we designed for care of ill newborns. Methods The idea, design, and development of this device was completed in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The unit is an open mobile bed designed with the objective of maintaining the advantages of the incubator and radiant warmer, while overcoming some of their inherent shortcomings; these shortcomings include noise, magnetic fields and acrylic barriers in incubators, and lack of isolation and water loss through skin in radiant warmers. The unit has a pump that aspirates environmental air which is warmed by electrical resistance and decontaminated with High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter (HEPA) filters (laminar flow). The flow is directed by an air flow directioner. The unit has an embedded humidifier to increase humidity in the infant’s microenvironment and a servo control mechanism for regulation of skin temperature. Results The laminar flow unit is open and facilitates access of care providers and family, which is not the case in incubators. It provides warming by convection at an air velocity of 0.45 m/s, much faster than an incubator (0.1 m/s). The system provides isolation 1000 class (less than 1,000 particles higher than 0.3 micron per cubic feet at all times). This is much more protection than an incubator provides and more than radiant warmers, which have no isolation whatsoever. Additionally, it provides humidification of the newborn’s microenvironment (about 60% relative humidity), which is impossible with a radiant

  6. Expanding Continuous Quality Improvement Capacity in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Prehealth Volunteers as a Solution.

    PubMed

    Priest, Kelsey C; Lobingier, Hannah; McCully, Nancy; Lombard, Jackie; Hansen, Mark; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hagg, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are challenged to support the increasing demands for improving patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. Limited resources and staffing are common barriers for making significant and sustained improvements. At Oregon Health & Science University, the medical intensive care unit (MICU) leadership team faced internal capacity limitations for conducting continuous quality improvement, specifically for the implementation and evaluation of the mobility portion of an evidence-based care bundle. The MICU team successfully addressed this capacity challenge using the person power of prehealth volunteers. In the first year of the project, 52 trained volunteers executed an evidence-based mobility intervention for 305 critically ill patients, conducting more than 200 000 exercise repetitions. The volunteers contributed to real-time evaluation of the project, with the collection of approximately 26 950 process measure data points. Prehealth volunteers are an untapped resource for effectively expanding internal continuous quality improvement capacity in the MICU and beyond. PMID:27031356

  7. The Bariatric Patient in the Intensive Care Unit: Pitfalls and Management.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Carlos E; Pelosi, Paolo; Castro, Melina G

    2016-09-01

    The increasing number of bariatric/metabolic operations as important alternatives for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes brought several concerns about the intensive care of patients undergoing those procedures. Intensive Care Unit admission criteria are needed in order to better allocate resources and avoid unnecessary interventions. Furthermore, well-established protocols, helpful in many clinical situations, are not directly applicable to obese patients. Indeed, difficult airway management, mechanical ventilation, fluid therapy protocols, prophylaxis, and treatment of venous thromboembolic events have unique aspects that should be taken into consideration. Finally, new data related to planning nutrition therapy of the critically obese have been highlighted and deserve consideration. In this review, we provide an outline of recent studies related to those important aspects of the care of the bariatric/metabolic patients in critical conditions. PMID:27464648

  8. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously. PMID:24153217

  9. Ethical issues experienced by intensive care unit nurses in everyday practice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria I D; Moreira, Isabel M P B

    2013-02-01

    This research aims to identify the ethical issues perceived by intensive care nurses in their everyday practice. It also aims to understand why these situations were considered an ethical issue and what interventions/strategies have been or are expected to be developed so as to minimize them. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview with 15 nurses working at polyvalent intensive care units in 4 Portuguese hospitals, who were selected by the homogenization of multiple samples. The qualitative content analysis identified end-of-life decisions, privacy, interaction, team work, and health-care access as emerging ethical issues. Personal, team, and institutional aspects emerge as reasons behind the experience of these issues. Personal and team resources are used in and for solving these issues. Moral development and training are the most significant strategies. PMID:22918059

  10. Prognostic physiology: modeling patient severity in Intensive Care Units using radial domain folding.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rohit; Szolovits, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Real-time scalable predictive algorithms that can mine big health data as the care is happening can become the new "medical tests" in critical care. This work describes a new unsupervised learning approach, radial domain folding, to scale and summarize the enormous amount of data collected and to visualize the degradations or improvements in multiple organ systems in real time. Our proposed system is based on learning multi-layer lower dimensional abstractions from routinely generated patient data in modern Intensive Care Units (ICUs), and is dramatically different from most of the current work being done in ICU data mining that rely on building supervised predictive models using commonly measured clinical observations. We demonstrate that our system discovers abstract patient states that summarize a patient's physiology. Further, we show that a logistic regression model trained exclusively on our learned layer outperforms a customized SAPS II score on the mortality prediction task. PMID:23304406

  11. Critical Care Medicine and Infectious Diseases: An Emerging Combined Subspecialty in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Sameer S.; Rhee, Chanu; Fortna, Gregory S.; O'Grady, Naomi P.

    2015-01-01

    The recent rise in unfilled training positions among infectious diseases (ID) fellowship programs nationwide indicates that ID is declining as a career choice among internal medicine residency graduates. Supplementing ID training with training in critical care medicine (CCM) might be a way to regenerate interest in the specialty. Hands-on patient care and higher salaries are obvious attractions. High infection prevalence and antibiotic resistance in intensive care units, expanding immunosuppressed host populations, and public health crises such as the recent Ebola outbreak underscore the potential synergy of CCM-ID training. Most intensivists receive training in pulmonary medicine and only 1% of current board-certified intensivists are trained in ID. While still small, this cohort of CCM-ID certified physicians has continued to rise over the last 2 decades. ID and CCM program leadership nationwide must recognize these trends and the merits of the CCM-ID combination to facilitate creation of formal dual-training opportunities. PMID:25944345

  12. Antimicriobial resistance patterns of colonizing flora on nurses' hands in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Heather A.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of an alcohol-based handrub for health care worker hand hygiene. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hand hygiene product and skin condition on the antimicrobial resistance patterns of colonizing hand flora among nurses. Methods Colonizing hand flora of 119 nurses working in 2 neonatal intensive care units was compared during a 22-month crossover study using alcohol handrub or antiseptic soap. Results Altogether, 1442 isolates from 834 hand cultures (mean, 7 cultures/nurse) were obtained. In 3 of 9 regression analyses modeling for resistant staphylococcal flora, the use of antiseptic soap was a significant predictor of resistance, and nurses with damaged skin were 2.79 times more likely to carry Staphylococcus warneri isolates resistant to gentamicin. Conclusion Hand hygiene product and skin condition may influence resistance patterns of hand flora of care providers. PMID:17482994

  13. Minimizing the potential for nosocomial pneumonia: architectural, engineering, and environmental considerations for the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G

    1989-01-01

    The development of pneumonia in seriously ill patients remains an important concern of intensive care medicine. The design of the intensive care unit will have a direct effect upon the potential for infection. Persons involved in this design should consider engineering and architectural elements that will ultimately contribute to lower rates of infection. These include components to regulate the atmosphere, such as ventilation systems and temperature and humidity controls. Sources of contaminated water and the amplification mechanisms need to be addressed and minimized in the final designs. Architectural elements such as treatment space and lighting encourage optimal patient management and workable staffing patterns. Personnel who treat seriously ill patients should be part of the planning and design process in the construction and renovation of intensive care facilities. PMID:2495954

  14. INTRAVENOUS MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION ERRORS AND THEIR CAUSES IN CARDIAC CRITICAL CARE UNITS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Esmaeili, Ravanbakhsh; Tajari, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The dangerous events caused by medication errors are one of the main challenges faced in critical care units. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes in cardiac critical care units in Iran. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was conducted in the critical care units (CCUs and cardiac surgery intensive care units) of 12 teaching hospitals. Of the total of 240 nurses working in these departments, 190 participated in the present study. The data collection tools used in this study included the “nurses’ demographic data questionnaire”, the “patients’ medical and demographic data questionnaire” and the “nurses’ self-reporting questionnaire about the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes”. The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS-20 using descriptive statistics such as the absolute and relative frequency. Findings: During the 2 months in which this study was being conducted, 2542 patients were admitted to these departments and 20240 doses of intravenous medications were administered to these patients. The nurses reported 262 intravenous medication administration errors. The most common intravenous medication error pertained to administering the wrong medication (n=71 and 27.1%). As for the causes of intravenous medication administration errors, 51.5% of the errors were associated with work conditions, 24% with packaging, 13.4% with communication, 9.9% with transcription and 1.2% with pharmacies. Discussion and Conclusion: According to the results, strategies are recommended to be adopted for reducing or limiting medication errors, such as building a stronger pharmacology knowledge base in nurses and nursing students, improving work conditions and improving communication between the nurses and physicians. PMID:26889108

  15. Using Diffusion of Innovations Theory to implement the confusion assessment method for the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Constance Mary; Stanton, Marietta; Manno, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Routine screening of mechanically ventilated patients for delirium is essential for prompt recognition and management; however, this represents a change in practice. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory can be useful as a strategy to facilitate adoption of a practice change. This case study describes the effectiveness of identifying barriers to a change in practice and developing strategies, specific to Rogers' innovation decision process, for implementing the Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit. PMID:22367153

  16. The impact of a clinical training unit on integrated child health care in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Guiscafré, H.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Villa, S.; Espinosa, P.; Bojalil, R.; Gutiérrez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This study had two aims: to describe the activities of a clinical training unit set up for the integrated management of sick children, and to evaluate the impact of the unit after its first four years of operation. The training unit was set up in the outpatient ward of a government hospital and was staffed by a paediatrician, a family medicine physician, two nurses and a nutritionist. The staff kept a computerized database for all patients seen and they were supervised once a month. During the first three years, the demand for first-time medical consultation increased by 477% for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and 134% for acute diarrhoea (AD), with an average annual increase of demand for medical care of 125%. Eighty-nine per cent of mothers who took their child for consultation and 85% of mothers who lived in the catchment area and had a deceased child received training on how to recognize alarming signs in a sick child. Fifty-eight per cent of these mothers were evaluated as being properly trained. Eighty-five per cent of primary care physicians who worked for government institutions (n = 350) and 45% of private physicians (n = 90) were also trained in the recognition and proper management of AD and ARI. ARI mortality in children under 1 year of age in the catchment area (which included about 25,000 children under 5 years of age) decreased by 43.2% in three years, while mortality in children under 5 years of age decreased by 38.8%. The corresponding figures for AD mortality reduction were 36.3% and 33.6%. In this same period, 11 clinical research protocols were written. In summary, we learned that a clinical training unit for integrated child care management was an excellent way to offer in-service training for primary health care physicians. PMID:11417039

  17. Evaluation of intoxicated patients hospitalized in a newly-opened level two pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Güngörer, Vildan; Yisldırım, Nurdan Kökten

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to retrospectively examine the demographic and etiological characteristics, prognosis and length of stay in intensive care unit of intoxicated patients hospitalized in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun. Material and Methods: The study retrospectively examined the records of patients hospitalized between 14th March 2014 and 14th March 2015 in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun with respect to age, gender, cause of poisoning, time of emergency department admission, length of hospitalization and prognosis. Results: Of 82 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, 29 (35.3%) were male and 53 (64.6%) were female. The mean age of the male and female patients was 7.89±6.3 years and 11.2±5.7 years, respectively and the mean age of the study group was 10.04±6.1. Twenthy one (39,6%) of the female patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and 32 (60.4%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. Twenthy (68.9%) of the male patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and nine (31.1%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. The cause of poisoning was drug intoxication (antidepressants, antibiotics, painkillers and other drugs) in 64 patients (78%) and the remaining 18 patients (22%) were admitted to hospital for other causes (rat poison, mushroom, carbonmonoxide, scorpion stings, bonzai and pesticides). Thirthy eight (46.3%) of all the patients used such substances for suicidal purpose. Thirthy three (62.2%) of these were female and 32 were at the age group of 14–18 years. Fourty (48.7%) of the patients who ingested medication ingested one drug, while 24 (29.2%) ingested multiple drugs. Antidepressants were found to be the most commonly used drugs (31.2%). The mean hospital admission time was 3.41±2 hours and the mean time of intensive care unit stay was 2.89±1.04 days. No mortality was recorded. Thirthy patients (36.5%) were referred

  18. In Search of Common Ground in Handoff Documentation in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Mamykina, Lena; Jordan, Desmond; Stein, Dan M.; Shine, Alisabeth; Reyfman, Paul; Kaufman, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective Handoff is an intra-disciplinary process, yet the flow of critical handoff information spans multiple disciplines. Understanding this information flow is important for the development of computer-based tools that supports the communication and coordination of patient care in a multi-disciplinary and highly specialized critical care setting. We aimed to understand the structure, functionality, and content of nurses’ and physicians’ handoff artifacts. Design We analyzed 22 nurses’ and physicians’ handoff artifacts from a Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) at a large urban medical center. We combined artifact analysis with semantic coding based on our published Interdisciplinary Handoff Information Coding (IHIC) framework for a novel two-step data analysis approach. Results We found a high degree of structure and overlap in the content of nursing and physician artifacts. Our findings demonstrated a non-technical, yet sophisticated, system with a high degree of structure for the organization and communication of patient data that functions to coordinate the work of multiple disciplines in a highly specialized unit of patient care. Limitations This study took place in one CTICU. Further work is needed to determine the generalizability of the results. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the development of semi-structured patient-centered interdisciplinary handoff tools with discipline specific views customized for specialty settings may effectively support handoff communication and patient safety. PMID:22142947

  19. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Amanda S; Blucker, Ryan T; Thornberry, Timothy S; Hetherington, Carla; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Methods Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Results Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Conclusion Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. Relevance This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and implementation, as well as key considerations for institutions initiating such a program. PMID:26937199

  20. Incidence and impact of infection in a nursing home care unit.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, C; Strausbaugh, L J

    1990-06-01

    In this study we examined the frequency of infection and its consequences in a Veterans Administration medical center nursing home care unit during its first 9 months of operation. A total of 231 patients were enrolled and were followed up for an average stay of 115 days. Sixty-nine infections occurred in 50 patients and yielded a period prevalence rate of 22% and an infection incidence rate of 2.6 infections per 1000 days of patient care. Symptomatic urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin and soft tissue infections accounted for 41%, 32%, and 17% of the infections, respectively. Staphylococci, streptococci, and aerobic gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacterial isolates. Thirty-four episodes of infection (49%) required administration of parenteral antibiotics in the nursing home care unit, and 21 episodes (30%) necessitated transfer to the acute care hospital for management. Infection caused one death and contributed to the death of 4 of the 55 other patients who died during the study period. PMID:2363537

  1. Effect of PACS/CR on cost of care and length of stay in a medical intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlotz, Curtis P.; Kundel, Harold L.; Brikman, Inna; Pratt, Hugh M.; Redfern, Regina O.; Horii, Steven C.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    1996-05-01

    Our purpose was to determine the economic effects associated with the introduction of PACS and computed radiology (CR) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Clinical and financial data were collected over a period of 6 months, both before and after the introduction of PACS/CR in our medical intensive care unit. Administrative claims data resulting from the MICU stay of each patient enrolled in our study were transferred online to our research database from the administrative databases of our hospital and its affiliated clinical practices. These data included all charge entries, sociodemographic data, admissions/discharge/transfer chronologies, ICD9 diagnostic and procedure codes, and diagnostic related groups. APACHE III scores and other case mix adjusters were computed from the diagnostic codes, and from the contemporaneous medical record. Departmental charge to cost ratios and the Medicare Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule were used to estimate costs from hospital and professional charges. Data were analyzed using both the patient and the exam as the unit of analysis. Univariate analyses by patient show that patients enrolled during the PACS periods were similar to those enrolled during the Film periods in age, sex, APACHE III score, and other measures of case mix. No significant differences in unadjusted median length of stay between the two Film and two PACS periods were detected. Likewise, no significant differences in unadjusted total hospital and professional costs were found between the Film and PACS periods. In our univariate analyses by exam, we focused on the subgroup of exams that had triggered primary clinical actions in any period. Those action-triggering exams were divided into two groups according to whether the referring clinician elected to obtain imaging results from the workstation or from the usual channels. Patients whose imaging results were obtain from the workstation had significantly lower professional costs in the 7 days

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder among spouses of patients discharged from the intensive care unit after six months.

    PubMed

    Dithole, Kefalotse; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria; Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-01-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be traumatic, not only for patients, but also their closest relatives, especially spouses. Within Botswana, a developing country with very few ICUs and not so sophisticated machinery or a generalised lack of counselling for relatives, the ICU experience can be more traumatic. This study reports on the proportion of spouses who continued to experience mental distress, including the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder, at six months after the discharge of their spouse from an intensive care unit. Mixed data collected approaches were used on a convenience sample of 28 spouses of patients who had been hospitalised at the Princess Marina Hospital ICU, Gaborone, Botswana, in the six months prior to the interview sessions. Participants were interviewed six months after the discharge of their spouse from the Intensive Care Unit using the PCL-S (PTSD Checklist). All the patients had been mechanically ventilated and had been hospitalised in the ICU for more than three days. Fifteen spouses reported intrusive memories of ICU and avoided reminders of the experience six months later. Ten spouses reported feeling anxious for a short while after their spouse's discharge but that they had come to terms with the experience. In order to mitigate the trauma experienced by spouses the study suggests that pre- and post-counselling for close relatives, especially spouses, should be implemented at the point of hospitalisation, during admission, and after discharge for a period of at least six months. PMID:23301567

  3. Indications and outcome for obstetric patients' admission to intensive care unit: a 7-year review.

    PubMed

    Lataifeh, I; Amarin, Z; Zayed, F; Al-Mehaisen, L; Alchalabi, H; Khader, Y

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to investigate the indications, interventions and clinical outcome of pregnant and newly delivered women admitted to the multidisciplinary intensive care unit at the King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan over a 7-year period from January 2002 to December 2008. The collected data included demographic characteristics of the patients, mode of delivery, pre-existing medical conditions, reason for admission, specific intervention, length of stay and maternal outcome. A total of 43 women required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), which represented 0.37% of all deliveries. The majority (95.3%) of patients were admitted to the ICU postpartum. The most common reasons for admissions were (pre)eclampsia (48.8%) and obstetric haemorrhage (37.2). The remainder included adult respiratory distress syndrome (6.9%), pulmonary embolism (2.3%) and neurological disorders (4.6%). Mechanical ventilation was required to support 18.6% of patients and transfusion of red blood cells was needed for 48.8% of patients. There were three maternal deaths (6.9%). A multidisciplinary team approach is essential to improve the management of hypertensive disorders and postpartum haemorrhage to achieve significant improvements in maternal outcome. A large, prospective study to know which women are at high risk of admission to the intensive care units and to prevent serious maternal morbidity and mortality is warranted. PMID:20455722

  4. Use of scores to calculate the nursing workload in a pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Campagner, Andriza Oliveira Moschetta; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos; Piva, Jefferson Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance of the Nursing Activities Score in a pediatric intensive care unit, compare its scores expressed as time spent on nursing activities to the corresponding ones calculated using the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System, and correlate the results obtained by both instruments with severity, morbidity and mortality. Methods Prospective, observational, and analytical cohort study conducted at a type III general pediatric intensive care unit. The study participants were all the children aged 29 days to 12 years admitted to the investigated pediatric intensive care unit from August 2008 to February 2009. Results A total of 545 patients were studied, which corresponded to 2,951 assessments. The average score of the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System was 28.79±10.37 (915±330 minutes), and that of the Nursing Activities Score was 55.6±11.82 (802±161 minutes). The number of minutes that resulted from the conversion of the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System score was higher compared to that resulting from the Nursing Activities Score for all the assessments (p<0.001). The correlation between the instruments was significant, direct, positive, and moderate (R=0.564). Conclusions The agreement between the investigated instruments was satisfactory, and both instruments also exhibited satisfactory discrimination of mortality; for that purpose, the best cutoff point was 16 nursing hours/patient day. PMID:24770687

  5. End-of-life practices in a tertiary intensive care unit in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aldawood, Abdulaziz S; Alsultan, Mohammad; Arabi, Yaseen M; Baharoon, Salim A; Al-Qahtani, S; Al-Qahtani, M; Haddad, Samir H; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Jahdali, Hamdan A; Alatassi, Abdulaleem; Rishu, Asgar H

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate end-of-life practices in a tertiary intensive care unit in Saudi Arabia. A prospective observational study was conducted in the medical-surgical intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Over the course of the one-year study period, 176 patients died and 77% of these deaths were preceded by end-of-life decisions. Of these, 66% made do-not-resuscitate decisions, 30% decided to withhold life support and 4% withdrew life support. These decisions were made after a median time of four days (Q1 to Q3: 1 to 9) and at least one day before death (Q1 to Q3: 1 to 4). The patients' families or surrogates were informed for 88% of the decisions and all decisions were documented in the patients' medical records. Despite religious and cultural values, more than three-quarters of the patients whose deaths were preceded by end-of-life decisions gave do-not-resuscitate decisions before death. These decisions should be made early in the patients' stay in the intensive care unit. PMID:22313074

  6. Estimating Length of Stay by Patient Type in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Henry C; Bennett, Mihoko V; Schulman, Joseph; Gould, Jeffrey B; Profit, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    Objective Develop length of stay prediction models for neonatal intensive care unit patients. Study Design We used data from 2008 to 2010 to construct length of stay models for neonates admitted within 1 day of age to neonatal intensive care units and surviving to discharge home. Results Our sample included 23,551 patients. Median length of stay was 79 days when birth weight was < 1,000 g, 46 days for 1,000 to 1,500 g, 21 days for 1,500 to 2,500 g, and 8 days for ≥2,500 g. Risk factors for longer length of stay varied by weight. Units with shorter length of stay for one weight group had shorter lengths of stay for other groups. Conclusion Risk models for comparative assessments of length of stay need to appropriately account for weight, particularly considering the cutoff of 1,500 g. Refining prediction may benefit counseling of families and health care systems to efficiently allocate resources. PMID:26890437

  7. Is the intensive care unit traumatic? What we know and don't know about the intensive care unit and posttraumatic stress responses.

    PubMed

    McGiffin, Jed N; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2016-05-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) has been portrayed as psychologically stressful, with a growing body of research substantiating elevated rates of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other psychological disruptions in populations of critical care survivors. To explain these psychopathology elevations, some have proposed a direct effect of ICU admission upon the later development of psychopathology, whereas others highlight the complex interaction between the trauma of a life-threatening illness or injury and the stressful life-saving interventions often administered in the ICU. However, the conclusion that the ICU is an independent causal factor in trauma-related psychological outcomes may be premature. Current ICU research suffers from important methodological problems including lack of true prospective data, failure to employ appropriate comparison groups, sampling bias, measurement issues, and problems with statistical methodology. In addition, the ICU literature has yet to investigate important risk and resilience factors that have been empirically validated in the broader stress-response literature. The authors propose the application of these important constructs to the unique setting of the ICU. This review focuses on multiple aspects of the important but complex research question of whether the ICU confers risk for psychological distress above and beyond the traumatic impact of the serious health events that necessitate ICU treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27196855

  8. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tim; Schell, Carl Otto; Lugazia, Edwin; Blixt, Jonas; Mulungu, Moses; Castegren, Markus; Eriksen, Jaran; Konrad, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs) have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Tanzania. Methods and Findings Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001). A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 4.9 (2.9–8.3)). Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5–16.2)). In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02) giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94). Conclusion The introduction of a

  9. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany.

    PubMed

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina; Berkey, Douglas B

    2005-09-01

    This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition to perceived need, a variety of social and behavioral factors as well as general health factors have been identified as determinants of dental service use. Frail and functionally dependent elderly have special difficulties in accessing dental care; private dental practitioners are hesitant to provide dental care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people in Europe as well as in the United States. PMID:16141084

  10. Breast Cancer among Women Living in Poverty: Better Care in Canada than in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gorey, Kevin M.; Richter, Nancy L.; Luginaah, Isaac N.; Hamm, Caroline; Holowaty, Eric J.; Zou, GuangYong; Balagurusamy, Madhan K.

    2014-01-01

    This historical study estimated the protective effects of a universally accessible, single-payer health care system versus a multi-payer system that leaves many uninsured or underinsured by comparing breast cancer care of women living in high poverty neighborhoods in Ontario or California between 1996 and 2011. Women in Canada experienced better care particularly as compared to women who were inadequately insured in the United States. Women in Canada were diagnosed earlier (rate ratio [RR] = 1.12) and enjoyed better access to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.48), radiation (RR = 1.60) and hormone therapies (RR = 1.78). Women living in high poverty Canadian neighborhoods even experienced shorter waits for surgery (RR = 0.58) and radiation therapy (RR = 0.44) than did such women in the US. Consequently, women in Canada were much more likely to survive longer. Regression analyses indicated that health insurance could explain most of the better care and better outcomes in Canada. Over this study’s 15-year timeframe 31,500 late diagnoses, 94,500 sub-optimum treatment plans and 103,500 early deaths were estimated in high poverty US neighborhoods due to relatively inadequate health insurance coverage. Implications for social work practice, including advocacy for future reforms of US health care are discussed. PMID:26180488

  11. Child Care and School Performance in Denmark and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Esping-Andersen, Gosta; Garfinkel, Irwin; Han, Wen-Jui; Magnuson, Katherine; Wagner, Sander; Waldfogel, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Child care and early education policies may not only raise average achievement but may also be of special benefit for less advantaged children, in particular if programs are high quality. We test whether high quality child care is equalizing using rich longitudinal data from two comparison countries, Denmark and the United States. In Denmark, we find that enrollment in high-quality formal care at age 3 is associated with higher cognitive scores at age 11. Moreover, the findings suggest stronger effects for the lowest-income children and for children at the bottom of the test score distribution. In the US case, results are different. We find that enrollment in school or center based care is associated with higher cognitive scores at school entry, but the beneficial effects erode by age 11, particularly for disadvantaged children. Thus, the US results do not point to larger and more lasting effects for disadvantaged children. This may be because low income children attend poorer quality care and subsequently attend lower quality schools. PMID:24163491

  12. The perceived quality of interprofessional teamwork in an intensive care unit: A single centre intervention study.

    PubMed

    Van den Bulcke, Bo; Vyt, Andre; Vanheule, Stijn; Hoste, Eric; Decruyenaere, Johan; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes a study that evaluated the quality of teamwork in a surgical intensive care unit and assessed whether teamwork could be improved significantly through a tailor-made intervention. The quality of teamwork prior to and after the intervention was assessed using the Interprofessional Practice and Education Quality Scales (IPEQS) using the PROSE online diagnostics and documenting system, which assesses three domains of teamwork: organisational factors, care processes, and team members' attitudes and beliefs. Furthermore, team members evaluated strengths and weaknesses of the teamwork through open-ended questions. Information gathered by means of the open questions was used to design a tailor-made 12-week intervention consisting of (1) optimising the existing weekly interdisciplinary meetings with collaborative decision-making and clear communication of goal-oriented actions, including the psychosocial aspects of care; and (2) organising and supporting the effective exchange of information over time between all professions involved. It was found that the intervention had a significant impact on organisational factors and care processes related to interprofessional teamwork for the total group and within all subgroups, despite baseline differences between the subgroups in interprofessional teamwork. In conclusion, teamwork, and more particularly the organisational aspects of interprofessional collaboration and processes of care, can be improved by a tailor-made intervention that takes into account the professional needs of healthcare workers. PMID:27152533

  13. Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative and the relationship with exclusive breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Ana Lúcia Naves; de Oliveira, Maria Inês Couto; de Moraes, José Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and the association with the Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative. METHODS Cross-sectional study, whose data source were research on feeding behaviors in the first year of life conducted in the vaccination campaigns of 2003 and 2006, at the municipality of Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil. For the purposes of this study, infants under six months old, accounting for a total of 589 children in 2003 and 707 children in 2006, were selected. To verify the relationship between being followed-up by Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative units and exclusive breastfeeding practice, only data from the 2006 inquiry was used. Variables that in the bivariate analysis were associated (p-value ≤ 0.20) with the outcome (exclusive breastfeeding practice) were selected for multivariate analysis. Prevalence ratios (PR) of exclusive breastfeeding were obtained by Poisson Regression with robust variance through a hierarchical model. The final model included the variables that reached p-value ≤ 0.05. RESULTS The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding increased from 30.2% in 2003 to 46.7% in 2006. Multivariate analysis showed that mother's low education level reduced exclusive breastfeeding practice by 20.0% (PR = 0.798; 95%CI 0.684;0.931), cesarean delivery by 16.0% (PR = 0.838; 95%CI 0.719;0.976), and pacifier use by 41.0% (PR = 0.589; 95%CI 0.495;0.701). In the multiple analysis, each day of the infant's life reduced exclusive breastfeeding prevalence by 1.0% (PR = 0.992; 95%CI 0.991;0.994). Being followed-up by Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Initiative units increased exclusive breastfeeding by 19.0% (PR = 1.193; 95%CI 1.020;1.395). CONCLUSIONS Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative contributed to the practice of exclusive breastfeeding and to the advice for pregnant women and nursing mothers when implemented in the primary health care network.

  14. A prospective observational study assessing the outcome of Sepsis in intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, Peshawar

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Arslan Rahat; Hussain, Arshad; Ali, Iftikhar; Samad, Abdul; Ali Shah, Syed Tajammul; Yousef, Muhammad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The current study aims to explore the factors associated with outcome among patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, Northwest General Hospital and Research Centre, Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out at intensive care unit of our hospital from February 2014 to October 2015. Data was collected using a structured format and statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20®. Regression model was applied to identify the factors contributing to the outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock. P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the patients meeting the criteria of this study were male 147 (54.9%) with a mean age of 54.8. The most common source of sepsis was lung infections (42.2%) followed by urinary tract infections (18.7%), soft tissue infections (6.3%) abdominal infections (6%) and in 6.3% patients the source remained unknown. Further analysis has revealed that increase in number of days of hospitalization was observed to be slightly associated with the outcome of the treatment (1.086 [1.002 – 1.178], 0.046). Moreover, the risk of mortality was the higher among the patients with septic shock 22.161[10.055 – 48.840], and having respiratory, kidney and central nervous system complications. Overall it is seen that septic shock alone was found responsible to cause death among 32.0% of the patients (Model 1: R2 0.32, p=0.000), and upon involvement of the organ complications the risk of mortality was observed to 42.0%. Conclusion: Chances of recovery were poor among the patients with septic shock. Moreover, those patients having respiratory and urinary tract infection are least likely to survive. PMID:27375715

  15. Operating characteristics of residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, the majority of residential care communities had 4–25 beds, yet 71% of residents lived in communities with more than 50 beds. A lower percentage of communities with 4–25 beds were chain-affiliated, nonprofit, and in operation 10 years or more, compared with communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. Dementia-exclusive care or dementia care units were more common as community size increased. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for cognitive impairment and offered dementia-specific programming compared with communities with 4–25 and 26–50 beds. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for depression compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Compared with communities with 4–25 beds, a higher percentage of communities with 26–50 beds and more than 50 beds provided therapeutic, hospice, mental health, and dental services; but a lower percentage of communities with more than 50 beds provided skilled nursing services than did smaller communities. This report presents national estimates of residential care communities, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care communities provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residential care communities across different sizes. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/ nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care. PMID:25411834

  16. Phenotypic detection and molecular characterization of beta-lactamase genes among Citrobacter species in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Praharaj, Ashok Kumar; Khajuria, Atul; Kumar, Mahadevan; Grover, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the distribution, emergence, and spread of genes encoding beta-lactamase resistance in Citrobacter species isolated from hospitalized patients in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in a 1000-bed tertiary care center in Pune, India from October 2010 to October 2013. A total of 221 Citrobacter spp. isolates were recovered from clinical specimens from different patients (one isolate per patient) admitted to the surgical ward, medical ward and medical and surgical Intensive Care Units. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and sequencing were used to determine the presence of beta-lactamase encoding genes. Conjugation experiments were performed to determine their transferability. Isolate relatedness were determined by repetitive element based-PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Results: Among 221 tested isolates of Citrobacter spp. recovered from various clinical specimens, 179 (80.9%) isolates showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >4 μg/ml against meropenem and imipenem. One hundred and forty-five isolates with increased MICs value against carbapenems were further processed for molecular characterization of beta-lactamase genes. Susceptibility profiling of the isolates indicated that 100% retained susceptibility to colistin. Conjugation experiments indicated that blaNDM-1 was transferable via a plasmid. Conclusion: The ease of NDM-1 plasmid transmissibility may help their dissemination among the Citrobacter species as well as to others in Enterobacteriaceae. Early detection, antimicrobial stewardship and adequate infection control measures will help in limiting the spread of these organisms. PMID:26952135

  17. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC). Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization) and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management). The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories. Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC. PMID:26464837

  18. Integrated Operational Taxonomic Units (IOTUs) in Echolocating Bats: A Bridge between Molecular and Traditional Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Galimberti, Andrea; Spada, Martina; Russo, Danilo; Mucedda, Mauro; Agnelli, Paolo; Crottini, Angelica; Ferri, Emanuele; Martinoli, Adriano; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Nowadays, molecular techniques are widespread tools for the identification of biological entities. However, until very few years ago, their application to taxonomy provoked intense debates between traditional and molecular taxonomists. To prevent every kind of disagreement, it is essential to standardize taxonomic definitions. Along these lines, we introduced the concept of Integrated Operational Taxonomic Unit (IOTU). IOTUs come from the concept of Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) and paralleled the Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit (MOTU). The latter is largely used as a standard in many molecular-based works (even if not always explicitly formalized). However, while MOTUs are assigned solely on molecular variation criteria, IOTUs are identified from patterns of molecular variation that are supported by at least one more taxonomic characteristic. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the use of IOTUs on the widest DNA barcoding dataset of Italian echolocating bats species ever assembled (i.e. 31 species, 209 samples). We identified 31 molecular entities, 26 of which corresponded to the morphologically assigned species, two MOTUs and three IOTUs. Interestingly, we found three IOTUs in Myotis nattereri, one of which is a newly described lineage found only in central and southern Italy. In addition, we found a level of molecular variability within four vespertilionid species deserving further analyses. According to our scheme two of them (i.e. M. bechsteinii and Plecotus auritus) should be ranked as unconfirmed candidate species (UCS). Conclusions/Significance From a systematic point of view, IOTUs are more informative than the general concept of OTUs and the more recent MOTUs. According to information content, IOTUs are closer to species, although it is important to underline that IOTUs are not species. Overall, the use of a more precise panel of taxonomic entities increases the clarity in the systematic field and has the potential to fill the gaps

  19. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center. PMID:19174661

  20. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  1. Residential treatment centers and other organized mental health care for children and youth: United States, 1988.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, J H; Witkin, M J; Atay, J E; Manderscheid, R W

    1991-07-01

    Residential treatment centers (RTCs) for emotionally disturbed children are an important component of the mental health services delivery system in the United States. The 440 RTCs operating in 1988 represented 9 percent of all mental health organizations in the U.S. in that year. They served approximately 10 percent of the patients who received inpatient and residential treatment care and approximately 2 percent of outpatient psychiatric visits in organized settings. Their 39,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff and $1.3 billion expenditures were, respectively, 7 percent and 6 percent of the total for all mental health organizations. Between 1986 and 1988, the number of RTCs increased slightly, while the volume of residential treatment care changed little. However, partial care and outpatient care expanded in RTCs, with the number of visits in these categories increasing by 75 percent and 42 percent, respectively. FTE staff grew by 13 percent, and expenditures increased by 33 percent between 1986 and 1988. In 1988, RTCs were located in all States except North Dakota. The largest number were found in California (48), Massachusetts (38), and New York (28). By definition, all RTCs provided residential treatment care. About one-third of them also provided partial care and one-third provided outpatient care. The highest rates of additions to residential treatment care in RTCs per 100,000 civilian population were found in Minnesota and Colorado. Reflecting the role of RTCs as providers of care to children and youth, 94 percent of residential treatment patients in RTCs were under age 18. Seventy percent of residential treatment patients were male; 28 percent, black; and 10 percent, Hispanic. Approximately 94 percent had mental illness as their principal disability. In December 1988, 43,000 staff worked in RTCs; 14 percent were employed part-time, and 3 percent were trainees. Among others, the staff included approximately 900 psychiatrists, 300 other physicians, 1

  2. The road to patient experience of care measurement: lessons from the United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered care has become an increasing priority in the United States and plays a prominent role in recent healthcare reforms. One way the country has managed to advance patient-centered care is through establishment of a family of national patient experience surveys (the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Plans (CAHPS). CAHPS is publicly reported for several types of providers and was recently tied to hospital reimbursement. This is part of a trend over the last two decades that has shifted provider-patient relationships from a traditional paternal approach to customer service and then to clinical partnership. The health care system in Israel, however, is still struggling to overcome barriers to change in this area. While community based biannual patient experience surveys are conducted by the Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, there is no comprehensive national approach to measuring the patient experience across a broad range of settings. Only recently did the Israeli Ministry of Health take its first steps to include patient experience as a dimension of health care quality. In its current position, Israel should learn from the U.S. experience with policies promoting patient-centered care, and specifically the impact on clinical services of measuring the patient experience. Looking at what has happened in the United States, we suggest three main lessons. First, there is a need for a set of national patient experience surveys that would be publicly reported and eventually tied to provider reimbursement. Secondly, the national survey tools should be customized to the unique characteristics of Israeli society and draw from recent research on patient-centeredness to include new and important domains such as patient activation and shared decision-making. Finally, newer technological approaches should be explored with the aim of increasing response rates and the timeliness and usefulness of the surveys. PMID:24044672

  3. Inventory of Data Sources for Estimating Health Care Costs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Jennifer L.; Yabroff, K. Robin; Ibuka, Yoko; Russell, Louise B.; Barnett, Paul G.; Lipscomb, Joseph; Lawrence, William F.; Brown, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an inventory of data sources for estimating health care costs in the United States and provide information to aid researchers in identifying appropriate data sources for their specific research questions. Methods We identified data sources for estimating health care costs using 3 approaches: (1) a review of the 18 articles included in this supplement, (2) an evaluation of websites of federal government agencies, non profit foundations, and related societies that support health care research or provide health care services, and (3) a systematic review of the recently published literature. Descriptive information was abstracted from each data source, including sponsor, website, lowest level of data aggregation, type of data source, population included, cross-sectional or longitudinal data capture, source of diagnosis information, and cost of obtaining the data source. Details about the cost elements available in each data source were also abstracted. Results We identified 88 data sources that can be used to estimate health care costs in the United States. Most data sources were sponsored by government agencies, national or nationally representative, and cross-sectional. About 40% were surveys, followed by administrative or linked administrative data, fee or cost schedules, discharges, and other types of data. Diagnosis information was available in most data sources through procedure or diagnosis codes, self-report, registry, or chart review. Cost elements included inpatient hospitalizations (42.0%), physician and other outpatient services (45.5%), outpatient pharmacy or laboratory (28.4%), out-of-pocket (22.7%), patient time and other direct nonmedical costs (35.2%), and wages (13.6%). About half were freely available for downloading or available for a nominal fee, and the cost of obtaining the remaining data sources varied by the scope of the project. Conclusions Available data sources vary in population included, type of data source, scope, and

  4. Implementation of smart pump technology in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia C; de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; González-Vives, Leticia; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo-Álvarez, Ángel; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María; Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia M

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety is a matter of major concern that involves every health professional. Nowadays, emerging technologies such as smart pumps can diminish medication errors as well as standardise and improve clinical practice with the subsequent benefits for patients. The aim of this paper was to describe the smart pump implementation process in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and to present the most relevant infusion-related programming errors that were prevented. This was a comparative study between CareFusion Alaris Guardrails(®) and Hospira MedNet(®) systems, as well as a prospective and intervention study with analytical components carried out in the PICU of Gregorio Marañón General and Teaching Hospital. All intravenous infusions programmed with a pump in the eleven beds of the unit were analyzed. A drug library was developed and subsequently loaded into CareFusion and Hospira pumps that were used during a three month period each. The most suitable system for implementation was selected according to their differences in features and users' acceptance. Data stored in the pumps were analyzed to assess user compliance with the technology, health care setting and type of errors intercepted. The implementation process was carried out with CareFusion systems. Compliance with the technology was 92% and user acceptance was high. Vacation substitution and drug administration periods were significantly associated with a greater number of infusion-related programming errors. High risk drugs were involved in 48% of intercepted errors. Based on these results we can conclude that implementation of smart pumps proved effective in intercepting infusion-related programming errors from reaching patients. User awareness of the importance of programming infusions with the drug library is the key to succeed in the implementation process. PMID:24496443

  5. Fast, sensitive point of care electrochemical molecular system for point mutation and select agent detection.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, J A; Nemeth, A C; Dicke, W C; Wang, D; Manalili Wheeler, S; Hannis, J C; Collier, G B; Drader, J J

    2016-07-01

    Point of care molecular diagnostics benefits from a portable battery-operated device capable of performing a fast turnaround using reliable inexpensive cartridges. We describe a prototype device for performing a molecular diagnostics test for clinical and biodefense samples in 16 minutes using a prototype capable of an 8 minute PCR reaction, followed by hybridization and detection on an electrochemical microarray based on the i-STAT® system. We used human buccal swabs for hemochromatosis testing including in-device DNA extraction. Additional clinical and biodefense samples included influenza A and bacterial select agents Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis. PMID:27280174

  6. Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae pathogens isolated from intensive care units and surgical units in Russia.

    PubMed

    Partina, Irina; Kalinogorskaya, Olga; Kojima, Satoshi; Gostev, Vladimir; Volkova, Marina; Ageevets, Vladimir; Lobzin, Yuri; Sidorenko, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A total of 473 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia spp. and Providencia spp., were isolated from patients admitted to intensive care units and surgical units in Russia. About 90% of the isolates carried factors resistant to beta-lactams. The isolation rates of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producer defined in this study among E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 45%, 48% and 17%, respectively. In the settings with high prevalence of the ESBL producer, flomoxef, which belongs to the oxacephem subgroup, and carbapenems retain their activity. The MIC₅₀ of flomoxef, meropenem and imipenem against total isolates were 1 µg/mL, ≤ 0.063 µg/mL and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. Fifty-five carbapenem-resistant strains were isolated in this study. The carbapenem resistant rates of E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 3%, 16% and 29%, respectively PMID:27290829

  7. eyeGENE®: a vision community resource facilitating patient care and paving the path for research through molecular diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Blain, D; Goetz, KE; Ayyagari, R; Tumminia, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetics and genomics are revolutionizing the study and treatment of inherited eye diseases. In recognition of the impact of molecular genetics on vision and ophthalmology, the National Eye Institute established the National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE®) as a multidirectional research initiative whereby a clinical component for patients diagnosed with inherited eye disease fosters research into the causes and mechanisms of these ophthalmic diseases. This is accomplished by broadening access to genetic diagnostic testing and maintaining a repository of DNA samples from clinically characterized individuals and their families to allow investigations of the causes, interventions, and management of genetic eye disorders. The eyeGENE® Network currently includes Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified diagnostic laboratory partners, over 270 registered clinical organizations with 500 registered users from around the United States and Canada, and is now testing approximately 100 genes representing 35 inherited eye diseases. To date, the Network has received 4400 samples from individuals with rare inherited eye diseases, which are available for access by the vision research community. eyeGENE® is a model partnership between the U.S. federal government, eye health care providers, CLIA-approved molecular diagnostic laboratories, private industry, and scientists who represent a broad research constituency. PMID:23662816

  8. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity

  9. Acinetobacter infections prevalence and frequency of the antibiotics resistance: comparative study of intensive care units versus other hospital units

    PubMed Central

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Frikh, Mohammed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Bssaibis, Fatna; Belefquih, Bouchra; Maleb, Adil; Dahraoui, Souhail; Belyamani, Lahcen; Bait, Abdelouahed; Haimeur, Charki; Louzi, Lhoussain; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to determine the Acinetobacter sp clinical isolates frequency and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern by comparing results obtained from the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to that of other units at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Methods This is a retrospective study over a 2-years period where we collected all clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp obtained from samples for infection diagnosis performed on hospitalized patients between 2012 to 2014. Results During the study period, 441 clinical and non-repetitive isolates of Acinetobacter sp were collected representing 6.94% of all bacterial clinical isolates (n = 6352) and 9.6% of Gram negative rods (n = 4569). More than a half of the isolates were from the ICUs and were obtained from 293 infected patients of which 65, 2% (191 cases) were males (sex ratio = 1.9) and the median age was 56 years (interquartile range: 42-68 years). Acinetobacter clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples (44.67%) followed by blood cultures (14.51%). The resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin / tazobactam, imipenem, amikacin, tobramycin, netilmicin, rifampicin and colistin was respectively 87%, 86%, 79%, 76%; 52%, 43%, 33% 32% and 1.7%. The difference in resistance between the ICUs and the other units was statistically significant (p <0.05) except for colistin, tetracycline and rifampicin. Conclusion This paper shows that solving the problem of prevalence and high rate of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infection which represents a therapeutic impasse, requires the control of the hospital environment and optimizing hands hygiene and antibiotics use in the hospital. PMID:27347280

  10. Sources of Stress for Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units of East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Farnam, Alireza; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Bafandehzendeh, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is one of the main factors affecting one's efficiency as well as staff health and quality of nursing services. Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) can be stressful environments for nurses, infants and families as well. Since there is no evidence in this regard in Iran, the present study aimed to determine stress levels related to care delivering in NICU from the viewpoint of nurses in NICUs of East Azerbaijan Province, Iran during 2011. Methods: This was a descriptive study including a purposive sample of 110 nurses working in NICUs of hospitals in East Azerbaijan Province. The data collection tool was a self-report questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by content validity and Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α = 0.84). Results: According to factor analysis, the stressors included environmental and nurse and human factors. Stress sources in total and separately in each category were reported as moderate. The mean and 95% confidence interval of the factors in the categories were 2.75 (0.84); 2.59-2.91 and 3.21 (0.72); 3.07-3.35, respectively. Therefore, human factors caused significantly higher levels of stress compared to environmental factors (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Stressors involved in NICU nursing include environmental and human factors. Planning to remove or reduce their impact can improve the quality of nursing services in intensive care units and, thus, decrease the adverse effects of stress on workers. PMID:25276702

  11. Hyponatremia in the intensive care unit: How to avoid a Zugzwang situation?

    PubMed

    Rafat, Cédric; Flamant, Martin; Gaudry, Stéphane; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte derangement in the setting of the intensive care unit. Life-threatening neurological complications may arise not only in case of a severe (<120 mmol/L) and acute fall of plasma sodium levels, but may also stem from overly rapid correction of hyponatremia. Additionally, even mild hyponatremia carries a poor short-term and long-term prognosis across a wide range of conditions. Its multifaceted and intricate physiopathology may seem deterring at first glance, yet a careful multi-step diagnostic approach may easily unravel the underlying mechanisms and enable physicians to adopt the adequate measures at the patient's bedside. Unless hyponatremia is associated with obvious extracellular fluid volume increase such as in heart failure or cirrhosis, hypertonic saline therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic of profound or severely symptomatic hyponatremia. When overcorrection of hyponatremia occurs, recent data indicate that re-lowering of plasma sodium levels through the infusion of hypotonic fluids and the cautious use of desmopressin acetate represent a reasonable strategy. New therapeutic options have recently emerged, foremost among these being vaptans, but their use in the setting of the intensive care unit remains to be clarified. PMID:26553121

  12. Safety of peripheral administration of phenylephrine in a neurologic intensive care unit: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Tim; Wolfe, Brianne; Davis, Gary; Ansari, Safdar

    2016-08-01

    Integral to the management of the neurocritically injured patient are the prevention and treatment of hypotension, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure, and occasionally blood pressure augmentation. When adequate volume resuscitation fails to meet perfusion needs, vasopressors are often used to restore end-organ perfusion. This has historically necessitated central venous access given well-documented incidence of extravasation injuries associated with peripheral administration of vasopressors. In this pilot study, we report our 6-month experience with peripheral administration of low-concentration phenylephrine (40 μg/mL) in our neurocritical care unit. We were able to administer peripheral phenylephrine, up to a dose of 2 μg/(kg min), for an average of 14.29hours (1-54.3) in 20 patients with only 1 possible minor complication and no major complications. This was achieved by adding additional safety measures in our computerized physician order entry system and additional nurse-driven safety protocols. Thus, with careful monitoring and safety precautions, peripheral administration of phenylephrine at an optimized concentration appears to have an acceptable safety profile for use in the neurocritical care unit up to a mean infusion time of 14hours. PMID:27288620

  13. Patient and staff dosimetry during radiographic procedures in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rosario; Moreno-Torres, Miguel; Contreras, Antonia M; Núñez, María I; Guirado, Damián; Peñas, Luis

    2015-09-01

    The performance of radiography in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) may be associated with a certain level of radiation exposure for staff and patients in the unit. Little evidence on exposure levels is available in the literature. However, healthcare professionals in the ICUs at our centre tend to leave the room during radiographic examinations, potentially compromising patient care. The objectives of this study were to quantify dose levels within the ICU and to evaluate the performance of ICU x-ray studies according to patient dose measurements. This study was conducted in the 18-bed ICU of a third-level hospital. The scattering radiation due to mobile x-ray examinations was measured by using four personal thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDs). The dose area product (DAP) was measured at each examination using a transmission chamber installed on the diaphragm of the x-ray equipment. Based on the TLD readings and taking account of the error margin, the annual dose to patients and staff was less than 0.6 mSv. The value given by the DAP meter for chest x-rays was 94  ±  17 mGy cm(2); this value is well below the lower limit recommended by different agencies and committees. Exposure levels were found to be extremely low and pose no apparent risk to staff or to those in beds adjacent to the patients undergoing x-ray examinations, which were correctly performed in the unit. PMID:26344655

  14. Designing a biocontainment unit to care for patients with serious communicable diseases: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip W; Anderson, Arthur O; Christopher, George W; Cieslak, Theodore J; Devreede, G J; Fosdick, Glen A; Greiner, Carl B; Hauser, John M; Hinrichs, Steven H; Huebner, Kermit D; Iwen, Peter C; Jourdan, Dawn R; Kortepeter, Mark G; Landon, V Paul; Lenaghan, Patricia A; Leopold, Robert E; Marklund, Leroy A; Martin, James W; Medcalf, Sharon J; Mussack, Robert J; Neal, Randall H; Ribner, Bruce S; Richmond, Jonathan Y; Rogge, Chuck; Daly, Leo A; Roselle, Gary A; Rupp, Mark E; Sambol, Anthony R; Schaefer, Joann E; Sibley, John; Streifel, Andrew J; Essen, Susanna G Von; Warfield, Kelly L

    2006-01-01

    In spite of great advances in medicine, serious communicable diseases are a significant threat. Hospitals must be prepared to deal with patients who are infected with pathogens introduced by a bioterrorist act (e.g., smallpox), by a global emerging infectious disease (e.g., avian influenza, viral hemorrhagic fevers), or by a laboratory accident. One approach to hazardous infectious diseases in the hospital setting is a biocontainment patient care unit (BPCU). This article represents the consensus recommendations from a conference of civilian and military professionals involved in the various aspects of BPCUs. The role of these units in overall U.S. preparedness efforts is discussed. Technical issues, including medical care issues (e.g., diagnostic services, unit access); infection control issues (e.g., disinfection, personal protective equipment); facility design, structure, and construction features; and psychosocial and ethical issues, are summarized and addressed in detail in an appendix. The consensus recommendations are presented to standardize the planning, design, construction, and operation of BPCUs as one element of the U.S. preparedness effort. PMID:17238819

  15. Information Specificity Vulnerability: Comparison of Medication Information Flows in Different Health Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Eeva; Raitoharju, Reetta

    Information on patient's medication is often vital especially when patient's condition is critical. However, the information does not yet move freely between different health care units and organizations. Before reaching the point of putting into practice any system that makes the inter-organizational medication information transmission possible, some prerequisites and characteristics of the information in different user organization should be defined. There are for instance units with different level of urgency and data/information intensity (e.g. emergency department vs. medical floor). The higher the urgency level, the more vulnerable the medication information flow is to different discontinuation situations. As a conceptual framework, a scoring system based on the asset specificity in the transaction cost theory and previous literacy on information flows of different health care units is created to define the vulnerability of the information flows. As there is a national medication database under planning, the scoring system could be used to assess the prerequisites for the medication database in Finland.

  16. Strategies for overcoming site and recruitment challenges in research studies based in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chlan, Linda; Guttormson, Jill; Tracy, Mary Fran; Bremer, Karin Lindstrom

    2009-09-01

    Although enrolling a sufficient number of participants is a challenge for any multisite clinical trial, recruiting patients who are critically ill and receiving mechanical ventilatory support presents additional challenges because of the severity of the patients' illness and the impediments to their communication. Recruitment challenges related to the research sites, nursing staff, and research participants faced in the first 2 years of a 4-year multisite clinical trial of a patient-directed music intervention for managing anxiety in the intensive care unit were determined. Strategies to overcome these challenges, and thereby increase enrollment, were devised. Individual strategies, such as timing of screening on a unit, were tailored to each participating site to enhance recruitment for this trial. Other strategies, such as obtaining a waiver for a participant's signature, were instituted across all participating sites. Through implementation of these various strategies, the mean monthly enrollment of participants increased by 50%. Investigators are advised to plan well in advance of starting recruitment for a clinical trial based in an intensive care unit, anticipate peaks and valleys in recruitment, and be proactive in addressing issues creatively as the issues arise. PMID:19723861

  17. Innovative Information Systems in the Intensive Care Unit, King Saud Medical City in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Saleem, Nouf; Al Harthy, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the experience of implementing innovative information technology to improve the quality of services in one of the largest Intensive Care Units in Saudi Arabia. The Intensive Care Units in King Saud Medical City (ICU-KSMC) is the main ICU in the kingdom that represents the Ministry of Health. KSMC's ICU is also considered one of the largest ICU in the world as it consists of six units with 129 beds. Leaders in KSMC's ICU have introduced and integrated three information technologies to produce powerful, accurate, and timely information systems to overcome the challenges of the ICU nature and improve the quality of service to ensure patients' safety. By 2015, ICU in KSMC has noticed a remarkable improvement in: beds' occupation and utilization, staff communication, reduced medical errors, and improved departmental work flow, which created a healthy professional work environment. Yet, ICU in KSMC has ongoing improvement projects that include future plans for more innovative information technologies' implementation in the department. PMID:26152977

  18. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care. PMID:27402986

  19. A survey of nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Hemmat, Faezeh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Zayeri, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is considered as the most important quality for healthcare. One of the main factors that play an important role in the promotion of healthcare institutes is patient safety. This study describes the nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 83 nurses working in neonatal intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were selected using purposive sampling. Data collection tools consisted of the demographic characteristics questionnaire and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software. Results: The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was “expectations and actions of the supervisor/manager in promoting safety culture.” The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was “frequency of error reporting.” 21.70% of the NICU nurses reported one or two incidents in their work units in the previous 12 months. Conclusions: In order to create and promote patient safety, appropriate management of resources and a correct understanding of patient safety culture are required. In this way, awareness of dimensions which are not acceptable provides the basic information necessary for improving patient safety. PMID:26257806

  20. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care. PMID:27402986