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Sample records for caries-affected primary tooth

  1. Physico-mechanical properties determination using microscale homotopic measurements: application to sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Orestes; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Bohaty, Brenda; Katz, J Lawrence

    2009-05-01

    Microscale elastic moduli, composition and density have rarely been determined at the same location for biological materials. In this paper, we have performed homotopic measurements to determine the physico-mechanical properties of a second primary molar specimen exhibiting sound and caries-affected regions. A microscale acoustic impedance map of a section through this sample was acquired using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Scanning electron microscopy was then used to obtain mineral mass fraction of the same section using backscattered images. Careful calibration of each method was performed to reduce system effects and obtain accurate data. Resorption, demineralization and hypermineralization mechanisms were considered in order to derive relationships between measured mineral mass fraction and material mass density. As a result, microscale mass density was determined at the same lateral resolution and location as the SAM data. The mass density and the acoustic impedance were combined to find the microscale elastic modulus and study the relationship between microscale composition and mechanical properties. PMID:19059013

  2. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. PMID:24913075

  3. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    PubMed Central

    Nuvvula, Sailavanya; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. Objective: to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. Conclusion: therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20–30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years. PMID:27143841

  4. Impacted Primary Tooth and Tooth Agenesis: A Case Report of Monozygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, A. Zeynep; Sumer, A. Pinar; Karaarslan, Emine

    2008-01-01

    In the present report, a case of 19 year-old monozygotic twin brothers with similar tooth agenesis and impacted primary teeth is presented. Both twins (HDH, DHH) had agenesis of ten and eleven teeth (respectively), third molars excluded, consistent with oligodontia and both had four impacted primary teeth and the permanent successors of all these primary teeth were congenitally missing. The occurrence of similarly located tooth agenesis and primary impacted teeth in monozygotic twins may suggest the influence of genetic factors in their etiology. In addition, primary tooth impaction may be related to congenitally missing tooth. PMID:19212538

  5. Current trends in primary tooth pulp therapy.

    PubMed

    Haney, Kevin L

    2007-10-01

    Pulp therapy in the primary dentition remains a technique generating a tremendous amount of study. Formocresol has been and continues to be the most commonly used intrapulpal medicament despite its known ability to escape the microcirculation of the pulp. Ferric sulfate has gained significant favor as a result of formocresol's disadvantages, though at the cost of requiring a much more acute awareness of the potential for remaining disease and its ability to mask that process. Mineral trioxide aggregate perhaps offers the best immediate alternative to either of the above though at this time it is still cost-prohibitive in a practice that actively treats many children. And, as MTA has no fixative properties of its own, accurately analyzing the extent of the pulpal disease becomes even more critical to the overall success of the procedure. As with other techniques in dentistry, the debate is sure to continue for severl years to come. PMID:18019933

  6. Primary Cilia Integrate Hedgehog and Wnt Signaling during Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Chen, S.; Cheng, D.; Jing, W.; Helms, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1Cre+Kif3afl/fl embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development. PMID:24659776

  7. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P <0.001). No significant correlation was observed between the eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times. PMID:26236432

  8. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Cynthia Soares de; Trung, Luciana Cardoso Espejo; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Freitas, Anderson Zanardi de; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4): G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm) with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air). Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively) were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm) 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained. PMID:22031053

  9. Esthetic management of a primary double tooth using a silicone putty guide: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ravi; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2013-03-01

    The term double tooth is often used to describe fusion and gemination. The development of isolated large or joined teeth is not rare, but the literature is confusing when the appropriate terminology is presented. The objective of this paper is to present a case of a primary double tooth in a 5-year-old girl with a history of trauma. The tooth was endodontically treated and esthetic management was carried out using a silicone putty guide. PMID:23600163

  10. Bonding to sound vs caries-affected dentin using photo- and dual-cure adhesives.

    PubMed

    Say, Esra Can; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Senawongse, Pisol; Soyman, Mübin; Ozer, Füsun; Tagami, Junji

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of photo- and dual-cure adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentin using total- and self-etch techniques. Human third molars with occlusal caries were prepared as previously described by Nakajima and others (1995). Dentin surfaces were bonded with Optibond Solo Plus (Kerr; photo-cure adhesive) or Optibond Solo Plus + Dual-cure activator (Kerr; dual-cure adhesive) with total- and self-etch technique. Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray) was used for composite buildups. Following storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slices to obtain sound and caries-affected dentin slabs, then trimmed to form hour glass shapes with a 1 mm2 cross-sectional area. The specimens were subjected to microtensile testing using EZ-test (Shimadzu) at 1 mm/minute. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-Test (p<0.05). Bond strengths to sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives using total- and self-etch techniques were significantly higher than those to caries-affected dentin. Dual-cure adhesive significantly decreased bond strengths both to sound and caries-affected dentin. The total-etch technique showed no beneficial effect on caries-affected dentin compared with the self-etch technique. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the resin-dentin interfaces revealed that hybrid layers in caries-affected dentin were thicker than those observed in sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives. Resin infiltration into dentinal tubules of caries-affected dentin was hampered by the presence of mineral deposits. PMID:15765963

  11. Timing of emergence of the first primary tooth in preterm and full-term infants.

    PubMed

    Pavičin, Ivana Savić; Dumančić, Jelena; Badel, Tomislav; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Variations in the timing of emergence of primary teeth are under strong genetic control, but there is also a significant contribution from external factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of preterm birth, birth weight and length, and feeding practices during the first 6 months of life on the timing of emergence of the first primary tooth. Data on pregnancy duration, birth weight and length, feeding practice, time of emergence and first emerged primary tooth were collected by electronic questionnaires. The study included 409 parents and 592 children of both genders. The sample was divided into two groups according to pregnancy duration (<37 weeks and ≥37 weeks), three groups according to feeding practice (exclusively breastfed, exclusively bottle fed, and a combination of breast feeding and bottle feeding), three groups by birth length (<50, 50-53, >53cm), and four groups by birth weight (<1500, 1500-2500, 2501-3500, >3500g). Data were analyzed considering chronological and postmenstrual age-which is the gestational age plus the infant's chronological age at the month of emergence of the first primary tooth. The mean time of first primary tooth emergence was 7.55±2.67 months when chronological age was considered. The first emerged tooth in most cases was a lower incisor (82.33%). There was a statistically significant difference in the timing of the first tooth emergence between preterm and full-term groups when chronological age was considered (p<0.005). However, no difference was found when age was adjusted. The age of emergence of the first tooth differed significantly when feeding, weight, and length groups (p<0. 05) were taken into account. In conclusion, the study indicates that shortened gestational age and very low birth weight are predictors for later ages of emergence of the first primary tooth. PMID:26123712

  12. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Bond strength was significantly influenced by dentin type (F = 38.23; P = 0.0001) and hemostatic agent (F = 6.32; P = 0.001). Furthermore, groups 2 and 6 (ViscoStat) showed significantly lower bond strength values than the control groups (groups 1 and 5) in both affected and sound dentin (P = 0.043 and P = 0.009, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, the bond strength of composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength. PMID:27367640

  13. Bell's palsy following primary tooth extraction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Owsley, David; Goldsmith, Jay P

    2012-04-01

    Bell's palsy is characterized by acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Unilateral paralysis of CN 7 is reported in 20 to 30 people out of 100,000 in the general population. It affects individuals of all ages. Most cases are idiopathic, while a few are identified as resulting from infectious or non-infectious causes. The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and Bell's palsy has been considered since the 1970s. Few cases have been reported after tooth extraction. PMID:22803274

  14. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Maria D.; Jeremias, Fabiano; Cordeiro, Rita C. L.; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption) that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm). The apparent tooth length (APTL) was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0), whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL) was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson's correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P ≤ 0.48) between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length. PMID:25802894

  15. The effects of periradicular inflamation and infection on a primary tooth and permanent successor.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodriguez; Rocha, Maria Jose de Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Primary teeth and the permanent successors must be understood as interdependent units, where each one of them interacts with and depends on each other. Pulpal inflammation/infection of a primary tooth and the spread of this condition over the periradicular tissues can lead to alterations in the dental germ of the permanent successor and to the surrounding structures if no therapy is done, i.e. endodontics or extraction. This work will present cases of permanent teeth that showed alteration in eruption and / or in development, as a consequence of inflammation / infection of the preceding primary teeth, such as: hypoplasia, morphological alteration on the dental crown or total arrest of. radicular formation. The teeth analysed in this study belong to patients who attended the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Children's Dentistry Clinic. The earlier these lesions are diagnosed, the less were the destructive effects and the consequences on the primary tooth/permanent germ unit. PMID:15926433

  16. Developmental changes in primary cilia in the mouse tooth germ and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory apparatus, functions as both a chemical and mechanical sensor to receive environmental stimuli. The present study focused on the primary cilia in the epithelialmesenchymal interaction during tooth development. We examined the localization and direction of projection of primary cilia in the tooth germ and oral cavity of mice by immunohistochemical observation. Adenylyl cyclase 3 (ACIII)-immunolabeled cilia were visible in the inner/outer enamel epithelium of molars at the fetal stage and then conspicuously developed in the odontoblast layer postnatally. The primary cilia in ameloblasts and odontoblasts-shown by the double staining of acetylated tubulin and γ-tubulin-were regularly arranged from postnatal Day12, projecting apart from each other. The periodontal ligament possessed ACIII-positive cilia, which gathered on both sides of the dentin/cement and alveolar bone in postnatal days. In the oral cavity, numerous long primary cilia immunoreactive for ACIII were condensed at subepithelial stromal cells in the oral processes in fetuses, while postnatally a small number of short cilia were dispersed throughout the stroma of the oral cavity. These findings suggest that the primary cilia showing stage- and regionspecific morphology are involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during tooth development via mechano- and/or chemoreception for growth factors. PMID:27356608

  17. Tablet fluoridation influences the calcification of primary tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, E A; Hopfenmüller, W; Ammar, S

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of long-term tablet fluoridation on primary pulp calcification by light microscopy. Twenty-four caries-free primary molars (after continuous postpartally initiated 1- to 10-year tablet fluoridation) were compared to 17 primary molars of children without fluoride prophylaxis. Pulp calcification in children with tablet fluoridation was significantly more frequent and more pronounced than in untreated children (p = 0.001). Besides the known pulp stones, the prophylaxis group evidenced a special form of calcification consisting of fibrodentin-like hard tissue not observed in the untreated children. These hard tissue bodies developed "intramurally" on the pulp floor and the inside of the dental roots with an irregular extramural spread into the coronal and radicular pulp by displacement and fibrotization of the pulp tissue. Moreover, some of the teeth had more or less extensive areas of interglobular dentin. The affected teeth were ankylosed in the area of the bi- and trifurcation and on the inside of the roots and were thus infra-occluded. Although the duration of tablet fluoridation has no statistically significant influence on pulp calcification, there is a correlation between extensive pulp calcification, postnatally initiated fluoride prophylaxis and the infraocclusion of primary molars. PMID:11227204

  18. Russell bodies in the pulp of a primary tooth.

    PubMed

    Tagger, E; Tagger, M; Sarnat, H

    2000-09-01

    Russell bodies can be found in the majority of the inflamed tissues throughout the body. They have been shown to consist of accumulations of normal globulins that may burst out of the distended plasma cells that secrete them. Russell bodies have also been described in oral tissues and are believed to occur in 80% of the chronic periapical lesions. Yet their occurrence in the pulp has not been subjected to scrutiny. Concentrations of large intracellular (in-plasma cells) and extracellular Russell bodies have been found in the inflammatory tissue occupying the pulp cavity of carious primary teeth. Their significance is so far unknown. PMID:10982960

  19. Dental caries affects body weight, growth and quality of life in pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Sheiham, A

    2006-11-25

    The effect of a relatively common chronic disease, severe dental caries, affects young childrens' growth and well-being. Treating dental caries in pre-school children would increase growth rates and the quality of life of millions of children. Severe untreated dental caries is common in pre-school children in many countries. Children with severe caries weighed less than controls, and after treatment of decayed teeth there was more rapid weight gain and improvements in their quality of life. This may be due to dietary intake improving because pain affected the quantity and variety of food eaten, and second, chronic inflammation from caries related pulpitis and abscesses is known to suppress growth through a metabolic pathway and to reduce haemoglobin as a result of depressed erythrocyte production. PMID:17128231

  20. Effect of foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel after erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Scatena, Camila; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrialised foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel previously eroded with hydrochloric acid (HCl). The crowns of one hundred two specimens were subjected to an erosive challenge with HCl and randomly divided into six groups (n = 17): Chocolate Milk (Toddynho® - Pepsico) - negative control; Petit Suisse Yogurt (Danoninho® - Danone); Strawberry Yogurt (Vigor); Apple puree (Nestlé); Fermented Milk (Yakult® - Yakult); and Home Squeezed Style Orange Juice (del Valle) - positive control. The 28-day immersion cycles for the test products were performed twice daily and were interspersed with exposure of the test substrate to artificial saliva. Measurements of enamel surface microhardness (SMH) were performed initially, after immersion in HCl and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of experimentation. A two-way ANOVA, according to a split-plot design, followed by the sum of squares decomposition and Tukey's test, revealed a significant effect for the interaction between Foods and Drinks and Length of Exposure (p < 0.00001). Orange juice resulted in greater mineral loss of enamel after 28 days. None of the test products was associated with recovery of tooth enamel microhardness. PMID:26247516

  1. Bleaching a devital primary tooth using sodium perborate with walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye; Sonmez, Hayriye

    2009-05-01

    Nowadays, both children and parents place a greater value on appearance and aesthetics than has previously been the case. Primary teeth with intrinsic discoloration may be treated by a number of methods, including facings and abrasion. However, dental bleaching may offer a safer alternative that can be completed with less chair time and without harming dental structures. This case report describes the treatment of a darkened primary tooth of a 4-year-old boy with sodium perborate using the walking bleach technique and its 1-year clinical and radiographical follow-up. During this 1-year follow-up period, no signs of any pathology were observed either clinically (sensitivity to percussion or palpation, fistulae, color change) or radiographically (external or internal root resorption, apical radiolucency). In this study, using sodium perborate with the walking bleach technique is found to be successful in whitening primary teeth and can be recommended as a safe alternative for the bleaching of devital primary teeth with intrinsic discoloration. PMID:19426913

  2. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  3. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances.

    PubMed

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J; Tobias, Jon H; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I; Toma, Arshed M; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A; Ring, Susan M; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M

    2013-09-15

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 'age at first tooth' and 11 loci for 'number of teeth'. Together, these associations explain 6.06% of the variation in 'age of first tooth' and 4.76% of the variation in 'number of teeth'. The identified loci included eight previously unidentified loci, some containing genes known to play a role in tooth and other developmental pathways, including an SNP in the protein-coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10(-17)). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy for detecting variants involved in tooth eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development. PMID:23704328

  4. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Carolina; FERNANDES, Fernando Pelegrim; FREITAS, Valeria da Penha; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; TURSSI, Cecilia Pedroso; AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract), applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10): NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area) and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. Conclusion It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control) had any effect on bond strength after water storage. PMID:27383701

  5. Genome-wide association study reveals multiple loci associated with primary tooth development during infancy.

    PubMed

    Pillas, Demetris; Hoggart, Clive J; Evans, David M; O'Reilly, Paul F; Sipilä, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Millwood, Iona Y; Kaakinen, Marika; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Blane, David; Charoen, Pimphen; Sovio, Ulla; Pouta, Anneli; Freimer, Nelson; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Laitinen, Jaana; Vaara, Sarianna; Glaser, Beate; Crawford, Peter; Timpson, Nicholas J; Ring, Susan M; Deng, Guohong; Zhang, Weihua; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena; Elliott, Paul; Coin, Lachlan J M; Smith, George Davey; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2010-02-01

    Tooth development is a highly heritable process which relates to other growth and developmental processes, and which interacts with the development of the entire craniofacial complex. Abnormalities of tooth development are common, with tooth agenesis being the most common developmental anomaly in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study of time to first tooth eruption and number of teeth at one year in 4,564 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966) and 1,518 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We identified 5 loci at P<5x10(-8), and 5 with suggestive association (P<5x10(-6)). The loci included several genes with links to tooth and other organ development (KCNJ2, EDA, HOXB2, RAD51L1, IGF2BP1, HMGA2, MSRB3). Genes at four of the identified loci are implicated in the development of cancer. A variant within the HOXB gene cluster associated with occlusion defects requiring orthodontic treatment by age 31 years. PMID:20195514

  6. Primary tooth emergence in Polish children: timing, sequence and the relation between morphological and dental maturity in males and females.

    PubMed

    Zadzińska, Elzbieta; Nieczuja-Dwojacka, Joanna; Borowska-Sturgińska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was an assessment of differences between boys and girls in the process of emergence of primary teeth. This paper also provides updated data on the timing and sequence of primary tooth emergence in Polish children. The research were conducted in the years 2004-2008, and covered 865 children (437 boys and 428 girls) aged 3 to 36 months from all nursery and randomly selected "Healthy Child Clinics" in Lodz (central Poland). The first and last primary tooth emerged, on average: in boys at 6.24 months and 24.75 months respectively; in girls at 7.07 months and 24.21 months respectively. All incisors and the first upper molars erupted significantly earlier in boys. Typical order of teeth emergence--central incisor, lateral incisor, first molar, canine, second molar--was observed in 86.36% of boys and in 89.47% of girls. The interdependence between the morphological and the dental criterion of biological maturity during the completion of primary teeth was very strong in both sexes (stronger in boys). The regression equations for the estimation of the number of erupted primary teeth based on child's chronological age, body height and body mass were proposed separately for boys and for girls. PMID:23590109

  7. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    PubMed Central

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J.; Tobias, Jon H.; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I.; Toma, Arshed M.; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ring, Susan M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of ‘age at first tooth’ and ‘number of teeth’ using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) for ‘age at first tooth’ and 11 loci for ‘number of teeth’. Together, these associations explain 6.06% of the variation in ‘age of first tooth’ and 4.76% of the variation in ‘number of teeth’. The identified loci included eight previously unidentified loci, some containing genes known to play a role in tooth and other developmental pathways, including an SNP in the protein-coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10−17). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy for detecting variants involved in tooth eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development. PMID:23704328

  8. Intra-coronal bleaching in young permanent and primary tooth with biologic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya S; Barjatya, Khushboo; Agrawal, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    The odd attracts society in odd manner, as is the case when a patient with discolored tooth smiles. Because of that, pediatric patients have psychological impact. Trauma and pulpal necrosis are the most common causes for discoloration of teeth. If tooth is intact, intra-coronal bleaching is the most conservative and noninvasive treatment modality provided, it is done cautiously. This article intends to present two case-reports of successful intra-coronal bleaching using milder (sodium perborate) and tissue-friendly bleaching agent with walking bleach. PMID:22046690

  9. Application of 17% EDTA Enhances Diffusion of (45)Ca-labeled OH(-) and Ca(2+) in Primary Tooth Root Canal.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Marcos; Cavalcanti Taguchi, Carolina Mayumi; Triches, Thaisa Cezaria; Sartori, Neimar; Pereira Dias, Luis Alberto; de Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti; Cardoso, Mariane

    2016-01-01

    Proper cleaning of the root canal is key to the success of endodontic treatment as it allows more effective diffusion of medication throughout the dentinal tubules. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the efficacy of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in enhancing diffusion of hydroxyl (OH(-)) and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) throughout the root canal in primary teeth. The canals of 25 primary tooth roots were cleaned with endodontic files and 1% sodium hypochlorite. Three groups (G) were then established: GI, in which final irrigation was performed with 1% sodium hypochlorite; GII, in which 17% EDTA was used; and GIII, in which no irrigation was performed. The roots canals in GI and GII were filled with a calcium hydroxide-based paste labeled with the radioisotope calcium-45. Diffusion of OH(-) was detected with pH strips and Ca(2+) analyzed by measuring radioactivity in counts per min. Group II differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of OH(-) at 24 hr (p<0.05), but no significant difference among groups was found at the day 7 evaluation; GII also differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of Ca(2+) at 24 hr (p<0.05). These results suggest that application of 17% EDTA in primary tooth enhances diffusion of OH(-) and Ca(2+). PMID:26961333

  10. Zirconia-Prefabricated Crowns for Pediatric Patients With Primary Dentition: Technique and Cementation for Esthetic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, many clinicians tend to forego esthetic considerations when full-coverage restorations are indicated for pediatric patients with primary dentitions. However, the availability of new zirconia pediatric crowns and reliable techniques for cementation makes esthetic outcomes practical and consistent when restoring primary dentition. Two cases are described: a 3-year-old boy who presented with severe early childhood caries affecting both anterior and posterior teeth, and a 6-year-old boy who presented with extensive caries of his primary posterior dentition, including a molar requiring full coverage. The parents of both boys were concerned about esthetics, and the extent of decay indicated the need for full-coverage restorations. This led to the boys receiving treatment using a restorative procedure in which the carious teeth were prepared for and restored with esthetic tooth-colored zirconia crowns. In both cases, comfortable function and pleasing esthetics were achieved. PMID:27608199

  11. Self-etching zinc-doped adhesives improve the potential of caries-affected dentin to be functionally remineralized.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if mechanical cycling influences bioactivity at the resin-carious dentin interface after bonding with Zn-doped self-etching adhesives. Caries-affected dentin surfaces were bonded with: Clearfil SE bond (SEB), and 10 wt. % ZnO nanoparticles or 2 wt. % ZnCl2 were added into the SEB primer or bonding components. Bonded interfaces were stored during 24 h and then tested or submitted to mechanical loading. Microtensile bond strength was assessed. Debonded dentin surfaces were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Remineralization of the bonded interfaces was evaluated through nanohardness (Hi) and Young's modulus (Ei), Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, and Masson's trichrome staining technique. New precipitation of minerals composed of zinc-base salts and multiple Zn-rich phosphate deposits was observed in samples infiltrated with the Zn-doped adhesives. At the hybrid layer, specimens treated with ZnO incorporated in the primer (SEB·P-ZnO), after load cycling, attained the highest Ei and Hi. Load cycling increased Ei at the bottom of the hybrid layer when both, SEB undoped and SEB with ZnCl2 included in the bonding (SEB·Bd-ZnCl2), were used. ZnO incorporated in the primer promoted an increase in height of the phosphate and carbonate peaks, crystallinity, relative mineral concentration, and lower collagen crosslinking. ZnCl2 included in the bonding attained similar results, but relative mineral concentration decreased, associated to higher crosslinking and restricted collagen maturation. In general, a substantial restoration of the mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin substrata occurred when SEB-Zn doped adhesives were used and load cycled was applied, leading to functional and biochemical remineralization. PMID:26178264

  12. Effect of Tooth Preparation on Microleakage of Stainless Steel Crowns Placed on Primary Mandibular First Molars with Reduced Mesiodistal Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Ranjbar, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Incomplete adaptation of stainless steel crown margins leads to microleakage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth preparation on microleakage of stainless steel crowns (SSCs) placed on mesiodistally reduced primary mandibular first molars. Materials and Methods: In this In vitro study, 60 primary mandibular first molars with reduced mesiodistal dimension were selected. Pulp cavities were filled with amalgam and occlusal surfaces were reduced. The samples were randomly divided into two groups (groups P and BLP). Standard preparation was done in group P with only proximal reduction. In group BLP, after reducing the proximal undercuts, buccal and lingual surfaces were slightly reduced. Occlusal one-third of the buccal surfaces was beveled in both groups. Then, the SSCs of the primary maxillary and mandibular first molars were fitted and cemented in P and BLP groups, respectively. After immersing the samples into deionized water, thermo-cycling, and immersion in 2% basic fuchsin, the samples were sectioned buccolingually. The mesial halves were evaluated microscopically for microleakage in both buccal and lingual margins. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test in SPSS 19 at the significant level of 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in microleakage of the buccal margin (P=0.003); whereas, the difference observed in the lingual margin was not significant (P=0.54). Conclusion: We suggest reduction of buccal and lingual surfaces of mesiodistally reduced primary mandibular first molars and placing lower (mandibular) crowns. PMID:26005450

  13. Postendodontic restoration of severely decayed primary tooth using modified omega loop as a post

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ruchi; Raiyani, Chirag M.; Singh, Vikram; Katageri, Abhinandan Anand

    2016-01-01

    The esthetic concern of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth in the case of early childhood caries has been a challenge to pediatric dentist. Early childhood caries is the most common chronic disease of the preschool child. The case report presented here is of a three year old boy with severely decayed maxillary anterior teeth. After root canal treatment, the primary maxillary central incisors were reinforced using modified omega post and followed by using celluloid strip crowns. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring severely decayed primary anterior teeth that reestablishes shape, function, and esthetics. PMID:27003983

  14. Postendodontic restoration of severely decayed primary tooth using modified omega loop as a post.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ruchi; Raiyani, Chirag M; Singh, Vikram; Katageri, Abhinandan Anand

    2016-01-01

    The esthetic concern of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth in the case of early childhood caries has been a challenge to pediatric dentist. Early childhood caries is the most common chronic disease of the preschool child. The case report presented here is of a three year old boy with severely decayed maxillary anterior teeth. After root canal treatment, the primary maxillary central incisors were reinforced using modified omega post and followed by using celluloid strip crowns. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring severely decayed primary anterior teeth that reestablishes shape, function, and esthetics. PMID:27003983

  15. Effects of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on external adaptation of restorations in caries-affected cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Tonetto, Mateus; Coelho Bandéca, Matheus; Henrique Borges, Alvaro; Souza Pinto, Shelon Cristina; Cury Saad, José Roberto; Alves de Campos, Edson; de Toledo Porto Neto, Sizenando; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the external adaptation of composite resin restorations in caries-affected cavities. Mixed class V cavity preparations were performed in 36 intact human third molars, in half of which caries was artificially induced. Both healthy and carious dentin were etched with 35% phosphoric acid (Ultradent Products Inc., South Jordan, Utah, USA), and the teeth were divided into three groups, i.e., (a) untreated etched dentin, (b) application of the Er, Cr:YSGG laser and (c) use of chlorhexidine as an adjunct in the bonding process. Restorations were fabricated with Z350 XT FiltekTM composite resin (3M ESPE) and subsequently the specimens were subjected to thermocycling to simulate artificial ageing. Quantitative analysis of external adaptation was performed by scanning electron microscopy in both healthy and affected dentin using epoxy resin replicas. It was concluded that the application of laser and chlorhexidine did not affect the percentages of marginal adaptation of class V restorations. Furthermore, thermocycling may influence adaptation values.

  16. Microtensile and Microshear Bond Strength of an Antibacterial Self-Etching System to Primary Tooth Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Sibel; Tosun, Gül; Koyutürk, Alp Erdin; Şener, Yaḡmur; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Özer, Füsun; Imazato, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the bonding ability of antibacterial bonding system to primary dentin was not different from the parental material which did not contain any antibacterial component. Methods Extracted human non-carious primary molars were ground to expose the coronal dentin, and then randomly divided into two experimental groups: treatment with Clearfil Protect Bond or with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical Inc.). Composite-dentin sticks with a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.90 mm2 were prepared and subsequently subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and microshear bond strength (μSBS) tests. For the μTBS tests, specimens were attached to an Instron testing machine with a cyanoacrylate adhesive. For μSBS testing, the sticks were mechanically fixed to the μSBS testing apparatus. The bonds were stressed in shear or tension at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min until failure occurred. Resin-dentin interfaces produced by each system were examined using SEM. The data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney’s U test. Results The μTBS and μSBS of Clearfil Protect Bond were 30.69±9.71 and 9.94±3.78 MPa, respectively. Clearfil SE Bond showed significantly greater values of 37.31±9.57 and 12.83±3.15 MPa, respectively. SEM analysis demonstrated similar micro-morphological features including the thickness of the hybrid layer for both materials. Conclusions It was showed that antibacterial self-etching system Clearfil Protect Bond showed lower bond strength values compared to primary dentin than that of to Clearfil SE Bond on primary dentin. (Eur J Dent 2008;2:11–17) PMID:19212503

  17. EFFECT OF ADDING TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE TO FLUORIDE MOUTHRINSE ON MICROHARDNESS OF DEMINERALIZED PRIMARY HUMAN TOOTH.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Phuekcharoen, Pimonchat

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride mouthrinse containing tricalcium phosphate on microhardness of demineralized primary enamel. Thirty-six sound primary incisors were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.4) for 96 hours at 37 degrees C to create artificial caries-like lesions. After artificial caries formation, the specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups (with 12 specimens in each group): Group A: deionized water; Group B: 0.05% NaF plus 20 ppm tricalcium phosphate mouthrinse and Group C: 0.05% NaF mouthrinse. All the specimens were immersed for 1 minute at 37 degrees C three times per day for 7 days in the respective mouthrinse among pH cycling. The surface microhardness was examined using a Vickers hardness tester (100 grams for 15 seconds) at baseline, before and after the pH-cycling procedure. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests with a significance level of 0.05. After treatment, Group Ahad a significantly lower surface microhardness value than the other two groups (p=0.000); however, there was no significant difference between Groups B and C (p=0.728). We concluded fluoride mouthrinse containing tricalcium phosphate and fluoride mouthrinse have similar remineralizing effects on microhardness of demineralized primary teeth. PMID:26521528

  18. Impact of CO2 laser and stannous fluoride on primary tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cristiane Tomaz; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the effect of input power of CO2 laser, either associated or not to stannous fluoride (SnF2) gel, for the control of intrinsic erosion in primary teeth. One hundred four enamel slabs (3 × 3 × 2 mm) from human primary molars were flattened and polished. Adhesive tapes were placed on their surface leaving a window of 3 × 1 mm. Slabs were then cycled four times in 0.01 M hydrochloric acid (pH 2, 2 min) and in artificial saliva (2 h) for creation of erosive lesions. Specimens were randomly assigned into eight groups (n = 13) according to fluoride application [absent (control) or 0.4 % stannous fluoride gel (SnF2)] and input power of CO2 laser [unlased (control), 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 W]. The CO2 laser irradiation was performed in an ultra-pulse mode (100 μs of pulse duration), 4-mm working distance, for 10 s. Specimens were then submitted to further erosive episodes for 5 days and evaluated for enamel relative permeability. Fluoride did not show any protective effect for any of the laser-treated groups or control (p = 0.185). However, a significant effect was detected for input power of CO2 laser (p = 0.037). Tukey's test showed that there was a significant statistically difference between specimens irradiated with 0.5 and 1.5 W (p = 0.028). The input power of 0.5 W showed lower permeability. Variation of input power CO2 laser can influence enamel permeability, at the power of 1.5 W which promoted greater permeability. PMID:26886587

  19. Experimental study of iron and multivitamin drops on enamel microhardness of primary tooth

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Nilgoon; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Mottaghi, Fattane; Tavassoli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron and multivitamin drops are being frequently prescribed in children less than 2 years of age. Due to their low pH levels, these drops may lead to the softening of enamel and accelerate the destructive process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enamel microhardness of primary teeth after exposing them to iron and multivitamin drops. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 10 samples each. Samples were exposed to two iron drops of Kharazmi (Iran) and Ironorm (UK) and two multivitamin drops of Shahdarou (Iran) and Eurovit (Germany) for 5 min. The surface microhardness was measured before and after exposure and data processing was done using statistical paired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The surface structure of the teeth was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In all groups, microhardness was decreased, but it was not significant in Eurovit multivitamin group (P = 0.088). The reduction rate in Kharazmi iron group was significant compared to that in other groups (P < 0.005). Hardness reduction percent for Kharazmi iron drop was 28/12 ± 47/43. In SEM analysis, irregular granular appearance was observed in the enamel exposed to Kharazmi iron drop. Conclusion: The results showed that all the studied drugs have the potential to cause erosion; this potential is the most in Kharazmi iron drop and the least in Eurovit multivitamin drops. Therefore, after using these kinds of drops, preventive measures should be used in children. PMID:26759808

  20. Efficacy of using Carisolv in the removal of decayed tooth structure in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Analia Veitz; Congiusta, Marie A

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Web of Science and Scopus were searched using a unique search strategy.Study selectionTwo authors independently reviewed and selected Clinical Trials, Randomised Clinical trials and Controlled Trials assessing the efficacy on primary dentition of Carisolv compared to traditional caries removal with drilling instruments. Only studies where total caries removal in each group was completed using Carisolv systems or rotary instruments used without any time limit were considered suitable. Studies assessing the complete caries removal by different methods from the clinical criteria selected (ie using a sharp probe) were excluded.Data extraction and synthesisThe outcomes considered for the review were: the caries removal rate (binary yes/no), the time required to complete the tissue removal (continuous) and the pain threshold during the procedure, assessed through the need for local anaesthesia by the patients (binary yes/no).For dichotomous data Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated along with 95% Confidence intervals (CIs) and for continuous data, the Mean Difference (MD) with 99% Confidence Intervals (CIs) was calculated. Meta-analysis was performed with studies analysing the same outcomes.ResultsFrom 195 studies identified, 28 were analysed. Ten met eligibility criteria. The trials included involved a total of 348 patients for 532 treated teeth. Three studies evaluated clinical efficacy in caries removal. When the data were collected in a meta-analysis no statistically significant difference was observed in regard of the clinical efficacy between Carisolv and the rotary instruments (p= 0.50, OR= 0.33 95% CI 0.01-8.22).In seven studies the length of time to perform the procedures was evaluated and data analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01, MD 310.92, 99 % CI 234.57- 387.27) with the Carisolv system, which required a greater amount of time than the conventional drill technique. With regard to pain threshold, a near

  1. Tooth abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling within the tooth. This causes a painful toothache . The toothache may stop if the pulp of the tooth ... tissue. Symptoms The main symptom is a severe toothache. The pain is continuous. It can be described ...

  2. Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... made of a hard, bonelike material. Inside the tooth are nerves and blood vessels. You need your ... These include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include ...

  3. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Lingen MW. Head and neck. In: Kumar ...

  4. Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include problems ... with your teeth. Fortunately, you can prevent many tooth disorders by taking care of your teeth and keeping ...

  5. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    The part of the tooth you can see is called the crown. The outer surface of the crown is made of enamel. Just beneath the ... The gum surrounds the base (root) of the tooth. The root of the tooth extends down into ...

  6. Tooth extraction

    MedlinePlus

    ... hole where the tooth was, causing bleeding and pain. This is called dry socket. To care for your mouth: Begin gently brushing and flossing your other teeth the day after your surgery. Avoid the area near the open ...

  7. Tooth Problems

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    ... to determine if you need to see your dentist right away. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here ... You have TOOTH LOSS. DENTAL EMERGENCY See your dentist or go to the emergency room right away. ...

  8. Broken or knocked out tooth

    MedlinePlus

    Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC. Management of dental injuries and reimplantation of an avulsed tooth. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  9. Effect of erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on surface micro-hardness of primary tooth enamel

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Pandey, Annu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of Er, Cr: YSGG laser and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on surface micro-hardness of primary tooth enamel. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 freshly extracted caries free primary anterior teeth were cleaned and stored in 1% thymol. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin such that only their buccal surfaces were exposed and were divided into four groups. Group I: Five intact teeth (negative control). The remaining 25 teeth were immersed for 30 min in 1% citric acid for demineralization. Group II: Five demineralized teeth (positive control), Group III: CPP-ACP (GC tooth mousse-GC International, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan) application and Group IV: Etching using Er, Cr: YSGG laser + CPP-ACP application. Groups III and IV were subjected to pH cycling for 5 days. Surface micro-hardness of all the teeth was measured using Brinell hardness tester (Fuel Instruments and Engineers Pvt. Ltd.). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results: Mean surface micro-hardness of Groups I and II were 177.43 kgf/mm2 and 164.86 kgf/mm2, respectively. Group IV showed a higher mean surface micro-hardness (230.68 kgf/mm2) compared with that of Group III (190.28 kgf/mm2). In comparison to all other groups, laser etching prior to CPP-ACP application increased surface micro-hardness significantly (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Laser irradiation of primary teeth followed by CPP-ACP application increased surface micro-hardness of enamel. PMID:25202223

  10. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  11. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  12. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  13. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or appear as spots or ... the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... include: Congenital diseases Environmental factors Infections ...

  14. Impacted tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Unerupted tooth References Buttaravoli P, Leffler SM, eds. Dental pain, pericoronitis. Minor Emergencies . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 46. Read More Abscess ... Updated by: Ilona Fotek, DMD, MS, Palm Beach Prosthodontics Dental Associates, West Palm Beach, FL. Review provided by ...

  15. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  16. Caries in the infundibulum of the second upper premolar tooth in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Torbjörn S; Dahlén, Gunnar G; Wattle, Ove S

    2007-01-01

    Background Swedish equine dental practices have empirically found that the prevalence of infundibular caries as a primary disorder in the first permanent premolar teeth (P2) of the horse upper jaw has increased during the last 10 years. A previously unknown bacterial species, Streptococcus devriesei (CCUG 47155T), which is related to Streptococcus mutans, has recently been isolated from these carious lesions. To understand the aetiology of caries in horses, it is essential to elucidate the relationship between S. devriesei and P2 infundibular caries. Methods The anterior infundibulum of maxillary P2, or the occlusal surface at the site of the infundibulum, in 117 horses and ponies, 77 with and 40 without caries in this tooth, was sampled for bacteriological analyses between 1990 and 2004. Samples were transported in VMGA III medium and then inoculated onto MSB agar. The approximate number of bacteria was counted in each sample and the isolates were characterised biochemically, using a commercial kit. Results All 50 samples taken from carious lesions after 2002 were positive for an S. mutans-like strain, i.e. S. devriesei. The bacteria were also found in four of the control animals, but were much less numerous than in samples from caries-affected horses. None of the swabs taken prior to 2002 were positive for this bacteria. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that S. devriesei can colonise the infundibulum of P2 of the horse upper jaw, which can be fatal for the dental tissue. We conclude that S. devriesei is strongly associated with P2 caries in horses. PMID:17391523

  17. Effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive with caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength in total-etch versus self-etch adhesive systems in caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Forty class II cavities were prepared on extracted proximally carious human mandibular first molars and were divided into two groups: Group I — self-etch adhesive system restorations and Group II — total-etch adhesive system restorations. Group I and II were further divided into sub-groups A (Without thermal and mechanical loading) and B (With thermal and mechanical loading of 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2°C to 55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 seconds, and 150,000 cycles at 60N). The gingival margin of the proximal box was evaluated at 200X magnification for marginal adaptation in a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. The restorations were sectioned, perpendicular to the bonded surface, into 0.8 mm thick slabs. All the specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using descriptive studies, and the bond strength data was analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results and Conclusions: The total-etch system performed better under thermomechanical loading. PMID:21691507

  18. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  19. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  20. Acoustic comparison of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and dental high speed handpiece for primary anterior tooth preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorden, Monserrat; Chen, Jung-Wei; Easley, Elisabeth; Li, Yiming; Kurti, R. Steven

    The acoustics of a dental hard tissue laser (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a traditional dental high speed hand piece (Midwest®, Dentsply International, USA) were compared in vitro using a simple approach that can be easily adapted for in vivo studies. Thirty one extracted caries and restoration free primary anterior teeth were selected. These teeth were sectioned along a symmetry axis to give two identical halves for use in a split study. These halves were randomly assigned to either the laser (experimental) or the high speed (control) group. A miniature electret microphone was coupled to the sample using a polymer and used to collect the acoustic signal at the interface of the pulp chamber. This signal was captured periodically by a digitizing oscilloscope and multiple traces were stored for subsequent analysis. 2x1x1mm3 preparations were made according to manufacturers recommendations for the given method. Each cavity was prepared by the same clinician and calibration tests were performed to ensure consistency. The measurements indicated that the peak acoustic pressures as well as cumulative acoustic effects (due to duty cycle) were significantly higher (P<0.001, T-test) with the dental hand piece than with the dental laser. Our study suggests the need for further investigations into the neurological implications of acoustic effects in dental patient care such as pain studies.

  1. Tooth whitening in children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J; Donly, Adriana Segura; Baharloo, Laila; Rojas-Candelas, Edith; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Zhou, Xiaojie; Gerlach, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Although there are several case reports of vital tooth bleaching in children, there is limited clinical trial evidence of the safety or efficacy of this practice. Accordingly, a new clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of 2 different bleaching systems, a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip system and a 10% carbamide peroxide tray system, in a population of preteens and teens. A total of 106 volunteers, aged 11 to 18 years, took part in this 8-week study. Patients were randomized by a ratio of 2:1 to the strip or tray groups, with each group treating the maxillary arch first and then the mandibular arch for 4 consecutive weeks each. Individuals assigned to the strip group used the system twice daily for 30 minutes (a total of 56 contact hours over the 8-week study). Those assigned to the tray group used that system overnight (approximately 448 contact hours). Digital images were obtained at baseline and after every 2-week treatment period. Average tooth color was determined in L*, a*, b* color space, where L* indicated lightness, a* indicated red-green, and b* indicated yellow-blue. Both systems significantly whitened teeth (P < 0.0001). While there were no significant differences between groups with respect to the primary whitening response (delta b*) on the maxillary teeth, 4 weeks of overnight treatment with the 10% carbamide peroxide tray (approximately 224 contact hours) yielded statistically significant whitening (P < 0.05) on the mandibular teeth compared with the 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip used for 28 hours. Both tooth-whitening systems had similar sensitivity/irritation reported after instructed use. This research demonstrates that tooth whitening in teens may be safely accomplished using either the short-contact-time hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips or the overnight carbamide peroxide tray systems tested in this study. PMID:11913290

  2. Natural tooth as an interim prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, Neha S.; Gokhale, Niraj S.; Patel, Punit; Hugar, Shivayogi M.

    2016-01-01

    A traumatic injury to primary maxillary anterior tooth is one of the common causes for problems with the succedaneous tooth leading to it noneruption. A missing anterior tooth can be psychologically and socially damaging to the patient. Despite a wide range of treatment options available, sometimes, it is inevitable to save the natural tooth. This paper describes the immediate replacement of a right central incisor using a fiber-composite resin splint with the natural tooth crown as a pontic following surgical extraction of the dilacerated impacted permanent maxillary central incisor. The abutment teeth can be conserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible and can be completed at chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. It can be used as an interim measure until a definitive prosthesis can be fabricated as the growth is still incomplete. PMID:27433074

  3. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as when chewing or when tapped by a dental instrument. Pain in a tooth suggests tooth decay or gum ... fractured. Sinus congestion can cause similar symptoms of pain in the area of the upper ... CONSUMERS: ...

  4. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear as spots or lines in the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... Infections Inherited diseases may affect the thickness of enamel or the calcium or protein content of the ...

  5. Fractured tooth (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A tooth can be chipped or fractured during an accident or a bad fall. A tooth that is chipped or not badly fractured can usually be handled on a nonemergency basis. A tooth that is badly fractured may have exposed nerve ...

  6. Erosive tooth wear in children.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago S; Lussi, Adrian; Jaeggi, Thomas; Gambon, Dein L

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are more liable to erosive wear than permanent teeth. However, results from epidemiological studies imply that the primary dentition is less wear resistant than permanent teeth, possibly due to the overlapping of erosion with mechanical forces (like attrition or abrasion). Although low severity of tooth wear in children does not cause a significant impact on their quality of life, early erosive damage to their permanent teeth may compromise their dentition for their entire lifetime and require extensive restorative procedures. Therefore, early diagnosis of erosive wear and adequate preventive measures are important. Knowledge on the aetiological factors of erosive wear is a prerequisite for preventive strategies. Like in adults, extrinsic and intrinsic factors, or a combination of them, are possible reasons for erosive tooth wear in children and adolescents. Several factors directly related to erosive tooth wear in children are presently discussed, such as socio-economic aspects, gastroesophageal reflux or vomiting, and intake of some medicaments, as well as behavioural factors such as unusual eating and drinking habits. Additionally, frequent and excessive consumption of erosive foodstuffs and drinks are of importance. PMID:24993274

  7. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  8. [Tooth-pick? Picking the Right Tooth].

    PubMed

    Apicella, Lysann; Cassis, Paola Rodoni; Balestra, Brenno

    2016-01-20

    We report about an 80-year-old patient, who underwent the extraction of an upper molar tooth because of facial pain. In the course of time the patient developed a maxillary sinusitis in presence of an ectopic tooth. Given that the patient got fever, neck pain and -stiffness, a purulent meningitis was first suspected. The liquor analysis was normal and the CT-scan showed a calcification around the dens axis. We finally diagnosed a “Crowned Dens”-syndrome. PMID:26787332

  9. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... chap 304. Ribeiro NM, Ribeiro MA. Breastfeeding and early childhood caries: a critical review. J Pediatr (Rio J) . ...

  10. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... majority of patients with clefts will require full orthodontic treatment, especially if the cleft has passed through ... later replacement of the missing lateral incisor. During orthodontic treatment, an artificial tooth may be attached to ...

  11. Fracture tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra Nangalia; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This clinical case reports the management of two coronal tooth fracture cases that were successfully treated using tooth fragment reattachment using glass-fibre-reinforced composite post. PMID:23853012

  12. Evaluation of sealing ability two self-etching adhesive systems and a glass ionomer lining LC under composite restoration in primary tooth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Ananda Xavier; Duraisamy, Vinola; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Reddy, Venugopal; Rao, Arun Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the sealing ability of two self-etching adhesive systems and glass ionomer cement (GIC) lining Light cure (LC) under composite restorations in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities are prepared on the cervical third of the facial and lingual surfaces of primary molars. The specimens are then assigned into four experimental groups. The restored primary molars are stored in distilled water and subjected to thermocycling. Each section was examined using a stereomicroscope to assess dye penetration at the margin of the restoration and evaluated via pictures. Statistical Analysis Used: The degree of microleakage was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test and the intergroup significance by multiple comparison analysis. Results: The mean rank of the groups are Group I (Adper Prompt™ + Z−100) 19.44, Group II (UniFil BOND + Solare) 5.38, Group III (GIC lining LC + Z−100) 20.06, and Group IV (GIC lining LC + Solare) 21.13 with the P < 0.001. Conclusion: Composite resin restorations bonded with two-step self-etching adhesive system (UniFil Bond) exhibited lesser microleakage than one-step self-etching adhesive system (Adperprompt™) in primary teeth. PMID:26538910

  13. Dental plaque, preventive care, and tooth brushing associated with dental caries in primary teeth in schoolchildren ages 6–9 years of Leon, Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    del Socorro Herrera, Miriam; Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Minaya-Sánchez, Mirna; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Islas-Granillo, Horacio; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of various risk indicators for dental caries on primary teeth of Nicaraguan children (from Leon, Nicaragua) ages 6 to 9, using the negative binomial regression model. Material/Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect clinical, demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data from 794 schoolchildren ages 6 to 9 years, randomly selected from 25 schools in the city of León, Nicaragua. Clinical examinations for dental caries (dmft index) were performed by 2 trained and standardized examiners. Socio-demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were self-reported using questionnaires. Multivariate negative binomial regression (NBR) analysis was used. Results Mean age was 7.49±1.12 years. Boys accounted for 50.1% of the sample. Mean dmft was 3.54±3.13 and caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 77.6%. In the NBR multivariate model (p<0.05), for each year of age, the expected mean dmft decreased by 7.5%. Brushing teeth at least once a day and having received preventive dental care in the last year before data collection were associated with declines in the expected mean dmft by 19.5% and 69.6%, respectively. Presence of dental plaque increased the expected mean dmft by 395.5%. Conclusions The proportion of students with caries in this sample was high. We found associations between dental caries in the primary dentition and dental plaque, brushing teeth at least once a day, and having received preventive dental care. To improve oral health, school programs and/or age-appropriate interventions need to be developed based on the specific profile of caries experience and the associated risk indicators. PMID:24247119

  14. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  15. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  16. Immediate total tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Garber, D A; Salama, M A; Salama, H

    2001-03-01

    Successful implant placement at the time of extraction has been documented. Implant placement at the time of extraction was initially performed as a two-stage procedure often with barrier membranes and sophisticated second-stage surgical uncoverings. The authors describe the next generation of this technique, including atraumatic tooth removal with simultaneous root form, implant placement, and temporization at one appointment. This technique of "Immediate Total Tooth Replacement" allows for the maintenance of the bony housing and soft-tissue form that existed before extraction, while at the same time establishing a root form anchor in the bone for an esthetic restoration. PMID:11913258

  17. Comparative evaluation of the effect of different bonding agents on the ultramorphology of primary tooth dentin and the resin dentin interface

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Pallavi; Goswami, Mousumi; Mittal, Mudit; Chaudhary, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To analyze and compare the changes in the ultramorphology of dentin in primary teeth using different bonding agents and to study the resin/dentin interface produced by them. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 50 extracted human deciduous teeth were grounded to expose the dentin. The teeth were divided into two groups (A) For viewing surface morphology- 18 teeth divided into four groups: (a) for viewing dentinal morphology (3 teeth), (b) Scotchbond multi-purpose (5 teeth), (c) Adhe SE (5 teeth), (d) Futurabond (5 teeth). (B) For viewing interfacial morphology- 32 teeth divided into four groups with 8 teeth each: (a) Scotch Bond Multipurpose (3M, ESPE),), (b) Adhe Se (Vivadent), (c) Optibond All-in-One (Kerr), (d) Futurabond NR (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany). The adhesives were applied to each group following the manufacturer's instruction. All the samples were then prepared for viewing under SEM. Results: The photographs were graded using a four-step (0-3) scale method proposed by Ferrari et al. For Scotchbond, 12 (75%) were graded as 2 Grade 3 was observed in only 1 observation in the entire lot of materials. The results obtained for Adhe SE and Optibond AIO were similar, i.e. in 5 (31.25%) observations each the scores were 0 and in 11 (68.75%) observations each the scores were 1. In case of Futurabond, 3 (18.75%) observations were graded as 0 and 13 (81.25%) were graded as 1, thus showing a mean score of 0.81±0.40. Conclusion: Three- step bonding agent results in the complete removal of smear layer. While the self- etch approach is not efficient in removing the smear layer and opening of the dentinal tubules. The longest resin tags with lateral branches were seen in two groups- Scotch bond multipurpose and Optibond FL. PMID:23112484

  18. Pneumomediastinum after Tooth Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Ocakcioglu, Ilhan; Koyuncu, Serhat; Kupeli, Mustafa; Bol, Oguzhan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is defined as the presence of air in mediastinum. Pneumomediastinum can sometimes occur after surgery. Pneumomediastinum seen after dental procedures is rare. We presented the case of subcutaneous emphysema developed in the neck and upper chest after tooth extraction and discussed the possible mechanisms of pneumomediastinum. PMID:26989552

  19. The Wisdom Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Speck, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Physicians may often wonder about the basis on which dentists advocate removal of third molars. This article outlines indications for removal and for leaving the tooth in place. It also describes postoperative experiences according to the nature of the extractions. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:21289716

  20. The Rachitic Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nociti, Francisco H.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are mineralized organs composed of three unique hard tissues, enamel, dentin, and cementum, and supported by the surrounding alveolar bone. Although odontogenesis differs from osteogenesis in several respects, tooth mineralization is susceptible to similar developmental failures as bone. Here we discuss conditions fitting under the umbrella of rickets, which traditionally referred to skeletal disease associated with vitamin D deficiency but has been more recently expanded to include newly identified factors involved in endocrine regulation of vitamin D, phosphate, and calcium, including phosphate-regulating endopeptidase homolog, X-linked, fibroblast growth factor 23, and dentin matrix protein 1. Systemic mineral metabolism intersects with local regulation of mineralization, and factors including tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase are necessary for proper mineralization, where rickets can result from loss of activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Individuals suffering from rickets often bear the additional burden of a defective dentition, and transgenic mouse models have aided in understanding the nature and mechanisms involved in tooth defects, which may or may not parallel rachitic bone defects. This report reviews dental effects of the range of rachitic disorders, including discussion of etiologies of hereditary forms of rickets, a survey of resulting bone and tooth mineralization disorders, and a discussion of mechanisms, known and hypothesized, involved in the observed dental pathologies. Descriptions of human pathology are augmented by analysis of transgenic mouse models, and new interpretations are brought to bear on questions of how teeth are affected under conditions of rickets. In short, the rachitic tooth will be revealed. PMID:23939820

  1. Tooth patterning and evolution.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2012-12-01

    Teeth are a good system for studying development and evolution. Tooth development is largely independent of the rest of the body and teeth can be grown in culture to attain almost normal morphology. Their development is not affected by the patterns of movement or sensorial perception in the embryo. Teeth are hard and easily preserved. Thus, there is plenty of easily accessible information about the patterns of morphological variation occurring between and within species. This review summarises recent work and describes how tooth development can be understood as the coupling between a reaction-diffusion system and differential growth produced by diffusible growth factors: which growth factors are involved, how they affect each other's expression and how they affect the spatial patterns of proliferation that lead to final morphology. There are some aspects of tooth development, however, that do not conform to some common assumptions in many reaction-diffusion models. Those are discussed here since they provide clues about how reaction-diffusion systems may work in actual developmental systems. Mathematical models implementing what we know about tooth development are discussed. PMID:23266218

  2. Pneumomediastinum after Tooth Extraction.

    PubMed

    Ocakcioglu, Ilhan; Koyuncu, Serhat; Kupeli, Mustafa; Bol, Oguzhan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is defined as the presence of air in mediastinum. Pneumomediastinum can sometimes occur after surgery. Pneumomediastinum seen after dental procedures is rare. We presented the case of subcutaneous emphysema developed in the neck and upper chest after tooth extraction and discussed the possible mechanisms of pneumomediastinum. PMID:26989552

  3. I Lost My Tooth!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Diann

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the Internet Schoolhouse Web site and outlines a cross-curriculum (language arts, geography, social studies, health, art, and math) lesson plan for a grades K-3 telecommunications project in which students gather data about lost teeth and share tooth-fairy legends. Lists required hardware, software, and other materials and describes…

  4. Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper. PMID:23071971

  5. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  6. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  7. Gear tooth topological modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Isabelle, Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The topology of parallel axis gears, such as spur and helical gears is modified to produce quieter and more smoothly operating gear sets with more uniform load distribution. A finite element analysis of the gear in its operating mode is made to produce a plot of radial and tangential deflections of the pinion and gear tooth surfaces which will occur when the gears are loaded during operation. The resultant plot is then inverted to produce a plot, or set of coordinates, which will define the path of travel of the gear tooth grinding wheel, which path is a mirror image of the plot of the finite element analysis. The resulting gears, when subjected to operating loads, will thus be deflected tangentially and radially to their optimum operating, or theoretical true involute, positions so as to produce quieter, smoother, and more evenly loaded gear trains.

  8. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. PMID:19226602

  9. Two-year study of alternative conservative treatment modalities for early anterior permanent tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Tulunoğlu, Ozlem; Cinar, Cagdaş; Bal, Cenkhan; Bal, Bilge Turhan

    2010-11-01

    Premature tooth loss in children may consist of single or multiple, primary or permanent, and anterior or posterior units of the dentition. This tooth loss may be due to either trauma or caries and, in some cases, to congenital or genetic defects. With anterior tooth loss cases, there are several problems the dental practitioner must consider. These are space maintenance, masticatory function, speech and esthetic appearance. PMID:21226403

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of disorders passed down through families that affect the nerves outside the brain and ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth is one of the most common nerve-related disorders passed down through families (inherited). Changes to at least ...

  11. Diagnosis of erosive tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis 'erosion' is made from characteristic deviations from the original anatomical tooth morphology, thus distinguishing acid-induced tissue loss from other forms of wear. Primary pathognomonic features are shallow concavities on smooth surfaces occurring coronal from the enamel-cementum junction. Problems from diagnosing occlusal surfaces and exposed dentine are discussed. Indices for recording erosive wear include morphological as well as quantitative criteria. Currently, various indices are used, each having their virtues and flaws, making the comparison of prevalence studies difficult. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) is described, which is intended to provide an easy tool for research as well as for use in general dental practice. The cumulative score of this index is the sum of the most severe scores obtained from all sextants and is linked to suggestions for clinical management. In addition to recording erosive lesions, the assessment of progression is important as the indication of treatment measures depends on erosion activity. A number of evaluated and sensitive methods for in vitro and in situ approaches are available, but the fundamental problem for their clinical use is the lack of reidentifiable reference areas. Tools for clinical monitoring are described. PMID:24993255

  12. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Study Of Crown Dilaceration With a Talon Cusp in an Unerupted Permanent Maxillary Tooth.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Donyavi, Zakiyeh; Shokri, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    This article describes a rare case of crown dilaceration with a talon cusp in an unerupted permanent maxillary central incisor. Our patient was a 7-year-old boy with a history of trauma to his primary maxillary teeth (#51 and 52), at 3 years of age complaining of failure of eruption of tooth #11. Periapical radiography showed incomplete formation of tooth root #11 and more superior position of tooth bud #11 relative to tooth bud #12. A cone-beam computed tomography was ordered, which revealed crown dilaceration with a talon cusp in tooth bud #11. The patient was scheduled for follow-up at 6 months. PMID:26854775

  14. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  15. New Perspectives on Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Peter W.; Omar, Ridwaan

    2012-01-01

    Some of the efforts that have been made to document tooth wear are reviewed here with an emphasis on nonhuman mammals, literature with which dentists may not be very familiar. We project a change in research strategy from the description of wear at various scales of measurement towards investigation of the mechanical mechanisms that actually create the texture of a worn surface. These studies should reveal exactly how tooth tissue is lost and what aspects of the structure of dental tissues affect this. The most important aspects of the interaction between the tooth surface and wear particles would appear to be particle size, particle shape, their mechanical properties with respect to those of tooth tissues, and the influence of saliva. PMID:22536239

  16. PiggyBac transposon-mediated gene delivery efficiently generates stable transfectants derived from cultured primary human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) and HDDPC-derived iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Satoshi; Aoki, Reiji; Miura, Hiromi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Murakami, Tomoya; Sawami, Tadashi; Yamasaki, Youichi; Sato, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The ability of human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) to differentiate into odontoblasts that generate mineralized tissue holds immense potential for therapeutic use in the field of tooth regenerative medicine. Realization of this potential depends on efficient and optimized protocols for the genetic manipulation of HDDPCs. In this study, we demonstrate the use of a PiggyBac (PB)-based gene transfer system as a method for introducing nonviral transposon DNA into HDDPCs and HDDPC-derived inducible pluripotent stem cells. The transfection efficiency of the PB-based system was significantly greater than previously reported for electroporation-based transfection of plasmid DNA. Using the neomycin resistance gene as a selection marker, HDDPCs were stably transfected at a rate nearly 40-fold higher than that achieved using conventional methods. Using this system, it was also possible to introduce two constructs simultaneously into a single cell. The resulting stable transfectants, expressing tdTomato and enhanced green fluorescent protein, exhibited both red and green fluorescence. The established cell line did not lose the acquired phenotype over three months of culture. Based on our results, we concluded that PB is superior to currently available methods for introducing plasmid DNA into HDDPCs. There may be significant challenges in the direct clinical application of this method for human dental tissue engineering due to safety risks and ethical concerns. However, the high level of transfection achieved with PB may have significant advantages in basic scientific research for dental tissue engineering applications, such as functional studies of genes and proteins. Furthermore, it is a useful tool for the isolation of genetically engineered HDDPC-derived stem cells for studies in tooth regenerative medicine. PMID:26208039

  17. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awamleh, L; Pun, H; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2015-04-01

    Acute inflammatory dental pain is a prevalent condition often associated with limited jaw movements. Mustard oil (MO, a small-fiber excitant/inflammatory irritant) application to the rat molar tooth pulp induces increased excitability (i.e., central sensitization) of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons that can be modulated by MDH application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO). The objectives of the study were to determine whether MO application to the rat right maxillary first molar tooth pulp affects left face-M1 excitability manifested as altered intracortical microstimulation thresholds for evoking electromyographic activity in the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle), and whether MSO application to face-M1 can modulate this MO effect. Under Ketamine general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats had a microelectrode positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) face-M1 site. Then MO (n = 16) or control solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed tooth pulp, and RAD threshold was monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was then applied to the face-M1, and RAD thresholds were monitored every 15 min for 120 min. ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni was used to analyze data (p < 0.05). Within 15 min of MO (but not control) pulp application, RAD thresholds increased significantly (p < 0.001) as compared to baseline. One hour following MSO (but not saline) application to the face-M1, RAD thresholds decreased significantly (p = 0.005) toward baseline. These novel findings suggest that acute inflammatory dental pain is associated with decreased face-M1 excitability that may be dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes and related to mechanisms underlying limited jaw movements in acute orofacial pain conditions. PMID:25618005

  18. PiggyBac transposon-mediated gene delivery efficiently generates stable transfectants derived from cultured primary human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) and HDDPC-derived iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Satoshi; Aoki, Reiji; Miura, Hiromi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Murakami, Tomoya; Sawami, Tadashi; Yamasaki, Youichi; Sato, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    The ability of human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) to differentiate into odontoblasts that generate mineralized tissue holds immense potential for therapeutic use in the field of tooth regenerative medicine. Realization of this potential depends on efficient and optimized protocols for the genetic manipulation of HDDPCs. In this study, we demonstrate the use of a PiggyBac (PB)-based gene transfer system as a method for introducing nonviral transposon DNA into HDDPCs and HDDPC-derived inducible pluripotent stem cells. The transfection efficiency of the PB-based system was significantly greater than previously reported for electroporation-based transfection of plasmid DNA. Using the neomycin resistance gene as a selection marker, HDDPCs were stably transfected at a rate nearly 40-fold higher than that achieved using conventional methods. Using this system, it was also possible to introduce two constructs simultaneously into a single cell. The resulting stable transfectants, expressing tdTomato and enhanced green fluorescent protein, exhibited both red and green fluorescence. The established cell line did not lose the acquired phenotype over three months of culture. Based on our results, we concluded that PB is superior to currently available methods for introducing plasmid DNA into HDDPCs. There may be significant challenges in the direct clinical application of this method for human dental tissue engineering due to safety risks and ethical concerns. However, the high level of transfection achieved with PB may have significant advantages in basic scientific research for dental tissue engineering applications, such as functional studies of genes and proteins. Furthermore, it is a useful tool for the isolation of genetically engineered HDDPC-derived stem cells for studies in tooth regenerative medicine. PMID:26208039

  19. Nonvital Tooth Bleaching: A Case Discussion for the Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Zarow, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    When clinicians embark on an esthetic treatment plan, teeth bleaching should be a primary consideration, regardless of whether the approach taken will be a conservative one or more prosthodontic. Tooth discolorations occur for various reasons, ranging from changes simply related to the age of the patient to those caused by trauma or tooth necrosis. In contemporary dentistry, by applying the proper protocol, sufficient results can be achieved with bleaching, even in many cases of root canal-treated discolored teeth. This article, which highlights a long-term case report, describes a protocol for nonvital bleaching of significantly discolored anterior teeth and offers numerous pragmatic tips for practitioners. PMID:27136121

  20. Turner's tooth with unique radiographic presentation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Anusha Rangare; Kanneppady, Sham Kishor; Castelino, Renita Lorina

    2014-01-01

    Hypoplasia--the result of a disruption in the enamel matrix formation process--causes a defect in the quality and thickness of enamel. Enamel formation is a complex and highly regulated process. Enamel defects have been associated with a broad spectrum of etiologies, including genetic, epigenetic, systemic, local, and environmental factors. An enamel defect in the permanent teeth caused by periapical inflammatory disease in the overlying primary tooth is referred to as Turner's tooth (also known as Turner's hypoplasia). This article presents a case of Turner's hypoplasia of the first mandibular premolar, with an unusual radiographic presentation. PMID:25184717

  1. Functional tooth restoration utilising split germs through re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Chie; Ogawa, Miho; Nakajima, Kei; Ishida, Kentaro; Moriyama, Keiji; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The tooth is an ectodermal organ that arises from a tooth germ under the regulation of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Tooth morphogenesis occurs in the tooth-forming field as a result of reaction-diffusion waves of specific gene expression patterns. Here, we developed a novel mechanical ligation method for splitting tooth germs to artificially regulate the molecules that control tooth morphology. The split tooth germs successfully developed into multiple correct teeth through the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field, which is regulated by reaction-diffusion waves in response to mechanical force. Furthermore, split teeth erupted into the oral cavity and restored physiological tooth function, including mastication, periodontal ligament function and responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study presents a novel tooth regenerative technology based on split tooth germs and the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field by artificial mechanical force. PMID:26673152

  2. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  3. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  4. Tooth polishing: The current status

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Madhuri Alankar; Bhardwaj, Ashu; Jafri, Zeba; Sultan, Nishat; Daing, Anika

    2015-01-01

    Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients’ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same. PMID:26392683

  5. Molecular Genetics of Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Marianna

    2009-01-01

    Organogenesis depends upon a well-ordered series of inductive events involving coordination of molecular pathways that regulate the generation and patterning of specific cell types. Key questions in organogenesis involve the identification of the molecular mechanisms by which proteins interact to organize distinct pattern formation and cell fate determination. Tooth development is an excellent context for investigating this complex problem because of the wealth of information emerging from studies of model organisms and human mutations. Since there are no obvious sources of stem cells in adult human teeth, any attempt to create teeth de novo will likely require the re-programming of other cell types. Thus, the fundamental understanding of the control mechanisms responsible for normal tooth patterning in the embryo will help us understand cell fate specificity and may provide valuable information towards tooth organ regeneration. PMID:19875280

  6. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  7. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths. PMID:9823086

  8. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. PMID:26599117

  9. Tooth Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Tooth Disorders URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Tooth Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A; Richman, Joy M

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development. PMID:23788284

  11. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of medullary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pun, H; Awamleh, L; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that application of the small-fiber excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the rat molar tooth pulp can decrease face-M1 excitability, but increase the excitability of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons and that application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to the face-M1 or MDH can attenuate the MO-induced changes. The present study aimed to determine whether medullary MSO application could modulate the MO-induced decreased face-M1 excitability. Under ketamine general anesthesia, electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were implanted into the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A microelectrode was positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) site in the left face-M1. Then MO (n = 16) or control-solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed molar tooth pulp, and intracortical microstimulation threshold intensities for evoking RAD EMG activities were monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, n = 8) was then applied to the MDH and RAD thresholds monitored every 15 min for 120 min. Statistics used ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni as appropriate (p < 0.05). As compared to baseline, RAD thresholds significantly increased (i.e., decreased excitability) within 1 min (26.3 ± 7.9 %, p = 0.007) and peaked at 15 min following pulpal MO application (49.9 ± 5.7 %, p < 0.001) but not following control-solution. Following MSO (but not PBS) application to the medulla, RAD thresholds significantly decreased within 15 min (26.5 ± 3.0 %, p = 0.05) and at 60 min approached 6.3 ± 2.4 %, of baseline values (p = 0.1). These novel findings suggest that clinically related motor disturbances arising from dental pain may involve decreased face-M1 excitability that is modulated by medullary astrocytes. PMID:26487182

  12. [Tooth regeneration--dream to reality].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-Ling; Wang, Xue-Jiu

    2008-04-01

    Tooth or dentition missing compromises human health physically and psychiatrically. Although several prosthesis methods are used to restore tooth loss, these restorations are still non-biological methods. It is a dream for human being to regenerate a real tooth for hundreds years. There are two ways to regenerate the tooth. One is application of conventional tissue engineering techniques including seed cells and scaffold. The other is regeneration tooth using dental epithelium and dental mesenchymal cells based on the knowledge of tooth initiation and development. Marked progress has been achieved in these two ways, while there is still a long way to go. Recently a new concept has been proposed for regeneration of a biological tooth root based on tooth-related stem cells and tissue engineering technique. A biological tooth root has been regenerated in swine. It may be a valuable method for restoration of tooth loss before successful whole tooth regeneration. A latest research showed that a subpopulation in bone marrow cells can give rise to ameloblast-like cells when mixed with embryonic epithelium and reassociation with integrated mesenchyme, which may provide a new seed cell source for tooth regeneration. PMID:18605442

  13. Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

  14. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  17. Continued research on gin saw tooth design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toothed saws have been used to separate cotton fiber from the seed for over 200 years. There have been many saw tooth designs developed over the years. Most of these designs were developed by trial and error. A complete and scientific analysis of tooth design has never been published. It is not know...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  20. Stem cells for tooth engineering.

    PubMed

    Bluteau, G; Luder, H U; De Bari, C; Mitsiadis, T A

    2008-01-01

    Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come. PMID:18671204

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  2. A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alistair R; Daly, E Susanne; Catlett, Kierstin K; Paul, Kathleen S; King, Stephen J; Skinner, Matthew M; Nesse, Hans P; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Townsend, Grant C; Schwartz, Gary T; Jernvall, Jukka

    2016-02-25

    The variation in molar tooth size in humans and our closest relatives (hominins) has strongly influenced our view of human evolution. The reduction in overall size and disproportionate decrease in third molar size have been noted for over a century, and have been attributed to reduced selection for large dentitions owing to changes in diet or the acquisition of cooking. The systematic pattern of size variation along the tooth row has been described as a 'morphogenetic gradient' in mammal, and more specifically hominin, teeth since Butler and Dahlberg. However, the underlying controls of tooth size have not been well understood, with hypotheses ranging from morphogenetic fields to the clone theory. In this study we address the following question: are there rules that govern how hominin tooth size evolves? Here we propose that the inhibitory cascade, an activator-inhibitor mechanism that affects relative tooth size in mammals, produces the default pattern of tooth sizes for all lower primary postcanine teeth (deciduous premolars and permanent molars) in hominins. This configuration is also equivalent to a morphogenetic gradient, finally pointing to a mechanism that can generate this gradient. The pattern of tooth size remains constant with absolute size in australopiths (including Ardipithecus, Australopithecus and Paranthropus). However, in species of Homo, including modern humans, there is a tight link between tooth proportions and absolute size such that a single developmental parameter can explain both the relative and absolute sizes of primary postcanine teeth. On the basis of the relationship of inhibitory cascade patterning with size, we can use the size at one tooth position to predict the sizes of the remaining four primary postcanine teeth in the row for hominins. Our study provides a development-based expectation to examine the evolution of the unique proportions of human teeth. PMID:26911784

  3. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid. PMID:27563579

  4. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid.

  5. [Tooth decay complications incidence].

    PubMed

    Petrikas, A Zh; Zakharova, E L; Ol'khovskaia, E B; Chestnykh, E V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to assess the quality of endodontic therapy and estimate further treatment needs. 900 orthopantomograms of 442 men and 458 women (aged 18-70) without any clinical manifestations of endodontic pathology were examined for endodontic treatment. 1,170 patients (41%) had additional intraoral radiographs taken for assessment of their periapical status. 2,852 (13.8%) of the 20,724 teeth examined had periapical lesions and/or root fillings. 2,503 of the 2,853 teeth were endodontically treated, only 1,011 of them (40.4%) having all their root canals obturated. 612 (41.3%) of the 1,492 (59.6%) teeth with inadequate root canal fillings hat a healthy apical periodontium. Of the 1,229 teeth to be endodontically treated 349 teeth required primary treatment, 880 required retreatment. PMID:24576961

  6. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  7. Mechanical modelling of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Karme, Aleksis; Rannikko, Janina; Kallonen, Aki; Clauss, Marcus; Fortelius, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    Different diets wear teeth in different ways and generate distinguishable wear and microwear patterns that have long been the basis of palaeodiet reconstructions. Little experimental research has been performed to study them together. Here, we show that an artificial mechanical masticator, a chewing machine, occluding real horse teeth in continuous simulated chewing (of 100 000 chewing cycles) is capable of replicating microscopic wear features and gross wear on teeth that resemble wear in specimens collected from nature. Simulating pure attrition (chewing without food) and four plant material diets of different abrasives content (at n = 5 tooth pairs per group), we detected differences in microscopic wear features by stereomicroscopy of the chewing surface in the number and quality of pits and scratches that were not always as expected. Using computed tomography scanning in one tooth per diet, absolute wear was quantified as the mean height change after the simulated chewing. Absolute wear increased with diet abrasiveness, originating from phytoliths and grit. In combination, our findings highlight that differences in actual dental tissue loss can occur at similar microwear patterns, cautioning against a direct transformation of microwear results into predictions about diet or tooth wear rate. PMID:27411727

  8. Epithelial histogenesis during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Lesot, H; Brook, A H

    2009-12-01

    This paper reviews the current understanding of the progressive changes mediating dental epithelial histogenesis as a basis for future collaborative studies. Tooth development involves morphogenesis, epithelial histogenesis and cell differentiation. The consecutive morphological stages of lamina, bud, cap and bell are also characterized by changes in epithelial histogenesis. Differential cell proliferation rates, apoptosis, and alterations in adhesion and shape lead to the positioning of groups of cells with different functions. During tooth histo-morphogenesis changes occur in basement membrane composition, expression of signalling molecules and the localization of cell surface components. Cell positional identity may be related to cell history. Another important parameter is cell plasticity. Independently of signalling molecules, which play a major role in inducing or modulating specific steps, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions regulate the plasticity/rigidity of particular domains of the enamel organ. This involves specifying in space the differential growth and influences the progressive tooth morphogenesis by shaping the epithelial-mesenchymal junction. Deposition of a mineralized matrix determines the final shape of the crown. All data reviewed in this paper were investigated in the mouse. PMID:18656852

  9. Biomarkers in orthodontic tooth movement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Anand; Saravanan, K.; Kohila, K.; Kumar, S. Sathesh

    2015-01-01

    Tooth movement by orthodontic treatment is characterized by remodeling changes in the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, and gingiva. A reflection of these phenomenons can be found in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of moving teeth, with significant elevations in the concentrations of its components like, cytokines, neurotransmitters, growth Factors, and a arachidonic acid metabolites. GCF arises at the gingival margin and can be described as a transudate or an exudate. Several studies have focused on the composition of GCF and the changes that occur during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). GCF component analysis is a non-invasive method for studying the cellular response of the underlying periodontium. Clinically, GCF can be easily collected using platinum loops, filter paper strips, gingival washings, and micropipettes. A number of GCF biomarkers involve in bone remodeling during OTM. The data suggest that knowledge of all the biomarkers present in the GCF that can be used to mark the changes in tooth that is undergoing orthodontic treatment may be of clinical usefulness leading to proper choice of mechanical stress to improve and to shorten treatment time and avoid side effects. PMID:26538871

  10. Molecular Genetics of Supernumerary Tooth Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu-Ping; Fan, Jiabing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, relatively little is known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. A small number of supernumerary teeth may be a common developmental dental anomaly, while multiple supernumerary teeth usually have a genetic component and they are sometimes thought to represent a partial third dentition in humans. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition, with very few mouse models exhibiting supernumerary teeth similar to those in humans. Inactivation of Apc or forced activation of Wnt/β(catenin signalling results in multiple supernumerary tooth formation in both humans and in mice, but the key genes in these pathways are not very clear. Analysis of other model systems with continuous tooth replacement or secondary tooth formation, such as fish, snake, lizard, and ferret, is providing insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying succesional tooth development, and will assist in the studies on supernumerary tooth formation in humans. This information, together with the advances in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, will pave ways for the tooth regeneration and tooth bioengineering. PMID:21309064

  11. Automating digital leaf measurement: the tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.

    PubMed

    Corney, David P A; Tang, H Lilian; Clark, Jonathan Y; Hu, Yin; Jin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Many species of plants produce leaves with distinct teeth around their margins. The presence and nature of these teeth can often help botanists to identify species. Moreover, it has long been known that more species native to colder regions have teeth than species native to warmer regions. It has therefore been suggested that fossilized remains of leaves can be used as a proxy for ancient climate reconstruction. Similar studies on living plants can help our understanding of the relationships. The required analysis of leaves typically involves considerable manual effort, which in practice limits the number of leaves that are analyzed, potentially reducing the power of the results. In this work, we describe a novel algorithm to automate the marginal tooth analysis of leaves found in digital images. We demonstrate our methods on a large set of images of whole herbarium specimens collected from Tilia trees (also known as lime, linden or basswood). We chose the genus Tilia as its constituent species have toothed leaves of varied size and shape. In a previous study we extracted c.1600 leaves automatically from a set of c.1100 images. Our new algorithm locates teeth on the margins of such leaves and extracts features such as each tooth's area, perimeter and internal angles, as well as counting them. We evaluate an implementation of our algorithm's performance against a manually analyzed subset of the images. We found that the algorithm achieves an accuracy of 85% for counting teeth and 75% for estimating tooth area. We also demonstrate that the automatically extracted features are sufficient to identify different species of Tilia using a simple linear discriminant analysis, and that the features relating to teeth are the most useful. PMID:22870286

  12. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it’s necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  13. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  14. Mechanisms of tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Wise, G E; King, G J

    2008-05-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments. PMID:18434571

  15. Mechanisms of Tooth Eruption and Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Wise, G.E.; King, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments. PMID:18434571

  16. Tooth fragment reattachment: An esthetic, biological restoration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Ajay; Garg, Rakesh; Bhalla, Anindya; Khatri, Rohit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma. If the original tooth fragment is retained following fracture, reattachment of the fractured fragment to the remaining tooth can provide better and long lasting esthetics, improved function, a positive psychological response, and is a faster and less complicated procedure. This paper reports on coronal tooth fracture case that was successfully treated using adhesive reattachment of fractured fragment and post placement. PMID:25810662

  17. The doppelganger tooth: A diagnostic conundrum!

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Preeti; Gaurav, Vivek; Singh, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in tooth morphology and number are not uncommon. However, an exact clone of a normal tooth is a recondite clinical finding. Presence of supplementary teeth is mostly noticed in maxillary anterior, molar or premolar region, followed by mandibular premolar region in descending order of its site of occurrence. Supplemental tooth in mandibular anterior has a low prevalence of 0.01%. This paper reports one such rare case of nonsyndromic incisive jumeaux in mandibular anterior region during mixed dentition period. PMID:26097343

  18. Different representations of tooth chatter and purr call in guinea pig auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Jasmine Marion S; Palmer, Alan Richard; Wallace, Mark Nelson

    2011-08-24

    Multielectrode arrays were used to compare responses to tooth chatter and purr calls from all eight areas of the auditory cortex in anaesthetized guinea pigs. These calls have different behavioural contexts: males emit tooth chatters in aggressive encounters and the purr call during courtship behaviour. Of the two core areas, the primary auditory cortex responded better to both signals than the dorsocaudal core area. Of the six belt areas, the ventral transition area was found to be exceptionally sensitive to tooth chatter and less responsive to purr. The small rostral field responded faithfully to the purr, but not to tooth chatter, and ventrorostral belt often showed on/off responses; other belt areas were unresponsive. PMID:21734609

  19. The randomized shortened dental arch study: tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Walter, M H; Weber, A; Marré, B; Gitt, I; Gerss, J; Hannak, W; Hartmann, S; Heydecke, G; Huppertz, J; Jahn, F; Ludwig, A; Mundt, T; Kern, M; Klein, V; Pospiech, P; Stumbaum, M; Wolfart, S; Wöstmann, B; Busche, E; Böning, K; Luthardt, R G

    2010-08-01

    The evidence concerning the management of shortened dental arch (SDA) cases is sparse. This multi-center study was aimed at generating data on outcomes and survival rates for two common treatments, removable dental prostheses (RDP) for molar replacement or no replacement (SDA). The hypothesis was that the treatments lead to different incidences of tooth loss. We included 215 patients with complete molar loss in one jaw. Molars were either replaced by RDP or not replaced, according to the SDA concept. First tooth loss after treatment was the primary outcome measure. This event occurred in 13 patients in the RDP group and nine patients in the SDA group. The respective Kaplan-Meier survival rates at 38 months were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74-0.91) in the RDP group and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78-0.95) in the SDA group, the difference being non-significant. PMID:20400723

  20. [The history of tooth dyeing].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    While tooth dyeing is a disappearing custom, the pharmaceutical benefits of paan in India are now being studied for other reasons. The oral carcinogenicity of betel nuts, the traditional ingredient in paan, however, has been causing paan users to replace betel with canari or lime. As a consequence of this trend, the pharmaceutical interest of paan is no longer in betel, but in the health-promoting properties of Uncaria gambir. This article has been prepared as an interim record of the progress of the author's research into this field, and was presented in the December 2006 meeting of the [symbol see text]. PMID:18175443

  1. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Szigeti, Kinga; Lupski, James R

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders presenting with the phenotype of a chronic progressive neuropathy affecting both the motor and sensory nerves. During the last decade over two dozen genes have been identified in which mutations cause CMT. The disease illustrates a multitude of genetic principles, including diverse mutational mechanisms from point mutations to copy number variation (CNV), allelic heterogeneity, age-dependent penetrance and variable expressivity. Population based studies have determined the contributions of the various genes to disease burden enabling evidence-based approaches to genetic testing. PMID:19277060

  2. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez, Juan Francisco; Muelas, Nuria; Bataller, Luis; Millán, José María; Palau, Fancesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic distribution and the phenotypic correlation of an extensive series of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in a geographically well-defined Mediterranean area. Methods: A thorough genetic screening, including most of the known genes involved in this disease, was performed and analyzed in this longitudinal descriptive study. Clinical data were analyzed and compared among the genetic subgroups. Results: Molecular diagnosis was accomplished in 365 of 438 patients (83.3%), with a higher success rate in demyelinating forms of the disease. The CMT1A duplication (PMP22 gene) was the most frequent genetic diagnosis (50.4%), followed by mutations in the GJB1 gene (15.3%), and in the GDAP1 gene (11.5%). Mutations in 13 other genes were identified, but were much less frequent. Sixteen novel mutations were detected and characterized phenotypically. Conclusions: The relatively high frequency of GDAP1 mutations, coupled with the scarceness of MFN2 mutations (1.1%) and the high proportion of recessive inheritance (11.6%) in this series exemplify the particularity of the genetic distribution of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in this region. PMID:24078732

  3. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures. PMID:27000809

  4. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  5. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  6. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  7. Dynamic influences of changing gear tooth stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Morguel, O.K.; Esat, I.

    1997-07-01

    One of the principal sources of vibratory excitation of gear a system is due to the angular speed fluctuation of meshing gears due to non-linearities and profile errors and tooth and supporting bearings flexibility. The transmission error is also influenced by the varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying contact force itself is influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. This paper presents a simplified single degree of freedom gear system. It is assumed that one member of the gear pair is rigid and flexibility of the gear tooth is attributed only to one section of the gear system. This enables the equation to be simplified to a single degree of freedom system. The resulting non-linear equation is solved iteratively by employing a method which combines piecewise linearization for the stiffness and resulting contact orientation shift due to shaft and tooth flexibility. The contact shift will be referred as the phase shift in this report. The early finding indicates that there are significant differences between the response of the system incorporating three different tooth stiffness, namely, constant tooth stiffness, rectangular wave tooth stiffness and sinusoidal tooth stiffness. The results also implies that any design specification associated with gears has to include gear tooth influences, especially if the excitation is of a major concern. The rectangular stiffness variation which most accurately describes the tooth stiffness gives a response fluctuation, studied in the frequency domain shows that the effective natural frequencies fluctuates between certain upper and lower limits. Thus the paper suggest that any design study should consider these limits.

  8. Relative contribution of restorative treatment to tooth extraction in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Q D; Khalaf, M E; Al-Shawaf, N M

    2013-06-01

    Teeth can be extracted due to multiple factors. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to identify the relative contribution of restorative treatments to tooth loss. The study reviewed records of 826 patients (1102 teeth). Patient's gender, age and education were obtained. In addition to the main reason for extraction (caries, periodontal disease, pre-prosthetic extraction, restorative failure and remaining root), the following information was collected about each extracted tooth: type, the status of caries if any (primary or secondary) and pulpal status (normal or reversible pulpitis, irreversible pulpitis, necrotic or root canal treated) and type and size of restoration, if present. Following data collection, descriptive analysis was performed. A log-linear model was used to examine the association between restorative treatment and tooth loss and between reasons for tooth loss and type of tooth. Lower molars followed by upper molars were the most commonly extracted teeth. Teeth with no restorations or with crowns were less likely to be extracted (P < 0·001). Lower and upper molars and lower premolars were more likely to be extracted due to restorative failure, while lower anterior teeth were more likely to be extracted due to periodontal disease (P < 0·05). Twenty two per cent of the extractions was due to restorative failure, and at least 65·9% of these teeth had secondary caries. Gender, age and educational level were factors that affect tooth loss. In conclusion, teeth receiving multiple restorative therapies were more likely to be extracted. PMID:23600993

  9. Dentin dysplasia: single-tooth involvement?

    PubMed

    Naik, Veena V; Kale, Alka D

    2009-03-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a genetic defect of dentin formation inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pulpal morphology. Once thought to be a single entity, dentin dysplasia has now been divided into type I (radicular) and II (coronal). Type I is by far the more common. Both types include multiple/generalized involvement of primary and permanent dentition. Combinations of both types have also been described in the literature. Four distinct forms of dentin dysplasia type I and 1 form of dentin dysplasia type II are identified. Although there seems to be no need to identify more than 2 distinct types of this relatively rare inherited defect of human dentin, the possible existence of additional forms of the disease cannot be ruled out. Here is a case report of dentin dysplasia in a single tooth, with crown and roots of normal dimensions, associated with severe pain and mobility and histologically involving both coronal and radicular dentin. Focal odontoblastic dysplasia or dentin dysplasia type III could be the new entity. PMID:19417880

  10. Ultrasonic assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.

    2002-06-01

    A means of assessing the internal structure of teeth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a short laser pulse is discussed. Some key advantages of laser-generated ultrasound over more traditional contact transducer methods are that it is noncontact and nondestructive in nature and requires no special surface preparation. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary nondestructive, noncontact technique with a very small detection footprint. This combination of techniques, termed laser-based ultrasonics, holds promise for future in-vivo diagnostics of tooth health. In this paper, initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented on an extracted human incisor. Results show the technique to be sensitive to the enamel/dentin, dentin/pulp, and dentin/cementum junctions as well as a region of dead tracts in the dentin.

  11. Safety analysis of tooth extraction in elderly patients with cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Gong, Yiwen; Chen, Yi; Cai, Wenwei; Sheng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the safety of tooth extraction in elderly patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material/Methods A total of 13 527 patients underwent tooth extraction at the Affiliated Ninth People’s Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University. Age, sex, and diseases were analyzed. Cardiac monitoring during tooth extraction was performed in 7077 elderly patients with hypertension and other chronic diseases, and the influence of various factors on safety of tooth extraction was evaluated. Additionally, 89 patients with primary hypertension were recruited, and electrocardiogram was monitored with a general monitor or a Holter monitor, and the detection rate of cardiovascular events was compared between the 2 groups. Results The elderly accounted from 75.3%, and patients aged 70–79 years had highest proportion. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension, coronary heart disease, arrhythmia, cerebrovascular accident, and diabetes. In analysis of factors influencing the safety of tooth extraction in the elderly, a significant difference was noted in systolic blood pressure at different time points. In addition, change in heart rate was different between males and females. Detection rate of cardiovascular events by use of a Holter monitor was significantly higher than with a general monitor. Conclusions Hypertension was the most common comorbidity in elderly patients undergoing tooth extraction, followed by coronary heart disease and arrhythmia. Advanced age and increased comorbidity may increase the risk of complications. Risk score can be used to rapidly determine risk for complications during tooth extraction. The Holter monitor is superior to the general monitor in identifying cardiovascular events in high-risk elderly patients undergoing tooth extraction, and can be used in this population. PMID:24819043

  12. Towards Unraveling the Human Tooth Transcriptome: The Dentome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to characterize the transcriptome profiles of human ameloblasts and odontoblasts, evaluate molecular pathways and advance our knowledge of the human “dentome”. Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate odontoblasts and ameloblasts from human tooth buds (15-20week gestational age) from 4 fetuses. RNA was examined using Agilent 41k whole genome arrays at 2 different stages of enamel formation, presecretory and secretory. Probe detection was considered against the array negative control to control for background noise. Differential expression was examined using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) 4.0 between different cell types and developmental stages with a false discovery rate of 20%. Pathway analysis was conducted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. We found that during primary tooth formation, odontoblasts expressed 14,802 genes, presecretory ameloblasts 15,179 genes and secretory ameloblasts 14,526 genes. Genes known to be active during tooth development for each cell type (eg COL1A1, AMELX) were shown to be expressed by our approach. Exploring further into the list of differentially expressed genes between the motile odontoblasts and non-motile presecretory ameloblasts we found several genes of interest that could be involved in cell movement (FN1, LUM, ASTN1). Furthermore, our analysis indicated that the Phospholipase C and ERK5 pathways, that are important for cell movement, were activated in the motile odontoblasts. In addition our pathway analysis identified WNT3A and TGFB1 as important upstream contributors. Recent studies implicate these genes in the development of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. The utility of laser capture microdissection can be a valuable tool in the examination of specific tissues or cell populations present in human tooth buds. Advancing our knowledge of the human dentome and related molecular pathways provides new insights into the complex mechanisms regulating odontogenesis and

  13. Towards unraveling the human tooth transcriptome: the dentome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijia; Parker, Joel; Wright, John Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to characterize the transcriptome profiles of human ameloblasts and odontoblasts, evaluate molecular pathways and advance our knowledge of the human "dentome". Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate odontoblasts and ameloblasts from human tooth buds (15-20week gestational age) from 4 fetuses. RNA was examined using Agilent 41k whole genome arrays at 2 different stages of enamel formation, presecretory and secretory. Probe detection was considered against the array negative control to control for background noise. Differential expression was examined using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) 4.0 between different cell types and developmental stages with a false discovery rate of 20%. Pathway analysis was conducted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. We found that during primary tooth formation, odontoblasts expressed 14,802 genes, presecretory ameloblasts 15,179 genes and secretory ameloblasts 14,526 genes. Genes known to be active during tooth development for each cell type (eg COL1A1, AMELX) were shown to be expressed by our approach. Exploring further into the list of differentially expressed genes between the motile odontoblasts and non-motile presecretory ameloblasts we found several genes of interest that could be involved in cell movement (FN1, LUM, ASTN1). Furthermore, our analysis indicated that the Phospholipase C and ERK5 pathways, that are important for cell movement, were activated in the motile odontoblasts. In addition our pathway analysis identified WNT3A and TGFB1 as important upstream contributors. Recent studies implicate these genes in the development of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. The utility of laser capture microdissection can be a valuable tool in the examination of specific tissues or cell populations present in human tooth buds. Advancing our knowledge of the human dentome and related molecular pathways provides new insights into the complex mechanisms regulating odontogenesis and

  14. Unicuspid and bicuspid tooth crown formation in squamates.

    PubMed

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2011-12-15

    The molecular and developmental factors that regulate tooth morphogenesis in nonmammalian species, such as snakes and lizards, have received relatively little attention compared to mammals. Here we describe the development of unicuspid and bicuspid teeth in squamate species. The simple, cone-shaped tooth crown of the bearded dragon and ball python is established at cap stage and fixed in shape by the differentiation of cells and the secretion of dental matrices. Enamel production, as demonstrated by amelogenin expression, occurs relatively earlier in squamate teeth than in mouse molars. We suggest that the early differentiation in squamate unicuspid teeth at cap stage correlates with a more rudimentary tooth crown shape. The leopard gecko can form a bicuspid tooth crown despite the early onset of differentiation. Cusp formation in the gecko does not occur by the folding of the inner enamel epithelium, as in the mouse molar, but by the differential secretion of enamel. Ameloblasts forming the enamel epithelial bulge, a central swelling of cells in the inner enamel epithelium, secrete amelogenin at cap stage, but cease to do so by bell stage. Meanwhile, other ameloblasts in the inner enamel epithelium continue to secrete enamel, forming cusp tips on either side of the bulge. Bulge cells specifically express the gene Bmp2, which we suggest serves as a pro-differentiation signal for cells of the gecko enamel organ. In this regard, the enamel epithelial bulge of the gecko may be more functionally analogous to the secondary enamel knot of mammals than the primary enamel knot. PMID:21932327

  15. Associations between smoking and tooth loss according to reason for tooth loss

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaodan; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hovey, Kathleen M.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Chen, Chaoru; Tezal, Mine; Genco, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Smoking is associated with tooth loss. However, smoking's relationship to the specific reason for tooth loss in postmenopausal women is unknown. Methods Postmenopausal women (n = 1,106) who joined a Women's Health Initiative ancillary study (The Buffalo OsteoPerio Study) underwent oral examinations for assessment of the number of missing teeth, as well as the self-reported reasons for tooth loss. The authors obtained information about smoking status via a self-administered questionnaire. The authors calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs) by means of logistic regression to assess smoking's association with overall tooth loss, as well as with tooth loss due to periodontal disease (PD) and with tooth loss due to caries. Results After adjusting for age, education, income, body mass index (BMI), history of diabetes diagnosis, calcium supplement use and dental visit frequency, the authors found that heavy smokers (≥ 26 pack-years) were significantly more likely to report having experienced tooth loss compared with never smokers (OR = 1.82; 95 percent CI, 1.10-3.00). Smoking status, packs smoked per day, years of smoking, pack-years and years since quitting smoking were significantly associated with tooth loss due to PD. For pack-years, the association for heavy smokers compared with that for never smokers was OR = 6.83 (95 percent CI, 3.40-13.72). The study results showed no significant associations between smoking and tooth loss due to caries. Conclusions and Practical Implications Smoking may be a major factor in tooth loss due to PD. However, smoking appears to be a less important factor in tooth loss due to caries. Further study is needed to explore the etiologies by which smoking is associated with different types of tooth loss. Dentists should counsel their patients about the impact of smoking on oral health, including the risk of tooth loss due to PD. PMID:23449901

  16. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth. PMID:26589925

  17. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  18. Molecular regulatory mechanism of tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Feng; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The root is crucial for the physiological function of the tooth, and a healthy root allows an artificial crown to function as required clinically. Tooth crown development has been studied intensively during the last few decades, but root development remains not well understood. Here we review the root development processes, including cell fate determination, induction of odontoblast and cementoblast differentiation, interaction of root epithelium and mesenchyme, and other molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of the signaling cascades and mechanisms involved in root development. It also sets the stage for de novo tooth regeneration. PMID:23222990

  19. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration. PMID:26798366

  20. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  1. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S. Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  2. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S Sujatha; Roy, K Karthik

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  3. Expression analysis of candidate genes regulating successional tooth formation in the human embryo

    PubMed Central

    Olley, Ryan; Xavier, Guilherme M.; Seppala, Maisa; Volponi, Ana A.; Geoghegan, Fin; Sharpe, Paul T.; Cobourne, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Human dental development is characterized by formation of primary teeth, which are subsequently replaced by the secondary dentition. The secondary dentition consists of incisors, canines, and premolars, which are derived from the successional dental lamina of the corresponding primary tooth germs; and molar teeth, which develop as a continuation of the dental lamina. Currently, very little is known about the molecular regulation of human successional tooth formation. Here, we have investigated expression of three candidate regulators for human successional tooth formation; the Fibroblast Growth Factor-antagonist SPROUTY2, the Hedgehog co-receptor GAS1 and the RUNT-related transcription factor RUNX2. At around 8 weeks of development, only SPROUTY2 showed strong expression in both epithelium and mesenchyme of the early bud. During the cap stage between 12–14 weeks, SPROUTY2 predominated in the dental papilla and inner enamel epithelium of the developing tooth. No specific expression was seen in the successional dental lamina. GAS1 was expressed in dental papilla and follicle, and associated with mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina during the late cap stage. In addition, GAS1 was identifiable in mesenchyme adjacent to the successional lamina, particularly in the developing primary first molar. For RUNX2, expression predominated in the dental papilla and follicle. Localized expression was seen in mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina at the late cap stage; but surprisingly, not in the early successional lamina at these stages. These findings confirm that SPROUTY2, GAS1, and RUNX2 are all expressed during early human tooth development. The domains of GAS1 and RUNX2 are consistent with a role influencing function of the primary dental lamina but only GAS1 transcripts were identifiable in the successional lamina at these early stages of development. PMID:25484868

  4. Lead levels among various deciduous tooth types

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.B. National Taiwan Univ., Taipei ); Bellinger, D.; Leviton, A. ); Jungder Wang )

    1991-10-01

    The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. However, the pattern of lead abundances among the various tooth positions in a child's mouth appears to be non-uniform. Taken together these findings show an apparently inconsistent pattern among the tooth types. These comparisons are complicated by different research groups using different portions of the tooth. This issue is of significance to those who wish to compare the lead burden of children but have available teeth from different positions from the various children. By examining a large number of teeth from two different populations, the authors hope to explore the more universal aspects of any variability among tooth types.

  5. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs. PMID:25994486

  6. Robust tooth surface reconstruction by iterative deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaotong; Dai, Ning; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jun; Peng, Qingjin; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Digital design technologies have been applied extensively in dental medicine, especially in the field of dental restoration. The all-ceramic crown is an important restoration type of dental CAD systems. This paper presents a robust tooth surface reconstruction algorithm for all-ceramic crown design. The algorithm involves three necessary steps: standard tooth initial positioning and division; salient feature point extraction using Morse theory; and standard tooth deformation using iterative Laplacian Surface Editing and mesh stitching. This algorithm can retain the morphological features of the tooth surface well. It is robust and suitable for almost all types of teeth, including incisor, canine, premolar, and molar. Moreover, it allows dental technicians to use their own preferred library teeth for reconstruction. The algorithm has been successfully integrated in our Dental CAD system, more than 1000 clinical cases have been tested to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26638148

  7. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  8. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  9. Tooth microwear formation rate in Gasterosteus aculeatus

    PubMed Central

    Baines, D C; Purnell, M A; Hart, P J B

    2014-01-01

    Tooth microwear feature densities were significantly increased in a population of laboratory-reared three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in four days, after they were transferred from a limnetic feeding regime to a benthic feeding regime. These results show that even in aquatic vertebrates with non-occluding teeth, changes in feeding can cause changes in tooth microwear in just a few days, as in mammals. PMID:24773545

  10. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.” Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing “toothache.” Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:26539363

  11. Patterns in ritual tooth avulsion at Roonka.

    PubMed

    Durband, Arthur C; Littleton, Judith; Walshe, Keryn

    2014-08-01

    Tooth avulsion is the intentional removal of one or more teeth for ritual or aesthetic reasons, or to denote group affiliation. Typically the maxillary incisors are the teeth most often selected for removal. Previous authors have discussed the presence of tooth avulsions in several individuals recovered from Roonka, but those papers did not examine any patterns in those removals that might be present. Analysis of the tooth avulsions at Roonka reveals a change in the practice over time, with the older burials from phase II typically showing removal of both maxillary central incisors with a left side bias when only one tooth is removed, and the more recent phase III burials showing only one incisor avulsed and a right side bias for removal. Frequencies in the practice also changed over time, with avulsions being much more common in the older phase II burials. Historical evidence suggests that any particular regional or social group would have its own particular pattern of tooth avulsion, so these changes in tooth avulsions at Roonka suggest that the site was either used by multiple groups of people for burials, or that there was significant cultural change during the occupation of the site. PMID:24827419

  12. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an "unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury." Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing "toothache." Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:26539363

  13. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  14. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Fiore; Nolano, Maria; Pisciotta, Chiara; Provitera, Vincenzo; Fabrizi, Gian M.; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate, by skin biopsy, dermal nerve fibers in 31 patients with 3 common Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) genotypes (CMT1A, late-onset CMT1B, and CMTX1), and rarer forms of CMT caused by mutations in RAB7 (CMT2B), TRPV4 (CMT2C), and GDAP1 (AR-CMT2K) genes. Methods: We investigated axonal loss by quantifying Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings and evaluated morphometric changes in myelinated dermal nerve fibers by measuring fiber caliber, internodal, and nodal gap length. Results: The density of both Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings was reduced in skin samples from patients with CMT1A and all the other CMT genotypes. Nodal gaps were larger in all the CMT genotypes though widening was greater in CMT1A. Perhaps an altered communication between axons and glia may be a common feature for multiple forms of CMT. Internodal lengths were shorter in all the CMT genotypes, and patients with CMT1A had the shortest internodes of all our patients. The uniformly shortened internodes in all the CMT genotypes suggest that mutations in both myelin and axon genes may developmentally impede internode formation. The extent of internodal shortening and nodal gap widening are likely both important in determining nerve conduction velocities in CMT. Conclusions: This study extends the information gained from skin biopsies on morphologic abnormalities in various forms of CMT and provides insights into potential pathomechanisms of axonal and demyelinating CMT. PMID:26362287

  15. Deletion of Osr2 Partially Rescues Tooth Development in Runx2 Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, H J E; Park, E K; Jia, S; Liu, H; Lan, Y; Jiang, R

    2015-08-01

    Tooth organogenesis depends on genetically programmed sequential and reciprocal inductive interactions between the dental epithelium and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. Previous studies showed that the Msx1 and Runx2 transcription factors are required for activation of odontogenic signals, including Bmp4 and Fgf3, in the early tooth mesenchyme to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 acts downstream of Msx1 to activate Fgf3 expression. Recent studies identified Osr2 as a repressor of tooth development and showed that inactivation of Osr2 rescued molar tooth morphogenesis in the Msx1(-/-) mutant mice as well as in mice with neural crest-specific inactivation of Bmp4. Here we show that Runx2 expression is expanded in the tooth bud mesenchyme in Osr2(-/-) mutant mouse embryos and is partially restored in the tooth mesenchyme in Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) mutants in comparison with Msx1(-/-) and wild-type embryos. Whereas mandibular molar development arrested at the bud stage and maxillary molar development arrested at the bud-to-cap transition in Runx2(-/-) mutant mice, both mandibular and maxillary molar tooth germs progressed to the early bell stage, with rescued expression of Msx1 and Bmp4 in the dental papilla as well as expression of Bmp4, p21, and Shh in the primary enamel knot in the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutants. In contrast to the Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) compound mutants, which exhibit nearly normal first molar morphogenesis, the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutant embryos failed to activate the expression of Fgf3 and Fgf10 in the dental papilla and exhibited significant deficit in cell proliferation in both the dental epithelium and mesenchyme in comparison with the control embryos. These data indicate that Runx2 synergizes with Msx1 to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 controls continued tooth growth and morphogenesis beyond the cap stage through activation of Fgf3 and Fgf10 expression

  16. Targeted Expression of csCSF-1 in op/op Mice Ameliorates Tooth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Werner, S. Abboud; Gluhak-Heinrich, J.; Woodruff, K.; Wittrant, Y.; Cardenas, L.; Roudier, M.; MacDougall, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to characterize the tooth phenotype of CSF-1-deficient op/op mice and determine whether expression of csCSF-1 in these mice has a role in primary tooth matrix formation. Design Ameloblasts and odontoblasts, isolated from wt/wt frozen sections using laser capture microdissection, were analyzed for csCSF-1, sCSF-1 and CSF-1R mRNA by RT-PCR. Mandibles, excised from 8 day op/op and wt/wt littermates, were examined for tooth morphology as well as amelogenin and DMP1 expression using in situ hybridization. Op/opCS transgenic mice, expressing csCSF-1 in teeth and bone using the osteocalcin promoter, were generated. Skeletal x-rays and histomorphometry were performed; teeth were analyzed for morphology and matrix proteins. Results Normal dental cells in vivo express both CSF-1 isoforms and CSF-1R. Compared to wt/wt, op/op teeth prior to eruption showed altered dental cell morphology and dramatic reduction in DMP1 transcripts. Op/opCS mice showed marked resolution of osteopetrosis, tooth eruption and teeth that resembled amelogenesis imperfecta-like phenotype. At 3 weeks, op/op teeth showed severe enamel and dentin defects and barely detectable amelogenin and DMP1. In op/opCS mice, DMP1 in odontoblasts increased to near normal and dentin morphology was restored; amelogenin also increased. Enamel integrity improved in op/opCS, although it was thinner than wt enamel. Conclusions Results demonstrate that ameloblasts and odontoblasts are a source and potential target of CSF-1 isoforms in vivo. Expression of csCSF-1 within the tooth microenvironment is essential for normal tooth morphogenesis and may provide a mechanism for coordinating the process of tooth eruption with endogenous matrix formation. PMID:17126805

  17. Endodontic treatment in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Sajeev; Love, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    A number of factors are involved in the development of pulp and periapical disease in primary and permanent teeth, with dental caries being the main factor. Although these factors are similar, the clinical management of a primary or permanent tooth with pulp or periapical disease may be quite different. This is based mainly on the differences between the two types of teeth, with primary tooth longevity, coronal structural integrity, root canal morphology, and root anatomy being important features to be taken into account when treatment planning. This paper reviews some aspects of primary teeth and the various treatment options for the management of pulp and periapical disease. PMID:15378974

  18. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  19. Severe Impaction of the Primary Mandibular Second Molar Accompanied by Displacement of the Permanent Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Junko; Kinoshita-Kawano, Shoko; Hayashi-Sakai, Sachiko; Mitomi, Tomoe; Sano-Asahito, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is defined as any tooth that fails to erupt into a normal functional position and remains unerupted beyond the time at which it should normally erupt. Reports of impaction and eruption failure in primary teeth are relatively rare compared to permanent teeth. We report 2 rare cases where the second premolar was located on the occlusal side of the impacted mandibular second primary molar. In the first case, the succedaneous permanent tooth erupted after extraction of the primary tooth, fenestration, and traction. In the second case, the succedaneous permanent tooth erupted without fenestration or traction. Although the etiology of the tooth displacement was unknown in both cases, inhibition of the eruptive movement of the primary molar may have been associated with displacement of the succedaneous permanent premolar. PMID:25810929

  20. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  1. Stress analysis in single molar tooth.

    PubMed

    Merdji, Ali; Mootanah, Rajshree; Bachir Bouiadjra, Bel Abbes; Benaissa, Ali; Aminallah, Laid; Ould Chikh, El Bahri; Mukdadi, Sam

    2013-03-01

    The human tooth faces different stresses under environments of different loading conditions, these loading produces major factors in weakness of the tooth and bone structure. The need to save natural teeth has prompted the development of novel and complex techniques in endodontology, prosthodontics and periodontology. Despite a poor long-term prognosis and some prejudice to local bone, considerable efforts have been exerted for the realization of these techniques. Nowadays, the 3D finite element analysis (FEA) is one of the more recently used techniques for stress analysis in single human tooth under different loading cases. The von Mises stress distribution indicated that the greatest effort area of tooth lies at the base of crown up to the gingival line with varying intensities in the different loading cases. The highest stress in the cortical bone was predominantly found around the cervical region of the tooth and lowest in the cancellous bone and periodontal ligament (PDL). The PDL is a soft tissue, and it could function as an intermediate cushion element which absorbs the impact force and uniformly transfers the occlusal forces into the surrounding bone. PMID:25427475

  2. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  3. Autogenous Tooth Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rashmi; Chugh, Vinay Kumar; Wadhwa, Puneet; Kohli, Munish

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autogenous tooth transplantation is the surgical movement of a tooth from one location in the mouth to another in the same individual. Though done for years but it has achieved variable success rates. Although the indications for autotransplantation are narrow, careful patient selection coupled with an appropriate technique can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional results. This article discusses the reviews of previous works done and highlights the criteria and factors influencing the success of autotransplant along with reports of two cases of transplantation of impacted and malposed canine. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Aggarwal R, Chugh VK, Wadhwa P, Kohli M. Autogenous Tooth Transplantation as a Treatment Option. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):87-92. PMID:25206143

  4. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. PMID:24755349

  5. Cytokine Expression and Accelerated Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, C.C.; Khoo, E.; Tran, J.; Chartres, I.; Liu, Y.; Thant, L.M.; Khabensky, I.; Gart, L.P.; Cisneros, G.; Alikhani, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibiting the expression of certain cytokines decreases the rate of tooth movement. Here, we hypothesized that stimulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines, through small perforations of cortical bone, increases the rate of bone remodeling and tooth movement. Forty-eight rats were divided into 4 groups: 50-cN force applied to the maxillary first molar (O), force application plus soft tissue flap (OF), force application plus flap plus 3 small perforations of the cortical plate (OFP), and a control group (C). From the 92 cytokines studied, the expression of 37 cytokines increased significantly in all experimental groups, with 21 cytokines showing the highest levels in the OFP group. After 28 days, micro-computed tomography, light and fluorescent microscopy, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher numbers of osteoclasts and bone remodeling activity in the OFP group, accompanied by generalized osteoporosity and increased rate of tooth movement. PMID:20639508

  6. Whole Tooth Regeneration as a Future Dental Treatment.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances for the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding of embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technology. Tooth regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole tooth replacement is currently expected a novel therapeutic concept with the full recovery of tooth physiological functions. Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration because they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is considered to be an attractive concept for next generation regenerative therapy as a form of bioengineered organ replacement. For realization of whole tooth regeneration, we have developed a novel three-dimensional cell manipulation method designated the "organ germ method". This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in organogenesis. The bioengineered tooth germ generates a structurally correct tooth in vitro, and erupted successfully with correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Bioengineered teeth were also able to perform physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function and response to noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning whole tooth regenerative therapy. PMID:26545754

  7. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Roshanghias, Korosh; Peisker, Andre; Zieron, Jörg Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa.

  8. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Roshanghias, Korosh; Peisker, Andre; Zieron, Jörg Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa. PMID:27605997

  9. A report of canine tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, William B; O'Halloran, Henry S

    2004-03-01

    The authors describe the case of a 5-year-old girl traumatized from a dog bite to the superior aspect of the orbit in the right eye. The dog's canine tooth penetrated deep into the posterior orbit and severed the attachment of the superior oblique muscle from the globe posterior to the trochlea. The management and clinical course of the patient are described and photographs documenting the initial ocular damage and postoperative course are provided. In addition, the entity known as 'canine tooth syndrome' is reviewed. PMID:15513022

  10. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  20. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  1. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed tooth positioner. 872.5525 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  4. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed tooth positioner. 872.5525 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be...

  8. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed tooth positioner. 872.5525 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be...

  11. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed tooth positioner. 872.5525 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected...

  12. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed tooth positioner. 872.5525 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  15. Impact of gin saw tooth design on textile processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toothed gin saws have been used to separate cotton fiber from the seed for over 200 years. There have been many saw tooth designs developed over the years. Most of these designs were developed by trial and error. A complete and scientific analysis of tooth design has never been done. It is not k...

  16. Matrix Gla protein inhibition of tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, N R; Murshed, M; McKee, M D

    2008-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization is regulated by mineral ion availability, proteins, and other molecular determinants. To investigate protein regulation of mineralization in tooth dentin and cementum, and in alveolar bone, we expressed matrix Gla protein (MGP) ectopically in bones and teeth in mice, using an osteoblast/odontoblast-specific 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter. Mandibles were analyzed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, light microscopy, histomorphometry, and transmission electron microscopy. While bone and tooth ECMs were established in the Col1a1-Mgp mice, extensive hypomineralization was observed, with values of unmineralized ECM from four- to eight-fold higher in dentin and alveolar bone when compared with that in wild-type tissues. Mineralization was virtually absent in tooth root dentin and cellular cementum, while crown dentin showed "breakthrough" areas of mineralization. Acellular cementum was lacking in Col1a1-Mgp teeth, and unmineralized osteodentin formed within the pulp. These results strengthen the view that bone and tooth mineralization is critically regulated by mineralization inhibitors. PMID:18719210

  17. Neurologic Regulation and Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Huang, Hechang; Faber, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pain and discomfort are prevalent symptoms among the vast majority of patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and is the most disliked aspect of treatment. The periodontium is a highly innervated structure that also provides the necessary trophic factors, such as nerve growth factor, which promote neuronal survival, maintenance and axonal growth, via interaction with specific nerve surface receptors, such as TrkA. Various types of nerves are found in the periodontium, including thinly myelinated and unmyelinated sensory fibers that express the neuropeptides substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide among others. Tooth movement activates peripheral sensory nerve endings, which transmit painful signals to the brain after being processed at the trigeminal spinal nucleus, resulting in local expression of pain related genes, such as c-Fos. Concurrently, an attendant inflammatory process is detected in the trigeminal spinal nucleus, including activation of astrocytes, microglia and neurons. This complex neurologic reaction to tooth movement mediates orthodontic pain and also serves a source of neurogenic inflammation exhibited in the trigeminal spinal nucleus and the periodontium. Activated periodontal sensory fibers release neuropeptides in the periodontal environment, which in turn induce a local inflammatory cascade aiding in alveolar bone turnover and tooth movement per se. Control of pain with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other prescription or over-the-counter pain killers effectively reduce this neurologic reaction and alleviate the attendant pain, but also reduce the neurogenic inflammatory component of orthodontic tooth movement causing a slowdown in bone turnover and consequently delaying orthodontic treatment. PMID:26599119

  18. Computerized Inspection Of Gear-Tooth Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, Y.; Kuan, C.

    1994-01-01

    Method of manufacturing gears with precisely shaped teeth involves computerized inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize deviations between real and theoretical versions of surfaces. Thus, iterated cycles of cutting gear teeth, inspection, and adjustments help increase and/or maintain precision of subsequently manufactured gears.

  19. Dynamic Tooth Loads for Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, R.; Westervelt, W.

    1986-01-01

    Computer program developed using time-history, interactive, closed-form solution for dynamic tooth loads for both low- and high-contact-ratio spur gears. Facilitates application of high-contact-ratio spur gear concepts. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  20. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  1. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. Methods: A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. Results: Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses. Conclusions: Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. PMID:27563612

  2. Roles of Bmp4 during tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shihai; Zhou, Jing; Gao, Yang; Baek, Jin-A; Martin, James F.; Lan, Yu; Jiang, Rulang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Bmp4 is a key Msx1-dependent mesenchymal odontogenic signal for driving tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition. Whereas all tooth germs were arrested at the bud stage in Msx1–/– mice, we show that depleting functional Bmp4 mRNAs in the tooth mesenchyme, through neural crest-specific gene inactivation in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice, caused mandibular molar developmental arrest at the bud stage but allowed maxillary molars and incisors to develop to mineralized teeth. We found that expression of Osr2, which encodes a zinc finger protein that antagonizes Msx1-mediated activation of odontogenic mesenchyme, was significantly upregulated in the molar tooth mesenchyme in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre embryos. Msx1 heterozygosity enhanced maxillary molar developmental defects whereas Osr2 heterozygosity partially rescued mandibular first molar morphogenesis in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice. Moreover, in contrast to complete lack of supernumerary tooth initiation in Msx1–/–Osr2–/– mice, Osr2–/–Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre compound mutant mice exhibited formation and subsequent arrest of supernumerary tooth germs that correlated with downregulation of Msx1 expression in the tooth mesenchyme. In addition, we found that the Wnt inhibitors Dkk2 and Wif1 were much more abundantly expressed in the mandibular than maxillary molar mesenchyme in wild-type embryos and that Dkk2 expression was significantly upregulated in the molar mesenchyme in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre embryos, which correlated with the dramatic differences in maxillary and mandibular molar phenotypes in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice. Together, these data indicate that Bmp4 signaling suppresses tooth developmental inhibitors in the tooth mesenchyme, including Dkk2 and Osr2, and synergizes with Msx1 to activate mesenchymal odontogenic potential for tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation. PMID:23250216

  3. Orthodontic tooth movement after different coxib therapies.

    PubMed

    de Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Juan; Perillan, Carmen; Garcia, Miguel A; Arguelles, Juan; Vijande, Manuel; Costales, Marina

    2007-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory substances used for treatment of pain and discomfort related to orthodontic treatment (OT) could slow down tooth movement. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are an alternative to conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The aim of this study was to compare different coxibs on dental movement in the rat. Twenty-eight Wistar male rats (3 months old) divided into four experimental groups were studied: (1) Five rats underwent a 50 g coil spring implantation and received three injections of 0.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) of Rofecoxib in the maxillary gingiva, close to the first molar, on the day of implantation and after 3 and 5 days. Similar procedures were carried out (2) on six animals receiving 8 mg/kg bw of Celecoxib and (3) on five animals receiving 25 mg/kg bw of Parecoxib. (4) For the controls, 12 rats received the same OT but only equivolumetric 0.9 per cent saline solution injections. Tooth movement was measured on lateral cranial teleradiographs after 10 days of treatment. Non-parametric standard techniques (Wilcoxon, H, and Mann-Whitney, U) were used for statistical analysis. Mesial tooth displacement in the control animals was 0.33 +/- 0.07 mm. While no movement was found in rats treated with Rofecoxib, the Celecoxib- and Parecoxib-treated rats showed tooth movement of 0.42 +/- 0.09 mm and 0.22 +/- 0.04 mm, respectively. The differences were statistically significant (H = 13.07; P < 0.004). Celecoxib and Parecoxib, but not Rofecoxib, seem appropriate for discomfort and pain relief while avoiding interference during tooth movement. PMID:17878187

  4. Relative cheek-tooth size in Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    McHenry, H M

    1984-07-01

    Until the discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, cheek-tooth megadontia was unequivocally one of the defining characteristics of the australopithecine grade in human evolution along with bipedalism and small brains. This species, however, has an average postcanine area of 757 mm2, which is more like Homo habilis (759 mm2) than A. africanus (856 mm2). But what is its relative cheek-tooth size in comparison to body size? One approach to this question is to compare postcanine tooth area to estimated body weight. By this method all Australopithecus species are megadont: they have cheek teeth 1.7 to 2.3 times larger than modern hominoids of similar body size. The series from A. afarensis to A. africanus to A. robustus to A. boisei shows strong positive allometry indicating increasing megadontia through time. The series from H. habilis to H. erectus to H. sapiens shows strong negative allometry which implies a sharp reduction in the relative size of the posterior teeth. Postcanine megadontia in Australopithecus species can also be demonstrated by comparing tooth size and body size in associated skeletons: A. afarensis (represented by A.L. 288-1) has a cheek-tooth size 2.8 times larger than expected from modern hominoids; A. africanus (Sts 7) and A. robustus (TM 1517) are over twice the expected size. The evolutionary transition from the megadont condition of Australopithecus to the trend of decreasing megadontia seen in the Homo lineage may have occurred between 3.0 and 2.5 m.y. from A. afarensis to H.habilis but other evidence indicates that it is more likely to have occurred between 2.5 to 2.0 m.y. from an A. africanus-like form to H. habilis. PMID:6433716

  5. Positioning the actual interference fringe pattern on the tooth flank in measuring gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Suping; Wang, Leijie; Liu, Shiqiao; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2011-05-01

    In measuring form deviation of gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry, the collected interference fringe pattern (IFP) is badly distorted, in the case of shape, relative to the actual tooth flank. Meanwhile, a clear and definite mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank is indispensable for both transforming phase differences into deviation values and positioning the measurement result on the actual tooth flank. In order to solve these problems, this paper proposes a method using the simulation tooth image as a bridge connecting the actual tooth flank and the collected IFP. The mapping relationship between the simulation tooth image and the actual tooth flank has been obtained by ray tracing methods [Fang et al., Appl. Opt. 49(33), 6409-6415 (2010)]. This paper mainly discusses how to build the relationship between the simulation tooth image and the collected IFP by using a matching algorithm of two characteristic point sets. With the combination of the two above-mentioned assistant mapping relationships, the mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank can be built; the collected IFP can be positioned on the actual tooth flank. Finally, the proposed method is employed in a measurement of the form deviation of a gear tooth flank and the result proves the feasibility of the proposed method.

  6. Solitary osteochondroma of the trapezoid disguised as a tooth fragment.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andreas; Pereira, Daniela; Baldwin, Katy; Weusten, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Fight bite injuries of the hand are common presentations in A&E departments and usually result from a fist blow to the mouth. The authors report a case of a 24-year-old man who presented 6 weeks after an injury to his right wrist following an altercation. Radiographic examination and CT scans were in keeping with a tooth fragment embedded in the trapezoid. However, post excision histology subsequently revealed the lesion to be a solitary osteochondroma of the trapezoid. Osteochondromas are benign lesions of bony or cartilaginous origin and are usually found in the metaphyseal region of long bones. They represent by far the most common primary bone tumours. However, osteochondromas arising from the carpal bones are extremely rare with very few cases reported in the literature. This case illustrates the need to include 'tumour' as a differential diagnosis in every unusual appearing bony lesion, even if there is a history of trauma. PMID:26240108

  7. [Biomechanical study on orthodontic tooth movement: changes in biomechanical property of the periodontal tissue in terms of tooth mobility].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y

    1989-12-01

    The magnitude of tooth mobility has been frequently used for evaluating biomechanical response of the periodontal tissue to applied forces. However, tooth mobility during orthodontic tooth movement has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in biomechanical property of the periodontal tissue during canine retraction, in terms of tooth mobility. The upper canines on both sides of ten orthodontic patients were moved in the distal direction for about four weeks with an initial force of 200 gf. An amount of tooth movement and a magnitude of tooth mobility were measured every 3 or 4 days during retraction. A distally directed force up to 500 gf was continuously applied to each canine and tooth mobility was measured with a noncontact type of eddy current displacement sensor. A two-dimensional finite element model was constructed and displacements of the finite element model were calculated with various Young's moduli in loading with a 100 gf force in the distal direction. In comparison with the magnitudes of the tooth mobility, Young's modulus of the periodontal membrane before retraction and the influence of the biomechanical factors on changes in tooth mobility were investigated. The tooth movement curve was divided into three phases; an initial phase, a lag phase and a post-lag phase. The magnitudes of tooth mobility at the initial phase were significantly larger than those before retraction within the range of 250 gf to 500 gf and these magnitudes decreased during the lag phase. The magnitudes of tooth mobility at the post-lag phase significantly increased, within the range of 50 gf to 500 gf, than those before retraction. As a result of curveliniar regression analysis, the tooth mobility curves approximated to delta = AFB, where delta and F denote tooth mobility and force respectively. The coefficients A and B changed according to the phases of tooth movement. An inclination of the tooth mobility curve expressed by a tangent at the

  8. Computer aided design and analysis of gear tooth geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A simulation method for gear hobbing and shaping of straight and spiral bevel gears is presented. The method is based upon an enveloping theory for gear tooth profile generation. The procedure is applicable in the computer aided design of standard and nonstandard tooth forms. An inverse procedure for finding a conjugate gear tooth profile is presented for arbitrary cutter geometry. The kinematic relations for the tooth surfaces of straight and spiral bevel gears are proposed. The tooth surface equations for these gears are formulated in a manner suitable for their automated numerical development and solution.

  9. Generation of a crowned pinion tooth surface by a plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The topology of a crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is described. The geometry of the modified pinion tooth surface and of the regular involute gear tooth surface is discussed. The tooth contact analysis between the meshing surfaces is also described. Generating a modified pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a 5-degree-of-freedom system is investigated. The numerical results included indicate that the transmission error remains low as the gears are misaligned.

  10. Effect of Fluoridated Sealants on Adjacent Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cagetti, M.G.; Carta, G.; Cocco, F.; Sale, S.; Congiu, G.; Mura, A.; Strohmenger, L.; Lingström, P.; Campus, G.

    2014-01-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in 6- to 7-yr-old schoolchildren to evaluate, in a 30-mo period, whether the caries increment on the distal surface of the second primary molars adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with fluoride release compounds would be lower with respect to those adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with a nonfluoridated sealant. In sum, 2,776 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 3 groups receiving sealants on sound first molars: high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC group); resin-based sealant with fluoride (fluoride-RB group); and a resin-based sealant without fluoride (RB group). Caries (D1 – D3 level) was recorded on the distal surface of the second primary molar, considered the unit of analysis including only sound surfaces at the baseline. At baseline, no differences in caries prevalence were recorded in the 3 groups regarding the considered surfaces. At follow-up, the prevalence of an affected unit of analysis was statistically lower (p = .03) in the GIC and fluoride-RB groups (p = .04). In the GIC group, fewer new caries were observed in the unit of analysis respect to the other 2 groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.68; p < .01) for GIC vs. RB and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.04; p = .005) for fluoride-RB vs. RB. Caries incidence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic status (IRR = 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.42; p = .05). Dental sealant high-viscosity GIC and fluoride-RB demonstrated protection against dental caries, and there was evidence that these materials afforded additional protection for the tooth nearest to the sealed tooth (clinical trial registration NCT01588210). PMID:24846910

  11. Blood lead--tooth lead relationship among Boston children

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.B.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.C. )

    1989-10-01

    The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. Elevated tooth lead levels have been seen in children who had lead poisoning. Also, on a population wide basis tooth lead levels appear to vary according to housing status and presumably lead exposure. This exposure index has been applied using varying techniques in Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Because of the neurotoxicity of lead, the tooth lead levels of retarded and normal children have been compared. Most recently, in research of lead and child development, tooth lead levels have been used as markers of past lead exposure. Despite the widespread use of tooth lead values, very little is known about the exact time course of lead deposition in tooth from blood. This report compares blood lead levels at different ages to tooth lead levels in a group of Boston children.

  12. Dynamic analysis of straight and involute tooth forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of load speed on straight and involute tooth forms is studied using several finite-element models. It is found that for rapidly rotating gears and sprockets, the load speed along the tooth surface can significantly affect the tooth vibration. Indeed, it is found that for sufficiently high load speeds and for sufficiently slender tooth forms, the tooth deflection can, at times, be directed opposite to the load direction. Comparisons are made of various dynamic models of gear and sprocket teeth. It is shown that for stubby tooth forms there is considerable difference between results obtained with finite element models and results obtained with Timoshenko beam models. Finally, it is shown that gear or sprocket vibrations can be induced by the shape of the tooth form itself. This effect becomes increasingly significant at higher speeds.

  13. Multidisciplinary Management of a Fused Tooth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sen Tunc, Emine; Arici, Nursel; Ozkan, Nilüfer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Fusion is a dental anomaly that arises through the union of two adjacent teeth. The case report presents multidisciplinary management of a fused maxillary anterior tooth. Case Report. A 10-year-old boy was referred to the pediatric dental clinic with the chief complaint of a large upper anterior tooth. Intraoral and radiographic examinations indicated fusion between the permanent maxillary right central incisor and a supernumerary tooth. According to the treatment plan, the fused tooth was sectioned, and the mesial portion was removed. The remaining tooth section was restored with composite resin, and the diastema between the central incisors was closed with orthodontic treatment. After an 18-month followup period, the tooth showed no sign of pathosis. Conclusion. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring a fused tooth that reestablishes function, shape, and esthetics. PMID:24396611

  14. Reasons for Placement of Restorations on Previously Unrestored Tooth Surfaces by Dental PBRN Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O.D.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Mjör, Ivar A.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and quantify the reasons for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org) dentists. Methods A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations from 5,810 patients. Information included: (1) reasons for restoring; (2) tooth and surfaces restored; and (3) restorative materials employed. Results Primary caries (85%) and non-carious defects (15%), which included abrasion/ abfraction/ erosion lesions and tooth fracture, were the main reasons for placement of restorations. Restorations due to caries were frequently placed on occlusal surfaces (49%), followed by distal, mesial, buccal/facial, lingual/palatal, and incisal surfaces. Amalgam was used for 46% of the molar and 45% of the premolar restorations. Directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) was used for 48% of the molar, 49% of the premolar, and 92% of the anterior restorations. Conclusion Dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth are the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by DPBRN practitioner-investigators. RBC is the material most commonly used for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore proximal caries in posterior teeth, although there are significant differences by DPBRN region. PMID:20354094

  15. The Prx1 Homeobox Gene is Critical for Molar Tooth Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J.M.; Hicklin, D.M.; Doughty, P.M.; Hicklin, J.H.; Dickert, J.W.; Tolbert, S.M.; Peterkova, R.; Kern, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The paired-related homeobox genes, Prx1 and Prx2, encode transcription factors critical for orofacial development. Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- neonates have mandibular hypoplasia and malformed mandibular incisors. Although the mandibular incisor phenotype has been briefly described (ten Berge et al., 1998, 2001; Lu et al., 1999), very little is known about the role of Prx proteins during tooth morphogenesis. Since the posterior mandibular region was relatively normal, we examined molar tooth development in Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- embryos to determine whether the tooth malformation is primary to the loss of Prx protein or secondary to defects in surrounding tissues. Three-dimensional (3D) morphological reconstructions demonstrated that Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- embryos had molar malformations, including cuspal changes and ectopic epithelial projections. Although we demonstrate that Prx1 protein is expressed only mesenchymally, 3D reconstructions showed important morphological defects in epithelial tissues at the cap and bell stages. Analysis of these data suggests that the Prx homeoproteins are critical for mesenchymal-epithelial signaling during tooth morphogenesis. PMID:16998126

  16. Two stage gear tooth dynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    The epicyclic gear dynamics program was expanded to add the option of evaluating the tooth pair dynamics for two epicyclic gear stages with peripheral components. This was a practical extension to the program as multiple gear stages are often used for speed reduction, space, weight, and/or auxiliary units. The option was developed for either stage to be a basic planetary, star, single external-external mesh, or single external-internal mesh. The two stage system allows for modeling of the peripherals with an input mass and shaft, an output mass and shaft, and a connecting shaft. Execution of the initial test case indicated an instability in the solution with the tooth paid loads growing to excessive magnitudes. A procedure to trace the instability is recommended as well as a method of reducing the program's computation time by reducing the number of boundary condition iterations.

  17. Effective property of tooth enamel: monoclinic behavior.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cunyou; Nakamura, Toshio; Korach, Chad S

    2012-05-11

    Human tooth enamel possesses a unique morphology characterized by a repeated cell arrangement, which is composed of varying orientations of hydroxyapatite crystals. In the past, various investigators have reported diverse mechanical properties based on isotropic or orthotropic mechanical models in their experimental and numerical studies. However, these models are insufficient to capture the accurate microstructural effects on the enamel mechanical response. In this paper, a monoclinic anisotropic model, which offers correct descriptions of enamel deformation behaviors, is introduced. The model takes into account the 3D orientation changes of the hydroxyapatite crystals and their spatial elastic property variations. The proposed approach is based on a unit-cell and periodic boundary conditions, and it utilizes the collective deformation characteristics of many rods to determine 13 independent material constants required for the monoclinic model. These constants are necessary to utilize the effective property model to study various mechanical conditions such as abrasion, erosion, wear and fracture of whole tooth enamel. PMID:22405497

  18. New method of control of tooth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, I.; Mantareva, V.; Gisbrecht, A.; Valkanov, S.; Uzunov, Tz.

    2010-10-01

    New methods of control of tooth bleaching stages through simultaneous measurements of a reflected light and a fluorescence signal are proposed. It is shown that the bleaching process leads to significant changes in the intensity of a scattered signal and also in the shape and intensity of the fluorescence spectra. Experimental data illustrate that the bleaching process causes essential changes in the teeth discoloration in short time as 8-10 min from the beginning of the application procedure. The continuation of the treatment is not necessary moreover the probability of the enamel destroy increases considerably. The proposed optical back control of tooth surface is a base for development of a practical set up to control the duration of the bleaching procedure.

  19. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. PMID:27197087

  20. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain. PMID:15363215

  1. Ectopic Premolar Tooth in the Sigmoid Notch.

    PubMed

    Törenek, K; Akgül, H M; Bayrakdar, I S

    2016-01-01

    Impaction of a mandibular premolar is relatively uncommon. Ectopic placement is more unusual and there has been no discussion in the literature of an ectopic mandibular premolar in the coronoid process. In this case report, we present an impacted ectopic mandibular permanent premolar in the sigmoid notch (incisura mandibulae) region. Etiology of the tooth and treatment options are discussed and illustrated by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) images. PMID:27547475

  2. Ectopic Premolar Tooth in the Sigmoid Notch

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, H. M.; Bayrakdar, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    Impaction of a mandibular premolar is relatively uncommon. Ectopic placement is more unusual and there has been no discussion in the literature of an ectopic mandibular premolar in the coronoid process. In this case report, we present an impacted ectopic mandibular permanent premolar in the sigmoid notch (incisura mandibulae) region. Etiology of the tooth and treatment options are discussed and illustrated by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) images. PMID:27547475

  3. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures. PMID:25695556

  4. Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

    PubMed

    Kaidonis, John A

    2008-03-01

    Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment. PMID:17938977

  5. Mechanics analysis of molar tooth splitting.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Chai, Herzl; Lawn, Brian R; Bush, Mark B

    2015-03-01

    A model for the splitting of teeth from wedge loading of molar cusps from a round indenting object is presented. The model is developed in two parts: first, a simple 2D fracture mechanics configuration with the wedged tooth simulated by a compact tension specimen; second, a full 3D numerical analysis using extended finite element modeling (XFEM) with an embedded crack. The result is an explicit equation for splitting load in terms of indenter radius and key tooth dimensions. Fracture experiments on extracted human molars loaded axially with metal spheres are used to quantify the splitting forces and thence to validate the model. The XFEM calculations enable the complex crack propagation, initially in the enamel coat and subsequently in the interior dentin, to be followed incrementally with increasing load. The fracture evolution is shown to be stable prior to failure, so that dentin toughness, not strength, is the controlling material parameter. Critical conditions under which tooth splitting in biological and dental settings are likely to be met, however rare, are considered. PMID:25584989

  6. Anthropology, tooth wear, and occlusion ab origine.

    PubMed

    Young, W G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this essay is to emphasize that anthropology, the study of man in his environments, is a potent tool for scientific discovery and inspiration in dental science. It attempts to capture flashes of creative anthropological insight which have illuminated studies of tooth wear and occlusion in the past. While it documents contributions, understandings, and misunderstandings from Australian and New Zealand dentists, it is not a hagiography. The real saint of this essay is the Australian aborigine. For when men and women are understood in their environments, much is learned from them which challenges preconceptions of our dental science culture. The essay concludes that new, contemporary Australian culture needs to be studied by anthropological approaches if we are to understand how dental erosion is exacerbating tooth wear and damaging the occlusions of contemporary Australians. Much remains to be discovered about contemporary lifestyles, habits, and diets that lead to dental erosion, the principal cause of contemporary tooth wear in this part of the world. PMID:9823723

  7. Molariform Mesiodens in Primary Dentition: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Indira, MD; R, Sujatha; Kumar PS, Praveen; Devi BM, Gayatri

    2014-01-01

    A supernumerary tooth is a developmental anomaly and it has been argued to arise from multiple aetiologies. Mesiodens is a midline supernumerary tooth which is commonly seen in the maxillary arch, and incidence of molariform mesiodens in the maxillary midline is rare in permanent dentition and extremely uncommon in primary dentition. A midline supernumerary tooth in the primary dentition can cause an ectopic or a delayed eruption of permanent central incisors, which will further alter occlusion and may compromise aesthetics and formation of dentigerous cysts. This paper reports a rare case which had the presence of a molariform mesiodens in the primary dentition. The treatment plan consisted of extraction of the supernumerary tooth and regular observation of permanent central incisors for proper eruption and alignment. PMID:24995262

  8. Influence of tooth profile modification on spur gear dynamic tooth strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents results of dynamic strain gage measurements performed on the NASA gear-noise rig. The experiments were part of a joint research program between NASA and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. Tests were performed on six sets of low contact ratio spur gears with different tooth profile modifications. Results presented include static and dynamic measurements of gear tooth strain taken over a matrix of operating conditions. The results demonstrate that a well-designed tooth profile modification can significantly reduce dynamic loads in spur gears, especially for gears which operate at high speed and under high torque. The two parabolic modifications tested were not as effective as linear modifications, possibly because the modification zone was too long.

  9. Influence of tooth profile modification on spur gear dynamic tooth strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results of dynamic strain gage measurements performed on the NASA gear-noise rig. The experiments were part of a joint research program between NASA and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. Tests were performed on six sets of low contact ratio spur gears with different tooth profile modifications. Results presented include static and dynamic measurements of gear tooth strain taken over a matrix of operating conditions. The results demonstrate that a well-designed tooth profile modification can significantly reduce dynamic loads in spur gears, especially for gears which operate at high speed and under high torque. The two parabolic modifications tested were not as effective as linear modifications, possibly because the modification zone was too long.

  10. Altered states: Effects of diagenesis on fossil tooth chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, M.J.; Schoeninger, M.J.; Barker, W.W.

    1999-09-01

    Investigation of modern and fossil teeth from northern and central Kenya, using the ion microprobe, electron microprobe, and transmission electron microscope, confirms that fossil tooth chemistry is controlled not only by the diagenetic precipitation of secondary minerals but also by the chemical alteration of the biogenic apatite. Increases in the concentrations of Fe, Mn, Si, Al, Ba, and possibly Cu in fossil vs. modern teeth reflect mixtures of apatite and secondary minerals. These secondary minerals occur in concentrations ranging from {approximately}0.3% in enamel to {approximately}5% in dentine and include sub-{micro}m, interstitial Fe-bearing manganite [(Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 3+})O(OH)], and smectite. The pervasive distribution and fine grain size of the secondary minerals indicate that mixed analyses of primary and secondary material are unavoidable in in situ methods, even in ion microprobe spots only 10 {micro}m in diameter, and that bulk chemical analyses are severely biased. Increases in other elements, including the rare earth elements, U, F, and possibly Sr apparently reflect additional alteration of apatite in both dentine and enamel. Extreme care will be required to separate secondary minerals from original biogenic apatite for paleobiological or paleoclimate studies, and nonetheless bulk analyses of purified apatite may be suspect. Although the PO{sub 4} component of teeth seems resistant to chemical alteration, the OH component is extensively altered. This OH alteration implies that bulk analyses of fossil tooth enamel for oxygen isotope composition may be systematically biased by {+-}1%, and seasonal records of oxygen isotope composition may be spuriously shifted, enhanced, or diminished.

  11. Local Synthesis and Tooth Contact Analysis of Face-Milled, Uniform Tooth Height Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Wang, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    Face-milled spiral bevel gears with uniform tooth height are considered. An approach is proposed for the design of low-noise and localized bearing contact of such gears. The approach is based on the mismatch of contacting surfaces and permits two types of bearing contact either directed longitudinally or across the surface to be obtained. Conditions to avoid undercutting were determined. A Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) was developed. This analysis was used to determine the influence of misalignment on meshing and contact of the spiral bevel gears. A numerical example that illustrates the theory developed is provided.

  12. Generation of spiral bevel gears with conjugate tooth surfaces and tooth contact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Tsung, Wei-Jiung; Lee, Hong-Tao

    1987-01-01

    A new method for generation of spiral bevel gears is proposed. The main features of this method are as follows: (1) the gear tooth surfaces are conjugated and can transform rotation with zero transmission errors; (2) the tooth bearing contact is localized; (3) the center of the instantaneous contact ellipse moves in a plane that has a fixed orientation; (4) the contact normal performs in the process of meshing a parallel motion; (5) the motion of the contact ellipse provides improved conditions of lubrication; and (6) the gears can be manufactured by use of Gleason's equipment.

  13. Efficacy of Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seoul Hee; Lee, Hae June; Hong, Jin Woo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The conventional light source used for tooth bleaching has the potential to cause thermal damage, and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. In this study, we evaluated bleaching efficacy, temperature, and morphological safety after tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. Tooth bleaching combined with plasma had improved efficacy in providing a higher level of brightness. The temperature of the pulp chamber was maintained around 37°C, indicating that the plasma does not cause any thermal damage. The morphological results of tooth bleaching with plasma did not affect mineral composition under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. On the basis of these results, the application of plasma and low concentration of 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) has a high capability for effective tooth bleaching. It can be documented that plasma is a safe energe source, which has no deleterious effects on the tooth surface. PMID:25685843

  14. beta-Catenin initiates tooth neogenesis in adult rodent incisors.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Dangaria, S; Andl, T; Zhang, Y; Wright, A C; Damek-Poprawa, M; Piccolo, S; Nagy, A; Taketo, M M; Diekwisch, T G H; Akintoye, S O; Millar, S E

    2010-09-01

    beta-Catenin signaling is required for embryonic tooth morphogenesis and promotes continuous tooth development when activated in embryos. To determine whether activation of this pathway in the adult oral cavity could promote tooth development, we induced mutation of epithelial beta-catenin to a stabilized form in adult mice. This caused increased proliferation of the incisor tooth cervical loop, outpouching of incisor epithelium, abnormal morphology of the epithelial-mesenchymal junction, and enhanced expression of genes associated with embryonic tooth development. Ectopic dental-like structures were formed from the incisor region following implantation into immunodeficient mice. Thus, forced activation of beta-catenin signaling can initiate an embryonic-like program of tooth development in adult rodent incisor teeth. PMID:20530729

  15. β-catenin Initiates Tooth Neogenesis in Adult Rodent Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, F.; Dangaria, S.; Andl, T.; Zhang, Y.; Wright, A.C.; Damek-Poprawa, M.; Piccolo, S.; Nagy, A.; Taketo, M.M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Akintoye, S.O.; Millar, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    β-catenin signaling is required for embryonic tooth morphogenesis and promotes continuous tooth development when activated in embryos. To determine whether activation of this pathway in the adult oral cavity could promote tooth development, we induced mutation of epithelial β-catenin to a stabilized form in adult mice. This caused increased proliferation of the incisor tooth cervical loop, outpouching of incisor epithelium, abnormal morphology of the epithelial-mesenchymal junction, and enhanced expression of genes associated with embryonic tooth development. Ectopic dental-like structures were formed from the incisor region following implantation into immunodeficient mice. Thus, forced activation of β-catenin signaling can initiate an embryonic-like program of tooth development in adult rodent incisor teeth. PMID:20530729

  16. Tooth structural health monitoring with a fiber optic microbend sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishen, A.; Rafique, A.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to monitor structural response in intact teeth and teeth with structural loss using a noninvasive fiber optic microbend (FOMB) sensor. In this study a miniature fiber optic microbend sensor is fabricated and tested on intact tooth specimens, tooth specimens in which one-third crown structure was removed, tooth specimens in which access cavity was prepared and tooth specimens in which access cavity and root canal were prepared. The microbend sensor displayed a direct relationship between the applied load and the output light intensity. The rate of change in light intensity with increase in loads corresponded with the structural response of the tooth. This experiment highlights the potential of FOMB sensor technology to quantitatively monitor tooth structural loss during post endodontic restorations.

  17. Knowledge about tooth avulsion and its management among dental assistants in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating dental assistants’ knowledge about tooth avulsion and its management are rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of knowledge about tooth avulsion and its management among dental assistants in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and to assess its relationship with their educational background. Methods A convenience sampling methodology was employed for sample selection. Over a period of four months starting in February, 2013, 691 pretested 17-item questionnaires were distributed. A total of 498 questionnaires were returned for an overall response rate of 72.1%. Six questions were related to knowledge about permanent tooth avulsion and one question was related to knowledge about primary tooth avulsion. Correct answers to these questions were assigned one point each, and based on this scoring system, an overall knowledge score was calculated. An analysis of covariance was used to test the association between the level of knowledge (total score) and the educational qualifications of the respondents (dental degree and others). A P-value of 0.05 was considered the threshold for statistical significance. Results The majority of the respondents (n = 387; 77.7%) were non-Saudis (377 were from the Philippines), and 79.1% (n = 306) of the Filipinos had a dental degree. The question about recommendations for an avulsed tooth that is dirty elicited the highest number of correct responses (n = 444; 89.2%), whereas the question about the best storage media elicited the lowest number of correct responses (n = 192; 38.6%). The overall mean score for knowledge about tooth avulsion was 6.27 ± 1.74. The mean knowledge score among the respondents with a dental degree was 6.63 ± 1.37, whereas that among the respondents with other qualifications was 5.71 ± 2.08. Conclusions The educational qualifications of the surveyed dental assistants were strongly correlated with the level of knowledge about tooth avulsion and its

  18. Sonosurgery for atraumatic tooth extraction: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Dimitrios E V; Geminiani, Alessandro; Zahavi, Thomas; Ercoli, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The preservation of an intact labial plate during tooth extraction is a critical determinant of whether an immediate implant can be placed and is also an important predictor of the esthetic result. The purpose of this clinical report was to present a method for atraumatic tooth extraction by using an air-driven sonic instrument with specially designed inserts. This surgical technique provides the clinician with an efficient method for atraumatic tooth extraction and preservation of an intact labial plate. PMID:23217465

  19. [Interproximal tooth cleansing of abutment teeth and pontic design].

    PubMed

    Kocher, T; Plagmann, H C; Engelsmann, U; Schlüter, R

    1990-03-01

    This clinical study was an attempt to find out if a patient's home care plaque control at his or her abutment tooth is more effectively enhanced by a modified ridge lap or a hygienic pontic design. Oral hygiene was performed either with a tooth brush alone or in combination with an interdental brush. We found that the effectivity of interproximal toothcleaning was not influenced by the pontic design and that only interdental brushes permit a good plaque control at the proximal area of the abutment tooth. This implies that "self cleansing" is non-existent in these tooth areas. PMID:2257819

  20. Computer aided design of bevel gear tooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided design procedure for generating bevel gears. The development is based on examining a perfectly plastic, cone-shaped gear blank rolling over a cutting tooth on a plane crown rack. The resulting impression on the plastic gear blank is the envelope of the cutting tooth. This impression and envelope thus form a conjugate tooth surface. Equations are presented for the locus of points on the tooth surface. The same procedures are then extended to simulate the generation of a spiral bevel gear. The corresponding governing equations are presented.

  1. Computer-aided design of bevel gear tooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuo, Hung Chang; Huston, Ronald L.; Coy, John J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided design procedure for generating bevel gears. The development is based on examining a perfectly plastic, cone-shaped gear blank rolling over a cutting tooth on a plane crown rack. The resulting impression on the plastic gear blank is the envelope of the cutting tooth. This impression and envelope thus form a conjugate tooth surface. Equations are presented for the locus of points on the tooth surface. The same procedures are then extended to simulate the generation of a spiral bevel gear. The corresponding governing equations are presented.

  2. Interactions of the tooth and bone during development.

    PubMed

    Alfaqeeh, S A; Gaete, M; Tucker, A S

    2013-12-01

    The tooth works as a functional unit with its surrounding bony socket, the alveolar bone. The growth of the tooth and alveolar bone is co-ordinated so that a studied distance always separates the 2, known as the tooth-bone interface (TBI). Lack of mineralization, a crucial feature of the TBI, creates the space for the developing tooth to grow and the soft tissues of the periodontium to develop. We have investigated the interactions between the tooth and its surrounding bone during development, focusing on the impact of the developing alveolar bone on the development of the mouse first molar (M1). During development, TRAP-positive osteoclasts are found to line the TBI as bone starts to be deposited around the tooth, removing the bone as the tooth expands. An enhancement of osteoclastogenesis through RANK-RANKL signaling results in an expansion of the TBI, showing that osteoclasts are essential for defining the size of this region. Isolation of the M1 from the surrounding mesenchyme and alveolar bone leads to an expansion of the tooth germ, driven by increased proliferation, indicating that, during normal development, the growth of the tooth germ is constrained by the surrounding tissues. PMID:24155263

  3. Reliability in age determination by pulp/tooth ratio in upper canines in skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Brogi, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Luigi; Mirtella, Dora; Vultaggio, Claudia; Cingolani, Mariano; Fornaciari, Gino

    2006-07-01

    Estimation of age of skeletal remains is one of the most complex questions for anthropologists. The most common macroscopic methods are based on dental wear and histological evaluation of bone remodeling. These methods are often qualitative, require great technical expertise, and have proved inexact in the estimation of ages over 50 years. Certain dental methods investigate the apposition of secondary dentine, in the study of tooth cross-sections, and X-rays to study width, height, and pulp area. The primary author previously proposed a method of estimating the age of a living person based on the pulp/tooth ratio (PTR) method in the upper canines. The aim of the present study is to verify whether the PTR method can also be used to estimate the age at death of skeletal remains. This paper investigates the study of historical samples of known age as a means to validate the proposed method. PMID:16882230

  4. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  5. Impact of diet on tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Richards, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesPubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, EBSHost, Scientific Electronic Library online (SciELO).Study selectionPopulation-based cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing tooth erosion and diet, conducted in children and adolescents between eight and 19 years reporting on the permanent dentition were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudies were selected independently by two reviewers and standard data items extracted. Study quality was assessed using the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) statement and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). The pooled effect of dietary habits on tooth erosion occurrence was calculated using a fixed and a random model (OR and 95%CI).ResultsThirteen studies involving a total of 16,661 children were included. Eleven of the studies were cross-sectional and two longitudinal. Dietary habits data were mainly obtained from brief dietary assessments (69.2%) with food amount (weighed or estimated) and food frequency questionnaires used less commonly (15.4%). Most dietary assessments were self-administered (84.6%), assessed diet on a single occasion (61.5%) and required recalls of a week or more days or usual behaviours (46.2%). Meta-analyses were carried out for carbonated/soft drinks, sports drinks, milk-based drinks, yogurt, confectionery and snacks and acidic natural fruit drinks. Higher consumption of carbonated drinks or acid snacks/sweets and for acid fruit juices increased the odds for tooth erosion, while higher intake of milk and yogurt reduced the odds of erosion (see table).ConclusionsThe evidence indicated that some dietary habits (soft drinks, acidic snacks/sweets and acidic fruit juices) increased the odds for erosion occurrence, while milk or yogurt produced a protective effect. Methodological issues were shown to partly explain the heterogeneity of the data for some dietary products. PMID:27339233

  6. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells. PMID:26538639

  7. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S

    2015-01-01

    During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2(+) cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2(+)/Sox9(+) cells. PMID:26538639

  8. Global Burden of Severe Tooth Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kassebaum, N.J.; Bernabé, E.; Dahiya, M.; Bhandari, B.; Murray, C.J.L.; Marcenes, W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study has been to systematically produce comparable estimates of the burden of 291 diseases and injuries and their associated 1,160 sequelae from 1990 to 2010. We aimed to report here internally consistent prevalence and incidence estimates of severe tooth loss for all countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes for 1990 and 2010. The systematic search of the literature yielded 5,618 unique citations. After titles and abstracts were screened, 5,285 citations were excluded as clearly not relevant to this systematic review, leaving 333 for full-text review; 265 publications were further excluded following the validity assessment. A total of 68 studies—including 285,746 individuals aged 12 yr or older in 26 countries—were included in the meta-analysis using modeling resources of the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study. Between 1990 and 2010, the global age-standardized prevalence of edentate people decreased from 4.4% (95% uncertainty interval: 4.1%, 4.8%) to 2.4% (95% UI: 2.2%, 2.7%), and incidence rate decreased from 374 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% UI: 347, 406) to 205 cases (95% UI: 187, 226). No differences were found by sex in 2010. Prevalence increased gradually with age, showing a steep increase around the seventh decade of life that was associated with a peak in incidence at 65 years. Geographic differences in prevalence, incidence, and rate of improvement from 1990 to 2010 were stark. Our review of available quality literature on the epidemiology of tooth loss shows a significant decline in the prevalence and incidence of severe tooth loss between 1990 and 2010 at the global, regional, and country levels. PMID:24947899

  9. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  10. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth. PMID:26582651

  11. Community social capital and tooth loss in Japanese older people: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shihoko; Aida, Jun; Saito, Masashige; Kondo, Naoki; Sato, Yukihiro; Matsuyama, Yusuke; Tani, Yukako; Sasaki, Yuri; Kondo, Katsunori; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Tsuboya, Toru; Osaka, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Objective To date, no study has prospectively examined the association between social capital (SC) in the community and oral health. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study was to examine the association between both community-level and individual-level SC and tooth loss in older Japanese people. Design Prospective cohort study Setting We utilised data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) performed in 2010 and 2013 and conducted in 525 districts. Participants The target population was restricted to non-institutionalised people aged 65 years or older. Participants included 51 280 people who responded to two surveys and who had teeth at baseline. Primary outcome measure The primary outcome measure was loss of remaining teeth, measured by the downward change of any category of remaining teeth, between baseline and follow-up. Results The mean age of the participants was 72.5 years (SD=5.4). During the study period, 8.2% (n=4180) lost one or more of their remaining teeth. Among three community-level SC variables obtained from factor analysis, an indicator of civic participation significantly reduced the risk of tooth loss (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99). The individual-level SC variables ‘hobby activity participation’ and ‘sports group participation’ were also associated with a reduced risk of tooth loss (OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.95 and OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.82 to 0.99, respectively). Conclusions Living in a community with rich SC and individuals with good SC is associated with lower incidence of tooth loss among older Japanese people. PMID:27048636

  12. Combined implant-residual tooth supported prosthesis after tooth hemisection: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Hasan, Istabrak; Keilig, Ludger; Chen, Junliang; Pan, Qing; Huang, Yue; Bourauel, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Tooth hemisection preserves partial tooth structure and reduces the resorption of alveolar bone. The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of preserving a molar after hemisection and inserting a dental implant with different prosthetic superstructures by means of finite element analysis. First, the distance between the root of the mandibular second premolar and the distal root of the first molar were measured in 80 cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets. Based on these data, the lower right posterior jaw segment was reconstructed and the geometries of the appropriate implant were imported. Four models were created: (1) Hemi-1: An implant (3.7×9mm) replaced the mesial root of the molar, and a single crown was placed on the implant and residual tooth. (2) Hemi-2: Two separate crowns were generated for the implant and the residual tooth. (3) Single: An implant (5.5×9mm) with crown replaced the whole molar. (4) FPD: A 3-unit fixed partial denture combined the distal residual part of the molar and premolar. The results indicated that stresses in the cortical bone and strains in the majority region of the spongious bone were below the physiological upper limits. There were higher stresses in implant with the Hemi-1 and Single models, which had the same maximum values of 45.0MPa. The FPD models represented the higher values of stresses in the teeth and strains in PDL compared to other models. From a biomechanical point of view, it can be concluded that a combination of an implant and residual molar after tooth hemisection is an acceptable treatment option. PMID:26851558

  13. Fate of HERS during Tooth Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Bringas, Pablo; Slavkin, Harold C.; Chai, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Tooth root development begins after the completion of crown formation in mammals. Previous studies have shown that Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) plays an important role in root development, but the fate of HERS has remained unknown. In order to investigate the morphological fate and analyze the dynamic movement of HERS cells in vivo, we generated K14-Cre;R26R mice. HERS cells are detectable on the surface of the root throughout root formation and do not disappear. Most of the HERS cells are attached to the surface of the cementum, and others separate to become the epithelial rest of Malasez. HERS cells secrete extracellular matrix components onto the surface of the dentin before dental follicle cells penetrate the HERS network to contact dentin. HERS cells also participate in the cementum development and may differentiate into cementocytes. During root development, the HERS is not interrupted, and instead the HERS cells continue to communicate with each other through the network structure. Furthermore, HERS cells interact with cranial neural crest derived mesenchyme to guide root development. Taken together, the network of HERS cells is crucial for tooth root development. PMID:19576204

  14. Inadvertent tooth movement with fixed lingual retainers.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Timothy G; Proffit, William R; Samara, Said A

    2016-02-01

    Fixed retainers are effective in maintaining the alignment of the anterior teeth more than 90% of the time, but they can produce inadvertent tooth movement that in the most severe instances requires orthodontic retreatment managed with a periodontist. This is different from relapse into crowding when a fixed retainer is lost. These problems arise when the retainer breaks but remains bonded to some or all teeth, or when an intact retainer is distorted by function or was not passive when bonded. In both instances, torque of the affected teeth is the predominant outcome. A fixed retainer made with dead soft wire is the least likely to create torque problems but is the most likely to break. Highly flexible twist wires bonded to all the teeth appear to be the most likely to produce inadvertent tooth movement, but this also can occur with stiffer wires bonded only to the canines. Orthodontists, general dentists, and patients should be aware of possible problems with fixed retainers, especially those with all teeth bonded, because the patient might not notice partial debonding. Regular observations of patients wearing fixed retainers by orthodontists in the short term and family dentists in the long term are needed. PMID:26827985

  15. Fus Expression Patterns in Developing Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the RNA/DNA-binding protein FUS, Fused in sarcoma, was shown to play a role in growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis in vertebrates. Because little is known about Fus, we investigated its expression pattern in murine tooth development. In situ hybridization of mouse mandibles at specific developmental stages was performed with a DIG-labeled RNA probe. During early tooth development, Fus was detected in the dental epithelium and dental mesenchyme at 11 days postcoitum (dpc) and 12 dpc. From 14 dpc, Fus was strongly expressed in the dental papilla and the cervical loop of the dental epithelium. At postnatal day 4 (PN4), Fus expression was observed in the odontoblasts, ameloblasts, the proliferation zone of the pulp, and the cervical loop. At PN14, the expression pattern of Fus was found to be maintained in the odontoblasts and the proliferation zone of the pulp. Furthermore, Fus expression was especially strong in the Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath (HERS). Therefore, this study suggests that Fus may play a role in the HERS during root development. PMID:25949136

  16. The challenges of treating a fused tooth.

    PubMed

    Baratto-Filho, Flares; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Crozeta, Bruno Monguilhott; Baratto, Samantha Pugsley; Campos, Edson Alves; Tomazinho, Flavia Sens Fagundes; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the multidisciplinary treatment involving a permanent maxillary lateral incisor fused to a supernumerary tooth, both presenting pulp necrosis and periapical lesion. A 15-year-old male patient sought treatment complaining of pain, swelling and mobility on the maxillary right lateral incisor. After clinical and radiographic examination, root canal preparation was performed according to the crown-down technique and a calcium hydroxide dressing was placed for 15 days. The patient returned and the definitive endodontic filling was done with thermomechanical compaction of gutta-percha and sealer. After 18 months, clinical and radiographic examinations were carried out and no pain or swelling was reported. Two years after endodontic treatment, the patient returned for periodontal and cosmetic treatments. Nine months later, a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed that the previously detected periodontal defect and periapical lesion were persistent. Apical endodontic surgery was indicated. The supernumerary tooth was removed, the communicating distal surface was filled and the surgical site received bioactive glass and demineralized bovine organic bone. The pathological tissue was submitted to histopathological examination and the diagnosis was periapical cyst. One year after the apical endodontic surgery, CBCT showed bone formation at maxillary lateral incisor apical area. Two years after the surgery, the restoration was replaced due to aesthetic reasons and periapical radiograph showed success after 5 years of treatment. A correct diagnosis and establishment of an adequate treatment plan resulted in a successful management of the case. PMID:22814696

  17. Specificity protein 7 is not essential for tooth morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John C.; Bae, Ji-Myung; Adhami, Mitra; Rashid, Harunur; Chen, Haiyan; Napierala, Dobrawa; Gutierrez, Soraya E.; Sinha, Krishna; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Javed, Amjad

    2014-01-01

    Tooth formation is a multifaceted process involving numerous interactions between oral epithelium and neural crest derived ecto-mesenchyme from morphogenesis to cytodifferentiation. The precise molecular regulator that drives the cyto-differentiation and dynamic cross-talk between the two cell types has yet to be fully understood. Runx2 along with its downstream target Sp7 are essential transcription factors for development of the mineralizing cell types. Global knockout of the Runx2 gene results in an arrest of tooth morphogenesis at the late bud stage. Like Runx2, Sp7-null mutants exhibit peri-natal lethality and are completely devoid of alveolar bone. However, the role of Sp7 in tooth development remains elusive. Here, we report the effects of Sp7 deletion on tooth formation. Surprisingly, tooth morphogenesis progresses normally until the mid bell stage in Sp7-homozygous mutants. Incisors and multi-cusped first and second molars were noted in both littermates. Thus, formation of alveolar bone is not a prerequisite for tooth morphogenesis. Tooth organs of Sp7-null however, were significantly smaller in size when compared to WT. Differentiation of both ameloblasts and odontoblasts was disrupted in Sp7-null mice. Only premature and disorganized ameloblasts and odontoblasts were noted in mutant mice. These data indicate that Sp7 is not required for tooth morphogenesis but is obligatory for the functional maturation of both ameloblasts and odontoblasts. PMID:25158188

  18. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a)...

  19. [Tooth decay and its complication prognosis in smokers].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, L Iu; Osipova, M V

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on complicated and non-complicated tooth decay course and prognosis in smokers. Oral status, prevention and treatment effectiveness was assessed in 330 non-smokers and 345 smoking patients. The results allowed concluding with guidelines for tooth decay prevention and treatment in smokers. PMID:24576962

  20. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  1. [Tooth regeneration in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)].

    PubMed

    Stephan, F; Artis, J P; Lanot, R

    1977-01-01

    The first inferior molar has been extracted, a part of its being reimplanted or not. A new molar of normal form regenerated, apparently from the apex of the tooth germ, in all cases in which the alveolus was left free or implanted with a tooth freagment deprived of pulpa. PMID:145296

  2. Erosive Tooth Wear and Related Risk Factors in 8- and 14-Year-Old Greek Children.

    PubMed

    Provatenou, Efthymia; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Kevrekidou, Aikaterini; Kosma, Ismini; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the erosive tooth wear of primary and permanent teeth and its association with related risk factors. Two groups of Greek children aged 8 (n = 329) and 14 years (n = 263) were examined in the classroom using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. Data concerning risk factors were collected using questionnaires. Dental caries (DMFS/dmfs) was also recorded. The data were analyzed using the t test, one-way ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, Fisher's exact test, and the χ2 test. In the 8-year-olds, the primary teeth showed a predominantly medium level of wear and the permanent teeth no wear. A majority of the 14-year-olds exhibited low risk levels of wear. The most frequently affected dental surface in both age groups was the occlusal surface of the mandibular posterior teeth. In the 8-year-olds, BEWE scores and the prevalence of wear in the primary teeth was influenced by gender (p = 0.020). In their permanent teeth, soft drink consumption (p < 0.0001) and preference for lemon/vinegar (p = 0.041) significantly affected wear prevalence and BEWE scores, while habitually retaining soft drinks in the mouth influenced wear prevalence (p = 0.008), risk (p = 0.004), and BEWE scores (p = 0.022). In the 14-year-olds, wear prevalence was significantly affected by the consumption of lemon-flavored candies (p = 0.016) and soft drinks (p = 0.050). BEWE scores were significantly affected by gender (p = 0.022) and soft drink consumption (p = 0.030). Gender influenced tooth wear risk in both age groups (p = 0.010 and p = 0.021, respectively). The results of this study indicate that erosive tooth wear differed between primary and permanent teeth and was influenced by gender and dietary factors. PMID:27286713

  3. Crowned spur gears - Methods for generation and tooth contact analysis. I - Basic concepts, generation of the pinion tooth surface by a plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Handschuh, R. F.; Zhang, J.

    1988-01-01

    A topology of crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is proposed. The geometry of the deviated pinion tooth surface and regular gear tooth surface, along with tooth contact analysis is discussed. Generation of the deviated pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a five-degree-of-freedom system is proposed. Numerical results are included and indicate that transmission errors remain low as the gears are misaligned.

  4. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  5. Cracked tooth syndrome: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Sadasiva, Kadandale; Ramalingam, Sathishmuthukumar; Rajaram, Krishnaraj; Meiyappan, Alagappan

    2015-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), the term was coined by Cameron in 1964, which refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth extending to the dentin and occasionally into the pulp. CTS has always been a nightmare to the patient because of its unpredictable symptoms and a diagnostic dilemma for the dental practitioner due to its variable, bizarre clinical presentation. The treatment planning and management of CTS has also given problems and challenges the dentist as there is no specific treatment option. The management of CTS varies from one case to another or from one tooth to another in the same individual based on the severity of the symptoms and depth of tooth structure involved. After all, the prognosis of such tooth is still questionable and requires continuous evaluation. This article aims at presenting a series three cases of CTS with an overview on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and the different treatment options that varies from one case to another. PMID:26538947

  6. Surgical Methods for the Acceleration of the Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Almpani, Konstantinia; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-01-01

    Surgical techniques for the acceleration of the orthodontic tooth movement have been tested for more than 100 years in clinical practice. Since original methods have been extremely invasive and have been associated with increased tooth morbidity and various other gaps, the research in this field has always followed an episodic trend. Modern approaches represent a well-refined strategy where the concept of the bony block has been abandoned and only a cortical plate around the orthodontic tooth movement has been desired. Selective alveolar decortication has been a reproducible gold standard to this end. Its proposed mechanism has been the induction of rapid orthodontic tooth movement through the involvement of the periodontal ligament. More recent techniques included further refinement of this procedure through less invasive techniques such as the use of piezoelectricity and corticision. This chapter focuses on the evolution of the surgical approaches and the mechanistic concepts underlying the biological process during the surgically accelerated orthodontic tooth movement. PMID:26599122

  7. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  8. The fusion of three primary incisors: report of case.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, K; Yonezu, T; Yakushiji, M; Machida, Y

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of a fusion of three primary incisors is rare. A two-year-old Japanese girl was brought to the pediatric dental outpatient clinic, Tokyo Dental College, to receive a caries-prevention treatment. The fused tooth consisted of the maxillary primary central incisors and right maxillary lateral incisor. Primary left lateral incisor erupted normally and the other primary teeth were erupted. The radicular pulp chambers were fused into one for three fourths of the length from the apex, and only one root. The hair and skin of the patient appeared normal and no systemic abnormality or congenital disease was noted in the medical history of the patient and her family. The occurrence of a three-tooth fusion, and no supernumerary tooth was confirmed. PMID:10656127

  9. ACQUIRED PES CAVUS IN CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Maranho, Daniel Augusto; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of the forefoot, hindfoot or it may be a combination of both locations. Related deformities, mainly the varus and toe clawing require appropriate evaluation; clinical characteristics such as severity of the deformity, impairment of the muscular power, flexibility and patient's age are important characteristics in the treatment decision. Conservative treatment of the cavusvarus foot with physiotherapy, insoles and shoe modifications are reserved to young patients and mild deformities. However, there is a tendency of the deformity to become more severe over time because of the progressive feature of the underlying neurological condition. So, the surgical treatment by using classical techniques is performed in early stages. Most importantly is the identification of the primary and main components of each deformity to properly correct them, if possible. Muscular transfers are used to treat the dynamic unbalance, retracted structures should be either divided or lengthened and localized osteotomies should be preferred over arthrodeses, which are reserved for stiff and severely deformed feet in adults. PMID:27077056

  10. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease and intracellular traffic

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Cecilia; Bakke, Oddmund; Progida, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of genes whose primary function is the regulation of membrane traffic are increasingly being identified as the underlying causes of various important human disorders. Intriguingly, mutations in ubiquitously expressed membrane traffic genes often lead to cell type- or organ-specific disorders. This is particularly true for neuronal diseases, identifying the nervous system as the most sensitive tissue to alterations of membrane traffic. Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common inherited peripheral neuropathies. It is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), which comprises a group of disorders specifically affecting peripheral nerves. This peripheral neuropathy, highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of the muscle of the foot, lower leg, hand and forearm, accompanied by sensory loss in the toes, fingers and limbs. More than 30 genes have been identified as targets of mutations that cause CMT neuropathy. A number of these genes encode proteins directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of intracellular traffic. Indeed, the list of genes linked to CMT disease includes genes important for vesicle formation, phosphoinositide metabolism, lysosomal degradation, mitochondrial fission and fusion, and also genes encoding endosomal and cytoskeletal proteins. This review focuses on the link between intracellular transport and CMT disease, highlighting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the different forms of this peripheral neuropathy and discussing the pathophysiological impact of membrane transport genetic defects as well as possible future ways to counteract these defects. PMID:22465036

  11. Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Urala, Arun Srinivas; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Jayaswal, Priyanka; Valiathan, Ashima

    2012-01-01

    Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed. PMID:22474648

  12. Update on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patzkó, Ágnes; Shy, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. CMT results from mutations in more than 40 genes expressed in Schwann cells and neurons causing overlapping phenotypes. The classic CMT phenotype reflects length-dependent axonal degeneration characterized by distal sensory loss and weakness, deep tendon reflex abnormalities, and skeletal deformities. Recent articles have provided insight into the molecular pathogenesis of CMT, which, for the first time, suggest potential therapeutic targets. Although there are currently no effective medications for CMT, multiple clinical trials are ongoing or being planned. This review will focus on the underlying pathomechanisms and diagnostic approaches of CMT and discuss the emerging therapeutic strategies. PMID:21080241

  13. Tooth Size Variation in Pinniped Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Suzuki, Satoshi; Asahara, Masakazu; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    It is contentious whether size variation among mammalian teeth is heterogeneous or homogeneous, whether the coefficient of variation is reliable, and whether the standard deviation of log-transformed data and the residual of standard deviation on mean variable size are useful replacements for the coefficient of variation. Most studies of tooth size variation have been on mammals with complex-crowned teeth, with relatively little attention paid to taxa with simple-crowned teeth, such as Pinnipedia. To fill this gap in knowledge and to resolve the existing controversies, we explored the variation of linear size variables (length and width) for all teeth from complete permanent dentitions of four pinniped species, two phocids (Histriophoca fasciata, Phoca largha) and two otariids (Callorhinus ursinus, Eumetopias jubatus). Size variation among these teeth was mostly heterogeneous both along the toothrow and among species. The incisors, canines, and mesial and distal postcanines were often relatively highly variable. The levels of overall dental size variation ranged from relatively low as in land carnivorans (Phoca largha and both otariids) to high (Histriophoca fasciata). Sexual size dimorphism varied among teeth and among species, with teeth being, on average, larger in males than in females. This dimorphism was more pronounced, and the canines were larger and more dimorphic relative to other teeth in the otariids than in the phocids. The coefficient of variation quantified variation reliably in most cases. The standard deviation of log-transformed data was redundant with the coefficient of variation. The residual of standard deviation on mean variable size was inaccurate when size variation was considerably heterogeneous among the compared variables, and was incomparable between species and between sexes. The existing hypotheses invoking developmental fields, occlusal complexity, and the relative timing of tooth formation and sexually dimorphic hormonal activity do

  14. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  15. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided. PMID:26581762

  16. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  17. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation. PMID:26945598

  18. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  19. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a transmembrane zinc-endopeptidase that breaks down extracellular matrix components, including several collagens, during tissue development and physiological remodeling. MT1-MMP-deficient mice (MT1-MMP(-/-)) feature severe defects in connective tissues, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, fibrosis, and conspicuous loss of molar tooth eruption and root formation. In order to define the functions of MT1-MMP during root formation and tooth eruption, we analyzed the development of teeth and surrounding tissues in the absence of MT1-MMP. In situ hybridization showed that MT1-MMP was widely expressed in cells associated with teeth and surrounding connective tissues during development. Multiple defects in dentoalveolar tissues were associated with loss of MT1-MMP. Root formation was inhibited by defective structure and function of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, no defect was found in creation of the eruption pathway, suggesting that tooth eruption was hampered by lack of alveolar bone modeling/remodeling coincident with reduced periodontal ligament (PDL) formation and integration with the alveolar bone. Additionally, we identified a significant defect in dentin formation and mineralization associated with the loss of MT1-MMP. To segregate these multiple defects and trace their cellular origin, conditional ablation of MT1-MMP was performed in epithelia and mesenchyme. Mice featuring selective loss of MT1-MMP activity in the epithelium were indistinguishable from wild type mice, and importantly, featured a normal HERS structure and molar eruption. In contrast, selective knock-out of MT1-MMP in Osterix-expressing mesenchymal cells, including osteoblasts and odontoblasts, recapitulated major defects from the global knock-out including altered HERS structure, short roots, defective dentin formation and mineralization, and reduced alveolar bone formation, although molars were able to erupt. These data

  20. Primary Place. Whole Language--Starting Out and Staying Strong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Mary Beth; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The article addresses the needs of primary grade teachers, focusing on whole language. It offers strategies from various primary teachers on such issues as classroom supplies, whole-language displays, literature-based activities, charts, graphs, language logs, end-of-the-day journals, and a class tooth book. (SM)

  1. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun; Du, Minquan; Jiang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35-49 yrs and 50-74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35-49 and 50-74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50-74 yr group than in the 35-49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  2. Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The range of potential morphologies resulting from evolution is limited by complex interacting processes, ranging from development to function. Quantifying these interactions is important for understanding adaptation and convergent evolution. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of carnivoran and dasyuromorph tooth rows, we compared statistical models of the relationship between tooth row shape and the opposing tooth row, a static feature, as well as measures of mandibular motion during chewing (occlusion), which are kinetic features. This is a new approach to quantifying functional integration because we use measures of movement and displacement, such as the amount the mandible translates laterally during occlusion, as opposed to conventional morphological measures, such as mandible length and geometric landmarks. By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals. Results Statistical model comparisons demonstrate that the best performing models always include some measure of mandibular motion, indicating that functional and statistical models of tooth shape as purely a function of the opposing tooth row are too simple and that increased model complexity provides a better understanding of tooth form. The predictors of the best performing models always included the opposing tooth row shape and a relative linear measure of mandibular motion. Conclusions Our results provide quantitative support of long-standing hypotheses of tooth row shape as being influenced by mandibular motion in addition to the opposing tooth row. Additionally, this study illustrates the utility and necessity of including kinetic features in analyses of morphological integration. PMID:22899809

  3. Natal tooth associated with fibrous hyperplasia - a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Harsimran Singh; Munjal, Deepti; Dhingra, Renuka; Malik, Narender Singh; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur

    2015-04-01

    Eruption of tooth at about 6 months of age is a significant stage in child's life and is an emotional event for parents. However, a tooth present in the oral cavity of newborn can lead to a lot of delusions. Natal and neonatal teeth are of utmost importance not only for a dentist but also for a paediatrician due to parent's anxiety, folklore superstitions and numerous associated complications with it. This paper reports a rare case, wherein a natal tooth has led to the development of a reactive fibrous hyperplasia in an 8-week-old infant. PMID:26023656

  4. Management of a root fracture in an immature permanent tooth.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kenshi; Nishioka, Takahiro; Seo, Reishi; Kimura, Mitsusaka

    2005-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with trauma to the maxillary right permanent central incisor is reported. Clinically the tooth appeared extruded with one third of the root visible. The radiographic examination revealed a root fracture. The extruded tooth was repositioned and splinted with a heavy wire and adhesive resin, after which a resorbable collagen tissue was placed to cover the buccal region. Subsequent to the injury, swelling was observed and the patient complained of pressure pain in the periapical region of the tooth with no response to electric pulp testing. It was treated successfully with periodontal therapy and endodontic therapy with Vitapex. PMID:16491966

  5. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert... tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a... and metals of the platinum group intended to replace a natural tooth. The device is attached...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert... tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a... and metals of the platinum group intended to replace a natural tooth. The device is attached...

  7. Mandibular canine tooth impaction in a young dog--treatment and subsequent eruption: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, B L; Clarke, L L

    1999-09-01

    Extraction of an embedded supranumerary incisor tooth and surgical exposure of the crown of an impacted left mandibular canine tooth were performed in a 5 month-old Doberman Pinscher dog. Six months following surgery, the canine tooth was fully erupted and in normal occlusion. A review of tooth eruption in the dog is provided. PMID:10863519

  8. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended for..., which is made of gold, is attached to the dental appliance and supports the tooth-colored facing,...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended for..., which is made of gold, is attached to the dental appliance and supports the tooth-colored facing,...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended for..., which is made of gold, is attached to the dental appliance and supports the tooth-colored facing,...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert... tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a... and metals of the platinum group intended to replace a natural tooth. The device is attached...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert... tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a... and metals of the platinum group intended to replace a natural tooth. The device is attached...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended for..., which is made of gold, is attached to the dental appliance and supports the tooth-colored facing,...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended for..., which is made of gold, is attached to the dental appliance and supports the tooth-colored facing,...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a device... to a tooth surface. (b) Classification. Class II....

  16. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert... tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a... and metals of the platinum group intended to replace a natural tooth. The device is attached...

  17. Interrelationships between tooth properties and biochemical bone turnover markers investigated on six-month-old pig model.

    PubMed

    Tymczyna, Barbara; Tatara, Marcin R; Krupski, Witold; Tymczyna-Sobotka, Monika; Bachanek, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine interrelationships between bone tissue metabolism indices and morphological, biomechanical and densitometric properties of hard dental tissues. First primary maxillary incisor from 6-month-old pigs (N=27) was evaluated in terms of weight and length. Mean volumetric tooth mineral density, total tooth volume, enamel total volume, enamel volumetric mineral density, dentine total volume and dentine volumetric mineral density were estimated with the use of quantitative computed tomography and micro computed tomography techniques. Tooth mineral density and tooth mineral content were evaluated with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Microhardness of enamel was measured using Vicker's test. Evaluations of total calcium, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, bone alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (CTX), insulin-like growth factor-1, growth hormone and parathyroid hormone were performed in plasma and serum samples. Pearson's correlation coefficients were determined between all the investigated variables, and P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The obtained results have shown mainly mutual dependences between biochemical indicators of bone metabolism. Evaluation of CTX concentration in serum of pigs has shown the highest predictive value in relation to morphological, densitometric and biomechanical properties of teeth. PMID:23076035

  18. Study of the kinematic and load sharing properties of wormgearing with non-symmetric tooth profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of non-symmetric tooth profiles, i.e. tooth profiles with different pressure angles on the two sides of the tooth, is studied. A feasible non-symmetric tooth profile for application in helicopter transmissions is laid out as the best compromise among several conflicting factors. The non-symmetric tooth profile is then compared with the symmetric tooth profile studied previously. Based on the detailed comparisons it is concluded that the use of the non-symmetric tooth profile would severely limit the face width of the worm, consequently reduce the number of meshing teeth and cause much higher normal load on the individual gear teeth.

  19. Complications associated with cheek tooth extraction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Baratt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Common indications for cheek tooth extraction in the horse include dental fracture, periodontal disease, severe decay/ caries, mandibular fracture with alveolar/tooth involvement, and periapical abscess. Complications secondary to extraction of cheek teeth are prevalent. Typical complications may include retained root tip(s), collateral damage of neighboring teeth and alveolar bone, mandibular fracture non-union or delayed union, cemental ankylosis, dilacerated root(s), oroantral/oronasal fistula, palatal deviation of cheek teeth, bone sequestration, sinus involvement, alveolar plug failure, and palatine artery laceration. This paper presents a series of cases that had complications following cheek tooth extraction. Anticipation of problematic extractions, recognition of complications, and appropriate treatment will aid the clinician in managing the inevitable cheek tooth extraction complication. PMID:24660307

  20. 12. Interior view showing main section, mezzanine and saw tooth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view showing main section, mezzanine and saw tooth truss roof with skylight, looking west. - College Heights Lemon Packing House, 519-532 West First Street, Claremont, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. A technique to salvage endodontically compromised maxillary anterior tooth.

    PubMed

    Comut, Alper; Foran, Denise; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    A complication of endodontic treatment is over-preparation of the tooth structure in an attempt to access calcified pulp chambers and root canals. This could result in thin root walls that might compromise the long-term prognosis of the tooth. There are various treatment options when such a complication occurs, among them, extraction of the compromised tooth and its replacement with a dental implant. This clinical report describes a nonsurgical, multidisciplinary treatment alternative where a maxillary anterior tooth with a thinned root wall was successfully saved by repairing the damaged root to its original thickness using a composite resin material and subsequently restoring with a cast post and core and a crown. PMID:24654367

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of Strain Near Tooth Fillet by Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Tomoya; Yoshiizumi, Satoshi; Inoue, Katsumi

    The accurate measurement of strain and stress in a tooth is important for the reliable evaluation of the strength or life of gears. In this research, a strain measurement method which is based on image processing is applied to the analysis of strain near the tooth fillet. The loaded tooth is photographed using a CCD camera and stored as a digital image. The displacement of the point in the tooth flank is tracked by the cross-correlation method, and then, the strain is calculated. The interrogation window size of the correlation method and the overlap amount affect the accuracy and resolution. In the case of measurements at structures with complicated profiles such as fillets, the interrogation window maintains a large size and the overlap amount should be large. The surface condition also affects the accuracy. The white painted surface with a small black particle is suitable for measurement.

  3. Seal Out Tooth Decay: A Fact Sheet for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Seal Out Tooth Decay A Fact Sheet for Parents What are dental sealants? Sealants are thin, plastic coatings painted on the chewing surfaces of ...

  4. Ectopic 3rd Molar Tooth in the Maxillary Antrum

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Seidu A.; Oketade, Ifeoluwa O.; Osunde, Otasowie D.

    2014-01-01

    Location of ectopic tooth in a nondentate area like the maxillary antrum is rare. A 17-year-old boy, with one year history of recurrent right facial swelling and radiographic finding of a maxillary third molar tooth located at the posterior wall of the maxillary antrum, is presented. Under endotracheal intubation, the tooth was extracted through a Caldwell-Luc antrostomy approach and patient had an uneventful recovery and has been symptom free for eight months. Ectopic tooth in the maxillary antrum is rare and is commonest with maxillary third molar. It may be symptomless but is more commonly associated with inflammatory symptoms. The treatment of choice is surgical excision which is mostly carried out with Caldwell-Luc approach, even though endoscopic approach is being reported. PMID:25132999

  5. Ectopic 3rd molar tooth in the maxillary antrum.

    PubMed

    Bello, Seidu A; Oketade, Ifeoluwa O; Osunde, Otasowie D

    2014-01-01

    Location of ectopic tooth in a nondentate area like the maxillary antrum is rare. A 17-year-old boy, with one year history of recurrent right facial swelling and radiographic finding of a maxillary third molar tooth located at the posterior wall of the maxillary antrum, is presented. Under endotracheal intubation, the tooth was extracted through a Caldwell-Luc antrostomy approach and patient had an uneventful recovery and has been symptom free for eight months. Ectopic tooth in the maxillary antrum is rare and is commonest with maxillary third molar. It may be symptomless but is more commonly associated with inflammatory symptoms. The treatment of choice is surgical excision which is mostly carried out with Caldwell-Luc approach, even though endoscopic approach is being reported. PMID:25132999

  6. Three dimension digitization of tooth with structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjin; Zhang, Qican

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimension (3-D) digitization of tooth is becoming an important diagnostic tool of dentistry for the quantitative medicine investigations. In this paper, an optical measurement instrument for tooth data acquisition based on the principle of structured illumination was developed. The instrument consists of a structured illumination optics, a stepping motor driven phase shifting device, a commercial CCD camera system with frame grabber interface and a control personal computer. Because there is no possibility of watching the system directly in the mouth, the measurements were still restricted to plaster casts of the tooth. With a new calibration gauge, both the phase-height mapping and 3D coordinates calibration could be done simultaneously through only one measurement. Additionally, to recover complex shape distribution of the tooth, a phase unwrapping procedure is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by experimental results.

  7. Treatment of Necrotic Calcified Tooth Using Intentional Replantation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Arvin, Armita; Darvish, Alireza; Aflaki, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. If the teeth are impacted by a chronic irritant, the pulp space possibly will undergo calcific changes that may impede access opening during root canal treatment. In such cases that conventional endodontic treatment is impossible or impractical, intentional replantation may be considered as a last solution to preserve the tooth. Methods. After failing to perform conventional root canal therapy for a necrotic calcified right mandibular second premolar, the tooth was gently extracted. The root apex was resected and the root end cavity was prepared and filled with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Then, the extracted tooth was replanted in its original position. Results. After a year the tooth was asymptomatic, and the size of periapical radiolucency was remarkably reduced and no clinical sign of ankylosis was observed. Conclusion. Intentional replantation of the necrotic calcified teeth could be considered as an alternative to teeth extraction, especially for the single-rooted teeth and when nonsurgical and surgical endodontic procedures seem impossible. PMID:24716000

  8. Factors associated with implant recommendation for single-tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammari, Khalaf F; Al-Ansari, Jassem M; Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2005-06-01

    The use of dental implants for single-tooth replacement has been established as a predictable treatment option; yet, limited data are available as to how frequently this option is recommended to patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the frequency of implant recommendation by general dental practitioners after single-tooth extraction and factors influencing their decision to recommend an implant. All single-tooth extractions performed in 26 general dental practice clinics in Kuwait over a 30-day period were examined. Dentists in these centers used the study form to record demographic data, the type of tooth extracted, reason for extraction, and replacement options presented to the patients. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between background factors and decisions to recommend implant therapy. A total of 1367 patients (mean age, 37.9 +/- 11.8 years) had an extraction of one tooth during the study period. Forty-three patients were offered implants as a replacement option (3.3% of the total sample; 8.6% of patients who were offered tooth replacement options). Factors associated significantly with the recommendation of an implant by Kuwaiti dentists to their patients included younger age, regular dental maintenance visits, and adequate oral hygiene practices (P < 0.05; binary logistic regression). Dental implant recommendation for single-tooth replacement in the present sample of dentists was low. Factors associated significantly with dentist recommendation of an implant for single-tooth replacement included age, history of dental maintenance, and oral hygiene practices. PMID:15968193

  9. Tooth replantation after traumatic avulsion: a 27-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wilson Denis; Westphalen, Vania Portela Ditzel; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique

    2004-04-01

    This report presents a case of replantation of a traumatically avulsed central incisor in a 32-year-old woman. The tooth was replanted after a 30-min extra-alveolar period. Emergency unconventional immobilization was performed, using 2-0 chromic gut, and a restorative composite made Gunning-type splint. The tooth is still in place 27 years after replantation (1976 to date) without marked resorption. PMID:15025692

  10. Assessment of Tooth Proportions in an Aesthetically Acceptable Smile

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Munish; Raghav, Pradeep; Jain, Shalu; Anjum, Arbab; Misra, Vaibhav; Suri, Ragini

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aesthetic facial animation is mostly reported to be due to a close relationship between soft and hard tissue i.e. dynamic smile with appropriate tooth proportions. But variations in tooth size have been seen among various ethnic populations globally. Aim: To evaluate the size and morphology of maxillary anterior teeth, the tooth with maximum variation both mesiodistally and cervicoincisally. Also, the tooth to tooth ratio in percentage of the mean tooth sizes in both genders in patients with aesthetically acceptable smile decided by a panel in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 subjects (50 males and 50 females) were taken and a video clip of their dynamic smile was captured .The smiles were analyzed by a panel and the tooth proportions of the selected attractive smiles were evaluated in both males and females separately. Statistical analysis: Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using Microsoft Excel 2007 software; test used was Unpaired t-test and also Mean ± S.D., Variance, Ratio of W/L and its ranges were calculated. Significance is assessed at 5% level of significance. Results: The mesiodistal width and cervicoincisal length of maxillary central incisor was greater compared to lateral incisor and canine in both males and females. There was a statistically significant difference between the width/length ratio of maxillary anterior teeth between males and females.Canine and Lateral incisor showed maximum variation mesio-distally and cervico-incisally. Conclusion: A smile is more pleasing if the visible teeth are in proper morphological proportions. Thus, it relates that teeth play a vital role in increasing the attractiveness of a smile. The mean coronal width/length ratio displayed a more square like tooth form for both males and females. PMID:26023632

  11. 3D-Geomorphometrics tooth shape analysis in hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim; Dirks, Wendy; Jepson, Nicholas; Khalaf, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of tooth morphology is an important part of the diagnosis and management of hypodontia patients. Several techniques have been used to analyze tooth form in hypodontia patients and these have shown smaller tooth dimensions and anomalous tooth shapes in patients with hypodontia when compared with controls. However, previous studies have mainly used 2D images and provided limited information. In the present study, 3D surface-imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate tooth form differences between hypodontia and control patients. Eighteen anatomical landmarks were recorded on the clinical crown of the lower left first permanent molar of 3D scanned study models of hypodontia and control subjects. The study sample group comprised of 120 hypodontia patients (40 mild, 40 moderate, and 40 severe hypodontia patients) and 40 age- and sex-matched controls. Procrustes coordinates were utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data and then were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, differences in shape as well as size were tested statistically using allometric analysis and MANOVA. Significant interaction was found between the two factor variables “group” and “sex” (p < 0.002). Overall expected accuracies were 66 and 56% for females and males, respectively, in the cross-validated discriminant-analysis using the first 20 PCs. Hypodontia groups showed significant shape differences compared with the control subjects (p < 0.0001). Significant differences in tooth crown shape were also found between sexes (p < 0.0001) within groups. Furthermore, the degree of variation in tooth form was proportional to the degree of the severity of the hypodontia. Thus, quantitative measurement of tooth shape in hypodontia patients may enhance the multidisciplinary management of those patients. PMID:24795649

  12. A conservative approach toward restoration of fractured anterior tooth

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Dutta, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Reattachment of the fractured anterior tooth is a highly conservative and aesthetic treatment that has gained popularity in the recent past. Presented here is one such case in which a combination of external enamel bevel and internal dentinal groove has been used to enhance the bonding between the fractured fragment and the remaining tooth. The treatment was found to be successful both functionally and aesthetically at the 18-month follow-up. PMID:22629071

  13. Atraumatic surgical extrusion to improve tooth restorability: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Robert D; Addison, Owen; Tomson, Phillip L; Krastl, Gabriel; Dietrich, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    This clinical report describes the use of an "atraumatic" vertical extraction system to facilitate the restorative treatment of a tooth that would otherwise be considered unrestorable because of subgingival caries. Minimally invasive surgical root extrusion was undertaken using the Benex extraction system, which can provide controlled tooth extrusion with minimal deformation of the bone socket. A carious endodontically treated mandibular premolar was extruded to provide routine restorative treatment and endodontic retreatment. PMID:26803176

  14. An automatic tooth preparation technique: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fusong; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yaopeng; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Dangxiao; Lyu, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the feasibility and accuracy of a new automatic tooth preparation technique in dental healthcare. An automatic tooth preparation robotic device with three-dimensional motion planning software was developed, which controlled an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) beam (wavelength 1,064 nm, pulse width 15 ps, output power 30 W, and repeat frequency rate 100 kHz) to complete the tooth preparation process. A total of 15 freshly extracted human intact first molars were collected and fixed into a phantom head, and the target preparation shapes of these molars were designed using customised computer-aided design (CAD) software. The accuracy of tooth preparation was evaluated using the Geomagic Studio and Imageware software, and the preparing time of each tooth was recorded. Compared with the target preparation shape, the average shape error of the 15 prepared molars was 0.05-0.17 mm, the preparation depth error of the occlusal surface was approximately 0.097 mm, and the error of the convergence angle was approximately 1.0°. The average preparation time was 17 minutes. These results validated the accuracy and feasibility of the automatic tooth preparation technique. PMID:27125874

  15. An automatic tooth preparation technique: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fusong; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yaopeng; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Dangxiao; Lyu, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the feasibility and accuracy of a new automatic tooth preparation technique in dental healthcare. An automatic tooth preparation robotic device with three-dimensional motion planning software was developed, which controlled an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) beam (wavelength 1,064 nm, pulse width 15 ps, output power 30 W, and repeat frequency rate 100 kHz) to complete the tooth preparation process. A total of 15 freshly extracted human intact first molars were collected and fixed into a phantom head, and the target preparation shapes of these molars were designed using customised computer-aided design (CAD) software. The accuracy of tooth preparation was evaluated using the Geomagic Studio and Imageware software, and the preparing time of each tooth was recorded. Compared with the target preparation shape, the average shape error of the 15 prepared molars was 0.05–0.17 mm, the preparation depth error of the occlusal surface was approximately 0.097 mm, and the error of the convergence angle was approximately 1.0°. The average preparation time was 17 minutes. These results validated the accuracy and feasibility of the automatic tooth preparation technique. PMID:27125874

  16. Permanent tooth calcification in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): patterns and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, K L; Conroy, G C

    1996-01-01

    Tooth calcification is an important developmental marker for use in constructing models for early hominid life history, particularly for its application to the fossil record. As chimpanzees are commonly utilized in interspecific comparisons in such research, this study aims to improve available baseline data for tooth calcification patterns in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and to quantify basic patterns and polymorphisms. We present an analysis of developmental patterns for the left mandibular dentition (I1-M3) based on intraoral radiographs obtained from a cross-sectional sample of chimpanzees (58 males, 60 females) housed at LEMSIP (NYU Medical Center) and Yerkes (Emory University). No significant differences with previous descriptions of the basic sequences of tooth calcification in chimpanzees were found, but variation in such patterns was documented for the first time. In the overall sequence, polymorphisms between the canine and the group (M2 P4 P3) reached significant levels. This is due to the relative delay in canine crown formation compared to other teeth. Differences in the basic sequence between males and females were recorded, but are due to minor shifts in the percentages of occurrence for polymorphic sequences which are common to both genders. Perhaps our most important findings are that a) different polymorphic sequences occur in tooth calcification and tooth emergence in chimpanzees, and b) developmental relationships among teeth fluctuate throughout tooth calcification. Thus, characterizations of dental developmental patterns based on particular stages of development cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other stages without supporting data. PMID:8928717

  17. Chemerin-ChemR23 Signaling in Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, T.; Spear, D.; Azimi, N.; Andreeva, V.; Yelick, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to identify and characterize molecular mechanisms regulating tooth development, including those mediating the critical dental epithelial-dental mesenchymal (DE-DM) cell interactions required for normal tooth development. The goal of this study was to investigate Chemerin (Rarres2)/ChemR23(Cmklr1) signaling in DE-DM cell interactions in normal tooth development. Here we present, for the first time, tissue-specific expression patterns of Chemerin and ChemR23 in mouse tooth development. We show that Chemerin is expressed in cultured DE progenitor cells, while ChemR23 is expressed in cultured DM cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ribosomal protein S6 (rS6) and Akt, downstream targets of Chemerin/ChemR23 signaling, are phosphorylated in response to Chemerin/ChemR23 signaling in vitro and are expressed in mouse tooth development. Together, these results suggest roles for Chemerin/ChemR23-mediated DE-DM cell signaling during tooth morphogenesis. PMID:23053848

  18. Corticotomy-/osteotomy-assisted tooth movement microCTs differ.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Karapetyan, G; Moats, R; Yamashita, D-D; Moon, H-B; Ferguson, D J; Yen, S

    2008-09-01

    Corticotomy-assisted and osteotomy-assisted tooth movement involves surgical incisions through the alveolar bone. To ascertain whether teeth move by distraction osteogenesis or by regional accelerated phenomenon (RAP), we randomly assigned 30 Sprague-Dawley rats to one of 5 experimental groups: corticotomy alone, corticotomy-assisted tooth movement, osteotomy alone, osteotomy-assisted tooth movement, or tooth movement alone. Each animal was imaged by microtomography immediately after surgery, after 21 days, and after 2 months. After 21 days, regional accelerated phenomenon was observed in the alveolar bone of the corticotomy-treated animals and distraction osteogenesis in the osteotomy-assisted tooth movement animals. Pixel count data were analyzed by nested ANOVA for 5 experimental groups, split-mouth controls, 3 levels along the root, and 5 sites per level. The most demineralized sites after 21 days differed for each of the experimental groups. Our study indicates that osteotomies and corticotomies induce different alveolar bone reactions, which can be exploited for tooth movement. PMID:18719214

  19. An automatic tooth preparation technique: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fusong; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yaopeng; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Dangxiao; Lyu, Peijun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the feasibility and accuracy of a new automatic tooth preparation technique in dental healthcare. An automatic tooth preparation robotic device with three-dimensional motion planning software was developed, which controlled an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) beam (wavelength 1,064 nm, pulse width 15 ps, output power 30 W, and repeat frequency rate 100 kHz) to complete the tooth preparation process. A total of 15 freshly extracted human intact first molars were collected and fixed into a phantom head, and the target preparation shapes of these molars were designed using customised computer-aided design (CAD) software. The accuracy of tooth preparation was evaluated using the Geomagic Studio and Imageware software, and the preparing time of each tooth was recorded. Compared with the target preparation shape, the average shape error of the 15 prepared molars was 0.05–0.17 mm, the preparation depth error of the occlusal surface was approximately 0.097 mm, and the error of the convergence angle was approximately 1.0°. The average preparation time was 17 minutes. These results validated the accuracy and feasibility of the automatic tooth preparation technique.

  20. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  1. Corticision: A Flapless Procedure to Accelerate Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Guk

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from applied forces to the teeth evoking cellular responses in the teeth and their surrounding tissues, including the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. It is advantageous for the orthodontist to be well informed of the detailed process of the biological events that unfold during tooth movement, since some of these details may differ from one person to another due to biological differences such as periodontal metabolism or alveolar bone density. This led us to emphasize that orthodontics is a field of endeavor where the integration of mechanics and biology is materialized, and to affirm the fact that tooth movement is conducted in individual human beings, each composed of a unique and intricate physiological system. Biological variations may be the foundation of the differences that are frequently observed in the outcomes of orthodontic treatment in particular with reference to treatment duration between patients with similar malocclusions and who were treated identically. A wide diversity of clinical trials has been carried out to control the tissue resistance to facilitate orthodontic tooth movement, which involves biomechanical, pharmaceutical, surgical, electrical regimens or tissue engineering technology. The term 'Corticision' is a neologism which indicates 'cortical bone incision'. It is a minimally invasive periodontal procedure without flap elevation, thus accelerating tooth movement with an enhanced turnover rate of the surrounding structures. This chapter introduces the technical procedure, and the biological background of how such a minor surgical procedure can receive the accelerated tooth movement with impunity and thereby shorten the duration of treatment. PMID:26599124

  2. Biomaterials in Tooth Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration. PMID:24596804

  3. [Rehabilitation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yukihide; Arakawa, Hideki; Kawasaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most commonly inherited neuromuscular diseases causing progressive muscle weakness; contracture; deformity in the feet, legs, and hands; and impairments of ambulation and handgrip. Reduced physical ability can be attributed not only to the disease but also to physical deconditioning. Previously, most physicians in the field of rehabilitation were anxious about the hypothesis of overwork weakness in CMT, and did not conduct intensive exercise programs for patients with CMT. However, recent studies have reported that progressive resistance strengthening programs for lower extremities are feasible, safe, beneficial, and improve exercise intolerance and undue fatigue in patients with CMT. Although the improvement in exercise tolerance may be partly due to the reversal of deconditioning effect of related sedentary lifestyle, progressive resistance training and physical fitness can improve walking function, activities of daily living, and subjective perception of pain and fatigue in patients with CMT. To increase the daily physical function, some studies described the potential benefits of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs); however, no control study supported it. So far, the training programs on CMT have been dependent on the exercise programs for able-bodied individuals. To increase the effects of rehabilitation, optimal programs that combine the training protocol and AFO strategies will have to be designed for patients with CMT. PMID:26764300

  4. Tooth-surface-specific Effects of Xylitol

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, A.V.; Bader, J.D.; Leo, M.C.; Preisser, J.S.; Shugars, D.A.; Vollmer, W.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Holland, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial was a three-year, double-blind, multi-center, randomized clinical trial that evaluated the effectiveness of xylitol vs. placebo lozenges in the prevention of dental caries in caries-active adults. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to investigate whether xylitol lozenges had a differential effect on cumulative caries increments on different tooth surfaces. Participants (ages 21-80 yrs) with at least one follow-up visit (n = 620) were examined at baseline, 12, 24, and 33 months. Negative binomial and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) for xylitol’s differential effect on cumulative caries increments on root and coronal surfaces and, among coronal surfaces, on smooth (buccal and lingual), occlusal, and proximal surfaces. Participants in the xylitol arm developed 40% fewer root caries lesions (0.23 D2FS/year) than those in the placebo arm (0.38 D2FS/year; IRR = 0.60; 95% CI [0.44, 0.81]; p < .001). There was no statistically significant difference between xylitol and control participants in the incidence of smooth-surface caries (p = .100), occlusal-surface caries (p = .408), or proximal-surface caries (p = .159). Among these caries-active adults, xylitol appears to have a caries-preventive effect on root surfaces (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00393055). PMID:23589387

  5. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure. PMID:26764296

  6. Mechanics of microwear traces in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that microwear traces in natural tooth enamel can be simulated and quantified using microindentation mechanics. Microcontacts associated with particulates in the oral wear medium are modeled as sharp indenters with fixed semi-apical angle. Distinction is made between markings from static contacts (pits) and translational contacts (scratches). Relations for the forces required to produce contacts of given dimensions are derived, with particle angularity and compliance specifically taken into account so as to distinguish between different abrasives in food sources. Images of patterns made on human enamel with sharp indenters in axial and sliding loading are correlated with theoretical predictions. Special attention is given to threshold conditions for transition from a microplasticity to a microcracking mode, corresponding to mild and severe wear domains. It is demonstrated that the typical microwear trace is generated at loads on the order of 1N - i.e. much less than the forces exerted in normal biting - attesting to the susceptibility of teeth to wear in everyday mastication, especially in diets with sharp, hard and large inclusive intrinsic or extraneous particulates. PMID:25484336

  7. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  8. Autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling are necessary for tooth morphogenesis, but not tooth replacement in snakes and lizards (Squamata).

    PubMed

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2010-01-01

    Here we study the role of Shh signaling in tooth morphogenesis and successional tooth initiation in snakes and lizards (Squamata). By characterizing the expression of Shh pathway receptor Ptc1 in the developing dentitions of three species (Eublepharis macularius, Python regius, and Pogona vitticeps) and by performing gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that Shh signaling is active in the squamate tooth bud and is required for its normal morphogenesis. Shh apparently mediates tooth morphogenesis by separate paracrine- and autocrine-mediated functions. According to this model, paracrine Shh signaling induces cell proliferation in the cervical loop, outer enamel epithelium, and dental papilla. Autocrine signaling within the stellate reticulum instead appears to regulate cell survival. By treating squamate dental explants with Hh antagonist cyclopamine, we induced tooth phenotypes that closely resemble the morphological and differentiation defects of vestigial, first-generation teeth in the bearded dragon P. vitticeps. Our finding that these vestigial teeth are deficient in epithelial Shh signaling further corroborates that Shh is needed for the normal development of teeth in snakes and lizards. Finally, in this study, we definitively refute a role for Shh signaling in successional dental lamina formation and conclude that other pathways regulate tooth replacement in squamates. PMID:19850027

  9. Effects of Ion-Releasing Tooth-Coating Material on Demineralization of Bovine Tooth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Koji; Kambara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    We compared the effect of a novel ion-releasing tooth-coating material that contained S-PRG (surface-reaction type prereacted glass-ionomer) filler to that of non-S-PRG filler and nail varnish on the demineralization of bovine enamel subsurface lesions. The demineralization process of bovine enamel was examined using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) measurement. Ion concentrations in demineralizing solution were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic (ICP) emission spectrometry and an ion electrode. The nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization. Although the nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization, the S-PRG filler group did not. Further, plane-scanning by EPMA analysis in the S-PRG filler group showed no changes in Ca ion distribution, and F ions showed peak levels on the surface of enamel specimens. Most ions in the demineralizing solution were present at higher concentrations in the S-PRG filler group than in the other two groups. In conclusion, only the S-PRG filler-containing tooth-coating material released ions and inhibited demineralization around the coating. PMID:24578706

  10. Anti Cariogenic Efficacy of Herbal and Conventional Tooth Pastes - A Comparative In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    K P, Mohankumar; N K, Priya; G S, Madhushankari

    2013-01-01

    Background: An upsurge of herbal products in various catalogues of fast moving consumer goods is evident. Dental creams or pastes which have numerous brands since years, have addition of many more herbal tooth pastes. Main claim of these herbal tooth pastes being effective reduction in cavities and plaque control. Proven fact is that proper brushing with a tooth brush and tooth paste brings down the caries incidence, and there is a substantial amount of contribution made by indispensable ingredient i.e, tooth pastes and their antibacterial component. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of various herbal tooth pastes available in the market and compare it with a conventional tooth paste with known antibacterial effect. Materials & Methods: The antibacterial efficacy of five herbal tooth pastes and two conventional tooth pastes with different ingredients was evaluated by the zone of inhibition created around the disc on the culture plates against streptococcus mutans and lactobacillus acidophilus. Results: The herbal tooth pastes showed similar efficacy as that of the conventional tooth pastes. One herbal tooth paste with multiple herbal ingredients had greater zone of inhibition compared to the conventional tooth pastes and other herbal tooth pastes. Conclusion: Herbal tooth pastes have similar antibacterial effect as conventional tooth pastes. Tooth paste with multiple herbal ingredients is more efficient than the tooth pastes with fewer herbal ingredients in an anticariogenic property. How to cite this article: Mohan Kumar K P, Priya N K, Madhushankari G S. Anti Cariogenic Efficacy of Herbal and Conventional Tooth Pastes - A Comparative In-Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):8-13. PMID:24155585

  11. Amery Ice Shelf's 'Loose Tooth' Gets Looser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Amery Ice Shelf is an important dynamic system responsible for draining about 16% of the grounded East Antarctic ice sheet through only 2% of its coastline. Most of the mass input to the system occurs from the Lambert and several other glaciers. Mass loss from the system occurs through basal melting and iceberg calving. These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray the ice shelf front on October 6, 2001 (top) and September 29, 2002 (bottom), and illustrate changes that took place over the year elapsed between the two views.

    Two longitudinal rifts, oriented roughly parallel to the direction of ice flow and measuring about 25 and 15 kilometers in length, are apparent near the seaward edge of the ice shelf. Between them, a transverse fracture extends eastward from the base of the western rift. This rift system is colloquially named the Amery 'loose tooth.' Over the course of the one-year interval between these two MISR images, the ice front has advanced approximately 1.6 - 1.7 kilometers, and the transverse fracture and a three-way fissure at the juncture of the rifts have widened. When the transverse fracture eventually reaches the eastern rift, a large iceberg (25 kilometers x 25 kilometers) will be released.

    These false-color multi-angle composites combine red-band data from MISR's 60o forward, nadir, and 60o aftward viewing cameras, displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. Different colors represent angular reflectance variations. Since generally smooth surfaces predominantly forward-scatter sunlight, these appear in shades of blue. Rough surfaces tend to backward-scatter sunlight, and these appear in shades of red or orange. Low clouds appear bright purple, since they exhibit both forward and backward-scattering. Using this technique, textural variations among ice types are revealed, and clouds can be easily distinguished from ice. Illumination conditions on the two dates are nearly identical.

    Understanding the

  12. Cellular and molecular basis of tooth eruption

    PubMed Central

    Wise, GE

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Tooth eruption requires the presence of a dental follicle (DF), alveolar bone resorption for an eruption pathway, and alveolar bone formation at the base of the bony crypt. The objectives of our investigations have been to determine how the DF regulates both the osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis needed for eruption. Material & Methods Multiple experimental methods have been employed. Results The DF regulates osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis by regulating the expression of critical genes in both a chronological and spatial fashion. In the rat 1st mandibular molar there is a major burst of osteoclastogenesis at day 3 postnatally and a minor burst at day 10. At day 3, the DF maximally expresses colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) to down-regulate the expression of osteoprotegerin such that osteoclastogenesis can occur. At day 10, the minor burst of osteoclastogenesis is promoted by upregulation of VEGF and RANKL in the DF. Spatially, the bone resorption is in the coronal portion of the bony crypt and genes such as RANKL are expressed more in the coronal region of the DF than in its basal one-half. For osteogenesis, bone formation begins at day 3 at the base of the bony crypt and maximal growth is at days 9–14. Osteo-inductive genes such as BMP-2 appear to promote this and are expressed more in the basal half of the DF than in the coronal. Conclusion The osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis needed for eruption are regulated by differential gene expression in the DF both chronologically and spatially. PMID:19419449

  13. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  14. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  15. Tooth wear in three ethnic groups in Sabah (northern Borneo).

    PubMed

    Milosevic, A; Lo, M S

    1996-12-01

    The prevalence and associated aetiologies of tooth wear were investigated in three ethnic groups in Sabah (Northern Borneo) using the Tooth Wear Index (TWI). The number of surfaces with enamel wear only, dentine exposed for less than a third or dentine exposed for more than a third were categorised into the TW minimal, moderate or severe respectively. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit medical/dental history, oral hygiene practices, satisfaction with body image, diet and other personal habits/details. The sample comprised of a self selected sample of 148 dental hospital attenders; 47 (32 per cent) each of ethnic Chinese and Malay and 54 (36 per cent) of ethnic Kadazan, matched for age and with a similar number of scoreable teeth per subject. Dentine exposure within the total sample was a common finding (95 per cent TW with moderate, 41 per cent TW severe). The Kadazan group had significantly (P < 0.05) more surfaces with severe tooth wear than the Chinese or Malay. Tobacco chewing was positively associated (rho = +0.4, P < 0.05) with both moderate and severe tooth wear, as was the habit of crushing/eating bones. Neither carbonated beverages or fresh fruit intake were associated with tooth wear, but their frequency of consumption was low. The buccal and occlusal surfaces of the posterior teeth were the most severely worn. Generally, wear was greater in the upper anterior sextant compared to the lower anterior sextant, with the exception of the lower incisal edges in the Kadazan group. Tooth wear into dentine was a common occurrence, especially among the Kadazan subjects and least among the Chinese subjects. The aetiological factors associated with this tooth wear are different to those encountered in Western cultures. PMID:9023582

  16. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of spur gear in altered tooth-sum gearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachidananda, H. K.; Gonsalvis, Joseph; Prakash, H. R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the contact stress, power loss, and pitting of spur gear tooth in altered tooth-sum gearing for a tooth-sum of 100 teeth when altered by ±4% tooth-sum. Analytical and experimental methods were performed to investigate and compare the altered tooth-sum gearing against the standard tooth-sum gearing. The experiments were performed using a power recirculating type test rig. The tooth loads for the experimental investigations were determined considering the surface durability of gears. A clear picture of the surface damage was obtained using a scanning electron microphotograph. The negative alteration in the tooth-sum performed better than the positive alteration in a tooth-sum operating between specified center distances.

  17. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration. PMID:25965323

  18. Management of a Compound Odontoma in the Primary Dentition.

    PubMed

    Altay, Mehmet Ali; Ozgur, Beste; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2016-01-01

    Odontomas are the most common benign odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity; however, their occurrence in the primary dentition is an extremely rare condition. When associated with primary teeth, odontomas may lead to disturbances in tooth eruption, which often requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on odontomas of the primary dentition and discuss the management of a compound odontoma in a pediatric patient. PMID:27620522

  19. Efficient transport of droplet sandwiched between saw-tooth plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liya; Wu, Hengan; Wang, Fengchao

    2016-01-15

    The transport of droplet sandwiched between smooth and saw-tooth plates was investigated using molecular dynamics method. The repeated opening and closing of the plates result in sequential stretching and squeezing of the droplet, which provide the driving force. The asymmetrical saw tooth obstructs the backward motion of the droplet, and gives rise to a net forward displacement of the droplet in every opening and closing cycle. This unidirectional motion facilitates the efficient droplet transport, which is referred to as the ratchet-like effect in this work. Our simulations also reveal that the influence of the surface wettability on the droplet transport is different for saw-tooth and smooth plates. Droplet transport efficiency exhibits monotonic decrease with the increase of the solid-liquid interactions for saw-tooth plates. While for smooth plates, unidirectional droplet movement was only observed for certain solid-liquid interactions. Taken together these simulation results and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that hydrophobic saw-tooth plates can improve the transport efficiency significantly. These findings not only enhance our understanding of the droplet transport from atomistic scale, but also are beneficial to practical applications in designing of micro- and nano-fluidic systems. PMID:26473277

  20. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  1. Twist1 Is Essential for Tooth Morphogenesis and Odontoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tian; Huang, Yanyu; Wang, Suzhen; Zhang, Hua; Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Xiaofang; Qin, Chunlin; Shi, Bing; D'Souza, Rena N; Lu, Yongbo

    2015-12-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-containing transcription factor that is expressed in the dental mesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. To better delineate its roles in tooth development, we generated Twist1 conditional knockout embryos (Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl)) by breeding Twist1 floxed mice (Twist1(fl/fl)) with Twist2-Cre recombinase knockin mice (Twist2(Cre) (/+)). The Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos formed smaller tooth germs and abnormal cusps during early tooth morphogenesis. Molecular and histological analyses showed that the developing molars of the Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos had reduced cell proliferation and expression of fibroblast growth factors 3, 4, 9, and 10 and FGF receptors 1 and 2 in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme. In addition, 3-week-old renal capsular transplants of embryonic day 18.5 Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) molars showed malformed crowns and cusps with defective crown dentin and enamel. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the implanted mutant molars had defects in odontoblast differentiation and delayed ameloblast differentiation. Furthermore, in vitro ChIP assays demonstrated that Twist1 was able to bind to a specific region of the Fgf10 promoter. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Twist1 plays crucial roles in regulating tooth development and that it may exert its functions through the FGF signaling pathway. PMID:26487719

  2. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266

  3. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266

  4. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid, and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus, and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development. PMID:24611053

  5. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Tucker, Abigail S

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid, and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus, and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development. PMID:24611053

  6. Systemic Antibiotics and Tooth Loss in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Hujoel, P.P.; Maupome, G.; Saver, B.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics have been recommended for the treatment of destructive periodontal disease. Our goal was to relate antibiotic use for medical or dental reasons to subsequent tooth loss in a cohort of 12,631 persons with destructive periodontal disease. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other confounders, the dispensing of antibiotics for 1-13 days, 14-20 days, or 21 or more days was not associated with reduced tooth loss [Adjusted rate ratio (RR) = 1.0; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.8-1.1; RR = 1.2; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4, and RR =1.2, 95% CI =1.0-1.3, respectively]. Numerous subgroup analyses were consistent with these overall null findings, with two exceptions: Longer courses of tetracyclines were associated with reduced tooth loss among persons receiving periodontal care, and penicillin was associated with reduced tooth loss among persons with more severe disease. Long-term, larger randomized trials are needed to provide evidence that antibiotics reduce tooth loss when used in the management of destructive periodontal disease. PMID:18719216

  7. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  8. Decision support system for predicting color change after tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Thanathornwong, Bhornsawan; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Ouivirach, Kan

    2016-03-01

    Tooth whitening is becoming increasingly popular among patients and dentists since it is a relatively noninvasive approach. However, the degree of color change after tooth whitening is known to vary substantially between studies. The present study aims to develop a clinical decision support system for predicting color change after in-office tooth whitening. We used the information from patients' data sets, and applied the multiple regression equation of CIELAB color coordinates including L*, a*, and b* of the original tooth color and the color difference (ΔE) that expresses the color change after tooth whitening. To evaluate the system performance, the patient's post-treatment color was used as "gold standard" to compare with the post-treatment color predicted by the system. There was a high degree of agreement between the patient's post-treatment color and the post-treatment color predicted by the system (kappa value=0.894). The results obtained have demonstrated that the decision support system is possible to predict the color change obtained using an in-office whitening system using colorimetric values. PMID:26657921

  9. Tooth wear among patients suffering from mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Cassetta, Michele; Migliau, Guido; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim Assess oral health, treatment needs and the correlation between tooth wear and medications in patients with psychiatric disease. Methodology 92 patients (40 male and 52 female) admitted in the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry of the Umberto I Hospital of Rome underwent an oral and dental clinical examination in accordance according to World Health Organization Basic Methods Criteria. One dentist performed all clinical examinations, training and calibration was carried out by an experienced clinical examiner. To measure the degree of inter-examiner agreement Kappa statistics was calculated. Level of tooth wear was assessed using the tooth wear classification of Johansson et al. Exact psychiatric pathology and medications of each patient were registrated. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Ill.) was used to analyze the data. A value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 34.78% of the sample regarding tooth wear demonstrated score 2. Men demonstrated 30% score 2, and 20% score 3 and 4 whereas female patients 38.46% score 2, 7.69% score 3 and none score 4. Conclusions Chronic exposure to neuroleptic drugs can cause phenomena of bruxism. There is a direct correlation between tooth wear, psychiatric disorders and administration of certain drugs. Poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment were widespread among psychiatric patients. PMID:25002918

  10. 41Ca - a possible neutron specific biomarker in tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Arazi, A.; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Maier, H. J.; Nakamura, N.; Rühm, W.; Rugel, G.

    2004-08-01

    The measurement of long-lived radionuclides, produced by neutrons originating from the atomic-bomb explosions, offers the possibility to reconstruct neutron fluences to which survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed. The long-lived radionuclide, 41Ca (T1/2=103 000 years), is suggested here as a means for a retrospective determination of thermal neutron fluences, directly within the human body of a survivor. As proper material tooth enamel is proposed. The 41Ca signal in tooth enamel may be correlated with the exposure to A-bomb induced thermal neutron fluences, provided the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca is significantly lower. Therefore, tooth samples of unexposed survivors of the A-bomb explosions have been examined by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, in order to quantify the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca. Measured 41Ca/Ca ratios were confirmed to be as low as about 2 × 10-15. Thus, the A-bomb induced additional signal should be detectable for survivors at epidemiological relevant distances. Since tooth enamel had already been used as a dosemeter for gamma radiation from the A-bomb explosion, the detection of 41Ca in tooth enamel would allow, for the first time, an assessment of both, γ-ray and neutron exposures in the same biological material.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth.

  12. Scales and Tooth Whorls of Ancient Fishes Challenge Distinction between External and Oral ‘Teeth’

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qingming; Sanchez, Sophie; Blom, Henning; Tafforeau, Paul; Ahlberg, Per Erik

    2013-01-01

    The debate about the origin of the vertebrate dentition has been given fresh fuel by new fossil discoveries and developmental studies of extant animals. Odontodes (teeth or tooth-like structures) can be found in two distinct regions, the ‘internal’ oropharyngeal cavity and the ‘external’ skin. A recent hypothesis argues that regularly patterned odontodes is a specific oropharyngeal feature, whereas odontodes in the external skeleton lack this organization. However, this argument relies on the skeletal system of modern chondrichthyans (sharks and their relatives), which differ from other gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) groups in not having dermal bones associated with the odontodes. Their external skeleton is also composed of monoodontode 'placoid scales', whereas the scales of most early fossil gnathostomes are polyodontode, i.e. constructed from several odontodes on a shared bony base. Propagation phase contrast X-ray Synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRµCT) is used to study the polyodontode scales of the early bony fish Andreolepis hedei. The odontodes constructing a single scale are reconstructed in 3D, and a linear and regular growth mechanism similar to that in a gnathostome dentition is confirmed, together with a second, gap-filling growth mechanism. Acanthodian tooth whorls are described, which show that ossification of the whorl base preceded and probably patterned the development of the dental lamina, in contrast to the condition in sharks where the dental lamina develops early and patterns the dentition.The new findings reveal, for the first time, how polyodontode scales grow in 3D in an extinct bony fish. They show that dentition-like odontode patterning occurs on scales and that the primary patterning unit of a tooth whorl may be the bony base rather than the odontodes it carries. These results contradict the hypothesis that oropharyngeal and external odontode skeletons are fundamentally separate and suggest that the importance of dermal bone

  13. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut). Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome). In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs) are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures. PMID:27127510

  14. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Unnikrishnan, Nandini; Kapoor, Vikram; Arora, Dhruv; Khinnavar, Poonam K.

    2014-01-01

    An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD. PMID:25254122

  15. OCT monitoring of diffusion of clearing agents within tooth dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, N. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Monitoring of agent diffusion within tooth tissues is important in a wide context of tooth therapy (diffusion of medicinal preparations) and cosmetics (chemical whitening agents). We report here the results of optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring of diffusion of water and glycerol as clearing agents in samples of human tooth tissue. The diffusion process is analyzed by monitoring the changes in the OCT signal slope and the depth-resolved amplitude of OCT signal from a sample. Slow temporal kinetics of the mean attenuation coefficient was measured to monitor a saturable optical clearing due to the diffusion of the agent. The average permeability coefficient was estimated by dividing the measured thickness of the selected region by the time it took for the agent to diffuse through. The experimental results demonstrate that OCT can be an efficient tool in the study of agent diffusion through hard tissues.

  16. Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT): historical perspectives and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kazamel, Mohamed; Boes, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Prior to Charcot and Marie's and Tooth's reports, patients with peroneal muscular atrophy had been described by Virchow, Eulenburg, Friedreich, Osler, and others. In February 1886, Charcot and Marie published their original description of five patients who had what they called Progressive Muscular Atrophy. They surmised that the lesion could be in the spinal cord. Three months later, Tooth presented his M.D. degree thesis entitled "Peroneal Type of Progressive Muscular Atrophy", to the University of Cambridge, UK. Tooth localized the pathology to the peripheral nerves. Dyck and Lambert (Arch Neurol 18:619-625, 1968) classified several CMT kinships based on differences in modes of inheritance, natural history, biochemical features, nerve conduction velocity, and pathologic characteristics. This article will focus on historical landmarks and major discoveries pertinent to the disease since its original description through the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25201224

  17. A Comparison between Osteotomy and Corticotomy-Assisted Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Yen, Stephen L-K

    2016-01-01

    Osteotomies and corticotomies used in combination with orthodontic tooth movement can activate different bone responses that may be exploited to accelerate tooth movement. Segmental osteotomies around dental roots can create a tooth-bearing transport disk that may be distracted and positioned with orthodontic appliances and archwires. In difficult craniofacial repairs, alveolar segments can be guided into position with archwires and orthodontic mechanics. The corticotomy extending into the marrow space can activate bone injury repair mechanisms that accelerate bone turnover as the alveolar bone surrounding the dental roots transitions from a demineralization phase to a fibrous replacement phase and, finally, a mineralization phase. The controlled demineralization and replacement of alveolar bone provides a window of opportunity for roots to move though less dense bone prior to remineralization. Although the corticotomies and osteotomies are minor surgeries compared to orthognathic surgery, the goal of future research is to produce similar bone responses by using smaller surgeries or by eliminating the surgeries altogether. PMID:26599126

  18. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut). Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome). In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs) are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures. PMID:27127510

  19. From hopeless to good prognosis: journey of a failing tooth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh; Deshmukh, Jeevanand; Khatri, Richa; Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar; Karthik, B

    2015-02-01

    Chronic periodontitis, along with associated clinical findings such as pathologic tooth migration, diastema, functional and aesthetic aberrations, poses an immense challenge to a dental professional. These findings convert clinical decision making into a daunting task and adversely affect the prognosis and the treatment plan for the presenting clinical problem. An interdisciplinary approach aimed at restoring functional and aesthetic needs of the affected individual within the limitations of such a compromised clinical scenario may be a viable alternative to any radical treatment causing loss of natural tooth structure such as extraction. This article reports the usefulness of the interdisciplinary route for managing an otherwise hopeless clinical situation of chronic periodontitis complicated with extreme mobility and pathologic tooth migration, which resulted in compromised function and aesthetics. PMID:25859109

  20. Interdisciplinary Treatment of a Fused Lower Premolar with Supernumerary Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Gadimli, Cengiz; Sari, Zafer

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe combined orthodontic and endodontic treatment of a fused mandibular premolar with supernumerary tooth. The patient was a 15 year old girl seeking orthodontic treatment for the correction of maxillary and mandibular crowding. Cephalometric examination revealed skeletally Class I relationship. The panoramic radiograph showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers and two separate root canals connecting in apical third. After the endodontic treatment of the fused teeth, the stripping of the supernumerary tooth was performed to establish a Class I canine relationship and to correct midline deviation. At the end of the treatment, the crowding was resolved and positive overjet and overbite was achieved. PMID:21769280

  1. Role of tooth elongation in promoting fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Keown, Amanda J; Bush, Mark B; Lee, James J-W; Lawn, Brian R

    2012-04-01

    A study is made of the role of tooth height on the resistance to side-wall longitudinal fracture under axial occlusal loading, building on earlier analyses for molar teeth with low dome-like ('bunodont') crown structures characteristic of primates and several other omnivorous mammals. The present study extends the analysis by considering molar teeth with an elongate columnar structure below the crown, more characteristic of grazing mammals. Extended finite element modeling is used to determine the evolution of longitudinal cracking, from initial growth to final failure. Experimental tests on sheep teeth confirm the predicted behavior of the longitudinal fracture mode, at least in its early stages. It is demonstrated that elongate tooth structures have a substantially increased resistance to longitudinal fracture, by restricting crack growth along the extended side walls. Biological implications concerning the adaptation of tooth structure to meet changes in the dietary habits of herbivores, and of some carnivores, are considered. PMID:22402152

  2. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    PubMed

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan. PMID:25219096

  3. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  4. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  5. Generation of gear tooth surfaces by application of CNC machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.

    1994-01-01

    This study will demonstrate the importance of application of computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines in generation of gear tooth surfaces with new topology. This topology decreases gear vibration and will extend the gear capacity and service life. A preliminary investigation by a tooth contact analysis (TCA) program has shown that gear tooth surfaces in line contact (for instance, involute helical gears with parallel axes, worm gear drives with cylindrical worms, etc.) are very sensitive to angular errors of misalignment that cause edge contact and an unfavorable shape of transmission errors and vibration. The new topology of gear tooth surfaces is based on the localization of bearing contact, and the synthesis of a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb a piecewise linear function of transmission errors caused by gear misalignment. The report will describe the following topics: description of kinematics of CNC machines with six degrees of freedom that can be applied for generation of gear tooth surfaces with new topology. A new method for grinding of gear tooth surfaces by a cone surface or surface of revolution based on application of CNC machines is described. This method provides an optimal approximation of the ground surface to the given one. This method is especially beneficial when undeveloped ruled surfaces are to be ground. Execution of motions of the CNC machine is also described. The solution to this problem can be applied as well for the transfer of machine tool settings from a conventional generator to the CNC machine. The developed theory required the derivation of a modified equation of meshing based on application of the concept of space curves, space curves represented on surfaces, geodesic curvature, surface torsion, etc. Condensed information on these topics of differential geometry is provided as well.

  6. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  7. Gear sound levels with various tooth contact ratios and forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Spencer, Robert H.; Drago, Raymond J.; Valco, Mark J.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1993-01-01

    The real noise reduction benefits which may be obtained through the use of one gear tooth form as compared to another is an important design parameter for any geared system, especially for helicopters in which both weight and reliability are very important factors. The design and testing of nine sets of gears which are as identical as possible except for their basic tooth geometry are described. Noise measurements were made at various combinations of load and speed for each gear set so that direct comparisons could be made. The resultant data was analyzed so that valid conclusions could be drawn and interpreted for design use.

  8. Melatonin Effects on Hard Tissues: Bone and Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Fang; He, Hong-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone rhythmically produced in the pineal gland under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the light/dark cycle. This indole plays an important role in many physiological processes including circadian entrainment, blood pressure regulation, seasonal reproduction, ovarian physiology, immune function, etc. Recently, the investigation and applications of melatonin in the hard tissues bone and tooth have received great attention. Melatonin has been investigated relative to bone remolding, osteoporosis, osseointegration of dental implants and dentine formation. In the present review, we discuss the large body of published evidence and review data of melatonin effects on hard tissues, specifically, bone and tooth. PMID:23665905

  9. Tooth contact shift in loaded spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  10. Tooth Contact Shift in Loaded Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  11. CBCT-Aided Multidisciplinary Approach to Salvaging an Intruded Tooth.

    PubMed

    Pamboo, Jaya; Hans, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Subhash; Kumar, Santosh; Chinna, Harleen

    2016-03-01

    Among the most severe types of traumatic dental injuries is intrusive luxation, which displaces the affected tooth deeper into the alveolus, causing significant damage to the pulp and all of the supporting structures. This article describes a unique case of intrusive luxation of the mature left maxillary central incisor in an 18-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was confirmed using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), after which the intruded tooth was successfully repositioned by endodontic and orthodontic management. This was followed by prosthodontic rehabilitation. This case report also discusses the role of CBCT in effectively diagnosing this type of injury. PMID:26977899

  12. The Missing Tooth: A Curious Case of Postobstructive Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Ian; Gajurel, Kiran; Montoya, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspirations that are not recognized at the time of aspiration can lead to insidious symptoms that can present a diagnostic challenge. We report the case of a 70-year-old man presenting with postobstructive pneumonia 2 months after aspirating his own tooth during a meal. He had been mistakenly diagnosed with asthma and treated with bronchodilators before a computed tomography scan of the thorax revealed the impacted tooth in his left bronchus. We review the clinical features and microbiology of postobstructive pneumonia and discuss the rationale of its treatment.

  13. Esthetic enhancement of a traumatized anterior tooth with a combination of forced eruption and tooth alignment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kang, So-Hee; Ha, Jung-Hong; Jin, Myoung-Uk; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2016-08-01

    Exposing sound structure of a subgingivally fractured tooth using orthodontic extrusion is considered to be a conservative way to re-establish biologic width without sacrificing esthetics or jeopardizing periodontal support of neighboring teeth. When a misaligned tooth is traumatically involved, a more comprehensive approach combining tooth extrusion and re-alignment may be necessary for a successful restorative outcome. This case report describes a successful esthetic management of a patient with complicated crown-root fracture on the maxillary right central incisor and pre-existing malocclusion in the maxillary anterior region. Forced eruption along with re-alignment of teeth by orthodontic movement seems to allow re-positioning of the fracture line to a favorable position and correction of crowding, providing a better esthetic result. PMID:27508163

  14. Esthetic enhancement of a traumatized anterior tooth with a combination of forced eruption and tooth alignment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So-Hee; Jin, Myoung-Uk; Kim, Sung-Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Exposing sound structure of a subgingivally fractured tooth using orthodontic extrusion is considered to be a conservative way to re-establish biologic width without sacrificing esthetics or jeopardizing periodontal support of neighboring teeth. When a misaligned tooth is traumatically involved, a more comprehensive approach combining tooth extrusion and re-alignment may be necessary for a successful restorative outcome. This case report describes a successful esthetic management of a patient with complicated crown-root fracture on the maxillary right central incisor and pre-existing malocclusion in the maxillary anterior region. Forced eruption along with re-alignment of teeth by orthodontic movement seems to allow re-positioning of the fracture line to a favorable position and correction of crowding, providing a better esthetic result. PMID:27508163

  15. p38α MAPK is required for tooth morphogenesis and enamel secretion.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Matthew B; Kim, Jung-Min; Oh, Hwanhee; Park, Kwang Hwan; Choo, Min-Kyung; Sano, Yasuyo; Tye, Coralee E; Skobe, Ziedonis; Davis, Roger J; Park, Jin Mo; Bei, Marianna; Glimcher, Laurie H; Shim, Jae-Hyuck

    2015-01-01

    An improved understanding of the molecular pathways that drive tooth morphogenesis and enamel secretion is needed to generate teeth from organ cultures for therapeutic implantation or to determine the pathogenesis of primary disorders of dentition (Abdollah, S., Macias-Silva, M., Tsukazaki, T., Hayashi, H., Attisano, L., and Wrana, J. L. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27678-27685). Here we present a novel ectodermal dysplasia phenotype associated with conditional deletion of p38α MAPK in ectodermal appendages using K14-cre mice (p38α(K14) mice). These mice display impaired patterning of dental cusps and a profound defect in the production and biomechanical strength of dental enamel because of defects in ameloblast differentiation and activity. In the absence of p38α, expression of amelogenin and β4-integrin in ameloblasts and p21 in the enamel knot was significantly reduced. Mice lacking the MAP2K MKK6, but not mice lacking MAP2K MKK3, also show the enamel defects, implying that MKK6 functions as an upstream kinase of p38α in ectodermal appendages. Lastly, stimulation with BMP2/7 in both explant culture and an ameloblast cell line confirm that p38α functions downstream of BMPs in this context. Thus, BMP-induced activation of the p38α MAPK pathway is critical for the morphogenesis of tooth cusps and the secretion of dental enamel. PMID:25406311

  16. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  20. Impact of gin saw tooth design on fiber and textile processing quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toothed gin saws have been used to separate cotton fiber from the seed for over 200 years. There have been many saw tooth designs developed over the years. Most of these designs were developed by trial and error. A complete and scientific analysis of tooth design has never been done. It is not k...

  1. Overview of Cannery Building, note the saw tooth monitors with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of Cannery Building, note the saw tooth monitors with glazing and with corrugated fiberglass and screens, view facing north - Kahului Cannery, Plant No. 28, Cannery Building and Dryer House/Feed Storage Building, 120 Kane Street, Kahului, Maui County, HI

  2. Functional convergence in bat and toothed whale biosonars.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P T; Surlykke, A

    2013-09-01

    Echolocating bats and toothed whales hunt and navigate by emission of sound pulses and analysis of returning echoes to form a self-generated auditory scene. Here, we demonstrate a striking functional convergence in the way these two groups of mammals independently evolved the capability to sense with sound in air and water. PMID:23997187

  3. Sexual dimorphism in tooth morphometrics: An evaluation of the parameters

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Rajkumar, Komali; Sundaram, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sexual dimorphism refers to the variations in tooth size and shape between the sexes. The consistency of these variations is valuable in the identification of the sex of an individual in times of mass disaster when whole body parts get destroyed or are unavailable. There exist differences in the expression of these variables across races and regions. This study aims to tabulate and identify the variations in tooth measurements using standarized reference points in an attempt to establish parameters of sexual dimorphism. Materials and Methods: 100 individuals (50 of each sex) in the age group 19-23 years were assessed for standard morphometric parameters of the maxillary central incisor, canine, premolar and molar. Odontometric measurements of established parameters were recorded from impression casts of the maxillary jaws. The mesiodistal width (MDW), the bucco-ligual width (BLW), the crown length (CL) and the cervical angle (CA) were charted among the teeth. The consistency of the variations was statistically analyzed and a logistic regression table was prepared to identify the sex of the individual from the tooth measurements. Results and Conclusions: The BLW, MDW and CL reflected significant variations among all the teeth to be effective in establishing sexual dimorphism. CA as a parameter was inadequate across all the teeth. The permanent maxillary canine was the most important tooth to be reflective of the gender and statistically significant to be utilized for gender determination. PMID:27051219

  4. Reducing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay. A SERVE Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE), Tallahassee, FL.

    This pamphlet discusses strategies for reducing baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) among Native American children. BBTD in infants and toddlers is a painful disease characterized by extensive decay of the upper front and side teeth. It is caused by prolonged exposure of teeth to carbohydrates, such as those contained in infant formula, milk, and fruit…

  5. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  6. Training in tooth preparation utilizing a support system.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Sohmura, T; Takahashi, J

    2004-02-01

    Tooth preparation is an essential technique for dental treatment, but it is a skill not easily learned by a dental student. To facilitate this leaning process, a new tooth preparation support system with a parallel link mechanism was developed. This study reports the educational efficiency of this system for dental students. Dental students with no experience in clinical practice were selected and divided into two groups; one trained with this support system; and the other, with freehand preparation. They prepared axial walls in right maxillary second premolars and molars mounted in a phantom manikin with an air-turbine handpiece. Convergence angles of the axial walls and parallelisms between axes of prepared teeth were evaluated. Training with the support system led to significantly smaller convergence angles and parallelisms as compared with freehand preparation training. With the freehand preparation after training, the convergence angles and parallelisms became smaller in the group trained with the support system than those trained with freehand. The above findings suggest that training in tooth preparation utilizing the newly developed support system can be one of practical programs that are useful for dental students to achieve greater competency in tooth preparation. PMID:15009599

  7. Intra-oral PTH Administration Promotes Tooth Extraction Socket Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kuroshima, S.; Kovacic, B.L.; Kozloff, K.M.; McCauley, L.K.; Yamashita, J.

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration increases systemic and craniofacial bone mass. However, the effect of PTH therapy on healing of tooth extraction sites is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of PTH therapy on tooth extraction socket healing and to examine whether PTH intra-oral injection promotes healing. The mandibular first molars were extracted in rats, and subcutaneous PTH was administered intermittently for 7, 14, and 28 days. In a second study, maxillary second molars were extracted, and PTH was administered by either subcutaneous or intra-oral injection to determine the efficacy of intra-oral PTH administration. Healing was assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analyses. PTH therapy accelerated the entire healing process and promoted both hard- and soft-tissue healing by increasing bone fill and connective tissue maturation. PTH therapy by intra-oral injection was as effective as subcutaneous injection in promoting tooth extraction socket healing. The findings suggest that PTH therapy promotes tooth extraction socket healing and that intra-oral injections can be used to administer PTH. PMID:23611925

  8. Pinion tooth surface generation strategy of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guanglei; Fan, Hongwei

    2012-07-01

    Aviation spiral bevel gears are often generated by spiral generated modified (SGM) roll method. In this style, pinion tooth surface modified generation strategy has an important influence on the meshing and contact performances. For the optimal contact pattern and transmission error function, local synthesis is applied to obtain the machine-tool settings of pinion. For digitized machine, four tooth surface generation styles of pinion are proposed. For every style, tooth contact analysis (TCA) is applied to obtain contact pattern and transmission error function. For the difference between TCA transmission error function and design objective curve, the degree of symmetry and agreement are defined and the corresponding sub-objective functions are established. Linear weighted combination method is applied to get an equivalent objective function to evaluate the shape of transmission error function. The computer programs for the process above are developed to analyze the meshing performances of the four pinion tooth surface generation styles for a pair of aviation spiral bevel gears with 38/43 teeth numbers. The four analytical results are compared with each other and show that the incomplete modified roll is optimal for this gear pair. This study is an expansion to generation strategy of spiral bevel gears, and offers new alternatives to computer numerical control (CNC) manufacture of spiral bevel gears.

  9. Variability and evolutionary trends in tooth size of Gigantopithecus blacki.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y

    1982-09-01

    The measurements of Gigantopithecus blacki teeth from Liucheng are summarized and comparative statistics are calculated. Compared to the variability of tooth size in living nonhuman primates, emphasizing Pongo because of close ecological and genetic relationships, the hypothesis of a single species for Liucheng specimens is acceptable. The Liucheng sample pattern of variability in tooth size, as well as the South African robust australopithecines, differs from living nonhuman primates in the same way; the first molar is not the least variable of the molars, and the molars are relatively variable compared with the other teeth. Sexual dimorphism may be responsible for this pattern in both cases. Later G. blacki cheek teeth are significantly larger than early G. blacki. From early G. blacki to later, the expansion ratio in tooth breadth is more than in tooth length. The pattern of expansion is like that seen in South African australopithecines. Both G. blacki and South African robust Australopithecus seem to show continued adaptation to more powerful and efficient chewing. The diet of G. blacki is not known, and its reconstruction depends on estimates of body size that differ greatly. PMID:6753599

  10. Consideration of Moving Tooth Load in Gear Crack Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2001-01-01

    Robust gear designs consider not only crack initiation, but crack propagation trajectories for a fail-safe design. In actual gear operation, the magnitude as well as the position of the force changes as the gear rotates through the mesh. A study to determine the effect of moving gear tooth load on crack propagation predictions was performed. Two-dimensional analysis of an involute spur gear and three-dimensional analysis of a spiral-bevel pinion gear using the finite element method and boundary element method were studied and compared to experiments. A modified theory for predicting gear crack propagation paths based on the criteria of Erdogan and Sih was investigated. Crack simulation based on calculated stress intensity factors and mixed mode crack angle prediction techniques using a simple static analysis in which the tooth load was located at the highest point of single tooth contact was validated. For three-dimensional analysis, however, the analysis was valid only as long as the crack did not approach the contact region on the tooth.

  11. An automatic and effective tooth isolation method for dental radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.-L.; Huang, P.-W.; Cho, Y. S.; Kuo, C.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Tooth isolation is a very important step for both computer-aided dental diagnosis and automatic dental identification systems, because it will directly affect the accuracy of feature extraction and, thereby, the final results of both types of systems. This paper presents an effective and fully automatic tooth isolation method for dental X-ray images, which contains up-per-lower jaw separation, single tooth isolation, over-segmentation verification, and under-segmentation detection. The upper-lower jaw separation mechanism is based on a gray-scale integral projection to avoid possible information loss and incorporates with the angle adjustment to handle skewed images. In a single tooth isolation, an adaptive windowing scheme for locating gap valleys is proposed to improve the accuracy. In over-segmentation, an isolation-curve verification scheme is proposed to remove excessive curves; and in under-segmentation, a missing-teeth detection scheme is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that our method achieves the accuracy rates of 95.63% and 98.71% for the upper and lower jaw images, respectively, from the test database of 60 bitewing dental radiographs, and performs better for images with severe teeth occlusion, excessive dental works, and uneven illumination than that of Nomir and Abdel-Mottaleb's method. The method without upper-lower jaw separation step also works well for panoramic and periapical images.

  12. Nonlinear Simulation of the Tooth Enamel Spectrum for EPR Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Dubovsky, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Software was developed where initial EPR spectra of tooth enamel were deconvoluted based on nonlinear simulation, line shapes and signal amplitudes in the model initial spectrum were calculated, the regression coefficient was evaluated, and individual spectra were summed. Software validation demonstrated that doses calculated using it agreed excellently with the applied radiation doses and the doses reconstructed by the method of additive doses.

  13. Chapter 1: An Introduction to the Saber-Tooth Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a theme issue on the Saber-Tooth Project, an ongoing reform effort involving a university and school district that collaborate to improve middle school physical education by improving teaching conditions and engaging teachers in professional development emphasizing curriculum improvement. The monograph explains the nature of…

  14. Chapter 3: Design of the Saber-Tooth Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Used data from interviews, surveys, and document analysis to describe the methods and reform processes of the Saber Tooth Project, examining selection of sites; demographics (school sites, teachers, data sources, and project assumptions); and project phases (development, planning, implementation, and support). The project's method of reform was…

  15. Sox2 contributes to tooth development via Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Jung; Kim, Eun-Jung; Otsu, Keishi; Harada, Hidemitsu; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor Sox2 is a stem cell marker that dictates cell lineage. It has been shown to mark the epithelial stem cells of the continuously growing mouse incisors. Sox2 also interferes with Wnt signaling by binding to β-catenin, a central mediator of the Wnt pathway. We show that these functions of Sox2 are essential for mouse molar development. Sox2 has previously been shown to play a role in the formation of new teeth from the existing dental epithelium. To assess Sox2 function related to cell migration within a tooth, we monitored cell movement by using a DiI system and observed that DiI moves from molar 1 to molar 2 during tooth development. However, upon temporal knockdown of Sox2, DiI remains in the molar 1 region. This study also provides novel insights into the role of Sox2 and the important validation of Sox2 as a potent target in Wnt signaling during tooth development. Our data reveal that the degradation of Wnt signaling caused by the knockdown of Sox2 results in a lack of cell migration during tooth development. PMID:26846112

  16. Removal of deciduous canine tooth buds in Kenyan rural Maasai.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, J; Amwayi, P; Muriithi, A

    1995-04-01

    The removal of deciduous canine tooth buds in early childhood is a practice that has been documented in Kenya and in neighboring countries. This paper describes the occurrence, rationale and method of this practice amongst rural Kenyan Maasai. In a group of 95 children aged between six months and two years, who were examined in 1991/92, 87% were found to have undergone the removal of one or more deciduous canine tooth buds. In an older age group (3-7 years of age), 72% of the 111 children examined exhibited missing mandibular or maxillary deciduous canines. It was found that the actual removal of a deciduous tooth bud is often performed by middle-aged Maasai women who enucleate the developing tooth using a pointed pen-knife. There exists a strong belief among the Maasai that diarrhoea, vomiting and other febrile illnesses of early childhood are caused by the gingival swelling over the canine region, and which is thought to contain 'worms' or 'nylon' teeth. The immediate and long-term hazards of this practice include profuse bleeding, infection and damage to the developing permanent canines. A multi-disciplinary approach involving social anthropologists in addition to dental and medical personnel, is recommend in order to discourage this harmful operation that appears to be on the increase. PMID:7621751

  17. Tooth Size Variation Related to Age in Amboseli Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Galbany, Jordi; Dotras, Laia; Alberts, Susan C.; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    We measured the molar size from a single population of wild baboons from Amboseli (Kenya), both females (n = 57) and males (n = 50). All the females were of known age; the males represented a mix of known-age individuals (n = 31) and individuals with ages estimated to within 2 years (n = 19). The results showed a significant reduction in the mesiodistal length of teeth in both sexes as a function of age. Overall patterns of age-related change in tooth size did not change whether we included or excluded the individuals of estimated age, but patterns of statistical significance changed as a result of changed sample sizes. Our results demonstrate that tooth length is directly related to age due to interproximal wearing caused by M2 and M3 compression loads. Dental studies in primates, including both fossil and extant species, are mostly based on specimens obtained from osteological collections of varying origins, for which the age at death of each individual in the sample is not known. Researchers should take into account the phenomenon of interproximal attrition leading to reduced tooth size when measuring tooth length for ondontometric purposes. PMID:21325862

  18. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  19. Fetal age estimation using MSCT scans of deciduous tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Minier, Marie; Maret, Delphine; Dedouit, Fabrice; Vergnault, Marion; Mokrane, Fathima-Zohra; Rousseau, Hervé; Adalian, Pascal; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of fetal age is an essential element in many fields such as anthropology, odontology, paleopathology, and forensic sciences. This study examines the correlation between fetal age, femoral diaphyseal length (considered as the gold standard), and deciduous tooth germs of fetuses aged 22 to 40 weeks amenorrhea (WA) based on computed tomography (MSCT) reconstructions. Qualitative and quantitative studies of femoral and deciduous tooth germ lengths were performed on 81 fetuses (39 females and 42 males). R software was used for statistical analyses. Intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities and the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Correlation coefficients (R (2)) and linear regression equations were calculated. Intra- and inter-observer variabilities were very satisfactory (intra-observer ICC ≥ 0.96, inter-observer ICC ≥ 0.95). Femoral length was significantly correlated with age (R (2) = 0.9). The correlation coefficient between age and height, width, and dental volume was R (2) ≥ 0.73. Tooth germs were good indicators of fetal age. Our method appears to be reliable and reproducible, and the results of this study agreed with those of the literature. The dental formula provided a precise estimation of fetal age between 25 and 32 WA. Tooth germs were reliable indicators of fetal age, and multislice computed tomography was shown to be an innovative and reliable technology for this purpose. PMID:23828625

  20. Prosthetic clone and natural human tooth comparison by speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Pierre; Corn, Stephane; Fages, Michel; Raynal, Jacques; Cuisinier, Frederic J. G.

    2010-09-01

    New trends in dental prosthodontic interventions tend to preserve the maximum of "body" structure. With the evolution of CAD-CAM techniques, it is now possible to measure "in mouth" the remaining dental tissues. The prosthetic crown is then designed using this shape on which it will be glued on, and also by taking into account the contact surface of the opposite jaw tooth. Several theories discuss on the glue thickness and formulation, but also on the way to evolve to a more biocompatible crown and also new biomechanical concepts. In order to validate these new concepts and materials, and to study the mechanical properties and mechanical integrity of the prosthesis, high resolution optical measurements of the deformations of the glue and the crown are needed. Samples are two intact premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons. The reference sample has no modifications on the tooth while the second sample tooth is shaped to receive a feldspathic ceramic monoblock crown which will be glued. This crown was manufactured with a chairside CAD-CAM system from an intra-oral optical print. The software allows to realize a nearly perfect clone of the reference sample. The necessary space for the glue is also entered with ideal values. This duplication process yields to obtain two samples with identical anatomy for further processing. The glue joint thickness can also be modified if required. The purpose is to compare the behaviour of a natural tooth and its prosthetic clone manufactured with "biomechanical" concepts. Vertical cut samples have been used to deal with planar object observation, and also to look "inside" the tooth. We have developed a complete apparatus enabling the study of the compressive mechanical behaviour of the concerned tooth by speckle interferometry. Because in plane displacements are of great interest for orthodontic measurements1, an optical fiber in-plane sensitive interferometer has been designed. The fibers are wrapped around piezoelectric

  1. TLR signalling can modify the mineralization of tooth germ.

    PubMed

    Papp, Tamas; Hollo, Krisztina; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Nagy, Zoltan; Polyak, Angela; Miko, Edit; Bai, Peter; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-05-01

    Objective The aim of this work is to investigate the possible role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) during the development of mouse tooth germ. TLR4 is well known to inhibit mineralization and cause inflammation in mature odontoblasts and dental pulp cells. However, unlike these pathological functions of TLR4, little is known about the developmental function(s) of TLR4 during tooth development. Materials and methods TLR4 expression was studied via Western blot in developing lower mouse incisors from E13.5 to E18.5. To generate functional data about the effects of TLR4, a specific agonist (LPS) was applied to the medium of in vitro tooth germ cultures, followed by Western blot, histochemical staining, ELISA assay, in situ hybridization and RT-qPCR. Results Increased accumulation of biotin-labelled LPS was detected in the enamel organ and in preodontoblasts. LPS treatment induced degradation of the inhibitor molecule (IκB) of the NF-κB signalling pathway. However, no morphological alterations were detected in cultured tissue after LPS addition at the applied dosage. Activation of TLR4 inhibited the mineralization of enamel and dentin, as demonstrated by alizarin red staining and as decreased levels of collagen type X. mRNA expression of ameloblastin was elevated after LPS administration. Conclusion These results demonstrate that TLR4 may decrease the mineralization of hard tissues of the tooth germ and may trigger the maturation of ameloblasts; it can give valuable information to understand better congenital tooth abnormalities. PMID:26763602

  2. Tooth Engineering: Searching for Dental Mesenchymal Cells Sources

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Laetitia; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Mendoza, Soledad Acuña; Poliard, Anne; Lesot, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The implantation of cultured re-associations between embryonic dental mesenchymal cells and epithelial cells from mouse molars at embryonic day 14 (ED14) allowed making full teeth with crown, root, periodontal ligament fibers, and bone. Although representing valuable tools to set up methodologies embryonic cells are not easily available. This work thus aimed to replace the embryonic cells by dental mesenchymal cell lines or cultured expanded embryonic cells, and to test their ability to mediate tooth development in vitro when re-associated with a competent dental epithelium. Histology, immunostaining and RT-PCR allowed getting complementary sets of results. Two different immortalized cell lines from ED18 dental mesenchyme failed in mediating tooth formation. The potentialities of embryonic dental mesenchymal cells decreased from ED14 to ED16 and were lost at ED18. This is likely related to a change in the mesenchymal cell phenotype and/or populations during development. Attempts to cultivate ED14 or ED16 embryonic dental mesenchymal cells prior to re-association led to the loss of their ability to support tooth development. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of Fgf3 transcription. Supplementation of the culture medium with FGF2 allowed restoring Fgf3 expression, but not the ability of mesenchymal cells to engage in tooth formation. Altogether, these observations suggest that a competent cell population exists in the dental mesenchyme at ED14, progressively decreases during development, and cannot as such be maintained in vitro. This study evidenced the need for specific conditions to maintain the ability of dental mesenchymal cells to initiate whole tooth formation, when re-associated with an odontogenic epithelium. Efforts to improve the culture conditions will have to be combined with attempts to characterize the competent cells within the dental mesenchyme. PMID:21483728

  3. Dental patterning in the earliest sharks: Implications for tooth evolution.

    PubMed

    Maisey, John G; Turner, Susan; Naylor, Gavin J P; Miller, Randall F

    2014-05-01

    Doliodus problematicus is the oldest known fossil shark-like fish with an almost intact dentition (Emsian, Lower Devonian, c. 397Ma). We provide a detailed description of the teeth and dentition in D. problematicus, based on tomographic analysis of NBMG 10127 (New Brunswick Museum, Canada). Comparisons with modern shark dentitions suggest that Doliodus was a ram-feeding predator with a dentition adapted to seizing and disabling prey. Doliodus provides several clues about the early evolution of the "shark-like" dentition in chondrichthyans and also raises new questions about the evolution of oral teeth in jawed vertebrates. As in modern sharks, teeth in Doliodus were replaced in a linguo-labial sequence within tooth families at fixed positions along the jaws (12-14 tooth families per jaw quadrant in NBMG 10127). Doliodus teeth were replaced much more slowly than in modern sharks. Nevertheless, its tooth formation was apparently as highly organized as in modern elasmobranchs, in which future tooth positions are indicated by synchronized expression of shh at fixed loci within the dental epithelium. Comparable dental arrays are absent in osteichthyans, placoderms, and many "acanthodians"; a "shark-like" dentition, therefore, may be a synapomorphy of chondrichthyans and gnathostomes such as Ptomacanthus. The upper anterior teeth in Doliodus were not attached to the palatoquadrates, but were instead supported by the ethmoid region of the prechordal basicranium, as in some other Paleozoic taxa (e.g., Triodus, Ptomacanthus). This suggests that the chondrichthyan dental lamina was originally associated with prechordal basicranial cartilage as well as jaw cartilage, and that the modern elasmobranch condition (in which the oral dentition is confined to the jaws) is phylogenetically advanced. Thus, oral tooth development in modern elasmobranchs does not provide a complete developmental model for chondrichthyans or gnathostomes. PMID:24347366

  4. Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis Treated with Tooth Extractions following Mediastinal and Cervical Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Minoru; Suzuki, Okihide; Nasu, Daisuke; Koizumi, Kazue; Muta, Yu; Imaizumi, Hideko; Ishiguro, Toru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rare condition in which oropharyngeal infection spreads to the mediastinum via the cervical fascia. Delayed diagnosis and surgery result in a high mortality rate among patients with DNM. We present a case of DNM resulting from odontogenic infection treated successfully with tooth extraction following mediastinal and cervical drainage. A 43-year-old, previously healthy Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of acute mediastinitis. Computed tomography revealed gas collection around the mid-thoracic esophagus and bilateral pleural effusion. We performed mediastinal drainage via right thoracotomy. Cervicotomy was performed on postoperative day 14 to drain a residual cervical abscess. The patient required the extraction of ten teeth over three procedures to address primary odontogenic infection before his fever resolved on postoperative day 40. Prompt diagnosis, aggressive drainage and removal of the source of infection can improve survival among patients with this life-threatening disease. PMID:26600767

  5. Crown-root fracture of fused primary teeth--a case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marina de Deus de Moura; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Leopoldino, Valeria de Deus; Batista-Netto, Otacilio de Sousa; Carvalho, Carmen Milena Rodrigues Siqueira; Moura, Lucia de Fatima Almeida de Deus

    2012-01-01

    In the primary dentition, traumatic injuries affecting the tooth-supporting structures are common due to increased bone resilience in children. Crown-root fracture, defined as a fracture involving enamel, dentin, and cementum, is uncommon in the primary dentition, comprising only 2% of dental traumas. This article reports the treatment and follow-up of a 2-year-old boy who suffered a traumatic crown-root fracture involving a primary anterior incisor that was fused to a supernumerary tooth. PMID:22414512

  6. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nicholas A.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Donde, Nikunj N.; Cleves, Phillip A.; Agoglia, Rachel M.; Miller, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms. PMID:26062935

  7. Dynamic tooth loads and stressing for high contact ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, R. W.; Westervelt, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis and computer program were developed for calculating the dynamic gear tooth loading and root stressing for high contact ratio gearing (HCRG) as well as LCRG. The analysis includes the effects of the variable tooth stiffness during the mesh, tooth profile modification, and gear errors. The calculation of the tooth root stressing caused by the dynamic gear tooth loads is based on a modified Heywood gear tooth stress analysis, which appears more universally applicable to both LCRG and HCRG. The computer program is presently being expanded to calculate the tooth contact stressing and PV values. Sample application of the gear program to equivalent LCRG (1.566 contact ratio) and HCRG (2.40 contact ratio) revealed the following: (1) the operating conditions and dynamic characteristics of the gear system an affect the gear tooth loading and root stressing, and therefore, life significantly; (2) the length of the profile modification affect the tooth loading and root stressing significantly, the amount depending on the applied load, speed, and contact ratio; and (3) the effect of variable tooth stiffness is small, shifting and increasing the response peaks slightly from those for constant tooth stiffness.

  8. Factors associated with tooth loss and prosthodontic status among Sudanese adults.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Nadia; Allen, Patrick F; Abu-bakr, Neamat H; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the degree of tooth loss, factors influencing tooth loss, and the extent of prosthodontic rehabilitation in Sudanese adults (≥ 16 years old) attending outpatient clinics in Khartoum State. Pearson and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between tooth loss and specific characteristics determined through interviews and clinical examinations. The mean number of missing teeth was 3.6 (SD, 4.9) and the prevalence of edentulism was 0.1%. The prevalence of tooth loss (missing at least one tooth) was 78%; 66.9% of tooth loss was due to caries, and 11.2% was attributable to other reasons. Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth was evident in 3%, whereas a need for prosthetic replacement was evident in 57%. Having < 20 teeth was associated with age, gender, and socioeconomic status; tooth loss due to caries was associated with age, tribe, frequency of tooth-brushing, and a low rate of dental consultation. Tooth loss due to other reasons was associated with age, tribe, education, periodontal pocketing, tobacco use, tooth wear, and prosthetic status. The results of the present study indicated that the major cause of tooth loss was dental caries, thus emphasizing the importance of a public prevention-based healthcare program. Replacement of missing teeth was uncommon in the study subjects, which may reflect lack of access to this type of oral healthcare. PMID:23221155

  9. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Nicholas A; Glazer, Andrew M; Donde, Nikunj N; Cleves, Phillip A; Agoglia, Rachel M; Miller, Craig T

    2015-07-15

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms. PMID:26062935

  10. [Establishment of database with standard 3D tooth crowns based on 3DS MAX].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaosheng; An, Tao; Liao, Wenhe; Dai, Ning; Yu, Qing; Lu, Peijun

    2009-08-01

    The database with standard 3D tooth crowns has laid the groundwork for dental CAD/CAM system. In this paper, we design the standard tooth crowns in 3DS MAX 9.0 and create a database with these models successfully. Firstly, some key lines are collected from standard tooth pictures. Then we use 3DS MAX 9.0 to design the digital tooth model based on these lines. During the design process, it is important to refer to the standard plaster tooth model. After some tests, the standard tooth models designed with this method are accurate and adaptable; furthermore, it is very easy to perform some operations on the models such as deforming and translating. This method provides a new idea to build the database with standard 3D tooth crowns and a basis for dental CAD/CAM system. PMID:19813628

  11. The lateral enamel lamina--component of tooth primordia in selected mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Witter, K; Matulová, P; Mísek, I

    2002-01-01

    The lateral enamel lamina (LEL) is a part of the enamel organ, which is probably not involved in tooth formation. It represents, besides the "stalk" of the tooth primordium, a second interconnection between enamel organ and oral epithelium or vestibular lamina. We detected the LEL in the sheep (Ovis aries), the dolphin (Stenella attenuata), and the vole (Microtus agrestis) by light microscopy and computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction. The LEL could be found in cap to bell stage tooth primordia, most clearly in slowly developing tooth germs. LEL-like structures have been furthermore described or depicted in tooth germs of the mouse, the elk (Alces alces), the dugong (Dugong dugong), the elephant (Loxodonta africana), and the human. Probably it is a part of all mammalian tooth primordia that undergoes regression during morphogenesis of the enamel organ. As a reducing structure, it should be considered in studies of tooth development. PMID:12494916

  12. Applications of surface-surface matching algorithms for determination of orthodontic tooth movements.

    PubMed

    Keilig, L; Piesche, K; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2003-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movements are described as the differences between initial and final tooth positions. A computer based method for determination of tooth movements for different treatment methods was developed. A total of 20 casts of the upper jaw of patients treated with tooth positioners or fixed appliances were used as a basis for this study. Tooth movement was analysed on casts before (Ci) and after treatment (Cf). The casts were digitized either with a COMT or 3D laser scanning systems. After digitization, the models were superimposed in the palate by using a surface-surface matching algorithm. Tooth surfaces of the orthodontically moved teeth were segmented and determination of tooth movement was accomplished by matching the moved teeth from Ci to Cf. The resulting transformations delivered three dimensional information on translations and rotations. An accuracy of 0.2 mm in translations and 1 degree in rotations could be demonstrated, showing the different efficiency of treatment schemes. PMID:14675956

  13. Ultrasonic hearing and echolocation in the earliest toothed whales.

    PubMed

    Park, Travis; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Evans, Alistair R

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of biosonar (production of high-frequency sound and reception of its echo) was a key innovation of toothed whales and dolphins (Odontoceti) that facilitated phylogenetic diversification and rise to ecological predominance. Yet exactly when high-frequency hearing first evolved in odontocete history remains a fundamental question in cetacean biology. Here, we show that archaic odontocetes had a cochlea specialized for sensing high-frequency sound, as exemplified by an Oligocene xenorophid, one of the earliest diverging stem groups. This specialization is not as extreme as that seen in the crown clade. Paired with anatomical correlates for high-frequency signal production in Xenorophidae, this is strong evidence that the most archaic toothed whales possessed a functional biosonar system, and that this signature adaptation of odontocetes was acquired at or soon after their origin. PMID:27072406

  14. Graphene-based wireless bacteria detection on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Tao, Hu; Clayton, Jefferson D.; Sengupta, Amartya; Kaplan, David L.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Verma, Naveen; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2012-03-01

    Direct interfacing of nanosensors onto biomaterials could impact health quality monitoring and adaptive threat detection. Graphene is capable of highly sensitive analyte detection due to its nanoscale nature. Here we show that graphene can be printed onto water-soluble silk. This in turn permits intimate biotransfer of graphene nanosensors onto biomaterials, including tooth enamel. The result is a fully biointerfaced sensing platform, which can be tuned to detect target analytes. For example, via self-assembly of antimicrobial peptides onto graphene, we show bioselective detection of bacteria at single-cell levels. Incorporation of a resonant coil eliminates the need for onboard power and external connections. Combining these elements yields two-tiered interfacing of peptide-graphene nanosensors with biomaterials. In particular, we demonstrate integration onto a tooth for remote monitoring of respiration and bacteria detection in saliva. Overall, this strategy of interfacing graphene nanosensors with biomaterials represents a versatile approach for ubiquitous detection of biochemical targets.

  15. Management of a Nonvital Young Permanent Tooth by Pulp Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Vidya; Sivadas, G

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% This report presents the case of a 10-year-old patient with a nonvital young permanent tooth which was managed by pulp revascularization. Following disinfection of the canal by irrigation with NaOCl and use of a triantibiotic paste, a scaffold was created by inducing the formation of a blood clot within the canal. At the subsequent follow-up visits, the patient was asymptomatic, with normal response to percussion, normal periodontal probing depths, and no abnormal mobility. The radiographs showed evidence of continued apical root development with increase in root length, signs of apical closure and increase in thickness of dentinal walls. Thus, this case adds to the growing evidence supporting the revascularization approach as an option for management of nonvital young permanent teeth. How to cite this article: Chandran V, Chacko V, Sivadas G. Management of a Nonvital Young Permanent Tooth by Pulp Revascularization. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):213-216. PMID:25709305

  16. Graphene-based wireless bacteria detection on tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Tao, Hu; Clayton, Jefferson D; Sengupta, Amartya; Kaplan, David L; Naik, Rajesh R; Verma, Naveen; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Direct interfacing of nanosensors onto biomaterials could impact health quality monitoring and adaptive threat detection. Graphene is capable of highly sensitive analyte detection due to its nanoscale nature. Here we show that graphene can be printed onto water-soluble silk. This in turn permits intimate biotransfer of graphene nanosensors onto biomaterials, including tooth enamel. The result is a fully biointerfaced sensing platform, which can be tuned to detect target analytes. For example, via self-assembly of antimicrobial peptides onto graphene, we show bioselective detection of bacteria at single-cell levels. Incorporation of a resonant coil eliminates the need for onboard power and external connections. Combining these elements yields two-tiered interfacing of peptide-graphene nanosensors with biomaterials. In particular, we demonstrate integration onto a tooth for remote monitoring of respiration and bacteria detection in saliva. Overall, this strategy of interfacing graphene nanosensors with biomaterials represents a versatile approach for ubiquitous detection of biochemical targets. PMID:22453836

  17. A devitalized tooth as a complication of septorhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J M; Toriumi, D; Kerth, J D

    1987-07-01

    Complications of septorhinoplasty often involve adjacent structures, resulting in cosmetic as well as functional abnormalities. Dental complications of nasal surgery are rare. We describe a patient who underwent septorhinoplasty with a postoperative complication of a devitalized tooth. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a dental complication. Bony manipulation in the region of the nasal spine may have resulted in the interruption of the neurovascular supply to the right central incisor, yielding a devitalized tooth. An aberrant vascular supply, or root apex situated high in the premaxilla, can predispose to dental injury while performing bony manipulation near the nasal spine. Preoperative evaluation of patients who are at risk for dental complications may allow the surgeon to safely achieve the functional and cosmetic goals of septorhinoplasty. PMID:3580160

  18. Excimer laser interaction with dentin of the human tooth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Gilliam, Ruth L.; Baker, George R.

    1989-01-01

    The use an excimer laser produced many unusual conical structures within the dentin of the inner part of the human tooth. By varying the frequency of the laser one can disperse the energy and cause more bleeding in laser surgery, but not destroy the cells associated with the incision. Therefore, the healing process will virtually be without scarring. Whereas, using the infrared laser the blood loss would be less, but the healing process would tend to be longer because cells are being destroyed due to the cauterization effect of the laser. The question is, are these structures produced as an interaction with the laser or are they an intrinsic part of the structure. The effects of the laser interaction upon dentin was studied, and in using electron microscopy the interaction of the excimer laser upon the tooth dentin and other various biological tissue is more clearly understood.

  19. Tooth root resorption induced in rats by diphenylhydantoin and parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P. B.; Harvey, W.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in bone, cartilage and the dentition in animals and man following the administration of anticonvulsant drugs resemble those seen in hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism. Groups of 21-day-old rats were treated with diphenylhydantoin, parathyroidectomized, or made hypocalcaemic with a calcium-deficient diet. Histological examination revealed extensive resorption of cementum and dentine in the molars of the drug-treated and parathyroidectomized rats, but not in the hypocalcaemic or control groups. Localization of injected tetracycline by fluorescence showed that the resorption affected the distal side of the tooth roots and had occurred after root formation. No changes in cementum formation on the mesial side of the roots had occurred in any of the experimental groups. These results suggest that diphenylhydantoin induces a condition similar to pseudohypoparathyroidism in which the resistance of tooth roots to resorption is reduced. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2923790

  20. Management of a nonvital young permanent tooth by pulp revascularization.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Vidya; Chacko, Varghese; Sivadas, G

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the case of a 10-year-old patient with a nonvital young permanent tooth which was managed by pulp revascularization. Following disinfection of the canal by irrigation with NaOCl and use of a triantibiotic paste, a scaffold was created by inducing the formation of a blood clot within the canal. At the subsequent follow-up visits, the patient was asymptomatic, with normal response to percussion, normal periodontal probing depths, and no abnormal mobility. The radiographs showed evidence of continued apical root development with increase in root length, signs of apical closure and increase in thickness of dentinal walls. Thus, this case adds to the growing evidence supporting the revascularization approach as an option for management of nonvital young permanent teeth. How to cite this article: Chandran V, Chacko V, Sivadas G. Management of a Nonvital Young Permanent Tooth by Pulp Revascularization. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):213-216. PMID:25709305

  1. Effect of Bleaching Agents on the Nanohardness of Tooth Enamel, Composite Resin, and the Tooth-Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Abe, A T; Youssef, M N; Turbino, M L

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the nanohardness of tooth enamel, composite resin, dental adhesive, and enamel hybrid layer exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agents and analyze the tooth-restoration interface using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study used 40 crowns of bovine incisors, which were embedded in epoxy resin. A 2 × 2 × 2-mm cavity was prepared in the medial third of the flattened buccal surface of each tooth and restored (two-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 + nanocomposite resin Filtek Z350 XT). The specimens were polished and divided into four groups (n=10), corresponding to each bleaching agent used (TB: Total Blanc Office, pH=7.22-6.33; HPB: Whiteness HP Blue, pH=8.89-8.85; HP: Whiteness HP, pH=6.65-6.04; PO: Pola Office, pH=3.56-3.8), applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The nanohardness of the substrates was measured before and immediately after the bleaching procedure and after 7-day storage in artificial saliva with an Ultra-Microhardness Tester (DUH-211S, Shimadzu). Loads used were 100 mN for tooth enamel and composite resin and 10 mN for adhesive and enamel hybrid layer. For SEM analysis, epoxy replicas were prepared through high-precision impressions of the specimens. For nanohardness, the statistical tests two-way analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05) revealed that the agent with the lowest pH value (PO) was the only one to decrease the nanohardness of enamel and the enamel hybrid layer immediately after its application; however, after 7-day storage in artificial saliva, the nanohardness levels of these substrates returned to their original values. SEM analysis revealed small gaps between tooth enamel and adhesive after the exposure to all bleaching agents; however, the most evident gap in the tooth-restoration interface was observed immediately after application of agent PO. No bleaching agent used changed the nanohardness of the composite resin and adhesive layer. PMID:26266649

  2. Modeling of saw tooth instability in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.

    1999-04-08

    Assuming the validity of the Boussard criterion for the determination of the microwave instability threshold, we derive two coupled non linear differential equations which describe the time evolution of the energy spread and of the instability growth rate under different conditions. The equations reproduce the characteristic features of the saw tooth instability and are in agreement with the results of a time domain simulation code.

  3. Comparative perspective on antemortem tooth loss in Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Cassandra C; Weaver, Timothy D

    2016-03-01

    Neandertal specimens with severe antemortem (before death) tooth loss (AMTL) are sometimes interpreted as evidence for human-like behaviors in Neandertals, such as conspecific care or cooking, although it is uncertain whether AMTL frequencies in Neandertals are similar to those in modern humans and exceed those in non-human primates. This study characterizes AMTL (all tooth types) in Neandertals relative to recent human hunter-gatherers and several non-human primate taxa using binomial-normal regression models fit in a Bayesian framework to a sample of 25 Neandertals, 310 recent human hunter-gatherers, 61 chimpanzees, 38 orangutans, and 75 baboons. The probability that a tooth is lost antemortem is modeled to depend on tooth class, taxon, and estimated age at death. Neandertals have odds of AMTL above orangutans and baboons, similar to or somewhat lower than chimpanzees, and below recent humans, if we assume a human-like rate of senescence; or intermediate between chimpanzees and recent humans, if we assume a faster rate of senescence. These findings suggest that Neandertals can only be considered to have frequencies of AMTL above non-human primates if they had more rapid life histories than modern humans. Either Neandertals are not human-like in their life history or their frequency of AMTL. These interpretations are complicated, however, by the substantial inter-population variation in AMTL among recent humans, with some populations having odds of AMTL as low as in non-human primates. These results, together with theoretical considerations, suggest that only high frequencies of AMTL are diagnostic of behavior. Consequently, the behavioral implications of low frequencies of AMTL, such as those found in Neandertals, are ambiguous. Low frequencies in Neandertals could be because they had a low risk of AMTL rather than because they had high mortality from AMTL relative to an average modern human of similar age. PMID:26989018

  4. Biomechanical considerations on tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Pasquale; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the connection of teeth to implants, in order to restore partial edentulism. The main problem arising from this connection is tooth intrusion, which can occur in up to 7.3% of the cases. The justification of this complication is being attempted through the perspective of biomechanics of the involved anatomical structures, that is, the periodontal ligament and the bone, as well as that of the teeth- and implant-supported fixed partial dentures. PMID:23255882

  5. Selective β2-adrenergic Antagonist Butoxamine Reduces Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T.; Miyazawa, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizutani, Y.; Uchibori, S.; Asaoka, R.; Arai, M.; Togari, A.; Goto, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in bone metabolism has attracted attention. β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is presented on osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. We previously demonstrated that β-AR blockers at low dose improve osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system via β2-AR blocking, while they may have a somewhat inhibitory effect on osteoblastic activity at high doses. In this study, the effects of butoxamine (BUT), a specific β2-AR antagonist, on tooth movement were examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showing osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. We administered BUT (1 mg/kg) orally, and closed-coil springs were inserted into the upper-left first molar. After sacrifice, we calculated the amount of tooth movement and analyzed the trabecular microarchitecture and histomorphometry. The distance in the SHR control was greater than that in the Wistar-Kyoto rat group, but no significant difference was found in the SHR treated with BUT compared with the Wistar-Kyoto rat control. Analysis of bone volume per tissue volume, trabecular number, and osteoclast surface per bone surface in the alveolar bone showed clear bone loss by an increase of bone resorption in SHR. In addition, BUT treatment resulted in a recovery of alveolar bone loss. Furthermore, TH-immunoreactive nerves in the periodontal ligament were increased by tooth movement, and BUT administration decreased TH-immunoreactive nerves. These results suggest that BUT prevents alveolar bone loss and orthodontic tooth movement via β2-AR blocking. PMID:24868013

  6. Think before you extract – a case of tooth autotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Shoba; Al Habibullah, Mohammed; Nalam, Goutam Sai; Nair, Preeti P

    2011-01-01

    Renewed interest in autotransplantation has resulted in additional options in the treatment for rehabilitation of missing anterior teeth. Premolar teeth have been commonly used after extensive modifications while a supernumerary tooth from the anterior region when present would be a more suitable option. This case presents such a scenario, with a successful outcome ensuring adequate restoration of function, economical viability and aesthetic satisfaction for both the patient and clinician. PMID:22679047

  7. Maintenance of tooth color after prophylaxis: comparison of three dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, R L; Bartizek, R D; Owens, T S; Walters, P A; Gerlach, R W

    2001-01-01

    Pellicle rapidly accumulates on tooth surfaces after prophylaxis and may acquire cosmetically unacceptable levels of stain. A three-month clinical trial was conducted to evaluate stain prevention by a new silica-based tartar control whitening dentifrice (Crest Extra Whitening) compared to marketed tartar control baking soda peroxide whitening and regular dentifrice controls. Prior to the trial, a one-month screening exercise was conducted to identify adult subjects who accumulated extrinsic tooth stain after dental prophylaxis. A total of 672 subjects were stratified based on tooth whiteness, gender and tobacco usage, then given a dental prophylaxis and randomized into one of three dentifrice treatment groups. All product use was unsupervised. Change in tooth whiteness (delta L*) was determined by comparing colorimeter measurements collected on the facial surfaces of the four central incisors at months 1 and 3 to baseline. Ninety-six percent of subjects completed the three-month study. At both one and three months, the two whitening dentifrices did not differ from baseline in terms of delta L*. In contrast, the regular control had delta L* values of -0.26 and -0.39 at one and three months, respectively, differing significantly from baseline at both time points. Each of the whitening dentifrices differed statistically from the regular control in stain accumulation (p < or = 0.001) at one and three months, but were not different from each other. In general, all three test dentifrices were well tolerated. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of the new tartar control whitening dentifrice in preventing stain accumulation after dental prophylaxis compared to the marketed regular dentifrice control. PMID:11476015

  8. A longitudinal comparison of tooth whitening resulting from dentifrice use.

    PubMed

    Koertge, T E; Brooks, C N; Sarbin, A G; Powers, D; Gunsolley, J C

    1998-01-01

    The effect of twice-daily brushing with one of three different dentifrices (Arm & Hammer Dental Care, Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening, Crest) on stain removal and tooth whitening was examined in 115 volunteers over a period of 12 weeks. The facial surfaces of 12 anterior teeth were assessed for stain using a published, modified version of a standard stain index. Whiteness was measured on teeth 8 and 9 using a single Vita Lumin-Vaccum Shade Guide for consistency. At baseline, the mean facial stain scores were significantly higher (p < 0.05-0.01) for both Arm & Hammer dentifrices than for Crest. In addition, the tooth shades, as indicated by the stain guide, specifically the b* values representing yellowness, were quantified using a Minolta spectrophotometer. Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening formula was found to be significantly better than Crest at removing naturally occurring extrinsic stain. The difference between Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening and Crest became significant (p < 0.01) after two weeks of use, and remained intact during the balance of the study, achieving p values of 0.0002 for at least one of the three assessed parameters (total stain, proximal, and facial) at weeks 4 and 12. The study also found that Arm & Hammer Dental Care produced a significant increase in tooth whiteness by week 12, whereas Crest showed no such increase at any time during the study. These results suggest that the two Arm & Hammer Baking Soda products are more effective in reducing stain and increasing whiteness than the standard silica-based dentifrice. Their effectiveness is not related to abrasivity since they are less abrasive to tooth enamel than the silica-based product tested. PMID:10518865

  9. Complex cellular responses to tooth wear in rodent molar.

    PubMed

    Mahdee, A; Alhelal, A; Eastham, J; Whitworth, J; Gillespie, J I

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement and roles of the odontoblast and its process in sensing and responding to injuries such as tooth wear are incompletely understood. Evidence is presented that dentine exposure by tooth wear triggers structural and functional changes that aim to maintain tooth integrity. Mandibular first molars from freshly culled 8 week Wistar rats were prepared for light microscopy ground-sections (n=6), or fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, decalcified in 17% EDTA, sectioned and stained with antibodies to cyto-skeletal proteins (vimentin (vim), α-tubulin (tub) and α-actin), cellular homeostatic elements (sodium potassium ATPase (NaK-ATPase) and sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE-1)), and sensory nerve fibres (CGRP) (n=10) for fluorescence microscopy of worn and unworn regions of the mesial cusp. Immunoreactivity (IR) to vim, actin, NaK-ATPase and CGRP was confined to the pulpal third of odontoblast processes (OPs). IR to tub and nhe-1 was expressed by OPs in full dentine thickness. In areas associated with dentine exposure, the tubules contained no OPs. In regions with intact dentine, odontoblasts were arranged in a single cell layer and easily distinguished from the sub-odontoblast cells. In regions with open tubules, the odontoblasts were in stratified or pseudo-stratified in arrangement. Differences in structural antibody expression suggest a previously unreported heterogeneity of the odontoblast population and variations in different regions of the OP. This combined with differences in OPs extension and pulp cellular arrangement in worn and unworn regions suggests active and dynamic cellular responses to the opening of dentinal tubules by tooth wear. PMID:26547699

  10. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (~2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end.

  11. Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis: Histopathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Smedley, R C; Earley, E T; Galloway, S S; Baratt, R M; Rawlinson, J E

    2015-09-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a painful progressive condition of older horses that involves multiple teeth, including canines and incisors. EOTRH is uncommonly recognized by veterinary pathologists and in some cases may be misdiagnosed as cementoblastoma. The cause is unknown. The goals of this study were to describe the histopathologic features of EOTRH in 17 affected horses from the United States and to increase awareness of this condition. Samples ranged from affected tooth to the entire rostral mandible and maxilla. Affected teeth exhibited cemental hyperplasia and lysis. The marked proliferation of cementum in severe cases caused bulbous enlargement of the intra-alveolar portions of affected teeth. Several teeth contained necrotic debris, bacteria, and plant material in the regions of cemental lysis. All horses exhibited dentinal lysis in at least affected tooth, and several contained necrotic debris in these regions. Endodontic disease was often present with inflammation, lysis, necrotic debris, fibrosis, and/or a thin rim of atubular mineralized tissue in the pulp cavity. Periodontal disease was a common feature that was primarily characterized by moderate lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Resorption with secondary hypercementosis appears to begin on the external surface of the teeth rather than within the pulp cavity. Distinguishing EOTRH from other diseases requires a complete history that includes the number and location of affected teeth, a gross description of regional hard/soft tissue health, and radiographic findings. PMID:26077784

  12. Cracked tooth diagnosis and treatment: An alternative paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Mamoun, John S.; Napoletano, Donato

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth, and explores common clinical examples of cracked teeth, such as cusp fractures, fractures into tooth furcations, and root fractures. This article provides alternative definitions of terms such as cracked teeth, complete and incomplete fractures and crack lines, and explores the scientific rationale for dental terminology commonly used to describe cracked teeth, such as cracked tooth syndrome, structural versus nonstructural cracks, and vertical, horizontal, and oblique fractures. The article explains the advantages of high magnification loupes (×6–8 or greater), or the surgical operating microscope, combined with co-axial or head-mounted illumination, when observing teeth for microscopic crack lines or enamel craze lines. The article explores what biomechanical factors help to facilitate the development of cracks in teeth, and under what circumstances a full coverage crown may be indicated for preventing further propagation of a fracture plane. Articles on cracked tooth phenomena were located via a PubMed search using a variety of keywords, and via selective hand-searching of citations contained within located articles. PMID:26038667

  13. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500–750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  14. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  15. Early epithelial signaling center governs tooth budding morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Laura; Uski, Isa; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2016-09-12

    During organogenesis, cell fate specification and patterning are regulated by signaling centers, specialized clusters of morphogen-expressing cells. In many organs, initiation of development is marked by bud formation, but the cellular mechanisms involved are ill defined. Here, we use the mouse incisor tooth as a model to study budding morphogenesis. We show that a group of nonproliferative epithelial cells emerges in the early tooth primordium and identify these cells as a signaling center. Confocal live imaging of tissue explants revealed that although these cells reorganize dynamically, they do not reenter the cell cycle or contribute to the growing tooth bud. Instead, budding is driven by proliferation of the neighboring cells. We demonstrate that the activity of the ectodysplasin/Edar/nuclear factor κB pathway is restricted to the signaling center, and its inactivation leads to fewer quiescent cells and a smaller bud. These data functionally link the signaling center size to organ size and imply that the early signaling center is a prerequisite for budding morphogenesis. PMID:27621364

  16. Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw After Tooth Extraction.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ney Robson Bezerra; Silva, Leonardo de Freitas; Santana, Diego Matos; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia

    2015-10-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used for treatment or prevention of bone diseases characterized by high osteoclastic activity. Among the oral medicines used to treat osteoporosis, alendronate has been often used. Despite of the low rate of complications on its use, cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw have been reported on literature after tooth extractions. The main symptoms include pain, tooth mobility, swelling, erythema, and ulceration. The risk factors related to osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with bisphosphonate are exposition time to the medicine, routes of administration, and oral surgical procedures performed. The aim of this work is to report a case of a patient showing osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with the use of oral bisphosphonates after tooth extractions. The patient was treated through the suspension of the alendronate with the removal of the necrotic tissue and the foci of infection. After a year's follow-up, the patient showed no recurrence signs. From the foregoing, the interruption of the alendronate use and the surgical treatment associated to antibiotic therapy showed effective on the patient's treatment. PMID:26468839

  17. Tooth segmentation system with intelligent editing for cephalometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shoupu

    2015-03-01

    Cephalometric analysis is the study of the dental and skeletal relationship in the head, and it is used as an assessment and planning tool for improved orthodontic treatment of a patient. Conventional cephalometric analysis identifies bony and soft-tissue landmarks in 2D cephalometric radiographs, in order to diagnose facial features and abnormalities prior to treatment, or to evaluate the progress of treatment. Recent studies in orthodontics indicate that there are persistent inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the results provided using conventional 2D cephalometric analysis. Obviously, plane geometry is inappropriate for analyzing anatomical volumes and their growth; only a 3D analysis is able to analyze the three-dimensional, anatomical maxillofacial complex, which requires computing inertia systems for individual or groups of digitally segmented teeth from an image volume of a patient's head. For the study of 3D cephalometric analysis, the current paper proposes a system for semi-automatically segmenting teeth from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) volume with two distinct features, including an intelligent user-input interface for automatic background seed generation, and a graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration mechanism for three-dimensional GrowCut volume segmentation. Results show a satisfying average DICE score of 0.92, with the use of the proposed tooth segmentation system, by 15 novice users who segmented a randomly sampled tooth set. The average GrowCut processing time is around one second per tooth, excluding user interaction time.

  18. The first Neanderthal tooth found North of the Carpathian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowski, Mikołaj; Socha, Paweł; Dąbrowski, Paweł; Nowaczewska, Wioletta; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Stefaniak, Krzysztof; Nadachowski, Adam

    2010-04-01

    An upper second permanent molar from a human was found alongside numerous tools of the Micoquian tradition and was excavated in Stajnia Cave, which is located over 100 km North of the Carpathian Mountains in southern Poland. The age of these finds has been established within a time-span of late Saalian to early Weichselian, most likely to OIS 5c or 5a, according to the palaeontological, geological, archaeological and absolute dating of the layer from which they were obtained. An examination of the morphology of the human molar indicates that this tooth exhibits many traits frequently occurring in Neanderthal upper molars. Although the occurrence of derived Neanderthal traits in the Stajnia molar cannot be firmly established because of degradation of its cusps, the presence of the above-mentioned features allows the assertion that this tooth belonged to a Neanderthal. The age of the Stajnia tooth and the archaeological context of this find also indicate that this molar is of Neanderthal origin.

  19. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  20. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic(-/-) mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic(-/-) mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  1. Evidence to Support Tooth Brushing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully. PMID:21532045

  2. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is required for tooth eruption

    PubMed Central

    Philbrick, William M.; Dreyer, Barbara E.; Nakchbandi, Inaam A.; Karaplis, Andrew C.

    1998-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP)-knockout mice die at birth with a chondrodystrophic phenotype characterized by premature chondrocyte differentiation and accelerated bone formation, whereas overexpression of PTHrP in the chondrocytes of transgenic mice produces a delay in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification. Replacement of PTHrP expression in the chondrocytes of PTHrP-knockout mice using a procollagen II-driven transgene results in the correction of the lethal skeletal abnormalities and generates animals that are effectively PTHrP-null in all sites other than cartilage. These rescued PTHrP-knockout mice survive to at least 6 months of age but are small in stature and display a number of developmental defects, including cranial chondrodystrophy and a failure of tooth eruption. Teeth appear to develop normally but become trapped by the surrounding bone and undergo progressive impaction. Localization of PTHrP mRNA during normal tooth development by in situ hybridization reveals increasing levels of expression in the enamel epithelium before the formation of the eruption pathway. The type I PTH/PTHrP receptor is expressed in both the adjacent dental mesenchyme and in the alveolar bone. The replacement of PTHrP expression in the enamel epithelium with a keratin 14-driven transgene corrects the defect in bone resorption and restores the normal program of tooth eruption. PTHrP therefore represents an essential signal in the formation of the eruption pathway. PMID:9751753

  3. Estimation of Tooth Size Discrepancies among Different Malocclusion Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Madhu; Goyal, Virender

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regards and Tribute: Late Dr Narender Hasija was a mentor and visionary in the light of knowledge and experience. We pay our regards with deepest gratitude to the departed soul to rest in peace. Bolton’s ratios help in estimating overbite, overjet relationships, the effects of contemplated extractions on posterior occlusion, incisor relationships and identification of occlusal misfit produced by tooth size discrepancies. Aim: To determine any difference in tooth size discrepancy in anterior as well as overall ratio in different malocclusions and comparison with Bolton’s study. Materials and methods: After measuring the teeth on all 100 patients, Bolton’s analysis was performed. Results were compared with Bolton’s means and standard deviations. The results were also subjected to statistical analysis. Results show that the mean and standard deviations of ideal occlusion cases are comparable with those Bolton but, when the mean and standard deviation of malocclusion groups are compared with those of Bolton, the values of standard deviation are higher, though the mean is comparable. How to cite this article: Hasija N, Bala M, Goyal V. Estimation of Tooth Size Discrepancies among Different Malocclusion Groups. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):82-85. PMID:25356005

  4. Contemporary management of tooth replacement in the traumatized dentition

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Aws; Austin, Rupert; Djemal, Serpil

    2012-01-01

    Dental trauma can result in tooth loss despite best efforts at retaining and maintaining compromised teeth (Dent Traumatol, 24, 2008, 379). Upper anterior teeth are more likely to suffer from trauma, and their loss can result in significant aesthetic and functional problems that can be difficult to manage (Endod Dent Traumatol, 9, 1993, 61; Int Dent J 59, 2009, 127). Indeed, teeth of poor prognosis may not only present with compromised structure but trauma may also result in damage to the support tissues. Injury to the periodontium and alveolus can have repercussions on subsequent restorative procedures (Fig. 19). Where teeth are identified as having a hopeless prognosis either soon after the incident or at delayed presentation; planning for eventual tooth loss and replacement can begin at the early stages. With advances in both adhesive and osseointegration technologies, there are now a variety of options for the restoration of edentate spaces subsequent to dental trauma. This review aims to identify key challenges in the provision of tooth replacement in the traumatized dentition and outline contemporary methods in treatment delivery. PMID:22494549

  5. Accuracy of orthodontic force and tooth movement measurements.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, D; Owman-Moll, P; Kurol, J; Mårtensson, B

    1996-08-01

    This study was designed to test the accuracy of measurement methods for assessment of force and tooth movement in orthodontic procedures. Daily in vivo measurements of the force produced by activated archwires showed that the initial force declined substantially (by 20 per cent of mean value) within 3 days. Both the 'trueness' (validity) and precision of the force measurements, obtained with a strain gauge, were found to be high (SD values were 1.0 cN and 0.4 cN, respectively). Horizontal tooth movements were measured with three different instruments: a slide calliper, a co-ordinate measuring machine, and laser measuring equipment based on holograms. There was a good level of agreement between these methods. This was also confirmed by calibration data. The precision of the methods was (SD values) 0.06, 0.07, and 0.13 mm, respectively. The benefits of the use of the co-ordinate measuring machine are obvious, since it can measure tooth movements in relation to reference planes in all directions. PMID:8894157

  6. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p < 0.001) in dentine as well as a significant increase ( p < 0.001) in enamel was observed during tooth bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  7. Treatment of infra-occluded primary molars in patients with dental ageneses.

    PubMed

    Medio, Marie; de la Dure Molla, Muriel

    2014-09-01

    When dental agenesis is encountered, several treatment solutions can be considered: extraction of the primary tooth and closure of the space or, alternatively, conservation of the space with the primary tooth still on the arch until a prosthesis can be placed. In the presence of premolar agenesis, the corresponding primary molar may be infra-occluded relative to the occlusal plane. This situation complicates the treatment plan. Depending on the clinical setting, it can be useful to restore occlusal contacts using composite overlays. We will demonstrate this treatment option via two clinical cases. Tooth conservation helps maintain the bone volume that will later facilitate placement of an implant and limit extrusion of the antagonists as well as tipping of the neighboring teeth. PMID:25092254

  8. Tooth Size in Patients with Mild, Moderate and Severe Hypodontia and a Control Group

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare tooth size between subjects with mild, moderate and severe hypodontia and a control group. Material and Methods: The study comprised 120 patients with hypodontia divided into three groups of 40 mild (≤2 teeth congenitally missing), 40 moderate (3-5 teeth congenitally missing) and 40 severe (≥6 teeth congenitally missing) hypodontia; and 40 age and sex matched controls. Tooth size was recorded by measuring the mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions of all fully erupted teeth on study models using digital callipers and compared between all hypodontia and control groups using Two-way ANOVA and Post Hoc Tests of subgroup comparison. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed patients with hypodontia had significantly smaller mesiodistal and buccolingual tooth dimensions compared with controls (p<0.05). Furthermore patients with more severe hypodontia demonstrated significantly smaller tooth dimensions than those in the mild and moderate hypodontia subgroups (p<0.05). The most affected tooth in terms of tooth size reduction was the maxillary lateral incisor and the least affected tooth was the mandibular first molar. Conclusion: Patients with hypodontia have smaller tooth dimensions than control. Tooth size appears to be affected by the degree of hypodontia, with severe hypodontia having a greater effect on tooth size reduction. The findings of this study may contribute to understanding the aetiology of hypodontia and aid the multidisciplinary management of this complex condition. PMID:27583048

  9. Prevalence of Tooth Shade and its Correlation with Skin Colour - A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, K.V Halini; Choudhury, Gopal Krishna; Vilekar, Abhishek Madhukar; Das, Sitansu Sekhar; Jena, Debkant; Kataraki, Bharat; B.L, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aesthetics has become an important issue in modern society. Tooth shade is one of the factors in determining aesthetics. Studies have revealed that tooth shade is influenced by age, gender, eye colour, skin colour and other factors. Aim The present study was aimed to assess the prevalence of tooth shade and its correlation with skin colour. Materials and Methods A total of 300 subjects aged 18-20 years were evaluated for tooth shade using Vitapan – 3D shade guide. Anterior teeth were checked under natural light and facial skin colour by Lakme liquid foundation make up as a shade guide. Data was analysed using chi square test and spearman’s correlation. Results Out of 300 students, 114 (38.00%) had A2 tooth shade; the least prevalent tooth shade among Chitradurga population was C1 (4.00%). There was a positive correlation between tooth shade and skin colour which was found to be statistically significant (p <0.05). Conclusion The most prevalent tooth shade among Chitradurga population was A2 and least was C1. There was a significant correlation between tooth shade and skin colour with lighter skin tone subjects having lighter tooth shade hence skin colour can be used as a guide for shade selection. PMID:27042590

  10. Phosphoproteomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth matrix: identification of a major acidic sea urchin tooth phosphoprotein, phosphodontin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sea urchin is a major model organism for developmental biology and biomineralization research. However, identification of proteins involved in larval skeleton formation and mineralization processes in the embryo and adult, and the molecular characterization of such proteins, has just gained momentum with the sequencing of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the introduction of high-throughput proteomics into the field. Results The present report contains the determination of test (shell) and tooth organic matrix phosphoproteomes. Altogether 34 phosphoproteins were identified in the biomineral organic matrices. Most phosphoproteins were specific for one compartment, only two were identified in both matrices. The sea urchin phosphoproteomes contained several obvious orthologs of mammalian proteins, such as a Src family tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C-delta 1, Dickkopf-1 and other signal transduction components, or nucleobindin. In most cases phosphorylation sites were conserved between sea urchin and mammalian proteins. However, the majority of phosphoproteins had no mammalian counterpart. The most interesting of the sea urchin-specific phosphoproteins, from the perspective of biomineralization research, was an abundant highly phosphorylated and very acidic tooth matrix protein composed of 35 very similar short sequence repeats, a predicted N-terminal secretion signal sequence, and an Asp-rich C-terminal motif, contained in [Glean3:18919]. Conclusions The 64 phosphorylation sites determined represent the most comprehensive list of experimentally identified sea urchin protein phosphorylation sites at present and are an important addition to the recently analyzed Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth proteomes. The identified phosphoproteins included a major, highly phosphorylated protein, [Glean3:18919], for which we suggest the name phosphodontin. Although not sequence-related to such highly phosphorylated acidic mammalian dental

  11. Rolling-Tooth Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bickler, Donald B.; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Hudson, Nicolas H.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale that is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. This design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube and an inner tube) and a rolling element (rolling tooth). An additional tube can be used as a sample tube. The drill tube and the inner tube have longitudinal holes with the axes offset from the axis of each tube. The two eccentricities are equal. The inner tube fits inside the drill tube, and the sample tube fits inside the inner tube. While drilling, the two tubes are positioned relative to each other such that the sample tube is aligned with the drill tube axis and core. The drill tube includes teeth and flutes for cuttings removal. The inner tube includes, at the base, the rolling element implemented as a wheel on a shaft in an eccentric slot. An additional slot in the inner tube and a pin in the drill tube limit the relative motion of the two tubes. While drilling, the drill assembly rotates relative to the core and forces the rolling tooth to stay hidden in the slot along the inner tube wall. When the drilling depth has been reached, the drill bit assembly is rotated in the opposite direction, and the rolling tooth is engaged and penetrates into the core. Depending on the strength of the created core, the rolling tooth can score, lock the inner tube relative to the core, start the eccentric motion of the inner tube, and break the core. The tooth and the relative position of the two tubes can act as a core catcher or core-retention mechanism as well. The design was made to fit the core and hole parameters produced by an existing bit; the parts were fabricated and a series of demonstration tests were performed. This invention is potentially applicable to sample return and in situ missions to planets such as Mars and Venus, to moons such

  12. Double talon cusps on supernumerary tooth fused to maxillary central incisor: Review of literature and report of case

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human tooth development is a continuous process begin at the sixth weeks in utero and extends to about sixth months after birth for the primary dentition and from sixteenth week in utero to late adolescence for permanent dentition. There is no other organ of the human body which takes so long to attain its ultimate morphology as dentition. Several physiologic growth processes participate in the progressive development of the teeth including: initiation, proliferation, histodifferentiation, morphodifferentiation, apposition, calcification, and eruption. Aberrations in different stages of tooth development can result in unique manifestations both in primary and permanent dentitions. The fact that premaxilla is the predilection site for the occurrence of supernumerary teeth, talon cusp, dens invaginatus, and geminated teeth may suggest that the embryological development of premaxilla differ from other sites of the jaws. The dental abnormalities presented in this review are of great concern to dentist and parents because they create clinical, pathological and esthetic problems. Dental practitioner should be aware of the clinical sign, associated problems and treatment options for a given case. Key words:Double talon cusps, fusion, supernumerary, case report. PMID:25593664

  13. Implications of Diet for the Extinction of Saber-Toothed Cats and American Lions

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Larisa R. G.; Schubert, Blaine W.; Scott, Jessica R.; Ungar, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    The saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, and American lion, Panthera atrox, were among the largest terrestrial carnivores that lived during the Pleistocene, going extinct along with other megafauna ∼12,000 years ago. Previous work suggests that times were difficult at La Brea (California) during the late Pleistocene, as nearly all carnivores have greater incidences of tooth breakage (used to infer greater carcass utilization) compared to today. As Dental Microwear Texture Analysis (DMTA) can differentiate between levels of bone consumption in extant carnivores, we use DMTA to clarify the dietary niches of extinct carnivorans from La Brea. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that times were tough at La Brea with carnivorous taxa utilizing more of the carcasses. Our results show no evidence of bone crushing by P. atrox, with DMTA attributes most similar to the extant cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, which actively avoids bone. In contrast, S. fatalis has DMTA attributes most similar to the African lion Panthera leo, implying that S. fatalis did not avoid bone to the extent previously suggested by SEM microwear data. DMTA characters most indicative of bone consumption (i.e., complexity and textural fill volume) suggest that carcass utilization by the extinct carnivorans was not necessarily more complete during the Pleistocene at La Brea; thus, times may not have been “tougher” than the present. Additionally, minor to no significant differences in DMTA attributes from older (∼30–35 Ka) to younger (∼11.5 Ka) deposits offer little evidence that declining prey resources were a primary cause of extinction for these large cats. PMID:23300674

  14. Massive losses of taste receptor genes in toothed and baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zheng, Jinsong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Wang, Ding; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-06-01

    Taste receptor genes are functionally important in animals, with a surprising exception in the bottlenose dolphin, which shows extensive losses of sweet, umami, and bitter taste receptor genes. To examine the generality of taste gene loss, we examined seven toothed whales and five baleen whales and sequenced the complete repertoire of three sweet/umami (T1Rs) and ten bitter (T2Rs) taste receptor genes. We found all amplified T1Rs and T2Rs to be pseudogenes in all 12 whales, with a shared premature stop codon in 10 of the 13 genes, which demonstrated massive losses of taste receptor genes in the common ancestor of whales. Furthermore, we analyzed three genome sequences from two toothed whales and one baleen whale and found that the sour taste marker gene Pkd2l1 is a pseudogene, whereas the candidate salty taste receptor genes are intact and putatively functional. Additionally, we examined three genes that are responsible for taste signal transduction and found the relaxation of functional constraints on taste signaling pathways along the ancestral branch leading to whales. Together, our results strongly suggest extensive losses of sweet, umami, bitter, and sour tastes in whales, and the relaxation of taste function most likely arose in the common ancestor of whales between 36 and 53 Ma. Therefore, whales represent the first animal group to lack four of five primary tastes, probably driven by the marine environment with high concentration of sodium, the feeding behavior of swallowing prey whole, and the dietary switch from plants to meat in the whale ancestor. PMID:24803572

  15. Force-induced Adrb2 in Periodontal Ligament Cells Promotes Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Cao, H.; Kou, X.; Yang, R.; Liu, D.; Wang, X.; Song, Y.; Feng, L.; He, D.; Gan, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulates bone resorption through β-2 adrenergic receptor (Adrb2). In orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), mechanical force induces and regulates alveolar bone remodeling. Compressive force-associated osteoclast differentiation and alveolar bone resorption are the rate-limiting steps of tooth movement. However, whether mechanical force can activate Adrb2 and thus contribute to OTM remains unknown. In this study, orthodontic nickel-titanium springs were applied to the upper first molars of rats and Adrb1/2-/- mice to confirm the role of SNS and Adrb2 in OTM. The results showed that blockage of SNS activity in the jawbones of rats by means of superior cervical ganglion ectomy reduced OTM distance from 860 to 540 μm after 14 d of force application. In addition, the injection of nonselective Adrb2 agonist isoproterenol activated the downstream signaling of SNS to accelerate OTM from 300 to 540 μm after 7 d of force application. Adrb1/2-/- mice showed significantly reduced OTM distance (19.5 μm) compared with the wild-type mice (107.6 μm) after 7 d of force application. Histopathologic analysis showed that the number of Adrb2-positive cells increased in the compressive region of periodontal ligament after orthodontic force was applied on rats. Mechanistically, mechanical compressive force upregulated Adrb2 expression in primary-cultured human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) through the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Activation of Adrb2 in PDLCs increased the RANKL/OPG ratio and promoted the peripheral blood mononuclear cell differentiation to osteoclasts in the cocultured system. Upregulation of Adrb2 in PDLCs promoted osteoclastogenesis, which accelerated OTM through Adrb2-enhanced bone resorption. In summary, this study suggests that mechanical force-induced Adrb2 activation in PDLCs contributes to SNS-regulated OTM. PMID:25252876

  16. Massive Losses of Taste Receptor Genes in Toothed and Baleen Whales

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ping; Zheng, Jinsong; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Wang, Ding; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptor genes are functionally important in animals, with a surprising exception in the bottlenose dolphin, which shows extensive losses of sweet, umami, and bitter taste receptor genes. To examine the generality of taste gene loss, we examined seven toothed whales and five baleen whales and sequenced the complete repertoire of three sweet/umami (T1Rs) and ten bitter (T2Rs) taste receptor genes. We found all amplified T1Rs and T2Rs to be pseudogenes in all 12 whales, with a shared premature stop codon in 10 of the 13 genes, which demonstrated massive losses of taste receptor genes in the common ancestor of whales. Furthermore, we analyzed three genome sequences from two toothed whales and one baleen whale and found that the sour taste marker gene Pkd2l1 is a pseudogene, whereas the candidate salty taste receptor genes are intact and putatively functional. Additionally, we examined three genes that are responsible for taste signal transduction and found the relaxation of functional constraints on taste signaling pathways along the ancestral branch leading to whales. Together, our results strongly suggest extensive losses of sweet, umami, bitter, and sour tastes in whales, and the relaxation of taste function most likely arose in the common ancestor of whales between 36 and 53 Ma. Therefore, whales represent the first animal group to lack four of five primary tastes, probably driven by the marine environment with high concentration of sodium, the feeding behavior of swallowing prey whole, and the dietary switch from plants to meat in the whale ancestor. PMID:24803572

  17. Isolation and characterization of embryonic ameloblast lineage cells derived from tooth buds of fetal miniature swine.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Taka; Tominaga, Noriko; Toyomura, Junko; Tachibana, Toshiaki; Ide, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Dental enamel formation, known as "amelogenesis," is initiated by cytodifferentiation of the ectodermally derived dental epithelium. Enamel cannot regenerate itself because once it is completely formed, ameloblasts are lost as the tooth erupts. Rodent teeth have been useful for studying the mechanisms of amelogenesis because ameloblast cell lines can be derived from the ever-growing incisors. However, higher mammals such as humans have no growing teeth, and cell lines derived from larger animals that are more similar to humans are required for higher fidelity studies. Here, we isolated embryonic enamel epithelium-derived epithelial cells from fetal swine. The explant culture of the developing deciduous molars that had been removed from the dental papilla-derived mesenchymal tissue and cells inside the tooth buds provided the epithelial cell population for the primary culture. To isolate the cell population, we performed a unique cell isolation technique called cell fishing. The isolated cells showed clear embryonic-stage ameloblast characteristics with appropriate gene/protein expressions of enamel matrix and proteinases, abundant glycogen pools, and secretory granular materials. They could be continuously subcultured several times and are presently being maintained. This cell population will facilitate the establishment of a stable cell line and allow us to characterize the definitive phenotype and functional behavior of porcine ameloblasts, which, in turn, promises to yield useful and practical findings that are more relevant than those provided by rodent studies. Finally, analysis of in vitro enamel formation will be important for engineering "bio-enamel" as a new dental therapy to restore enamel defects. PMID:26698579

  18. Implications of diet for the extinction of saber-toothed cats and American lions.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Larisa R G; Schubert, Blaine W; Scott, Jessica R; Ungar, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    The saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, and American lion, Panthera atrox, were among the largest terrestrial carnivores that lived during the Pleistocene, going extinct along with other megafauna ∼12,000 years ago. Previous work suggests that times were difficult at La Brea (California) during the late Pleistocene, as nearly all carnivores have greater incidences of tooth breakage (used to infer greater carcass utilization) compared to today. As Dental Microwear Texture Analysis (DMTA) can differentiate between levels of bone consumption in extant carnivores, we use DMTA to clarify the dietary niches of extinct carnivorans from La Brea. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that times were tough at La Brea with carnivorous taxa utilizing more of the carcasses. Our results show no evidence of bone crushing by P. atrox, with DMTA attributes most similar to the extant cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, which actively avoids bone. In contrast, S. fatalis has DMTA attributes most similar to the African lion Panthera leo, implying that S. fatalis did not avoid bone to the extent previously suggested by SEM microwear data. DMTA characters most indicative of bone consumption (i.e., complexity and textural fill volume) suggest that carcass utilization by the extinct carnivorans was not necessarily more complete during the Pleistocene at La Brea; thus, times may not have been "tougher" than the present. Additionally, minor to no significant differences in DMTA attributes from older (∼30-35 Ka) to younger (∼11.5 Ka) deposits offer little evidence that declining prey resources were a primary cause of extinction for these large cats. PMID:23300674

  19. Brain activations in response to vibrotactile tooth stimulation: a psychophysical and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, Mats; Francis, Susan T; Bowtell, Richard; McGlone, Francis

    2010-10-01

    The tactile sensitivity of the teeth, and associated periodontium, serves important sensory and motor functions. Microneurographic recordings from human periodontal ligament mechanoreceptor (PDLM) nerves, in response to tooth loading, reveal discharge patterns with sole slowly adapting (SA) II-type characteristics, highlighting the unique role of PDLMs in oral sensory processes. Here we investigate these receptors' properties, psychophysically and with neuroimaging (fMRI), in response to varying frequencies of dynamic (vibrotactile) stimulation. The finding of increased activity in primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortices (SI and SII) at low frequencies of stimulation (20 Hz) as compared with higher frequencies (50 and 100 Hz), shows an increased entrainment of the PDLMs at this lower frequency in line with expected SA II-type response properties. At the highest frequency (100 Hz), no significant activity was found in SI or SII, suggesting this frequency is outside the range of activity of PDLMs. An activation matrix is mapped that includes SI, SII, insular, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobe and supplementary motor area as well as middle frontal gyrus and cerebellum. We compared the responses to tooth stimulation with those produced by identical vibrotactile stimulation of the finger. The results strongly suggest that the PDLMs play a significant role in the specification of the forces used to hold and manipulate food between teeth, and in these respects, the masticatory system appears analogous to fine finger-control mechanisms used during precision manipulation of small objects. Because fMRI reveals activations in posterior insular cortex, we also speculate that PDLMs, and SA II-type receptors in general, may be involved in one aspect of the feeling of body ownership. PMID:20668275

  20. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  1. Differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Veeraganta, Sumanth K.; Savadi, Ravindra C.; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose was to investigate the differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color among a sample of the local population in Bengaluru, India. Methodology: The study comprised 100 subjects belonging to both gender between the age groups of 16 years to 55 years. Tooth shade values of permanent maxillary left or right central incisors were recorded using the Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide. Skin color was matched using the Radiance compact makeup shades as a guide. Results: Chi-square statistical test demonstrated that younger subjects have lighter tooth shade values. No statistically significant differences were recorded in tooth shade value according to gender or skin color. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that tooth shade value is significantly influenced by age. Gender and skin color appear not to have a significant relation to tooth shade value. PMID:26929500

  2. Dynamic tooth loads and stressing for high contact ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, R. W.; Westervelt, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    A time history, closed form solution is presented for a dynamic model of spur gear systems for all practical contact ratios. The analysis determines the dynamic response of the gear system and the associated tooth loads and stressing. The dynamic model assumes the two gears act as a rigid inertia and the teeth act as a variable spring of a dynamic system excited by the meshing action of the teeth. Included in the analysis are the effects of the nonlinearity of the tooth pair stiffness during mesh, the tooth errors, and the tooth profile modifications. Besides reviewing the features, solution, and program of this analysis, preliminary results from applying the analysis are presented, which show that tooth profile modification, system inertia and damping, and system critical speeds can affect the dynamic gear tooth loads and stressing significantly.

  3. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePlus

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, infectious disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum . This bacterium causes ...

  4. Mutation of SIMPLE in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1C alters production of exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Guariglia, Sara; Yu, Raymond Y L; Li, Wenjing; Brancho, Deborah; Peinado, Hector; Lyden, David; Salzer, James; Bennett, Craig; Chow, Chi-Wing

    2013-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited neurological disorder. Mutations in the small integral membrane protein of the lysosome/late endosome (SIMPLE) account for the rare autosomal-dominant demyelination in CMT1C patients. Understanding the molecular basis of CMT1C pathogenesis is impeded, in part, by perplexity about the role of SIMPLE, which is expressed in multiple cell types. Here we show that SIMPLE resides within the intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and inside exosomes, which are nanovesicles secreted extracellularly. Targeting of SIMPLE to exosomes is modulated by positive and negative regulatory motifs. We also find that expression of SIMPLE increases the number of exosomes and secretion of exosome proteins. We engineer a point mutation on the SIMPLE allele and generate a physiological mouse model that expresses CMT1C-mutated SIMPLE at the endogenous level. We find that CMT1C mouse primary embryonic fibroblasts show decreased number of exosomes and reduced secretion of exosome proteins, in part due to improper formation of MVBs. CMT1C patient B cells and CMT1C mouse primary Schwann cells show similar defects. Together the data indicate that SIMPLE regulates the production of exosomes by modulating the formation of MVBs. Dysregulated endosomal trafficking and changes in the landscape of exosome-mediated intercellular communications may place an overwhelming burden on the nervous system and account for CMT1C molecular pathogenesis. PMID:23576546

  5. Coordination of tooth morphogenesis and neuronal development through tissue interactions: lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Luukko, Keijo; Kettunen, Päivi

    2014-07-15

    In addition to being an advantageous model to investigate general molecular mechanisms of organ formation, the tooth is a distinct target organ for peripheral nerve innervation. These nerves are required for the function and protection of the teeth and, as shown in fish, also for their regeneration. This review focuses on recent findings of the local tissue interactions and molecular signaling mechanisms that regulate the early nerve arrival and patterning of mouse mandibular molar tooth sensory innervation. Dental sensory nerve growth and patterning is a stepwise process that is intimately linked to advancing tooth morphogenesis. In particular, nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A serve as essential functions during and are iteratively used at different stages of tooth innervation. The tooth germ controls development of its own nerve supply, and similar to the development of the tooth organ proper, tissue interactions between dental epithelial and mesenchymal tissues control the establishment of tooth innervation. Tgf-β, Wnt, and Fgf signaling, which regulate tooth formation, are implicated to mediate these interactions. Therefore, tissue interactions mediated by conserved signal families may constitute key mechanism for the integration of tooth organogenesis and development of its peripheral nerve supply. PMID:24631295

  6. Acceleration of tooth movement during orthodontic treatment--a frontier in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nimeri, Ghada; Kau, Chung H; Abou-Kheir, Nadia S; Corona, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, there is an increased tendency for researches to focus on accelerating methods for tooth movement due to the huge demand for adults for a shorter orthodontic treatment time. Unfortunately, long orthodontic treatment time poses several disadvantages like higher predisposition to caries, gingival recession, and root resorption. This increases the demand to find the best method to increase tooth movement with the least possible disadvantages. The purpose of this study is to view the successful approaches in tooth movement and to highlight the newest technique in tooth movement. A total of 74 articles were reviewed in tooth movement and related discipline from 1959 to 2013. There is a high amount of researches done on the biological method for tooth movement; unfortunately, the majority of them were done on animals. Cytokine, PTH, vitamin D, and RANKL/RANK/OPG show promising results; on the other hand, relaxin does not accelerate tooth movement, but increases the tooth mobility. Low-level laser therapy has shown positive outcome, but further investigation should be done for the best energy and duration to achieve the highest success rate. Surgical approach has the most predictable outcomes but with limited application due to its aggressiveness. Piezocision technique is considered one of the best surgical approaches because it poses good periodontal tissue response and excellent aesthetic outcome. Due to the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, further investigations should be done to determine the best method to accelerate tooth movement. PMID:24326040

  7. Functional implications of variation in tooth spacing and crown size in pinnipedimorpha (mammalia: carnivora).

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Clementz, Mark T

    2015-05-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) show variation in tooth morphology that relates to ecology. However, crown size and spacing are two aspects of morphology that have not been quantified in prior studies. We measured these characters for nearly all extant pinnipeds and three fossil taxa and then determined the principal sources of variation in tooth size and spacing using principal components (PCAs) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). PCA and HCA showed that species sorted into three groups: taxa with small crowns and large diastemata, taxa with large crowns and small diastemata, and taxa that fell between these two extremes. We then performed discriminant function analysis (DFA) to determine if tooth morphology correlated with foraging strategy or diet. DFA results indicated weak correlation with diet, and stronger correlation with prey capture strategies. Tooth size and spacing were most strongly correlated with the importance of teeth in prey acquisition, with tooth size decreasing and tooth spacing increasing as teeth become less necessary in capturing food items. Taxa which relied on teeth for filtering prey from the water column or processing larger or tougher food items generally had larger crowns and smaller tooth spacing then taxa which swallowed prey whole. We found the fossil taxa Desmatophoca and Enaliarctos were most similar in tooth morphology to extant otariids, suggesting that both taxa were generalist feeders. This study established the relationship between tooth size and feeding behavior, and provides a new tool to explore the paleoecology of fossil pinnipeds and other aquatic tetrapods. PMID:25367223

  8. Effect of extended tooth contact on the modeling of spur gear transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Coy, John J.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Wang, Jifeng

    1993-01-01

    In some gear dynamic models, the effect of tooth flexibility is ignored when the model determines which pairs of teeth are in contact. Deflection of loaded teeth is not introduced until the equations of motion are solved. This means the zone of tooth contact and average tooth meshing stiffness are underestimated and the individual tooth load is overstated, especially for heavily-loaded gears. The static transmission error and dynamic load of heavily-loaded, low-contact-ratio spur gears is compared with this effect both neglected and included. Neglecting the effect yields an underestimate of resonance speeds and an overestimate of the dynamic load.

  9. Eighteen-month incidence of tooth loss among older adults in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R J; Drake, C W; Beck, J D

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated tooth loss in North Carolina adults 65 years of age or older. A random sample of 335 Blacks and 284 Whites participated in dental examinations and interviews at baseline and again after 18 months. Blacks were more likely than Whites to lose at least one tooth (36% vs 19%), and they lost more teeth on average (1.0 vs 0.4). Several oral disease conditions and symptoms were related to tooth loss, but many other hypothesized factors were not. Risk models were inconclusive in the identification of factors related to risk of tooth loss. PMID:7702124

  10. Use of CAD/CAM in Esthetic Restoration of Badly Decayed Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Faifi, Ali Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Proper, intelligent use of materials and technology should be utilized for the benefit of the patient. This case report presents a patient with a badly broken premolar tooth demanding high esthetic all-ceramic restoration. Following multiple procedure tooth was restored with zirconia all ceramic restoration. Multiple procedures to save a tooth are a really worthy, in the interest of patients. Use of zirconia and CAD-CAM will help in saving many compromised tooth even in high-stress regions. This provides the patient a chance to have restorations, which are biomechanically superior in addition to being pleasing esthetically. PMID:23251823

  11. On the pulpal nerve supply in primary human teeth: evidence for the innervation of primary dentine.

    PubMed

    Egan, C A; Hector, M P; Bishop, M A

    1999-03-01

    The presence of nerves in human tooth pulp has been recognized for over a hundred years, and the innervation of dentine for about 40 years. These observations have been made in permanent teeth. Very few studies have reported on the innervation of the primary pulp and dentine. The purpose of this study was to describe the innervation of the primary tooth pulp-dentine complex. Ten mature primary teeth (one incisor, six canines and three molars) were used. Immediately following extraction they were divided into three sections using a diamond disc and saline coolant. They were then immersion fixed in a solution of formaldehyde and picric acid dissolved in a phosphate buffer pH 7.4). The teeth were then demineralized for 1-3 weeks in formic acid. Following complete demineralization, 30 microns sections were cut on a freezing microtome. Neural tissue was stained using a specific antibody to calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Sections were mounted on glass slides and examined using light microscopy. No individual nerve fibres were seen in the control sections, suggesting that the method used was specific for CGRP-containing nerve fibres. The primary teeth appeared to be well innervated. Myelinated and unmyelinated nerves were seen. There was a dense but variable subodontoblastic plexus of nerves (plexus of Raschkow) and nerve fibres were seen to leave this to travel towards the odontoblast layer. Most terminated here, but a few penetrated the odontoblast layer to enter predentine and the dentine tubules. The maximum penetration was 125 microns but most terminated within 30 microns of the dentinopulpal junction. The coronal region was more densely innervated than the root. Within the crown the cervical third was the most densely innervated region, followed by the pulp horn and the middle third. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that mature primary tooth contains a pulp which is well innervated and has many nerve endings terminating in or near the odontoblast

  12. Self-directed study and carving tooth models for learning tooth morphology: perceptions of students at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Ewan, Keith; Foley, Jennifer; Oweis, Yara; Jayasinghe, Jaya

    2013-09-01

    Tooth morphology has been taught at the University of Aberdeen Dental School, United Kingdom, through self-directed workshops, using online handouts and tooth models. Tooth carving sessions were recently added to introduce manual skills training through learning tooth morphology at an early stage of the dental course. The aim of this study was to assess students' perception of both teaching modalities to evaluate their usefulness and to allow further course development. The subjects of this study were first-year dental students. Students' opinions were sought upon completion of the tooth morphology sessions using a structured questionnaire that investigated their views about the effectiveness of both learning methods. The results suggest that self-directed workshops represent an effective way of learning tooth morphology; however, the students recommended further development of the course to make it more focused. Although students questioned the value of the carving sessions, they agreed that it helped to develop their manual dexterity, which was one of the main objectives of the exercise. Further review and development of the course is required in addition to follow-up of the students' performance in clinical skills to further elucidate any advantages of tooth carving to advocate it as a mode of learning. PMID:24002852

  13. Effect of Fluoxetine Consumption on Orthodontic Tooth Movement in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mirhashemi, Amir Hossein; Ahmad Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Momeni, Nafiseh; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Farhadifard, Homa; Ansari, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) widely used for depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of fluoxetine on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups namely the control group (no medication), saline and fluoxetine dissolved in saline. In all groups, nickel titanium closed-coil spring was used between the left maxillary central incisor and first molar to exert 60g force at 2mm activation. Radiographs were taken at one and 21 days. After 21 days, the rats were sacrificed. The distance between the first and second molar teeth, optical density of bone, periodontal ligament (PDL) width, lacuna length and depth and number of osteoclasts were measured and compared among the groups. Results: Tooth movement significantly increased in the fluoxetine group (P=0.005). No significant differences were found in osteoclast count (P=0.069). The PDL width in the mesioapical region of root was significantly different among the groups (P=0.015). Statistical analysis did not show significant differences in depth or length of lacunae in any examined part of the root (P>0.05). Bone densitometry results showed that in fluoxetine group, density of bone in all four areas (alveolar bone, hard palate, skull and mandibular bone) significantly decreased from day one to day 21 (P< 0.05). Conclusion: This study indicated that fluoxetine decreased bone density, which resulted in subsequently greater tooth movement in rats; however, further studies are needed on humans.

  14. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  15. Platelet rich plasma to facilitate wound healing following tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, James L; Johnson, David A; Radio, Nicholas M; Fennell, James W

    2010-01-01

    Following tooth removal bone formation normally takes 16 weeks and may result in less than adequate volume for the necessary reconstruction. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) has been promoted as an effective method for improving bone formation. Its use is often expensive, time consuming, or not clinically convenient for the patient and/or clinician. This study examines a simple method for obtaining a "Buffy Coat"-PRP (BC-PRP) and its effect on bone healing following the removal of bilateral mandibular 3rd molars. Subtraction digital radiography and CT scan analysis were used to track changes in radiographic density at PRP treated sites in comparison to ipsilateral non-PRP treated sites. PRP treated sites demonstrated early and significant increased radiographic density over baseline measurements following tooth removal. The greatest benefit of PRP is during the initial 2-week postoperative healing time period (P < .001). During weeks 3 though 12, BC-PRP treatment resulted in significant (P < .0001) increases in bone density compared to control, but there was no significant interaction between time and treatment (P > .05). For the entire time period (0-25 weeks) PRP treatment was significant (P < .0001) and time was significant (P < .0001) but there was no significant interaction (P > .05) between the effect of PRP treatment and time. It required 6 weeks for control extraction sites to reach comparable bone density that PRP treated sites achieved at week 1. Postoperative pain, bleeding, and numbness were not significantly affected by BC-PRP application. Results suggest that this simple technique may be of value to clinicians performing oral surgery by facilitating bone regeneration following tooth extraction. PMID:20218866

  16. Effect of Alveolar Ridge Preservation after Tooth Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Ortiz, G.; Elangovan, S.; Kramer, K.W.O.; Blanchette, D.; Dawson, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect that socket filling with a bone grafting material has on the prevention of postextraction alveolar ridge volume loss as compared with tooth extraction alone in nonmolar teeth. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Literature screening and article selection were conducted by 3 independent reviewers, while data extraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. Outcome measures were mean horizontal ridge changes (buccolingual) and vertical ridge changes (midbuccal, midlingual, mesial, and distal). The influence of several variables of interest (i.e., flap elevation, membrane usage, and type of bone substitute employed) on the outcomes of ridge preservation therapy was explored via subgroup analyses. We found that alveolar ridge preservation is effective in limiting physiologic ridge reduction as compared with tooth extraction alone. The clinical magnitude of the effect was 1.89 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 2.36; p < .001) in terms of buccolingual width, 2.07 mm (95% CI: 1.03, 3.12; p < .001) for midbuccal height, 1.18 mm (95% CI: 0.17, 2.19; p = .022) for midlingual height, 0.48 mm (95% CI: 0.18, 0.79; p = .002) for mesial height, and 0.24 mm (95% CI: –0.05, 0.53; p = .102) for distal height changes. Subgroup analyses revealed that flap elevation, the usage of a membrane, and the application of a xenograft or an allograft are associated with superior outcomes, particularly on midbuccal and midlingual height preservation. PMID:24966231

  17. Distribution of interglobular dentine in human tooth roots.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kagayama, M; Sasano, Y; Mayanagi, H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the distribution of interglobular dentine in human tooth roots. The material comprised 17 teeth, of which 3 were premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons from children 10-12 years of age and the other teeth (4 incisors, 3 canines and 7 molars) were extracted for periodontitis from individuals aged 32-63 years. All teeth were free of caries and cervical dentine defects. Ground sections of the teeth cut longitudinally were stained with basic fuchsin and observed by fluorescence and confocal microscopy as well as transmitted light microscopy. Basic fuchsin stained the dentinal tubules, interglobular dentine and the granular layer of Tomes. These structures appeared intense blue to faint violet with transmitted light microscopy, whereas their staining displayed intense fluorescence with fluorescence microscopy. Therefore, the interglobular dentine could be detected more sensitively with fluorescence and confocal microscopy than with transmitted light microscopy. Typical interglobular dentine was present in coronal dentine in most of the teeth. In the radicular dentin, position and size of the interglobular dentine was different among the teeth examined. Most of the teeth had the interglobular dentine in the cervical part of the roots (type A). Two premolars displayed the interglobular dentine in the coronal half of the root (type B). The types A and B contained large interglobular areas. A small amount of interglobular dentine was restricted to the apical half of the roots of two canines and one molar (type C). In contrast to types A and B which were seen at both labial or buccal and lingual sides of roots, the interglobular dentine of type C was seen only at one side, labial or lingual. Some of the tooth roots did not show any interglobular dentine (type D). Most of the incisors, canines and premolar were types A, B, and C, respectively, and the molars were mixed types A, C, and D. These results suggest that the factors

  18. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated. PMID:24953823

  19. The limits of tooth pulp evoked potentials for pain quantitation.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Fornarelli, M; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M

    1983-09-01

    Tooth pulp evoked potentials (TPEPs) and subjective evaluation of painful dental stimuli have been recorded in healthy volunteers. The amplitude of TPEPs late components and the subjective rating have been studied in different psychological states, by the expectancy of pain with a placebo and by providing foreknowledge of stimulus timing with self-stimulation. The placebo induced a significant depression of TPEPs and pain sensation. The amplitude of TPEPs evoked by self-delivered stimuli was reduced but the subjective report remained unchanged. These results demonstrate that TPEPs are not a stable correlate of the pain perceived or of the painful input. PMID:6635002

  20. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor with an Ectopic Tooth in Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Bhagawati, Basavaraj T.; Gupta, Manish; Narang, Gaurav; Bhagawati, Sharanamma

    2013-01-01

    The term odontogenic keratocyst was first used by Philipsen in the year 1956. The lesion was renamed by him as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and reclassified as odontogenic neoplasm in the World Health Organization's 2005 edition that occurs commonly in the jaws having a predilection for the angle and ascending ramus of mandible. In contrast, KCOTs arising in the maxillary premolar region are relatively rare. Here, we discuss a rare case of keratocystic odontogenic tumor occurring in the maxilla with an ectopic tooth position. PMID:24396609