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Sample records for carlo line transport

  1. Comparison of Implicit and Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo Line Transport With Frequency Weight Vector Extension

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Szoke, A

    2002-03-20

    We compare the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) technique to the Symbolic IMC (SIMC) technique, with and without weight vectors in frequency space, for time-dependent line transport in the presence of collisional pumping. We examine the efficiency and accuracy of the IMC and SIMC methods for examples involving the evolution of a collisionally pumped trapping problem to steady-state, the surface heating of cold media by a beam, and the diffusion of energy from a localized region that is collisionally pumped. The importance of spatial biasing and teleportation for problems involving high opacity is demonstrated. Our numerical solution, along with its associated teleportation error, is checked against theoretical calculations for the last example.

  2. Comparison of Implicit and Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo Line Transport with Frequency Weight Vector Extension

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Szoke, A

    2002-12-03

    We compare the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) technique to the Symbolic IMC (SIMC) technique, with and without weight vectors in frequency space, for time-dependent line transport in the presence of collisional pumping. We examine the efficiency and accuracy of the IMC and SIMC methods for test problems involving the evolution of a collisionally pumped trapping problem to its steady-state, the surface heating of a cold medium by a beam, and the diffusion of energy from a localized region that is collisionally pumped. The importance of spatial biasing and teleportation for problems involving high opacity is demonstrated. Our numerical solution, along with its associated teleportation error, is checked against theoretical calculations for the last example.

  3. A generalized framework for in-line energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Stedry, M. H.

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous treatment of energy deposition in a Monte Carlo transport calculation, including coupled transport of all secondary and tertiary radiations, increases the computational cost of a simulation dramatically, making fully-coupled heating impractical for many large calculations, such as 3-D analysis of nuclear reactor cores. However, in some cases, the added benefit from a full-fidelity energy-deposition treatment is negligible, especially considering the increased simulation run time. In this paper we present a generalized framework for the in-line calculation of energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo transport simulations. This framework gives users the ability to select among several energy-deposition approximations with varying levels of fidelity. The paper describes the computational framework, along with derivations of four energy-deposition treatments. Each treatment uses a unique set of self-consistent approximations, which ensure that energy balance is preserved over the entire problem. By providing several energy-deposition treatments, each with different approximations for neglecting the energy transport of certain secondary radiations, the proposed framework provides users the flexibility to choose between accuracy and computational efficiency. Numerical results are presented, comparing heating results among the four energy-deposition treatments for a simple reactor/compound shielding problem. The results illustrate the limitations and computational expense of each of the four energy-deposition treatments. (authors)

  4. Monte Carlo Transport for Electron Thermal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted into a Monte Carlo transport method in order to better model the effects of non-local behavior. The end goal is a hybrid transport-diffusion method that combines Monte Carlo Transport with a discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC). The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  5. Monte Carlo Ion Transport Analysis Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-04-15

    Version: 00 TRIPOS is a versatile Monte Carlo ion transport analysis code. It has been applied to the treatment of both surface and bulk radiation effects. The media considered is composed of multilayer polyatomic materials.

  6. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  7. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    WATERS, LAURIE S.; MCKINNEY, GREGG W.; DURKEE, JOE W.; FENSIN, MICHAEL L.; JAMES, MICHAEL R.; JOHNS, RUSSELL C.; PELOWITZ, DENISE B.

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  8. Monte Carlo radiation transport¶llelism

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Post, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    This talk summarizes the main aspects of the LANL ASCI Eolus project and its major unclassified code project, MCNP. The MCNP code provide a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport to approximately 3000 users world-wide. Almost all hardware platforms are supported because we strictly adhere to the FORTRAN-90/95 standard. For parallel processing, MCNP uses a mixture of OpenMp combined with either MPI or PVM (shared and distributed memory). This talk summarizes our experiences on various platforms using MPI with and without OpenMP. These platforms include PC-Windows, Intel-LINUX, BlueMountain, Frost, ASCI-Q and others.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  10. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation. The main algorithms we consider are: • Domain decomposition of constructive solid geometry: enables extremely large calculations in which the background geometry is too large to fit in the memory of a single computational node. • Load Balancing: keeps the workload per processor as even as possible so the calculation runs efficiently. • Global Particle Find: if particles are on the wrong processor, globally resolve their locations to the correct processor based on particle coordinate and background domain. • Visualizing constructive solid geometry, sourcing particles, deciding that particle streaming communication is completed and spatial redecomposition. These algorithms are some of the most important parallel algorithms required for domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport. We demonstrate that our previous algorithms were not scalable, prove that our new algorithms are scalable, and run some of the algorithms up to 2 million MPI processes on the Sequoia supercomputer.

  11. COMPARISON OF MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR NONLINEAR RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. MARTIN; F. B. BROWN

    2001-03-01

    Five Monte Carlo methods for solving the nonlinear thermal radiation transport equations are compared. The methods include the well-known Implicit Monte Carlo method (IMC) developed by Fleck and Cummings, an alternative to IMC developed by Carter and Forest, an ''exact'' method recently developed by Ahrens and Larsen, and two methods recently proposed by Martin and Brown. The five Monte Carlo methods are developed and applied to the radiation transport equation in a medium assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Conservation of energy is derived and used to define appropriate material energy update equations for each of the methods. Details of the Monte Carlo implementation are presented, both for the random walk simulation and the material energy update. Simulation results for all five methods are obtained for two infinite medium test problems and a 1-D test problem, all of which have analytical solutions. Conclusions regarding the relative merits of the various schemes are presented.

  12. Shift: A Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Package

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the massively-parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package, Shift, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It reviews the capabilities, implementation, and parallel performance of this code package. Scaling results demonstrate very good strong and weak scaling behavior of the implemented algorithms. Benchmark results from various reactor problems show that Shift results compare well to other contemporary Monte Carlo codes and experimental results.

  13. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  14. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, M.B.

    1983-02-01

    This report is an addendum to the MORSE report, ORNL-4972, originally published in 1975. This addendum contains descriptions of several modifications to the MORSE Monte Carlo Code, replacement pages containing corrections, Part II of the report which was previously unpublished, and a new Table of Contents. The modifications include a Klein Nishina estimator for gamma rays. Use of such an estimator required changing the cross section routines to process pair production and Compton scattering cross sections directly from ENDF tapes and writing a new version of subroutine RELCOL. Another modification is the use of free form input for the SAMBO analysis data. This required changing subroutines SCORIN and adding new subroutine RFRE. References are updated, and errors in the original report have been corrected. (WHK)

  15. Monte Carlo Nucleon Meson Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-11-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAERI97 is an upgraded version of the code system NMTC/JAERI, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAERI97 simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nucleon-meson transport processes.

  16. Full 3D visualization tool-kit for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a package of tools capable of translating the geometric inputs and outputs of many Monte Carlo and deterministic radiation transport codes into open source file formats. These tools are aimed at bridging the gap between trusted, widely-used radiation analysis codes and very powerful, more recent and commonly used visualization software, thus supporting the design process and helping with shielding optimization. Three main lines of development were followed: mesh-based analysis of Monte Carlo codes, mesh-based analysis of deterministic codes and Monte Carlo surface meshing. The developed kit is considered a powerful and cost-effective tool in the computer-aided design for radiation transport code users of the nuclear world, and in particular in the fields of core design and radiation analysis. (authors)

  17. Improved geometry representations for Monte Carlo radiation transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Matthew Ryan

    2004-08-01

    ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. ITS allows designers to predict product performance in radiation environments.

  18. Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

  19. Efficient, Automated Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Ambrose, Martin; Spanier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an indispensible model for solving radiative transport problems, but their slow convergence inhibits their use as an everyday computational tool. In this paper, we present two new ideas for accelerating the convergence of Monte Carlo algorithms based upon an efficient algorithm that couples simulations of forward and adjoint transport equations. Forward random walks are first processed in stages, each using a fixed sample size, and information from stage k is used to alter the sampling and weighting procedure in stage k + 1. This produces rapid geometric convergence and accounts for dramatic gains in the efficiency of the forward computation. In case still greater accuracy is required in the forward solution, information from an adjoint simulation can be added to extend the geometric learning of the forward solution. The resulting new approach should find widespread use when fast, accurate simulations of the transport equation are needed. PMID:23226872

  20. Applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, Kenneth E.; Bergstrom, Paul M., Jr.; Buck, Richard M.; Cullen, Dermot; Fujino, D.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    1999-09-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  1. Modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT with a vectorized Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Smith, M F

    1993-10-01

    A vectorized Monte Carlo code has been developed for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code is designed to compute photon detection kernels, which are used to build system matrices for simulating SPECT projection data acquisition and for use in matrix-based image reconstruction. Non-uniform attenuating and scattering regions are constructed from simple three-dimensional geometric shapes, in which the density and mass attenuation coefficients are individually specified. On a Stellar GS1000 computer, Monte Carlo simulations are performed between 1.6 and 2.0 times faster when the vector processor is utilized than when computations are performed in scalar mode. Projection data acquired with a clinical SPECT gamma camera for a line source in a non-uniform thorax phantom are well modelled by Monte Carlo simulations. The vectorized Monte Carlo code was used to stimulate a 99Tcm SPECT myocardial perfusion study, and compensations for non-uniform attenuation and the detection of scattered photons improve activity estimation. The speed increase due to vectorization makes Monte Carlo simulation more attractive as a tool for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT. PMID:8248288

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  3. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-04-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science.

  4. New Capabilities in Mercury: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A; Kramer, K J; McKinley, M S; O'Brien, M J; Taylor, J M

    2007-03-08

    The new physics, algorithmic and computer science capabilities of the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code are discussed. The new physics and algorithmic features include in-line energy deposition and isotopic depletion, significant enhancements to the tally and source capabilities, diagnostic ray-traced particles, support for multi-region hybrid (mesh and combinatorial geometry) systems, and a probability of initiation method. Computer science enhancements include a second method of dynamically load-balancing parallel calculations, improved methods for visualizing 3-D combinatorial geometries and initial implementation of an in-line visualization capabilities.

  5. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  6. Benchmarking of Proton Transport in Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Gui; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been intergrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with exitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to treat the intermediate energy nuclear

  7. Condensed history Monte Carlo methods for photon transport problems

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Katherine; Spanier, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    We study methods for accelerating Monte Carlo simulations that retain most of the accuracy of conventional Monte Carlo algorithms. These methods – called Condensed History (CH) methods – have been very successfully used to model the transport of ionizing radiation in turbid systems. Our primary objective is to determine whether or not such methods might apply equally well to the transport of photons in biological tissue. In an attempt to unify the derivations, we invoke results obtained first by Lewis, Goudsmit and Saunderson and later improved by Larsen and Tolar. We outline how two of the most promising of the CH models – one based on satisfying certain similarity relations and the second making use of a scattering phase function that permits only discrete directional changes – can be developed using these approaches. The main idea is to exploit the connection between the space-angle moments of the radiance and the angular moments of the scattering phase function. We compare the results obtained when the two CH models studied are used to simulate an idealized tissue transport problem. The numerical results support our findings based on the theoretical derivations and suggest that CH models should play a useful role in modeling light-tissue interactions. PMID:18548128

  8. Parallel Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods for discrete transport problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Stuart R.

    This work researches and develops Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration (MCSA) methods as a new class of solution techniques for discrete neutron transport and fluid flow problems. Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods use a traditional Monte Carlo process to approximate the solution to the discrete problem as a means of accelerating traditional fixed-point methods. To apply these methods to neutronics and fluid flow and determine the feasibility of these methods on modern hardware, three complementary research and development exercises are performed. First, solutions to the SPN discretization of the linear Boltzmann neutron transport equation are obtained using MCSA with a difficult criticality calculation for a light water reactor fuel assembly used as the driving problem. To enable MCSA as a solution technique a group of modern preconditioning strategies are researched. MCSA when compared to conventional Krylov methods demonstrated improved iterative performance over GMRES by converging in fewer iterations when using the same preconditioning. Second, solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations were obtained by developing the Forward-Automated Newton-MCSA (FANM) method for nonlinear systems based on Newton's method. Three difficult fluid benchmark problems in both convective and driven flow regimes were used to drive the research and development of the method. For 8 out of 12 benchmark cases, it was found that FANM had better iterative performance than the Newton-Krylov method by converging the nonlinear residual in fewer linear solver iterations with the same preconditioning. Third, a new domain decomposed algorithm to parallelize MCSA aimed at leveraging leadership-class computing facilities was developed by utilizing parallel strategies from the radiation transport community. The new algorithm utilizes the Multiple-Set Overlapping-Domain strategy in an attempt to reduce parallel overhead and add a natural element of replication to the algorithm. It

  9. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  10. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  11. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could be tested. Most

  12. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  13. Shield weight optimization using Monte Carlo transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Wohl, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines are given of the theory used in FASTER-3 Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries. The code has the additional capability of calculating the minimum weight layered unit shield configuration which will meet a specified dose rate constraint. It includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quardric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have a specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron and both primary and secondary photon transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration. These results include the optimization of the shield configuration.

  14. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svatos, Michelle Marie

    1998-10-01

    This thesis proves the feasibility of basing depth dose calculations for electron radiotherapy on first- principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is comparable to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that have potential to be much faster than conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to- Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or 'kugel'. A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV-8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry, which in this case is a CT (computed tomography) scan of a patient or phantom. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code against EGS4 and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. The energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel were tested. Most resulting depth dose calculations were within 2-3% of well-benchmarked codes, with one excursion to 4%. This thesis shows that the concept of using single scatter-based physics in clinical radiation

  15. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  16. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-03-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Electron transport in magnetrons by a posteriori Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Electron transport across magnetic barriers is crucial in all magnetized plasmas. It governs not only the plasma parameters in the volume, but also the fluxes of charged particles towards the electrodes and walls. It is particularly important in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) reactors, influencing the quality of the deposited thin films, since this type of discharge is characterized by an increased ionization fraction of the sputtered material. Transport coefficients of electron clouds released both from the cathode and from several locations in the discharge volume are calculated for a HiPIMS discharge with pre-ionization operated in argon at 0.67 Pa and for very short pulses (few µs) using the a posteriori Monte Carlo simulation technique. For this type of discharge electron transport is characterized by strong temporal and spatial dependence. Both drift velocity and diffusion coefficient depend on the releasing position of the electron cloud. They exhibit minimum values at the centre of the race-track for the secondary electrons released from the cathode. The diffusion coefficient of the same electrons increases from 2 to 4 times when the cathode voltage is doubled, in the first 1.5 µs of the pulse. These parameters are discussed with respect to empirical Bohm diffusion.

  18. Monte Carlo Particle Transport Capability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S; Stuart, L M

    2006-11-06

    A time-dependent massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport calculational module (ParticleMC) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications is described. The ParticleMC package is designed with the long-term goal of transporting neutrons, charged particles, and gamma rays created during the simulation of ICF targets and surrounding materials, although currently the package treats neutrons and gamma rays. Neutrons created during thermonuclear burn provide a source of neutrons to the ParticleMC package. Other user-defined sources of particles are also available. The module is used within the context of a hydrodynamics client code, and the particle tracking is performed on the same computational mesh as used in the broader simulation. The module uses domain-decomposition and the MPI message passing interface to achieve parallel scaling for large numbers of computational cells. The Doppler effects of bulk hydrodynamic motion and the thermal effects due to the high temperatures encountered in ICF plasmas are directly included in the simulation. Numerical results for a three-dimensional benchmark test problem are presented in 3D XYZ geometry as a verification of the basic transport capability. In the full paper, additional numerical results including a prototype ICF simulation will be presented.

  19. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  20. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE{sub 0} and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E{sub 0} and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE{sub 0})/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm{sup 3} size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy

  1. Coupled Deterministic-Monte Carlo Transport for Radiation Portal Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2008-01-14

    Radiation portal monitors are being deployed, both domestically and internationally, to detect illicit movement of radiological materials concealed in cargo. Evaluation of the current and next generations of these radiation portal monitor (RPM) technologies is an ongoing process. 'Injection studies' that superimpose, computationally, the signature from threat materials onto empirical vehicle profiles collected at ports of entry, are often a component of the RPM evaluation process. However, measurement of realistic threat devices can be both expensive and time-consuming. Radiation transport methods that can predict the response of radiation detection sensors with high fidelity, and do so rapidly enough to allow the modeling of many different threat-source configurations, are a cornerstone of reliable evaluation results. Monte Carlo methods have been the primary tool of the detection community for these kinds of calculations, in no small part because they are particularly effective for calculating pulse-height spectra in gamma-ray spectrometers. However, computational times for problems with a high degree of scattering and absorption can be extremely long. Deterministic codes that discretize the transport in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for these same kinds of problems, but the pulse-height calculations needed to predict gamma-ray spectrometer response are not readily accessible. These complementary strengths for radiation detection scenarios suggest that coupling Monte Carlo and deterministic methods could be beneficial in terms of computational efficiency. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its collaborators are developing a RAdiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) founded on this coupling approach. The deterministic core of RADSAT is Attila, a three-dimensional, tetrahedral-mesh code originally developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and since expanded and refined by Transpire, Inc. [1

  2. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D transport

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-04-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI`s unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed.

  3. Status of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    There are two versions of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MORSE-CGA is the most well-known and has undergone extensive use for many years. MORSE-SGC was originally developed in about 1980 in order to restructure the cross-section handling and thereby save storage. However, with the advent of new computer systems having much larger storage capacity, that aspect of SGC has become unnecessary. Both versions use data from multigroup cross-section libraries, although in somewhat different formats. MORSE-SGC is the version of MORSE that is part of the SCALE system, but it can also be run stand-alone. Both CGA and SGC use the Multiple Array System (MARS) geometry package. In the last six months the main focus of the work on these two versions has been on making them operational on workstations, in particular, the IBM RISC 6000 family. A new version of SCALE for workstations is being released to the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). MORSE-CGA, Version 2.0, is also being released to RSIC. Both SGC and CGA have undergone other revisions recently. This paper reports on the current status of the MORSE code system.

  4. Review of Monte Carlo modeling of light transport in tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan

    2013-05-01

    A general survey is provided on the capability of Monte Carlo (MC) modeling in tissue optics while paying special attention to the recent progress in the development of methods for speeding up MC simulations. The principles of MC modeling for the simulation of light transport in tissues, which includes the general procedure of tracking an individual photon packet, common light-tissue interactions that can be simulated, frequently used tissue models, common contact/noncontact illumination and detection setups, and the treatment of time-resolved and frequency-domain optical measurements, are briefly described to help interested readers achieve a quick start. Following that, a variety of methods for speeding up MC simulations, which includes scaling methods, perturbation methods, hybrid methods, variance reduction techniques, parallel computation, and special methods for fluorescence simulations, as well as their respective advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Then the applications of MC methods in tissue optics, laser Doppler flowmetry, photodynamic therapy, optical coherence tomography, and diffuse optical tomography are briefly surveyed. Finally, the potential directions for the future development of the MC method in tissue optics are discussed. PMID:23698318

  5. BEAM TRANSPORT LINES FOR THE BSNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    This paper presents the design of two beam transport lines at the BSNS: one is the injection line from the Linac to the RCS and the other is the target line from the RCS to the target station. In the injection beam line, space charge effects, transverse halo collimation, momentum tail collimation and debunching are the main concerned topics. A new method of using triplet cells and stripping foils is used to collimate transverse halo. A long straight section is reserved for the future upgrading linac and debuncher. In the target beam line, large halo emittance, beam stability at the target due to kicker failures and beam jitters, shielding of back-scattering neutrons from the target are main concerned topics. Special bi-gap magnets will be used to reduce beam losses in the collimators in front of the target.

  6. Moisture Transport Through Sprayed Concrete Tunnel Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holter, Karl Gunnar; Geving, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Waterproofing of permanent sprayed concrete tunnel linings with sprayed membranes in a continuous sandwich structure has been attempted since 2000 and has seen increased use in some countries. The main function of a sprayed membrane from a waterproofing perspective is to provide crack bridging and hence prevent flow of liquid water into the tunnel through cracks and imperfections in the concrete material. However, moisture can migrate through the concrete and EVA-based membrane materials by capillary and vapor diffusion mechanisms. These moisture transport mechanisms can have an influence on the degree of saturation, and may influence the pore pressures in the concrete material as well as risk of freeze-thaw damage of the concrete and membrane. The paper describes a detailed study of moisture transport material parameters, moisture condition in tunnel linings and climatic conditions tunnels in hard rock in Norway. These data have been included in a hygrothermal simulation model in the software WUFI for moisture transport to substantiate moisture transport and long-term effects on saturation of the concrete and membrane material. The findings suggest that EVA-based membranes exhibit significant water absorption and vapor transport properties although they are impermeable to liquid water flow. State-of-the-art sprayed concrete material applied with the wet mix method exhibits very low hydraulic conductivities, lower than 10-14 m/s, thus saturated conductive water flow is a very unlikely dominant transport mechanism. Moisture transport through the lining structure by capillary flow and vapor diffusion are calculated to approximately 3 cm3/m2 per day for lining thicknesses in the range of 25-35 cm and seasonal Nordic climate variations. The calculated moisture contents in the tunnel linings from the hygrothermal simulations are largely in agreement with the measured moisture contents in the tunnel linings. The findings also indicate that the concrete material exhibits

  7. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  8. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  9. Monte-Carlo Impurity transport simulations in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak using the MCI code

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Sager, G.T.; West, W.P.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Porter, G.D.

    1995-07-01

    A Monte-Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is used to follow trace impurities through multiple ionization states in realistic 2-D tokamak geometries. The MCI code is used to study impurity transport along the open magnetic field lines of the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) and to understand how impurities get into the core from the SOL. An MCI study concentrating on the entrainment of carbon impurities ions by deuterium background plasma into the DIII-D divertor is discussed. MCI simulation results are compared to experimental DIII-D carbon measurements.

  10. FZ2MC: A Tool for Monte Carlo Transport Code Geometry Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, B M; Nielsen Jr., D E; Procassini, R J

    2009-02-25

    The process of creating and validating combinatorial geometry representations of complex systems for use in Monte Carlo transport simulations can be both time consuming and error prone. To simplify this process, a tool has been developed which employs extensions of the Form-Z commercial solid modeling tool. The resultant FZ2MC (Form-Z to Monte Carlo) tool permits users to create, modify and validate Monte Carlo geometry and material composition input data. Plugin modules that export this data to an input file, as well as parse data from existing input files, have been developed for several Monte Carlo codes. The FZ2MC tool is envisioned as a 'universal' tool for the manipulation of Monte Carlo geometry and material data. To this end, collaboration on the development of plug-in modules for additional Monte Carlo codes is desired.

  11. Detector-selection technique for Monte Carlo transport in azimuthally symmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1982-01-01

    Many radiation transport problems contain geometric symmetries which are not exploited in obtaining their Monte Carlo solutions. An important class of problems is that in which the geometry is symmetric about an axis. These problems arise in the analyses of a reactor core or shield, spent fuel shipping casks, tanks containing radioactive solutions, radiation transport in the atmosphere (air-over-ground problems), etc. Although amenable to deterministic solution, such problems can often be solved more efficiently and accurately with the Monte Carlo method. For this class of problems, a technique is described in this paper which significantly reduces the variance of the Monte Carlo-calculated effect of interest at point detectors.

  12. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  13. Accelerator and transport line survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are introduced and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations. Various approaches to smoothing used at major laboratories are discussed. 47 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-12-13

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation Of H{sup -} Ion Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diomede, P.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2009-03-12

    In this work we study in detail the kinetics of H{sup -} ion swarms in velocity space: this provides a useful contrast to the usual literature in the field, where device features in configuration space are often included in detail but kinetic distributions are only marginally considered. To this aim a Monte Carlo model is applied, which includes several collision processes of H{sup -} ions with neutral particles as well as Coulomb collisions with positive ions. We characterize the full velocity distribution i.e. including its anisotropy, for different values of E/N, the atomic fraction and the H{sup +} mole fraction, which makes our results of interest for both source modeling and beam formation. A simple analytical theory, for highly dissociated hydrogen is formulated and checked by Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Iandola, F N; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  17. SU-E-T-558: Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulations On GPU with Quadric Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation on GPU has experienced rapid advancements over the past a few years and tremendous accelerations have been achieved. Yet existing packages were developed only in voxelized geometry. In some applications, e.g. radioactive seed modeling, simulations in more complicated geometry are needed. This abstract reports our initial efforts towards developing a quadric geometry module aiming at expanding the application scope of GPU-based MC simulations. Methods: We defined the simulation geometry consisting of a number of homogeneous bodies, each specified by its material composition and limiting surfaces characterized by quadric functions. A tree data structure was utilized to define geometric relationship between different bodies. We modified our GPU-based photon MC transport package to incorporate this geometry. Specifically, geometry parameters were loaded into GPU’s shared memory for fast access. Geometry functions were rewritten to enable the identification of the body that contains the current particle location via a fast searching algorithm based on the tree data structure. Results: We tested our package in an example problem of HDR-brachytherapy dose calculation for shielded cylinder. The dose under the quadric geometry and that under the voxelized geometry agreed in 94.2% of total voxels within 20% isodose line based on a statistical t-test (95% confidence level), where the reference dose was defined to be the one at 0.5cm away from the cylinder surface. It took 243sec to transport 100million source photons under this quadric geometry on an NVidia Titan GPU card. Compared with simulation time of 99.6sec in the voxelized geometry, including quadric geometry reduced efficiency due to the complicated geometry-related computations. Conclusion: Our GPU-based MC package has been extended to support photon transport simulation in quadric geometry. Satisfactory accuracy was observed with a reduced efficiency. Developments for charged

  18. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  19. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  20. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  1. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  2. Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin

    2011-09-01

    With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

  3. Monte Carlo method for calculating oxygen abundances and their uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M.; Oh, S. M.; Fierroz, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kewley, L.; Graur, O.

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity calibrators, based on the original IDL code of Kewley and Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley and Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed calibrators. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios (referred to as indicators) in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo sampling, better characterizes the statistical oxygen abundance confidence region including the effect due to the propagation of observational uncertainties. These uncertainties are likely to dominate the error budget in the case of distant galaxies, hosts of cosmic explosions. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, our code produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 15 metallicity calibrators simultaneously, as well as for E(B- V) , and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. We provide the option of outputting the full Monte Carlo distributions, and their Kernel Density estimates. We test our code on emission line measurements from a sample of nearby supernova host galaxies (z < 0.15) and compare our metallicity results with those from previous methods. We show that our metallicity estimates are consistent with previous methods but yield smaller statistical uncertainties. It should be noted that systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. We also offer visualization tools to assess the spread of the oxygen abundance in the different calibrators, as well as the shape of the estimated oxygen abundance distribution in each calibrator, and develop robust metrics for determining the appropriate Monte Carlo sample size. The code

  4. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-08-15

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  5. Macro-step Monte Carlo Methods and their Applications in Proton Radiotherapy and Optical Photon Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqmin, Dustin J.

    Monte Carlo modeling of radiation transport is considered the gold standard for radiotherapy dose calculations. However, highly accurate Monte Carlo calculations are very time consuming and the use of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods is often not practical in clinical settings. With this in mind, a variation on the Monte Carlo method called macro Monte Carlo (MMC) was developed in the 1990's for electron beam radiotherapy dose calculations. To accelerate the simulation process, the electron MMC method used larger steps-sizes in regions of the simulation geometry where the size of the region was large relative to the size of a typical Monte Carlo step. These large steps were pre-computed using conventional Monte Carlo simulations and stored in a database featuring many step-sizes and materials. The database was loaded into memory by a custom electron MMC code and used to transport electrons quickly through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The purpose of this thesis work was to apply the same techniques to proton radiotherapy dose calculation and light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. First, the MMC method was implemented for proton radiotherapy dose calculations. A database composed of pre-computed steps was created using MCNPX for many materials and beam energies. The database was used by a custom proton MMC code called PMMC to transport protons through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The PMMC code was tested against MCNPX for a number of different proton beam energies and geometries and proved to be accurate and much more efficient. The MMC method was also implemented for light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. The widely accepted Monte Carlo for multilayered media (MCML) was modified to incorporate the MMC method. The original MCML uses basic scattering and absorption physics to transport optical photons through multilayered geometries. The MMC version of MCML was tested against the original MCML code using a number of different geometries and

  6. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Hall, J M

    1999-06-01

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging.

  7. Time series analysis of Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Brian Robert

    A time series based approach is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) fission source distribution to calculate the non-fundamental mode eigenvalues of the system. The approach applies Principal Oscillation Patterns (POPs) to the fission source distribution, transforming the problem into a simple autoregressive order one (AR(1)) process. Proof is provided that the stationary MC process is linear to first order approximation, which is a requirement for the application of POPs. The autocorrelation coefficient of the resulting AR(1) process corresponds to the ratio of the desired mode eigenvalue to the fundamental mode eigenvalue. All modern k-eigenvalue MC codes calculate the fundamental mode eigenvalue, so the desired mode eigenvalue can be easily determined. The strength of this approach is contrasted against the Fission Matrix method (FMM) in terms of accuracy versus computer memory constraints. Multi-dimensional problems are considered since the approach has strong potential for use in reactor analysis, and the implementation of the method into production codes is discussed. Lastly, the appearance of complex eigenvalues is investigated and solutions are provided.

  8. Using Nuclear Theory, Data and Uncertainties in Monte Carlo Transport Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-11-03

    These are slides for a presentation on using nuclear theory, data and uncertainties in Monte Carlo transport applications. The following topics are covered: nuclear data (experimental data versus theoretical models, data evaluation and uncertainty quantification), fission multiplicity models (fixed source applications, criticality calculations), uncertainties and their impact (integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation).

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of Light Transport in Tissue, Beta Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-12-09

    Understanding light-tissue interaction is fundamental in the field of Biomedical Optics. It has important implications for both therapeutic and diagnostic technologies. In this program, light transport in scattering tissue is modeled by absorption and scattering events as each photon travels through the tissue. the path of each photon is determined statistically by calculating probabilities of scattering and absorption. Other meausured quantities are total reflected light, total transmitted light, and total heat absorbed.

  10. Hadronic Monte Carlo Transport: A Very Personal View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prael, R. E.

    Much to the disappointment of many, our distinguished speaker for the initial plenary session has been unable to attend our conference. I was prevailed upon by the conference organization to present a talk which, as prescribed, will be of a historical nature, but as the title describes, will also be a very personal view. Perhaps the opinions expressed will find sympathy with my associates around the world who have devoted their efforts to and found some satisfaction with providing the code tools for radiation transport to a large, and occasional anxious, community of users.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional flux-line-lattice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Nagaosa, N. )

    1993-09-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional flux-line-lattice (FLL) melting transition is presented. The internal energy, specific heat, Abrikosov ratio, and diffraction pattern of the magnitude [vert bar][psi]([ital x])[vert bar][sup 2] of the order-parameter field are calculated. By examining in detail the hysteresis, histogram, and relaxation profiles of the internal energy, the existence of a first-order phase transition is concluded. Below the transition temperature [ital t][sub [ital m

  12. A Two-Dimensional Monte Carlo Code System for Linear Neutron Transport Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-04-24

    Version 00 KIM (k-infinite-Monte Carlo) solves the steady-state linear neutron transport equation for a fixed source problem or, by successive fixed-source runs, for the eigenvalue problem, in a two-dimensional infinite thermal reactor lattice using the Monte Carlo method. In addition to the combinatorial description of domains, the program allows complex configurations to be represented by a discrete set of points whereby the calculation speed is greatly improved. Configurations are described as the result of overlaysmore » of elementary figures over a basic domain.« less

  13. Coupling Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Methods for the Simulation of Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Miller, Erin A.; Shaver, Mark W.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Ellis, J. E.; Kaye, William R.; McConn, Ronald J.; Meriwether, George H.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Wareing, Todd A.

    2008-10-31

    Radiation transport modeling methods used in the radiation detection community fall into one of two broad categories: stochastic (Monte Carlo) and deterministic. Monte Carlo methods are typically the tool of choice for simulating gamma-ray spectrometers operating in homeland and national security settings (e.g. portal monitoring of vehicles or isotope identification using handheld devices), but deterministic codes that discretize the linear Boltzmann transport equation in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for many complex radiation detection problems. This paper describes the development of a scenario simulation framework based on deterministic algorithms. Key challenges include: formulating methods to automatically define an energy group structure that can support modeling of gamma-ray spectrometers ranging from low to high resolution; combining deterministic transport algorithms (e.g. ray-tracing and discrete ordinates) to mitigate ray effects for a wide range of problem types; and developing efficient and accurate methods to calculate gamma-ray spectrometer response functions from the deterministic angular flux solutions. The software framework aimed at addressing these challenges is described and results from test problems that compare coupled deterministic-Monte Carlo methods and purely Monte Carlo approaches are provided.

  14. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    reaction types as contiguous as possible and removes completed histories from the transport cycle. The sort reduces the amount of divergence in GPU ``thread blocks,'' keeps the SIMD units as full as possible, and eliminates using memory bandwidth to check if a neutron in the batch has been terminated or not. Using a remapping vector means the data access pattern is irregular, but this is mitigated by using large batch sizes where the GPU can effectively eliminate the high cost of irregular global memory access. WARP modifies the standard unionized energy grid implementation to reduce memory traffic. Instead of storing a matrix of pointers indexed by reaction type and energy, WARP stores three matrices. The first contains cross section values, the second contains pointers to angular distributions, and a third contains pointers to energy distributions. This linked list type of layout increases memory usage, but lowers the number of data loads that are needed to determine a reaction by eliminating a pointer load to find a cross section value. Optimized, high-performance GPU code libraries are also used by WARP wherever possible. The CUDA performance primitives (CUDPP) library is used to perform the parallel reductions, sorts and sums, the CURAND library is used to seed the linear congruential random number generators, and the OptiX ray tracing framework is used for geometry representation. OptiX is a highly-optimized library developed by NVIDIA that automatically builds hierarchical acceleration structures around user-input geometry so only surfaces along a ray line need to be queried in ray tracing. WARP also performs material and cell number queries with OptiX by using a point-in-polygon like algorithm. WARP has shown that GPUs are an effective platform for performing Monte Carlo neutron transport with continuous energy cross sections. Currently, WARP is the most detailed and feature-rich program in existence for performing continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in

  15. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano's theorem. Additionally, Lewis' approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano's and Lewis' approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano's theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis' theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms. PMID:26061045

  16. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano’s theorem. Additionally, Lewis’ approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano’s and Lewis’ approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano’s theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis’ theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms.

  17. A Hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministic Method for Global Binary Stochastic Medium Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Keady, K P; Brantley, P

    2010-03-04

    Global deep-penetration transport problems are difficult to solve using traditional Monte Carlo techniques. In these problems, the scalar flux distribution is desired at all points in the spatial domain (global nature), and the scalar flux typically drops by several orders of magnitude across the problem (deep-penetration nature). As a result, few particle histories may reach certain regions of the domain, producing a relatively large variance in tallies in those regions. Implicit capture (also known as survival biasing or absorption suppression) can be used to increase the efficiency of the Monte Carlo transport algorithm to some degree. A hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic technique has previously been developed by Cooper and Larsen to reduce variance in global problems by distributing particles more evenly throughout the spatial domain. This hybrid method uses an approximate deterministic estimate of the forward scalar flux distribution to automatically generate weight windows for the Monte Carlo transport simulation, avoiding the necessity for the code user to specify the weight window parameters. In a binary stochastic medium, the material properties at a given spatial location are known only statistically. The most common approach to solving particle transport problems involving binary stochastic media is to use the atomic mix (AM) approximation in which the transport problem is solved using ensemble-averaged material properties. The most ubiquitous deterministic model developed specifically for solving binary stochastic media transport problems is the Levermore-Pomraning (L-P) model. Zimmerman and Adams proposed a Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm A) that solves the Levermore-Pomraning equations and another Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm B) that is more accurate as a result of improved local material realization modeling. Recent benchmark studies have shown that Algorithm B is often significantly more accurate than Algorithm A (and therefore the L-P model

  18. High-resolution Monte Carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 2. Transport results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the second of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, results from the transport aspect of these simulations are reported on. Transport simulations contained herein assume a finite pulse input of conservative tracer, and the numerical technique endeavors to realistically simulate tracer spreading as the cloud moves through a heterogeneous medium. Medium heterogeneity is limited to the hydraulic conductivity field, and generation of this field assumes that the hydraulic- conductivity process is second-order stationary. Methods of estimating cloud moments, and the interpretation of these moments, are discussed. Techniques for estimation of large-time macrodispersivities from cloud second-moment data, and for the approximation of the standard errors associated with these macrodispersivities, are also presented. These moment and macrodispersivity estimation techniques were applied to tracer clouds resulting from transport scenarios generated by specific Monte Carlo simulations. Where feasible, moments and macrodispersivities resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. Some limited results concerning the possible ergodic nature of these simulations, and the presence of non- Gaussian behavior of the mean cloud, are reported on as well.

  19. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  20. Bold-line Monte Carlo and the nonequilibrium physics of strongly correlated many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Guy

    2015-03-01

    This talk summarizes real time bold-line diagrammatic Monte-Carlo approaches to quantum impurity models, which make significant headway against the sign problem by summing over corrections to self-consistent diagrammatic expansions rather than a bare diagrammatic series. When the bold-line method is combined with reduced dynamics techniques both local single-time properties and two time correlators such as Green functions can be computed at very long timescales, enabling studies of nonequilibrium steady state behavior of quantum impurity models and creating new solvers for nonequilibrium dynamical mean field theory. This work is supported by NSF DMR 1006282, NSF CHE-1213247, DOE ER 46932, TG-DMR120085 and TG-DMR130036, and the Yad Hanadiv-Rothschild Foundation.

  1. A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D. . E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov; Urbatsch, Todd J. . E-mail: tmonster@lanl.gov; Evans, Thomas M. . E-mail: tme@lanl.gov; Buksas, Michael W. . E-mail: mwbuksas@lanl.gov

    2007-03-20

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting in a computationally expensive calculation. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many small Monte Carlo steps, thus increasing the efficiency of the simulation. In addition, given that DDMC is based on a diffusion equation, it should produce accurate solutions if used judiciously. In practice, DDMC is combined with standard Monte Carlo to form a hybrid transport-diffusion method that can accurately simulate problems with both diffusive and non-diffusive regions. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for nonlinear, time-dependent, radiative-transfer calculations. The use of DDMC in these types of problems is advantageous since, due to the underlying linearizations, optically thick regions appear to be diffusive. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous in time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. Also, we treat the interface between optically thick and optically thin regions with an improved method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, that can produce accurate results regardless of the angular distribution of the incident Monte Carlo particles. Finally, we develop a technique for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the

  2. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  3. A Novel Implementation of Massively Parallel Three Dimensional Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. B.; Peterson, J. D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of our summer project was to implement the difference formulation for radiation transport into Cosmos++, a multidimensional, massively parallel, magneto hydrodynamics code for astrophysical applications (Peter Anninos - AX). The difference formulation is a new method for Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo thermal transport (Brooks and Szöke - PAT). Formerly, simultaneous implementation of fully implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport in multiple dimensions on multiple processors had not been convincingly demonstrated. We found that a combination of the difference formulation and the inherent structure of Cosmos++ makes such an implementation both accurate and straightforward. We developed a "nearly nearest neighbor physics" technique to allow each processor to work independently, even with a fully implicit code. This technique coupled with the increased accuracy of an implicit Monte Carlo solution and the efficiency of parallel computing systems allows us to demonstrate the possibility of massively parallel thermal transport. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48

  4. Overview and applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport kit at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K E

    1999-06-23

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  5. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  6. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  7. Minimizing the cost of splitting in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    A deterministic analysis of the computational cost associated with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. Appropriate integro-differential equations are developed for the first and second moments of the Monte Carlo tally as well as time per particle history, given that splitting with Russian roulette takes place at one (or several) internal surfaces of the geometry. The equations are solved using a standard S/sub n/ (discrete ordinates) solution technique, allowing for the prediction of computer cost (formulated as the product of sample variance and time per particle history, sigma/sup 2//sub s/tau p) associated with a given set of splitting parameters. Optimum splitting surface locations and splitting ratios are determined. Benefits of such an analysis are particularly noteworthy for transport problems in which splitting is apt to be extensively employed (e.g., deep penetration calculations).

  8. A General-Purpose Monte Carlo Gamma-Ray Transport Code System for Minicomputers.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1981-08-27

    Version 00 The OGRE code system was designed to calculate, by Monte Carlo methods, any quantity related to gamma-ray transport. The system is represented by two codes which treat slab geometry. OGRE-P1 computes the dose on one side of a slab for a source on the other side, and HOTONE computes energy deposition in addition. The source may be monodirectional, isotropic, or cosine distributed.

  9. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  10. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  11. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random numbermore » and for measuring the time of simulation.« less

  12. Exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo for the 1-D transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. R.; Morel, J. E.; Ragusa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    We define a new exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo method for solving the one-speed 1-D slab-geometry transport equation. This method is based upon the use of a linear discontinuous finite-element trial space in space and direction to represent the transport solution. A space-direction h-adaptive algorithm is employed to restore exponential convergence after stagnation occurs due to inadequate trial-space resolution. This methods uses jumps in the solution at cell interfaces as an error indicator. Computational results are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the new approach. (authors)

  13. A Deterministic-Monte Carlo Hybrid Method for Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Justin Pounders; Farzad Rahnema

    2001-10-01

    A new deterministic-Monte Carlo hybrid solution technique is derived for the time-dependent transport equation. This new approach is based on dividing the time domain into a number of coarse intervals and expanding the transport solution in a series of polynomials within each interval. The solutions within each interval can be represented in terms of arbitrary source terms by using precomputed response functions. In the current work, the time-dependent response function computations are performed using the Monte Carlo method, while the global time-step march is performed deterministically. This work extends previous work by coupling the time-dependent expansions to space- and angle-dependent expansions to fully characterize the 1D transport response/solution. More generally, this approach represents and incremental extension of the steady-state coarse-mesh transport method that is based on global-local decompositions of large neutron transport problems. An example of a homogeneous slab is discussed as an example of the new developments.

  14. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.; Finkenthal, D. F.

    1998-09-28

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI's unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed.

  15. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  16. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Godfrey, T.N.K.

    1985-01-01

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported.

  17. Update on the Development and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Taylor, J M; McKinley, M S; Greenman, G M; Cullen, D E; O'Brien, M J; Beck, B R; Hagmann, C A

    2005-06-06

    An update on the development and validation of the MERCURY Monte Carlo particle transport code is presented. MERCURY is a modern, parallel, general-purpose Monte Carlo code being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the past year, several major algorithm enhancements have been completed. These include the addition of particle trackers for 3-D combinatorial geometry (CG), 1-D radial meshes, 2-D quadrilateral unstructured meshes, as well as a feature known as templates for defining recursive, repeated structures in CG. New physics capabilities include an elastic-scattering neutron thermalization model, support for continuous energy cross sections and S ({alpha}, {beta}) molecular bound scattering. Each of these new physics features has been validated through code-to-code comparisons with another Monte Carlo transport code. Several important computer science features have been developed, including an extensible input-parameter parser based upon the XML data description language, and a dynamic load-balance methodology for efficient parallel calculations. This paper discusses the recent work in each of these areas, and describes a plan for future extensions that are required to meet the needs of our ever expanding user base.

  18. Monte Carlo photon transport on vector and parallel supercomputers: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Nowak, P.F.

    1986-12-01

    The University of Michigan has been investigating the implementation of vectorized and parallelized Monte Carlo algorithms for the analysis of photon transport in an inertially-confined fusion (ICF) plasma. The goal of this work is to develop and test Monte Carlo algorithms for vector/parallel supercomputers such as the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Previous effort has resulted in the development of a vectorized photon transport code, named VPHOT, and a companion scalar code, named SPHOT, that performs the same analysis and is used for comparative purposes to assess the performance of the vectorized algorithm. A test problem, denoted the ICF test problem, has been created and tested with the VPHOT and SPHOT codes. By comparison with a reference LLNL calculation of the ICF test problem, the VPHOT/SPHOT codes have been verified to predict the correct results. Performance results with VPHOT versus SPHOT and the reference LLNL code have been reported previously and indicate that speedups in the range of 6 to 12 can be achieved with the vectorized algorithm versus the conventional scalar algorithm on the Cray X-MP. This report summarizes the progress made during the last year to continue the investigation of vectorized Monte Carlo (parameter studies, alternative vectorized algorithm, alternative target machines) and to extend the work into the area of parallel processing. 5 refs.

  19. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  20. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  1. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  2. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  3. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  4. Monte Carlo methods for neutrino transport in type-II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas

    Neutrinos play an important role in the type-II supernova scenario. Numerous approaches have been made in order to treat the generation and transport of neutrinos and the interactions between neutrinos and matter during stellar collapse and the shock propagation phase. However, all computationally fast methods have in common the fact that they cannot avoid simplifications in describing the interactions and, furthermore, have to use parameterizations in handling the Boltzmann transport equation. In order to provide an instrument for calibrating these treatments and for calculating neutrino spectra emitted from given stellar configurations, a Monte Carlo transport code was designed. Special attention was paid to an accurate computation of scattering kernels and source functions. Neutrino spectra for a hydrostatic stage of a 20 solar mass supernova simulation were generated and conclusions drawn concerning a late time revival of the stalled shock by neutrino heating.

  5. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  6. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 106 particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer. PMID:25190994

  7. The Moment Condensed History Algorithm for Monte Carlo Electron Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, D R; Larsen, E W

    2001-02-27

    We introduce a new Condensed History algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. To obtain more accurate simulations, the new algorithm preserves the mean position and the variance in the mean position exactly for electrons that have traveled a given path length and are traveling in a given direction. This is accomplished by deriving the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments of the Spencer-Lewis equation and employing this information directly in the Condensed History process. Numerical calculations demonstrate the advantages of our method over standard Condensed History methods.

  8. Hybrid Parallel Programming Models for AMR Neutron Monte-Carlo Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dureau, David; Poëtte, Gaël

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with High Performance Computing (HPC) applied to neutron transport theory on complex geometries, thanks to both an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm and a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver. Several Parallelism models are presented and analyzed in this context, among them shared memory and distributed memory ones such as Domain Replication and Domain Decomposition, together with Hybrid strategies. The study is illustrated by weak and strong scalability tests on complex benchmarks on several thousands of cores thanks to the petaflopic supercomputer Tera100.

  9. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    reaction types as contiguous as possible and removes completed histories from the transport cycle. The sort reduces the amount of divergence in GPU ``thread blocks,'' keeps the SIMD units as full as possible, and eliminates using memory bandwidth to check if a neutron in the batch has been terminated or not. Using a remapping vector means the data access pattern is irregular, but this is mitigated by using large batch sizes where the GPU can effectively eliminate the high cost of irregular global memory access. WARP modifies the standard unionized energy grid implementation to reduce memory traffic. Instead of storing a matrix of pointers indexed by reaction type and energy, WARP stores three matrices. The first contains cross section values, the second contains pointers to angular distributions, and a third contains pointers to energy distributions. This linked list type of layout increases memory usage, but lowers the number of data loads that are needed to determine a reaction by eliminating a pointer load to find a cross section value. Optimized, high-performance GPU code libraries are also used by WARP wherever possible. The CUDA performance primitives (CUDPP) library is used to perform the parallel reductions, sorts and sums, the CURAND library is used to seed the linear congruential random number generators, and the OptiX ray tracing framework is used for geometry representation. OptiX is a highly-optimized library developed by NVIDIA that automatically builds hierarchical acceleration structures around user-input geometry so only surfaces along a ray line need to be queried in ray tracing. WARP also performs material and cell number queries with OptiX by using a point-in-polygon like algorithm. WARP has shown that GPUs are an effective platform for performing Monte Carlo neutron transport with continuous energy cross sections. Currently, WARP is the most detailed and feature-rich program in existence for performing continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in

  10. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  11. Comparison of Monte Carlo collimator transport methods for photon treatment planning in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidhalter, D.; Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Fix, M. K.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was a Monte Carlo (MC) based investigation of the impact of different radiation transport methods in collimators of a linear accelerator on photon beam characteristics, dose distributions, and efficiency. Thereby it is investigated if it is possible to use different simplifications in the radiation transport for some clinical situations in order to save calculation time. Methods: Within the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan, a GUI-based framework for photon MC treatment planning, different MC methods are available for the radiation transport through the collimators [secondary jaws and multileaf collimator (MLC)]: EGSnrc (reference), VMC++, and Pin (an in-house developed MC code). Additional nonfull transport methods were implemented in order to provide different complexity levels for the MC simulation: Considering collimator attenuation only, considering Compton scatter only or just the firstCompton process, and considering the collimators as totally absorbing. Furthermore, either a simple or an exact geometry of the collimators can be selected for the absorbing or attenuation method. Phasespaces directly above and dose distributions in a water phantom are analyzed for academic and clinical treatment fields using 6 and 15 MV beams, including intensity modulated radiation therapy with dynamic MLC. Results: For all MC transport methods, differences in the radial mean energy and radial energy fluence are within 1% inside the geometric field. Below the collimators, the energy fluence is underestimated for nonfull MC transport methods ranging from 5% for Compton to 100% for Absorbing. Gamma analysis using EGSnrc calculated doses as reference shows that the percentage of voxels fulfilling a 1% /1 mm criterion is at least 98% when using VMC++, Compton, or firstCompton transport methods. When using the methods Pin, Transmission, Flat-Transmission, Flat-Absorbing or Absorbing, the mean value of points fulfilling this criterion over all tested cases is 97

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Transport in 4H- and 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C. C.; You, A. H.; Wong, E. K.

    2010-07-07

    The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of electron transport properties at high electric field region in 4H- and 6H-SiC are presented. This MC model includes two non-parabolic conduction bands. Based on the material parameters, the electron scattering rates included polar optical phonon scattering, optical phonon scattering and acoustic phonon scattering are evaluated. The electron drift velocity, energy and free flight time are simulated as a function of applied electric field at an impurity concentration of 1x10{sup 18} cm{sup 3} in room temperature. The simulated drift velocity with electric field dependencies is in a good agreement with experimental results found in literature. The saturation velocities for both polytypes are close, but the scattering rates are much more pronounced for 6H-SiC. Our simulation model clearly shows complete electron transport properties in 4H- and 6H-SiC.

  13. Comparison of generalized transport and Monte-Carlo models of the escape of a minor species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    The steady-state diffusion of a minor species through a static background species is studied using a Monte Carlo model and a generalized 16-moment transport model. The two models are in excellent agreement in the collision-dominated region and in the 'transition region'. In the 'collisionless' region the 16-moment solution contains two singularities, and physical meaning cannot be assigned to the solution in their vicinity. In all regions, agreement between the models is best for the distribution function and for the lower-order moments and is less good for higher-order moments. Moments of order higher than the heat flow and hence beyond the level of description provided by the transport model have a noticeable effect on the shape of distribution functions in the collisionless region.

  14. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  15. An implicit Monte Carlo method for simulation of impurity transport in divertor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akiko; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Hatayama, Akiyoshi

    1997-02-01

    A new {open_quotes}implicit{close_quotes} Monte Carlo (IMC) method has been developed to simulate ionization and recombination processes of impurity ions in divertor plasmas. The IMC method takes into account many ionization and recombination processes during a time step {Delta}t. The time step is not limited by a condition, {Delta}t {much_lt} {tau}{sub min} ({tau}{sub min}; the minimum characteristic time of atomic processes), which is forced to be adopted in conventional Monte Carlo methods. We incorporate this method into a one-dimensional impurity transport model. In this transport calculation, impurity ions are followed with the time step about 10 times larger than that used in conventional methods. The average charge state of impurities, (Z), and the radiative cooling rate, L(T{sub e}), are calculated at the electron temperature T{sub e} in divertor plasmas. These results are compared with those obtained from the simple noncoronal model. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Hybrid two-dimensional Monte-Carlo electron transport in self-consistent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Cranfill, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The physics and numerics of the hybrid electron transport code ANTHEM are described. The need for the hybrid modeling of laser generated electron transport is outlined, and a general overview of the hybrid implementation in ANTHEM is provided. ANTHEM treats the background ions and electrons in a laser target as coupled fluid components moving relative to a fixed Eulerian mesh. The laser converts cold electrons to an additional hot electron component which evolves on the mesh as either a third coupled fluid or as a set of Monte Carlo PIC particles. The fluids and particles move in two-dimensions through electric and magnetic fields calculated via the Implicit Moment method. The hot electrons are coupled to the background thermal electrons by Coulomb drag, and both the hot and cold electrons undergo Rutherford scattering against the ion background. Subtleties of the implicit E- and B-field solutions, the coupled hydrodynamics, and large time step Monte Carlo particle scattering are discussed. Sample applications are presented.

  17. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  18. Multilevel Monte Carlo for Two Phase Flow and Transport in a Subsurface Reservoir with Random Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Florian; Jenny, Patrick; Daniel, Meyer

    2014-05-01

    To a large extent, the flow and transport behaviour within a subsurface reservoir is governed by its permeability. Typically, permeability measurements of a subsurface reservoir are affordable at few spatial locations only. Due to this lack of information, permeability fields are preferably described by stochastic models rather than deterministically. A stochastic method is needed to asses the transition of the input uncertainty in permeability through the system of partial differential equations describing flow and transport to the output quantity of interest. Monte Carlo (MC) is an established method for quantifying uncertainty arising in subsurface flow and transport problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow statistical convergence. To reduce the computational cost of MC, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method was introduced. Instead of sampling a random output quantity of interest on the finest affordable grid as in case of MC, MLMC operates on a hierarchy of grids. If parts of the sampling process are successfully delegated to coarser grids where sampling is inexpensive, MLMC can dramatically outperform MC. MLMC has proven to accelerate MC for several applications including integration problems, stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance as well as stochastic elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations. In this study, MLMC is combined with a reservoir simulator to assess uncertain two phase (water/oil) flow and transport within a random permeability field. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two-dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. It is found that MLMC yields significant speed-ups with respect to MC while providing results of essentially equal accuracy. This finding holds true not only for one specific Gaussian logarithmic permeability model but for a range of correlation lengths and variances.

  19. Generalized emittance measurements in a beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Gardner, C.; Luccio, A.; Kponou, A.; Reece, K.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the need to commission 3 beam transport lines for the new AGS Booster project, we have developed a generalized emittance-measurement program; beam line specifics are entirely resident in data tables, not in program code. For instrumentation, the program requires one or more multi-wire profile monitors; one or multiple profiles are acquired from each monitor, corresponding to one or multiple tunes of the transport line. Emittances and Twiss parameters are calculated using generalized algorithms. The required matix descriptions of the beam optics are constructed by an on-line general beam modeling program. Design of the program, its algorithms, and initial experience with it will be described. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII{endash}D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-09-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI{close_quote}s unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII{endash}D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50{percent} of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. a Test Particle Model for Monte Carlo Simulation of Plasma Transport Driven by Quasineutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Nelson M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of transport in controlled nuclear fusion as it applies to confinement in a tokamak or stellarator. We perform numerical experiments to validate a mathematical model of P. R. Garabedian in which the electric potential is determined by quasineutrality because of singular perturbation of the Poisson equation. The simulations are made using a transport code written by O. Betancourt and M. Taylor, with changes to incorporate our case studies. We adopt a test particle model naturally suggested by the problem of tracking particles in plasma physics. The statistics due to collisions are modeled by a drift kinetic equation whose numerical solution is based on the Monte Carlo method of A. Boozer and G. Kuo -Petravic. The collision operator drives the distribution function in velocity space towards the normal distribution, or Maxwellian. It is shown that details of the collision operator other than its dependence on the collision frequency and temperature matter little for transport, and the role of conservation of momentum is investigated. Exponential decay makes it possible to find the confinement times of both ions and electrons by high performance computing. Three -dimensional perturbations in the electromagnetic field model the anomalous transport of electrons and simulate the turbulent behavior that is presumably triggered by the displacement current. We make a convergence study of the method, derive scaling laws that are in good agreement with predictions from experimental data, and present a comparison with the JET experiment.

  2. Transporting hot oil by a new concept in insulated lines

    SciTech Connect

    Matteelli, R.; Brambilla, M.; Pierangeli, P.

    1986-07-01

    Heavy fuel oil, heated to 60/sup 0/C, is transported to the Porto Tolle power plant, near Ravenna, Italy, through an 8-mi, 22-in. insulated pipe line system. The authors tell how Snamprogetti's patented pipe insulation system was used to connect a man-made island in the Adriatic Sea to the power plant.

  3. Design of the SLC damping ring to linac transport lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.H.; Murray, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    The first and second order optics for the damping ring to linac transport line are designed to preserve the damped transverse emittance while simultaneously compressing the bunch length of the beam to that length required for reinjection into the linac. This design, including provisions for future control of beam polarization, is described.

  4. 3D electro-thermal Monte Carlo study of transport in confined silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Y.

    The simultaneous explosion of portable microelectronics devices and the rapid shrinking of microprocessor size have provided a tremendous motivation to scientists and engineers to continue the down-scaling of these devices. For several decades, innovations have allowed components such as transistors to be physically reduced in size, allowing the famous Moore's law to hold true. As these transistors approach the atomic scale, however, further reduction becomes less probable and practical. As new technologies overcome these limitations, they face new, unexpected problems, including the ability to accurately simulate and predict the behavior of these devices, and to manage the heat they generate. This work uses a 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulator to investigate the electro-thermal behavior of quasi-one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) multigate MOSFETs. In order to study these highly confined architectures, the inclusion of quantum correction becomes essential. To better capture the influence of carrier confinement, the electrostatically quantum-corrected full-band MC model has the added feature of being able to incorporate subband scattering. The scattering rate selection introduces quantum correction into carrier movement. In addition to the quantum effects, scaling introduces thermal management issues due to the surge in power dissipation. Solving these problems will continue to bring improvements in battery life, performance, and size constraints of future devices. We have coupled our electron transport Monte Carlo simulation to Aksamija's phonon transport so that we may accurately and efficiently study carrier transport, heat generation, and other effects at the transistor level. This coupling utilizes anharmonic phonon decay and temperature dependent scattering rates. One immediate advantage of our coupled electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator is its ability to provide an accurate description of the spatial variation of self-heating and its effect on non

  5. Improved Convergence Rate of Multi-Group Scattering Moment Tallies for Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Adam

    Multi-group scattering moment matrices are critical to the solution of the multi-group form of the neutron transport equation, as they are responsible for describing the change in direction and energy of neutrons. These matrices, however, are difficult to correctly calculate from the measured nuclear data with both deterministic and stochastic methods. Calculating these parameters when using deterministic methods requires a set of assumptions which do not hold true in all conditions. These quantities can be calculated accurately with stochastic methods, however doing so is computationally expensive due to the poor efficiency of tallying scattering moment matrices. This work presents an improved method of obtaining multi-group scattering moment matrices from a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. This improved method of tallying the scattering moment matrices is based on recognizing that all of the outgoing particle information is known a priori and can be taken advantage of to increase the tallying efficiency (therefore reducing the uncertainty) of the stochastically integrated tallies. In this scheme, the complete outgoing probability distribution is tallied, supplying every one of the scattering moment matrices elements with its share of data. In addition to reducing the uncertainty, this method allows for the use of a track-length estimation process potentially offering even further improvement to the tallying efficiency. Unfortunately, to produce the needed distributions, the probability functions themselves must undergo an integration over the outgoing energy and scattering angle dimensions. This integration is too costly to perform during the Monte Carlo simulation itself and therefore must be performed in advance by way of a pre-processing code. The new method increases the information obtained from tally events and therefore has a significantly higher efficiency than the currently used techniques. The improved method has been implemented in a code system

  6. Code System to Calculate Particle Penetration Through Aerosol Transport Lines.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-14

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. DEPOSITION1.03 is an interactive software program which was developed for the design and analysis of aerosol transport lines. Models are presented for calculating aerosol particle penetration through straight tubes of arbitrary orientation, inlets, and elbows. An expression to calculate effective depositional velocities of particles on tube walls is derived. The concept of maximum penetration is introduced, which is the maximum possible penetrationmore » through a sampling line connecting any two points in a three-dimensional space. A procedure to predict optimum tube diameter for an existing transport line is developed. Note that there is a discrepancy in this package which includes the DEPOSITION 1.03 executable and the DEPOSITION 2.0 report. RSICC was unable to obtain other executables or reports.« less

  7. Measured performances on vectorization and multitasking with a Monte Carlo code for neutron transport problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Yves

    1985-07-01

    This paper summarized two improvements of a real production code by using vectorization and multitasking techniques. After a short description of Monte Carlo algorithms employed in our neutron transport problems, we briefly describe the work we have done in order to get a vector code. Vectorization principles will be presented and measured performances on the CRAY 1S, CYBER 205 and CRAY X-MP compared in terms of vector lengths. The second part of this work is an adaptation to multitasking on the CRAY X-MP using exclusively standard multitasking tools available with FORTRAN under the COS 1.13 system. Two examples will be presented. The goal of the first one is to measure the overhead inherent to multitasking when tasks become too small and to define a granularity threshold that is to say a minimum size for a task. With the second example we propose a method that is very X-MP oriented in order to get the best speedup factor on such a computer. In conclusion we prove that Monte Carlo algorithms are very well suited to future vector and parallel computers.

  8. Analysis of Light Transport Features in Stone Fruits Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chizhu; Shi, Shuning; Chen, Jianjun; Wei, Wei; Tan, Zuojun

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of light in stone fruit tissue was modeled using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. Peaches were used as the representative model of stone fruits. The effects of the fruit core and the skin on light transport features in the peaches were assessed. It is suggested that the skin, flesh and core should be separately considered with different parameters to accurately simulate light propagation in intact stone fruit. The detection efficiency was evaluated by the percentage of effective photons and the detection sensitivity of the flesh tissue. The fruit skin decreases the detection efficiency, especially in the region close to the incident point. The choices of the source-detector distance, detection angle and source intensity were discussed. Accurate MC simulations may result in better insight into light propagation in stone fruit and aid in achieving the optimal fruit quality inspection without extensive experimental measurements. PMID:26469695

  9. Domain Decomposition of a Constructive Solid Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Joy, K I; Procassini, R J; Greenman, G M

    2008-12-07

    Domain decomposition has been implemented in a Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) Monte Carlo neutron transport code. Previous methods to parallelize a CSG code relied entirely on particle parallelism; but in our approach we distribute the geometry as well as the particles across processors. This enables calculations whose geometric description is larger than what could fit in memory of a single processor, thus it must be distributed across processors. In addition to enabling very large calculations, we show that domain decomposition can speed up calculations compared to particle parallelism alone. We also show results of a calculation of the proposed Laser Inertial-Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) facility, which has 5.6 million CSG parts.

  10. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K; Brown, Forrest B; Forget, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of atoms in DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, S.; Buyle, G.; Depla, D.; Heirwegh, S.; Ghekiere, P.; De Gryse, R.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, we present a Monte Carlo simulation for the transport of sputtered particles during DC magnetron sputter deposition through the gas phase. The nascent sputter flux has been simulated by SRIM and TRIM, while the collisions of the sputtered atoms with the sputter gas are simulated with a screened Coulomb potential, with the Molière screening function and the Firsov screening length. The model calculates the flux of the atoms arriving at the substrate, their energy, direction and number of collisions they underwent. The model was verified by comparing the simulated thickness profiles with experimental profiles of deposited layers of Al, Cu and Zr/Y (85/15 wt%) on large substrates (ratio of the substrate diameter to the target diameter is 8). A good agreement between the experimental data and the simulations for sputter pressures (0.3-1 Pa) and target-substrate distances (7-16 cm) is obtained.

  12. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  13. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  14. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.M.; Hochstedler, R.D.

    1997-02-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code).

  15. Monte Carlo charge transport and photoemission from negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Siddharth; Dimitrov, Dimitre; Schaff, William; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Liu, Xianghong; Sawyer, Eric; Esposito, Teresa; Bazarov, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    High quantum yield, low transverse energy spread, and prompt response time make GaAs activated to negative electron affinity an ideal candidate for a photocathode in high brightness photoinjectors. Even after decades of investigation, the exact mechanism of electron emission from GaAs is not well understood. Here, photoemission from such photocathodes is modeled using detailed Monte Carlo electron transport simulations. Simulations show a quantitative agreement with the experimental results for quantum efficiency, energy distributions of emitted electrons, and response time without the assumption of any ad hoc parameters. This agreement between simulation and experiment sheds light on the mechanism of electron emission and provides an opportunity to design novel semiconductor photocathodes with optimized performance.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of transport in PbSe nanocrystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, I. Carter, S. A.; Zimanyi, G. T.

    2013-11-21

    A Monte Carlo hopping model was developed to simulate electron and hole transport in nanocrystalline PbSe films. Transport is carried out as a series of thermally activated hopping events between neighboring sites on a cubic lattice. Each site, representing an individual nanocrystal, is assigned a size-dependent electronic structure, and the effects of particle size, charging, interparticle coupling, and energetic disorder on electron and hole mobilities were investigated. Results of simulated field-effect measurements confirm that electron mobilities and conductivities at constant carrier densities increase with particle diameter by an order of magnitude up to 5 nm and begin to decrease above 6 nm. We find that as particle size increases, fewer hops are required to traverse the same distance and that site energy disorder significantly inhibits transport in films composed of smaller nanoparticles. The dip in mobilities and conductivities at larger particle sizes can be explained by a decrease in tunneling amplitudes and by charging penalties that are incurred more frequently when carriers are confined to fewer, larger nanoparticles. Using a nearly identical set of parameter values as the electron simulations, hole mobility simulations confirm measurements that increase monotonically with particle size over two orders of magnitude.

  17. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  18. Applications Of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulation Techniques For Predicting Single Event Effects In Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Kevin; Reed, Robert; Weller, Robert; Mendenhall, Marcus; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ronald

    2011-06-01

    MRED (Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition) is Vanderbilt University's Geant4 application for simulating radiation events in semiconductors. Geant4 is comprised of the best available computational physics models for the transport of radiation through matter. In addition to basic radiation transport physics contained in the Geant4 core, MRED has the capability to track energy loss in tetrahedral geometric objects, includes a cross section biasing and track weighting technique for variance reduction, and additional features relevant to semiconductor device applications. The crucial element of predicting Single Event Upset (SEU) parameters using radiation transport software is the creation of a dosimetry model that accurately approximates the net collected charge at transistor contacts as a function of deposited energy. The dosimetry technique described here is the multiple sensitive volume (MSV) model. It is shown to be a reasonable approximation of the charge collection process and its parameters can be calibrated to experimental measurements of SEU cross sections. The MSV model, within the framework of MRED, is examined for heavy ion and high-energy proton SEU measurements of a static random access memory.

  19. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  20. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU’s shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75–2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  1. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  2. Assessment of Parametric Uncertainty in Groundwater Reactive Transport Modeling Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Ye, M.; Curtis, G. P.; Lu, D.; Meyer, P. D.; Yabusaki, S.; Wu, J.

    2011-12-01

    Assessment of parametric uncertainty for groundwater reactive transport models is challenging, because the models are highly nonlinear with respect to their parameters due to nonlinear reaction equations and process coupling. The nonlinearity may yield parameter distributions that are non-Gaussian and have multiple modes. For such parameter distributions, the widely used nonlinear regression methods may not be able to accurately quantify predictive uncertainty. One solution to this problem is to use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Both the nonlinear regression and MCMC methods are used in this study for quantification of parametric uncertainty of a surface complexation model (SCM), developed to simulate hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] transport in column experiments. Firstly, a brute force Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with hundreds of thousands of model executions is conducted to understand the surface of objective function and predictive uncertainty of uranium concentration. Subsequently, the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method is applied to calibrate the model. It shows that, even with multiple initial guesses, the local optimization method has difficulty of finding the global optimum because of the rough surface of the objective function and local optima/minima due to model nonlinearity. Another problem of the nonlinear regression is the underestimation of predictive uncertainty, as both the linear and nonlinear confidence intervals are narrower than that obtained from the native MC simulation. Since the naïve MC simulation is computationally expensive, the above challenges for parameter estimation and predictive uncertainty analysis are addressed using a computationally efficient MCMC technique, the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis algorithm (DREAM) algorithm. The results obtained from running DREAM compared with those from brute force Monte Carlo simulations shown that MCMC not only successfully infers the multi-modals posterior probability

  3. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated Tiger Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Brian C.; Kensek, Ronald P.; Prinja, Anil K.

    2014-06-01

    Stochastic-media simulations require numerous boundary crossings. We consider two Monte Carlo electron transport approaches and evaluate accuracy with numerous material boundaries. In the condensed-history method, approximations are made based on infinite-medium solutions for multiple scattering over some track length. Typically, further approximations are employed for material-boundary crossings where infinite-medium solutions become invalid. We have previously explored an alternative "condensed transport" formulation, a Generalized Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck GBFP method, which requires no special boundary treatment but instead uses approximations to the electron-scattering cross sections. Some limited capabilities for analog transport and a GBFP method have been implemented in the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) codes. Improvements have been made to the condensed history algorithm. The performance of the ITS condensed-history and condensed-transport algorithms are assessed for material-boundary crossings. These assessments are made both by introducing artificial material boundaries and by comparison to analog Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  5. Oxygen transport properties estimation by classical trajectory-direct simulation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Coupling direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations with classical trajectory calculations is a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational dilute gas dynamics. The considerable increase in computational effort outlined in early applications of the method can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, Graphics Processing Unit acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time of classical trajectory (CT)-DSMC simulations. The aim of the present work is to study dilute molecular oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions, in the rigid rotor approximation, through an accurate Potential Energy Surface (PES), obtained by molecular beams scattering. The PES accuracy is assessed by calculating molecular oxygen transport properties by different equilibrium and non-equilibrium CT-DSMC based simulations that provide close values of the transport properties. Comparisons with available experimental data are presented and discussed in the temperature range 300-900 K, where vibrational degrees of freedom are expected to play a limited (but not always negligible) role.

  6. Oxygen transport properties estimation by classical trajectory–direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2015-05-15

    Coupling direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations with classical trajectory calculations is a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational dilute gas dynamics. The considerable increase in computational effort outlined in early applications of the method can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, Graphics Processing Unit acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time of classical trajectory (CT)-DSMC simulations. The aim of the present work is to study dilute molecular oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions, in the rigid rotor approximation, through an accurate Potential Energy Surface (PES), obtained by molecular beams scattering. The PES accuracy is assessed by calculating molecular oxygen transport properties by different equilibrium and non-equilibrium CT-DSMC based simulations that provide close values of the transport properties. Comparisons with available experimental data are presented and discussed in the temperature range 300–900 K, where vibrational degrees of freedom are expected to play a limited (but not always negligible) role.

  7. Full-dispersion Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport in micron-sized graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.; Maurer, L. N.; Aksamija, Z.

    2014-10-28

    We simulate phonon transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with real-space edges and experimentally relevant widths and lengths (from submicron to hundreds of microns). The full-dispersion phonon Monte Carlo simulation technique, which we describe in detail, involves a stochastic solution to the phonon Boltzmann transport equation with the relevant scattering mechanisms (edge, three-phonon, isotope, and grain boundary scattering) while accounting for the dispersion of all three acoustic phonon branches, calculated from the fourth-nearest-neighbor dynamical matrix. We accurately reproduce the results of several experimental measurements on pure and isotopically modified samples [S. Chen et al., ACS Nano 5, 321 (2011);S. Chen et al., Nature Mater. 11, 203 (2012); X. Xu et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3689 (2014)]. We capture the ballistic-to-diffusive crossover in wide GNRs: room-temperature thermal conductivity increases with increasing length up to roughly 100 μm, where it saturates at a value of 5800 W/m K. This finding indicates that most experiments are carried out in the quasiballistic rather than the diffusive regime, and we calculate the diffusive upper-limit thermal conductivities up to 600 K. Furthermore, we demonstrate that calculations with isotropic dispersions overestimate the GNR thermal conductivity. Zigzag GNRs have higher thermal conductivity than same-size armchair GNRs, in agreement with atomistic calculations.

  8. Parallel Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport Simulation on Exascale Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Paul Kollath

    Monte Carlo particle transport methods are being considered as a viable option for high-fidelity simulation of nuclear reactors. While Monte Carlo methods offer several potential advantages over deterministic methods, there are a number of algorithmic shortcomings that would prevent their immediate adoption for full-core analyses. In this thesis, algorithms are proposed both to ameliorate the degradation in parallel efficiency typically observed for large numbers of processors and to offer a means of decomposing large tally data that will be needed for reactor analysis. A nearest-neighbor fission bank algorithm was proposed and subsequently implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo code. A theoretical analysis of the communication pattern shows that the expected cost is O( N ) whereas traditional fission bank algorithms are O(N) at best. The algorithm was tested on two supercomputers, the Intrepid Blue Gene/P and the Titan Cray XK7, and demonstrated nearly linear parallel scaling up to 163,840 processor cores on a full-core benchmark problem. An algorithm for reducing network communication arising from tally reduction was analyzed and implemented in OpenMC. The proposed algorithm groups only particle histories on a single processor into batches for tally purposes---in doing so it prevents all network communication for tallies until the very end of the simulation. The algorithm was tested, again on a full-core benchmark, and shown to reduce network communication substantially. A model was developed to predict the impact of load imbalances on the performance of domain decomposed simulations. The analysis demonstrated that load imbalances in domain decomposed simulations arise from two distinct phenomena: non-uniform particle densities and non-uniform spatial leakage. The dominant performance penalty for domain decomposition was shown to come from these physical effects rather than insufficient network bandwidth or high latency. The model predictions were verified with

  9. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Kasen, Daniel; O'Connor, Evan; Fernández, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 1046 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 1048 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  10. Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron/Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-11-30

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. The Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects onemore » of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 95. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.« less

  11. Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron/Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes System.

    SciTech Connect

    VALDEZ, GREG D.

    2012-11-30

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. The Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 95. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  12. Near-relativistic electron events. Monte Carlo simulations of solar injection and interplanetary transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, N.

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo model to simulate the transport of solar near-relativistic (NR; 30-300 keV) electrons along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), including adiabatic focusing, pitch-angle dependent scattering, and solar wind effects. By taking into account the angular response of the LEFS60 telescope of the EPAM experiment on board the "Advanced Composition Explorer" spacecraft, we have been able to transform simulated pitch-angle distributions into sectored intensities measured by the telescope. We have developed an algorithm that allows us, for the first time, to infer the best-fit transport conditions and the underlying solar injection profile of NR electrons from the deconvolution of observational sectored intensities. We have studied seven NR electron events observed by the LEFS60 telescope between 1998 and 2004 with the aim of estimating the roles that solar flares and CME-driven shocks play in the acceleration and injection of NR electrons, as well as the conditions of the electron transport along the IMF. In this set of seven NR electron events, we have identified two types of injection episodes in the derived injection profiles: short (< 15 min) and time-extended (> 1 h). The injection profile of three events shows both components; an initial injection episode of short duration, followed by a second much longer lasting episode; two events only show a time-extended injection episode; while the others show an injection profile composed by several short injection episodes. By comparing the timing of the injection with the associated electromagnetic emissions at the Sun, we have concluded that short injection episodes are preferentially associated with the injection of flare-accelerated particles, while longer lasting episodes are provided by CME-driven shocks.

  13. Parallel Monte Carlo transport modeling in the context of a time-dependent, three-dimensional multi-physics code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    The fine-scale, multi-space resolution that is envisioned for accurate simulations of complex weapons systems in three spatial dimensions implies flop-rate and memory-storage requirements that will only be obtained in the near future through the use of parallel computational techniques. Since the Monte Carlo transport models in these simulations usually stress both of these computational resources, they are prime candidates for parallelization. The MONACO Monte Carlo transport package, which is currently under development at LLNL, will utilize two types of parallelism within the context of a multi-physics design code: decomposition of the spatial domain across processors (spatial parallelism) and distribution of particles in a given spatial subdomain across additional processors (particle parallelism). This implementation of the package will utilize explicit data communication between domains (message passing). Such a parallel implementation of a Monte Carlo transport model will result in non-deterministic communication patterns. The communication of particles between subdomains during a Monte Carlo time step may require a significant level of effort to achieve a high parallel efficiency.

  14. Gibberellin Concentration and Transport in Genetic Lines of Pea 1

    PubMed Central

    Proebsting, William M.; Hedden, Peter; Lewis, Mervyn J.; Croker, Stephen J.; Proebsting, Lena N.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of the Na and Le loci on gibberellin (GA) content and transport in pea (Pisum sativum L.) shoots were studied. GA1, GA8, GA17, GA19, GA20, GA29, GA44, GA8 catabolite, and GA29 catabolite were identified by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in extracts of expanding and fully expanded tissues of line C79-338 (Na Le). Quantification of GAs by gas chromatography-single-ion monitoring using deuterated internal standards in lines differing at the Na and Le alleles showed that na reduced the contents of GA19, GA20, and GA29 on average to <3% and of GA1 and GA8 to <30% of those in corresponding Na lines. In expanding tissues from Na le lines, GA1 and GA8 concentrations were reduced to approximately 10 and 2%, respectively, and GA29 content increased 2- to 3-fold compared with those in Na Le plants. There was a close correlation between stem length and the concentrations of GA1 or GA8 in shoot apices in all six genotypes investigated. In na/Na grafts, internode length and GA1 concentration of nana scions were normalized, the GA20 content increased slightly, but GA19 levels were unaffected. Movement of labeled GAs applied to leaves on Na rootstocks indicated that GA19 was transported poorly to apices of na scions compared with GA20 and GA1. Our evidence suggests that GA20 is the major transported GA in peas. Images Figure 2 PMID:16653128

  15. Parallel domain decomposition methods in fluid models with Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Alme, H.J.; Rodrigues, G.H.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-12-01

    To examine the domain decomposition code coupled Monte Carlo-finite element calculation, it is important to use a domain decomposition that is suitable for the individual models. We have developed a code that simulates a Monte Carlo calculation ( ) on a massively parallel processor. This code is used to examine the load balancing behavior of three domain decomposition ( ) for a Monte Carlo calculation. Results are presented.

  16. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  17. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in human skin with rigorous treatment of curved tissue boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Premru, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of light transport in heterogeneous biological structures using the Monte Carlo (MC) approach, space is commonly discretized into optically homogeneous voxels by a rectangular spatial grid. Any round or oblique boundaries between neighboring tissues thus become serrated, which raises legitimate concerns about the realism of modeling results with regard to reflection and refraction of light on such boundaries. We analyze the related effects by systematic comparison with an augmented 3-D MC code, in which analytically defined tissue boundaries are treated in a rigorous manner. At specific locations within our test geometries, energy deposition predicted by the two models can vary by 10%. Even highly relevant integral quantities, such as linear density of the energy absorbed by modeled blood vessels, differ by up to 30%. Most notably, the values predicted by the customary model vary strongly and quite erratically with the spatial discretization step and upon minor repositioning of the computational grid. Meanwhile, the augmented model shows no such unphysical behavior. Artifacts of the former approach do not converge toward zero with ever finer spatial discretization, confirming that it suffers from inherent deficiencies due to inaccurate treatment of reflection and refraction at round tissue boundaries.

  19. Code System for Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron and Photon Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Version 01 PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials and complex quadric geometries. A mixed procedure is used for the simulation of electron and positron interactions (elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and bremsstrahlung emission), in which ‘hard’ events (i.e. those with deflection angle and/or energy loss larger than pre-selected cutoffs) are simulated in a detailed way, while ‘soft’ interactions are calculated from multiple scattering approaches. Photon interactions (Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and electron-positron pair production) and positron annihilation are simulated in a detailed way. PENELOPE reads the required physical information about each material (which includes tables of physical properties, interaction cross sections, relaxation data, etc.) from the input material data file. The material data file is created by means of the auxiliary program MATERIAL, which extracts atomic interaction data from the database of ASCII files. PENELOPE mailing list archives and additional information about the code can be found at http://www.nea.fr/lists/penelope.html. See Abstract for additional features.

  20. Robust volume calculations for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) components in Monte Carlo transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, D. L.; Griesheimer, D. P.; Nease, B. R.; Snoeyink, J.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we consider a new generalized algorithm for the efficient calculation of component object volumes given their equivalent constructive solid geometry (CSG) definition. The new method relies on domain decomposition to recursively subdivide the original component into smaller pieces with volumes that can be computed analytically or stochastically, if needed. Unlike simpler brute-force approaches, the proposed decomposition scheme is guaranteed to be robust and accurate to within a user-defined tolerance. The new algorithm is also fully general and can handle any valid CSG component definition, without the need for additional input from the user. The new technique has been specifically optimized to calculate volumes of component definitions commonly found in models used for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for criticality safety and reactor analysis applications. However, the algorithm can be easily extended to any application which uses CSG representations for component objects. The paper provides a complete description of the novel volume calculation algorithm, along with a discussion of the conjectured error bounds on volumes calculated within the method. In addition, numerical results comparing the new algorithm with a standard stochastic volume calculation algorithm are presented for a series of problems spanning a range of representative component sizes and complexities. (authors)

  1. Code System for Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron and Photon Transport.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-07-01

    Version 01 PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials and complex quadric geometries. A mixed procedure is used for the simulation of electron and positron interactions (elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and bremsstrahlung emission), in which ‘hard’ events (i.e. those with deflection angle and/or energy loss larger than pre-selected cutoffs) are simulated in a detailed way, while ‘soft’ interactions are calculated from multiple scattering approaches. Photon interactions (Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering,more » photoelectric effect and electron-positron pair production) and positron annihilation are simulated in a detailed way. PENELOPE reads the required physical information about each material (which includes tables of physical properties, interaction cross sections, relaxation data, etc.) from the input material data file. The material data file is created by means of the auxiliary program MATERIAL, which extracts atomic interaction data from the database of ASCII files. PENELOPE mailing list archives and additional information about the code can be found at http://www.nea.fr/lists/penelope.html. See Abstract for additional features.« less

  2. Two-dimensional dynamical drainage-flow model with Monte Carlo transport and diffusion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.J.; Smith, F.G. III

    1982-09-01

    A simplified drainage flow model was developed from the equations of motion and the mass continuity equation in a terrain-following coordinate system. The equations were reduced to a two-dimensional system by vertically integrating over the drainage layer. A numerical solution for the drainage layer depth and wind field was obtained using a fourth order finite difference scheme. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate the transport and diffusion of tracer gases. Model simulations of drainage flow have been compared to observations from the 1980 Geysers area experiments. The Geysers area is mountainous, with steep slopes, some of which are steeper than 10/sup 0/. The model predictions of wind direction are good, but with speeds are not predicted as accurately. Simulation of perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were in good agreement with observed values. Maximum tracer concentration was predicted to within a factor of five. While predicted plume arrival was somewhat early, the model closely predicted the duration of the passage for plume concentrations greater than 0.5 ppt. The two-dimensional model was found to work equally well in simulating drainage flows over the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and surrounding terrain with slopes of around 1/sup 0/. The model correctly predicted that drainage winds at SRP are usually shallower than 60 m, which is the height at which meteorological towers measure the winds in the SRP production areas. The modest computational requirements of the model make it suitable for use in screening potential industrial sites.

  3. Improved Hybrid Monte Carlo/n-Moment Transport Equations Model for the Polar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Ji, J.; Schunk, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    In many space plasma problems (e.g. terrestrial polar wind, solar wind, etc.), the plasma gradually evolves from dense collision-dominated into rarified collisionless conditions. For decades, numerous attempts were made in order to address this type of problem using simulations based on one of two approaches. These approaches are: (1) the (fluid-like) Generalized Transport Equations, GTE, and (2) the particle-based Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. In contrast to the computationally intensive MC, the GTE approach can be considerably more efficient but its validity is questionable outside the collision-dominated region depending on the number of transport parameters considered. There have been several attempts to develop hybrid models that combine the strengths of both approaches. In particular, low-order GTE formulations were applied within the collision-dominated region, while an MC simulation was applied within the collisionless region and in the collisional-to-collisionless transition region. However, attention must be paid to assuring the consistency of the two approaches in the region where they are matched. Contrary to all previous studies, our model pays special attention to the ';matching' issue, and hence eliminates the discontinuities/inaccuracies associated with mismatching. As an example, we applied our technique to the Coulomb-Milne problem because of its relevance to the problem of space plasma flow from high- to low-density regions. We will compare the velocity distribution function and its moments (density, flow velocity, temperature, etc.) from the following models: (1) the pure MC model, (2) our hybrid model, and (3) previously published hybrid models. We will also consider a wide range of the test-to-background mass ratio.

  4. Transport line from the Linac to the SXLS ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.

    1991-05-01

    Design of a transport line with highly restrictive space and beam size requirements and with flexibility in the orientation of the injector is presented. An analytic method, based on symbolic algebra is used to find optimal regions of the design parameters. The fine tuning of the parameter were than performed with standard matrix program. Special interest was paid to the question of dispersion vector matching large angle bend with very small bending radius using non-iron bending magnets with very small gap area. 3 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Line-by-line transport calculations for Jupiter entry probes. [of radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Cooper, D. M.; Park, C.; Prakash, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    Line-by-line calculations of the radiative transport for a condition near peak heating for entry of the Galileo probe into the Jovian atmosphere are described. The discussion includes a thorough specification of the atomic and molecular input data used in the calculations that could be useful to others working in the field. The results show that the use of spectrally averaged cross sections for diatomic absorbers such as CO and C2 in the boundary layer can lead to an underestimation (by as much as 29%) of the spectral flux at the stagnation point. On the other hand, for the turbulent region near the cone frustum on the probe, the flow tends to be optically thin, and the spectrally averaged results commonly used in coupled radiative transport-flow field calculations are in good agreement with the present line-by-line results. It is recommended that these results be taken into account in sizing the final thickness of the Galileo's heat shield.

  6. Toward Accurate Reaction Energetics for Molecular Line Growth at Surface: Quantum Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y; Takeuchi, N

    2009-10-14

    We revisit the molecular line growth mechanism of styrene on the hydrogenated Si(001) 2x1 surface. In particular, we investigate the energetics of the radical chain reaction mechanism by means of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the exchange correlation (XC) functional we use the non-empirical generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and meta-GGA. We find that the QMC result also predicts the intra dimer-row growth of the molecular line over the inter dimer-row growth, supporting the conclusion based on DFT results. However, the absolute magnitudes of the adsorption and reaction energies, and the heights of the energy barriers differ considerably between the QMC and DFT with the GGA/meta-GGA XC functionals.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Model of Charge Transport in Hematite (α-Fe2O3)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2007-09-28

    The mobility of electrons injected into iron oxide minerals via abiotic and biotic electron-transfer processes is one of the key factors that control the reductive dissolution of such minerals. Building upon our previous work on the computational modeling of elementary electron transfer reactions in iron oxide minerals using ab initio electronic structure calculations and parameterized molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed and implemented a kinetic Monte Carlo model of charge transport in hematite that integrates previous findings. The model aims to simulate the interplay between electron transfer processes for extended periods of time in lattices of increasing complexity. The electron transfer reactions considered here involve the II/III valence interchange between nearest-neighbor iron atoms via a small polaron hopping mechanism. The temperature dependence and anisotropic behavior of the electrical conductivity as predicted by our model are in good agreement with experimental data on hematite single crystals. In addition, we characterize the effect of electron polaron concentration and that of a range of defects on the electron mobility. Interaction potentials between electron polarons and fixed defects (iron substitution by divalent, tetravalent, and isovalent ions and iron and oxygen vacancies) are determined from atomistic simulations, based on the same model used to derive the electron transfer parameters, and show little deviation from the Coulombic interaction energy. Integration of the interaction potentials in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations allows the electron polaron diffusion coefficient and density and residence time around defect sites to be determined as a function of polaron concentration in the presence of repulsive and attractive defects. The decrease in diffusion coefficient with polaron concentration follows a logarithmic function up to the highest concentration considered, i.e., ~2% of iron(III) sites, whereas the presence of

  8. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  9. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, D. A.; Ercolano, B.; Dale, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ionizing feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star-forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionization/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionization and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of a hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields on to Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionization calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionization structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimizations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.

  10. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  11. Qualitative Simulation of Photon Transport in Free Space Based on Monte Carlo Method and Its Parallel Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueli; Gao, Xinbo; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Ma, Bin; Wang, Lin; Peng, Kuan; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, Monte Carlo method has obtained wide applications in optical imaging to simulate photon transport process inside tissues. However, this method has not been effectively extended to the simulation of free-space photon transport at present. In this paper, a uniform framework for noncontact optical imaging is proposed based on Monte Carlo method, which consists of the simulation of photon transport both in tissues and in free space. Specifically, the simplification theory of lens system is utilized to model the camera lens equipped in the optical imaging system, and Monte Carlo method is employed to describe the energy transformation from the tissue surface to the CCD camera. Also, the focusing effect of camera lens is considered to establish the relationship of corresponding points between tissue surface and CCD camera. Furthermore, a parallel version of the framework is realized, making the simulation much more convenient and effective. The feasibility of the uniform framework and the effectiveness of the parallel version are demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom based on real experimental results. PMID:20689705

  12. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  13. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-04-21

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 × 3 × 10 mm³ crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of

  14. Update on the Status of the FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L.; Anderson, V.; Empl, A.; Lee, K.; Smirnov, G.; Zapp, N; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, K.; Roesler, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Battisoni, G.; Ceruti, F.; Gadioli, M. V.; Garzelli, M.; Muraro, S.; Rancati, T.; Sala, P.; Ballarini, R.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parini, V.; Scannicchio, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is a well-known simulation tool in High Energy Physics. FLUKA is a dynamic tool in the sense that it is being continually updated and improved by the authors. Here we review the progresses achieved in the last year on the physics models. From the point of view of hadronic physics, most of the effort is still in the field of nucleus--nucleus interactions. The currently available version of FLUKA already includes the internal capability to simulate inelastic nuclear interactions beginning with lab kinetic energies of 100 MeV/A up the the highest accessible energies by means of the DPMJET-II.5 event generator to handle the interactions for greater than 5 GeV/A and rQMD for energies below that. The new developments concern, at high energy, the embedding of the DPMJET-III generator, which represent a major change with respect to the DPMJET-II structure. This will also allow to achieve a better consistency between the nucleus-nucleus section with the original FLUKA model for hadron-nucleus collisions. Work is also in progress to implement a third event generator model based on the Master Boltzmann Equation approach, in order to extend the energy capability from 100 MeV/A down to the threshold for these reactions. In addition to these extended physics capabilities, structural changes to the programs input and scoring capabilities are continually being upgraded. In particular we want to mention the upgrades in the geometry packages, now capable of reaching higher levels of abstraction. Work is also proceeding to provide direct import into ROOT of the FLUKA output files for analysis and to deploy a user-friendly GUI input interface.

  15. Monte Carlo solution for uncertainty propagation in particle transport with a stochastic Galerkin method

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The stochastic Galerkin method (SGM) is an intrusive technique for propagating data uncertainty in physical models. The method reduces the random model to a system of coupled deterministic equations for the moments of stochastic spectral expansions of result quantities. We investigate solving these equations using the Monte Carlo technique. We compare the efficiency with brute-force Monte Carlo evaluation of uncertainty, the non-intrusive stochastic collocation method (SCM), and an intrusive Monte Carlo implementation of the stochastic collocation method. We also describe the stability limitations of our SGM implementation. (authors)

  16. Generation of discrete scattering cross sections and demonstration of Monte Carlo charged particle transport in the Milagro IMC code package

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. A.; Palmer, T. S.; Urbatsch, T. J.

    2013-07-01

    A new method for generating discrete scattering cross sections to be used in charged particle transport calculations is investigated. The method of data generation is presented and compared to current methods for obtaining discrete cross sections. The new, more generalized approach allows greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data generated with the new method is verified through a comparison with discrete data obtained with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code package, Milagro. The implementation of this capability is verified using test problems with analytic solutions as well as a comparison of electron dose-depth profiles calculated with Milagro and an already-established electron transport code. An initial investigation of a preliminary integration of the discrete cross section generation method with the new charged particle transport capability in Milagro is also presented. (authors)

  17. Lattice design and tolerance analysis of the CBA transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The beam transport line from the AGS to CBA is 600 m long and consists of 70 bending magnets and 20 quadrupoles, as well as several special injection components. The beam has to bend 117/sup 0/ horizontally and drop 1.8 m in elevation. To insure that it has momentum acceptance of ..delta..P/P = +-1% and the transverse emittance dilution is within 30%, a detailed tolerance analysis has been carried out on the requirements of the AGS beam properties, magnetic field quality of the transport magnets, and misalignment errors. Field quality tolerances of ..delta..B/sub 0//B less than or equal to 1 x 10/sup -3/ for bending field, ..delta.. G/G less than or equal to 5 x 10/sup -3/ for gradient field, and ..delta..B/sub 2//B less than or equal to 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ cm/sup -2/ of the sextupole components in the bending magnets are indicated.

  18. Impact of punctual flat magnetic shear on the field line transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abud, C. V.; Caldas, I. L.

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the magnetic field line transport for tokamak equilibria with monotonic magnetic shear perturbed by resonant fields. We show that when the local profile is flat at the plasma edge a transport barrier can be created leading to a field line transport reduction. This transport reduction is due to the field lines topological modifications, caused by a local flattened profile that reduces the global field lines escape pattern. The results are obtained by applying a symplectic map that describes perturbed magnetic field lines in large aspect ratio tokamaks.

  19. Adaptive {delta}f Monte Carlo Method for Simulation of RF-heating and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeoek, J.; Hellsten, T.

    2009-11-26

    Essential for modeling heating and transport of fusion plasma is determining the distribution function of the plasma species. Characteristic for RF-heating is creation of particle distributions with a high energy tail. In the high energy region the deviation from a Maxwellian distribution is large while in the low energy region the distribution is close to a Maxwellian due to the velocity dependency of the collision frequency. Because of geometry and orbit topology Monte Carlo methods are frequently used. To avoid simulating the thermal part, {delta}f methods are beneficial. Here we present a new {delta}f Monte Carlo method with an adaptive scheme for reducing the total variance and sources, suitable for calculating the distribution function for RF-heating.

  20. Multilevel Monte Carlo for two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Florian Jenny, Patrick Meyer, Daniel W.

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is a well known method for quantifying uncertainty arising for example in subsurface flow problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow convergence. Extending MC by means of multigrid techniques yields the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method. MLMC has proven to greatly accelerate MC for several applications including stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance, elliptic stochastic partial differential equations and also hyperbolic problems. In this study, MLMC is combined with a streamline-based solver to assess uncertain two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. The influence of the variance and the correlation length of the logarithmic permeability on the MLMC performance is studied.

  1. Update On the Status of the FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Lorenzo-Sentis, M.; Roesler, S.; Smirnov, G.; Sommerer, F.; Theis, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Carboni, M.; Mostacci, A.; Pelliccioni, M.

    2006-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is a well-known simulation tool in High Energy Physics. FLUKA is a dynamic tool in the sense that it is being continually updated and improved by the authors. We review the progress achieved since the last CHEP Conference on the physics models, some technical improvements to the code and some recent applications. From the point of view of the physics, improvements have been made with the extension of PEANUT to higher energies for p, n, pi, pbar/nbar and for nbars down to the lowest energies, the addition of the online capability to evolve radioactive products and get subsequent dose rates, upgrading of the treatment of EM interactions with the elimination of the need to separately prepare preprocessed files. A new coherent photon scattering model, an updated treatment of the photo-electric effect, an improved pair production model, new photon cross sections from the LLNL Cullen database have been implemented. In the field of nucleus-- nucleus interactions the electromagnetic dissociation of heavy ions has been added along with the extension of the interaction models for some nuclide pairs to energies below 100 MeV/A using the BME approach, as well as the development of an improved QMD model for intermediate energies. Both DPMJET 2.53 and 3 remain available along with rQMD 2.4 for heavy ion interactions above 100 MeV/A. Technical improvements include the ability to use parentheses in setting up the combinatorial geometry, the introduction of pre-processor directives in the input stream. a new random number generator with full 64 bit randomness, new routines for mathematical special functions (adapted from SLATEC). Finally, work is progressing on the deployment of a user-friendly GUI input interface as well as a CAD-like geometry creation and visualization tool. On the application front, FLUKA has been used to extensively evaluate the potential space radiation effects on astronauts for future deep space missions, the activation

  2. Coupling between the Liouville equation and a classical Monte Carlo solver for the simulation of electron transport in resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, F.; García-García, J.; Oriols, X.; Suñé, J.

    1999-02-01

    A coupling model between a classical Monte Carlo simulator and a Liouville equation solver has been proposed with application to the simulation of vertical transport quantum devices in which extensive regions of the simulation domain behave classically. These devices can be partitioned in regions in which either a classical (Monte Carlo) or a quantum (Wigner formalism) treatment of carrier transport is required making a coupling scheme between adjacent regions necessary. According to this aim, the boundary conditions inferred from the Monte Carlo solver for the integration of the Liouville equation in the quantum regions, as well as the injecting scheme to the Monte Carlo regions provided by the Wigner distribution function at the boundaries have been earlier established. The results of this work, using a resonant tunneling diode as a reference device, show that the proposed technique is promising for the simulation of electron transport in quantum devices.

  3. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle

  4. MGGPOD: a Monte Carlo Suite for Modeling Instrumental Line and Continuum Backgrounds in Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenspointner, G.; Harris, M. J.; Sturner, S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Ferguson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Intense and complex instrumental backgrounds, against which the much smaller signals from celestial sources have to be discerned, are a notorious problem for low and intermediate energy gamma-ray astronomy (approximately 50 keV - 10 MeV). Therefore a detailed qualitative and quantitative understanding of instrumental line and continuum backgrounds is crucial for most stages of gamma-ray astronomy missions, ranging from the design and development of new instrumentation through performance prediction to data reduction. We have developed MGGPOD, a user-friendly suite of Monte Carlo codes built around the widely used GEANT (Version 3.21) package, to simulate ab initio the physical processes relevant for the production of instrumental backgrounds. These include the build-up and delayed decay of radioactive isotopes as well as the prompt de-excitation of excited nuclei, both of which give rise to a plethora of instrumental gamma-ray background lines in addition t o continuum backgrounds. The MGGPOD package and documentation are publicly available for download. We demonstrate the capabilities of the MGGPOD suite by modeling high resolution gamma-ray spectra recorded by the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) on board Wind during 1995. The TGRS is a Ge spectrometer operating in the 40 keV to 8 MeV range. Due to its fine energy resolution, these spectra reveal the complex instrumental background in formidable detail, particularly the many prompt and delayed gamma-ray lines. We evaluate the successes and failures of the MGGPOD package in reproducing TGRS data, and provide identifications for the numerous instrumental lines.

  5. PIPELINES, TRANSMISSION LINES, AND MISCELLANEOUS TRANSPORTATION FEATURES DIGITAL LINE GRAPHS FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA) STUDY AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a geographic information system (GIS) coverage of pipelines, transmission lines, and miscellaneous transportation features for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) Project region. The coverage was p...

  6. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  7. On the forward-backward-in-time approach for Monte Carlo solution of Parker's transport equation: One-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobik, P.; Boschini, M. J.; Della Torre, S.; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; La Vacca, G.; Pensotti, S.; Putis, M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M.; Zannoni, M.

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic rays propagation inside the heliosphere is well described by a transport equation introduced by Parker in 1965. To solve this equation, several approaches were followed in the past. Recently, a Monte Carlo approach became widely used in force of its advantages with respect to other numerical methods. In this approach the transport equation is associated to a fully equivalent set of stochastic differential equations (SDE). This set is used to describe the stochastic path of quasi-particle from a source, e.g., the interstellar space, to a specific target, e.g., a detector at Earth. We present a comparison of forward-in-time and backward-in-time methods to solve the cosmic rays transport equation in the heliosphere. The Parker equation and the related set of SDE in the several formulations are treated in this paper. For the sake of clarity, this work is focused on the one-dimensional solutions. Results were compared with an alternative numerical solution, namely, Crank-Nicolson method, specifically developed for the case under study. The methods presented are fully consistent each others for energy greater than 400 MeV. The comparison between stochastic integrations and Crank-Nicolson allows us to estimate the systematic uncertainties of Monte Carlo methods. The forward-in-time stochastic integrations method showed a systematic uncertainty <5%, while backward-in-time stochastic integrations method showed a systematic uncertainty <1% in the studied energy range.

  8. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running.

  9. Spectra of polarized thermal radiation in a cloudy atmosphere: Line-by-Line and Monte Carlo model for passive remote sensing of cirrus and polar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Boris; Falaleeva, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    A polarized high-resolution 1-D model has been presented for TIR (Thermal Infrared) remote sensing application. It is based on the original versions of MC (Monte Carlo) and LbL (Line-by-Line) algorithms, which have shown their effectiveness when modelling the thermal radiation atmospheric transfer, taking into account, the semi-transparent Ci-type and polar clouds scattering, as well as the direct consideration of the spectra of molecular absorption. This model may be useful in the planning of satellite experiments and in the validation of similar models, which use the "k-distribution" or other approximations, to account for gaseous absorption. The example simulations demonstrate that, the selective gas absorption does not only significantly affect the absorption and emission of radiation, but also, its polarization in the Ci-type clouds. As a result, the spectra of polarized radiation contain important information about the clouds, and a high-resolution polarized limb sounding in the TIR, seems to be a useful tool in obtaining information on cloud types and their vertical structures.

  10. Verification of Three Dimensional Triangular Prismatic Discrete Ordinates Transport Code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by Comparison with Monte Carlo Code GMVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Yuto; Moriwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Shigeo; Ikeda, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with verification of three dimensional triangular prismatic discrete ordinates transport calculation code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by comparison with multi-group Monte Carlo calculation code GMVP in a large fast breeder reactor. The reactor is a 750 MWe electric power sodium cooled reactor. Nuclear characteristics are calculated at beginning of cycle of an initial core and at beginning and end of cycle of equilibrium core. According to the calculations, the differences between the two methodologies are smaller than 0.0002 Δk in the multi-plication factor, relatively about 1% in the control rod reactivity, and 1% in the sodium void reactivity.

  11. Use of single scatter electron monte carlo transport for medical radiation sciences

    DOEpatents

    Svatos, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The single scatter Monte Carlo code CREEP models precise microscopic interactions of electrons with matter to enhance physical understanding of radiation sciences. It is designed to simulate electrons in any medium, including materials important for biological studies. It simulates each interaction individually by sampling from a library which contains accurate information over a broad range of energies.

  12. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  13. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; Jansen, A P J

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature. PMID:23406093

  14. Development of a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Sempau, Josep; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate method for absorbed dose calculations in radiotherapy. Its efficiency still requires improvement for routine clinical applications, especially for online adaptive radiotherapy. In this paper, we report our recent development on a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport. We have implemented the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo dose calculation package (Sempau et al 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 2263-91) on the GPU architecture under the CUDA platform. The implementation has been tested with respect to the original sequential DPM code on the CPU in phantoms with water-lung-water or water-bone-water slab geometry. A 20 MeV mono-energetic electron point source or a 6 MV photon point source is used in our validation. The results demonstrate adequate accuracy of our GPU implementation for both electron and photon beams in the radiotherapy energy range. Speed-up factors of about 5.0-6.6 times have been observed, using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. PMID:20463376

  15. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  16. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  17. Geant4 simulations of proton beam transport through a carbon or beryllium degrader and following a beam line.

    PubMed

    van Goethem, M J; van der Meer, R; Reist, H W; Schippers, J M

    2009-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit were performed for the carbon wedge degrader used in the beam line at the Center of Proton Therapy of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The simulations are part of the beam line studies for the development and understanding of the GANTRY2 and OPTIS2 treatment facilities at PSI, but can also be applied to other beam lines. The simulated stopping power, momentum distributions at the degrader exit and beam line transmission have been compared to accurate benchmark measurements. Because the beam transport through magnetic elements is not easily modeled using Geant4a connection to the TURTLE beam line simulation program was made. After adjusting the mean ionization potential of the carbon degrader material from 78 eV to 95 eV, we found an accurate match between simulations and benchmark measurements, so that the simulation model could be validated. We found that the degrader does not completely erase the initial beam phase space even at low degraded beam energies. Using the validation results, we present a study of the usability of beryllium as a degrader material (mean ionization potential 63.7 eV). We found an improvement in the transmission of 30-45%, depending on the degraded beam energy, the higher value for the lower energies. PMID:19741273

  18. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Carole K; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-02-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  19. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Carole K.; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  20. Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low-energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattersall, W. J.; Cocks, D. G.; Boyle, G. J.; Buckman, S. J.; White, R. D.

    2015-04-01

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly nonequilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 381 (2002), 10.1016/S0009-2614(02)01177-6], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and we develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multiterm Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

  1. A bone composition model for Monte Carlo x-ray transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-03-15

    In the megavoltage energy range although the mass attenuation coefficients of different bones do not vary by more than 10%, it has been estimated that a simple tissue model containing a single-bone composition could cause errors of up to 10% in the calculated dose distribution. In the kilovoltage energy range, the variation in mass attenuation coefficients of the bones is several times greater, and the expected error from applying this type of model could be as high as several hundred percent. Based on the observation that the calcium and phosphorus compositions of bones are strongly correlated with the bone density, the authors propose an analytical formulation of bone composition for Monte Carlo computations. Elemental compositions and densities of homogeneous adult human bones from the literature were used as references, from which the calcium and phosphorus compositions were fitted as polynomial functions of bone density and assigned to model bones together with the averaged compositions of other elements. To test this model using the Monte Carlo package DOSXYZnrc, a series of discrete model bones was generated from this formula and the radiation-tissue interaction cross-section data were calculated. The total energy released per unit mass of primary photons (terma) and Monte Carlo calculations performed using this model and the single-bone model were compared, which demonstrated that at kilovoltage energies the discrepancy could be more than 100% in bony dose and 30% in soft tissue dose. Percentage terma computed with the model agrees with that calculated on the published compositions to within 2.2% for kV spectra and 1.5% for MV spectra studied. This new bone model for Monte Carlo dose calculation may be of particular importance for dosimetry of kilovoltage radiation beams as well as for dosimetry of pediatric or animal subjects whose bone composition may differ substantially from that of adult human bones.

  2. Optimizing light transport in scintillation crystals for time-of-flight PET: an experimental and optical Monte Carlo simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving excellent timing resolution in gamma ray detectors is crucial in several applications such as medical imaging with time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). Although many factors impact the overall system timing resolution, the statistical nature of scintillation light, including photon production and transport in the crystal to the photodetector, is typically the limiting factor for modern scintillation detectors. In this study, we investigated the impact of surface treatment, in particular, roughening select areas of otherwise polished crystals, on light transport and timing resolution. A custom Monte Carlo photon tracking tool was used to gain insight into changes in light collection and timing resolution that were observed experimentally: select roughening configurations increased the light collection up to 25% and improved timing resolution by 15% compared to crystals with all polished surfaces. Simulations showed that partial surface roughening caused a greater number of photons to be reflected towards the photodetector and increased the initial rate of photoelectron production. This study provides a simple method to improve timing resolution and light collection in scintillator-based gamma ray detectors, a topic of high importance in the field of TOF-PET. Additionally, we demonstrated utility of our Monte Carlo simulation tool to accurately predict the effect of altering crystal surfaces on light collection and timing resolution. PMID:26114040

  3. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  4. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  5. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M; Jordan, Meredith J T; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves. PMID:26233114

  6. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  7. Monte-Carlo-based multiple-scattering channel modeling for non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Robert J.; Moore, Terrence J.; Sadler, Brian M.

    2011-06-01

    Although the concept of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) communications has been studied for decades, recent advances in the design and manufacturing of light-emitting diodes, filters, and sensors have ignited new interest. In this paper, we discuss a Monte Carlo channel model for NLOS UV communications that accounts for the possibility that a transmitted photon experiences multiple scattering events before being received. By simulating the propagation of many photons based on probabilistic rules derived from physics considerations, a computationally efficient algorithm is obtained that allows for the study of the contribution of various orders of scattering to the received signal and to the system impulse response function. We then demonstrate the use of this channel model in the exploration of several system configurations. In particular, we examine the effect of the transmitter beam shape and receiver sensitivity function on the faithfulness of a well-known linear model of path loss versus distance for short-range NLOS UV systems, and we explore geometry design for interference reduction in a full-duplex link. The use of the model to study such diverse system implementations demonstrates its general applicability.

  8. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  9. Consistent treatment of transport properties for five-species air direct simulation Monte Carlo/Navier-Stokes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, K. A.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for achieving consistency in the transport properties between direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes (CFD) solvers is presented for five-species air. Coefficients of species diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivities are considered. The transport coefficients that are modeled in CFD solvers are often obtained by expressions involving sets of collision integrals, which are obtained from more realistic intermolecular potentials (i.e., ab initio calculations). In this work, the self-consistent effective binary diffusion and Gupta et al.-Yos tranport models are considered. The DSMC transport coefficients are approximated from Chapman-Enskog theory in which the collision integrals are computed using either the variable hard sphere (VHS) and variable soft sphere (VSS) (phenomenological) collision cross section models. The VHS and VSS parameters are then used to adjust the DSMC transport coefficients in order to achieve a best-fit to the coefficients computed from more realistic intermolecular potentials over a range of temperatures. The best-fit collision model parameters are determined for both collision-averaged and collision-specific pairing approaches using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. A consistent treatment of the diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivities is presented, and recommended sets of best-fit VHS and VSS collision model parameters are provided for a five-species air mixture.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation studies of spin transport in graphene armchair nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimath, Akshay Kumar; Ghosh, Bahniman

    2014-10-01

    The research in the area of spintronics is gaining momentum due to the promise spintronics based devices have shown. Since spin degree of freedom of an electron is used to store and process information, spintronics can provide numerous advantages over conventional electronics by providing new functionalities. In this article, we study spin relaxation in graphene nanoribbons (GNR) of armchair type by employing semiclassical Monte Carlo approach. D'yakonov-Perel' relaxation due to structural inversion asymmetry (Rashba spin-orbit coupling) and Elliott-Yafet (EY) relaxation cause spin dephasing in armchair graphene nanoribbons. We investigate spin relaxation in α-,β- and γ-armchair GNR with varying width and temperature.

  11. Monte Carlo Code System for High-Energy Radiation Transport Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-02-16

    Version 00 HERMES-KFA consists of a set of Monte Carlo Codes used to simulate particle radiation and interaction with matter. The main codes are HETC, MORSE, and EGS. They are supported by a common geometry package, common random routines, a command interpreter, and auxiliary codes like NDEM that is used to generate a gamma-ray source from nuclear de-excitation after spallation processes. The codes have been modified so that any particle history falling outside the domainmore » of the physical theory of one program can be submitted to another program in the suite to complete the work. Also response data can be submitted by each program, to be collected and combined by a statistic package included within the command interpreter.« less

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of vapor transport in physical vapor deposition of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Boyd, Iain D.; Braun, David G.

    2000-05-01

    In this work, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to model the physical vapor deposition of titanium using electron-beam evaporation. Titanium atoms are vaporized from a molten pool at a very high temperature and are accelerated collisionally to the deposition surface. The electronic excitation of the vapor is significant at the temperatures of interest. Energy transfer between the electronic and translational modes of energy affects the flow significantly. The electronic energy is modeled in the DSMC method and comparisons are made between simulations in which electronic energy is excluded from and included among the energy modes of particles. The experimentally measured deposition profile is also compared to the results of the simulations. It is concluded that electronic energy is an important factor to consider in the modeling of flows of this nature. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental data. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  13. Enhancements to the Combinatorial Geometry Particle Tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo Transport Code: Embedded Meshes and Domain Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Greenman, G M; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Two enhancements to the combinatorial geometry (CG) particle tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo transport code are presented. The first enhancement is a hybrid particle tracker wherein a mesh region is embedded within a CG region. This method permits efficient calculations of problems with contain both large-scale heterogeneous and homogeneous regions. The second enhancement relates to the addition of parallelism within the CG tracker via spatial domain decomposition. This permits calculations of problems with a large degree of geometric complexity, which are not possible through particle parallelism alone. In this method, the cells are decomposed across processors and a particles is communicated to an adjacent processor when it tracks to an interprocessor boundary. Applications that demonstrate the efficacy of these new methods are presented.

  14. Simulation of the full-core pin-model by JMCT Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Shu, L.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Since the large numbers of cells over a million, the tallies over a hundred million and the particle histories over ten billion, the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model has become a real challenge for the computers and the computational methods. On the other hand, the basic memory of the model has exceeded the limit of a single CPU, so the spatial domain and data decomposition must be considered. JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport code) has successful fulfilled the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model by the domain decomposition and the nested parallel computation. The k{sub eff} and flux of each cell are obtained. (authors)

  15. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  16. Effects of Escherichia coli Challenge and Transport Stress on Hematology and Serum Chemistry Values of Three Genetic Lines of Turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Males and females from 3 genetic lines of turkeys were compared for their response to an Escherichia coli airsac challenge followed by transport stress (Transport). The turkey lines were a slow growing line selected for increased egg production (Egg line), a fast growing line selected for increased...

  17. Modeling of an industrial environment: external dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Eged, Katalin; Voigt, Gabriele; Meckbach, Reinhard; Müller, Heinz

    2004-02-01

    External gamma exposures from radionuclides deposited on surfaces usually result in the major contribution to the total dose to the public living in urban-industrial environments. The aim of the paper is to give an example for a calculation of the collective and averted collective dose due to the contamination and decontamination of deposition surfaces in a complex environment based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The shielding effects of the structures in complex and realistic industrial environments (where productive and/or commercial activity is carried out) were computed by the use of Monte Carlo method. Several types of deposition areas (walls, roofs, windows, streets, lawn) were considered. Moreover, this paper gives a summary about the time dependence of the source strengths relative to a reference surface and a short overview about the mechanical and chemical intervention techniques which can be applied in this area. An exposure scenario was designed based on a survey of average German and Hungarian supermarkets. In the first part of the paper the air kermas per photon per unit area due to each specific deposition area contaminated by 137Cs were determined at several arbitrary locations in the whole environment relative to a reference value of 8.39 x 10(-4) pGy per gamma m(-2). The calculations provide the possibility to assess the whole contribution of a specific deposition area to the collective dose, separately. According to the current results, the roof and the paved area contribute the most part (approximately 92%) to the total dose in the first year taking into account the relative contamination of the deposition areas. When integrating over 10 or 50 y, these two surfaces remain the most important contributors as well but the ratio will increasingly be shifted in favor of the roof. The decontamination of the roof and the paved area results in about 80-90% of the total averted collective dose in each calculated time period (1, 10, 50 y

  18. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  19. On the use of Monte Carlo simulations to model transport of positrons in gases and liquids.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marjanović, Srdjan; Dujko, Saša; Banković, Ana; Malović, Gordana; Buckman, Stephen; Garcia, Gustavo; White, Ron; Brunger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we make a parallel between the swarm method in physics of ionized gases and modeling of positrons in radiation therapy and diagnostics. The basic idea is to take advantage of the experience gained in the past with electron swarms and to use it in establishing procedures of modeling positron diagnostics and therapy based on the well-established experimental binary collision data. In doing so we discuss the application of Monte Carlo technique for positrons in the same manner as used previously for electron swarms, we discuss the role of complete cross section sets (complete in terms of number, momentum and energy balance and tested against measured swarm parameters), we discuss the role of benchmarks and how to choose benchmarks for electrons that may perhaps be a subject to experimental verification. Finally we show some samples of positron trajectories together with secondary electrons that were established solely on the basis of accurate binary cross sections and also how those may be used in modeling of both gas filled traps and living organisms. PMID:23466009

  20. Voxel2MCNP: software for handling voxel models for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Hegenbart, Lars; Pölz, Stefan; Benzler, Andreas; Urban, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    Voxel2MCNP is a program that sets up radiation protection scenarios with voxel models and generates corresponding input files for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Its technology is based on object-oriented programming, and the development is platform-independent. It has a user-friendly graphical interface including a two- and three-dimensional viewer. A row of equipment models is implemented in the program. Various voxel model file formats are supported. Applications include calculation of counting efficiency of in vivo measurement scenarios and calculation of dose coefficients for internal and external radiation scenarios. Moreover, anthropometric parameters of voxel models, for instance chest wall thickness, can be determined. Voxel2MCNP offers several methods for voxel model manipulations including image registration techniques. The authors demonstrate the validity of the program results and provide references for previous successful implementations. The authors illustrate the reliability of calculated dose conversion factors and specific absorbed fractions. Voxel2MCNP is used on a regular basis to generate virtual radiation protection scenarios at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology while further improvements and developments are ongoing. PMID:22217596

  1. Bacterial swimming and oxygen transport near contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuval, Idan; Cisneros, Luis; Dombrowski, Christopher; Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Kessler, John O.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2005-02-01

    Aerobic bacteria often live in thin fluid layers near solid-air-water contact lines, in which the biology of chemotaxis, metabolism, and cell-cell signaling is intimately connected to the physics of buoyancy, diffusion, and mixing. Using the geometry of a sessile drop, we demonstrate in suspensions of Bacillus subtilis the self-organized generation of a persistent hydrodynamic vortex that traps cells near the contact line. Arising from upward oxygentaxis and downward gravitational forcing, these dynamics are related to the Boycott effect in sedimentation and are explained quantitatively by a mathematical model consisting of oxygen diffusion and consumption, chemotaxis, and viscous fluid dynamics. The vortex is shown to advectively enhance uptake of oxygen into the suspension, and the wedge geometry leads to a singularity in the chemotactic dynamics near the contact line. bioconvection | chemotaxis | singularity | Bacillus subtilis

  2. Resolving magnetic field line stochasticity and parallel thermal transport in MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1998-12-31

    Heat transport along braided, or chaotic magnetic field lines is a key to understand the disruptive phase of tokamak operations, both the major disruption and the internal disruption (sawtooth oscillation). Recent sawtooth experimental results in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have inferred that magnetic field line stochasticity in the vicinity of the q = 1 inversion radius plays an important role in rapid changes in the magnetic field structures and resultant thermal transport. In this study, the characteristic Lyapunov exponents and spatial correlation of field line behaviors are calculated to extract the characteristic scale length of the microscopic magnetic field structure (which is important for net radial global transport). These statistical values are used to model the effect of finite thermal transport along magnetic field lines in a physically consistent manner.

  3. Characteristics of taurine transport in cultured renal epithelial cell lines: asymmetric polarity of proximal and distal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jones, D P; Miller, L A; Budreau, A; Chesney, R W

    1992-01-01

    Taurine transport was determined in two continuous, renal epithelial cell lines: LLC-PK1 derived from the proximal tubule of the pig, and the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell (MDCK) from the distal tubule of the dog. In LLC-PK1, taurine transport is maximal at the apical surface, whereas in MDCK cells, transport is greatest at the basolateral surface. Transport is highly dependent on both sodium and chloride in the external medium, and is specific for beta-amino acids. The apical and basolateral surfaces of both cell lines show an adaptive response to extracellular taurine concentration, but only the basolateral surface of the MDCK cell responds to hyperosomolality by increased taurine accumulation. Thus, differential control of the beta-amino acid transport system by substrate and external tonicity exists. The role of the beta-amino acid transport system may differ according to the origin of the cell: in the proximal renal tubular cell, net transepithelial reabsorption of filtered taurine increases the body pool. By contrast, taurine accumulation by distal tubular cells may form a mechanism of cell volume regulation in response to osmotic stress. PMID:1509959

  4. High-resolution monte carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 1. Methodology and flow results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the first of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, Various aspects of the modelling effort are examined. In particular, the need to save on core memory causes one to use only specific realizations that have certain initial characteristics; in effect, these transport simulations are conditioned by these characteristics. Also, the need to independently estimate length Scales for the generated fields is discussed. The statistical uniformity of the flow field is investigated by plotting the variance of the seepage velocity for vector components in the x, y, and z directions. Finally, specific features of the velocity field itself are illuminated in this first paper. In particular, these data give one the opportunity to investigate the effective hydraulic conductivity in a flow field which is approximately statistically uniform; comparisons are made with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. The mean cloud velocity is examined to ascertain whether it is identical to the mean seepage velocity of the model. Finally, the variance in the cloud centroid velocity is examined for the effect of source size and differing strengths of local transverse dispersion.

  5. Improving Electron Transport Simulation in Mesoscopic Systems by Coupling a Classical Monte Carlo Algorithm to a Wigner Function Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Oriols, X.; Suñé, J.

    Because of its high switching speed, low power consumption and reduced complexity to implement a given function, resonant tunneling diodes (RTD's) have been recently recognized as excellent candidates for digital circuit applications [1]. Device modeling and simulation is thus important, not only to understand mesoscopic transport properties, but also to provide guidance in optimal device design and fabrication. Several approaches have been used to this end. Among kinetic models, those based on the non-equilibrium Green function formalism [2] have gained increasing interest due to their ability to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions in a unified formulation. The Wigner distribution function approach has been also extensively used to study quantum transport in RTD's [3-6]. The main limitations of this formulation are the semiclassical treatment of carrier-phonon interactions by means of the relaxation time approximation and the huge computational burden associated to the self-consistent solution of Liouville and Poisson equations. This has imposed severe limitations on spatial domains, these being too small to succeed in the development of reliable simulation tools. Based on the Wigner function approach, we have developed a simulation tool that allows to extend the simulation domains up to hundreds of nanometers without a significant increase in computer time [7]. This tool is based on the coupling between the Wigner distribution function (quantum Liouville equation) and the Boltzmann transport equation. The former is applied to the active region of the device including the double barrier, where quantum effects are present (quantum window, QW). The latter is solved by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm and applied to the outer regions of the device, where quantum effects are not expected to occur. Since the classical Monte Carlo algorithm is much less time consuming than the discretized version of the Wigner transport equation, we can considerably

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of Quantum Transport in Semiconductors Using Wigner Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, A.; García-García, J.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.; Jacoboni, C.

    Charge transport in mesoscopic semiconductor systems must be analyzed in terms of a quantum theory since nowadays typical dimensions of the physical structures are comparable with the electron coherence length. Theoretical approaches based on fully quantum mechanical grounds have been developed in the last decade with the purpose of analyzing the quantum electron-phonon interaction in electron transport. The Wigner function (WF) formalism is particularly suitable for the analysis of mesoscopic structures owing to its phase-space formulation that allows a natural treatment of space dependent problems with given boundary conditions. The Hamiltonian describing the system is [1] {H}=-frac{hbar^2}{2m}nabla^2 +sum_qb... ...iqr} ) +V(r) +eE\\cdot r

  7. Application of discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods to transport of photons from environmental sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ryman, J.C.; Eckerman, K.F.; Shultis, J.K.; Faw, R.E.; Dillman, L.T.

    1996-04-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. Although the dose coefficients of this report are based on previously developed dosimetric methodologies, they are derived from new, detailed calculations of energy and angular distributions of the radiations incident on the body and the transport of these radiations within the body. Effort was devoted to expanding the information available for assessment of radiation dose from radionuclides distributed on or below the surface of the ground. A companion paper (External Exposure to Radionuclides in Air, Water, and Soil) discusses the significance of the new tabulations of coefficients and provides detiled comparisons to previously published values. This paper discusses details of the photon transport calculations.

  8. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-11-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  9. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  10. A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATION TRANSPORT AROUND KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  11. Transport map-accelerated Markov chain Monte Carlo for Bayesian parameter inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, Y.; Parno, M.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a new framework for efficient posterior sampling in Bayesian inference, using a combination of optimal transport maps and the Metropolis-Hastings rule. The core idea is to use transport maps to transform typical Metropolis proposal mechanisms (e.g., random walks, Langevin methods, Hessian-preconditioned Langevin methods) into non-Gaussian proposal distributions that can more effectively explore the target density. Our approach adaptively constructs a lower triangular transport map—i.e., a Knothe-Rosenblatt re-arrangement—using information from previous MCMC states, via the solution of an optimization problem. Crucially, this optimization problem is convex regardless of the form of the target distribution. It is solved efficiently using Newton or quasi-Newton methods, but the formulation is such that these methods require no derivative information from the target probability distribution; the target distribution is instead represented via samples. Sequential updates using the alternating direction method of multipliers enable efficient and parallelizable adaptation of the map even for large numbers of samples. We show that this approach uses inexact or truncated maps to produce an adaptive MCMC algorithm that is ergodic for the exact target distribution. Numerical demonstrations on a range of parameter inference problems involving both ordinary and partial differential equations show multiple order-of-magnitude speedups over standard MCMC techniques, measured by the number of effectively independent samples produced per model evaluation and per unit of wallclock time.

  12. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    SciTech Connect

    PADOVANI, ENRICO

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, was developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.

  13. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, wasmore » developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.« less

  14. An automated system for measuring the mass flowrate of powders in transport lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Howard; Morgan, Morris B., III; Prapas, Demetrios K.; Rubel, Glen O.

    1990-08-01

    A new automated particle transport (APT) system has been developed for studying the dissemination of bulk powders into deagglomerated aerosols. It consists of a 1.12-inch ID transport line with a spout-fluidized bed feeder. The particles are transported from an aerated annulus into the transport line and collected in a closed can or bag filter. Two separate feed lines supply the air necessary to operate the transport line and aerate the particles in order that they flow smoothly into the transport line. An IBM PC AT computer clone equipped with a data translation DT 2806 multifunction input-output board and A to D and D to A modules (DTX 311 and 328) is used for both control and data acquisition. A fluid mechanical model of the flow has been developed and the APT system will be used to verify it. Experiments will be conducted to measure the choking velocity, drag coefficient, fluid and particle flowrates, and pressure distribution in the line.

  15. A transported probability density function/photon Monte Carlo method for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion with spectral gas and wall radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. Y.; Haworth, D. C.; Ren, T.; Modest, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion is developed and exercised. The model features detailed gas-phase chemistry and radiation treatments (a photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution for gas and wall radiation - PMC/LBL) and a transported probability density function (PDF) method to account for turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. The model is first validated for a 0.8 MW oxy-natural gas furnace, and the level of agreement between model and experiment is found to be at least as good as any that has been published earlier. Next, simulations are performed with systematic model variations to provide insight into the roles of individual physical processes and their interplay in high-temperature oxy-fuel combustion. This includes variations in the chemical mechanism and the radiation model, and comparisons of results obtained with versus without the PDF method to isolate and quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions and turbulence-radiation interactions. In this combustion environment, it is found to be important to account for the interconversion of CO and CO2, and radiation plays a dominant role. The PMC/LBL model allows the effects of molecular gas radiation and wall radiation to be clearly separated and quantified. Radiation and chemistry are tightly coupled through the temperature, and correct temperature prediction is required for correct prediction of the CO/CO2 ratio. Turbulence-chemistry interactions influence the computed flame structure and mean CO levels. Strong local effects of turbulence-radiation interactions are found in the flame, but the net influence of TRI on computed mean temperature and species profiles is small. The ultimate goal of this research is to simulate high-temperature oxy-coal combustion, where accurate treatments of chemistry, radiation and turbulence-chemistry-particle-radiation interactions will be even more important.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of the spatially dispersive carrier transport in P3HT and P3HT:PCBM blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin

    2009-10-01

    The presence of traps, arising from morpohological or chemical defects, can be critical to the performance of organic semiconductor devices. Traps can reduce the charge carrier mobility, disturb the internal electrical field, drive recombination, and reduce the overall device efficiency as well as operational stability. In this work, we investigate the role of traps in determining charge transport properties of organic semiconductors and blends such as P3HT and P3HT:PCBM through Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF) mobility measurements. We employ a Marcus theory description of individual hopping events based on the molecular reorganization energy (lambda) for the MC simulations. Trap states are modeled as diffuse bands that reside at some energy away from the main transport band. This model is used to simulate TOF transients, and the results are compared to experimental data. As is expected from the Marcus theory equation, the mobility is seen to be maximum for an optimal value of lambda. This optimal value is strongly field dependent, but is found to be independent of the trap density. In comparing MC simulations with TOF data, it is found that inclusion of traps results in a much better fit to the data and provides for a mechanism to simulate dispersive transport with a long tail resulting from trapping and detrapping of carriers before they exit the device. We present results for a range of trap densities and statistical distributions and discuss the implications on the operation of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices.

  17. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-07-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  18. Coupled Deterministic/Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport and Detector Response

    SciTech Connect

    Gesh, Christopher J.; Meriwether, George H.; Pagh, Richard T.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-09-01

    The analysis of radiation sensor systems used to detect and identify nuclear and radiological weapons materials requires detailed radiation transport calculations. Two basic steps are required to solve radiation detection scenario analysis (RDSA) problems. First, the radiation field produced by the source must be calculated. Second, the response that the radiation field produces in a detector must be determined. RDSA problems are characterized by complex geometries, the presence of shielding materials, and large amounts of scattering (or absorption/re-emission). In this paper, we will discuss the use of the Attila code [2] for RDSA.

  19. Tyrosine transport in a human melanoma cell line as a basis for selective transport of cytotoxic analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Pankovich, J M; Jimbow, K

    1991-01-01

    Tyrosine is an essential amino acid for the initial step of melanin synthesis, yet little is known concerning its transport in melanocytes. As an important first step in the development of new anti-melanoma agents based upon chemical and pharmacological modifications of melanin synthesis, the present study characterized the transport mechanism of tyrosine in vitro using the human melanoma cell line SK-MEL 23. Several tyrosine transport systems may be involved in melanocytes: systems L and T, which transport neutral amino acids with branched or aromatic side chains, and systems A and ASC, which transport neutral amino acids with smaller side chains. In order to determine which system or combination of systems is involved in tyrosine transport in melanoma cells, studies of kinetics, Na(+)-dependence and competitive inhibition were undertaken. The Km and Vmax. for the Na(+)-independent transport system were found to be 0.164 +/- 0.016 mM and 21.6 +/- 1.1 nmol/min per mg of protein respectively. This transport was preferentially inhibited by the system L specific analogue, 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, the system T substrate tryptophan, and the sulphur homologue of tyrosine, 4-S-cysteinylphenol. Sequential addition of these inhibitors at increasing concentrations indicated that they inhibit the same transporter. Our results suggest that tyrosine transport in SK-MEL 23 melanoma cells is similar to system L transport previously characterized in other cell types. This one transport system appears to supply all the tyrosine required for both cell growth and melanin synthesis. The transport system may be subject to manipulation by melanogenic stimulating factors, making the transport of cytotoxic tyrosine analogues an important area for further study. PMID:1764036

  20. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  1. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  2. A graphics-card implementation of Monte-Carlo simulations for cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    A graphics card implementation of a test-particle simulation code is presented that is based on the CUDA extension of the C/C++ programming language. The original CPU version has been developed for the calculation of cosmic-ray diffusion coefficients in artificial Kolmogorov-type turbulence. In the new implementation, the magnetic turbulence generation, which is the most time-consuming part, is separated from the particle transport and is performed on a graphics card. In this article, the modification of the basic approach of integrating test particle trajectories to employ the SIMD (single instruction, multiple data) model is presented and verified. The efficiency of the new code is tested and several language-specific accelerating factors are discussed. For the example of isotropic magnetostatic turbulence, sample results are shown and a comparison to the results of the CPU implementation is performed.

  3. The Mechanical Design for the DARHT-II Downstream Beam Transport Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow, Glen

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the downstream beam transport line for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT II) Facility. The DARHT-II project is a collaboration between LANL, LBNL and LLNL. DARHT II is a 20-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-msec linear induction accelerator designed to generate short bursts of x-rays for the purpose of radiographing dense objects. The down-stream beam transport line is approximately 20-meter long region extending from the end of the accelerator to the bremsstrahlung target. Within this proposed transport line there are 15 conventional solenoid, quadrupole and dipole magnets; as well as several speciality magnets, which transport and focus the beam to the target and to the beam dumps. There are two high power beam dumps, which are designed to absorb 80-kJ per pulse during accelerator start-up and operation. Aspects of the mechanical design of these elements are presented.

  4. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.A.

    2000-07-03

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  5. Spin- and Valley-Polarized Transport across Line Defects in Monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkin, Artem; Yazyev, Oleg

    We address ballistic transmission of charge carriers across ordered line defects in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. Our study reveals the presence of a transport gap driven by spin-orbit interactions, spin and valley filtering, both stemming from a simple picture of spin and momentum conservation, as well as the electron-hole asymmetry of charge-carrier transmission. Electronic transport properties of experimentally observed ordered line defects in monolayer MoS2 , in particular the vacancy lines and inversion domain boundaries, are further investigated using first-principles Green's function methodology. Our calculations demonstrate the possibility of achieving nearly complete spin polarization of charge carriers in nanoelectronic devices based on engineered periodic line defects in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, thus suggesting a novel practical scheme for all-electric control of spin transport. We acknowledge support from ERC project ``TopoMat'' (Grant No. 306504) and the Swiss NSF (Grant No. PP00P2_133552).

  6. Spin- and valley-polarized transport across line defects in monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkin, Artem; Yazyev, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    We address the ballistic transmission of charge carriers across ordered line defects in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. Our study reveals the presence of a transport gap driven by spin-orbit interactions, spin and valley filtering, both stemming from a simple picture of spin and momentum conservation, as well as the electron-hole asymmetry of charge-carrier transmission. Electronic transport properties of experimentally observed ordered line defects in monolayer MoS2, in particular, the vacancy lines and inversion domain boundaries, are further investigated using first-principles Green's function methodology. Our calculations demonstrate the possibility of achieving nearly complete spin polarization of charge carriers in nanoelectronic devices based on engineered periodic line defects in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, thus suggesting a practical scheme for all-electric control of spin transport.

  7. Design of post linac to driver linac transport beam line in rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the design of a beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RAON). P2DT beam line is designed by 180° bending scheme to send the radioactive isotope separation on-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in the Linac-3 to Linac-2. The beam line is designed as a 180° bend for the transport of a multi-charge state 132Sn+45,+46,+47 beam. We used the TRACE 3-D, TRACK, and ORBIT codes to design the optics system, which also includes two bunchers and ten sextupole magnets for chromaticity compensation. The transverse emittance growth is minimized by adopting mirror symmetric optics and by correcting second-order aberrations using sextupoles. We report on the multi-charge state beam transport performance of the designed beam line. The main characteristics of the P2DT line are to minimize beam loss and the growth of emittance, and for charge stripping. Beam optics for P2DT is optimized for reducing beam loss and charge stripping. As Linac-3 may accelerate the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously, P2DT line also transports the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously. Thus, we need a RF switchyard to send the stable beam to the ISOL target and the radioactive beam to the high-energy experimental area in Linac-2 end.

  8. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Elucidating the electron transport in semiconductors via Monte Carlo simulations: an inquiry-driven learning path for engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Within the context of higher education for science or engineering undergraduates, we present an inquiry-driven learning path aimed at developing a more meaningful conceptual understanding of the electron dynamics in semiconductors in the presence of applied electric fields. The electron transport in a nondegenerate n-type indium phosphide bulk semiconductor is modelled using a multivalley Monte Carlo approach. The main characteristics of the electron dynamics are explored under different values of the driving electric field, lattice temperature and impurity density. Simulation results are presented by following a question-driven path of exploration, starting from the validation of the model and moving up to reasoned inquiries about the observed characteristics of electron dynamics. Our inquiry-driven learning path, based on numerical simulations, represents a viable example of how to integrate a traditional lecture-based teaching approach with effective learning strategies, providing science or engineering undergraduates with practical opportunities to enhance their comprehension of the physics governing the electron dynamics in semiconductors. Finally, we present a general discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of using an inquiry-based teaching approach within a learning environment based on semiconductor simulations.

  10. Verification of external exposure assessment for the upper Techa riverside by luminescence measurements and Monte Carlo photon transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Taranenko, V; Meckbach, R; Degteva, M O; Bougrov, N G; Göksu, Y; Vorobiova, M I; Jacob, P

    2003-04-01

    An area located in the Southern Urals was contaminated in 1949-1956 as a result of radioactive waste releases into the Techa river by the Mayak Production Association. The external dose reconstruction of the Techa river dosimetry system (TRDS-2000) for the exposed population is based on an assessment of dose rates in air (DRA) obtained by modeling transport and deposition of radionuclides along the river for the time before 1952 and by gamma dose rate measurements since 1952. The aim of this paper is to contribute to a verification of the TRDS-2000 external dose assessment. Absorbed doses in bricks from a 130-year-old building in the heavily exposed Metlino settlement were measured by a luminescence technique. By the autumn of 1956 the population of Metlino had been evacuated, and then a water reservoir was created at the village location, which led to a change in the radioactive source geometry. Radiation transport calculations for assumed environmental sources before and since 1957 were performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In combination with TRDS-2000 estimates for annual dose rates in air at the shore of the Techa river for the period 1949-1956 and contemporary dose rate in air measurements, absorbed doses in bricks were calculated. These calculations were performed deterministically with best estimates of the modeling parameters and stochastically by propagating uncertainty distributions through the calculation scheme. Assessed doses in bricks were found to be consistent with measured values within the uncertainty bounds, while their best estimates were approximately 15% lower than the luminescence measurements. PMID:12687379