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Sample records for carlo photon transport

  1. The 3-D Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code MCMG and its algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, L.; Hu, Z.; Li, G.; Li, S.; Liu, Z.

    2012-07-01

    The 3-D Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport parallel code MCMG is developed. A new collision mechanism based on material but not nuclide is added in the code. Geometry cells and surfaces can be dynamically extended. Combination of multigroup and continuous cross-section transport is developed. The multigroup scattering is expansible to P5 and upper scattering is considered. Various multigroup libraries can be easily equipped in the code. The same results with the experiments and the MCNP code are obtained for a series of modes. The speedup of MCMG is a factor of 2-4 relative to the MCNP code in speed. (authors)

  2. Macro-step Monte Carlo Methods and their Applications in Proton Radiotherapy and Optical Photon Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqmin, Dustin J.

    Monte Carlo modeling of radiation transport is considered the gold standard for radiotherapy dose calculations. However, highly accurate Monte Carlo calculations are very time consuming and the use of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods is often not practical in clinical settings. With this in mind, a variation on the Monte Carlo method called macro Monte Carlo (MMC) was developed in the 1990's for electron beam radiotherapy dose calculations. To accelerate the simulation process, the electron MMC method used larger steps-sizes in regions of the simulation geometry where the size of the region was large relative to the size of a typical Monte Carlo step. These large steps were pre-computed using conventional Monte Carlo simulations and stored in a database featuring many step-sizes and materials. The database was loaded into memory by a custom electron MMC code and used to transport electrons quickly through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The purpose of this thesis work was to apply the same techniques to proton radiotherapy dose calculation and light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. First, the MMC method was implemented for proton radiotherapy dose calculations. A database composed of pre-computed steps was created using MCNPX for many materials and beam energies. The database was used by a custom proton MMC code called PMMC to transport protons through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The PMMC code was tested against MCNPX for a number of different proton beam energies and geometries and proved to be accurate and much more efficient. The MMC method was also implemented for light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. The widely accepted Monte Carlo for multilayered media (MCML) was modified to incorporate the MMC method. The original MCML uses basic scattering and absorption physics to transport optical photons through multilayered geometries. The MMC version of MCML was tested against the original MCML code using a number of different geometries and proved to be just as accurate and more efficient. This work has the potential to accelerate light modeling for both photodynamic therapy and near-infrared spectroscopic imaging.

  3. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  4. Monte Carlo photon transport on vector and parallel superconductors: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Nowak, P.F.

    1987-09-30

    The vectorized Monte Carlo photon transport code VPHOT has been developed for the Cray-1, Cray-XMP, and Cray-2 computers. The effort in the current project was devoted to multitasking the VPHOT code and implement it on the Cray X-MP and Cray-2 parallel-vector supercomputers, examining the robustness of the vectorized algorithm for changes in the physics of the test problems, and evaluating the efficiency of alternative algorithms such as the ''stack-driven'' algorithm of Bobrowicz for possible incorporation into VPHOT. These tasks are discussed in this paper. 4 refs.

  5. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  6. COMET-PE as an Alternative to Monte Carlo for Photon and Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Robert M.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo methods are a central component of radiotherapy treatment planning, shielding design, detector modeling, and other applications. Long calculation times, however, can limit the usefulness of these purely stochastic methods. The coarse mesh method for photon and electron transport (COMET-PE) provides an attractive alternative. By combining stochastic pre-computation with a deterministic solver, COMET-PE achieves accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo methods in only a fraction of the time. The method's implementation has been extended to 3D, and in this work, it is validated by comparison to DOSXYZnrc using a photon radiotherapy benchmark. The comparison demonstrates excellent agreement; of the voxels that received more than 10% of the maximum dose, over 97.3% pass a 2% / 2mm acceptance test and over 99.7% pass a 3% / 3mm test. Furthermore, the method is over an order of magnitude faster than DOSXYZnrc and is able to take advantage of both distributed-memory and shared-memory parallel architectures for increased performance.

  7. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  8. penORNL: a parallel monte carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  9. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  10. Multiple processor version of a Monte Carlo code for photon transport in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasanti, Alberto; Guida, Giovanni; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Villani, Fulvia

    2000-10-01

    Although Monte Carlo (MC) simulations represent an accurate and flexible tool to study the photon transport in strongly scattering media with complex geometrical topologies, they are very often infeasible because of their very high computation times. Parallel computing, in principle very suitable for MC approach because it consists in the repeated application of the same calculations to unrelated and superposing events, offers a possible approach to overcome this problem. It was developed an MC multiple processor code for optical and IR photon transport which was run on the parallel processor computer CRAY-T3E (128 DEC Alpha EV5 nodes, 600 Mflops) at CINECA (Bologna, Italy). The comparison between single processor and multiple processor runs for the same tissue models shows that the parallelization reduces the computation time by a factor of about N , where N is the number of used processors. This means a computation time reduction by a factor ranging from about 10 2 (as in our case where 128 processors are available) up to about 10 3 (with the most powerful parallel computers with 1024 processors). This reduction could make feasible MC simulations till now impracticable. The scaling of the execution time of the parallel code, as a function of the values of the main input parameters, is also evaluated.

  11. Application of parallel computing to a Monte Carlo code for photon transport in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasanti, Alberto; Guida, Giovanni; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Villani, Fulvia

    1998-12-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of photon transport in turbid media suffer a severe limitation represented by very high execution times in all practical cases. This problem could be approached with the technique of parallel computing, which, in principle, is very suitable for MC simulations because they consist in the repeated application of the same calculations to unrelated and superposing events. For the first time in the field of the optical and IR photon transport, we developed a MC parallel code running on the parallel processor computer CRAY-T3E (128 DEC Alpha EV5 nodes, 600 Mflops) at CINECA (Bologna, Italy). The comparison of several single processor runs (on Alpha AXP DEC 2100) and N-processor runs (on Cray T3E) for the same tissue models shows that the computation time is reduced by a factor of about 5*N, where N is the number of used processors. This means a computation time reduction by a factor ranging from about 102 (as in our case) up to about 5*103 (with the most powerful parallel computers) that could make feasible MC simulations till now impracticable.

  12. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  13. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within +/-1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within +/-1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV. The dose through a static leaf tip is also predicted generally within +/-1% or 1 mm. Tests with sliding windows of various widths confirm the accuracy of the MLC model for dynamic delivery and indicate that accounting for a slight leaf position error (0.008 cm for our MLC) will improve the accuracy of the model. The MLC model developed is applicable to both dynamic MLC and segmental MLC IMRT beam delivery and will be useful for patient IMRT dose calculations, pre-treatment verification of IMRT delivery and IMRT portal dose transmission dosimetry.

  14. Parallel Monte Carlo Electron and Photon Transport Simulation Code (PMCEPT code)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2004-11-01

    Simulations for customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient are very useful for both patient and doctor. These simulations can be used to find the most effective treatment with the least possible dose to the patient. This typical system, so called ``Doctor by Information Technology", will be useful to provide high quality medical services everywhere. However, the large amount of computing time required by the well-known general purpose Monte Carlo(MC) codes has prevented their use for routine dose distribution calculations for a customized radiation treatment planning. The optimal solution to provide ``accurate" dose distribution within an ``acceptable" time limit is to develop a parallel simulation algorithm on a beowulf PC cluster because it is the most accurate, efficient, and economic. I developed parallel MC electron and photon transport simulation code based on the standard MPI message passing interface. This algorithm solved the main difficulty of the parallel MC simulation (overlapped random number series in the different processors) using multiple random number seeds. The parallel results agreed well with the serial ones. The parallel efficiency approached 100% as was expected.

  15. ITS Version 3.0: The Integrated TIGER Series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J.A.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Seltzer, S.M.; Berger, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. It combines operational simplicity and physical accuracy in order to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Flexibility of construction permits tailoring of the codes to specific applications and extension of code capabilities to more complex applications through simple update procedures.

  16. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  17. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  18. Development of parallel monte carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code III: Applications to medical radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih; Jeong, Hae Sun

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing the differences between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient is an essential requirement for successful radiotheraphy. Accurate calculation of dose distributions in the treatment planning process is important and can be done only by using a Monte Carlo calculation of particle transport. In this paper, we perform a further validation of our previously developed parallel Monte Carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code [Kum and Lee, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 47, 716 (2005) and Kim and Kum, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 49, 1640 (2006)] for applications to clinical radiation problems. A linear accelerator, Siemens' Primus 6 MV, was modeled and commissioned. A thorough validation includes both small fields, closely related to the intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), and large fields. Two-dimensional comparisons with film measurements were also performed. The PMCEPT results, in general, agreed well with the measured data within a maximum error of about 2%. However, considering the experimental errors, the PMCEPT results can provide the gold standard of dose distributions for radiotherapy. The computing time was also much faster, compared to that needed for experiments, although it is still a bottleneck for direct applications to the daily routine treatment planning procedure.

  19. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-07-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  20. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to calculate radiation dose due to the neutron environment around a MEA is shown. An uncertainty of a factor of three in the MEA calculations is shown to be due to uncertainties in the geometry modeling. It is believed that the methodology is sound and that good agreement between simulation and experiment has been demonstrated.

  1. A Monte Carlo study of high-energy photon transport in matter: application for multiple scattering investigation in Compton spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brancewicz, Marek; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    The first results of multiple scattering simulations of polarized high-energy X-rays for Compton experiments using a new Monte Carlo program, MUSCAT, are presented. The program is developed to follow the restrictions of real experimental geometries. The new simulation algorithm uses not only well known photon splitting and interaction forcing methods but it is also upgraded with the new propagation separation method and highly vectorized. In this paper, a detailed description of the new simulation algorithm is given. The code is verified by comparison with the previous experimental and simulation results by the ESRF group and new restricted geometry experiments carried out at SPring-8. PMID:26698070

  2. A Monte Carlo study of high-energy photon transport in matter: application for multiple scattering investigation in Compton spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brancewicz, Marek; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    The first results of multiple scattering simulations of polarized high-energy X-rays for Compton experiments using a new Monte Carlo program, MUSCAT, are presented. The program is developed to follow the restrictions of real experimental geometries. The new simulation algorithm uses not only well known photon splitting and interaction forcing methods but it is also upgraded with the new propagation separation method and highly vectorized. In this paper, a detailed description of the new simulation algorithm is given. The code is verified by comparison with the previous experimental and simulation results by the ESRF group and new restricted geometry experiments carried out at SPring-8. PMID:26698070

  3. The MC21 Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton TM, Donovan TJ, Trumbull TH, Dobreff PS, Caro E, Griesheimer DP, Tyburski LJ, Carpenter DC, Joo H

    2007-01-09

    MC21 is a new Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code currently under joint development at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. MC21 is the Monte Carlo transport kernel of the broader Common Monte Carlo Design Tool (CMCDT), which is also currently under development. The vision for CMCDT is to provide an automated, computer-aided modeling and post-processing environment integrated with a Monte Carlo solver that is optimized for reactor analysis. CMCDT represents a strategy to push the Monte Carlo method beyond its traditional role as a benchmarking tool or ''tool of last resort'' and into a dominant design role. This paper describes various aspects of the code, including the neutron physics and nuclear data treatments, the geometry representation, and the tally and depletion capabilities.

  4. Simulation of the full-core pin-model by JMCT Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Shu, L.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Since the large numbers of cells over a million, the tallies over a hundred million and the particle histories over ten billion, the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model has become a real challenge for the computers and the computational methods. On the other hand, the basic memory of the model has exceeded the limit of a single CPU, so the spatial domain and data decomposition must be considered. JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport code) has successful fulfilled the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model by the domain decomposition and the nested parallel computation. The k{sub eff} and flux of each cell are obtained. (authors)

  5. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  6. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  7. Monte Carlo simulations incorporating Mie calculations of light transport in tissue phantoms: Examination of photon sampling volumes for endoscopically compatible fiber optic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Hielscher, A.H.; Bigio, I.J.

    1996-04-01

    Details of the interaction of photons with tissue phantoms are elucidated using Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, photon sampling volumes and photon pathlengths are determined for a variety of scattering and absorption parameters. The Monte Carlo simulations are specifically designed to model light delivery and collection geometries relevant to clinical applications of optical biopsy techniques. The Monte Carlo simulations assume that light is delivered and collected by two, nearly-adjacent optical fibers and take into account the numerical aperture of the fibers as well as reflectance and refraction at interfaces between different media. To determine the validity of the Monte Carlo simulations for modeling the interactions between the photons and the tissue phantom in these geometries, the simulations were compared to measurements of aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres in the wavelength range 450-750 nm.

  8. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  9. Integrated Tiger Series of electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes: a user's guide for use on IBM mainframes

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.

    1985-12-01

    The ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) Monte Carlo code package developed at Sandia National Laboratories and distributed as CCC-467/ITS by the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of eight codes - the standard codes, TIGER, CYLTRAN, ACCEPT; the P-codes, TIGERP, CYLTRANP, ACCEPTP; and the M-codes ACCEPTM, CYLTRANM. The codes have been adapted to run on the IBM 3081, VAX 11/780, CDC-7600, and Cray 1 with the use of the update emulator UPEML. This manual should serve as a guide to a user running the codes on IBM computers having 370 architecture. The cases listed were tested on the IBM 3033, under the MVS operating system using the VS Fortran Level 1.3.1 compiler.

  10. RCPO1 - A Monte Carlo program for solving neutron and photon transport problems in three dimensional geometry with detailed energy description and depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ondis, L.A., II; Tyburski, L.J.; Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-03-01

    The RCP01 Monte Carlo program is used to analyze many geometries of interest in nuclear design and analysis of light water moderated reactors such as the core in its pressure vessel with complex piping arrangement, fuel storage arrays, shipping and container arrangements, and neutron detector configurations. Written in FORTRAN and in use on a variety of computers, it is capable of estimating steady state neutron or photon reaction rates and neutron multiplication factors. The energy range covered in neutron calculations is that relevant to the fission process and subsequent slowing-down and thermalization, i.e., 20 MeV to 0 eV. The same energy range is covered for photon calculations.

  11. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    WATERS, LAURIE S.; MCKINNEY, GREGG W.; DURKEE, JOE W.; FENSIN, MICHAEL L.; JAMES, MICHAEL R.; JOHNS, RUSSELL C.; PELOWITZ, DENISE B.

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Nelson M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of transport in controlled nuclear fusion as it applies to confinement in a tokamak or stellarator. Numerical experiments validate a mathematical model of Paul R. Garabedian in which the electric potential is determined by quasineutrality because of singular perturbation of the Poisson equation. The Monte Carlo method is used to solve a test particle drift kinetic equation. The collision operator drives the distribution function in velocity space towards the normal distribution, or Maxwellian, as suggested by the central limit theorem. The detailed structure of the collision operator and the role of conservation of momentum are investigated. Exponential decay of expected values allows the computation of the confinement times of both ions and electrons. Three-dimensional perturbations in the electromagnetic field model the anomalous transport of electrons and simulate the turbulent behavior that is presumably triggered by the displacement current. Comparison with experimental data and derivation of scaling laws are presented.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, N.M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of transport in controlled nuclear fusion as it applies to confinement in a tokamak or stellarator. Numerical experiments validate a mathematical model of Paul R. Garabedian in which the electric potential is determined by quasineutrality because of singular perturbation of the Poisson equation. The Monte Carlo method is used to solve a test particle drift kinetic equation. The collision operator drives the distribution function in velocity space towards the normal distribution, or Maxwellian, as suggested by the central limit theorem. The detailed structure of the collision operator and the role of conservation of momentum are investigated. Exponential decay of expected values allows the computation of the confinement times of both ions and electrons. Three-dimensional perturbations in the electromagnetic field model the anomalous transport of electrons and simulate the turbulent behavior that is presumably triggered by the displacement current. Comparison with experimental data and derivation of scaling laws are presented. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Photon transport in binary photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrguez-Lara, B. M.; Moya-Cessa, H.

    2013-03-01

    We present a review of the mathematical methods that are used to theoretically study classical propagation and quantum transport in arrays of coupled photonic waveguides. We focus on analyzing two types of binary photonic lattices: those where either self-energies or couplings alternate. For didactic reasons, we split the analysis into classical propagation and quantum transport, but all methods can be implemented, mutatis mutandis, in a given case. On the classical side, we use coupled mode theory and present an operator approach to the Floquet-Bloch theory in order to study the propagation of a classical electromagnetic field in two particular infinite binary lattices. On the quantum side, we study the transport of photons in equivalent finite and infinite binary lattices by coupled mode theory and linear algebra methods involving orthogonal polynomials. Curiously, the dynamics of finite size binary lattices can be expressed as the roots and functions of Fibonacci polynomials.

  15. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  16. Improved geometry representations for Monte Carlo radiation transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Matthew Ryan

    2004-08-01

    ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. ITS allows designers to predict product performance in radiation environments.

  17. Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

  18. Photon dose calculation incorporating explicit electron transport.

    PubMed

    Yu, C X; Mackie, T R; Wong, J W

    1995-07-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years to improve photon dose calculation. However, accurate prediction of dose perturbation effects near the interfaces of different media, where charged particle equilibrium is not established, remain unsolved. Furthermore, changes in atomic number, which affect the multiple Coulomb scattering of the secondary electrons, are not accounted for by current photon dose calculation algorithms. As local interface effects are mainly due to the perturbation of secondary electrons, a photon-electron cascade model is proposed which incorporates explicit electron transport in the calculation of the primary photon dose component in heterogeneous media. The primary photon beam is treated as the source of many electron pencil beams. The latter are transported using the Fermi-Eyges theory. The scattered photon dose contribution is calculated with the dose spread array [T.R. Mackie, J.W. Scrimger, and J.J. Battista, Med. Phys. 12, 188-196 (1985)] approach. Comparisons of the calculation with Monte Carlo simulation and TLD measurements show good agreement for positions near the polystyrene-aluminum interfaces. PMID:7565390

  19. Implict Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulations of Four Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N

    2007-08-01

    Radiation transport codes, like almost all codes, are difficult to develop and debug. It is helpful to have small, easy to run test problems with known answers to use in development and debugging. It is also prudent to re-run test problems periodically during development to ensure that previous code capabilities have not been lost. We describe four radiation transport test problems with analytic or approximate analytic answers. These test problems are suitable for use in debugging and testing radiation transport codes. We also give results of simulations of these test problems performed with an Implicit Monte Carlo photonics code.

  20. Evaluation of bremsstrahlung contribution to photon transport in coupled photon-electron problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio; Salvat, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The most accurate description of the radiation field in x-ray spectrometry requires the modeling of coupled photon-electron transport. Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect actually produce electrons as secondary particles which contribute to the photon field through conversion mechanisms like bremsstrahlung (which produces a continuous photon energy spectrum) and inner-shell impact ionization (ISII) (which gives characteristic lines). The solution of the coupled problem is time consuming because the electrons interact continuously and therefore, the number of electron collisions to be considered is always very high. This complex problem is frequently simplified by neglecting the contributions of the secondary electrons. Recent works (Fernández et al., 2013; Fernández et al., 2014) have shown the possibility to include a separately computed coupled photon-electron contribution like ISII in a photon calculation for improving such a crude approximation while preserving the speed of the pure photon transport model. By means of a similar approach and the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE (coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo), the bremsstrahlung contribution is characterized in this work. The angular distribution of the photons due to bremsstrahlung can be safely considered as isotropic, with the point of emission located at the same place of the photon collision. A new photon kernel describing the bremsstrahlung contribution is introduced: it can be included in photon transport codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo) with a minimal effort. A data library to describe the energy dependence of the bremsstrahlung emission has been generated for all elements Z=1-92 in the energy range 1-150 keV. The bremsstrahlung energy distribution for an arbitrary energy is obtained by interpolating in the database. A comparison between a PENELOPE direct simulation and the interpolated distribution using the data base shows an almost perfect agreement. The use of the data base increases the calculation speed by several magnitude orders.

  1. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  2. MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon) capabilities for nuclear well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Little, R.C.; Briesmeister, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. The general-purpose continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon), part of the LARTCS, provides a computational predictive capability for many applications of interest to the nuclear well logging community. The generalized three-dimensional geometry of MCNP is well suited for borehole-tool models. SABRINA, another component of the LARTCS, is a graphics code that can be used to interactively create a complex MCNP geometry. Users can define many source and tally characteristics with standard MCNP features. The time-dependent capability of the code is essential when modeling pulsed sources. Problems with neutrons, photons, and electrons as either single particle or coupled particles can be calculated with MCNP. The physics of neutron and photon transport and interactions is modeled in detail using the latest available cross-section data. A rich collections of variance reduction features can greatly increase the efficiency of a calculation. MCNP is written in FORTRAN 77 and has been run on variety of computer systems from scientific workstations to supercomputers. The next production version of MCNP will include features such as continuous-energy electron transport and a multitasking option. Areas of ongoing research of interest to the well logging community include angle biasing, adaptive Monte Carlo, improved discrete ordinates capabilities, and discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo hybrid development. Los Alamos has requested approval by the Department of Energy to create a Radiation Transport Computational Facility under their User Facility Program to increase external interactions with industry, universities, and other government organizations. 21 refs.

  3. Applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, Kenneth E.; Bergstrom, Paul M., Jr.; Buck, Richard M.; Cullen, Dermot; Fujino, D.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    1999-09-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  4. SABRINA - An interactive geometry modeler for MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon)

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T.; Murphy, J.

    1988-01-01

    SABRINA is an interactive three-dimensional geometry modeler developed to produce complicated models for the Los Alamos Monte Carlo Neutron Photon program MCNP. SABRINA produces line drawings and color-shaded drawings for a wide variety of interactive graphics terminals. It is used as a geometry preprocessor in model development and as a Monte Carlo particle-track postprocessor in the visualization of complicated particle transport problem. SABRINA is written in Fortran 77 and is based on the Los Alamos Common Graphics System, CGS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Parallel and Portable Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. R.; Cummings, J. C.; Nolen, S. D.; Keen, N. D.

    1997-08-01

    We have developed a multi-group, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++ using object-oriented methods and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and ? eigenvalues of the neutron transport equation on a rectilinear computational mesh. It is portable to and runs in parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities are discussed, along with physics and performance results for several test problems on a variety of hardware, including all three Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) platforms. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute ?-eigenvalues in seconds or minutes rather than days or weeks. Current and future work on the implementation of a general transport physics framework (TPF) is also described. This TPF employs modern C++ programming techniques to provide simplified user interfaces, generic STL-style programming, and compile-time performance optimization. Physics capabilities of the TPF will be extended to include continuous energy treatments, implicit Monte Carlo algorithms, and a variety of convergence acceleration techniques such as importance combing.

  6. Monte Carlo method for photon heating using temperature-dependent optical properties.

    PubMed

    Slade, Adam Broadbent; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The Monte Carlo method for photon transport is often used to predict the volumetric heating that an optical source will induce inside a tissue or material. This method relies on constant (with respect to temperature) optical properties, specifically the coefficients of scattering and absorption. In reality, optical coefficients are typically temperature-dependent, leading to error in simulation results. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that can incorporate variable properties and accurately simulate systems where the temperature will greatly vary, such as in the case of laser-thawing of frozen tissues. A numerical simulation was developed that utilizes the Monte Carlo method for photon transport to simulate the thermal response of a system that allows temperature-dependent optical and thermal properties. This was done by combining traditional Monte Carlo photon transport with a heat transfer simulation to provide a feedback loop that selects local properties based on current temperatures, for each moment in time. Additionally, photon steps are segmented to accurately obtain path lengths within a homogenous (but not isothermal) material. Validation of the simulation was done using comparisons to established Monte Carlo simulations using constant properties, and a comparison to the Beer-Lambert law for temperature-variable properties. The simulation is able to accurately predict the thermal response of a system whose properties can vary with temperature. The difference in results between variable-property and constant property methods for the representative system of laser-heated silicon can become larger than 100K. This simulation will return more accurate results of optical irradiation absorption in a material which undergoes a large change in temperature. This increased accuracy in simulated results leads to better thermal predictions in living tissues and can provide enhanced planning and improved experimental and procedural outcomes. PMID:25488656

  7. Energy Modulated Photon Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel treatment modality termed energy modulated photon radiotherapy (EMXRT) was investigated. The first step of EMXRT was to determine beam energy for each gantry angle/anatomy configuration from a pool of photon energy beams (2 to 10 MV) with a newly developed energy selector. An inverse planning system using gradient search algorithm was then employed to optimize photon beam intensity of various beam energies based on presimulated Monte Carlo pencil beam dose distributions in patient anatomy. Finally, 3D dose distributions in six patients of different tumor sites were simulated with Monte Carlo method and compared between EMXRT plans and clinical IMRT plans. Compared to current IMRT technique, the proposed EMXRT method could offer a better paradigm for the radiotherapy of lung cancers and pediatric brain tumors in terms of normal tissue sparing and integral dose. For prostate, head and neck, spine, and thyroid lesions, the EMXRT plans were generally comparable to the IMRT plans. Our feasibility study indicated that lower energy (<6 MV) photon beams could be considered in modern radiotherapy treatment planning to achieve a more personalized care for individual patient with dosimetric gains. PMID:26977413

  8. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Attili, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Carpinelli, M.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Varisano, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  10. Vertical Photon Transport in Cloud Remote Sensing Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Photon transport in plane-parallel, vertically inhomogeneous clouds is investigated and applied to cloud remote sensing techniques that use solar reflectance or transmittance measurements for retrieving droplet effective radius. Transport is couched in terms of weighting functions which approximate the relative contribution of individual layers to the overall retrieval. Two vertical weightings are investigated, including one based on the average number of scatterings encountered by reflected and transmitted photons in any given layer. A simpler vertical weighting based on the maximum penetration of reflected photons proves useful for solar reflectance measurements. These weighting functions are highly dependent on droplet absorption and solar/viewing geometry. A superposition technique, using adding/doubling radiative transfer procedures, is derived to accurately determine both weightings, avoiding time consuming Monte Carlo methods. Superposition calculations are made for a variety of geometries and cloud models, and selected results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. Effective radius retrievals from modeled vertically inhomogeneous liquid water clouds are then made using the standard near-infrared bands, and compared with size estimates based on the proposed weighting functions. Agreement between the two methods is generally within several tenths of a micrometer, much better than expected retrieval accuracy. Though the emphasis is on photon transport in clouds, the derived weightings can be applied to any multiple scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem, including arbitrary combinations of cloud, aerosol, and gas layers.

  11. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation. The main algorithms we consider are: Domain decomposition of constructive solid geometry: enables extremely large calculations in which the background geometry is too large to fit in the memory of a single computational node. Load Balancing: keeps the workload per processor as even as possible so the calculation runs efficiently. Global Particle Find: if particles are on the wrong processor, globally resolve their locations to the correct processor based on particle coordinate and background domain. Visualizing constructive solid geometry, sourcing particles, deciding that particle streaming communication is completed and spatial redecomposition. These algorithms are some of the most important parallel algorithms required for domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport. We demonstrate that our previous algorithms were not scalable, prove that our new algorithms are scalable, and run some of the algorithms up to 2 million MPI processes on the Sequoia supercomputer.

  12. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  13. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  14. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-12-13

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations.

  15. Approximation for Horizontal Photon Transport in Cloud Remote Sensing Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plantnick, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The effect of horizontal photon transport within real-world clouds can be of consequence to remote sensing problems based on plane-parallel cloud models. An analytic approximation for the root-mean-square horizontal displacement of reflected and transmitted photons relative to the incident cloud-top location is derived from random walk theory. The resulting formula is a function of the average number of photon scatterings, and particle asymmetry parameter and single scattering albedo. In turn, the average number of scatterings can be determined from efficient adding/doubling radiative transfer procedures. The approximation is applied to liquid water clouds for typical remote sensing solar spectral bands, involving both conservative and non-conservative scattering. Results compare well with Monte Carlo calculations. Though the emphasis is on horizontal photon transport in terrestrial clouds, the derived approximation is applicable to any multiple scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem. The complete horizontal transport probability distribution can be described with an analytic distribution specified by the root-mean-square and average displacement values. However, it is shown empirically that the average displacement can be reasonably inferred from the root-mean-square value. An estimate for the horizontal transport distribution can then be made from the root-mean-square photon displacement alone.

  16. Benchmarking of Proton Transport in Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Gui; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been intergrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with exitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to treat the intermediate energy nuclear reactions for proton. Some other hadronic models are also being developed now. The benchmarking of proton transport in SuperMC has been performed according to Accelerator Driven subcritical System (ADS) benchmark data and model released by IAEA from IAEA's Cooperation Research Plan (CRP). The incident proton energy is 1.0 GeV. The neutron flux and energy deposition were calculated. The results simulated using SupeMC and FLUKA are in agreement within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method. The proton transport in SuperMC has also been applied in China Lead-Alloy cooled Reactor (CLEAR), which is designed by FDS Team for the calculation of spallation reaction in the target.

  17. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lffler, W.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.; Euser, T. G.; Scharrer, M.; Russell, P.

    2012-03-01

    High-dimensional entangled photons pairs are interesting for quantum information and cryptography: Compared to the well-known 2D polarization case, the stronger non-local quantum correlations could improve noise resistance or security, and the larger amount of information per photon increases the available bandwidth. One implementation is to use entanglement in the spatial degree of freedom of twin photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, which is equivalent to orbital angular momentum entanglement, this has been proven to be an excellent model system. The use of optical fiber technology for distribution of such photons has only very recently been practically demonstrated and is of fundamental and applied interest. It poses a big challenge compared to the established time and frequency domain methods: For spatially entangled photons, fiber transport requires the use of multimode fibers, and mode coupling and intermodal dispersion therein must be minimized not to destroy the spatial quantum correlations. We demonstrate that these shortcomings of conventional multimode fibers can be overcome by using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which follows the paradigm to mimic free-space transport as good as possible, and are able to confirm entanglement of the fiber-transported photons. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons is largely unexplored yet, therefore we discuss the main complications, the interplay of intermodal dispersion and mode mixing, the influence of external stress and core deformations, and consider the pros and cons of various fiber types.

  18. The all particle method: Coupled neutron, photon, electron, charged particle Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    At the present time a Monte Carlo transport computer code is being designed and implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to include the transport of: neutrons, photons, electrons and light charged particles as well as the coupling between all species of particles, e.g., photon induced electron emission. Since this code is being designed to handle all particles this approach is called the ''All Particle Method''. The code is designed as a test bed code to include as many different methods as possible (e.g., electron single or multiple scattering) and will be data driven to minimize the number of methods and models ''hard wired'' into the code. This approach will allow changes in the Livermore nuclear and atomic data bases, used to described the interaction and production of particles, to be used to directly control the execution of the program. In addition this approach will allow the code to be used at various levels of complexity to balance computer running time against the accuracy requirements of specific applications. This paper describes the current design philosophy and status of the code. Since the treatment of neutrons and photons used by the All Particle Method code is more or less conventional, emphasis in this paper is placed on the treatment of electron, and to a lesser degree charged particle, transport. An example is presented in order to illustrate an application in which the ability to accurately transport electrons is important. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  19. A multiple-source photon beam model and its commissioning process for VMC++ Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillikainen, L.; Siljamki, S.

    2008-02-01

    The use of Monte Carlo methods in photon beam treatment planning is becoming feasible due to advances in hardware and algorithms. However, a major challenge is the modeling of the radiation produced by individual linear accelerators. Monte Carlo simulation through the accelerator head or a parameterized source model may be used for this purpose. In this work, the latter approach was chosen due to larger flexibility and smaller amount of required information about the accelerator composition. The source model used includes sub-sources for primary photons emerging from target, extra-focal photons, and electron contamination. The free model parameters were derived by minimizing an objective function measuring deviations between pencil-beam-kernel based dose calculations and measurements. The output of the source model was then used as input for the VMC++ code, which was used to transport the particles through the accessory modules and the patient. To verify the procedure, VMC++ calculations were compared to measurements for open, wedged, and irregular MLC-shaped fields for 6MV and 15MV beams. The observed discrepancies were mostly within 2%, 2 mm. This work demonstrates that the developed procedure could, in the future, be used to commission the VMC++ algorithm for clinical use in a hospital.

  20. Photon spectra calculation for an Elekta linac beam using experimental scatter measurements and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Campayo, J M; Diez, S; Verdu, G

    2008-01-01

    The present work is centered in reconstructing by means of a scatter analysis method the primary beam photon spectrum of a linear accelerator. This technique is based on irradiating the isocenter of a rectangular block made of methacrylate placed at 100 cm distance from surface and measuring scattered particles around the plastic at several specific positions with different scatter angles. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate the particles transport of mono-energetic beams to register the scatter measurement after contact the attenuator. Measured ionization values allow calculating the spectrum as the sum of mono-energetic individual energy bins using the Schiff Bremsstrahlung model. The measurements have been made in an Elekta Precise linac using a 6 MeV photon beam. Relative depth and profile dose curves calculated in a water phantom using the reconstructed spectrum agree with experimentally measured dose data to within 3%. PMID:19163410

  1. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations of photon/electron dosimetry in microscale applications.

    PubMed

    Joneja, O P; Negreanu, C; Stepanek, J; Chawl, R

    2003-06-01

    It is important to establish reliable calculational tools to plan and analyse representative microdosimetry experiments in the context of microbeam radiation therapy development. In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate the suitability of the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code to adequately model photon/electron transport over micron distances. The case of a single cylindrical microbeam of 25-micron diameter incident on a water phantom has been simulated in detail with both MCNP4C and the code PSI-GEANT, for different incident photon energies, to get absorbed dose distributions at various depths, with and without electron transport being considered. In addition, dose distributions calculated for a single microbeam with a photon spectrum representative of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) have been compared. Finally, a large number of cylindrical microbeams (a total of 2601 beams, placed on a 200-micron square pitch, covering an area of 1 cm2) incident on a water phantom have been considered to study cumulative radial dose distributions at different depths. From these distributions, ratios of peak (within the microbeam) to valley (mid-point along the diagonal connecting two microbeams) dose values have been determined. The various comparisons with PSI-GEANT results have shown that MCNP4C, with its high flexibility in terms of its numerous source and geometry description options, variance reduction methods, detailed error analysis, statistical checks and different tally types, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of microbeam experiments. PMID:12956187

  2. Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo for Electron Thermal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted to a Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) solution method for eventual inclusion in a hybrid IMC-DDMC (Implicit Monte Carlo) method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the iSNB-DDMC method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque.

  3. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ? 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose difference in PDD and dose profiles were achieve using incident electron energy 6.4 MeV.

  4. Review of Monte Carlo modeling of light transport in tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan

    2013-05-01

    A general survey is provided on the capability of Monte Carlo (MC) modeling in tissue optics while paying special attention to the recent progress in the development of methods for speeding up MC simulations. The principles of MC modeling for the simulation of light transport in tissues, which includes the general procedure of tracking an individual photon packet, common light-tissue interactions that can be simulated, frequently used tissue models, common contact/noncontact illumination and detection setups, and the treatment of time-resolved and frequency-domain optical measurements, are briefly described to help interested readers achieve a quick start. Following that, a variety of methods for speeding up MC simulations, which includes scaling methods, perturbation methods, hybrid methods, variance reduction techniques, parallel computation, and special methods for fluorescence simulations, as well as their respective advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Then the applications of MC methods in tissue optics, laser Doppler flowmetry, photodynamic therapy, optical coherence tomography, and diffuse optical tomography are briefly surveyed. Finally, the potential directions for the future development of the MC method in tissue optics are discussed. PMID:23698318

  5. A generic algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    A mixed (class II) algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of protons, and other heavy charged particles, in matter is presented. The emphasis is on the electromagnetic interactions (elastic and inelastic collisions) which are simulated using strategies similar to those employed in the electron-photon code PENELOPE. Elastic collisions are described in terms of numerical differential cross sections (DCSs) in the center-of-mass frame, calculated from the eikonal approximation with the Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic potential. The polar scattering angle is sampled by employing an adaptive numerical algorithm which allows control of interpolation errors. The energy transferred to the recoiling target atoms (nuclear stopping) is consistently described by transformation to the laboratory frame. Inelastic collisions are simulated from DCSs based on the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA), making use of the Sternheimer-Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength, with parameters adjusted to reproduce (1) the electronic stopping power read from the input file, and (2) the total cross sections for impact ionization of inner subshells. The latter were calculated from the PWBA including screening and Coulomb corrections. This approach provides quite a realistic description of the energy-loss distribution in single collisions, and of the emission of X-rays induced by proton impact. The simulation algorithm can be readily modified to include nuclear reactions, when the corresponding cross sections and emission probabilities are available, and bremsstrahlung emission.

  6. Efficient photon treatment planning by the use of Swiss Monte Carlo Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Mini, R.; Born, E. J.

    2007-06-01

    Currently photon Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) for a patient stored in the patient database of a treatment planning system (TPS) usually can only be performed using a cumbersome multi-step procedure where many user interactions are needed. Automation is needed for usage in clinical routine. In addition, because of the long computing time in MCTP, optimization of the MC calculations is essential. For these purposes a new GUI-based photon MC environment has been developed resulting in a very flexible framework, namely the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan (SMCP). Appropriate MC transport methods are assigned to different geometric regions by still benefiting from the features included in the TPS. In order to provide a flexible MC environment the MC particle transport has been divided into different parts: source, beam modifiers, and patient. The source part includes: Phase space-source, source models, and full MC transport through the treatment head. The beam modifier part consists of one module for each beam modifier. To simulate the radiation transport through each individual beam modifier, one out of three full MC transport codes can be selected independently. Additionally, for each beam modifier a simple or an exact geometry can be chosen. Thereby, different complexity levels of radiation transport are applied during the simulation. For the patient dose calculation two different MC codes are available. A special plug-in in Eclipse providing all necessary information by means of Dicom streams was used to start the developed MC GUI. The implementation of this framework separates the MC transport from the geometry and the modules pass the particles in memory, hence no files are used as interface. The implementation is realized for 6 and 15 MV beams of a Varian Clinac 2300 C/D. Several applications demonstrate the usefulness of the framework. Apart from applications dealing with the beam modifiers, three patient cases are shown. Thereby, comparisons between MC calculated dose distributions and those calculated by a pencil beam or the AAA algorithm. Interfacing this flexible and efficient MC environment with Eclipse allows a widespread use for all kinds of investigations from timing and benchmarking studies to clinical patient studies. Additionally, it is possible to add modules keeping the system highly flexible and efficient.

  7. A hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) approach for multi-dimensional radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Guillaume; Davis, Anthony B.; Langmore, Ian

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} We introduce a variance reduction scheme for Monte Carlo (MC) transport. {yields} The primary application is atmospheric remote sensing. {yields} The technique first solves the adjoint problem using a deterministic solver. {yields} Next, the adjoint solution is used as an importance function for the MC solver. {yields} The adjoint problem is solved quickly since it ignores the volume. - Abstract: A novel hybrid Monte Carlo transport scheme is demonstrated in a scene with solar illumination, scattering and absorbing 2D atmosphere, a textured reflecting mountain, and a small detector located in the sky (mounted on a satellite or a airplane). It uses a deterministic approximation of an adjoint transport solution to reduce variance, computed quickly by ignoring atmospheric interactions. This allows significant variance and computational cost reductions when the atmospheric scattering and absorption coefficient are small. When combined with an atmospheric photon-redirection scheme, significant variance reduction (equivalently acceleration) is achieved in the presence of atmospheric interactions.

  8. Shift: A Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Package

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the massively-parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package, Shift, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It reviews the capabilities, implementation, and parallel performance of this code package. Scaling results demonstrate very good strong and weak scaling behavior of the implemented algorithms. Benchmark results from various reactor problems show that Shift results compare well to other contemporary Monte Carlo codes and experimental results.

  9. Calculation of photon pulse height distribution using deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Azadeh; Vosoughi, Naser

    2015-12-01

    Radiation transport techniques which are used in radiation detection systems comprise one of two categories namely probabilistic and deterministic. However, probabilistic methods are typically used in pulse height distribution simulation by recreating the behavior of each individual particle, the deterministic approach, which approximates the macroscopic behavior of particles by solution of Boltzmann transport equation, is being developed because of its potential advantages in computational efficiency for complex radiation detection problems. In current work linear transport equation is solved using two methods including collided components of the scalar flux algorithm which is applied by iterating on the scattering source and ANISN deterministic computer code. This approach is presented in one dimension with anisotropic scattering orders up to P8 and angular quadrature orders up to S16. Also, multi-group gamma cross-section library required for this numerical transport simulation is generated in a discrete appropriate form. Finally, photon pulse height distributions are indirectly calculated by deterministic methods that approvingly compare with those from Monte Carlo based codes namely MCNPX and FLUKA.

  10. Response of thermoluminescent dosimeters to photons simulated with the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralles, M.; Guimarães, C. C.; Okuno, E.

    2005-06-01

    Personal monitors composed of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) made of natural fluorite (CaF 2:NaCl) and lithium fluoride (Harshaw TLD-100) were exposed to gamma and X rays of different qualities. The GEANT4 radiation transport Monte Carlo toolkit was employed to calculate the energy depth deposition profile in the TLDs. X-ray spectra of the ISO/4037-1 narrow-spectrum series, with peak voltage (kVp) values in the range 20-300 kV, were obtained by simulating a X-ray Philips MG-450 tube associated with the recommended filters. A realistic photon distribution of a 60Co radiotherapy source was taken from results of Monte Carlo simulations found in the literature. Comparison between simulated and experimental results revealed that the attenuation of emitted light in the readout process of the fluorite dosimeter must be taken into account, while this effect is negligible for lithium fluoride. Differences between results obtained by heating the dosimeter from the irradiated side and from the opposite side allowed the determination of the light attenuation coefficient for CaF 2:NaCl (mass proportion 60:40) as 2.2 mm -1.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in a cloud computing environment with MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is considered the most reliable method for modeling photon migration in heterogeneous media. However, its widespread use is hindered by the high computational cost. The purpose of this work is to report on our implementation of a simple MapReduce method for performing fault-tolerant Monte Carlo computations in a massively-parallel cloud computing environment. We ported the MC321 Monte Carlo package to Hadoop, an open-source MapReduce framework. In this implementation, Map tasks compute photon histories in parallel while a Reduce task scores photon absorption. The distributed implementation was evaluated on a commercial compute cloud. The simulation time was found to be linearly dependent on the number of photons and inversely proportional to the number of nodes. For a cluster size of 240 nodes, the simulation of 100 billion photon histories took 22 min, a 1258 speed-up compared to the single-threaded Monte Carlo program. The overall computational throughput was 85,178 photon histories per node per second, with a latency of 100 s. The distributed simulation produced the same output as the original implementation and was resilient to hardware failure: the correctness of the simulation was unaffected by the shutdown of 50% of the nodes. PMID:22191916

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in a cloud computing environment with MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is considered the most reliable method for modeling photon migration in heterogeneous media. However, its widespread use is hindered by the high computational cost. The purpose of this work is to report on our implementation of a simple MapReduce method for performing fault-tolerant Monte Carlo computations in a massively-parallel cloud computing environment. We ported the MC321 Monte Carlo package to Hadoop, an open-source MapReduce framework. In this implementation, Map tasks compute photon histories in parallel while a Reduce task scores photon absorption. The distributed implementation was evaluated on a commercial compute cloud. The simulation time was found to be linearly dependent on the number of photons and inversely proportional to the number of nodes. For a cluster size of 240 nodes, the simulation of 100 billion photon histories took 22 min, a 1258 speed-up compared to the single-threaded Monte Carlo program. The overall computational throughput was 85,178 photon histories per node per second, with a latency of 100 s. The distributed simulation produced the same output as the original implementation and was resilient to hardware failure: the correctness of the simulation was unaffected by the shutdown of 50% of the nodes.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in a cloud computing environment with MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is considered the most reliable method for modeling photon migration in heterogeneous media. However, its widespread use is hindered by the high computational cost. The purpose of this work is to report on our implementation of a simple MapReduce method for performing fault-tolerant Monte Carlo computations in a massively-parallel cloud computing environment. We ported the MC321 Monte Carlo package to Hadoop, an open-source MapReduce framework. In this implementation, Map tasks compute photon histories in parallel while a Reduce task scores photon absorption. The distributed implementation was evaluated on a commercial compute cloud. The simulation time was found to be linearly dependent on the number of photons and inversely proportional to the number of nodes. For a cluster size of 240 nodes, the simulation of 100 billion photon histories took 22 min, a 1258 speed-up compared to the single-threaded Monte Carlo program. The overall computational throughput was 85,178 photon histories per node per second, with a latency of 100 s. The distributed simulation produced the same output as the original implementation and was resilient to hardware failure: the correctness of the simulation was unaffected by the shutdown of 50% of the nodes. PMID:22191916

  14. Monte Carlo Assessments of Absorbed Doses to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers Due to Photon Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; Karagiannis, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations may overestimate or underestimate radiation doses to the skin depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radionuclide being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations of realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performedfor a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from dosimeter readings when dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

  15. Specific absorbed fractions of electrons and photons for Rad-HUMAN phantom using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Cheng, Meng-Yun; Long, Peng-Cheng; Hu, Li-Qin

    2015-07-01

    The specific absorbed fractions (SAF) for self- and cross-irradiation are effective tools for the internal dose estimation of inhalation and ingestion intakes of radionuclides. A set of SAFs of photons and electrons were calculated using the Rad-HUMAN phantom, which is a computational voxel phantom of a Chinese adult female that was created using the color photographic image of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data set by the FDS Team. The model can represent most Chinese adult female anatomical characteristics and can be taken as an individual phantom to investigate the difference of internal dose with Caucasians. In this study, the emission of mono-energetic photons and electrons of 10 keV to 4 MeV energy were calculated using the Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code MCNP. Results were compared with the values from ICRP reference and ORNL models. The results showed that SAF from the Rad-HUMAN have similar trends but are larger than those from the other two models. The differences were due to the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The SAFs based on the Rad-HUMAN phantom provide an accurate and reliable data for internal radiation dose calculations for Chinese females. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03040000), National Natural Science Foundation of China (910266004, 11305205, 11305203) and National Special Program for ITER (2014GB112001)

  16. Performance analysis of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A for photon-based radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarco, J.J.; Solberg, T.D.; Wallace, R.E.; Smathers, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos code MCNP4A (Monte Carlo M-Particle version 4A) is currently used to simulate a variety of problems ranging from nuclear reactor analysis to boron neutron capture therapy. This study is designed to evaluate MCNP4A as the dose calculation system for photon-based radiotherapy applications. A graphical user interface (MCNP Radiation Therapy) has been developed which automatically sets up the geometry and photon source requirements for three-dimensional simulations using Computed Tomography (CT) data. Preliminary results suggest the code is capable of calculating satisfactory dose distributions in a variety of simulated homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. The major drawback for this dosimetry system is the amount of time to obtain a statistically significant answer. MCNPRT allows the user to analyze the performance of MCNP4A as a function of material, geometry resolution and MCNP4A photon and electron physics parameters. A typical simulation geometry consists of a 10 MV photon point source incident on a 15 x 15 x 15 cm{sup 3} phantom composed of water voxels ranging in size from 10 x 10 x 10 mm{sup 3} to 2 x 2 x 2 mm{sup 3}. As the voxel size is decreased, a larger percentage of time is spent tracking photons through the voxelized geometry as opposed to the secondary electrons. A PRPR Patch file is under development that will optimize photon transport within the simulation phantom specifically for radiotherapy applications. MCNP4A also supports parallel processing capabilities via the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) message passing system. A dedicated network of five SUN SPARC2 processors produced a wall-clock speedup of 4.4 based on a simulation phantom containing 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} water voxels. The code was also tested on the 80 node IBM RS/6000 cluster at the Maui High Performance Computing Center (NHPCC). A non-dedicated system of 75 processors produces a wall clock speedup of 29 relative to one SUN SPARC2 computer.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Light Transport in Tissue, Beta Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-12-09

    Understanding light-tissue interaction is fundamental in the field of Biomedical Optics. It has important implications for both therapeutic and diagnostic technologies. In this program, light transport in scattering tissue is modeled by absorption and scattering events as each photon travels through the tissue. the path of each photon is determined statistically by calculating probabilities of scattering and absorption. Other meausured quantities are total reflected light, total transmitted light, and total heat absorbed.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurement of a nonspectroscopic radiation portal monitor for photon detection efficiencies of internally deposited radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Matthew Glen

    Particle transport of radionuclide photons using the Monte Carlo N-Particle computer code can be used to determine a portal monitor's photon detection efficiency, in units of counts per photon, for internally deposited radionuclides. Good agreement has been found with experimental results for radionuclides that emit higher energy photons, such as Cs-137 and Co-60. Detection efficiency for radionuclides that emit lower energy photons, such as Am-241, greatly depend on the effective discriminator energy level of the portal monitor as well as any attenuating material between the source and detectors. This evaluation uses a chi-square approach to determine the best fit discriminator level of a non-spectroscopic portal monitor when the effective discriminator level, in units of energy, is not known. Internal detection efficiencies were evaluated experimentally using an anthropomorphic phantom with NIST traceable sources at various internal locations, and by simulation using MCNP5. The results of this research find that MCNP5 can be an effective tool for simulation of photon detection efficiencies, given a known discriminator level, for internally and externally deposited radionuclides. In addition, MCNP5 can be used for bounding personnel doses from either internally or externally deposited mixtures of radionuclides.

  19. Efficient, Automated Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Ambrose, Martin; Spanier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an indispensible model for solving radiative transport problems, but their slow convergence inhibits their use as an everyday computational tool. In this paper, we present two new ideas for accelerating the convergence of Monte Carlo algorithms based upon an efficient algorithm that couples simulations of forward and adjoint transport equations. Forward random walks are first processed in stages, each using a fixed sample size, and information from stage k is used to alter the sampling and weighting procedure in stage k + 1. This produces rapid geometric convergence and accounts for dramatic gains in the efficiency of the forward computation. In case still greater accuracy is required in the forward solution, information from an adjoint simulation can be added to extend the geometric learning of the forward solution. The resulting new approach should find widespread use when fast, accurate simulations of the transport equation are needed. PMID:23226872

  20. Efficient, automated Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Rong; Ambrose, Martin; Spanier, Jerome

    2008-11-20

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an indispensible model for solving radiative transport problems, but their slow convergence inhibits their use as an everyday computational tool. In this paper, we present two new ideas for accelerating the convergence of Monte Carlo algorithms based upon an efficient algorithm that couples simulations of forward and adjoint transport equations. Forward random walks are first processed in stages, each using a fixed sample size, and information from stage k is used to alter the sampling and weighting procedure in stage k+1. This produces rapid geometric convergence and accounts for dramatic gains in the efficiency of the forward computation. In case still greater accuracy is required in the forward solution, information from an adjoint simulation can be added to extend the geometric learning of the forward solution. The resulting new approach should find widespread use when fast, accurate simulations of the transport equation are needed.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of photon densities inside the dermis in LLLT (low level laser therapy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Parviz; Eftekharnoori, Somayeh; Dehghanpour, Hamid Reza

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the photon distribution of He:Ne laser within dermis tissue is studied. The dermis as a highly scattering media was irradiated by a low power laser. The photon densities as well as the corresponding isothermal contours were obtained by two different numerical methods, i.e., Lambert-Beer and Welch. The results were compared to that of Monte Carlo subsequently.

  2. Accurate and efficient Monte Carlo solutions to the radiative transport equation in the spatial frequency domain

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adam R.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach to solving the radiative transport equation (RTE) for layered media in the spatial frequency domain (SFD) using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. This is done by obtaining a complex photon weight from analysis of the Fourier transform of the RTE. We also develop a modified shortcut method that enables a single MC simulation to efficiently provide RTE solutions in the SFD for any number of spatial frequencies. We provide comparisons between the modified shortcut method and conventional discrete transform methods for SFD reflectance. Further results for oblique illumination illustrate the potential diagnostic utility of the SFD phase-shifts for analysis of layered media. PMID:21685989

  3. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of the photon initiated showers and Kiel result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, A.; Muraki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The Kiel experimental results indicate an existence of the ultra high-energy gamma-rays coming from Cyg. X-3. However the result indicates that the number of the muons included in the photon initiated shower is the same as the number included in the proton initiated showers. According to our Monte Carlo calculation as shown in the graph of underpart, the number of muons included in the photon initiated showers should be less than 1/15 of the photon's. The previous simulation was made under one dimensional approximation. This time the result of three dimensional calculation is reported.

  4. Monte Carlo generator photon jets used for luminosity at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotovich, G. V.; Kuraev, E. A.; Sibidanov, A. L.

    2010-06-01

    A Monte-Carlo Generator Photon Jets (MCGPJ) to simulate Bhabha scattering as well as production of two charged muons and two photons events is discussed. The theoretical precision of the cross sections with radiative corrections (RC) is estimated to be smaller than 0.2%. The Next Leading Order (NLO) radiative corrections proportional to ? are treated exactly, whereas the all logarithmically enhanced contributions, related to photon jets emitted in the collinear region, are taken into account in frame of the Structure Function approach. Numerous tests of the MCGPJ as well as a detailed comparison with other MC generators are presented.

  5. Monte Carlo Modeling of Photon Interrogation Methods for Characterization of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara A; Downar, Thomas J; Padovani, Enrico; Clarke, Shaun D

    2006-01-01

    This work illustrates a methodology based on photon interrogation and coincidence counting for determining the characteristics of fissile material. The feasibility of the proposed methods was demonstrated using a Monte Carlo code system to simulate the full statistics of the neutron and photon field generated by the photon interrogation of fissile and non-fissile materials. Time correlation functions between detectors were simulated for photon beam-on and photon beam-off operation. In the latter case, the correlation signal is obtained via delayed neutrons from photofission, which induce further fission chains in the nuclear material. An analysis methodology was demonstrated based on features selected from the simulated correlation functions and on the use of artificial neural networks. We show that the methodology can reliably differentiate between highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Furthermore, the mass of the material can be determined with a relative error of about 12%. Keywords: MCNP, MCNP-PoliMi, Artificial neural network, Correlation measurement, Photofission

  6. Monte Carlo based beam model using a photon MLC for modulated electron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Vetterli, D.; Chatelain, C.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) promises sparing of organs at risk for certain tumor sites. Any implementation of MERT treatment planning requires an accurate beam model. The aim of this work is the development of a beam model which reconstructs electron fields shaped using the Millennium photon multileaf collimator (MLC) (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) for a Varian linear accelerator (linac). Methods: This beam model is divided into an analytical part (two photon and two electron sources) and a Monte Carlo (MC) transport through the MLC. For dose calculation purposes the beam model has been coupled with a macro MC dose calculation algorithm. The commissioning process requires a set of measurements and precalculated MC input. The beam model has been commissioned at a source to surface distance of 70 cm for a Clinac 23EX (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) and a TrueBeam linac (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). For validation purposes, measured and calculated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared for four different MLC shaped electron fields and all available energies. Furthermore, a measured two-dimensional dose distribution for patched segments consisting of three 18 MeV segments, three 12 MeV segments, and a 9 MeV segment is compared with corresponding dose calculations. Finally, measured and calculated two-dimensional dose distributions are compared for a circular segment encompassed with a C-shaped segment. Results: For 15 34, 5 5, and 2 2 cm{sup 2} fields differences between water phantom measurements and calculations using the beam model coupled with the macro MC dose calculation algorithm are generally within 2% of the maximal dose value or 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) for all electron beam energies. For a more complex MLC pattern, differences between measurements and calculations are generally within 3% of the maximal dose value or 3 mm DTA for all electron beam energies. For the two-dimensional dose comparisons, the differences between calculations and measurements are generally within 2% of the maximal dose value or 2 mm DTA. Conclusions : The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the developed beam model is suitable to accurately reconstruct photon MLC shaped electron beams for a Clinac 23EX and a TrueBeam linac. Hence, in future work the beam model will be utilized to investigate the possibilities of MERT using the photon MLC to shape electron beams.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  8. Neutron streaming Monte Carlo radiation transport code MORSE-CG

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, A.M.; Miller, W.H.

    1986-11-01

    Calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo code, MORSE-CG, to determine the neutron streaming through various straight and stepped gaps between radiation shield sectors in the conceptual tokamak fusion power plant design STARFIRE. This design calls for ''pie-shaped'' radiation shields with gaps between segments. It is apparent that some type of offset, or stepped gap, configuration will be necessary to reduce neutron streaming through these gaps. To evaluate this streaming problem, a MORSE-to-MORSE coupling technique was used, consisting of two separate transport calculations, which together defined the entire transport problem. The results define the effectiveness of various gap configurations to eliminate radiation streaming.

  9. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J.; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6?MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10?nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10??m away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  10. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-04-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science.

  11. SIMIND Monte Carlo simulation of a single photon emission CT

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Islamian, J. Pirayesh; Momennezhad, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Naseri, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we simulated a Siemens E.CAM SPECT system using SIMIND Monte Carlo program to acquire its experimental characterization in terms of energy resolution, sensitivity, spatial resolution and imaging of phantoms using 99mTc. The experimental and simulation data for SPECT imaging was acquired from a point source and Jaszczak phantom. Verification of the simulation was done by comparing two sets of images and related data obtained from the actual and simulated systems. Image quality was assessed by comparing image contrast and resolution. Simulated and measured energy spectra (with or without a collimator) and spatial resolution from point sources in air were compared. The resulted energy spectra present similar peaks for the gamma energy of 99mTc at 140 KeV. FWHM for the simulation calculated to 14.01 KeV and 13.80 KeV for experimental data, corresponding to energy resolution of 10.01 and 9.86% compared to defined 9.9% for both systems, respectively. Sensitivities of the real and virtual gamma cameras were calculated to 85.11 and 85.39 cps/MBq, respectively. The energy spectra of both simulated and real gamma cameras were matched. Images obtained from Jaszczak phantom, experimentally and by simulation, showed similarity in contrast and resolution. SIMIND Monte Carlo could successfully simulate the Siemens E.CAM gamma camera. The results validate the use of the simulated system for further investigation, including modification, planning, and developing a SPECT system to improve the quality of images. PMID:20177569

  12. Modeling photon transport in transabdominal fetal oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Vishnoi, Gargi; Choe, Regine; Chance, Britton

    2000-07-01

    The possibility of optical oximetry of the blood in the fetal brain measured across the maternal abdomen just prior to birth is under investigated. Such measurements could detect fetal distress prior to birth and aid in the clinical decision regarding Cesarean section. This paper uses a perturbation method to model photon transport through a 8- cm-diam fetal brain located at a constant 2.5 cm below a curved maternal abdominal surface with an air/tissue boundary. In the simulation, a near-infrared light source delivers light to the abdomen and a detector is positioned up to 10 cm from the source along the arc of the abdominal surface. The light transport [W/cm2 fluence rate per W incident power] collected at the 10 cm position is Tm equals 2.2 X 10-6 cm-2 if the fetal brain has the same optical properties as the mother and Tf equals 1.0 X 10MIN6 cm-2 for an optically perturbing fetal brain with typical brain optical properties. The perturbation P equals (Tf - Tm)/Tm is -53% due to the fetal brain. The model illustrates the challenge and feasibility of transabdominal oximetry of the fetal brain.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-03-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D(CF) (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h(-1) per Bq kg(-1)) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D(CF) values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good agreement (less than 15% of difference) for photon energies above 1,500 keV. Antithetically, the agreement is not as good (difference of 20-30%) for the low energy photons. PMID:10688452

  14. Neutron and photon transport in seagoing cargo containers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J.; Descalle, M.-A.; Hall, J.; Pohl, B.; Prussin, S.G.

    2005-05-01

    Factors affecting sensing of small quantities of fissionable material in large seagoing cargo containers by neutron interrogation and detection of {beta}-delayed photons are explored. The propagation of variable-energy neutrons in cargos, subsequent fission of hidden nuclear material and production of the {beta}-delayed photons, and the propagation of these photons to an external detector are considered explicitly. Detailed results of Monte Carlo simulations of these stages in representative cargos are presented. Analytical models are developed both as a basis for a quantitative understanding of the interrogation process and as a tool to allow ready extrapolation of our results to cases not specifically considered here.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Frankl, Matthias; Macin-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of <1 % in-field and 15 % in average over the rest of the phantom could be obtained. Neutron dose equivalent, caused by photonuclear reactions in the linear accelerator components at photon energies of approximately >8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation. PMID:26311702

  16. A Monte Carlo method for calculating the energy response of plastic scintillators to polarized photons below 100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kiss, M.; Kurita, K.; Pearce, M.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Ueno, M.; Umeki, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Arimoto, M.; Axelsson, M.; Marini Bettolo, C.; Bogaert, G.; Chen, P.; Craig, W.; Fukazawa, Y.; Gunji, S.; Kamae, T.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kishimoto, S.; Klamra, W.; Larsson, S.; Madejski, G.; Ng, J. S. T.; Ryde, F.; Rydstrm, S.; Takahashi, T.; Thurston, T. S.; Varner, G.

    2009-03-01

    The energy response of plastic scintillators (Eljen Technology EJ-204) to polarized soft gamma-ray photons below 100 keV has been studied, primarily for the balloon-borne polarimeter, PoGOLite. The response calculation includes quenching effects due to low-energy recoil electrons and the position dependence of the light collection efficiency in a 20 cm long scintillator rod. The broadening of the pulse-height spectrum, presumably caused by light transportation processes inside the scintillator, as well as the generation and multiplication of photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tube, were studied experimentally and have also been taken into account. A Monte Carlo simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was used to model photon interactions in the scintillators. When using the polarized Compton/Rayleigh scattering processes previously corrected by the authors, scintillator spectra and angular distributions of scattered polarized photons could clearly be reproduced, in agreement with the results obtained at a synchrotron beam test conducted at the KEK Photon Factory. Our simulation successfully reproduces the modulation factor, defined as the ratio of the amplitude to the mean of the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles, within 5% (relative). Although primarily developed for the PoGOLite mission, the method presented here is also relevant for other missions aiming to measure polarization from astronomical objects using plastic scintillator scatterers.

  17. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rhmann, Antje; Poppe, Bjrn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of detector responses and dose conversion factors, as well as increases of the RBE have to be anticipated. Parameter P(D)(200 keV) can also be used as a guidance supporting the selection of a calibration geometry suitable for radiation dosimeters to be used in small radiation fields. PMID:21530198

  18. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  19. Adaptively Learning an Importance Function Using Transport Constrained Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.

    1998-06-22

    It is well known that a Monte Carlo estimate can be obtained with zero-variance if an exact importance function for the estimate is known. There are many ways that one might iteratively seek to obtain an ever more exact importance function. This paper describes a method that has obtained ever more exact importance functions that empirically produce an error that is dropping exponentially with computer time. The method described herein constrains the importance function to satisfy the (adjoint) Boltzmann transport equation. This constraint is provided by using the known form of the solution, usually referred to as the Case eigenfunction solution.

  20. A high-order photon Monte Carlo method for radiative transfer in direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Modest, M.F.; Haworth, D.C. . E-mail: dch12@psu.edu

    2007-05-01

    A high-order photon Monte Carlo method is developed to solve the radiative transfer equation. The statistical and discretization errors of the computed radiative heat flux and radiation source term are isolated and quantified. Up to sixth-order spatial accuracy is demonstrated for the radiative heat flux, and up to fourth-order accuracy for the radiation source term. This demonstrates the compatibility of the method with high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) for chemically reacting flows. The method is applied to address radiative heat transfer in a one-dimensional laminar premixed flame and a statistically one-dimensional turbulent premixed flame. Modifications of the flame structure with radiation are noted in both cases, and the effects of turbulence/radiation interactions on the local reaction zone structure are revealed for the turbulent flame. Computational issues in using a photon Monte Carlo method for DNS of turbulent reacting flows are discussed.

  1. A Monte Carlo study on neutron and electron contamination of an unflattened 18-MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Mesbahi, Asghar

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on flattening filter (FF) free beams have shown increased dose rate and less out-of-field dose for unflattened photon beams. On the other hand, changes in contamination electrons and neutron spectra produced through photon (E>10 MV) interactions with linac components have not been completely studied for FF free beams. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of removing FF on contamination electron and neutron spectra for an 18-MV photon beam using Monte Carlo (MC) method. The 18-MV photon beam of Elekta SL-25 linac was simulated using MCNPX MC code. The photon, electron and neutron spectra at a distance of 100 cm from target and on the central axis of beam were scored for 10 x 10 and 30 x 30 cm(2) fields. Our results showed increase in contamination electron fluence (normalized to photon fluence) up to 1.6 times for FF free beam, which causes more skin dose for patients. Neuron fluence reduction of 54% was observed for unflattened beams. Our study confirmed the previous measurement results, which showed neutron dose reduction for unflattened beams. This feature can lead to less neutron dose for patients treated with unflattened high-energy photon beams. PMID:18760613

  2. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  3. A Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristivojevic, Zoran; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation for ion transport in hot background gases, which is an alternative way of solving the corresponding Boltzmann equation that determines the distribution function of ions. We consider the limit of low ion densities when the distribution function of the background gas remains unchanged due to collision with ions. Special attention has been paid to properly treating the thermal motion of the host gas particles and their influence on ions, which is very important at low electric fields, when the mean ion energy is comparable to the thermal energy of the host gas. We found the conditional probability distribution of gas velocities that correspond to an ion of specific velocity which collides with a gas particle. Also, we have derived exact analytical formulae for piecewise calculation of the collision frequency integrals. We address the cases when the background gas is monocomponent and when it is a mixture of different gases. The techniques described here are required for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and for hybrid models of non-equilibrium plasmas. The range of energies where it is necessary to apply the technique has been defined. The results we obtained are in excellent agreement with the existing ones obtained by complementary methods. Having verified our algorithm, we were able to produce calculations for Ar+ ions in Ar and propose them as a new benchmark for thermal effects. The developed method is widely applicable for solving the Boltzmann equation that appears in many different contexts in physics.

  4. Characterization of a novel micro-irradiator using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Jeraj, Robert

    2008-06-01

    Small animals are highly valuable resources for radiobiology research. While rodents have been widely used for decades, zebrafish embryos have recently become a very popular research model. However, unlike rodents, zebrafish embryos lack appropriate irradiation tools and methodologies. Therefore, the main purpose of this work is to use Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations to characterize dosimetric parameters, determine dosimetric sensitivity and help with the design of a new micro-irradiator capable of delivering irradiation fields as small as 1.0 mm in diameter. The system is based on a miniature x-ray source enclosed in a brass collimator with 3 cm diameter and 3 cm length. A pinhole of 1.0 mm diameter along the central axis of the collimator is used to produce a narrow photon beam. The MCNP5, Monte Carlo code, is used to study the beam energy spectrum, percentage depth dose curves, penumbra and effective field size, dose rate and radiation levels at 50 cm from the source. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations show that a beam produced by the miniature x-ray and the collimator system is adequate to totally or partially irradiate zebrafish embryos, cell cultures and other small specimens used in radiobiology research.

  5. A multiple source model for 6 MV photon beam dose calculations using Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Fix, M K; Stampanoni, M; Manser, P; Born, E J; Mini, R; Regsegger, P

    2001-05-01

    A multiple source model (MSM) for the 6 MV beam of a Varian Clinac 2300 C/D was developed by simulating radiation transport through the accelerator head for a set of square fields using the GEANT Monte Carlo (MC) code. The corresponding phase space (PS) data enabled the characterization of 12 sources representing the main components of the beam defining system. By parametrizing the source characteristics and by evaluating the dependence of the parameters on field size, it was possible to extend the validity of the model to arbitrary rectangular fields which include the central 3 x 3 cm2 field without additional precalculated PS data. Finally, a sampling procedure was developed in order to reproduce the PS data. To validate the MSM, the fluence, energy fluence and mean energy distributions determined from the original and the reproduced PS data were compared and showed very good agreement. In addition, the MC calculated primary energy spectrum was verified by an energy spectrum derived from transmission measurements. Comparisons of MC calculated depth dose curves and profiles, using original and PS data reproduced by the MSM, agree within 1% and 1 mm. Deviations from measured dose distributions are within 1.5% and 1 mm. However, the real beam leads to some larger deviations outside the geometrical beam area for large fields. Calculated output factors in 10 cm water depth agree within 1.5% with experimentally determined data. In conclusion, the MSM produces accurate PS data for MC photon dose calculations for the rectangular fields specified. PMID:11384062

  6. A deterministic computational model for the two dimensional electron and photon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Nealy, John E.

    2014-12-01

    A deterministic (non-statistical) two dimensional (2D) computational model describing the transport of electron and photon typical of space radiation environment in various shield media is described. The 2D formalism is casted into a code which is an extension of a previously developed one dimensional (1D) deterministic electron and photon transport code. The goal of both 1D and 2D codes is to satisfy engineering design applications (i.e. rapid analysis) while maintaining an accurate physics based representation of electron and photon transport in space environment. Both 1D and 2D transport codes have utilized established theoretical representations to describe the relevant collisional and radiative interactions and transport processes. In the 2D version, the shield material specifications are made more general as having the pertinent cross sections. In the 2D model, the specification of the computational field is in terms of a distance of traverse z along an axial direction as well as a variable distribution of deflection (i.e. polar) angles ? where -?/2transport formalism, a combined mean-free-path and average trajectory approach is used. For candidate shielding materials, using the trapped electron radiation environments at low Earth orbit (LEO), geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and Jupiter moon Europa, verification of the 2D formalism vs. 1D and an existing Monte Carlo code are presented.

  7. Dissipationless electron transport in photon-dressed nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kibis, O V

    2011-09-01

    It is shown that the electron coupling to photons in field-dressed nanostructures can result in the ground electron-photon state with a nonzero electric current. Since the current is associated with the ground state, it flows without the Joule heating of the nanostructure and is nondissipative. Such a dissipationless electron transport can be realized in strongly coupled electron-photon systems with the broken time-reversal symmetry--particularly, in quantum rings and chiral nanostructures dressed by circularly polarized photons. PMID:21981519

  8. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  9. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry.

  10. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-20

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t=0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry. PMID:24132041

  11. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.M.; Hochstedler, R.D.

    1997-02-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code).

  12. Analysis of Light Transport Features in Stone Fruits Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chizhu; Shi, Shuning; Chen, Jianjun; Wei, Wei; Tan, Zuojun

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of light in stone fruit tissue was modeled using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. Peaches were used as the representative model of stone fruits. The effects of the fruit core and the skin on light transport features in the peaches were assessed. It is suggested that the skin, flesh and core should be separately considered with different parameters to accurately simulate light propagation in intact stone fruit. The detection efficiency was evaluated by the percentage of effective photons and the detection sensitivity of the flesh tissue. The fruit skin decreases the detection efficiency, especially in the region close to the incident point. The choices of the source-detector distance, detection angle and source intensity were discussed. Accurate MC simulations may result in better insight into light propagation in stone fruit and aid in achieving the optimal fruit quality inspection without extensive experimental measurements. PMID:26469695

  13. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-03-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Uncertainty associated with Monte Carlo radiation transport in radionuclide metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochud, Franois O.; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Sima, Octavian

    2015-06-01

    In radionuclide metrology, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is widely used to compute parameters associated with primary measurements or calibration factors. Although MC methods are used to estimate uncertainties, the uncertainty associated with radiation transport in MC calculations is usually difficult to estimate. Counting statistics is the most obvious component of MC uncertainty and has to be checked carefully, particularly when variance reduction is used. However, in most cases fluctuations associated with counting statistics can be reduced using sufficient computing power. Cross-section data have intrinsic uncertainties that induce correlations when apparently independent codes are compared. Their effect on the uncertainty of the estimated parameter is difficult to determine and varies widely from case to case. Finally, the most significant uncertainty component for radionuclide applications is usually that associated with the detector geometry. Recent 2D and 3D x-ray imaging tools may be utilized, but comparison with experimental data as well as adjustments of parameters are usually inevitable.

  15. A self-consistent electric field for Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The BETA transport code implements a Monte Carlo method to calculate ion and electron confinement times tau/sub i/ and tau/sub e/ for stellarator equilibria defined by the BETA equilibrium code. The magnetic field strength is represented by a double Fourier series in poloidal and toroidal angles psi and phi with coefficients depending on the toroidal flux s. A linearized drift kinetic equation determining the distribution functions of the ions and electrons is solved by a method of split time using an Adams ordinary differential equation algorithm to trace orbits and using a random walk to model the Fokker-Planck collision operator. Confinement times are estimated from exponential decay of expected values of the solution. Expected values of trigonometric functions of psi and phi serve to specify Fourier coefficients of an average over velocity space of the distribution functions.

  16. Electron transport in magnetrons by a posteriori Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Electron transport across magnetic barriers is crucial in all magnetized plasmas. It governs not only the plasma parameters in the volume, but also the fluxes of charged particles towards the electrodes and walls. It is particularly important in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) reactors, influencing the quality of the deposited thin films, since this type of discharge is characterized by an increased ionization fraction of the sputtered material. Transport coefficients of electron clouds released both from the cathode and from several locations in the discharge volume are calculated for a HiPIMS discharge with pre-ionization operated in argon at 0.67 Pa and for very short pulses (few s) using the a posteriori Monte Carlo simulation technique. For this type of discharge electron transport is characterized by strong temporal and spatial dependence. Both drift velocity and diffusion coefficient depend on the releasing position of the electron cloud. They exhibit minimum values at the centre of the race-track for the secondary electrons released from the cathode. The diffusion coefficient of the same electrons increases from 2 to 4 times when the cathode voltage is doubled, in the first 1.5 s of the pulse. These parameters are discussed with respect to empirical Bohm diffusion.

  17. Monte Carlo study of photon fields from a flattening filter-free clinical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Titt, Uwe; Kry, Stephen F.; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael T.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-04-15

    In conventional clinical linear accelerators, the flattening filter scatters and absorbs a large fraction of primary photons. Increasing the beam-on time, which also increases the out-of-field exposure to patients, compensates for the reduction in photon fluence. In recent years, intensity modulated radiation therapy has been introduced, yielding better dose distributions than conventional three-dimensional conformal therapy. The drawback of this method is the further increase in beam-on time. An accelerator with the flattening filter removed, which would increase photon fluence greatly, could deliver considerably higher dose rates. The objective of the present study is to investigate the dosimetric properties of 6 and 18 MV photon beams from an accelerator without a flattening filter. The dosimetric data were generated using the Monte Carlo programs BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. The accelerator model was based on the Varian Clinac 2100 design. We compared depth doses, dose rates, lateral profiles, doses outside collimation, total and collimator scatter factors for an accelerator with and without a flatteneing filter. The study showed that removing the filter increased the dose rate on the central axis by a factor of 2.31 (6 MV) and 5.45 (18 MV) at a given target current. Because the flattening filter is a major source of head scatter photons, its removal from the beam line could reduce the out-of-field dose.

  18. Controlling single-photon transport with three-level quantum dots in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate how to control single-photon transport along the photonic crystal waveguide with the recent experimentally demonstrated artificial atoms [i.e., ?-type quantum dots (QDs)] [S. G. Carter et al., Nat. Photon. 7, 329 (2013), 10.1038/nphoton.2013.41] in an all-optical way. Adopting full quantum theory in real space, we analytically calculate the transport coefficients of single photons scattered by a ?-type QD embedded in single- and two-mode photonic crystal cavities (PCCs), respectively. Our numerical results clearly show that the photonic transmission properties can be exactly manipulated by adjusting the coupling strengths of waveguide-cavity and QD-cavity interactions. Specifically, for the PCC with two degenerate orthogonal polarization modes coupled to a ?-type QD with two degenerate ground states, we find that the photonic transmission spectra show three Rabi-splitting dips and the present system could serve as single-photon polarization beam splitters. The feasibility of our proposal with the current photonic crystal technique is also discussed.

  19. Identifying key surface parameters for optical photon transport in GEANT4/GATE simulations.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Cuplov, Vesna; Isaksson, Mats

    2015-09-01

    For a scintillator used for spectrometry, the generation, transport and detection of optical photons have a great impact on the energy spectrum resolution. A complete Monte Carlo model of a scintillator includes a coupled ionizing particle and optical photon transport, which can be simulated with the GEANT4 code. The GEANT4 surface parameters control the physics processes an optical photon undergoes when reaching the surface of a volume. In this work the impact of each surface parameter on the optical transport was studied by looking at the optical spectrum: the number of detected optical photons per ionizing source particle from a large plastic scintillator, i.e. the output signal. All simulations were performed using GATE v6.2 (GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission). The surface parameter finish (polished, ground, front-painted or back-painted) showed the greatest impact on the optical spectrum whereas the surface parameter ?(?), which controls the surface roughness, had a relatively small impact. It was also shown how the surface parameters reflectivity and reflectivity types (specular spike, specular lobe, Lambertian and backscatter) changed the optical spectrum depending on the probability for reflection and the combination of reflectivity types. A change in the optical spectrum will ultimately have an impact on a simulated energy spectrum. By studying the optical spectra presented in this work, a GEANT4 user can predict the shift in an optical spectrum caused be the alteration of a specific surface parameter. PMID:26046519

  20. Single Photon Transport through an Atomic Chain Coupled to a One-dimensional Photonic Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a single photon pulse travels through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our result is consistent with previous calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100%. The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single atom case. Many interesting physics can occur in this system such as the photonic bandgap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-type interference, superradiant effects and nonlinear frequency conversion. For engineering, this system may be used as a single photon frequency filter, single photon modulation and photon storage.

  1. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  2. Phonon transport analysis of semiconductor nanocomposites using monte carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malladi, Mayank

    Nanocomposites are composite materials which incorporate nanosized particles, platelets or fibers. The addition of nanosized phases into the bulk matrix can lead to significantly different material properties compared to their macrocomposite counterparts. For nanocomposites, thermal conductivity is one of the most important physical properties. Manipulation and control of thermal conductivity in nanocomposites have impacted a variety of applications. In particular, it has been shown that the phonon thermal conductivity can be reduced significantly in nanocomposites due to the increase in phonon interface scattering while the electrical conductivity can be maintained. This extraordinary property of nanocomposites has been used to enhance the energy conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric devices which is proportional to the ratio of electrical to thermal conductivity. This thesis investigates phonon transport and thermal conductivity in Si/Ge semiconductor nanocomposites through numerical analysis. The Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is adopted for description of phonon thermal transport in the nanocomposites. The BTE employs the particle-like nature of phonons to model heat transfer which accounts for both ballistic and diffusive transport phenomenon. Due to the implementation complexity and computational cost involved, the phonon BTE is difficult to solve in its most generic form. Gray media (frequency independent phonons) is often assumed in the numerical solution of BTE using conventional methods such as finite volume and discrete ordinates methods. This thesis solves the BTE using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique which is more convenient and efficient when non-gray media (frequency dependent phonons) is considered. In the MC simulation, phonons are displaced inside the computational domain under the various boundary conditions and scattering effects. In this work, under the relaxation time approximation, thermal transport in the nanocomposites are computed by using both gray media and non-gray media approaches. The non-gray media simulations take into consideration the dispersion and polarization effects of phonon transport. The effects of volume fraction, size, shape and distribution of the nanowire fillers on heat flow and hence thermal conductivity are studied. In addition, the computational performances of the gray and non-gray media approaches are compared.

  3. Simple beam models for Monte Carlo photon beam dose calculations in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fix, M K; Keller, H; Regsegger, P; Born, E J

    2000-12-01

    Monte Carlo (code GEANT) produced 6 and 15 MV phase space (PS) data were used to define several simple photon beam models. For creating the PS data the energy of starting electrons hitting the target was tuned to get correct depth dose data compared to measurements. The modeling process used the full PS information within the geometrical boundaries of the beam including all scattered radiation of the accelerator head. Scattered radiation outside the boundaries was neglected. Photons and electrons were assumed to be radiated from point sources. Four different models were investigated which involved different ways to determine the energies and locations of beam particles in the output plane. Depth dose curves, profiles, and relative output factors were calculated with these models for six field sizes from 5x5 to 40x40cm2 and compared to measurements. Model 1 uses a photon energy spectrum independent of location in the PS plane and a constant photon fluence in this plane. Model 2 takes into account the spatial particle fluence distribution in the PS plane. A constant fluence is used again in model 3, but the photon energy spectrum depends upon the off axis position. Model 4, finally uses the spatial particle fluence distribution and off axis dependent photon energy spectra in the PS plane. Depth dose curves and profiles for field sizes up to 10x10cm2 were not model sensitive. Good agreement between measured and calculated depth dose curves and profiles for all field sizes was reached for model 4. However, increasing deviations were found for increasing field sizes for models 1-3. Large deviations resulted for the profiles of models 2 and 3. This is due to the fact that these models overestimate and underestimate the energy fluence at large off axis distances. Relative output factors consistent with measurements resulted only for model 4. PMID:11190957

  4. Optimizing light transport in scintillation crystals for time-of-flight PET: an experimental and optical Monte Carlo simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving excellent timing resolution in gamma ray detectors is crucial in several applications such as medical imaging with time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). Although many factors impact the overall system timing resolution, the statistical nature of scintillation light, including photon production and transport in the crystal to the photodetector, is typically the limiting factor for modern scintillation detectors. In this study, we investigated the impact of surface treatment, in particular, roughening select areas of otherwise polished crystals, on light transport and timing resolution. A custom Monte Carlo photon tracking tool was used to gain insight into changes in light collection and timing resolution that were observed experimentally: select roughening configurations increased the light collection up to 25% and improved timing resolution by 15% compared to crystals with all polished surfaces. Simulations showed that partial surface roughening caused a greater number of photons to be reflected towards the photodetector and increased the initial rate of photoelectron production. This study provides a simple method to improve timing resolution and light collection in scintillator-based gamma ray detectors, a topic of high importance in the field of TOF-PET. Additionally, we demonstrated utility of our Monte Carlo simulation tool to accurately predict the effect of altering crystal surfaces on light collection and timing resolution. PMID:26114040

  5. Optimizing light transport in scintillation crystals for time-of-flight PET: an experimental and optical Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2015-06-01

    Achieving excellent timing resolution in gamma ray detectors is crucial in several applications such as medical imaging with time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). Although many factors impact the overall system timing resolution, the statistical nature of scintillation light, including photon production and transport in the crystal to the photodetector, is typically the limiting factor for modern scintillation detectors. In this study, we investigated the impact of surface treatment, in particular, roughening select areas of otherwise polished crystals, on light transport and timing resolution. A custom Monte Carlo photon tracking tool was used to gain insight into changes in light collection and timing resolution that were observed experimentally: select roughening configurations increased the light collection up to 25% and improved timing resolution by 15% compared to crystals with all polished surfaces. Simulations showed that partial surface roughening caused a greater number of photons to be reflected towards the photodetector and increased the initial rate of photoelectron production. This study provides a simple method to improve timing resolution and light collection in scintillator-based gamma ray detectors, a topic of high importance in the field of TOF-PET. Additionally, we demonstrated utility of our Monte Carlo simulation tool to accurately predict the effect of altering crystal surfaces on light collection and timing resolution. PMID:26114040

  6. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano; Gatti, Davide; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the non-Hermitian nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian asymmetric transport can occur in tight-binding lattices with an imaginary gauge field via a non-Hermitian delocalization transition, and in periodically-driven superlattices. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure. PMID:26314932

  7. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Stefano; Gatti, Davide; Valle, Giuseppe Della

    2015-01-01

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the non-Hermitian nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian asymmetric transport can occur in tight-binding lattices with an imaginary gauge field via a non-Hermitian delocalization transition, and in periodically-driven superlattices. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure. PMID:26314932

  8. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano; Gatti, Davide; Valle, Giuseppe Della

    2015-08-01

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the non-Hermitian nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian asymmetric transport can occur in tight-binding lattices with an imaginary gauge field via a non-Hermitian delocalization transition, and in periodically-driven superlattices. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure.

  9. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE{sub 0} and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E{sub 0} and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE{sub 0})/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm{sup 3} size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not small enough. Conclusions: Using conservative user-defined simulation parameters, both PENH and Geant4 pass the Fano cavity test for proton transport. Our methodology is applicable to any kind of charged particle, provided that the considered MC code is able to track the charged particle considered.

  10. Monte Carlo photon beam modeling and commissioning for radiotherapy dose calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, A; Ait chikh, S; Khelassi-Toutaoui, N; Hattali, B

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present work was a Monte Carlo verification of the Multi-grid superposition (MGS) dose calculation algorithm implemented in the CMS XiO (Elekta) treatment planning system and used to calculate the dose distribution produced by photon beams generated by the linear accelerator (linac) Siemens Primus. The BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc (EGSnrc package) Monte Carlo model of the linac head was used as a benchmark. In the first part of the work, the BEAMnrc was used for the commissioning of a 6 MV photon beam and to optimize the linac description to fit the experimental data. In the second part, the MGS dose distributions were compared with DOSXYZnrc using relative dose error comparison and γ-index analysis (2%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm), in different dosimetric test cases. Results show good agreement between simulated and calculated dose in homogeneous media for square and rectangular symmetric fields. The γ-index analysis confirmed that for most cases the MGS model and EGSnrc doses are within 3% or 3 mm. PMID:24947967

  11. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D transport

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-04-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI`s unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed.

  12. Status of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    There are two versions of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MORSE-CGA is the most well-known and has undergone extensive use for many years. MORSE-SGC was originally developed in about 1980 in order to restructure the cross-section handling and thereby save storage. However, with the advent of new computer systems having much larger storage capacity, that aspect of SGC has become unnecessary. Both versions use data from multigroup cross-section libraries, although in somewhat different formats. MORSE-SGC is the version of MORSE that is part of the SCALE system, but it can also be run stand-alone. Both CGA and SGC use the Multiple Array System (MARS) geometry package. In the last six months the main focus of the work on these two versions has been on making them operational on workstations, in particular, the IBM RISC 6000 family. A new version of SCALE for workstations is being released to the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). MORSE-CGA, Version 2.0, is also being released to RSIC. Both SGC and CGA have undergone other revisions recently. This paper reports on the current status of the MORSE code system.

  13. Analysis of EBR-II neutron and photon physics by multidimensional transport-theory techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.; Finck, P.J.; Palmiotti, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper contains a review of the challenges specific to the EBR-II core physics, a description of the methods and techniques which have been developed for addressing these challenges, and the results of some validation studies relative to power-distribution calculations. Numerical tests have shown that the VARIANT nodal code yields eigenvalue and power predictions as accurate as finite difference and discrete ordinates transport codes, at a small fraction of the cost. Comparisons with continuous-energy Monte Carlo results have proven that the errors introduced by the use of the diffusion-theory approximation in the collapsing procedure to obtain broad-group cross sections, kerma factors, and photon-production matrices, have a small impact on the EBR-II neutron/photon power distribution.

  14. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D{sub 90(w,m)} over D{sub 90(m,m)} for clinical implants matches D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} at 1 cm from the single point sources. Conclusions: Given the small variation with distance, using conversion factors based on the emitted photon spectrum (or its mean energy) of a given source introduces minimal error. The large differences observed between scoring schemes underline the need for guidelines on choice of media for dose reporting. Providing such guidelines is beyond the scope of this work.

  15. Monte Carlo calculation based on hydrogen composition of the tissue for MV photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Demol, Benjamin; Viard, Romain; Reynaert, Nick

    2015-01-01

     The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that Monte Carlo treatment planning systems require tissue characterization (density and composition) as a function of CT number. A discrete set of tissue classes with a specific composition is introduced. In the current work we demonstrate that, for megavoltage photon radiotherapy, only the hydrogen content of the different tissues is of interest. This conclusion might have an impact on MRI-based dose calculations and on MVCT calibration using tissue substitutes. A stoichiometric calibration was performed, grouping tissues with similar atomic composition into 15 dosimetrically equivalent subsets. To demonstrate the importance of hydrogen, a new scheme was derived, with correct hydrogen content, complemented by oxygen (all elements differing from hydrogen are replaced by oxygen). Mass attenuation coefficients and mass stopping powers for this scheme were calculated and compared to the original scheme. Twenty-five CyberKnife treatment plans were recalculated by an in-house developed Monte Carlo system using tissue density and hydrogen content derived from the CT images. The results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the original stoichiometric calibration. Between 300 keV and 3 MeV, the relative difference of mass attenuation coefficients is under 1% within all subsets. Between 10 keV and 20 MeV, the relative difference of mass stopping powers goes up to 5% in hard bone and remains below 2% for all other tissue subsets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the treatment plans present no visual difference between the two schemes. Relative differences of dose indexes D98, D95, D50, D05, D02, and Dmean were analyzed and a distribution centered around zero and of standard deviation below 2% (3 σ) was established. On the other hand, once the hydrogen content is slightly modified, important dose differences are obtained. Monte Carlo dose planning in the field of megavoltage photon radiotherapy is fully achievable using only hydrogen content of tissues, a conclusion that might impact MRI dose calculation, but can also help selecting the optimal tissue substitutes when calibrat-ing MVCT devices. PMID:26699320

  16. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on dose distribution and RBE of photon beams: comparing PENELOPE and EGS4 Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettelbeck, H.; Takacs, G. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2008-09-01

    The application of a strong transverse magnetic field to a volume undergoing irradiation by a photon beam can produce localized regions of dose enhancement and dose reduction. This study uses the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code to investigate the effect of a slice of uniform transverse magnetic field on a photon beam using different magnetic field strengths and photon beam energies. The maximum and minimum dose yields obtained in the regions of dose enhancement and dose reduction are compared to those obtained with the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in a study by Li et al (2001), who investigated the effect of a slice of uniform transverse magnetic field (1 to 20 Tesla) applied to high-energy photon beams. PENELOPE simulations yielded maximum dose enhancements and dose reductions as much as 111% and 77%, respectively, where most results were within 6% of the EGS4 result. Further PENELOPE simulations were performed with the Sheikh-Bagheri and Rogers (2002) input spectra for 6, 10 and 15 MV photon beams, yielding results within 4% of those obtained with the Mohan et al (1985) spectra. Small discrepancies between a few of the EGS4 and PENELOPE results prompted an investigation into the influence of the PENELOPE elastic scattering parameters C1 and C2 and low-energy electron and photon transport cut-offs. Repeating the simulations with smaller scoring bins improved the resolution of the regions of dose enhancement and dose reduction, especially near the magnetic field boundaries where the dose deposition can abruptly increase or decrease. This study also investigates the effect of a magnetic field on the low-energy electron spectrum that may correspond to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE). Simulations show that the increase in dose is achieved predominantly through the lower energy electron population.

  17. Simulating photon scattering effects in structurally detailed ventricular models using a Monte Carlo approach

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Martin J.; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantly distort the optically-recorded action potential (AP) upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modeling approaches based on the photon diffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such as small cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon packets as they propagate through tissue with differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals within unstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, including representations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct humped morphology. Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with virtual-electrode regions of strong de-/hyper-polarized tissue surrounding cavities during shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarization. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity. PMID:25309442

  18. Monte Carlo-based revised values of dose rate constants at discrete photon energies

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, T. Palani; Shrivastava, Vandana; Chourasiya, Ghanashyam; Babu, D. Appala Raju

    2014-01-01

    Absorbed dose rate to water at 0.2 cm and 1 cm due to a point isotropic photon source as a function of photon energy is calculated using the EDKnrc user-code of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. This code system utilized widely used XCOM photon cross-section dataset for the calculation of absorbed dose to water. Using the above dose rates, dose rate constants are calculated. Air-kerma strength Sk needed for deriving dose rate constant is based on the mass-energy absorption coefficient compilations of Hubbell and Seltzer published in the year 1995. A comparison of absorbed dose rates in water at the above distances to the published values reflects the differences in photon cross-section dataset in the low-energy region (difference is up to 2% in dose rate values at 1 cm in the energy range 3050 keV and up to 4% at 0.2 cm at 30 keV). A maximum difference of about 8% is observed in the dose rate value at 0.2 cm at 1.75 MeV when compared to the published value. Sk calculations based on the compilation of Hubbell and Seltzer show a difference of up to 2.5% in the low-energy region (2050 keV) when compared to the published values. The deviations observed in the values of dose rate and Sk affect the values of dose rate constants up to 3%. PMID:24600166

  19. A Monte Carlo simulation for predicting photon return from sodium laser guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lu; Kibblewhite, Edward; Jin, Kai; Xue, Suijian; Shen, Zhixia; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Junwei; Wei, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Sodium laser guide star is an ideal source for astronomical adaptive optics system correcting wave-front aberration caused by atmospheric turbulence. However, the cost and difficulties to manufacture a compact high quality sodium laser with power higher than 20W is not a guarantee that the laser will provide a bright enough laser guide star due to the physics of sodium atom in the atmosphere. It would be helpful if a prediction tool could provide the estimation of photon generating performance for arbitrary laser output formats, before an actual laser were designed. Based on rate equation, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation software that could be used to predict sodium laser guide star generating performance for arbitrary laser formats. In this paper, we will describe the model of our simulation, its implementation and present comparison results with field test data.

  20. Evaluation of Electron Contamination in Cancer Treatment with Megavoltage Photon Beams: Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Seif, F.; Bayatiani, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Megavoltage beams used in radiotherapy are contaminated with secondary electrons. Different parts of linac head and air above patient act as a source of this contamination. This contamination can increase damage to skin and subcutaneous tissue during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulation is an accurate method for dose calculation in medical dosimetry and has an important role in optimization of linac head materials. The aim of this study was to calculate electron contamination of Varian linac. Materials and Method The 6MV photon beam of Varian (2100 C/D) linac was simulated by Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, based on its companys instructions. The validation was done by comparing the calculated depth dose and profiles of simulation with dosimetry measurements in a water phantom (error less than 2%). The Percentage Depth Dose (PDDs), profiles and contamination electron energy spectrum were calculated for different therapeutic field sizes (55 to 4040 cm2) for both linacs. Results The dose of electron contamination was observed to rise with increase in field size. The contribution of the secondary contamination electrons on the surface dose was 6% for 55 cm2 to 27% for 4040 cm2, respectively. Conclusion Based on the results, the effect of electron contamination on patient surface dose cannot be ignored, so the knowledge of the electron contamination is important in clinical dosimetry. It must be calculated for each machine and considered in Treatment Planning Systems. PMID:25973409

  1. Extension of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes to 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.G.

    1988-08-01

    Version 2.1 of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes was modified to extend their ability to model interactions up to 100 GeV. Benchmarks against experimental results conducted at 10 and 15 GeV confirm the accuracy of the extended codes. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Detailed calculation of inner-shell impact ionization to use in photon transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Verardi, Luca; Salvat, Francesc

    2014-02-01

    Secondary electrons can modify the intensity of the XRF characteristic lines by means of a mechanism known as inner-shell impact ionization (ISII). The ad-hoc code KERNEL (which calls the PENELOPE package) has been used to characterize the electron correction in terms of angular, spatial and energy distributions. It is demonstrated that the angular distribution of the characteristic photons due to ISII can be safely considered as isotropic, and that the source of photons from electron interactions is well represented as a point source. The energy dependence of the correction is described using an analytical model in the energy range 1-150 keV, for all the emission lines (K, L and M) of the elements with atomic numbers Z=11-92. It is introduced a new photon kernel comprising the correction due to ISII, suitable to be adopted in photon transport codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo) with a minimal effort. The impact of the correction is discussed for the most intense K (Kα1,Kα2,Kβ1) and L (Lα1,Lα2) lines.

  3. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  4. FZ2MC: A Tool for Monte Carlo Transport Code Geometry Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, B M; Nielsen Jr., D E; Procassini, R J

    2009-02-25

    The process of creating and validating combinatorial geometry representations of complex systems for use in Monte Carlo transport simulations can be both time consuming and error prone. To simplify this process, a tool has been developed which employs extensions of the Form-Z commercial solid modeling tool. The resultant FZ2MC (Form-Z to Monte Carlo) tool permits users to create, modify and validate Monte Carlo geometry and material composition input data. Plugin modules that export this data to an input file, as well as parse data from existing input files, have been developed for several Monte Carlo codes. The FZ2MC tool is envisioned as a 'universal' tool for the manipulation of Monte Carlo geometry and material data. To this end, collaboration on the development of plug-in modules for additional Monte Carlo codes is desired.

  5. Detector-selection technique for Monte Carlo transport in azimuthally symmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1982-01-01

    Many radiation transport problems contain geometric symmetries which are not exploited in obtaining their Monte Carlo solutions. An important class of problems is that in which the geometry is symmetric about an axis. These problems arise in the analyses of a reactor core or shield, spent fuel shipping casks, tanks containing radioactive solutions, radiation transport in the atmosphere (air-over-ground problems), etc. Although amenable to deterministic solution, such problems can often be solved more efficiently and accurately with the Monte Carlo method. For this class of problems, a technique is described in this paper which significantly reduces the variance of the Monte Carlo-calculated effect of interest at point detectors.

  6. Utilization of a Photon Transport Code to Investigate Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Quantities and Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palta, Jatinder Raj

    A versatile computer program MORSE, based on neutron and photon transport theory has been utilized to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques. A multi-energy group representation of transport equation provides a concise approach in utilizing Monte Carlo numerical techniques to multiple radiation therapy treatment planning problems. A general three dimensional geometry is used to simulate radiation therapy treatment planning problems in configurations of an actual clinical setting. Central axis total and scattered dose distributions for homogeneous and inhomogeneous water phantoms are calculated and the correction factor for lung and bone inhomogeneities are also evaluated. Results show that Monte Carlo calculations based on multi-energy group transport theory predict the depth dose distributions that are in good agreement with available experimental data. Improved correction factors based on the concepts of lung-air-ratio and bone-air-ratio are proposed in lieu of the presently used correction factors that are based on tissue-air-ratio power law method for inhomogeneity corrections. Central axis depth dose distributions for a bremsstrahlung spectrum from a linear accelerator is also calculated to exhibit the versatility of the computer program in handling multiple radiation therapy problems. A novel approach is undertaken to study the dosimetric properties of brachytherapy sources. Dose rate constants for various radionuclides are calculated from the numerically generated dose rate versus source energy curves. Dose rates can also be generated for any point brachytherapy source with any arbitrary energy spectrum at various radial distances from this family of curves.

  7. Determination of peripheral underdosage at the lung-tumor interface using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Michael; Dunn, Leon; Kron, Tomas; Height, Felicity; Franich, Rick

    2012-04-01

    Prediction of dose distributions in close proximity to interfaces is difficult. In the context of radiotherapy of lung tumors, this may affect the minimum dose received by lesions and is particularly important when prescribing dose to covering isodoses. The objective of this work is to quantify underdosage in key regions around a hypothetical target using Monte Carlo dose calculation methods, and to develop a factor for clinical estimation of such underdosage. A systematic set of calculations are undertaken using 2 Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (EGSnrc and GEANT4). Discrepancies in dose are determined for a number of parameters, including beam energy, tumor size, field size, and distance from chest wall. Calculations were performed for 1-mm{sup 3} regions at proximal, distal, and lateral aspects of a spherical tumor, determined for a 6-MV and a 15-MV photon beam. The simulations indicate regions of tumor underdose at the tumor-lung interface. Results are presented as ratios of the dose at key peripheral regions to the dose at the center of the tumor, a point at which the treatment planning system (TPS) predicts the dose more reliably. Comparison with TPS data (pencil-beam convolution) indicates such underdosage would not have been predicted accurately in the clinic. We define a dose reduction factor (DRF) as the average of the dose in the periphery in the 6 cardinal directions divided by the central dose in the target, the mean of which is 0.97 and 0.95 for a 6-MV and 15-MV beam, respectively. The DRF can assist clinicians in the estimation of the magnitude of potential discrepancies between prescribed and delivered dose distributions as a function of tumor size and location. Calculation for a systematic set of 'generic' tumors allows application to many classes of patient case, and is particularly useful for interpreting clinical trial data.

  8. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassler, N.; Hansen, D. C.; Lühr, A.; Thomsen, B.; Petersen, J. B.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT simulates the transport of ions through matter. Since SHIELD-HIT08 we added numerous features that improves speed, usability and underlying physics and thereby the user experience. The "-A" fork of SHIELD-HIT also aims to attach SHIELD-HIT to a heavy ion dose optimization algorithm to provide MC-optimized treatment plans that include radiobiology. Methods: SHIELD-HIT12A is written in FORTRAN and carefully retains platform independence. A powerful scoring engine is implemented scoring relevant quantities such as dose and track-average LET. It supports native formats compatible with the heavy ion treatment planning system TRiP. Stopping power files follow ICRU standard and are generated using the libdEdx library, which allows the user to choose from a multitude of stopping power tables. Results: SHIELD-HIT12A runs on Linux and Windows platforms. We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction of computation time. Scheduled for later release are CT import and photon-electron transport. Conclusions: SHIELD-HIT12A is an interesting alternative ion transport engine. Apart from being a flexible particle therapy research tool, it can also serve as a back end for a MC ion treatment planning system. More information about SHIELD-HIT12A and a demo version can be found on http://www.shieldhit.org.

  9. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Carole K.; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  10. 3D Monte Carlo model of optical transport in laser-irradiated cutaneous vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Milani?, Matija; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) model of optical transport in skin and applied it to analysis of port wine stain treatment with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling. Our MC model extends the approaches of the popular multi-layer model by Wang et al.1 to three dimensions, thus allowing treatment of skin inclusions with more complex geometries and arbitrary irradiation patterns. To overcome the obvious drawbacks of either "escape" or "mirror" boundary conditions at the lateral boundaries of the finely discretized volume of interest (VOI), photons exiting the VOI are propagated in laterally infinite tissue layers with appropriate optical properties, until they loose all their energy, escape into the air, or return to the VOI, but the energy deposition outside of the VOI is not computed and recorded. After discussing the selection of tissue parameters, we apply the model to analysis of blood photocoagulation and collateral thermal damage in treatment of port wine stain (PWS) lesions with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling.

  11. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  12. Monte Carlo calculations of correction factors for plastic phantoms in clinical photon and electron beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Hanyu, Yuji; Fukuoka, Miyoko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiko; Oguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to calculate correction factors for plastic water (PW) and plastic water diagnostic-therapy (PWDT) phantoms in clinical photon and electron beam dosimetry using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. A water-to-plastic ionization conversion factor k{sub pl} for PW and PWDT was computed for several commonly used Farmer-type ionization chambers with different wall materials in the range of 4-18 MV photon beams. For electron beams, a depth-scaling factor c{sub pl} and a chamber-dependent fluence correction factor h{sub pl} for both phantoms were also calculated in combination with NACP-02 and Roos plane-parallel ionization chambers in the range of 4-18 MeV. The h{sub pl} values for the plane-parallel chambers were evaluated from the electron fluence correction factor {phi}{sub pl}{sup w} and wall correction factors P{sub wall,w} and P{sub wall,pl} for a combination of water or plastic materials. The calculated k{sub pl} and h{sub pl} values were verified by comparison with the measured values. A set of k{sub pl} values computed for the Farmer-type chambers was equal to unity within 0.5% for PW and PWDT in photon beams. The k{sub pl} values also agreed within their combined uncertainty with the measured data. For electron beams, the c{sub pl} values computed for PW and PWDT were from 0.998 to 1.000 and from 0.992 to 0.997, respectively, in the range of 4-18 MeV. The {phi}{sub pl}{sup w} values for PW and PWDT were from 0.998 to 1.001 and from 1.004 to 1.001, respectively, at a reference depth in the range of 4-18 MeV. The difference in P{sub wall} between water and plastic materials for the plane-parallel chambers was 0.8% at a maximum. Finally, h{sub pl} values evaluated for plastic materials were equal to unity within 0.6% for NACP-02 and Roos chambers. The h{sub pl} values also agreed within their combined uncertainty with the measured data. The absorbed dose to water from ionization chamber measurements in PW and PWDT plastic materials corresponds to that in water within 1%. Both phantoms can thus be used as a substitute for water for photon and electron dosimetry.

  13. Few-photon transport in many-body photonic systems: A scattering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyoup; Noh, Changsuk; Schetakis, Nikolaos; Angelakis, Dimitris G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the quantum transport of multiphoton Fock states in one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard lattices implemented in QED cavity arrays (QCAs). We propose an optical scheme to probe the underlying many-body states of the system by analyzing the properties of the transmitted light using scattering theory. To this end, we employ the Lippmann-Schwinger formalism within which an analytical form of the scattering matrix can be found. The latter is evaluated explicitly for the two-particle, two-site case which we use to study the resonance properties of two-photon scattering, as well as the scattering probabilities and the second-order intensity correlations of the transmitted light. The results indicate that the underlying structure of the many-body states of the model in question can be directly inferred from the physical properties of the transported photons in its QCA realization. We find that a fully resonant two-photon scattering scenario allows a faithful characterization of the underlying many-body states, unlike in the coherent driving scenario usually employed in quantum master-equation treatments. The effects of losses in the cavities, as well as the incoming photons' pulse shapes and initial correlations, are studied and analyzed. Our method is general and can be applied to probe the structure of any many-body bosonic model amenable to a QCA implementation, including the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, the extended Bose-Hubbard model, as well as a whole range of spin models.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of small electron fields collimated by the integrated photon MLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaljevic, Josip; Soukup, Martin; Dohm, Oliver; Alber, Markus

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based beam model for an ELEKTA linear accelerator was established. The beam model is based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, whereby electron beams with nominal energies of 10, 12 and 15 MeV were considered. For collimation of the electron beam, only the integrated photon multi-leaf-collimators (MLCs) were used. No additional secondary or tertiary add-ons like applicators, cutouts or dedicated electron MLCs were included. The source parameters of the initial electron beam were derived semi-automatically from measurements of depth-dose curves and lateral profiles in a water phantom. A routine to determine the initial electron energy spectra was developed which fits a Gaussian spectrum to the most prominent features of depth-dose curves. The comparisons of calculated and measured depth-dose curves demonstrated agreement within 1%/1 mm. The source divergence angle of initial electrons was fitted to lateral dose profiles beyond the range of electrons, where the imparted dose is mainly due to bremsstrahlung produced in the scattering foils. For accurate modelling of narrow beam segments, the influence of air density on dose calculation was studied. The air density for simulations was adjusted to local values (433 m above sea level) and compared with the standard air supplied by the ICRU data set. The results indicate that the air density is an influential parameter for dose calculations. Furthermore, the default value of the BEAMnrc parameter 'skin depth' for the boundary crossing algorithm was found to be inadequate for the modelling of small electron fields. A higher value for this parameter eliminated discrepancies in too broad dose profiles and an increased dose along the central axis. The beam model was validated with measurements, whereby an agreement mostly within 3%/3 mm was found.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of small electron fields collimated by the integrated photon MLC.

    PubMed

    Mihaljevic, Josip; Soukup, Martin; Dohm, Oliver; Alber, Markus

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based beam model for an ELEKTA linear accelerator was established. The beam model is based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, whereby electron beams with nominal energies of 10, 12 and 15 MeV were considered. For collimation of the electron beam, only the integrated photon multi-leaf-collimators (MLCs) were used. No additional secondary or tertiary add-ons like applicators, cutouts or dedicated electron MLCs were included. The source parameters of the initial electron beam were derived semi-automatically from measurements of depth-dose curves and lateral profiles in a water phantom. A routine to determine the initial electron energy spectra was developed which fits a Gaussian spectrum to the most prominent features of depth-dose curves. The comparisons of calculated and measured depth-dose curves demonstrated agreement within 1%/1 mm. The source divergence angle of initial electrons was fitted to lateral dose profiles beyond the range of electrons, where the imparted dose is mainly due to bremsstrahlung produced in the scattering foils. For accurate modelling of narrow beam segments, the influence of air density on dose calculation was studied. The air density for simulations was adjusted to local values (433 m above sea level) and compared with the standard air supplied by the ICRU data set. The results indicate that the air density is an influential parameter for dose calculations. Furthermore, the default value of the BEAMnrc parameter 'skin depth' for the boundary crossing algorithm was found to be inadequate for the modelling of small electron fields. A higher value for this parameter eliminated discrepancies in too broad dose profiles and an increased dose along the central axis. The beam model was validated with measurements, whereby an agreement mostly within 3%/3 mm was found. PMID:21242628

  16. CAD based Monte Carlo method: Algorithms for geometric evaluation in support of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengkuo

    In particle transport computations, the Monte Carlo simulation method is a widely used algorithm. There are several Monte Carlo codes available that perform particle transport simulations. However the geometry packages and geometric modeling capability of Monte Carlo codes are limited as they can not handle complicated geometries made up of complex surfaces. Previous research exists that take advantage of the modeling capabilities of CAD software. The two major approaches are the Converter approach and the CAD engine based approach. By carefully analyzing the strategies and algorithms of these two approaches, the CAD engine based approach has peen identified as the more promising approach. Though currently the performance of this approach is not satisfactory, there is room for improvement. The development and implementation of an improved CAD based approach is the focus of this thesis. Algorithms to accelerate the CAD engine based approach are studied. The major acceleration algorithm is the Oriented Bounding Box algorithm, which is used in computer graphics. The difference in application between computer graphics and particle transport has been considered and the algorithm has been modified for particle transport. The major work of this thesis has been the development of the MCNPX/CGM code and the testing, benchmarking and implementation of the acceleration algorithms. MCNPX is a Monte Carlo code and CGM is a CAD geometry engine. A facet representation of the geometry provided the least slowdown of the Monte Carlo code. The CAD model generates the facet representation. The Oriented Bounding Box algorithm was the fastest acceleration technique adopted for this work. The slowdown of the MCNPX/CGM to MCNPX was reduced to a factor of 3 when the facet model is used. MCNPX/CGM has been successfully validated against test problems in medical physics and a fusion energy device. MCNPX/CGM gives exactly the same results as the standard MCNPX when an MCNPX geometry model is available. For the case of the complicated fusion device---the stellerator, the MCNPX/CGM's results closely match a one-dimension model calculation performed by ARIES team.

  17. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  18. Monte Carlo linear accelerator simulation of megavoltage photon beams: Independent determination of initial beam parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Almberg, Sigrun Saur; Frengen, Jomar; Kylling, Arve; Lindmo, Tore

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To individually benchmark the incident electron parameters in a Monte Carlo model of an Elekta linear accelerator operating at 6 and 15 MV. The main objective is to establish a simplified but still precise benchmarking procedure that allows accurate dose calculations of advanced treatment techniques. Methods: The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc are used for photon beam simulations and dose calculations, respectively. A 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} field is used to determine both the incident electron energy and the electron radial intensity. First, the electron energy is adjusted to match the calculated depth dose to the measured one. Second, the electron radial intensity is adjusted to make the calculated dose profile in the penumbrae region match the penumbrae measured by GafChromic EBT film. Finally, the mean angular spread of the incident electron beam is determined by matching calculated and measured cross-field profiles of large fields. The beam parameters are verified for various field sizes and shapes. Results: The penumbrae measurements revealed a non-circular electron radial intensity distribution for the 6 MV beam, while a circular electron radial intensity distribution could best describe the 15 MV beam. These electron radial intensity distributions, given as the standard deviation of a Gaussian distribution, were found to be 0.25 mm (in-plane) and 1.0 mm (cross-plane) for the 6 MV beam and 0.5 mm (both in-plane and cross-plane) for the 15 MV beam. Introducing a small mean angular spread of the incident electron beam has a considerable impact on the lateral dose profiles of large fields. The mean angular spread was found to be 0.7 deg. and 0.5 deg. for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: The incident electron beam parameters in a Monte Carlo model of a linear accelerator could be precisely and independently determined by the benchmarking procedure proposed. As the dose distribution in the penumbra region is insensitive to moderate changes in electron energy and angular spread, accurate penumbra measurements is feasible for benchmarking the electron radial intensity distribution. This parameter is particularly important for accurate dosimetry of mlc-shaped fields and small fields.

  19. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  20. Peer-to-peer Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in topical applications of biomedical optics.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of further development of the unified approach of photon migration in complex turbid media, such as biological tissues we present a peer-to-peer (P2P) Monte Carlo (MC) code. The object-oriented programming is used for generalization of MC model for multipurpose use in various applications of biomedical optics. The online user interface providing multiuser access is developed using modern web technologies, such as Microsoft Silverlight, ASP.NET. The emerging P2P network utilizing computers with different types of compute unified device architecture-capable graphics processing units (GPUs) is applied for acceleration and to overcome the limitations, imposed by multiuser access in the online MC computational tool. The developed P2P MC was validated by comparing the results of simulation of diffuse reflectance and fluence rate distribution for semi-infinite scattering medium with known analytical results, results of adding-doubling method, and with other GPU-based MC techniques developed in the past. The best speedup of processing multiuser requests in a range of 4 to 35 s was achieved using single-precision computing, and the double-precision computing for floating-point arithmetic operations provides higher accuracy. PMID:23085901

  1. Peer-to-peer Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in topical applications of biomedical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of further development of the unified approach of photon migration in complex turbid media, such as biological tissues we present a peer-to-peer (P2P) Monte Carlo (MC) code. The object-oriented programming is used for generalization of MC model for multipurpose use in various applications of biomedical optics. The online user interface providing multiuser access is developed using modern web technologies, such as Microsoft Silverlight, ASP.NET. The emerging P2P network utilizing computers with different types of compute unified device architecture-capable graphics processing units (GPUs) is applied for acceleration and to overcome the limitations, imposed by multiuser access in the online MC computational tool. The developed P2P MC was validated by comparing the results of simulation of diffuse reflectance and fluence rate distribution for semi-infinite scattering medium with known analytical results, results of adding-doubling method, and with other GPU-based MC techniques developed in the past. The best speedup of processing multiuser requests in a range of 4 to 35 s was achieved using single-precision computing, and the double-precision computing for floating-point arithmetic operations provides higher accuracy.

  2. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Iandola, F N; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  3. MC-PEPTITA: A Monte Carlo model for Photon, Electron and Positron Tracking In Terrestrial AtmosphereApplication for a terrestrial gamma ray flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarria, D.; Blelly, P.-L.; Forme, F.

    2015-05-01

    Terrestrial gamma ray flashes are natural bursts of X and gamma rays, correlated to thunderstorms, that are likely to be produced at an altitude of about 10 to 20 km. After the emission, the flux of gamma rays is filtered and altered by the atmosphere and a small part of it may be detected by a satellite on low Earth orbit (RHESSI or Fermi, for example). Thus, only a residual part of the initial burst can be measured and most of the flux is made of scattered primary photons and of secondary emitted electrons, positrons, and photons. Trying to get information on the initial flux from the measurement is a very complex inverse problem, which can only be tackled by the use of a numerical model solving the transport of these high-energy particles. For this purpose, we developed a numerical Monte Carlo model which solves the transport in the atmosphere of both relativistic electrons/positrons and X/gamma rays. It makes it possible to track the photons, electrons, and positrons in the whole Earth environment (considering the atmosphere and the magnetic field) to get information on what affects the transport of the particles from the source region to the altitude of the satellite. We first present the MC-PEPTITA model, and then we validate it by comparison with a benchmark GEANT4 simulation with similar settings. Then, we show the results of a simulation close to Fermi event number 091214 in order to discuss some important properties of the photons and electrons/positrons that are reaching satellite altitude.

  4. Physical models, cross sections, and numerical approximations used in MCNP and GEANT4 Monte Carlo codes for photon and electron absorbed fraction calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoriyaz, Helio; Moralles, Mauricio; Tarso Dalledone Siqueira, Paulo de; Costa Guimaraes, Carla da; Belonsi Cintra, Felipe; Santos, Adimir dos

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Radiopharmaceutical applications in nuclear medicine require a detailed dosimetry estimate of the radiation energy delivered to the human tissues. Over the past years, several publications addressed the problem of internal dose estimate in volumes of several sizes considering photon and electron sources. Most of them used Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Despite the widespread use of these codes due to the variety of resources and potentials they offered to carry out dose calculations, several aspects like physical models, cross sections, and numerical approximations used in the simulations still remain an object of study. Accurate dose estimate depends on the correct selection of a set of simulation options that should be carefully chosen. This article presents an analysis of several simulation options provided by two of the most used codes worldwide: MCNP and GEANT4. Methods: For this purpose, comparisons of absorbed fraction estimates obtained with different physical models, cross sections, and numerical approximations are presented for spheres of several sizes and composed as five different biological tissues. Results: Considerable discrepancies have been found in some cases not only between the different codes but also between different cross sections and algorithms in the same code. Maximum differences found between the two codes are 5.0% and 10%, respectively, for photons and electrons.Conclusion: Even for simple problems as spheres and uniform radiation sources, the set of parameters chosen by any Monte Carlo code significantly affects the final results of a simulation, demonstrating the importance of the correct choice of parameters in the simulation.

  5. A GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation of radiation-induced light transport in biological media.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Kanick, Stephen C; Zhang, Rongxiao; Arce, Pedro; Pogue, Brian W

    2013-05-01

    We describe a tissue optics plug-in that interfaces with the GEANT4/GAMOS Monte Carlo (MC) architecture, providing a means of simulating radiation-induced light transport in biological media for the first time. Specifically, we focus on the simulation of light transport due to the ?erenkov effect (light emission from charged particle's traveling faster than the local speed of light in a given medium), a phenomenon which requires accurate modeling of both the high energy particle and subsequent optical photon transport, a dynamic coupled process that is not well-described by any current MC framework. The results of validation simulations show excellent agreement with currently employed biomedical optics MC codes, [i.e., Monte Carlo for Multi-Layered media (MCML), Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC), and diffusion theory], and examples relevant to recent studies into detection of ?erenkov light from an external radiation beam or radionuclide are presented. While the work presented within this paper focuses on radiation-induced light transport, the core features and robust flexibility of the plug-in modified package make it also extensible to more conventional biomedical optics simulations. The plug-in, user guide, example files, as well as the necessary files to reproduce the validation simulations described within this paper are available online at http://www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/research-projects/monte-carlo-software. PMID:23667790

  6. A GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation of radiation-induced light transport in biological media

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Adam K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Arce, Pedro; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a tissue optics plug-in that interfaces with the GEANT4/GAMOS Monte Carlo (MC) architecture, providing a means of simulating radiation-induced light transport in biological media for the first time. Specifically, we focus on the simulation of light transport due to the ?erenkov effect (light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a given medium), a phenomenon which requires accurate modeling of both the high energy particle and subsequent optical photon transport, a dynamic coupled process that is not well-described by any current MC framework. The results of validation simulations show excellent agreement with currently employed biomedical optics MC codes, [i.e., Monte Carlo for Multi-Layered media (MCML), Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC), and diffusion theory], and examples relevant to recent studies into detection of ?erenkov light from an external radiation beam or radionuclide are presented. While the work presented within this paper focuses on radiation-induced light transport, the core features and robust flexibility of the plug-in modified package make it also extensible to more conventional biomedical optics simulations. The plug-in, user guide, example files, as well as the necessary files to reproduce the validation simulations described within this paper are available online at http://www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/research-projects/monte-carlo-software. PMID:23667790

  7. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    The theory used in FASTER-III, a Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries, is outlined. The program includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quadric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. It can also calculate minimum weight shield configuration meeting a specified dose rate constraint. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron, and primary and secondary photon, transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration.

  8. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  9. Investigation of a probe design for facilitating the uses of the standard photon diffusion equation at short source-detector separations: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Hayakawa, Carole; Spanier, Jerome; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2009-09-01

    We design a special diffusing probe to investigate the optical properties of human skin in vivo. The special geometry of the probe enables a modified two-layer (MTL) diffusion model to precisely describe the photon transport even when the source-detector separation is shorter than 3 mean free paths. We provide a frequency domain comparison between the Monte Carlo model and the diffusion model in both the MTL geometry and conventional semiinfinite geometry. We show that using the Monte Carlo model as a benchmark method, the MTL diffusion theory performs better than the diffusion theory in the semiinfinite geometry. In addition, we carry out Monte Carlo simulations with the goal of investigating the dependence of the interrogation depth of this probe on several parameters including source-detector separation, sample optical properties, and properties of the diffusing high-scattering layer. From the simulations, we find that the optical properties of samples modulate the interrogation volume greatly, and the source-detector separation and the thickness of the diffusing layer are the two dominant probe parameters that impact the interrogation volume. Our simulation results provide design guidelines for a MTL geometry probe.

  10. Hypersensitive Transport in Photonic Crystals with Accidental Spatial Degeneracies.

    PubMed

    Makri, Eleana; Smith, Kyle; Chabanov, Andrey; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-01-01

    A localized mode in a photonic layered structure can develop nodal points (nodal planes), where the oscillating electric field is negligible. Placing a thin metallic layer at such a nodal point results in the phenomenon of induced transmission. Here we demonstrate that if the nodal point is not a point of symmetry, then even a tiny alteration of the permittivity in the vicinity of the metallic layer drastically suppresses the localized mode along with the resonant transmission. This renders the layered structure highly reflective within a broad frequency range. Applications of this hypersensitive transport for optical and microwave limiting and switching are discussed. PMID:26903232

  11. Hypersensitive Transport in Photonic Crystals with Accidental Spatial Degeneracies

    PubMed Central

    Makri, Eleana; Smith, Kyle; Chabanov, Andrey; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-01-01

    A localized mode in a photonic layered structure can develop nodal points (nodal planes), where the oscillating electric field is negligible. Placing a thin metallic layer at such a nodal point results in the phenomenon of induced transmission. Here we demonstrate that if the nodal point is not a point of symmetry, then even a tiny alteration of the permittivity in the vicinity of the metallic layer drastically suppresses the localized mode along with the resonant transmission. This renders the layered structure highly reflective within a broad frequency range. Applications of this hypersensitive transport for optical and microwave limiting and switching are discussed. PMID:26903232

  12. Monte Carlo study of photon beams from medical linear accelerators: Optimization, benchmark and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush

    1999-12-01

    BEAM is a general purpose EGS4 user code for simulating radiotherapy sources (Rogers et al. Med. Phys. 22, 503-524, 1995). The BEAM code is optimized by first minimizing unnecessary electron transport (a factor of 3 improvement in efficiency). The efficiency of the uniform bremsstrahlung splitting (UBS) technique is assessed and found to be 4 times more efficient. The Russian Roulette technique used in conjunction with UBS is substantially modified to make simulations additionally 2 times more efficient. Finally, a novel and robust technique, called selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS), is developed and shown to improve the efficiency of photon beam simulations by an additional factor of 3-4, depending on the end- point considered. The optimized BEAM code is benchmarked by comparing calculated and measured ionization distributions in water from the 10 and 20 MV photon beams of the NRCC linac. Unlike previous calculations, the incident e - energy is known independently to 1%, the entire extra-focal radiation is simulated and e- contamination is accounted for. Both beams use clinical jaws, whose dimensions are accurately measured, and which are set for a 10 x 10 cm2 field at 110 cm. At both energies, the calculated and the measured values of ionization on the central-axis in the buildup region agree within 1% of maximum dose. The agreement is well within statistics elsewhere on the central-axis. Ionization profiles match within 1% of maximum dose, except at the geometrical edges of the field, where the disagreement is up to 5% of dose maximum. Causes for this discrepancy are discussed. The benchmarked BEAM code is then used to simulate beams from the major commercial medical linear accelerators. The off-axis factors are matched within statistical uncertainties, for most of the beams at the 1 ? level and for all at the 2 ? level. The calculated and measured depth-dose data agree within 1% (local dose), at about 1% (1 ? level) statistics, at all depths past depth of maximum dose for almost all beams. The calculated photon spectra and average energy distributions are compared to those published by Mohan et al. and decomposed into direct and scattered photon components.

  13. Verification measurements and clinical evaluation of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo dose algorithm for 6 MV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoukhova, A. L.; van Wingerden, K.; Wiggenraad, R. G. J.; van de Vaart, P. J. M.; van Egmond, J.; Franken, E. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study presents data for verification of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo (MC) dose algorithm (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). MC calculations were compared with pencil beam (PB) calculations and verification measurements in phantoms with lung-equivalent material, air cavities or bone-equivalent material to mimic head and neck and thorax and in an Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Dosimetric accuracy of MC for the micro-multileaf collimator (MLC) simulation was tested in a homogeneous phantom. All measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and Kodak EDR2 films with Novalis 6 MV photon beams. Dose distributions measured with film and calculated with MC in the homogeneous phantom are in excellent agreement for oval, C and squiggle-shaped fields and for a clinical IMRT plan. For a field with completely closed MLC, MC is much closer to the experimental result than the PB calculations. For fields larger than the dimensions of the inhomogeneities the MC calculations show excellent agreement (within 3%/1 mm) with the experimental data. MC calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom show good agreement with measurements for conformal beam plans and reasonable agreement for dynamic conformal arc and IMRT plans. For 6 head and neck and 15 lung patients a comparison of the MC plan with the PB plan was performed. Our results demonstrate that MC is able to accurately predict the dose in the presence of inhomogeneities typical for head and neck and thorax regions with reasonable calculation times (5-20 min). Lateral electron transport was well reproduced in MC calculations. We are planning to implement MC calculations for head and neck and lung cancer patients.

  14. Comparison of space radiation calculations for deterministic and Monte Carlo transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, James; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Tripathi, Ram; Watts, John; Yepes, Pablo

    For space radiation protection of astronauts or electronic equipments, it is necessary to develop and use accurate radiation transport codes. Radiation transport codes include deterministic codes, such as HZETRN from NASA and UPROP from the Naval Research Laboratory, and Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, the Geant4 toolkit and HETC-HEDS. The deterministic codes and Monte Carlo codes complement each other in that deterministic codes are very fast while Monte Carlo codes are more elaborate. Therefore it is important to investigate how well the results of deterministic codes compare with those of Monte Carlo transport codes and where they differ. In this study we evaluate these different codes in their space radiation applications by comparing their output results in the same given space radiation environments, shielding geometry and material. Typical space radiation environments such as the 1977 solar minimum galactic cosmic ray environment are used as the well-defined input, and simple geometries made of aluminum, water and/or polyethylene are used to represent the shielding material. We then compare various outputs of these codes, such as the dose-depth curves and the flux spectra of different fragments and other secondary particles. These comparisons enable us to learn more about the main differences between these space radiation transport codes. At the same time, they help us to learn the qualitative and quantitative features that these transport codes have in common.

  15. Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2013-04-21

    The application of small photon fields in modern radiotherapy requires the determination of total scatter factors Scp or field factors ?(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) with high precision. Both quantities require the knowledge of the field-size-dependent and detector-dependent correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)). The aim of this study is the determination of the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) for different types of detectors in a clinical 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens KD linear accelerator. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose to water and the dose to different detectors to determine the field factor as well as the mentioned correction factor for different small square field sizes. Besides this, the mean water to air stopping power ratio as well as the ratio of the mean energy absorption coefficients for the relevant materials was calculated for different small field sizes. As the beam source, a Monte Carlo based model of a Siemens KD linear accelerator was used. The results show that in the case of ionization chambers the detector volume has the largest impact on the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)); this perturbation may contribute up to 50% to the correction factor. Field-dependent changes in stopping-power ratios are negligible. The magnitude of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) is of the order of 1.2 at a field size of 1 1 cm(2) for the large volume ion chamber PTW31010 and is still in the range of 1.05-1.07 for the PinPoint chambers PTW31014 and PTW31016. For the diode detectors included in this study (PTW60016, PTW 60017), the correction factor deviates no more than 2% from unity in field sizes between 10 10 and 1 1 cm(2), but below this field size there is a steep decrease of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) below unity, i.e. a strong overestimation of dose. Besides the field size and detector dependence, the results reveal a clear dependence of the correction factor on the accelerator geometry for field sizes below 1 1 cm(2), i.e. on the beam spot size of the primary electrons hitting the target. This effect is especially pronounced for the ionization chambers. In conclusion, comparing all detectors, the unshielded diode PTW60017 is highly recommended for small field dosimetry, since its correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) is closest to unity in small fields and mainly independent of the electron beam spot size. PMID:23514734

  16. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-03-01

    The ?-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the ?-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate ?-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate ?-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original ?-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a ?-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average ?-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a ?-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average ?-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a ?-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the ?-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  17. Full 3D visualization tool-kit for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a package of tools capable of translating the geometric inputs and outputs of many Monte Carlo and deterministic radiation transport codes into open source file formats. These tools are aimed at bridging the gap between trusted, widely-used radiation analysis codes and very powerful, more recent and commonly used visualization software, thus supporting the design process and helping with shielding optimization. Three main lines of development were followed: mesh-based analysis of Monte Carlo codes, mesh-based analysis of deterministic codes and Monte Carlo surface meshing. The developed kit is considered a powerful and cost-effective tool in the computer-aided design for radiation transport code users of the nuclear world, and in particular in the fields of core design and radiation analysis. (authors)

  18. Update On the Status of the FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Lorenzo-Sentis, M.; Roesler, S.; Smirnov, G.; Sommerer, F.; Theis, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Carboni, M.; Mostacci, A.; Pelliccioni, M.

    2006-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is a well-known simulation tool in High Energy Physics. FLUKA is a dynamic tool in the sense that it is being continually updated and improved by the authors. We review the progress achieved since the last CHEP Conference on the physics models, some technical improvements to the code and some recent applications. From the point of view of the physics, improvements have been made with the extension of PEANUT to higher energies for p, n, pi, pbar/nbar and for nbars down to the lowest energies, the addition of the online capability to evolve radioactive products and get subsequent dose rates, upgrading of the treatment of EM interactions with the elimination of the need to separately prepare preprocessed files. A new coherent photon scattering model, an updated treatment of the photo-electric effect, an improved pair production model, new photon cross sections from the LLNL Cullen database have been implemented. In the field of nucleus-- nucleus interactions the electromagnetic dissociation of heavy ions has been added along with the extension of the interaction models for some nuclide pairs to energies below 100 MeV/A using the BME approach, as well as the development of an improved QMD model for intermediate energies. Both DPMJET 2.53 and 3 remain available along with rQMD 2.4 for heavy ion interactions above 100 MeV/A. Technical improvements include the ability to use parentheses in setting up the combinatorial geometry, the introduction of pre-processor directives in the input stream. a new random number generator with full 64 bit randomness, new routines for mathematical special functions (adapted from SLATEC). Finally, work is progressing on the deployment of a user-friendly GUI input interface as well as a CAD-like geometry creation and visualization tool. On the application front, FLUKA has been used to extensively evaluate the potential space radiation effects on astronauts for future deep space missions, the activation dose for beam target areas, dose calculations for radiation therapy as well as being adapted for use in the simulation of events in the ALICE detector at the LHC.

  19. Photon energy-modulated radiotherapy: Monte Carlo simulation and treatment planning study

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-in; Heon Choi, Chang; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of photon energy-modulated radiotherapy during beam-on time. Methods: A cylindrical device made of aluminum was conceptually proposed as an energy modulator. The frame of the device was connected with 20 tubes through which mercury could be injected or drained to adjust the thickness of mercury along the beam axis. In Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a flattening filter of 6 or 10 MV linac was replaced with the device. The thickness of mercury inside the device varied from 0 to 40 mm at the field sizes of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} (FS5), 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} (FS10), and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} (FS20). At least 5 billion histories were followed for each simulation to create phase space files at 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD). In-water beam data were acquired by additional MC simulations using the above phase space files. A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned to generate a virtual machine using the MC-generated beam data. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for six clinical cases were generated using conventional 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free, and energy-modulated photon beams of the virtual machine. Results: As increasing the thickness of mercury, Percentage depth doses (PDD) of modulated 6 and 10 MV after the depth of dose maximum were continuously increased. The amount of PDD increase at the depth of 10 and 20 cm for modulated 6 MV was 4.8% and 5.2% at FS5, 3.9% and 5.0% at FS10 and 3.2%-4.9% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 20 mm. The same for modulated 10 MV was 4.5% and 5.0% at FS5, 3.8% and 4.7% at FS10 and 4.1% and 4.8% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 25 mm. The outputs of modulated 6 MV with 20 mm mercury and of modulated 10 MV with 25 mm mercury were reduced into 30%, and 56% of conventional linac, respectively. The energy-modulated IMRT plans had less integral doses than 6 MV IMRT or 6 MV flattening filter free plans for tumors located in the periphery while maintaining the similar quality of target coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Conclusions: The MC study for the designed energy modulator demonstrated the feasibility of energy-modulated photon beams available during beam-on time. The planning study showed an advantage of energy-and intensity modulated radiotherapy in terms of integral dose without sacrificing any quality of IMRT plan.

  20. Time series analysis of Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Brian Robert

    A time series based approach is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) fission source distribution to calculate the non-fundamental mode eigenvalues of the system. The approach applies Principal Oscillation Patterns (POPs) to the fission source distribution, transforming the problem into a simple autoregressive order one (AR(1)) process. Proof is provided that the stationary MC process is linear to first order approximation, which is a requirement for the application of POPs. The autocorrelation coefficient of the resulting AR(1) process corresponds to the ratio of the desired mode eigenvalue to the fundamental mode eigenvalue. All modern k-eigenvalue MC codes calculate the fundamental mode eigenvalue, so the desired mode eigenvalue can be easily determined. The strength of this approach is contrasted against the Fission Matrix method (FMM) in terms of accuracy versus computer memory constraints. Multi-dimensional problems are considered since the approach has strong potential for use in reactor analysis, and the implementation of the method into production codes is discussed. Lastly, the appearance of complex eigenvalues is investigated and solutions are provided.

  1. Modeling bioluminescent photon transport in tissue based on Radiosity-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Han, Dong; Yang, Xin

    2010-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the most important non-invasive optical molecular imaging modalities. The model for the bioluminescent photon propagation plays a significant role in the bioluminescence tomography study. Due to the high computational efficiency, diffusion approximation (DA) is generally applied in the bioluminescence tomography. But the diffusion equation is valid only in highly scattering and weakly absorbing regions and fails in non-scattering or low-scattering tissues, such as a cyst in the breast, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the brain and synovial fluid layer in the joints. A hybrid Radiosity-diffusion model is proposed for dealing with the non-scattering regions within diffusing domains in this paper. This hybrid method incorporates a priori information of the geometry of non-scattering regions, which can be acquired by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or x-ray computed tomography (CT). Then the model is implemented using a finite element method (FEM) to ensure the high computational efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that the method is comparable with Mont Carlo (MC) method which is regarded as a 'gold standard' for photon transportation simulation.

  2. Delocalization of electrons by cavity photons in transport through a quantum dot molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2014-11-01

    We present results on cavity-photon-assisted electron transport through two lateral quantum dots embedded in a finite quantum wire. The double quantum dot system is weakly connected to two leads and strongly coupled to a single quantized photon cavity mode with initially two linearly polarized photons in the cavity. Including the full electron-photon interaction, the transient current controlled by a plunger-gate in the central system is studied by using quantum master equation. Without a photon cavity, two resonant current peaks are observed in the range selected for the plunger gate voltage: The ground state peak, and the peak corresponding to the first-excited state. The current in the ground state is higher than in the first-excited state due to their different symmetry. In a photon cavity with the photon field polarized along or perpendicular to the transport direction, two extra side peaks are found, namely, photon-replica of the ground state and photon-replica of the first-excited state. The side-peaks are caused by photon-assisted electron transport, with multiphoton absorption processes for up to three photons during an electron tunneling process. The inter-dot tunneling in the ground state can be controlled by the photon cavity in the case of the photon field polarized along the transport direction. The electron charge is delocalized from the dots by the photon cavity. Furthermore, the current in the photon-induced side-peaks can be strongly enhanced by increasing the electron-photon coupling strength for the case of photons polarized along the transport direction.

  3. Light transport and lasing in complex photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt

    Complex photonic structures refer to composite optical materials with dielectric constant varying on length scales comparable to optical wavelengths. Light propagation in such heterogeneous composites is greatly different from homogeneous media due to scattering of light in all directions. Interference of these scattered light waves gives rise to many fascinating phenomena and it has been a fast growing research area, both for its fundamental physics and for its practical applications. In this thesis, we have investigated the optical properties of photonic structures with different degree of order, ranging from periodic to random. The first part of this thesis consists of numerical studies of the photonic band gap (PBG) effect in structures from 1D to 3D. From these studies, we have observed that PBG effect in a 1D photonic crystal is robust against uncorrelated disorder due to preservation of long-range positional order. However, in higher dimensions, the short-range positional order alone is sufficient to form PBGs in 2D and 3D photonic amorphous structures (PASS). We have identified several parameters including dielectric filling fraction and degree of order that can be tuned to create a broad isotropic PBG. The largest PBG is produced by the dielectric networks due to local uniformity in their dielectric constant distribution. In addition, we also show that deterministic aperiodic structures (DASs) such as the golden-angle spiral and topological defect structures can support a wide PBG and their optical resonances contain unexpected features compared to those in photonic crystals. Another growing research field based on complex photonic structures is the study of structural color in animals and plants. Previous studies have shown that non-iridescent color can be generated from PASs via single or double scatterings. For better understanding of the coloration mechanisms, we have measured the wavelength-dependent scattering length from the biomimetic samples. Our theoretical modeling and analysis explains why single scattering of light is dominant over multiple scattering in similar biological structures and is responsible for color generation. In collaboration with evolutionary biologists, we examine how closely-related species and populations of butterflies have evolved their structural color. We have used artificial selection on a lab model butterfly to evolve violet color from an ultra-violet brown color. The same coloration mechanism is found in other blue/violet species that have evolved their color in nature, which implies the same evolution path for their nanostructure. While the absorption of light is ubiquitous in nature and in applications, the question remains how absorption modifies the transmission in random media. Therefore, we numerically study the effects of optical absorption on the highest transmission states in a two-dimensional disordered waveguide. Our results show that strong absorption turns the highest transmission channel in random media from diffusive to ballistic-like transport. Finally, we have demonstrated lasing mode selection in a nearly circular semiconductor microdisk laser by shaping the spatial profile of the pump beam. Despite of strong mode overlap, selective pumping suppresses the competing lasing modes by either increasing their thresholds or reducing their power slopes. As a result, we can switch both the lasing frequency and the output direction. This powerful technique can have potential application as an on-chip tunable light source.

  4. Dosimetric impact of monoenergetic photon beams in the small-animal irradiation with inhomogeneities: A Monte Carlo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, James C. L.

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the variations of the dose and dose distribution in a small-animal irradiation due to the photon beam energy and presence of inhomogeneity. Based on the same mouse computed tomography image set, three Monte Carlo phantoms namely, inhomogeneous, homogeneous and bone-tissue phantoms were used in this study. These phantoms were generated by overriding the relative electron density of no voxel (inhomogeneous), all voxel (homogeneous) and the bone voxel (bone-tissue) to one. 360 photon arcs with beam energies of 50-1250 kV were used in mouse irradiations. Doses in the above phantoms were calculated using the EGSnrc-based DOSXYZnrc code through the DOSCTP. It was found that the dose conformity increased with the increase of the photon beam energy from the kV to MV range. For the inhomogeneous mouse phantom, increasing the photon beam energy from 50 kV to 1250 kV increased about 21 times the dose deposited at the isocenter. For the bone dose enhancement, the mean dose was 1.4 times higher when the bone inhomogeneity was not neglected using the 50 kV photon beams in the mouse irradiation. Bone dose enhancement affecting the mean dose in the mouse irradiation can be found in the photon beams with energy range of 50-200 kV, and the dose enhancement decreases with an increase of the beam energy. Moreover, the MV photon beam has a higher dose at the isocenter, and a better dose conformity compared to the kV beam.

  5. Selection of voxel size and photon number in voxel-based Monte Carlo method: criteria and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Ran, Wei Yu; Wang, Guo Xiang; Wu, Wen Juan

    2015-09-01

    The voxel-based Monte Carlo method (VMC) is now a gold standard in the simulation of light propagation in turbid media. For complex tissue structures, however, the computational cost will be higher when small voxels are used to improve smoothness of tissue interface and a large number of photons are used to obtain accurate results. To reduce computational cost, criteria were proposed to determine the voxel size and photon number in 3-dimensional VMC simulations with acceptable accuracy and computation time. The selection of the voxel size can be expressed as a function of tissue geometry and optical properties. The photon number should be at least 5 times the total voxel number. These criteria are further applied in developing a photon ray splitting scheme of local grid refinement technique to reduce computational cost of a nonuniform tissue structure with significantly varying optical properties. In the proposed technique, a nonuniform refined grid system is used, where fine grids are used for the tissue with high absorption and complex geometry, and coarse grids are used for the other part. In this technique, the total photon number is selected based on the voxel size of the coarse grid. Furthermore, the photon-splitting scheme is developed to satisfy the statistical accuracy requirement for the dense grid area. Result shows that local grid refinement technique photon ray splitting scheme can accelerate the computation by 7.6 times (reduce time consumption from 17.5 to 2.3 h) in the simulation of laser light energy deposition in skin tissue that contains port wine stain lesions. PMID:26417866

  6. Monte Carlo simulation on pre-clinical irradiation: A heterogeneous phantom study on monoenergetic kilovoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, James C. L.

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated radiation dose variations in pre-clinical irradiation due to the photon beam energy and presence of tissue heterogeneity. Based on the same mouse computed tomography image dataset, three phantoms namely, heterogeneous, homogeneous and bone homogeneous were used. These phantoms were generated by overriding the relative electron density of no voxel (heterogeneous), all voxel (homogeneous) and the bone voxel (bone homogeneous) to one. 360 photon arcs with beam energies of 50 - 1250 keV were used in mouse irradiations. Doses in the above phantoms were calculated using the EGSnrc-based DOSXYZnrc code through the DOSCTP. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out in parallel using multiple nodes in a high-performance computing cluster. It was found that the dose conformity increased with the increase of the photon beam energy from the keV to MeV range. For the heterogeneous mouse phantom, increasing the photon beam energy from 50 keV to 1250 keV increased seven times the dose deposited at the isocenter. For the bone dose enhancement, the mean dose was 2.7 times higher when the bone heterogeneity was not neglected using the 50 keV photon beams in the mouse irradiation. Bone dose enhancement affecting the mean dose was found in the photon beams with energy range of 50 - 200 keV and the dose enhancement decreased with an increase of the beam energy. Moreover, the MeV photon beam had a higher dose at the isocenter, and a better dose conformity compared to the keV beam.

  7. Selection of voxel size and photon number in voxel-based Monte Carlo method: criteria and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Ran, Wei Yu; Wang, Guo Xiang; Wu, Wen Juan

    2015-09-01

    The voxel-based Monte Carlo method (VMC) is now a gold standard in the simulation of light propagation in turbid media. For complex tissue structures, however, the computational cost will be higher when small voxels are used to improve smoothness of tissue interface and a large number of photons are used to obtain accurate results. To reduce computational cost, criteria were proposed to determine the voxel size and photon number in 3-dimensional VMC simulations with acceptable accuracy and computation time. The selection of the voxel size can be expressed as a function of tissue geometry and optical properties. The photon number should be at least 5 times the total voxel number. These criteria are further applied in developing a photon ray splitting scheme of local grid refinement technique to reduce computational cost of a nonuniform tissue structure with significantly varying optical properties. In the proposed technique, a nonuniform refined grid system is used, where fine grids are used for the tissue with high absorption and complex geometry, and coarse grids are used for the other part. In this technique, the total photon number is selected based on the voxel size of the coarse grid. Furthermore, the photon-splitting scheme is developed to satisfy the statistical accuracy requirement for the dense grid area. Result shows that local grid refinement technique photon ray splitting scheme can accelerate the computation by 7.6 times (reduce time consumption from 17.5 to 2.3 h) in the simulation of laser light energy deposition in skin tissue that contains port wine stain lesions.

  8. Coupling Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Methods for the Simulation of Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Miller, Erin A.; Shaver, Mark W.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Ellis, J. E.; Kaye, William R.; McConn, Ronald J.; Meriwether, George H.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Wareing, Todd A.

    2008-10-31

    Radiation transport modeling methods used in the radiation detection community fall into one of two broad categories: stochastic (Monte Carlo) and deterministic. Monte Carlo methods are typically the tool of choice for simulating gamma-ray spectrometers operating in homeland and national security settings (e.g. portal monitoring of vehicles or isotope identification using handheld devices), but deterministic codes that discretize the linear Boltzmann transport equation in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for many complex radiation detection problems. This paper describes the development of a scenario simulation framework based on deterministic algorithms. Key challenges include: formulating methods to automatically define an energy group structure that can support modeling of gamma-ray spectrometers ranging from low to high resolution; combining deterministic transport algorithms (e.g. ray-tracing and discrete ordinates) to mitigate ray effects for a wide range of problem types; and developing efficient and accurate methods to calculate gamma-ray spectrometer response functions from the deterministic angular flux solutions. The software framework aimed at addressing these challenges is described and results from test problems that compare coupled deterministic-Monte Carlo methods and purely Monte Carlo approaches are provided.

  9. High-resolution Monte Carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 2. Transport results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the second of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, results from the transport aspect of these simulations are reported on. Transport simulations contained herein assume a finite pulse input of conservative tracer, and the numerical technique endeavors to realistically simulate tracer spreading as the cloud moves through a heterogeneous medium. Medium heterogeneity is limited to the hydraulic conductivity field, and generation of this field assumes that the hydraulic- conductivity process is second-order stationary. Methods of estimating cloud moments, and the interpretation of these moments, are discussed. Techniques for estimation of large-time macrodispersivities from cloud second-moment data, and for the approximation of the standard errors associated with these macrodispersivities, are also presented. These moment and macrodispersivity estimation techniques were applied to tracer clouds resulting from transport scenarios generated by specific Monte Carlo simulations. Where feasible, moments and macrodispersivities resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. Some limited results concerning the possible ergodic nature of these simulations, and the presence of non- Gaussian behavior of the mean cloud, are reported on as well.

  10. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fanos theorem. Additionally, Lewis approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fanos and Lewis approaches are stated in this new equation. Fanos theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms.

  11. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equationin a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equationis modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equationare evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano's theorem. Additionally, Lewis' approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equationis modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equationis generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano's and Lewis' approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano's theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis' theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms. PMID:26061045

  12. The Monte Carlo approach to transport modeling in deca-nanometer MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, Enrico; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Fiegna, Claudio; Selmi, Luca

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we review recent developments of the Monte Carlo approach to the simulation of semi-classical carrier transport in nano-MOSFETs, with particular focus on the inclusion of quantum-mechanical effects in the simulation (using either the multi-subband approach or quantum corrections to the electrostatic potential) and on the numerical stability issues related to the coupling of the transport with the Poisson equation. Selected applications are presented, including the analysis of quasi-ballistic transport, the determination of the RF characteristics of deca-nanometric MOSFETs, and the study of non-conventional device structures and channel materials.

  13. Correlated few-photon transport in one-dimensional waveguides: Linear and nonlinear dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2011-04-15

    We address correlated few-photon transport in one-dimensional waveguides coupled to a two-level system (TLS), such as an atom or a quantum dot. We derive exactly the single-photon and two-photon current (transmission) for linear and nonlinear (tight-binding sinusoidal) energy-momentum dispersion relations of photons in the waveguides and compare the results for the different dispersions. A large enhancement of the two-photon current for the sinusoidal dispersion has been seen at a certain transition energy of the TLS away from the single-photon resonances.

  14. Radiation dose measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon reactions in a human head phantom for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo

    Dose measurements and radiation transport calculations were investigated for the interactions within the human brain of fast neutrons, slow neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons associated with accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT). To estimate the overall dose to the human brain, it is necessary to distinguish the doses from the different radiation sources. Using organic scintillators, human head phantom and detector assemblies were designed, constructed, and tested to determine the most appropriate dose estimation system to discriminate dose due to the different radiation sources that will ultimately be incorporated into a human head phantom to be used for dose measurements in ABNCT. Monoenergetic and continuous energy neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target near the reaction threshold using the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A human head phantom was built to measure and to distinguish the doses which result from proton recoils induced by fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium nuclei from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction, and photons generated in the 7Li accelerator target as well as those generated inside the head phantom through various nuclear reactions at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures. The phantom consists of two main parts to estimate dose to tumor and dose to healthy tissue as well: a 3.22 cm3 boron loaded plastic scintillator which simulates a boron containing tumor inside the brain and a 2664 cm3 cylindrical liquid scintillator which represents the surrounding healthy tissue in the head. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX(TM) was used for the simulation of radiation transport due to neutrons and photons and extended to investigate the effects of neutrons and other radiation on the brain at various depths.

  15. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  16. Electron transport in radiotherapy using local-to-global Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Siantar, C.L.H.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Ballinger, C.T.; Neuenschwander, H.; Mackie, T.R.; Reckwerdt, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Local-to-Global (L-G) Monte Carlo methods are a way to make three-dimensional electron transport both fast and accurate relative to other Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by breaking the simulation into two stages: a local calculation done over small geometries having the size and shape of the ``steps`` to be taken through the mesh; and a global calculation which relies on a stepping code that samples the stored results of the local calculation. The increase in speed results from taking fewer steps in the global calculation than required by ordinary Monte Carlo codes and by speeding up the calculation per step. The potential for accuracy comes from the ability to use long runs of detailed codes to compile probability distribution functions (PDFs) in the local calculation. Specific examples of successful Local-to-Global algorithms are given.

  17. Dosimetric variation due to the photon beam energy in the small-animal irradiation: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The impact of photon beam energy and tissue heterogeneities on dose distributions and dosimetric characteristics such as point dose, mean dose, and maximum dose was investigated in the context of small-animal irradiation using Monte Carlo simulations based on the EGSnrc code. Methods: Three Monte Carlo mouse phantoms, namely, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and bone homogeneous were generated based on the same mouse computed tomography image set. These phantoms were generated by overriding the tissue type of none of the voxels (heterogeneous), all voxels (homogeneous), and only the bone voxels (bone homogeneous) to that of soft tissue. Phase space files of the 100 and 225 kVp photon beams based on a small-animal irradiator (XRad225Cx, Precision X-Ray Inc., North Branford, CT) were generated using BEAMnrc. A 360 deg. photon arc was simulated and three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations were carried out using the DOSXYZnrc code through DOSCTP in the above three phantoms. For comparison, the 3D dose distributions, dose profiles, mean, maximum, and point doses at different locations such as the isocenter, lung, rib, and spine were determined in the three phantoms. Results: The dose gradient resulting from the 225 kVp arc was found to be steeper than for the 100 kVp arc. The mean dose was found to be 1.29 and 1.14 times higher for the heterogeneous phantom when compared to the mean dose in the homogeneous phantom using the 100 and 225 kVp photon arcs, respectively. The bone doses (rib and spine) in the heterogeneous mouse phantom were about five (100 kVp) and three (225 kVp) times higher when compared to the homogeneous phantom. However, the lung dose did not vary significantly between the heterogeneous, homogeneous, and bone homogeneous phantom for the 225 kVp compared to the 100 kVp photon beams. Conclusions: A significant bone dose enhancement was found when the 100 and 225 kVp photon beams were used in small-animal irradiation. This dosimetric effect, due to the presence of the bone heterogeneity, was more significant than that due to the lung heterogeneity. Hence, for kV photon energies of the range used in small-animal irradiation, the increase of the mean and bone dose due to the photoelectric effect could be a dosimetric concern.

  18. Backscatter towards the monitor ion chamber in high-energy photon and electron beams: charge integration versus Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Symonds-Tayler, R.; Liu, H. H.; Nahum, A. E.

    2000-11-01

    In some linear accelerators, the charge collected by the monitor ion chamber is partly caused by backscattered particles from accelerator components downstream from the chamber. This influences the output of the accelerator and also has to be taken into account when output factors are derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, the contribution of backscattered particles to the monitor ion chamber response of a Varian 2100C linac was determined for photon beams (6, 10 MV) and for electron beams (6, 12, 20 MeV). The experimental procedure consisted of charge integration from the target in a photon beam or from the monitor ion chamber in electron beams. The Monte Carlo code EGS4/BEAM was used to study the contribution of backscattered particles to the dose deposited in the monitor ion chamber. Both measurements and simulations showed a linear increase in backscatter fraction with decreasing field size for photon and electron beams. For 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams, a 2-3% increase in backscatter was obtained for a 0.50.5 cm2 field compared to a 4040 cm2 field. The results for the 6 MV beam were slightly higher than for the 10 MV beam. For electron beams (6, 12, 20 MeV), an increase of similar magnitude was obtained from measurements and simulations for 6 MeV electrons. For higher energy electron beams a smaller increase in backscatter fraction was found. The problem is of less importance for electron beams since large variations of field size for a single electron energy usually do not occur.

  19. Backscatter towards the monitor ion chamber in high-energy photon and electron beams: charge integration versus Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, F; Symonds-Tayler, R; Liu, H H; Nahum, A E

    2000-11-01

    In some linear accelerators, the charge collected by the monitor ion chamber is partly caused by backscattered particles from accelerator components downstream from the chamber. This influences the output of the accelerator and also has to be taken into account when output factors are derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, the contribution of backscattered particles to the monitor ion chamber response of a Varian 2100C linac was determined for photon beams (6, 10 MV) and for electron beams (6, 12, 20 MeV). The experimental procedure consisted of charge integration from the target in a photon beam or from the monitor ion chamber in electron beams. The Monte Carlo code EGS4/BEAM was used to study the contribution of backscattered particles to the dose deposited in the monitor ion chamber. Both measurements and simulations showed a linear increase in backscatter fraction with decreasing field size for photon and electron beams. For 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams, a 2-3% increase in backscatter was obtained for a 0.5 x 0.5 cm2 field compared to a 40 x 40 cm2 field. The results for the 6 MV beam were slightly higher than for the 10 MV beam. For electron beams (6, 12, 20 MeV), an increase of similar magnitude was obtained from measurements and simulations for 6 MeV electrons. For higher energy electron beams a smaller increase in backscatter fraction was found. The problem is of less importance for electron beams since large variations of field size for a single electron energy usually do not occur. PMID:11098896

  20. Correlated histogram representation of Monte Carlo derived medical accelerator photon-output phase space

    DOEpatents

    Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E.

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided to represent the calculated phase space of photons emanating from medical accelerators used in photon teletherapy. The method reproduces the energy distributions and trajectories of the photons originating in the bremsstrahlung target and of photons scattered by components within the accelerator head. The method reproduces the energy and directional information from sources up to several centimeters in radial extent, so it is expected to generalize well to accelerators made by different manufacturers. The method is computationally both fast and efficient overall sampling efficiency of 80% or higher for most field sizes. The computational cost is independent of the number of beams used in the treatment plan.

  1. Acceleration of Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in complex heterogeneous media using Intel many-integrated core architecture.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Anton V; Kirillin, Mikhail Yu

    2015-08-01

    Over two decades, the Monte Carlo technique has become a gold standard in simulation of light propagation in turbid media, including biotissues. Technological solutions provide further advances of this technique. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is a new type of accelerator for highly parallel general purpose computing, which allows execution of a wide range of applications without substantial code modification. We present a technical approach of porting our previously developed Monte Carlo (MC) code for simulation of light transport in tissues to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. We show that employing the accelerator allows reducing computational time of MC simulation and obtaining simulation speed-up comparable to GPU. We demonstrate the performance of the developed code for simulation of light transport in the human head and determination of the measurement volume in near-infrared spectroscopy brain sensing. PMID:26249663

  2. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  3. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  4. Minimizing the cost of splitting in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    A deterministic analysis of the computational cost associated with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. Appropriate integro-differential equations are developed for the first and second moments of the Monte Carlo tally as well as time per particle history, given that splitting with Russian roulette takes place at one (or several) internal surfaces of the geometry. The equations are solved using a standard S/sub n/ (discrete ordinates) solution technique, allowing for the prediction of computer cost (formulated as the product of sample variance and time per particle history, sigma/sup 2//sub s/tau p) associated with a given set of splitting parameters. Optimum splitting surface locations and splitting ratios are determined. Benefits of such an analysis are particularly noteworthy for transport problems in which splitting is apt to be extensively employed (e.g., deep penetration calculations).

  5. Capabilities, Implementation, and Benchmarking of Shift, a Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Hamilton, Steven P; Godfrey, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemorespecific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000 R problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.less

  6. A simplified spherical harmonic method for coupled electron-photon transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Josef, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    In this thesis we have developed a simplified spherical harmonic method (SP{sub N} method) and associated efficient solution techniques for 2-D multigroup electron-photon transport calculations. The SP{sub N} method has never before been applied to charged-particle transport. We have performed a first time Fourier analysis of the source iteration scheme and the P{sub 1} diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) scheme applied to the 2-D SP{sub N} equations. Our theoretical analyses indicate that the source iteration and P{sub 1} DSA schemes are as effective for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. Previous analyses have indicated that the P{sub 1} DSA scheme is unstable (with sufficiently forward-peaked scattering and sufficiently small absorption) for the 2-D S{sub N} equations, yet is very effective for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. In addition, we have applied an angular multigrid acceleration scheme, and computationally demonstrated that it performs as well for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. It has previously been shown for 1-D S{sub N} calculations that this scheme is much more effective than the DSA scheme when scattering is highly forward-peaked. We have investigated the applicability of the SP{sub N} approximation to two different physical classes of problems: satellite electronics shielding from geomagnetically trapped electrons, and electron beam problems. In the space shielding study, the SP{sub N} method produced solutions that are accurate within 10% of the benchmark Monte Carlo solutions, and often orders of magnitude faster than Monte Carlo. We have successfully modeled quasi-void problems and have obtained excellent agreement with Monte Carlo. We have observed that the SP{sub N} method appears to be too diffusive an approximation for beam problems. This result, however, is in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  7. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  8. MONTE CARLO PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN MEDIA WITH EXPONENTIALLY VARYING TIME-DEPENDENT CROSS-SECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    F. BROWN; W. MARTIN

    2001-02-01

    A probability density function (PDF) and random sampling procedure for the distance to collision were derived for the case of exponentially varying cross-sections. Numerical testing indicates that both are correct. This new sampling procedure has direct application in a new method for Monte Carlo radiation transport, and may be generally useful for analyzing physical problems where the material cross-sections change very rapidly in an exponential manner.

  9. Cavity-photon-switched coherent transient transport in a double quantum waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf Gudmundsson, Vidar; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2014-12-21

    We study a cavity-photon-switched coherent electron transport in a symmetric double quantum waveguide. The waveguide system is weakly connected to two electron reservoirs, but strongly coupled to a single quantized photon cavity mode. A coupling window is placed between the waveguides to allow electron interference or inter-waveguide transport. The transient electron transport in the system is investigated using a quantum master equation. We present a cavity-photon tunable semiconductor quantum waveguide implementation of an inverter quantum gate, in which the output of the waveguide system may be selected via the selection of an appropriate photon number or “photon frequency” of the cavity. In addition, the importance of the photon polarization in the cavity, that is, either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of electron propagation in the waveguide system is demonstrated.

  10. Magnetic confinement of electron and photon radiotherapy dose: A Monte Carlo simulation with a nonuniform longitudinal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Bielajew, Alex F.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Moran, Jean M.; Becchetti, Frederick D.

    2005-12-15

    It recently has been shown experimentally that the focusing provided by a longitudinal nonuniform high magnetic field can significantly improve electron beam dose profiles. This could permit precise targeting of tumors near critical areas and minimize the radiation dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The experimental results together with Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the magnetic confinement of electron radiotherapy beams may provide an alternative to proton or heavy ion radiation therapy in some cases. In the present work, the external magnetic field capability of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was utilized by providing a subroutine that modeled the actual field produced by the solenoid magnet used in the experimental studies. The magnetic field in our simulation covered the region from the vacuum exit window to the phantom including surrounding air. In a longitudinal nonuniform magnetic field, it is observed that the electron dose can be focused in both the transverse and longitudinal directions. The measured dose profiles of the electron beam are generally reproduced in the Monte Carlo simulations to within a few percent in the region of interest provided that the geometry and the energy of the incident electron beam are accurately known. Comparisons for the photon beam dose profiles with and without the magnetic field are also made. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced in the simulation. Our simulation shows that the excessive dose at the beam entrance is due to the magnetic field trapping and focusing scattered secondary electrons that were produced in the air by the incident photon beam. The simulations also show that the electron dose profile can be manipulated by the appropriate control of the beam energy together with the strength and displacement of the longitudinal magnetic field.

  11. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo studies of electron transport in resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonjakovi?, D.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj; White, R. D.; Dujko, S.

    2014-10-01

    A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique are used to investigate electron transport in Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments at CERN and elsewhere. Using cross sections for electron scattering in C2H2F4, iso-C4H10 and SF6 as an input in our Boltzmann and Monte Carlo codes, we have calculated data for electron transport as a function of reduced electric field E/N in various C2H2F4/iso-C4H10/SF6 gas mixtures used in RPCs in the ALICE, CMS and ATLAS experiments. Emphasis is placed upon the explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions (e.g. electron attachment and/or ionization) on the drift and diffusion. Among many interesting and atypical phenomena induced by the explicit effects of non-conservative collisions, we note the existence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component in the ALICE timing RPC system. We systematically study the origin and mechanisms for such phenomena as well as the possible physical implications which arise from their explicit inclusion into models of RPCs. Spatially-resolved electron transport properties are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique in order to understand these phenomena.

  12. A computationally efficient moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method with implementation in Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. A.; Prinja, A. K.; Franke, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical demonstration of a moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method. Foremost, a full implementation of the moment-preserving (MP) method within the Geant4 particle simulation toolkit is demonstrated. Beyond implementation details, it is shown that the MP method is a viable alternative to the condensed history (CH) method for inclusion in current and future generation transport codes through demonstration of the key features of the method including: systematically controllable accuracy, computational efficiency, mathematical robustness, and versatility. A wide variety of results common to electron transport are presented illustrating the key features of the MP method. In particular, it is possible to achieve accuracy that is statistically indistinguishable from analog Monte Carlo, while remaining up to three orders of magnitude more efficient than analog Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the MP method can be generalized to any applicable analog scattering DCS model by extending previous work on the MP method beyond analytical DCSs to the partial-wave (PW) elastic tabulated DCS data.

  13. Epp - A C++ EGSnrc user code for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Congwu; Lippuner, Jonas; Ingleby, Harry R.; Di Valentino, David N. M.; Elbakri, Idris A.

    2010-04-01

    Easy particle propagation (Epp) is a Monte Carlo simulation EGSnrc user code that we have developed for dose calculation in a voxelized volume, and to generate images of an arbitrary geometry irradiated by a particle source. The dose calculation aspect is a reimplementation of the function of DOSXYZnrc with new features added and some restrictions removed. Epp is designed for x-ray application, but can be readily extended to trace other kinds of particles. Epp is based on the EGSnrc C++ class library (egspp) which makes modeling particle sources and simulation geometries simpler than in DOSXYZnrc and other BEAM user codes based on EGSnrc code system. With Epp geometries can be modeled analytically or voxelized geometries, such as those in DOSXYZnrc, can be used. Compared to DOSXYZnrc (slightly modified from the official version for saving phase space information of photons leaving the geometry), Epp is at least two times faster. Photon propagation to the image plane is integrated into Epp (other particles possible with minor extension to the current code) with an ideal detector defined. When only the resultant images are needed, there is no need to save the particle data. This results in significant savings of data storage space, network load, and time for file I/O. Epp was validated against DOSXYZnrc for imaging and dose calculation by comparing simulation results with the same input. Epp can be used as a Monte Carlo simulation tool for faster imaging and radiation dose applications.

  14. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs' responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At {+-}1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer to water equivalent if there is a silica tube around the sensitive volume. The angular dependence of the response of the three PSDs in a 6 MV photon beam is not of concern at 2% level.

  15. Exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo for the 1-D transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. R.; Morel, J. E.; Ragusa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    We define a new exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo method for solving the one-speed 1-D slab-geometry transport equation. This method is based upon the use of a linear discontinuous finite-element trial space in space and direction to represent the transport solution. A space-direction h-adaptive algorithm is employed to restore exponential convergence after stagnation occurs due to inadequate trial-space resolution. This methods uses jumps in the solution at cell interfaces as an error indicator. Computational results are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the new approach. (authors)

  16. Development of A Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code System For HEDS: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Gabriel, Tony A.; Miller, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Modifications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code HETC are underway to extend the code to include transport of energetic heavy ions, such as are found in the galactic cosmic ray spectrum in space. The new HETC code will be available for use in radiation shielding applications associated with missions, such as the proposed manned mission to Mars. In this work the current status of code modification is described. Methods used to develop the required nuclear reaction models, including total, elastic and nuclear breakup processes, and their associated databases are also presented. Finally, plans for future work on the extended HETC code system and for its validation are described.

  17. GPU-Accelerated Monte Carlo Electron Transport Methods: Development and Application for Radiation Dose Calculations Using Six GPU cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-06-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software testbed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. For photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla™ M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  18. A Monte Carlo tool for combined photon and proton treatment planning verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, J.; Jiang, H.; Herrup, D.; Kooy, H.; Paganetti, H.

    2007-06-01

    Photons and protons are usually used independently to treat cancer. However, at MGH patients can be treated with both photons and protons since both modalities are available on site. A combined therapy can be advantageous in cancer therapy due to the skin sparing ability of photons and the sharp Bragg peak fall-off for protons beyond the tumor. In the present work, we demonstrate how to implement a combined 3D MC toolkit for photon and proton (ph-pr) therapy, which can be used for verification of the treatment plan. The commissioning of a MC system for combined ph-pr involves initially the development of a MC model of both the photon and proton treatment heads. The MC dose tool was evaluated on a head and neck patient treated with both combined photon and proton beams. The combined ph-pr dose agreed with measurements in solid water phantom to within 3%mm. Comparison with commercial planning system pencil beam prediction agrees within 3% (except for air cavities and bone regions).

  19. Topological Photonic Quasicrystals: Fractal Topological Spectrum and Protected Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandres, Miguel A.; Rechtsman, Mikael C.; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to have a topological phase in two-dimensional quasicrystals without any magnetic field applied, but instead introducing an artificial gauge field via dynamic modulation. This topological quasicrystal exhibits scatter-free unidirectional edge states that are extended along the system's perimeter, contrary to the states of an ordinary quasicrystal system, which are characterized by power-law decay. We find that the spectrum of this Floquet topological quasicrystal exhibits a rich fractal (self-similar) structure of topological "minigaps," manifesting an entirely new phenomenon: fractal topological systems. These topological minigaps form only when the system size is sufficiently large because their gapless edge states penetrate deep into the bulk. Hence, the topological structure emerges as a function of the system size, contrary to periodic systems where the topological phase can be completely characterized by the unit cell. We demonstrate the existence of this topological phase both by using a topological index (Bott index) and by studying the unidirectional transport of the gapless edge states and its robustness in the presence of defects. Our specific model is a Penrose lattice of helical optical waveguides—a photonic Floquet quasicrystal; however, we expect this new topological quasicrystal phase to be universal.

  20. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  1. A bone composition model for Monte Carlo x-ray transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-03-15

    In the megavoltage energy range although the mass attenuation coefficients of different bones do not vary by more than 10%, it has been estimated that a simple tissue model containing a single-bone composition could cause errors of up to 10% in the calculated dose distribution. In the kilovoltage energy range, the variation in mass attenuation coefficients of the bones is several times greater, and the expected error from applying this type of model could be as high as several hundred percent. Based on the observation that the calcium and phosphorus compositions of bones are strongly correlated with the bone density, the authors propose an analytical formulation of bone composition for Monte Carlo computations. Elemental compositions and densities of homogeneous adult human bones from the literature were used as references, from which the calcium and phosphorus compositions were fitted as polynomial functions of bone density and assigned to model bones together with the averaged compositions of other elements. To test this model using the Monte Carlo package DOSXYZnrc, a series of discrete model bones was generated from this formula and the radiation-tissue interaction cross-section data were calculated. The total energy released per unit mass of primary photons (terma) and Monte Carlo calculations performed using this model and the single-bone model were compared, which demonstrated that at kilovoltage energies the discrepancy could be more than 100% in bony dose and 30% in soft tissue dose. Percentage terma computed with the model agrees with that calculated on the published compositions to within 2.2% for kV spectra and 1.5% for MV spectra studied. This new bone model for Monte Carlo dose calculation may be of particular importance for dosimetry of kilovoltage radiation beams as well as for dosimetry of pediatric or animal subjects whose bone composition may differ substantially from that of adult human bones.

  2. A bone composition model for Monte Carlo x-ray transport simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul J; Graves, Edward E

    2009-03-01

    In the megavoltage energy range although the mass attenuation coefficients of different bones do not vary by more than 10%, it has been estimated that a simple tissue model containing a single-bone composition could cause errors of up to 10% in the calculated dose distribution. In the kilovoltage energy range, the variation in mass attenuation coefficients of the bones is several times greater, and the expected error from applying this type of model could be as high as several hundred percent. Based on the observation that the calcium and phosphorus compositions of bones are strongly correlated with the bone density, the authors propose an analytical formulation of bone composition for Monte Carlo computations. Elemental compositions and densities of homogeneous adult human bones from the literature were used as references, from which the calcium and phosphorus compositions were fitted as polynomial functions of bone density and assigned to model bones together with the averaged compositions of other elements. To test this model using the Monte Carlo package DOSXYZnrc, a series of discrete model bones was generated from this formula and the radiation-tissue interaction cross-section data were calculated. The total energy released per unit mass of primary photons (terma) and Monte Carlo calculations performed using this model and the single-bone model were compared, which demonstrated that at kilovoltage energies the discrepancy could be more than 100% in bony dose and 30% in soft tissue dose. Percentage terma computed with the model agrees with that calculated on the published compositions to within 2.2% for kV spectra and 1.5% for MV spectra studied. This new bone model for Monte Carlo dose calculation may be of particular importance for dosimetry of kilovoltage radiation beams as well as for dosimetry of pediatric or animal subjects whose bone composition may differ substantially from that of adult human bones. PMID:19378761

  3. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, A S; Ford, J R

    2008-10-01

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy. PMID:18780958

  4. Ion beam transport in tissue-like media using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, Irena; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Andreo, Pedro; Belki?, Dzevad; Brahme, Anders

    2004-05-21

    The development of the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT (heavy ion transport) for the simulation of the transport of protons and heavier ions in tissue-like media is described. The code SHIELD-HIT, a spin-off of SHIELD (available as RSICC CCC-667), extends the transport of hadron cascades from standard targets to that of ions in arbitrary tissue-like materials, taking into account ionization energy-loss straggling and multiple Coulomb scattering effects. The consistency of the results obtained with SHIELD-HIT has been verified against experimental data and other existing Monte Carlo codes (PTRAN, PETRA), as well as with deterministic models for ion transport, comparing depth distributions of energy deposition by protons, 12C and 20Ne ions impinging on water. The SHIELD-HIT code yields distributions consistent with a proper treatment of nuclear inelastic collisions. Energy depositions up to and well beyond the Bragg peak due to nuclear fragmentations are well predicted. Satisfactory agreement is also found with experimental determinations of the number of fragments of a given type, as a function of depth in water, produced by 12C and 14N ions of 670 MeV u(-1), although less favourable agreement is observed for heavier projectiles such as 16O ions of the same energy. The calculated neutron spectra differential in energy and angle produced in a mimic of a Martian rock by irradiation with 12C ions of 290 MeV u(-1) also shows good agreement with experimental data. It is concluded that a careful analysis of stopping power data for different tissues is necessary for radiation therapy applications, since an incorrect estimation of the position of the Bragg peak might lead to a significant deviation from the prescribed dose in small target volumes. The results presented in this study indicate the usefulness of the SHIELD-HIT code for Monte Carlo simulations in the field of light ion radiation therapy. PMID:15214534

  5. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  6. Surface dose reduction from bone interface in kilovoltage X-ray radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study of photon spectra.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Owrangi, Amir M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dosimetric impact of surface dose reduction due to the loss of backscatter from the bone interface in kilovoltage (kV) X-ray radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulation was carried out using the EGSnrc code. An inhomogeneous phantom containing a thin water layer (0.5-5 mm) on top of a bone (thickness = 1 cm) was irradiated by a clinical 105 kVp photon beam produced by a Gulmay D3225 X-ray machine. Field sizes of 2, 5, and 10 cm diameter and source-to-surface distance of 20 cm were used. Surface doses for different phantom configurations were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Photon energy spectra at the phantom surface and bone were determined according to the phase-space files at the particle scoring planes which included the multiple crossers. For comparison, all Monte Carlo simulations were repeated in a phantom with the bone replaced by water. Surface dose reduction was found when a bone was underneath the water layer. When the water thickness was equal to 1 mm for the circular field of 5 cm diameter, a surface dose reduction of 6.3% was found. The dose reduction decreased to 4.7% and 3.4% when the water thickness increased to 3 and 5 mm, respectively. This shows that the impact of the surface dose uncertainty decreased while the water thickness over the bone increased. This result was supported by the decrease in relative intensity of the lower energy photons in the energy spectrum when the water layer was with and over the bone, compared to without the bone. We concluded that surface dose reduction of 7.8%-1.1% was found when the water thickness increased from 0.5-5 mm for circular fields with diameters ranging from 2-10 cm. This decrease of surface dose results in an overestimation of prescribed dose at the patient's surface, and might be a concern when using kV photon beam to treat skin tumors in sites such as forehead, chest wall, and kneecap. PMID:22955657

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the operational quantities at the realistic mixed neutron-photon radiation fields CANEL and SIGMA.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V

    2007-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety owns two facilities producing realistic mixed neutron-photon radiation fields, CANEL, an accelerator driven moderator modular device, and SIGMA, a graphite moderated americium-beryllium assembly. These fields are representative of some of those encountered at nuclear workplaces, and the corresponding facilities are designed and used for calibration of various instruments, such as survey meters, personal dosimeters or spectrometric devices. In the framework of the European project EVIDOS, irradiations of personal dosimeters were performed at CANEL and SIGMA. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to estimate the reference values of the personal dose equivalent at both facilities. The Hp(10) values were calculated for three different angular positions, 0 degrees, 45 degrees and 75 degrees, of an ICRU phantom located at the position of irradiation. PMID:17578872

  8. On Monte Carlo modeling of megavoltage photon beams: A revisited study on the sensitivity of beam parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar; Moftah, Belal; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To commission Monte Carlo beam models for five Varian megavoltage photon beams (4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV). The goal is to closely match measured dose distributions in water for a wide range of field sizes (from 2x2 to 35x35 cm{sup 2}). The second objective is to reinvestigate the sensitivity of the calculated dose distributions to variations in the primary electron beam parameters. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used for photon beam simulations and dose calculations. The linear accelerator geometric models are based on (i) manufacturer specifications, (ii) corrections made by Chibani and Ma [''On the discrepancies between Monte Carlo dose calculations and measurements for the 18 MV Varian photon beam,'' Med. Phys. 34, 1206-1216 (2007)], and (iii) more recent drawings. Measurements were performed using pinpoint and Farmer ionization chambers, depending on the field size. Phase space calculations for small fields were performed with and without angle-based photon splitting. In addition to the three commonly used primary electron beam parameters (E{sub AV} is the mean energy, FWHM is the energy spectrum broadening, and R is the beam radius), the angular divergence ({theta}) of primary electrons is also considered. Results: The calculated and measured dose distributions agreed to within 1% local difference at any depth beyond 1 cm for different energies and for field sizes varying from 2x2 to 35x35 cm{sup 2}. In the penumbra regions, the distance to agreement is better than 0.5 mm, except for 15 MV (0.4-1 mm). The measured and calculated output factors agreed to within 1.2%. The 6, 10, and 18 MV beam models use {theta}=0 deg., while the 4 and 15 MV beam models require {theta}=0.5 deg. and 0.6 deg., respectively. The parameter sensitivity study shows that varying the beam parameters around the solution can lead to 5% differences with measurements for small (e.g., 2x2 cm{sup 2}) and large (e.g., 35x35 cm{sup 2}) fields, while a perfect agreement is maintained for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field. The influence of R on the central-axis depth dose and the strong influence of {theta} on the lateral dose profiles are demonstrated. Conclusions: Dose distributions for very small and very large fields were proved to be more sensitive to variations in E{sub AV}, R, and {theta} in comparison with the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field. Monte Carlo beam models need to be validated for a wide range of field sizes including small field sizes (e.g., 2x2 cm{sup 2}).

  9. SAF values for internal photon emitters calculated for the RPI-P pregnant-female models using Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C. Y.; Xu, X. George; Stabin, Michael G.

    2008-07-15

    Estimates of radiation absorbed doses from radionuclides internally deposited in a pregnant woman and her fetus are very important due to elevated fetal radiosensitivity. This paper reports a set of specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for use with the dosimetry schema developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. The calculations were based on three newly constructed pregnant female anatomic models, called RPI-P3, RPI-P6, and RPI-P9, that represent adult females at 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational periods, respectively. Advanced Boundary REPresentation (BREP) surface-geometry modeling methods were used to create anatomically realistic geometries and organ volumes that were carefully adjusted to agree with the latest ICRP reference values. A Monte Carlo user code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to simulate internal photon emitters ranging from 10 keV to 4 MeV. SAF values were calculated and compared with previous data derived from stylized models of simplified geometries and with a model of a 7.5-month pregnant female developed previously from partial-body CT images. The results show considerable differences between these models for low energy photons, but generally good agreement at higher energies. These differences are caused mainly by different organ shapes and positions. Other factors, such as the organ mass, the source-to-target-organ centroid distance, and the Monte Carlo code used in each study, played lesser roles in the observed differences in these. Since the SAF values reported in this study are based on models that are anatomically more realistic than previous models, these data are recommended for future applications as standard reference values in internal dosimetry involving pregnant females.

  10. A 3D photon superposition/convolution algorithm and its foundation on results of Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, W; Pyyry, J; Kaissl, W

    2005-04-21

    Based on previous publications on a triple Gaussian analytical pencil beam model and on Monte Carlo calculations using Monte Carlo codes GEANT-Fluka, versions 95, 98, 2002, and BEAMnrc/EGSnrc, a three-dimensional (3D) superposition/convolution algorithm for photon beams (6 MV, 18 MV) is presented. Tissue heterogeneity is taken into account by electron density information of CT images. A clinical beam consists of a superposition of divergent pencil beams. A slab-geometry was used as a phantom model to test computed results by measurements. An essential result is the existence of further dose build-up and build-down effects in the domain of density discontinuities. These effects have increasing magnitude for field sizes < or =5.5 cm(2) and densities < or = 0.25 g cm(-3), in particular with regard to field sizes considered in stereotaxy. They could be confirmed by measurements (mean standard deviation 2%). A practical impact is the dose distribution at transitions from bone to soft tissue, lung or cavities. PMID:15815095

  11. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-07-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 10(6) particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer. PMID:25190994

  12. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R.

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  13. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 106 particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer. PMID:25190994

  14. Analysis of atmospheric gamma-ray flashes detected in near space with allowance for the transport of photons in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Donskoy, E. N.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of transport of the bremsstrahlung produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches are performed for altitudes up to the orbit altitudes where terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) have been detected aboard satellites. The photon flux per runaway electron and angular distribution of photons on a hemisphere of radius similar to that of the satellite orbits are calculated as functions of the source altitude z. The calculations yield general results, which are recommended for use in TGF data analysis. The altitude z and polar angle are determined for which the calculated bremsstrahlung spectra and mean photon energies agree with TGF measurements. The correlation of TGFs with variations of the vertical dipole moment of a thundercloud is analyzed. We show that, in agreement with observations, the detected TGFs can be produced in the fields of thunderclouds with charges much smaller than 100 C and that TGFs are not necessarily correlated with the occurrence of blue jets and red sprites.

  15. Analysis of atmospheric gamma-ray flashes detected in near space with allowance for the transport of photons in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L. P. Donskoy, E. N.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-07-15

    Monte Carlo simulations of transport of the bremsstrahlung produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches are performed for altitudes up to the orbit altitudes where terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) have been detected aboard satellites. The photon flux per runaway electron and angular distribution of photons on a hemisphere of radius similar to that of the satellite orbits are calculated as functions of the source altitude z. The calculations yield general results, which are recommended for use in TGF data analysis. The altitude z and polar angle are determined for which the calculated bremsstrahlung spectra and mean photon energies agree with TGF measurements. The correlation of TGFs with variations of the vertical dipole moment of a thundercloud is analyzed. We show that, in agreement with observations, the detected TGFs can be produced in the fields of thunderclouds with charges much smaller than 100 C and that TGFs are not necessarily correlated with the occurrence of blue jets and red sprites.

  16. New nuclear data for high-energy all-particle Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Resler, D.A.

    1994-06-01

    We are extending the LLNL nuclear data libraries to 250 MeV for neutron and proton interaction with biologically important nuclei; i.e. H, C, N, 0, F, P, and Ca. Because of the large number of reaction channels that open with increasing energies, the data is generated in particle production cross section format with energy-angle correlated distributions for the outgoing particles in the laboratory frame of reference. The new Production Cross Section data Library (PCSL) will be used in PEREGRINE -- the new all-particle Monte Carlo transport code being developed at LLNL for dose calculation in radiation therapy planning.

  17. Hybrid Parallel Programming Models for AMR Neutron Monte-Carlo Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dureau, David; Potte, Gal

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with High Performance Computing (HPC) applied to neutron transport theory on complex geometries, thanks to both an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm and a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver. Several Parallelism models are presented and analyzed in this context, among them shared memory and distributed memory ones such as Domain Replication and Domain Decomposition, together with Hybrid strategies. The study is illustrated by weak and strong scalability tests on complex benchmarks on several thousands of cores thanks to the petaflopic supercomputer Tera100.

  18. Monte Carlo evaluation of electron transport in heterojunction bipolar transistor base structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziar, C. M.; Klausmeier-Brown, M. E.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Datta, S.

    1986-07-01

    Electron transport through base structures of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heterojunction bipolar transistors is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of both ballistic launching ramps and graded bases for reducing base transit time. Both techniques are limited, however, in their ability to maintain short transit times across the wide bases that are desirable for reduction of base resistance. Simulation results demonstrate that neither technique is capable of maintaining a 1-ps transit time across a 0.25-micron base. The physical mechanisms responsible for limiting the performance of each structure are identified and a promising hybrid structure is described.

  19. Evaluation of PENFAST--a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Habib, B; Poumarede, B; Tola, F; Barthe, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within +/-1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE. PMID:19342258

  20. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-02-01

    The microwave reflection coefficient is commonly used to characterize the impedance of high-speed optoelectronic devices. Error and uncertainty in equivalent circuit parameters measured using this data are systematically evaluated. The commonly used nonlinear least-squares method for estimating uncertainty is shown to give unsatisfactory and incorrect results due to the nonlinear relationship between the circuit parameters and the measured data. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to provide superior results, both for individual devices and for assessing within-die variation. PMID:26906783

  1. 3D imaging using combined neutron-photon fan-beam tomography: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J; Yazdanpanah, A Pour; Barzilov, A; Regentova, E

    2016-05-01

    The application of combined neutron-photon tomography for 3D imaging is examined using MCNP5 simulations for objects of simple shapes and different materials. Two-dimensional transmission projections were simulated for fan-beam scans using 2.5MeV deuterium-deuterium and 14MeV deuterium-tritium neutron sources, and high-energy X-ray sources, such as 1MeV, 6MeV and 9MeV. Photons enable assessment of electron density and related mass density, neutrons aid in estimating the product of density and material-specific microscopic cross section- the ratio between the two provides the composition, while CT allows shape evaluation. Using a developed imaging technique, objects and their material compositions have been visualized. PMID:26953978

  2. Coupling 3D Monte Carlo light transport in optically heterogeneous tissues to photoacoustic signal generation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Steven L

    2014-12-01

    The generation of photoacoustic signals for imaging objects embedded within tissues is dependent on how well light can penetrate to and deposit energy within an optically absorbing object, such as a blood vessel. This report couples a 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light transport to stress wave generation to predict the acoustic signals received by a detector at the tissue surface. The Monte Carlo simulation allows modeling of optically heterogeneous tissues, and a simple MATLAB acoustic algorithm predicts signals reaching a surface detector. An example simulation considers a skin with a pigmented epidermis, a dermis with a background blood perfusion, and a 500-?m-dia. blood vessel centered at a 1-mm depth in the skin. The simulation yields acoustic signals received by a surface detector, which are generated by a pulsed 532-nm laser exposure before and after inserting the blood vessel. A MATLAB version of the acoustic algorithm and a link to the 3D Monte Carlo website are provided. PMID:25426426

  3. A direction-selective flattening filter for clinical photon beams. Monte Carlo evaluation of a new concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rhmann, Antje; Poppe, Bjrn

    2011-07-01

    A new concept for the design of flattening filters applied in the generation of 6 and 15 MV photon beams by clinical linear accelerators is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The beam head of the Siemens Primus accelerator has been taken as the starting point for the study of the conceived beam head modifications. The direction-selective filter (DSF) system developed in this work is midway between the classical flattening filter (FF) by which homogeneous transversal dose profiles have been established, and the flattening filter-free (FFF) design, by which advantages such as increased dose rate and reduced production of leakage photons and photoneutrons per Gy in the irradiated region have been achieved, whereas dose profile flatness was abandoned. The DSF concept is based on the selective attenuation of bremsstrahlung photons depending on their direction of emission from the bremsstrahlung target, accomplished by means of newly designed small conical filters arranged close to the target. This results in the capture of large-angle scattered Compton photons from the filter in the primary collimator. Beam flatness has been obtained up to any field cross section which does not exceed a circle of 15 cm diameter at 100 cm focal distance, such as 10 10 cm2, 4 14.5 cm2 or less. This flatness offers simplicity of dosimetric verifications, online controls and plausibility estimates of the dose to the target volume. The concept can be utilized when the application of small- and medium-sized homogeneous fields is sufficient, e.g. in the treatment of prostate, brain, salivary gland, larynx and pharynx as well as pediatric tumors and for cranial or extracranial stereotactic treatments. Significant dose rate enhancement has been achieved compared with the FF system, with enhancement factors 1.67 (DSF) and 2.08 (FFF) for 6 MV, and 2.54 (DSF) and 3.96 (FFF) for 15 MV. Shortening the delivery time per fraction matters with regard to workflow in a radiotherapy department, patient comfort, reduction of errors due to patient movement and a slight, probably just noticable improvement of the treatment outcome due to radiobiological reasons. In comparison with the FF system, the number of head leakage photons per Gy in the irradiated region has been reduced at 15 MV by factors 1/2.54 (DSF) and 1/3.96 (FFF), and the source strength of photoneutrons was reduced by factors 1/2.81 (DSF) and 1/3.49 (FFF).

  4. A deterministic electron, photon, proton and heavy ion transport suite for the study of the Jovian moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2011-02-01

    A Langley research center (LaRC) developed deterministic suite of radiation transport codes describing the propagation of electron, photon, proton and heavy ion in condensed media is used to simulate the exposure from the spectral distribution of the aforementioned particles in the Jovian radiation environment. Based on the measurements by the Galileo probe (1995-2003) heavy ion counter (HIC), the choice of trapped heavy ions is limited to carbon, oxygen and sulfur (COS). The deterministic particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron photon algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light heavy ion algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means to the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, photon, proton and heavy ion exposure assessment in a complex space structure. In this paper, the reference radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron and proton spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) Galileo interim radiation electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter system mission (EJSM), the JPL provided Europa mission fluence spectrum, is used to produce the corresponding depth dose curve in silicon behind a default aluminum shield of 100 mils (0.7 g/cm2). The transport suite can also accept a geometry describing ray traced thickness file from a computer aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point within the interior of the vehicle. In that regard, using a low fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe generated by the authors, the transport suite was verified versus Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for orbits JOI-J35 of the Galileo probe extended mission. For the upcoming EJSM mission with an expected launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute the depth dose profile for the traditional aluminum silicon as a standard shield target combination, as well as simulating the shielding response of a high charge number (Z) material such as tantalum (Ta). Finally, a shield optimization algorithm is discussed which can guide the instrument designers and fabrication personnel with the choice of graded-Z shield selection and analysis.

  5. Single photon transport along a one-dimensional waveguide with a side manipulated cavity QED system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2015-04-20

    An external mirror coupling to a cavity with a two-level atom inside is put forward to control the photon transport along a one-dimensional waveguide. Using a full quantum theory of photon transport in real space, it is shown that the Rabi splittings of the photonic transmission spectra can be controlled by the cavity-mirror couplings; the splittings could still be observed even when the cavity-atom system works in the weak coupling regime, and the transmission probability of the resonant photon can be modulated from 0 to 100%. Additionally, our numerical results show that the appearance of Fano resonance is related to the strengths of the cavity-mirror coupling and the dissipations of the system. An experimental demonstration of the proposal with the current photonic crystal waveguide technique is suggested. PMID:25969078

  6. Output correction factors for nine small field detectors in 6 MV radiation therapy photon beams: A PENELOPE Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Sempau, Josep; Andreo, Pedro

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To determine detector-specific output correction factors,k{sub Q} {sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n}}}} {sub ,Q} {sub m{sub s{sub r}}} {sup f{sub {sup {sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}{sub {sup ,f{sub {sup {sub m}{sub s}{sub r}{sub ,}}}}}}}} in 6 MV small photon beams for air and liquid ionization chambers, silicon diodes, and diamond detectors from two manufacturers. Methods: Field output factors, defined according to the international formalism published byAlfonso et al. [Med. Phys. 35, 5179–5186 (2008)], relate the dosimetry of small photon beams to that of the machine-specific reference field; they include a correction to measured ratios of detector readings, conventionally used as output factors in broad beams. Output correction factors were calculated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) system with a statistical uncertainty (type-A) of 0.15% or lower. The geometries of the detectors were coded using blueprints provided by the manufacturers, and phase-space files for field sizes between 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} from a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV linac used as sources. The output correction factors were determined scoring the absorbed dose within a detector and to a small water volume in the absence of the detector, both at a depth of 10 cm, for each small field and for the reference beam of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Results: The Monte Carlo calculated output correction factors for the liquid ionization chamber and the diamond detector were within about ±1% of unity even for the smallest field sizes. Corrections were found to be significant for small air ionization chambers due to their cavity dimensions, as expected. The correction factors for silicon diodes varied with the detector type (shielded or unshielded), confirming the findings by other authors; different corrections for the detectors from the two manufacturers were obtained. The differences in the calculated factors for the various detectors were analyzed thoroughly and whenever possible the results were compared to published data, often calculated for different accelerators and using the EGSnrc MC system. The differences were used to estimate a type-B uncertainty for the correction factors. Together with the type-A uncertainty from the Monte Carlo calculations, an estimation of the combined standard uncertainty was made, assigned to the mean correction factors from various estimates. Conclusions: The present work provides a consistent and specific set of data for the output correction factors of a broad set of detectors in a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV accelerator and contributes to improving the understanding of the physics of small photon beams. The correction factors cannot in general be neglected for any detector and, as expected, their magnitude increases with decreasing field size. Due to the reduced number of clinical accelerator types currently available, it is suggested that detector output correction factors be given specifically for linac models and field sizes, rather than for a beam quality specifier that necessarily varies with the accelerator type and field size due to the different electron spot dimensions and photon collimation systems used by each accelerator model.

  7. Unified single-photon and single-electron counting statistics: From cavity QED to electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Neill; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Nori, Franco

    2010-12-15

    A key ingredient of cavity QED is the coupling between the discrete energy levels of an atom and photons in a single-mode cavity. The addition of periodic ultrashort laser pulses allows one to use such a system as a source of single photons--a vital ingredient in quantum information and optical computing schemes. Here we analyze and time-adjust the photon-counting statistics of such a single-photon source and show that the photon statistics can be described by a simple transport-like nonequilibrium model. We then show that there is a one-to-one correspondence of this model to that of nonequilibrium transport of electrons through a double quantum dot nanostructure, unifying the fields of photon-counting statistics and electron-transport statistics. This correspondence empowers us to adapt several tools previously used for detecting quantum behavior in electron-transport systems (e.g., super-Poissonian shot noise and an extension of the Leggett-Garg inequality) to single-photon-source experiments.

  8. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute the traditional aluminum-silicon dose-depth calculation as a standard shield-target combination output, as well as the shielding response of high charge (Z) shields such as tantalum (Ta). Finally, a shield optimization algorithm is used to guide the instrument designer with the choice of graded-Z shield analysis.

  9. Dynamic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen isotope reactive diffusive transport in porous graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Rai, A.; Mutzke, A.; Warrier, M.; Salonen, E.; Nordlund, K.

    2007-08-01

    An equal mixture of deuterium and tritium will be the fuel used in a fusion reactor. It is important to study the recycling and mixing of these hydrogen isotopes in graphite from several points of view: (i) impact on the ratio of deuterium to tritium in a reactor, (ii) continued use of graphite as a first wall and divertor material, and (iii) reaction with carbon atoms and the transport of hydrocarbons will provide insight into chemical erosion. Dynamic Monte-Carlo techniques are used to study the reactive-diffusive transport of hydrogen isotopes and interstitial carbon atoms in a 3-D porous graphite structure irradiated with hydrogen and deuterium and is compared with published experimental results for hydrogen re-emission and isotope exchange.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Transport in 4H- and 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C. C.; You, A. H.; Wong, E. K.

    2010-07-07

    The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of electron transport properties at high electric field region in 4H- and 6H-SiC are presented. This MC model includes two non-parabolic conduction bands. Based on the material parameters, the electron scattering rates included polar optical phonon scattering, optical phonon scattering and acoustic phonon scattering are evaluated. The electron drift velocity, energy and free flight time are simulated as a function of applied electric field at an impurity concentration of 1x10{sup 18} cm{sup 3} in room temperature. The simulated drift velocity with electric field dependencies is in a good agreement with experimental results found in literature. The saturation velocities for both polytypes are close, but the scattering rates are much more pronounced for 6H-SiC. Our simulation model clearly shows complete electron transport properties in 4H- and 6H-SiC.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport for electron beam-induced deposition of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valenti, Roser

    2013-03-01

    Tungsten hexacarbonyl, W(CO)6, is a particularly interesting precursor molecule for electron beam-induced deposition of nanoparticles, since it yields deposits whose electronic properties can be tuned from metallic to insulating. However, the growth of tungsten nanostructures poses experimental difficulties: the metal content of the nanostructure is variable. Furthermore, fluctuations in the tungsten content of the deposits seem to trigger the growth of the nanostructure. Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport have been carried out with the radiation-transport code Penelope in order to study the charge and energy deposition of the electron beam in the deposit and in the substrate. These simulations allow us to examine the conditions under which nanostructure growth takes place and to highlight the relevant parameters in the process.

  12. A full-band Monte Carlo model for hole transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallepalli, S.; Rashed, M.; Shih, W.-K.; Maziar, C. M.; Tasch, A. F., Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Hole transport in bulk silicon is explored using an efficient and accurate Monte Carlo (MC) tool based on the local pseudopotential band structure. Acoustic and optical phonon scattering, ionized impurity scattering, and impact ionization are the dominant scattering mechanisms that have been included. In the interest of computational efficiency, momentum relaxation times have been used to describe ionized impurity scattering and self-scattering rates have been computed in a dynamic fashion. The temperature and doping dependence of low-field hole mobility is obtained and good agreement with experimental data has been observed. MC extracted impact ionization coefficients are also shown to agree well with published experimental data. Momentum and energy relaxation times are obtained as a function of the average hole energy for use in moment based hydrodynamic simulators. The MC model is suitable for studying both low-field and high-field hole transport in silicon.

  13. Comparison of generalized transport and Monte-Carlo models of the escape of a minor species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    The steady-state diffusion of a minor species through a static background species is studied using a Monte Carlo model and a generalized 16-moment transport model. The two models are in excellent agreement in the collision-dominated region and in the 'transition region'. In the 'collisionless' region the 16-moment solution contains two singularities, and physical meaning cannot be assigned to the solution in their vicinity. In all regions, agreement between the models is best for the distribution function and for the lower-order moments and is less good for higher-order moments. Moments of order higher than the heat flow and hence beyond the level of description provided by the transport model have a noticeable effect on the shape of distribution functions in the collisionless region.

  14. Monte Carlo Calculation of Slow Electron Beam Transport in Solids:. Reflection Coefficient Theory Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentabet, A.

    The reflection coefficient theory developed by Vicanek and Urbassek showed that the backscattering coefficient of light ions impinging on semi-infinite solid targets is strongly related to the range and the first transport cross-section as well. In this work and in the electron case, we show that not only the backscattering coefficient is, but also most of electron transport quantities (such as the mean penetration depth, the diffusion polar angles, the final backscattering energy, etc.), are strongly correlated to both these quantities (i.e. the range and the first transport cross-section). In addition, most of the electron transport quantities are weakly correlated to the distribution of the scattering angle and the total elastic cross-section as well. To make our study as straightforward and clear as possible, we have projected different input data of elastic cross-sections and ranges in our Monte Carlo code to study the mean penetration depth and the backscattering coefficient of slow electrons impinging on semi-infinite aluminum and gold in the energy range up to 10 keV. The possibility of extending the present study to other materials and other transport quantities using the same models is a valid process.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation and Boltzmann equation analysis of non-conservative positron transport in H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankovi?, A.; Dujko, S.; White, R. D.; Buckman, S. J.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj.

    2012-05-01

    This work reports on a new series of calculations of positron transport properties in molecular hydrogen under the influence of spatially homogeneous electric field. Calculations are performed using a Monte Carlo simulation technique and multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation. Values and general trends of the mean energy, drift velocity and diffusion coefficients as a function of the reduced electric field E/n0 are reported here. Emphasis is placed on the explicit and implicit effects of positronium (Ps) formation on the drift velocity and diffusion coefficients. Two important phenomena arise; first, for certain regions of E/n0 the bulk and flux components of the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficient are markedly different, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Second, and contrary to previous experience in electron swarm physics, there is negative differential conductivity (NDC) effect in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component. In order to understand this atypical manifestation of the drift and diffusion of positrons in H2 under the influence of electric field, the spatially dependent positron transport properties such as number of positrons, average energy and velocity and spatially resolved rate for Ps formation are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. The spatial variation of the positron average energy and extreme skewing of the spatial profile of positron swarm are shown to play a central role in understanding the phenomena.

  16. Hybrid two-dimensional Monte-Carlo electron transport in self-consistent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Cranfill, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The physics and numerics of the hybrid electron transport code ANTHEM are described. The need for the hybrid modeling of laser generated electron transport is outlined, and a general overview of the hybrid implementation in ANTHEM is provided. ANTHEM treats the background ions and electrons in a laser target as coupled fluid components moving relative to a fixed Eulerian mesh. The laser converts cold electrons to an additional hot electron component which evolves on the mesh as either a third coupled fluid or as a set of Monte Carlo PIC particles. The fluids and particles move in two-dimensions through electric and magnetic fields calculated via the Implicit Moment method. The hot electrons are coupled to the background thermal electrons by Coulomb drag, and both the hot and cold electrons undergo Rutherford scattering against the ion background. Subtleties of the implicit E- and B-field solutions, the coupled hydrodynamics, and large time step Monte Carlo particle scattering are discussed. Sample applications are presented.

  17. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  18. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  19. Monte Carlo model of the transport in the atmosphere of relativistic electrons and ?-rays associated to TGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarria, D.; Forme, F.; Blelly, P.

    2013-12-01

    Onboard TARANIS satellite, the CNES mission dedicated to the study of TLE and TGFs, IDEE and XGRE are the two instruments which will measure the relativistic electrons and X and gamma rays. At the altitude of the satellite, the fluxes have been significantly altered by the filtering of the atmosphere and the satellite only measures a subset of the particles. Therefore, the inverse problem, to get an information on the sources and on the mechanisms responsible for these emissions, is rather tough to tackle, especially if we want to take advantage of the other instruments which will provide indirect information on those particles. The only reasonable way to solve this problem is to embed in the data processing, a theoretical approach using a numerical model of the generation and the transport of these burst emissions. For this purpose, we start to develop a numerical Monte carlo model which solves the transport in the atmosphere of both relativistic electrons and gamma-rays. After a brief presentation of the model and the validation by comparison with GEANT 4, we discuss how the photons and electrons may be spatially dispersed as a function of their energy at the altitude of the satellite, depending on the source properties, and the impact that could have on the detection by the satellite. Then, we give preliminary results on the interaction of the energetic particles with the neutral atmosphere, mainly in term of production rate of excited states, which will accessible through MCP experiment, and ionized species, which are important for the electrodynamics.

  20. Jet transport and photon bremsstrahlung via longitudinal and transverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Guang-You; Majumder, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    We study the effect of multiple scatterings on the propagation of hard partons and the production of jet-bremsstrahlung photons inside a dense medium in the framework of deep-inelastic scattering off a large nucleus. We include the momentum exchanges in both longitudinal and transverse directions between the hard partons and the constituents of the medium. Keeping up to the second order in a momentum gradient expansion, we derive the spectrum for the photon emission from a hard quark jet when traversing dense nuclear matter. Our calculation demonstrates that the photon bremsstrahlung process is influenced not only by the transverse momentum diffusion of the propagating hard parton, but also by the longitudinal drag and diffusion of the parton momentum. A notable outcome is that the longitudinal drag tends to reduce the amount of stimulated emission from the hard parton.

  1. Ballistic transport in one-dimensional random dimer photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherid, Samira; Bentata, Samir; Zitouni, Ali; Djelti, Radouan; Aziz, Zoubir

    2014-04-01

    Using the transfer-matrix technique and the Kronig Penney model, we numerically and analytically investigate the effect of short-range correlated disorder in Random Dimer Model (RDM) on transmission properties of the light in one dimensional photonic crystals made of three different materials. Such systems consist of two different structures randomly distributed along the growth direction, with the additional constraint that one kind of these layers always appear in pairs. It is shown that the one dimensional random dimer photonic crystals support two types of extended modes. By shifting of the dimer resonance toward the host fundamental stationary resonance state, we demonstrate the existence of the ballistic response in these systems.

  2. Dosimetric validation of Acuros XB with Monte Carlo methods for photon dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, K.; Gagne, I. M.; Zavgorodni, S.; Ansbacher, W.; Beckham, W.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric accuracy of the recently released Acuros XB advanced dose calculation algorithm (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) is investigated for single radiation fields incident on homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries, and a comparison is made to the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). Methods: Ion chamber measurements for the 6 and 18 MV beams within a range of field sizes (from 4.0x4.0 to 30.0x30.0 cm{sup 2}) are used to validate Acuros XB dose calculations within a unit density phantom. The dosimetric accuracy of Acuros XB in the presence of lung, low-density lung, air, and bone is determined using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc calculations as a benchmark. Calculations using the AAA are included for reference to a current superposition/convolution standard. Results: Basic open field tests in a homogeneous phantom reveal an Acuros XB agreement with measurement to within {+-}1.9% in the inner field region for all field sizes and energies. Calculations on a heterogeneous interface phantom were found to agree with Monte Carlo calculations to within {+-}2.0%({sigma}{sub MC}=0.8%) in lung ({rho}=0.24 g cm{sup -3}) and within {+-}2.9%({sigma}{sub MC}=0.8%) in low-density lung ({rho}=0.1 g cm{sup -3}). In comparison, differences of up to 10.2% and 17.5% in lung and low-density lung were observed in the equivalent AAA calculations. Acuros XB dose calculations performed on a phantom containing an air cavity ({rho}=0.001 g cm{sup -3}) were found to be within the range of {+-}1.5% to {+-}4.5% of the BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc calculated benchmark ({sigma}{sub MC}=0.8%) in the tissue above and below the air cavity. A comparison of Acuros XB dose calculations performed on a lung CT dataset with a BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc benchmark shows agreement within {+-}2%/2mm and indicates that the remaining differences are primarily a result of differences in physical material assignments within a CT dataset. Conclusions: By considering the fundamental particle interactions in matter based on theoretical interaction cross sections, the Acuros XB algorithm is capable of modeling radiotherapy dose deposition with accuracy only previously achievable with Monte Carlo techniques.

  3. a Test Particle Model for Monte Carlo Simulation of Plasma Transport Driven by Quasineutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Nelson M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of transport in controlled nuclear fusion as it applies to confinement in a tokamak or stellarator. We perform numerical experiments to validate a mathematical model of P. R. Garabedian in which the electric potential is determined by quasineutrality because of singular perturbation of the Poisson equation. The simulations are made using a transport code written by O. Betancourt and M. Taylor, with changes to incorporate our case studies. We adopt a test particle model naturally suggested by the problem of tracking particles in plasma physics. The statistics due to collisions are modeled by a drift kinetic equation whose numerical solution is based on the Monte Carlo method of A. Boozer and G. Kuo -Petravic. The collision operator drives the distribution function in velocity space towards the normal distribution, or Maxwellian. It is shown that details of the collision operator other than its dependence on the collision frequency and temperature matter little for transport, and the role of conservation of momentum is investigated. Exponential decay makes it possible to find the confinement times of both ions and electrons by high performance computing. Three -dimensional perturbations in the electromagnetic field model the anomalous transport of electrons and simulate the turbulent behavior that is presumably triggered by the displacement current. We make a convergence study of the method, derive scaling laws that are in good agreement with predictions from experimental data, and present a comparison with the JET experiment.

  4. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  5. Epithelial cancers and photon migration: Monte Carlo simulations and diffuse reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubiana, Jerome; Kass, Alex J.; Newman, Maya Y.; Levitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Detecting pre-cancer in epithelial tissues such as the cervix is a challenging task in low-resources settings. In an effort to achieve low cost cervical cancer screening and diagnostic method for use in low resource settings, mobile colposcopes that use a smartphone as their engine have been developed. Designing image analysis software suited for this task requires proper modeling of light propagation from the abnormalities inside tissues to the camera of the smartphones. Different simulation methods have been developed in the past, by solving light diffusion equations, or running Monte Carlo simulations. Several algorithms exist for the latter, including MCML and the recently developed MCX. For imaging purpose, the observable parameter of interest is the reflectance profile of a tissue under some specific pattern of illumination and optical setup. Extensions of the MCX algorithm to simulate this observable under these conditions were developed. These extensions were validated against MCML and diffusion theory for the simple case of contact measurements, and reflectance profiles under colposcopy imaging geometry were also simulated. To validate this model, the diffuse reflectance profiles of tissue phantoms were measured with a spectrometer under several illumination and optical settings for various homogeneous tissues phantoms. The measured reflectance profiles showed a non-trivial deviation across the spectrum. Measurements of an added absorber experiment on a series of phantoms showed that absorption of dye scales linearly when fit to both MCX and diffusion models. More work is needed to integrate a pupil into the experiment.

  6. Improved Convergence Rate of Multi-Group Scattering Moment Tallies for Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Adam

    Multi-group scattering moment matrices are critical to the solution of the multi-group form of the neutron transport equation, as they are responsible for describing the change in direction and energy of neutrons. These matrices, however, are difficult to correctly calculate from the measured nuclear data with both deterministic and stochastic methods. Calculating these parameters when using deterministic methods requires a set of assumptions which do not hold true in all conditions. These quantities can be calculated accurately with stochastic methods, however doing so is computationally expensive due to the poor efficiency of tallying scattering moment matrices. This work presents an improved method of obtaining multi-group scattering moment matrices from a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. This improved method of tallying the scattering moment matrices is based on recognizing that all of the outgoing particle information is known a priori and can be taken advantage of to increase the tallying efficiency (therefore reducing the uncertainty) of the stochastically integrated tallies. In this scheme, the complete outgoing probability distribution is tallied, supplying every one of the scattering moment matrices elements with its share of data. In addition to reducing the uncertainty, this method allows for the use of a track-length estimation process potentially offering even further improvement to the tallying efficiency. Unfortunately, to produce the needed distributions, the probability functions themselves must undergo an integration over the outgoing energy and scattering angle dimensions. This integration is too costly to perform during the Monte Carlo simulation itself and therefore must be performed in advance by way of a pre-processing code. The new method increases the information obtained from tally events and therefore has a significantly higher efficiency than the currently used techniques. The improved method has been implemented in a code system containing a new pre-processor code, NDPP, and a Monte Carlo neutron transport code, OpenMC. This method is then tested in a pin cell problem and a larger problem designed to accentuate the importance of scattering moment matrices. These tests show that accuracy was retained while the figure-of-merit for generating scattering moment matrices and fission energy spectra was significantly improved.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of high-frequency non-equilibrium transport in mercury-cadmium-telluride for infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Christophe; Varani, Luca; Vaissière, Jean-Claude

    2004-04-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of both static and small-signal electron transport in Hg0.8Cd0.2Te in order to study the high-frequency behaviour of this material usually employed for infrared detection. Firstly we simulate static conditions by using a Monte Carlo simulation in order to extract transport parameters. Then, an analytical method based on hydrodynamic equations is used to perform the small-signal study by modelling the high-frequency differential mobility. This approach allows a full study of the frequency response for arbitrary electric fields starting only from static parameters and to overcome technical problems of direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Monte Carlo Study of Fetal Dosimetry Parameters for 6 MV Photon Beam

    PubMed Central

    Atarod, Maryam; Shokrani, Parvaneh

    2013-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects of ionizing radiation on fetuses, prior to radiotherapy of pregnant patients, fetal dose should be estimated. Fetal dose has been studied by several authors in different depths in phantoms with various abdomen thicknesses (ATs). In this study, the effect of maternal AT and depth in fetal dosimetry was investigated, using peripheral dose (PD) distribution evaluations. A BEAMnrc model of Oncor linac using out of beam components was used for dose calculations in out of field border. A 6 MV photon beam was used to irradiate a chest phantom. Measurements were done using EBT2 radiochromic film in a RW3 phantom as abdomen. The followings were measured for different ATs: Depth PD profiles at two distances from the field's edge, and in-plane PD profiles at two depths. The results of this study show that PD is depth dependent near the field's edge. The increase in AT does not change PD depth of maximum and its distribution as a function of distance from the field's edge. It is concluded that estimating the maximum fetal dose, using a flat phantom, i.e., without taking into account the AT, is possible. Furthermore, an in-plane profile measured at any depth can represent the dose variation as a function of distance. However, in order to estimate the maximum PD the depth of Dmax in out of field should be used for in-plane profile measurement. PMID:24083135

  9. Study of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in small-field 6 MV photon beams by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in a 6 MV photon beam of various field sizes using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Three PSDs were simulated: A BC-400 and a BCF-12, each attached to a plastic-core optical fiber, and a BC-400 attached to an air-core optical fiber. PSD response was calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose for field sizes ranging from 10x10 down to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} for both perpendicular and parallel orientations of the detectors to an incident beam. Similar calculations were performed for a CC01 compact chamber. The off-axis dose profiles were calculated in the 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} photon beam and were compared to the dose profile calculated for the CC01 chamber and that calculated in water without any detector. The angular dependence of the PSDs' responses in a small photon beam was studied. Results: In the perpendicular orientation, the response of the BCF-12 PSD varied by only 0.5% as the field size decreased from 10x10 to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2}, while the response of BC-400 PSD attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by more than 3% at the smallest field size because of its longer sensitive region. In the parallel orientation, the response of both PSDs attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by less than 0.4% for the same range of field sizes. For the PSD attached to an air-core fiber, the response varied, at most, by 2% for both orientations. Conclusions: The responses of all the PSDs investigated in this work can have a variation of only 1%-2% irrespective of field size and orientation of the detector if the length of the sensitive region is not more than 2 mm long and the optical fiber stems are prevented from pointing directly to the incident source.

  10. Influence of electrodes on the photon energy deposition in CVD-diamond dosimeters studied with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Grka, B; Nilsson, B; Fernndez-Varea, J M; Svensson, R; Brahme, A

    2006-08-01

    A new dosimeter, based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond as the active detector material, is being developed for dosimetry in radiotherapeutic beams. CVD-diamond is a very interesting material, since its atomic composition is close to that of human tissue and in principle it can be designed to introduce negligible perturbations to the radiation field and the dose distribution in the phantom due to its small size. However, non-tissue-equivalent structural components, such as electrodes, wires and encapsulation, need to be carefully selected as they may induce severe fluence perturbation and angular dependence, resulting in erroneous dose readings. By introducing metallic electrodes on the diamond crystals, interface phenomena between high- and low-atomic-number materials are created. Depending on the direction of the radiation field, an increased or decreased detector signal may be obtained. The small dimensions of the CVD-diamond layer and electrodes (around 100 microm and smaller) imply a higher sensitivity to the lack of charged-particle equilibrium and may cause severe interface phenomena. In the present study, we investigate the variation of energy deposition in the diamond detector for different photon-beam qualities, electrode materials and geometric configurations using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The prototype detector was produced from a 50 microm thick CVD-diamond layer with 0.2 microm thick silver electrodes on both sides. The mean absorbed dose to the detector's active volume was modified in the presence of the electrodes by 1.7%, 2.1%, 1.5%, 0.6% and 0.9% for 1.25 MeV monoenergetic photons, a complete (i.e. shielded) (60)Co photon source spectrum and 6, 18 and 50 MV bremsstrahlung spectra, respectively. The shift in mean absorbed dose increases with increasing atomic number and thickness of the electrodes, and diminishes with increasing thickness of the diamond layer. From a dosimetric point of view, graphite would be an almost perfect electrode material. This study shows that, for the considered therapeutic beam qualities, the perturbation of the detector signal due to charge-collecting graphite electrodes of thicknesses between 0.1 and 700 microm is negligible within the calculation uncertainty of 0.2%. PMID:16861769

  11. Mesh-based Monte Carlo method for fibre-optic optogenetic neural stimulation with direct photon flux recording strategy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-21

    We propose a Monte Carlo (MC) method based on a direct photon flux recording strategy using inhomogeneous, meshed rodent brain atlas. This MC method was inspired by and dedicated to fibre-optics-based optogenetic neural stimulations, thus providing an accurate and direct solution for light intensity distributions in brain regions with different optical properties. Our model was used to estimate the 3D light intensity attenuation for close proximity between an implanted optical fibre source and neural target area for typical optogenetics applications. Interestingly, there are discrepancies with studies using a diffusion-based light intensity prediction model, perhaps due to use of improper light scattering models developed for far-field problems. Our solution was validated by comparison with the gold-standard MC model, and it enabled accurate calculations of internal intensity distributions in an inhomogeneous near light source domain. Thus our strategy can be applied to studying how illuminated light spreads through an inhomogeneous brain area, or for determining the amount of light required for optogenetic manipulation of a specific neural target area. PMID:26914289

  12. Gel dosimetry measurements and Monte Carlo modeling for external radiotherapy photon beams: Comparison with a treatment planning system dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Aon, E.; Brunetto, M.; Castellano, G.; Gallivanone, F.; Gambarini, G.

    2007-09-01

    Gel dosimetry has proved to be useful to determine absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy, as well as to validate treatment plans. Gel dosimetry allows dose imaging and is particularly helpful for non-uniform dose distribution measurements, as may occur when multiple-field irradiation techniques are employed. In this work, we report gel-dosimetry measurements and Monte Carlo (PENELOPE ®) calculations for the dose distribution inside a tissue-equivalent phantom exposed to a typical multiple-field irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 10 MV photon beam from a Varian ® Clinac 18 accelerator. The employed dosimeters consisted of layers of Fricke Xylenol Orange radiochromic gel. The method for absorbed dose imaging was based on analysis of visible light transmittance, usually detected by means of a CCD camera. With the aim of finding a simple method for light transmittance image acquisition, a commercial flatbed-like scanner was employed. The experimental and simulated dose distributions have been compared with those calculated with a commercially available treatment planning system, showing a reasonable agreement.

  13. On the Monte Carlo simulation of small-field micro-diamond detectors for megavoltage photon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro; Palmans, Hugo; Marteinsdóttir, Maria; Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Carlsson-Tedgren, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculated detector-specific output correction factors for small photon beam dosimetry are commonly used in clinical practice. The technique, with a geometry description based on manufacturer blueprints, offers certain advantages over experimentally determined values but is not free of weaknesses. Independent MC calculations of output correction factors for a PTW-60019 micro-diamond detector were made using the EGSnrc and PENELOPE systems. Compared with published experimental data the MC results showed substantial disagreement for the smallest field size simulated (5~\\text{mm}× 5 mm). To explain the difference between the two datasets, a detector was imaged with x rays searching for possible anomalies in the detector construction or details not included in the blueprints. A discrepancy between the dimension stated in the blueprints for the active detector area and that estimated from the electrical contact seen in the x-ray image was observed. Calculations were repeated using the estimate of a smaller volume, leading to results in excellent agreement with the experimental data. MC users should become aware of the potential differences between the design blueprints of a detector and its manufacturer production, as they may differ substantially. The constraint is applicable to the simulation of any detector type. Comparison with experimental data should be used to reveal geometrical inconsistencies and details not included in technical drawings, in addition to the well-known QA procedure of detector x-ray imaging.

  14. On the Monte Carlo simulation of small-field micro-diamond detectors for megavoltage photon dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro; Palmans, Hugo; Marteinsdóttir, Maria; Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Carlsson-Tedgren, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculated detector-specific output correction factors for small photon beam dosimetry are commonly used in clinical practice. The technique, with a geometry description based on manufacturer blueprints, offers certain advantages over experimentally determined values but is not free of weaknesses. Independent MC calculations of output correction factors for a PTW-60019 micro-diamond detector were made using the EGSnrc and PENELOPE systems. Compared with published experimental data the MC results showed substantial disagreement for the smallest field size simulated ([Formula: see text] mm). To explain the difference between the two datasets, a detector was imaged with x rays searching for possible anomalies in the detector construction or details not included in the blueprints. A discrepancy between the dimension stated in the blueprints for the active detector area and that estimated from the electrical contact seen in the x-ray image was observed. Calculations were repeated using the estimate of a smaller volume, leading to results in excellent agreement with the experimental data. MC users should become aware of the potential differences between the design blueprints of a detector and its manufacturer production, as they may differ substantially. The constraint is applicable to the simulation of any detector type. Comparison with experimental data should be used to reveal geometrical inconsistencies and details not included in technical drawings, in addition to the well-known QA procedure of detector x-ray imaging. PMID:26630437

  15. Understanding the lateral dose response functions of high-resolution photon detectors by reverse Monte Carlo and deconvolution analysis.

    PubMed

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2015-08-21

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the mechanism underlying the perturbation of the field of the secondary electrons, which occurs in the presence of a detector in water as the surrounding medium. By means of 'reverse' Monte Carlo simulation, the points of origin of the secondary electrons contributing to the detector's signal are identified and associated with the detector's mass density, electron density and atomic composition. The spatial pattern of the origin of these secondary electrons, in addition to the formation of the detector signal by components from all parts of its sensitive volume, determines the shape of the lateral dose response function, i.e. of the convolution kernel K(x,y) linking the lateral profile of the absorbed dose in the undisturbed surrounding medium with the associated profile of the detector's signal. The shape of the convolution kernel is shown to vary essentially with the electron density of the detector's material, and to be attributable to the relative contribution by the signal-generating secondary electrons originating within the detector's volume to the total detector signal. Finally, the representation of the over- or underresponse of a photon detector by this density-dependent convolution kernel will be applied to provide a new analytical expression for the associated volume effect correction factor. PMID:26267311

  16. Guiding electromagnetic waves around sharp corners: topologically protected photonic transport in meta-waveguides (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady B.; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Lai, Kueifu

    2015-09-01

    Science thrives on analogies, and a considerable number of inventions and discoveries have been made by pursuing an unexpected connection to a very different field of inquiry. For example, photonic crystals have been referred to as "semiconductors of light" because of the far-reaching analogies between electron propagation in a crystal lattice and light propagation in a periodically modulated photonic environment. However, two aspects of electron behavior, its spin and helicity, escaped emulation by photonic systems until recent invention of photonic topological insulators (PTIs). The impetus for these developments in photonics came from the discovery of topologically nontrivial phases in condensed matter physics enabling edge states immune to scattering. The realization of topologically protected transport in photonics would circumvent a fundamental limitation imposed by the wave equation: inability of reflections-free light propagation along sharply bent pathway. Topologically protected electromagnetic states could be used for transporting photons without any scattering, potentially underpinning new revolutionary concepts in applied science and engineering. I will demonstrate that a PTI can be constructed by applying three types of perturbations: (a) finite bianisotropy, (b) gyromagnetic inclusion breaking the time-reversal (T) symmetry, and (c) asymmetric rods breaking the parity (P) symmetry. We will experimentally demonstrate (i) the existence of the full topological bandgap in a bianisotropic, and (ii) the reflectionless nature of wave propagation along the interface between two PTIs with opposite signs of the bianisotropy.

  17. Bone and mucosal dosimetry in skin radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study using kilovoltage photon and megavoltage electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, James C. L.; Jiang, Runqing

    2012-06-01

    This study examines variations of bone and mucosal doses with variable soft tissue and bone thicknesses, mimicking the oral or nasal cavity in skin radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based codes) using the clinical kilovoltage (kVp) photon and megavoltage (MeV) electron beams, and the pencil-beam algorithm (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system) using the MeV electron beams were performed in dose calculations. Phase-space files for the 105 and 220 kVp beams (Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine), and the 4 and 6?MeV electron beams (Varian 21 EX linear accelerator) with a field size of 5 cm diameter were generated using the BEAMnrc code, and verified using measurements. Inhomogeneous phantoms containing uniform water, bone and air layers were irradiated by the kVp photon and MeV electron beams. Relative depth, bone and mucosal doses were calculated for the uniform water and bone layers which were varied in thickness in the ranges of 0.5-2 cm and 0.2-1 cm. A uniform water layer of bolus with thickness equal to the depth of maximum dose (dmax) of the electron beams (0.7 cm for 4 MeV and 1.5 cm for 6 MeV) was added on top of the phantom to ensure that the maximum dose was at the phantom surface. From our Monte Carlo results, the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams were found to produce insignificant bone and mucosal dose (<1%), when the uniform water layer at the phantom surface was thicker than 1.5 cm. When considering the 0.5 cm thin uniform water and bone layers, the 4 MeV electron beam deposited less bone and mucosal dose than the 6 MeV beam. Moreover, it was found that the 105 kVp beam produced more than twice the dose to bone than the 220 kVp beam when the uniform water thickness at the phantom surface was small (0.5 cm). However, the difference in bone dose enhancement between the 105 and 220 kVp beams became smaller when the thicknesses of the uniform water and bone layers in the phantom increased. Dose in the second bone layer interfacing with air was found to be higher for the 220 kVp beam than that of the 105 kVp beam, when the bone thickness was 1 cm. In this study, dose deviations of bone and mucosal layers of 18% and 17% were found between our results from Monte Carlo simulation and the pencil-beam algorithm, which overestimated the doses. Relative depth, bone and mucosal doses were studied by varying the beam nature, beam energy and thicknesses of the bone and uniform water using an inhomogeneous phantom to model the oral or nasal cavity. While the dose distribution in the pharynx region is unavailable due to the lack of a commercial treatment planning system commissioned for kVp beam planning in skin radiation therapy, our study provided an essential insight into the radiation staff to justify and estimate bone and mucosal dose.

  18. Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, A.; Smith, K.; Felker, K.; Romano, P.; Forget, B.; Beckman, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral particle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, exhibit poor locality, and are typically too much large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on a distributed memory machine. The proposed energy banding algorithm allows maximal temporal reuse of data in band sizes that can flexibly accommodate different architectural features. The energy banding algorithm is general and has a number of benefits compared to the traditional approach. In the present analysis we explore its potential to achieve improvements in time-to-solution on modern cache-based architectures.

  19. Massively parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge carrier transport in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaap, N. J.; Koster, L. J. A.

    2016-02-01

    A parallel, lattice based Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is developed that runs on a GPGPU board and includes Coulomb like particle-particle interactions. The performance of this computationally expensive problem is improved by modifying the interaction potential due to nearby particle moves, instead of fully recalculating it. This modification is achieved by adding dipole correction terms that represent the particle move. Exact evaluation of these terms is guaranteed by representing all interactions as 32-bit floating numbers, where only the integers between -222 and 222 are used. We validate our method by modelling the charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors, including Coulomb interactions between charges. Performance is mainly governed by the particle density in the simulation volume, and improves for increasing densities. Our method allows calculations on large volumes including particle-particle interactions, which is important in the field of organic semiconductors.

  20. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K; Brown, Forrest B; Forget, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, G.; Marinchio, H.; Palermo, C.; Varani, L.; Daoud, T.; Teissier, R.; Rodilla, H.; Gonzlez, T.; Mateos, J.

    2009-11-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14105 m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of transport in PbSe nanocrystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, I. Carter, S. A.; Zimanyi, G. T.

    2013-11-21

    A Monte Carlo hopping model was developed to simulate electron and hole transport in nanocrystalline PbSe films. Transport is carried out as a series of thermally activated hopping events between neighboring sites on a cubic lattice. Each site, representing an individual nanocrystal, is assigned a size-dependent electronic structure, and the effects of particle size, charging, interparticle coupling, and energetic disorder on electron and hole mobilities were investigated. Results of simulated field-effect measurements confirm that electron mobilities and conductivities at constant carrier densities increase with particle diameter by an order of magnitude up to 5?nm and begin to decrease above 6?nm. We find that as particle size increases, fewer hops are required to traverse the same distance and that site energy disorder significantly inhibits transport in films composed of smaller nanoparticles. The dip in mobilities and conductivities at larger particle sizes can be explained by a decrease in tunneling amplitudes and by charging penalties that are incurred more frequently when carriers are confined to fewer, larger nanoparticles. Using a nearly identical set of parameter values as the electron simulations, hole mobility simulations confirm measurements that increase monotonically with particle size over two orders of magnitude.

  3. Cartesian Meshing Impacts for PWR Assemblies in Multigroup Monte Carlo and Sn Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manalo, K.; Chin, M.; Sjoden, G.

    2014-06-01

    Hybrid methods of neutron transport have increased greatly in use, for example, in applications of using both Monte Carlo and deterministic transport to calculate quantities of interest, such as flux and eigenvalue in a nuclear reactor. Many 3D parallel Sn codes apply a Cartesian mesh, and thus for nuclear reactors the representation of curved fuels (cylinder, sphere, etc.) are impacted in the representation of proper fuel inventory (both in deviation of mass and exact geometry representation). For a PWR assembly eigenvalue problem, we explore the errors associated with this Cartesian discrete mesh representation, and perform an analysis to calculate a slope parameter that relates the pcm to the percent areal/volumetric deviation (areal corresponds to 2D and volumetric to 3D, respectively). Our initial analysis demonstrates a linear relationship between pcm change and areal/volumetric deviation using Multigroup MCNP on a PWR assembly compared to a reference exact combinatorial MCNP geometry calculation. For the same multigroup problems, we also intend to characterize this linear relationship in discrete ordinates (3D PENTRAN) and discuss issues related to transport cross-comparison. In addition, we discuss auto-conversion techniques with our 3D Cartesian mesh generation tools to allow for full generation of MCNP5 inputs (Cartesian mesh and Multigroup XS) from a basis PENTRAN Sn model.

  4. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, D. A.; Ercolano, B.; Dale, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ionizing feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star-forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionization/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionization and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of a hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields on to Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionization calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionization structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimizations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.

  5. The validity of the density scaling method in primary electron transport for photon and electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, M.K.; Cunningham, J.R. )

    1990-03-01

    In the convolution/superposition method of photon beam dose calculations, inhomogeneities are usually handled by using some form of scaling involving the relative electron densities of the inhomogeneities. In this paper the accuracy of density scaling as applied to primary electrons generated in photon interactions is examined. Monte Carlo calculations are compared with density scaling calculations for air and cork slab inhomogeneities. For individual primary photon kernels as well as for photon interactions restricted to a thin layer, the results can differ significantly, by up to 50%, between the two calculations. However, for realistic photon beams where interactions occur throughout the whole irradiated volume, the discrepancies are much less severe. The discrepancies for the kernel calculation are attributed to the scattering characteristics of the electrons and the consequent oversimplified modeling used in the density scaling method. A technique called the kernel integration technique is developed to analyze the general effects of air and cork inhomogeneities. It is shown that the discrepancies become significant only under rather extreme conditions, such as immediately beyond the surface after a large air gap. In electron beams all the primary electrons originate from the surface of the phantom and the errors caused by simple density scaling can be much more significant. Various aspects relating to the accuracy of density scaling for air and cork slab inhomogeneities are discussed.

  6. Technical Note: Study of the electron transport parameters used in PENELOPE for the Monte Carlo simulation of Linac targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in Linac targets using the condensed history technique is known to be problematic owing to a potential dependence of absorbed dose distributions on the electron step length. In the PENELOPE code, the step length is partially determined by the transport parameters C1 and C2. The authors have investigated the effect on the absorbed dose distribution of the values given to these parameters in the target. Methods: A monoenergetic 6.26 MeV electron pencil beam from a point source was simulated impinging normally on a cylindrical tungsten target. Electrons leaving the tungsten were discarded. Radial absorbed dose profiles were obtained at 1.5 cm of depth in a water phantom located at 100 cm for values of C1 and C2 in the target both equal to 0.1, 0.01, or 0.001. A detailed simulation case was also considered and taken as the reference. Additionally, lateral dose profiles were estimated and compared with experimental measurements for a 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 2100 for the cases of C1 and C2 both set to 0.1 or 0.001 in the target. Results: On the central axis, the dose obtained for the case C1 = C2 = 0.1 shows a deviation of (17.2% ± 1.2%) with respect to the detailed simulation. This difference decreases to (3.7% ± 1.2%) for the case C1 = C2 = 0.01. The case C1 = C2 = 0.001 produces a radial dose profile that is equivalent to that of the detailed simulation within the reached statistical uncertainty of 1%. The effect is also appreciable in the crossline dose profiles estimated for the realistic geometry of the Linac. In another simulation, it was shown that the error made by choosing inappropriate transport parameters can be masked by tuning the energy and focal spot size of the initial beam. Conclusions: The use of large path lengths for the condensed simulation of electrons in a Linac target with PENELOPE conducts to deviations of the dose in the patient or phantom. Based on the results obtained in this work, values of C1 and C2 larger than 0.001 should not be used in Linac targets without further investigation.

  7. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of dmax dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The passing rate of the γ-index test within the 10% isodose line of the prescription dose was improved from 92.73 to 99.70% and from 82.16 to 96.73% for 2%/2 mm and 1%/1 mm criteria, respectively. Real clinical data measured from Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators were also used to validate our commissioning method and a similar level of accuracy was achieved.

  8. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2014-11-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of dmax dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The passing rate of the γ-index test within the 10% isodose line of the prescription dose was improved from 92.73 to 99.70% and from 82.16 to 96.73% for 2%/2 mm and 1%/1 mm criteria, respectively. Real clinical data measured from Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators were also used to validate our commissioning method and a similar level of accuracy was achieved. PMID:25295381

  9. Monte Carlo based method for conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectra obtained with a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    1998-02-01

    A Monte Carlo based method for the conversion of an in-situ gamma-ray spectrum obtained with a portable Ge detector to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The spectrum is first stripped of the partial absorption and cosmic-ray events leaving only the events corresponding to the full absorption of a gamma ray. Applying to the resulting spectrum the full absorption efficiency curve of the detector determined by calibrated point sources and Monte Carlo simulations, the photon flux energy distribution is deduced. The events corresponding to partial absorption in the detector are determined by Monte Carlo simulations for different incident photon energies and angles using the CERN's GEANT library. Using the detector's characteristics given by the manufacturer as input it is impossible to reproduce experimental spectra obtained with point sources. A transition zone of increasing charge collection efficiency has to be introduced in the simulation geometry, after the inactive Ge layer, in order to obtain good agreement between the simulated and experimental spectra. The functional form of the charge collection efficiency is deduced from a diffusion model. PMID:9450590

  10. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated Tiger Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Brian C.; Kensek, Ronald P.; Prinja, Anil K.

    2014-06-01

    Stochastic-media simulations require numerous boundary crossings. We consider two Monte Carlo electron transport approaches and evaluate accuracy with numerous material boundaries. In the condensed-history method, approximations are made based on infinite-medium solutions for multiple scattering over some track length. Typically, further approximations are employed for material-boundary crossings where infinite-medium solutions become invalid. We have previously explored an alternative "condensed transport" formulation, a Generalized Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck GBFP method, which requires no special boundary treatment but instead uses approximations to the electron-scattering cross sections. Some limited capabilities for analog transport and a GBFP method have been implemented in the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) codes. Improvements have been made to the condensed history algorithm. The performance of the ITS condensed-history and condensed-transport algorithms are assessed for material-boundary crossings. These assessments are made both by introducing artificial material boundaries and by comparison to analog Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Pre-conditioned backward Monte Carlo solutions to radiative transport in planetary atmospheres. Fundamentals: Sampling of propagation directions in polarising media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.; Mills, F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The interpretation of polarised radiation emerging from a planetary atmosphere must rely on solutions to the vector radiative transport equation (VRTE). Monte Carlo integration of the VRTE is a valuable approach for its flexible treatment of complex viewing and/or illumination geometries, and it can intuitively incorporate elaborate physics. Aims: We present a novel pre-conditioned backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm for solving the VRTE and apply it to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. As classical BMC methods, our PBMC algorithm builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. Methods: We show that the neglect of polarisation in the sampling of photon propagation directions in classical BMC algorithms leads to unstable and biased solutions for conservative, optically-thick, strongly polarising media such as Rayleigh atmospheres. The numerical difficulty is avoided by pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions. Pre-conditioning introduces a sense of history in the photon polarisation states through the simulated trajectories. Results: The PBMC algorithm is robust, and its accuracy is extensively demonstrated via comparisons with examples drawn from the literature for scattering in diverse media. Since the convergence rate for MC integration is independent of the integral's dimension, the scheme is a valuable option for estimating the disk-integrated signal of stellar radiation reflected from planets. Such a tool is relevant in the prospective investigation of exoplanetary phase curves. We lay out two frameworks for disk integration and, as an application, explore the impact of atmospheric stratification on planetary phase curves for large star-planet-observer phase angles. By construction, backward integration provides a better control than forward integration over the planet region contributing to the solution, and this presents a clear advantage when estimating the disk-integrated signal at moderate and large phase angles. A one-slab, plane-parallel version of the PBMC algorithm is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A72

  12. The lower timing resolution bound for scintillators with non-negligible optical photon transport time in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Vinke, Ruud; Olcott, Peter D; Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2014-10-21

    In this work, a method is presented that can calculate the lower bound of the timing resolution for large scintillation crystals with non-negligible photon transport. Hereby, the timing resolution bound can directly be calculated from Monte Carlo generated arrival times of the scintillation photons. This method extends timing resolution bound calculations based on analytical equations, as crystal geometries can be evaluated that do not have closed form solutions of arrival time distributions. The timing resolution bounds are calculated for an exemplary 3mmנ3mmנ20mm LYSO crystal geometry, with scintillation centers exponentially spread along the crystal length as well as with scintillation centers at fixed distances from the photosensor. Pulse shape simulations further show that analog photosensors intrinsically operate near the timing resolution bound, which can be attributed to the finite single photoelectron pulse rise time. PMID:25255807

  13. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-12-21

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (gamma) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% +/- 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 x 10 cm(2) field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 x 2 cm(2)) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the heterogeneous phantom. For the clinical test cases, the average dose discrepancy was 0.5% +/- 1.1%. Relative dose investigations of the transverse plane for clinical beam arrangements were performed with a 2D gamma-evaluation procedure. For 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA criteria, the average value for gamma(>1) was 4.7% +/- 3.7%, the average gamma(1%) value was 1.19 +/- 0.16 and the mean 2D gamma-value was 0.44 +/- 0.07 in the heterogeneous phantom. The iPlan MC algorithm leads to accurate dosimetric results under clinical test conditions. PMID:19934489

  14. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-12-01

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (γ) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% ± 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 × 10 cm2 field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 × 2 cm2) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the heterogeneous phantom. For the clinical test cases, the average dose discrepancy was 0.5% ± 1.1%. Relative dose investigations of the transverse plane for clinical beam arrangements were performed with a 2D γ-evaluation procedure. For 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA criteria, the average value for γ>1 was 4.7% ± 3.7%, the average γ1% value was 1.19 ± 0.16 and the mean 2D γ-value was 0.44 ± 0.07 in the heterogeneous phantom. The iPlan MC algorithm leads to accurate dosimetric results under clinical test conditions.

  15. MCNP: Photon benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.J.; Hollowell, D.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    The recent widespread, markedly increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurance that such codes give correct results. Responding to these pressing requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on six different photon problem families. MCNP was used to simulate these six sets numerically. Results for each were compared to the set's analytical or experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the analytical or experimental results of all six families within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method. From this we conclude that MCNP can accurately model a broad spectrum of photon transport problems. 8 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. One-dimensional hopping transport in disordered organic solids. II. Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohary, K.; Cordes, H.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Thomas, P.; Yamasaki, S.; Hensel, F.; Wendorff, J.-H.

    2001-03-01

    Drift mobility of charge carriers in strongly anisotropic disordered organic media is studied by Monte Carlo computer simulations. Results for the nearest-neighbor hopping are in excellent agreement with those of the analytic theory (Cordes et al., preceding paper). It is widely believed that the low-field drift mobility in disordered organic solids has the form ?~exp[-(T0/T)2] with characteristic temperature T0 depending solely on the scale of the energy distribution of localized states responsible for transport. Taking into account electron transitions to more distant sites than the nearest neighbors, we show that this dependence is not universal and parameter T0 depends also on the concentration of localized states and on the decay length of the electron wave function in localized states. The results of computer simulation evidence that correlations in the distribution of localized states influence essentially not only the field dependence as known from the literature, but also the temperature dependence of the drift mobility. In particular, strong space-energy correlations diminish the role of long-range hopping transitions in the charge carrier transport.

  17. A new Monte Carlo program for simulating light transport through Port Wine Stain skin.

    PubMed

    Lister, T; Wright, P A; Chappell, P H

    2014-05-01

    A new Monte Carlo program is presented for simulating light transport through clinically normal skin and skin containing Port Wine Stain (PWS) vessels. The program consists of an eight-layer mathematical skin model constructed from optical coefficients described previously. A simulation including diffuse illumination at the surface and subsequent light transport through the model is carried out using a radiative transfer theory ray-tracing technique. Total reflectance values over 39 wavelengths are scored by the addition of simulated light returning to the surface within a specified region and surface reflections (calculated using Fresnel's equations). These reflectance values are compared to measurements from individual participants, and characteristics of the model are adjusted until adequate agreement is produced between simulated and measured skin reflectance curves. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the epidermis are adjusted through changes in the simulated concentrations and mean diameters of epidermal melanosomes to reproduce non-lesional skin colour. Pseudo-cylindrical horizontal vessels are added to the skin model, and their simulated mean depths, diameters and number densities are adjusted to reproduce measured PWS skin colour. Accurate reproductions of colour measurement data are produced by the program, resulting in realistic predictions of melanin and PWS blood vessel parameters. Using a modest personal computer, the simulation currently requires an average of five and a half days to complete. PMID:24142045

  18. Full-dispersion Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport in micron-sized graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.; Maurer, L. N.; Aksamija, Z.

    2014-10-28

    We simulate phonon transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with real-space edges and experimentally relevant widths and lengths (from submicron to hundreds of microns). The full-dispersion phonon Monte Carlo simulation technique, which we describe in detail, involves a stochastic solution to the phonon Boltzmann transport equation with the relevant scattering mechanisms (edge, three-phonon, isotope, and grain boundary scattering) while accounting for the dispersion of all three acoustic phonon branches, calculated from the fourth-nearest-neighbor dynamical matrix. We accurately reproduce the results of several experimental measurements on pure and isotopically modified samples [S. Chen et al., ACS Nano 5, 321 (2011);S. Chen et al., Nature Mater. 11, 203 (2012); X. Xu et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3689 (2014)]. We capture the ballistic-to-diffusive crossover in wide GNRs: room-temperature thermal conductivity increases with increasing length up to roughly 100 μm, where it saturates at a value of 5800 W/m K. This finding indicates that most experiments are carried out in the quasiballistic rather than the diffusive regime, and we calculate the diffusive upper-limit thermal conductivities up to 600 K. Furthermore, we demonstrate that calculations with isotropic dispersions overestimate the GNR thermal conductivity. Zigzag GNRs have higher thermal conductivity than same-size armchair GNRs, in agreement with atomistic calculations.

  19. Oxygen transport properties estimation by classical trajectory–direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2015-05-15

    Coupling direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations with classical trajectory calculations is a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational dilute gas dynamics. The considerable increase in computational effort outlined in early applications of the method can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, Graphics Processing Unit acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time of classical trajectory (CT)-DSMC simulations. The aim of the present work is to study dilute molecular oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions, in the rigid rotor approximation, through an accurate Potential Energy Surface (PES), obtained by molecular beams scattering. The PES accuracy is assessed by calculating molecular oxygen transport properties by different equilibrium and non-equilibrium CT-DSMC based simulations that provide close values of the transport properties. Comparisons with available experimental data are presented and discussed in the temperature range 300–900 K, where vibrational degrees of freedom are expected to play a limited (but not always negligible) role.

  20. Experimental validation of a coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee T.

    2011-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  1. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of {alpha}-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  2. Suppression of population transport and control of exciton distributions by entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, Frank; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-04-01

    Entangled photons provide an important tool for secure quantum communication, computing and lithography. Low intensity requirements for multi-photon processes make them idealy suited for minimizing damage in imaging applications. Here we show how their unique temporal and spectral features may be used in nonlinear spectroscopy to reveal properties of multiexcitons in chromophore aggregates. Simulations demostrate that they provide unique control tools for two-exciton states in the bacterial reaction centre of Blastochloris viridis. Population transport in the intermediate single-exciton manifold may be suppressed by the absorption of photon pairs with short entanglement time, thus allowing the manipulation of the distribution of two-exciton states. The quantum nature of the light is essential for achieving this degree of control, which cannot be reproduced by stochastic or chirped light. Classical light is fundamentally limited by the frequency-time uncertainty, whereas entangled photons have independent temporal and spectral characteristics not subjected to this uncertainty.

  3. Development of a photon-cell interactive monte carlo simulation for non-invasive measurement of blood glucose level by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Turbidity variation is one of the major limitations in Raman spectroscopy for quantifying blood components, such as glucose, non-invasively. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a Raman scattering simulation using a photon-cell interactive Monte Carlo (pciMC) model that tracks photon migration in both the extra- and intracellular spaces without relying on the macroscopic scattering phase function and anisotropy factor. The interaction of photons at the plasma-cell boundary of randomly oriented three-dimensionally biconcave red blood cells (RBCs) is modeled using geometric optics. The validity of the developed pciMCRaman was investigated by comparing simulation and experimental results of Raman spectroscopy of glucose level in a bovine blood sample. The scattering of the excitation laser at a wavelength of 785 nm was simulated considering the changes in the refractive index of the extracellular solution. Based on the excitation laser photon distribution within the blood, the Raman photon derived from the hemoglobin and glucose molecule at the Raman shift of 1140 cm(-1) = 862 nm was generated, and the photons reaching the detection area were counted. The simulation and experimental results showed good correlation. It is speculated that pciMCRaman can provide information about the ability and limitations of the measurement of blood glucose level. PMID:26737759

  4. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7.8-16.5% below 120 kVp X-ray beams. In this study, we were especially interested in BNCT doses where low energy photon contribution is less to ignore, MCNP model is recognized as the most suitable to simulate wide photon-electron and neutron energy distributed responses of the paired ICs. Also, MCNP provides the best prediction of BNCT source adjustment by the detector's neutron and photon responses.

  5. Event-by-event Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in vapor and liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, Georgios Ioannis

    A Monte-Carlo Simulation is presented for Radiation Transport in water. This process is of utmost importance, having applications in oncology and therapy of cancer, in protecting people and the environment, waste management, radiation chemistry and on some solid-state detectors. It's also a phenomenon of interest in microelectronics on satellites in orbit that are subject to the solar radiation and in space-craft design for deep-space missions receiving background radiation. The interaction of charged particles with the medium is primarily due to their electromagnetic field. Three types of interaction events are considered: Elastic scattering, impact excitation and impact ionization. Secondary particles (electrons) can be generated by ionization. At each stage, along with the primary particle we explicitly follow all secondary electrons (and subsequent generations). Theoretical, semi-empirical and experimental formulae with suitable corrections have been used in each case to model the cross sections governing the quantum mechanical process of interactions, thus determining stochastically the energy and direction of outgoing particles following an event. Monte-Carlo sampling techniques have been applied to accurate probability distribution functions describing the primary particle track and all secondary particle-medium interaction. A simple account of the simulation code and a critical exposition of its underlying assumptions (often missing in the relevant literature) are also presented with reference to the model cross sections. Model predictions are in good agreement with existing computational data and experimental results. By relying heavily on a theoretical formulation, instead of merely fitting data, it is hoped that the model will be of value in a wider range of applications. Possible future directions that are the object of further research are pointed out.

  6. Parallel Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport Simulation on Exascale Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Paul Kollath

    Monte Carlo particle transport methods are being considered as a viable option for high-fidelity simulation of nuclear reactors. While Monte Carlo methods offer several potential advantages over deterministic methods, there are a number of algorithmic shortcomings that would prevent their immediate adoption for full-core analyses. In this thesis, algorithms are proposed both to ameliorate the degradation in parallel efficiency typically observed for large numbers of processors and to offer a means of decomposing large tally data that will be needed for reactor analysis. A nearest-neighbor fission bank algorithm was proposed and subsequently implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo code. A theoretical analysis of the communication pattern shows that the expected cost is O( N ) whereas traditional fission bank algorithms are O(N) at best. The algorithm was tested on two supercomputers, the Intrepid Blue Gene/P and the Titan Cray XK7, and demonstrated nearly linear parallel scaling up to 163,840 processor cores on a full-core benchmark problem. An algorithm for reducing network communication arising from tally reduction was analyzed and implemented in OpenMC. The proposed algorithm groups only particle histories on a single processor into batches for tally purposes---in doing so it prevents all network communication for tallies until the very end of the simulation. The algorithm was tested, again on a full-core benchmark, and shown to reduce network communication substantially. A model was developed to predict the impact of load imbalances on the performance of domain decomposed simulations. The analysis demonstrated that load imbalances in domain decomposed simulations arise from two distinct phenomena: non-uniform particle densities and non-uniform spatial leakage. The dominant performance penalty for domain decomposition was shown to come from these physical effects rather than insufficient network bandwidth or high latency. The model predictions were verified with measured data from simulations in OpenMC on a full-core benchmark problem. Finally, a novel algorithm for decomposing large tally data was proposed, analyzed, and implemented/tested in OpenMC. The algorithm relies on disjoint sets of compute processes and tally servers. The analysis showed that for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead. Tests were performed on Intrepid and Titan and demonstrated that the algorithm did indeed perform well over a wide range of parameters. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  7. A Monte Carlo evaluation of dose enhancement by cisplatin and titanocene dichloride chemotherapy drugs in brachytherapy with photon emitting sources.

    PubMed

    Yahya Abadi, Akram; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-06-01

    Some chemotherapy drugs contain a high Z element in their structure that can be used for tumour dose enhancement in radiotherapy. In the present study, dose enhancement factors (DEFs) by cisplatin and titanocene dichloride agents in brachytherapy were quantified based on Monte Carlo simulation. Six photon emitting brachytherapy sources were simulated and their dose rate constant and radial dose function were determined and compared with published data. Dose enhancement factor was obtained for 1, 3 and 5 % concentrations of cisplatin and titanocene dichloride chemotherapy agents in a tumour, in soft tissue phantom. The results of the dose rate constant and radial dose function showed good agreement with published data. Our results have shown that depending on the type of chemotherapy agent and brachytherapy source, DEF increases with increasing chemotherapy drug concentration. The maximum in-tumour averaged DEF for cisplatin and titanocene dichloride are 4.13 and 1.48, respectively, reached with 5 % concentrations of the agents, and (125)I source. Dose enhancement factor is considerably higher for both chemotherapy agents with (125)I, (103)Pd and (169)Yb sources, compared to (192)Ir, (198)Au and (60)Co sources. At similar concentrations, dose enhancement for cisplatin is higher compared with titanocene dichloride. Based on the results of this study, combination of brachytherapy and chemotherapy with agents containing a high Z element resulted in higher radiation dose to the tumour. Therefore, concurrent use of chemotherapy and brachytherapy with high atomic number drugs can have the potential benefits of dose enhancement. However, more preclinical evaluations in this area are necessary before clinical application of this method. PMID:24706342

  8. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Kasen, Daniel; O'Connor, Evan; Fernández, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 1046 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 1048 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  9. Anisotropy collision effect on ion transport in cold gas discharges with Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hennad, A.; Yousfi, M.

    1995-12-31

    Ion-molecule collision cross sections and transport and reaction coefficients are one of the basic data needed for discharge modelling of non thermal cold plasmas. In the literature, numerous methods are devoted to the experimental and theoretical determination of these basic data. However, data on ion-molecule collision cross sections are very sparse and in certain case practically not existent for low and intermediate ion energy range. So, the aim of this communication is to give, in the case of two ions in their parent gases (N{sub 2}{sup +}/N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup +}/O{sub 2}), the set of collision cross sections involving momentum transfer, symmetric charge transfer and also inelastic (vibration and ionisation) cross sections. The differential collision cross section is also given in order to take into account the strong anisotropy effect of elastic collisions of ions which are scattered mainly in the forward direction at the intermediate energy range. The differential cross sections are full calculated from interaction potential of polarization at low energy range and potentials of Lennard-Jones for N{sub 2}{sup +}/N{sub 2} and a modified form for O{sub 2}{sup +}/O{sub 2} at upper energy and then, by using a swarm unfolding technique, they are fitted until to obtain the best agreement between the transport and reaction coefficients measured from classical swarm experiments and calculated from Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport for a large range of reduced electric field E/N.

  10. Design of a hybrid computational fluid dynamics-monte carlo radiation transport methodology for radioactive particulate resuspension studies.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fawaz; Waller, Ed

    2014-10-01

    There are numerous scenarios where radioactive particulates can be displaced by external forces. For example, the detonation of a radiological dispersal device in an urban environment will result in the release of radioactive particulates that in turn can be resuspended into the breathing space by external forces such as wind flow in the vicinity of the detonation. A need exists to quantify the internal (due to inhalation) and external radiation doses that are delivered to bystanders; however, current state-of-the-art codes are unable to calculate accurately radiation doses that arise from the resuspension of radioactive particulates in complex topographies. To address this gap, a coupled computational fluid dynamics and Monte Carlo radiation transport approach has been developed. With the aid of particulate injections, the computational fluid dynamics simulation models characterize the resuspension of particulates in a complex urban geometry due to air-flow. The spatial and temporal distributions of these particulates are then used by the Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to calculate the radiation doses delivered to various points within the simulated domain. A particular resuspension scenario has been modeled using this coupled framework, and the calculated internal (due to inhalation) and external radiation doses have been deemed reasonable. GAMBIT and FLUENT comprise the software suite used to perform the Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations, and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended is used to perform the Monte Carlo Radiation Transport simulations. PMID:25162421

  11. PENGEOM-A general-purpose geometry package for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in material systems defined by quadric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, Julio; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Díaz-Londoño, Gloria; Carnicer, Artur; Lallena, Antonio M.; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-02-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENGEOM provides a complete set of tools to handle quadric geometries in Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport. The material structure where radiation propagates is assumed to consist of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The PENGEOM subroutines (a subset of the PENELOPE code) track particles through the material structure, independently of the details of the physics models adopted to describe the interactions. Although these subroutines are designed for detailed simulations of photon and electron transport, where all individual interactions are simulated sequentially, they can also be used in mixed (class II) schemes for simulating the transport of high-energy charged particles, where the effect of soft interactions is described by the random-hinge method. The definition of the geometry and the details of the tracking algorithm are tailored to optimize simulation speed. The use of fuzzy quadric surfaces minimizes the impact of round-off errors. The provided software includes a Java graphical user interface for editing and debugging the geometry definition file and for visualizing the material structure. Images of the structure are generated by using the tracking subroutines and, hence, they describe the geometry actually passed to the simulation code.

  12. SU-E-T-142: Effect of the Bone Heterogeneity On the Unflattened and Flattened Photon Beam Dosimetry: A Monte Carlo Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Owrangi, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study compared the dependence of depth dose on bone heterogeneity of unflattened photon beams to that of flattened beams. Monte Carlo simulations (the EGSnrc-based codes) were used to calculate depth doses in phantom with a bone layer in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams. Methods: Heterogeneous phantom containing a bone layer of 2 cm thick at a depth of 1 cm in water was irradiated by the unflattened and flattened 6 MV photon beams (field size = 10×10 cm{sup 2}). Phase-space files of the photon beams based on the Varian TrueBeam linac were generated by the Geant4 and BEAMnrc codes, and verified by measurements. Depth doses were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code with beam angles set to 0° and 30°. For dosimetric comparison, the above simulations were repeated in a water phantom using the same beam geometry with the bone layer replaced by water. Results: Our results showed that the beam output of unflattened photon beams was about 2.1 times larger than the flattened beams in water. Comparing the water phantom to the bone phantom, larger doses were found in water above and below the bone layer for both the unflattened and flattened photon beams. When both beams were turned 30°, the deviation of depth dose between the bone and water phantom became larger compared to that with beam angle equal to 0°. Dose ratio of the unflattened and flattened photon beams showed that the unflattened beam has larger depth dose in the buildup region compared to the flattened beam. Conclusion: Although the unflattened photon beam had different beam output and quality compared to the flattened, dose enhancements due to the bone scatter were found similar. However, we discovered that depth dose deviation due to the presence of bone was sensitive to the beam obliquity.

  13. Dosimetric advantage of using 6 MV over 15 MV photons in conformal therapy of lung cancer: Monte Carlo studies in patient geometries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yorke, Ellen; Desobry, Gregory; Chui, Chen-Shou

    2002-01-01

    Many lung cancer patients who undergo radiation therapy are treated with higher energy photons (15-18 MV) to obtain deeper penetration and better dose uniformity. However, the longer range of the higher energy recoil electrons in the low-density medium may cause lateral electronic disequilibrium and degrade the target coverage. To compare the dose homogeneity achieved with lower versus higher energy photon beams, we performed a dosimetric study of 6 and 15 MV three-dimensional (3D) conformal treatment plans for lung cancer using an accurate, patient-specific dose-calculation method based on a Monte Carlo technique. A 6 and 15 MV 3D conformal treatment plan was generated for each of two patients with target volumes exceeding 200 cm(3) on an in-house treatment planning system in routine clinical use. Each plan employed four conformally shaped photon beams. Each dose distribution was recalculated with the Monte Carlo method, utilizing the same beam geometry and patient-specific computed tomography (CT) images. Treatment plans using the two energies were compared in terms of their isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The 15 MV dose distributions and DVHs generated by the clinical treatment planning calculations were as good as, or slightly better than, those generated for 6 MV beams. However, the Monte Carlo dose calculation predicted increased penumbra width with increased photon energy resulting in decreased lateral dose homogeneity for the 15 MV plans. Monte Carlo calculations showed that all target coverage indicators were significantly worse for 15 MV than for 6 MV; particularly the portion of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose (V(95)) dropped dramatically for the 15 MV plan in comparison to the 6 MV. Spinal cord and lung doses were clinically equivalent for the two energies. In treatment planning of tumors that abut lung tissue, lower energy (6 MV) photon beams should be preferred over higher energies (15-18 MV) because of the significant loss of lateral dose equilibrium for high-energy beams in the low-density medium. Any gains in radial dose uniformity across steep density gradients for higher energy beams must be weighed carefully against the lateral beam degradation due to penumbra widening. PMID:11818004

  14. penMesh--Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation in a triangle mesh geometry.

    PubMed

    Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Banh, Diem Phuc; Badano, Aldo; Sempau, Josep

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation code, called penMesh, that combines the accuracy of the radiation transport physics subroutines from PENELOPE and the flexibility of a geometry based on triangle meshes. While the geometric models implemented in most general-purpose codes--such as PENELOPE's quadric geometry--impose some limitations in the shape of the objects that can be simulated, triangle meshes can be used to describe any free-form (arbitrary) object. Triangle meshes are extensively used in computer-aided design and computer graphics. We took advantage of the sophisticated tools already developed in these fields, such as an octree structure and an efficient ray-triangle intersection algorithm, to significantly accelerate the triangle mesh ray-tracing. A detailed description of the new simulation code and its ray-tracing algorithm is provided in this paper. Furthermore, we show how it can be readily used in medical imaging applications thanks to the detailed anatomical phantoms already available. In particular, we present a whole body radiography simulation using a triangulated version of the anthropomorphic NCAT phantom. An example simulation of scatter fraction measurements using a standardized abdomen and lumbar spine phantom, and a benchmark of the triangle mesh and quadric geometries in the ray-tracing of a mathematical breast model, are also presented to show some of the capabilities of penMesh. PMID:19435677

  15. Robust volume calculations for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) components in Monte Carlo transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, D. L.; Griesheimer, D. P.; Nease, B. R.; Snoeyink, J.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we consider a new generalized algorithm for the efficient calculation of component object volumes given their equivalent constructive solid geometry (CSG) definition. The new method relies on domain decomposition to recursively subdivide the original component into smaller pieces with volumes that can be computed analytically or stochastically, if needed. Unlike simpler brute-force approaches, the proposed decomposition scheme is guaranteed to be robust and accurate to within a user-defined tolerance. The new algorithm is also fully general and can handle any valid CSG component definition, without the need for additional input from the user. The new technique has been specifically optimized to calculate volumes of component definitions commonly found in models used for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for criticality safety and reactor analysis applications. However, the algorithm can be easily extended to any application which uses CSG representations for component objects. The paper provides a complete description of the novel volume calculation algorithm, along with a discussion of the conjectured error bounds on volumes calculated within the method. In addition, numerical results comparing the new algorithm with a standard stochastic volume calculation algorithm are presented for a series of problems spanning a range of representative component sizes and complexities. (authors)

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in human skin with rigorous treatment of curved tissue boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Milani?, Matija; Premru, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of light transport in heterogeneous biological structures using the Monte Carlo (MC) approach, space is commonly discretized into optically homogeneous voxels by a rectangular spatial grid. Any round or oblique boundaries between neighboring tissues thus become serrated, which raises legitimate concerns about the realism of modeling results with regard to reflection and refraction of light on such boundaries. We analyze the related effects by systematic comparison with an augmented 3-D MC code, in which analytically defined tissue boundaries are treated in a rigorous manner. At specific locations within our test geometries, energy deposition predicted by the two models can vary by 10%. Even highly relevant integral quantities, such as linear density of the energy absorbed by modeled blood vessels, differ by up to 30%. Most notably, the values predicted by the customary model vary strongly and quite erratically with the spatial discretization step and upon minor repositioning of the computational grid. Meanwhile, the augmented model shows no such unphysical behavior. Artifacts of the former approach do not converge toward zero with ever finer spatial discretization, confirming that it suffers from inherent deficiencies due to inaccurate treatment of reflection and refraction at round tissue boundaries.

  17. Proton transport in water and DNA components: A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, C.; Incerti, S.; Tran, H. N.; Karamitros, M.; Shin, J. I.; Lee, S. B.; Lekadir, H.; Bernal, M.; Francis, Z.; Ivanchenko, V.; Fojón, O. A.; Hanssen, J.; Rivarola, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate modeling of DNA damages resulting from ionizing radiation remains a challenge of today's radiobiology research. An original set of physics processes has been recently developed for modeling the detailed transport of protons and neutral hydrogen atoms in liquid water and in DNA nucleobases using the Geant4-DNA extension of the open source Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. The theoretical cross sections as well as the mean energy transfers during the different ionizing processes were taken from recent works based on classical as well as quantum mechanical predictions. Furthermore, in order to compare energy deposition patterns in liquid water and DNA material, we here propose a simplified cellular nucleus model made of spherical voxels, each containing randomly oriented nanometer-size cylindrical targets filled with either liquid water or DNA material (DNA nucleobases) both with a density of 1 g/cm3. These cylindrical volumes have dimensions comparable to genetic material units of mammalian cells, namely, 25 nm (diameter) × 25 nm (height) for chromatin fiber segments, 10 nm (d) × 5 nm (h) for nucleosomes and 2 nm (d) × 2 nm (h) for DNA segments. Frequencies of energy deposition in the cylindrical targets are presented and discussed.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in human skin with rigorous treatment of curved tissue boundaries.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Premru, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of light transport in heterogeneous biological structures using the Monte Carlo (MC) approach, space is commonly discretized into optically homogeneous voxels by a rectangular spatial grid. Any round or oblique boundaries between neighboring tissues thus become serrated, which raises legitimate concerns about the realism of modeling results with regard to reflection and refraction of light on such boundaries. We analyze the related effects by systematic comparison with an augmented 3-D MC code, in which analytically defined tissue boundaries are treated in a rigorous manner. At specific locations within our test geometries, energy deposition predicted by the two models can vary by 10%. Even highly relevant integral quantities, such as linear density of the energy absorbed by modeled blood vessels, differ by up to 30%. Most notably, the values predicted by the customary model vary strongly and quite erratically with the spatial discretization step and upon minor repositioning of the computational grid. Meanwhile, the augmented model shows no such unphysical behavior. Artifacts of the former approach do not converge toward zero with ever finer spatial discretization, confirming that it suffers from inherent deficiencies due to inaccurate treatment of reflection and refraction at round tissue boundaries. PMID:25604544

  19. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  20. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of fission product silver transport through TRISO fuel particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bellefon, G. M.; Wirth, B. D.

    2011-06-01

    A mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model developed to investigate the diffusion of silver through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide containment layers of a TRISO fuel particle is described. The release of radioactive silver from TRISO particles has been studied for nearly three decades, yet the mechanisms governing silver transport are not fully understood. This model atomically resolves Ag, but provides a mesoscale medium of carbon and silicon carbide, which can include a variety of defects including grain boundaries, reflective interfaces, cracks, and radiation-induced cavities that can either accelerate silver diffusion or slow diffusion by acting as traps for silver. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, trap binding energies, interface characteristics) are determined from available experimental data, or parametrically varied, until more precise values become available from lower length scale modeling or experiment. The predicted results, in terms of the time/temperature dependence of silver release during post-irradiation annealing and the variability of silver release from particle to particle have been compared to available experimental data from the German HTR Fuel Program ( Gontard and Nabielek [1]) and Minato and co-workers ( Minato et al. [2]).

  2. Poster — Thur Eve — 48: Dosimetric dependence on bone backscatter in orthovoltage radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo photon fluence spectral study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Grigor, G

    2014-08-15

    This study investigated dosimetric impact due to the bone backscatter in orthovoltage radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate depth doses and photon fluence spectra using the EGSnrc-based code. Inhomogeneous bone phantom containing a thin water layer (1–3 mm) on top of a bone (1 cm) to mimic the treatment sites of forehead, chest wall and kneecap was irradiated by the 220 kVp photon beam produced by the Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine. Percentage depth doses and photon energy spectra were determined using Monte Carlo simulations. Results of percentage depth doses showed that the maximum bone dose was about 210–230% larger than the surface dose in the phantoms with different water thicknesses. Surface dose was found to be increased from 2.3 to 3.5%, when the distance between the phantom surface and bone was increased from 1 to 3 mm. This increase of surface dose on top of a bone was due to the increase of photon fluence intensity, resulting from the bone backscatter in the energy range of 30 – 120 keV, when the water thickness was increased. This was also supported by the increase of the intensity of the photon energy spectral curves at the phantom and bone surface as the water thickness was increased. It is concluded that if the bone inhomogeneity during the dose prescription in the sites of forehead, chest wall and kneecap with soft tissue thickness = 1–3 mm is not considered, there would be an uncertainty in the dose delivery.

  3. Improved Hybrid Monte Carlo/n-Moment Transport Equations Model for the Polar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Ji, J.; Schunk, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    In many space plasma problems (e.g. terrestrial polar wind, solar wind, etc.), the plasma gradually evolves from dense collision-dominated into rarified collisionless conditions. For decades, numerous attempts were made in order to address this type of problem using simulations based on one of two approaches. These approaches are: (1) the (fluid-like) Generalized Transport Equations, GTE, and (2) the particle-based Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. In contrast to the computationally intensive MC, the GTE approach can be considerably more efficient but its validity is questionable outside the collision-dominated region depending on the number of transport parameters considered. There have been several attempts to develop hybrid models that combine the strengths of both approaches. In particular, low-order GTE formulations were applied within the collision-dominated region, while an MC simulation was applied within the collisionless region and in the collisional-to-collisionless transition region. However, attention must be paid to assuring the consistency of the two approaches in the region where they are matched. Contrary to all previous studies, our model pays special attention to the ';matching' issue, and hence eliminates the discontinuities/inaccuracies associated with mismatching. As an example, we applied our technique to the Coulomb-Milne problem because of its relevance to the problem of space plasma flow from high- to low-density regions. We will compare the velocity distribution function and its moments (density, flow velocity, temperature, etc.) from the following models: (1) the pure MC model, (2) our hybrid model, and (3) previously published hybrid models. We will also consider a wide range of the test-to-background mass ratio.

  4. Consequences of removing the flattening filter from linear accelerators in generating high dose rate photon beams for clinical applications: A Monte Carlo study verified by measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmael Parsai, E.; Pearson, David; Kvale, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    An Elekta SL-25 medical linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) has been modelled using Monte Carlo simulations with the photon flattening filter removed. It is hypothesized that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments may be carried out after the removal of this component despite it's criticality to standard treatments. Measurements using a scanning water phantom were also performed after the flattening filter had been removed. Both simulated and measured beam profiles showed that dose on the central axis increased, with the Monte Carlo simulations showing an increase by a factor of 2.35 for 6 MV and 4.18 for 10 MV beams. A further consequence of removing the flattening filter was the softening of the photon energy spectrum leading to a steeper reduction in dose at depths greater than the depth of maximum dose. A comparison of the points at the field edge showed that dose was reduced at these points by as much as 5.8% for larger fields. In conclusion, the greater photon fluence is expected to result in shorter treatment times, while the reduction in dose outside of the treatment field is strongly suggestive of more accurate dose delivery to the target.

  5. Experimental validation of a coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Harding, Lee; Mitchell, Dean James

    2010-03-01

    Forward radiation transport is the problem of calculating the radiation field given a description of the radiation source and transport medium. In contrast, inverse transport is the problem of inferring the configuration of the radiation source and transport medium from measurements of the radiation field. As such, the identification and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) is a problem of inverse radiation transport, and numerous techniques to solve this problem have been previously developed. The authors have developed a solver based on nonlinear regression applied to deterministic coupled neutron-photon transport calculations. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5-kg sphere of alpha-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured in six different configurations: bare, and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses of 1.27, 2.54, 3.81, 7.62, and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to characterize the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured signatures.

  6. Dependences of mucosal dose on photon beams in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C.L.; Owrangi, Amir M.

    2012-07-01

    Dependences of mucosal dose in the oral or nasal cavity on the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration, and mucosal thickness were studied for small photon fields using Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based code), which were validated by measurements. Cylindrical mucosa phantoms (mucosal thickness = 1, 2, and 3 mm) with and without the bone and air inhomogeneities were irradiated by the 6- and 18-MV photon beams (field size = 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2}) with gantry angles equal to 0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign , and 180 Degree-Sign , and multibeam configurations using 2, 4, and 8 photon beams in different orientations around the phantom. Doses along the central beam axis in the mucosal tissue were calculated. The mucosal surface doses were found to decrease slightly (1% for the 6-MV photon beam and 3% for the 18-MV beam) with an increase of mucosal thickness from 1-3 mm, when the beam angle is 0 Degree-Sign . The variation of mucosal surface dose with its thickness became insignificant when the beam angle was changed to 180 Degree-Sign , but the dose at the bone-mucosa interface was found to increase (28% for the 6-MV photon beam and 20% for the 18-MV beam) with the mucosal thickness. For different multibeam configurations, the dependence of mucosal dose on its thickness became insignificant when the number of photon beams around the mucosal tissue was increased. The mucosal dose with bone was varied with the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration and mucosal thickness for a small segmental photon field. These dosimetric variations are important to consider improving the treatment strategy, so the mucosal complications in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be minimized.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Model of Charge Transport in Hematite (?-Fe2O3)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2007-09-28

    The mobility of electrons injected into iron oxide minerals via abiotic and biotic electron-transfer processes is one of the key factors that control the reductive dissolution of such minerals. Building upon our previous work on the computational modeling of elementary electron transfer reactions in iron oxide minerals using ab initio electronic structure calculations and parameterized molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed and implemented a kinetic Monte Carlo model of charge transport in hematite that integrates previous findings. The model aims to simulate the interplay between electron transfer processes for extended periods of time in lattices of increasing complexity. The electron transfer reactions considered here involve the II/III valence interchange between nearest-neighbor iron atoms via a small polaron hopping mechanism. The temperature dependence and anisotropic behavior of the electrical conductivity as predicted by our model are in good agreement with experimental data on hematite single crystals. In addition, we characterize the effect of electron polaron concentration and that of a range of defects on the electron mobility. Interaction potentials between electron polarons and fixed defects (iron substitution by divalent, tetravalent, and isovalent ions and iron and oxygen vacancies) are determined from atomistic simulations, based on the same model used to derive the electron transfer parameters, and show little deviation from the Coulombic interaction energy. Integration of the interaction potentials in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations allows the electron polaron diffusion coefficient and density and residence time around defect sites to be determined as a function of polaron concentration in the presence of repulsive and attractive defects. The decrease in diffusion coefficient with polaron concentration follows a logarithmic function up to the highest concentration considered, i.e., ~2% of iron(III) sites, whereas the presence of repulsive defects has a linear effect on the electron polaron diffusion. Attractive defects are found to significantly affect electron polaron diffusion at low polaron to defect ratios due to trapping on nanosecond to microsecond time scales. This work indicates that electrons can diffuse away from the initial site of interfacial electron transfer at a rate that is consistent with measured electrical conductivities but that the presence of certain kinds of defects will severely limit the mobility of donated electrons.

  8. Monte Carlo neutral particle transport through a binary stochastic mixture using chord length sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Timothy J.

    A Monte Carlo algorithm is developed to estimate the ensemble-averaged behavior of neutral particles within a binary stochastic mixture. A special case stochastic mixture is examined, in which non-overlapping spheres of constant radius are uniformly mixed in a matrix material. Spheres are chosen to represent the stochastic volumes due to their geometric simplicity and because spheres are a common approximation to a large number of applications. The boundaries of the mixture are impenetrable, meaning that spheres in the stochastic mixture cannot be assumed to overlap the mixture boundaries. The algorithm employs a method called Limited Chord Length Sampling (LCLS). While in the matrix material, LCLS uses chord-length sampling to sample the distance to the next stochastic interface. After a surface crossing into a stochastic sphere, transport is treated explicitly until the particle exits or is killed. This capability eliminates the need to explicitly model a representation of the random geometry of the mixture. The algorithm is first proposed and tested against benchmark results for a two dimensional, fixed source model using stand-alone Monte Carlo codes. The algorithm is then implemented and tested in a test version of the Los Alamos M&barbelow;onte C&barbelow;arlo ?-p&barbelow;article Code MCNP. This prototype MCNP version has the capability to calculate LCLS results for both fixed source and multiplied source (i.e., eigenvalue) problems. Problems analyzed with MCNP range from simple binary mixtures, designed to test LCLS over a range of optical thicknesses, to a detailed High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel element, which tests the value of LCLS in a current problem of practical significance. Comparisons of LCLS and benchmark results include both accuracy and efficiency comparisons. To ensure conservative efficiency comparisons, the statistical basis for the benchmark technique is derived and a formal method for optimizing the benchmark calculations is developed. LCLS results are compared to results obtained through other methods to gauge accuracy and efficiency. The LCLS model is efficient and provides a high degree of accuracy through a wide range of conditions.

  9. ITS Version 4.0: Electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J.A,; Kensek, R.P.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    The current publicly released version of the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS), Version 3.0, has been widely distributed both domestically and internationally, and feedback has been very positive. This feedback as well as our own experience have convinced us to upgrade the system in order to honor specific user requests for new features and to implement other new features that will improve the physical accuracy of the system and permit additional variance reduction. This presentation we will focus on components of the upgrade that (1) improve the physical model, (2) provide new and extended capabilities to the three-dimensional combinatorial-geometry (CG) of the ACCEPT codes, and (3) permit significant variance reduction in an important class of radiation effects applications.

  10. Enhanced photon-assisted spin transport in a quantum dot attached to ferromagnetic leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Fabrício M.; Carrara, Thiago L.; Vernek, E.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate real-time dynamics of spin-polarized current in a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic leads in both parallel and antiparallel alignments. While an external bias voltage is taken constant in time, a gate terminal, capacitively coupled to the quantum dot, introduces a periodic modulation of the dot level. Using nonequilibrium Green’s function technique we find that spin polarized electrons can tunnel through the system via additional photon-assisted transmission channels. Owing to a Zeeman splitting of the dot level, it is possible to select a particular spin component to be photon transferred from the left to the right terminal, with spin dependent current peaks arising at different gate frequencies. The ferromagnetic electrodes enhance or suppress the spin transport depending upon the leads magnetization alignment. The tunnel magnetoresistance also attains negative values due to a photon-assisted inversion of the spin-valve effect.

  11. Transparent and Nonflammable Ionogel Photon Upconverters and Their Solute Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoichi; Himuro, Yuki; Ito, Toshiyuki; Morita, Ryoutarou; Niimi, Kazuki; Kiyoyanagi, Noriko

    2016-02-01

    Photon upconversion based on triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA-UC) is a technology to convert presently wasted sub-bandgap photons to usable higher-energy photons. In this paper, ionogel TTA-UC samples are first developed by gelatinizing ionic liquids containing triplet-sensitizing and light-emitting molecules using an ionic gelator, resulting in transparent and nonflammable ionogel photon upconverters. The photophysical properties of the ionogel samples are then investigated, and the results suggest that the effect of gelation on the diffusion of the solutes is negligibly small. To further examine this suggestion and acquire fundamental insight into the solute transport properties of the samples, the diffusion of charge-neutral solute species over much longer distances than microscopic interpolymer distances is measured by electrochemical potential-step chronoamperometry. The results reveal that the diffusion of solute species is not affected by gelation within the tested gelator concentration range, supporting our interpretation of the initial results of the photophysical investigations. Overall, our results show that the advantage of nonfluidity can be imparted to ionic-liquid-based photon upconverters without sacrificing molecular diffusion, optical transparency, and nonflammability. PMID:26752701

  12. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Thomsen, Bjarne; Bassler, Niels

    2015-03-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi-Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi-Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  13. Update on the Status of the FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L.; Anderson, V.; Empl, A.; Lee, K.; Smirnov, G.; Zapp, N; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, K.; Roesler, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Battisoni, G.; Ceruti, F.; Gadioli, M. V.; Garzelli, M.; Muraro, S.; Rancati, T.; Sala, P.; Ballarini, R.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parini, V.; Scannicchio, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is a well-known simulation tool in High Energy Physics. FLUKA is a dynamic tool in the sense that it is being continually updated and improved by the authors. Here we review the progresses achieved in the last year on the physics models. From the point of view of hadronic physics, most of the effort is still in the field of nucleus--nucleus interactions. The currently available version of FLUKA already includes the internal capability to simulate inelastic nuclear interactions beginning with lab kinetic energies of 100 MeV/A up the the highest accessible energies by means of the DPMJET-II.5 event generator to handle the interactions for greater than 5 GeV/A and rQMD for energies below that. The new developments concern, at high energy, the embedding of the DPMJET-III generator, which represent a major change with respect to the DPMJET-II structure. This will also allow to achieve a better consistency between the nucleus-nucleus section with the original FLUKA model for hadron-nucleus collisions. Work is also in progress to implement a third event generator model based on the Master Boltzmann Equation approach, in order to extend the energy capability from 100 MeV/A down to the threshold for these reactions. In addition to these extended physics capabilities, structural changes to the programs input and scoring capabilities are continually being upgraded. In particular we want to mention the upgrades in the geometry packages, now capable of reaching higher levels of abstraction. Work is also proceeding to provide direct import into ROOT of the FLUKA output files for analysis and to deploy a user-friendly GUI input interface.

  14. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-04-21

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 3 10 mm crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of treatments and materials attached to the surface. PMID:24694727

  15. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-04-01

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 3 10 mm3 crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of treatments and materials attached to the surface.

  16. Monte Carlo solution for uncertainty propagation in particle transport with a stochastic Galerkin method

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The stochastic Galerkin method (SGM) is an intrusive technique for propagating data uncertainty in physical models. The method reduces the random model to a system of coupled deterministic equations for the moments of stochastic spectral expansions of result quantities. We investigate solving these equations using the Monte Carlo technique. We compare the efficiency with brute-force Monte Carlo evaluation of uncertainty, the non-intrusive stochastic collocation method (SCM), and an intrusive Monte Carlo implementation of the stochastic collocation method. We also describe the stability limitations of our SGM implementation. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport of the high strain ionomer with conducting powder electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingxi; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    The transport of charge due to electric stimulus is the primary mechanism of actuation for a class of polymeric active materials known as ionomeric polymer transducers (IPT). At low frequency, strain response is strongly related to charge accumulation at the electrodes. Experimental results demonstrated using conducting powder, such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), polyaniline (PANI) powders, high surface area RuO II, carbon black electrodes etc. as an electrode increases the mechanical deformation of the IPT by increasing the capacitance of the material. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional ion hopping model has been built to describe ion transport in the IPT. The shape of the conducting powder is assumed to be a sphere. A step voltage is applied between the electrodes of the IPT, causing the thermally-activated hopping between multiwell energy structures. Energy barrier height includes three parts: the energy height due to the external electric potential, intrinsic energy, and the energy height due to ion interactions. Finite element method software-ANSYS is employed to calculate the static electric potential distribution inside the material with the powder sphere in varied locations. The interaction between ions and the electrodes including powder electrodes is determined by using the method of images. At each simulation step, the energy of each cation is updated to compute ion hopping rate which directly relates to the probability of an ion moving to its neighboring site. Simulation ends when the current drops to constant zero. Periodic boundary conditions are applied when ions hop in the direction perpendicular to the external electric field. When an ion is moved out of the simulation region, its corresponding periodic replica enters from the opposite side. In the direction of the external electric field, parallel programming is achieved in C augmented with functions that perform message-passing between processors using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. The effects of conducting powder size, locations and amount are discussed by studying the stationary charge density plots and ion distribution plots.

  18. Unidirectional transport in electronic and photonic Weyl materials by Dirac mass engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ren; Wang, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Unidirectional transports have been observed in two-dimensional systems, however, so far they have not been experimentally observed in three-dimensional bulk materials. In this theoretical work, we show that the recently discovered Weyl materials provide a platform for unidirectional transports inside bulk materials. With high experimental feasibility, a complex Dirac mass can be generated and manipulated in photonic Weyl crystals, creating unidirectionally propagating modes observable in transmission experiments. A possible realization in (electronic) Weyl semimetals is also studied. We show in a lattice model that, with a short-range interaction, the desired form of the Dirac mass can be spontaneously generated in a first-order transition.

  19. Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiruma, Teruo

    1993-04-01

    After developing various kinds of photodetectors such as phototubes, photomultiplier tubes, image pick up tubes, solid state photodetectors and a variety of light sources, we also started to develop integrated systems utilizing new detectors or imaging devices. These led us to the technology for a single photon counting imaging and detection of picosecond and femtosecond phenomena. Through those experiences, we gained the understanding that photon is a paste of substances, and yet we know so little about photon. By developing various technology for many fields such as analytical chemistry, high energy physics, medicine, biology, brain science, astronomy, etc., we are beginning to understand that the mind and life are based on the same matter, that is substance. Since humankind has so little knowledge about the substance concerning the mind and life, this makes some confusion on these subjects at this moment. If we explore photonics more deeply, many problems we now have in the world could be solved. By creating new knowledge and technology, I believe we will be able to solve the problems of illness, aging, energy, environment, human capability, and finally, the essential healthiness of the six billion human beings in the world.

  20. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  1. Report of the AAPM Task Group No. 105: Issues associated with clinical implementation of Monte Carlo-based photon and electron external beam treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Curran, Bruce; Cygler, Joanna E.; DeMarco, John J.; Ezzell, Gary; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Kawrakow, Iwan; Keall, Paul J.; Liu, Helen; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Rogers, D. W. O.; Seuntjens, Jan; Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2007-12-15

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been shown through many research studies to calculate accurate dose distributions for clinical radiotherapy, particularly in heterogeneous patient tissues where the effects of electron transport cannot be accurately handled with conventional, deterministic dose algorithms. Despite its proven accuracy and the potential for improved dose distributions to influence treatment outcomes, the long calculation times previously associated with MC simulation rendered this method impractical for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the development of faster codes optimized for radiotherapy calculations and improvements in computer processor technology have substantially reduced calculation times to, in some instances, within minutes on a single processor. These advances have motivated several major treatment planning system vendors to embark upon the path of MC techniques. Several commercial vendors have already released or are currently in the process of releasing MC algorithms for photon and/or electron beam treatment planning. Consequently, the accessibility and use of MC treatment planning algorithms may well become widespread in the radiotherapy community. With MC simulation, dose is computed stochastically using first principles; this method is therefore quite different from conventional dose algorithms. Issues such as statistical uncertainties, the use of variance reduction techniques, the ability to account for geometric details in the accelerator treatment head simulation, and other features, are all unique components of a MC treatment planning algorithm. Successful implementation by the clinical physicist of such a system will require an understanding of the basic principles of MC techniques. The purpose of this report, while providing education and review on the use of MC simulation in radiotherapy planning, is to set out, for both users and developers, the salient issues associated with clinical implementation and experimental verification of MC dose algorithms. As the MC method is an emerging technology, this report is not meant to be prescriptive. Rather, it is intended as a preliminary report to review the tenets of the MC method and to provide the framework upon which to build a comprehensive program for commissioning and routine quality assurance of MC-based treatment planning systems.

  2. Using FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code to develop parameterizations for fluence and energy deposition data for high-energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittingham, John; Townsend, Lawrence; Barzilla, Janet; Lee, Kerry

    2012-03-01

    Monte Carlo codes provide an effective means of modeling three dimensional radiation transport; however, their use is both time- and resource-intensive. The creation of a lookup table or parameterization from Monte Carlo simulation allows users to perform calculations with Monte Carlo results without replicating lengthy calculations. FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code was used to develop lookup tables and parameterizations for data resulting from the penetration of layers of aluminum, polyethylene, and water with areal densities ranging from 0 to 100 g/cm2. Heavy charged ion radiation including ions from Z=1 to Z=26 and from 0.1 to 10 GeV/nucleon were simulated. Dose, dose equivalent, and fluence as a function of particle identity, energy, and scattering angle were examined at various depths. Calculations were compared to well-known data and the calculations of other deterministic and Monte Carlo codes. Results will be presented.

  3. A generalized framework for in-line energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Stedry, M. H.

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous treatment of energy deposition in a Monte Carlo transport calculation, including coupled transport of all secondary and tertiary radiations, increases the computational cost of a simulation dramatically, making fully-coupled heating impractical for many large calculations, such as 3-D analysis of nuclear reactor cores. However, in some cases, the added benefit from a full-fidelity energy-deposition treatment is negligible, especially considering the increased simulation run time. In this paper we present a generalized framework for the in-line calculation of energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo transport simulations. This framework gives users the ability to select among several energy-deposition approximations with varying levels of fidelity. The paper describes the computational framework, along with derivations of four energy-deposition treatments. Each treatment uses a unique set of self-consistent approximations, which ensure that energy balance is preserved over the entire problem. By providing several energy-deposition treatments, each with different approximations for neglecting the energy transport of certain secondary radiations, the proposed framework provides users the flexibility to choose between accuracy and computational efficiency. Numerical results are presented, comparing heating results among the four energy-deposition treatments for a simple reactor/compound shielding problem. The results illustrate the limitations and computational expense of each of the four energy-deposition treatments. (authors)

  4. Multilevel Monte Carlo for two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Florian Jenny, Patrick Meyer, Daniel W.

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is a well known method for quantifying uncertainty arising for example in subsurface flow problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow convergence. Extending MC by means of multigrid techniques yields the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method. MLMC has proven to greatly accelerate MC for several applications including stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance, elliptic stochastic partial differential equations and also hyperbolic problems. In this study, MLMC is combined with a streamline-based solver to assess uncertain two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. The influence of the variance and the correlation length of the logarithmic permeability on the MLMC performance is studied.

  5. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-01-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (?2.5?eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350?C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ?0.2?eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron-hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26498984

  6. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-01-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (∼2.5 eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350 °C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ∼0.2 eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron–hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26498984

  7. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-10-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (~2.5 eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350 C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ~0.2 eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron-hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge.

  8. Enhanced photon-assisted spin transport in a quantum dot attached to ferromagnetic leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Fabricio M.; Carrara, Thiago L.; Vernek, Edson

    2012-02-01

    Time-dependent transport in quantum dot system (QDs) has received significant attention due to a variety of new quantum physical phenomena emerging in transient time scale.[1] In the present work [2] we investigate real-time dynamics of spin-polarized current in a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic leads in both parallel and antiparallel alignments. While an external bias voltage is taken constant in time, a gate terminal, capacitively coupled to the quantum dot, introduces a periodic modulation of the dot level. Using non equilibrium Green's function technique we find that spin polarized electrons can tunnel through the system via additional photon-assisted transmission channels. Owing to a Zeeman splitting of the dot level, it is possible to select a particular spin component to be photon-transferred from the left to the right terminal, with spin dependent current peaks arising at different gate frequencies. The ferromagnetic electrodes enhance or suppress the spin transport depending upon the leads magnetization alignment. The tunnel magnetoresistance also attains negative values due to a photon-assisted inversion of the spin-valve effect. [1] F. M. Souza, Phys. Rev. B 76, 205315 (2007). [2] F. M. Souza, T. L. Carrara, and E. Vernek, Phys. Rev. B 84, 115322 (2011).

  9. Monte-Carlo-derived insights into dose-kerma-collision kerma inter-relationships for 50?keV-25?MeV photon beams in water, aluminum and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between D, K and Kcol are of fundamental importance in radiation dosimetry. These relationships are critically influenced by secondary electron transport, which makes Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation indispensable; we have used MC codes DOSRZnrc and FLURZnrc. Computations of the ratios D/K and D/Kcol in three materials (water, aluminum and copper) for large field sizes with energies from 50?keV to 25?MeV (including 6-15?MV) are presented. Beyond the depth of maximum dose D/K is almost always less than or equal to unity and D/Kcol greater than unity, and these ratios are virtually constant with increasing depth. The difference between K and Kcol increases with energy and with the atomic number of the irradiated materials. D/K in sub-equilibrium small megavoltage photon fields decreases rapidly with decreasing field size. A simple analytical expression for \\overline{X} , the distance upstream from a given voxel to the mean origin of the secondary electrons depositing their energy in this voxel, is proposed: {{\\overline{X}}\\text{emp}}? 0.5{{R}\\text{csda}}(\\overline{{{E}0}}) , where \\overline{{{E}0}} is the mean initial secondary electron energy. These {{\\overline{X}}\\text{emp}} agree well with exact MC-derived values for photon energies from 5-25?MeV for water and aluminum. An analytical expression for D/K is also presented and evaluated for 50?keV-25?MeV photons in the three materials, showing close agreement with the MC-derived values.

  10. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle differential basis with common cross-section libraries.

  11. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running.

  12. Verification of Three Dimensional Triangular Prismatic Discrete Ordinates Transport Code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by Comparison with Monte Carlo Code GMVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Yuto; Moriwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Shigeo; Ikeda, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with verification of three dimensional triangular prismatic discrete ordinates transport calculation code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by comparison with multi-group Monte Carlo calculation code GMVP in a large fast breeder reactor. The reactor is a 750 MWe electric power sodium cooled reactor. Nuclear characteristics are calculated at beginning of cycle of an initial core and at beginning and end of cycle of equilibrium core. According to the calculations, the differences between the two methodologies are smaller than 0.0002 ?k in the multi-plication factor, relatively about 1% in the control rod reactivity, and 1% in the sodium void reactivity.

  13. Production and dosimetry of simultaneous therapeutic photons and electrons beam by linear accelerator: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Khledi, Navid; Sardari, Dariush; Arbabi, Azim; Ameri, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2015-02-24

    Depending on the location and depth of tumor, the electron or photon beams might be used for treatment. Electron beam have some advantages over photon beam for treatment of shallow tumors to spare the normal tissues beyond of the tumor. In the other hand, the photon beam are used for deep targets treatment. Both of these beams have some limitations, for example the dependency of penumbra with depth, and the lack of lateral equilibrium for small electron beam fields. In first, we simulated the conventional head configuration of Varian 2300 for 16 MeV electron, and the results approved by benchmarking the Percent Depth Dose (PDD) and profile of the simulation and measurement. In the next step, a perforated Lead (Pb) sheet with 1mm thickness placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer producing bremsstrahlung x-ray and a part of the electrons passing through the holes, in result, we have a simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. For making the irradiation field uniform, a layer of steel placed after the Pb layer. The simulation was performed for 10×10, and 4×4 cm2 field size. This study was showed the advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam by reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size.

  14. Production and dosimetry of simultaneous therapeutic photons and electrons beam by linear accelerator: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Sardari, Dariush; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    Depending on the location and depth of tumor, the electron or photon beams might be used for treatment. Electron beam have some advantages over photon beam for treatment of shallow tumors to spare the normal tissues beyond of the tumor. In the other hand, the photon beam are used for deep targets treatment. Both of these beams have some limitations, for example the dependency of penumbra with depth, and the lack of lateral equilibrium for small electron beam fields. In first, we simulated the conventional head configuration of Varian 2300 for 16 MeV electron, and the results approved by benchmarking the Percent Depth Dose (PDD) and profile of the simulation and measurement. In the next step, a perforated Lead (Pb) sheet with 1mm thickness placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer producing bremsstrahlung x-ray and a part of the electrons passing through the holes, in result, we have a simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. For making the irradiation field uniform, a layer of steel placed after the Pb layer. The simulation was performed for 10×10, and 4×4 cm2 field size. This study was showed the advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam by reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size.

  15. Use of single scatter electron monte carlo transport for medical radiation sciences

    DOEpatents

    Svatos, Michelle M. (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The single scatter Monte Carlo code CREEP models precise microscopic interactions of electrons with matter to enhance physical understanding of radiation sciences. It is designed to simulate electrons in any medium, including materials important for biological studies. It simulates each interaction individually by sampling from a library which contains accurate information over a broad range of energies.

  16. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  17. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; Jansen, A P J

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature. PMID:23406093

  18. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  19. High-power beam transport through a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Bennett, C R; Smith, M A; Scott, A M

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the use of a seven-cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber for transport of CW laser radiation from a single-mode, narrow-linewidth, high-power fiber laser amplifier. Over 90% of the amplifier output was coupled successfully and transmitted through the fiber in a near-Gaussian mode, with negligible backreflection into the source. 100W of power was successfully transmitted continuously without damage and 160W of power was transmitted briefly before the onset of thermal lensing in the coupling optics. PMID:24875992

  20. Program EPICP: Electron photon interaction code, photon test module. Version 94.2

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    The computer code EPICP performs Monte Carlo photon transport calculations in a simple one zone cylindrical detector. Results include deposition within the detector, transmission, reflection and lateral leakage from the detector, as well as events and energy deposition as a function of the depth into the detector. EPICP is part of the EPIC (Electron Photon Interaction Code) system. EPICP is designed to perform both normal transport calculations and diagnostic calculations involving only photons, with the objective of developing optimum algorithms for later use in EPIC. The EPIC system includes other modules that are designed to develop optimum algorithms for later use in EPIC; this includes electron and positron transport (EPICE), neutron transport (EPICN), charged particle transport (EPICC), geometry (EPICG), source sampling (EPICS). This is a modular system that once optimized can be linked together to consider a wide variety of particles, geometries, sources, etc. By design EPICP only considers photon transport. In particular it does not consider electron transport so that later EPICP and EPICE can be used to quantitatively evaluate the importance of electron transport when starting from photon sources. In this report I will merely mention where we expect the results to significantly differ from those obtained considering only photon transport from that obtained using coupled electron-photon transport.

  1. Result of Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-photon cascades in lead and layers of lead-scintillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, A.; Krys, E.

    1985-01-01

    Results of Monte-Carlo simulation of electromagnetic cascade development in lead and lead-scintillator sandwiches are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the structure function for core approximation is not applicable in the case in which the primary energy is higher than 100 GeV. The simulation data has shown that introducing an inhomogeneous chamber structure results in subsequent reduction of secondary particles.

  2. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  3. Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low-energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattersall, W. J.; Cocks, D. G.; Boyle, G. J.; Buckman, S. J.; White, R. D.

    2015-04-01

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly nonequilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 381 (2002), 10.1016/S0009-2614(02)01177-6], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and we develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multiterm Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

  4. Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low-energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, W J; Cocks, D G; Boyle, G J; Buckman, S J; White, R D

    2015-04-01

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly nonequilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 381 (2002)], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and we develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multiterm Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems. PMID:25974609

  5. Modeling Positron Transport in Gaseous and Soft-condensed Systems with Kinetic Theory and Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, G.; Tattersall, W.; Robson, R. E.; White, Ron; Dujko, S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Brunger, M. J.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.

    2013-09-01

    An accurate quantitative understanding of the behavior of positrons in gaseous and soft-condensed systems is important for many technological applications as well as to fundamental physics research. Optimizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology and understanding the associated radiation damage requires knowledge of how positrons interact with matter prior to annihilation. Modeling techniques developed for electrons can also be employed to model positrons, and these techniques can also be extended to account for the structural properties of the medium. Two complementary approaches have been implemented in the present work: kinetic theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Kinetic theory is based on the multi-term Boltzmann equation, which has recently been modified to include the positron-specific interaction processes of annihilation and positronium formation. Simultaneously, a Monte Carlo simulation code has been developed that can likewise incorporate positron-specific processes. Funding support from ARC (CoE and DP schemes).

  6. Thermal Scattering Law Data: Implementation and Testing Using the Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes COG, MCNP and TART

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E; Hansen, L F; Lent, E M; Plechaty, E F

    2003-05-17

    Recently we implemented the ENDF/B-VI thermal scattering law data in our neutron transport codes COG and TART. Our objective was to convert the existing ENDF/B data into double differential form in the Livermore ENDL format. This will allow us to use the ENDF/B data in any neutron transport code, be it a Monte Carlo, or deterministic code. This was approached as a multi-step project. The first step was to develop methods to directly use the thermal scattering law data in our Monte Carlo codes. The next step was to convert the data to double-differential form. The last step was to verify that the results obtained using the data directly are essentially the same as the results obtained using the double differential data. Part of the planned verification was intended to insure that the data as finally implemented in the COG and TART codes, gave the same answer as the well known MCNP code, which includes thermal scattering law data. Limitations in the treatment of thermal scattering law data in MCNP have been uncovered that prevented us from performing this part of our verification.

  7. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thilo; Jger, Christof M.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  8. Voxel2MCNP: a framework for modeling, simulation and evaluation of radiation transport scenarios for Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plz, Stefan; Laubersheimer, Sven; Eberhardt, Jakob S.; Harrendorf, Marco A.; Keck, Thomas; Benzler, Andreas; Breustedt, Bastian

    2013-08-01

    The basic idea of Voxel2MCNP is to provide a framework supporting users in modeling radiation transport scenarios using voxel phantoms and other geometric models, generating corresponding input for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, and evaluating simulation output. Applications at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are primarily whole and partial body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients. A new generic data model describing data related to radiation transport, including phantom and detector geometries and their properties, sources, tallies and materials, has been developed. It is modular and generally independent of the targeted Monte Carlo code. The data model has been implemented as an XML-based file format to facilitate data exchange, and integrated with Voxel2MCNP to provide a common interface for modeling, visualization, and evaluation of data. Also, extensions to allow compatibility with several file formats, such as ENSDF for nuclear structure properties and radioactive decay data, SimpleGeo for solid geometry modeling, ImageJ for voxel lattices, and MCNPXs MCTAL for simulation results have been added. The framework is presented and discussed in this paper and example workflows for body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients is given to illustrate its application.

  9. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M; Jordan, Meredith J T; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves. PMID:26233114

  10. A Modified Treatment of Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N A; Trahan, T J

    2011-03-22

    We describe a modification of the treatment of photon sources in the IMC algorithm. We describe this modified algorithm in the context of thermal emission in an infinite medium test problem at equilibrium and show that it completely eliminates statistical noise.

  11. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the reaction types as contiguous as possible and removes completed histories from the transport cycle. The sort reduces the amount of divergence in GPU ``thread blocks,'' keeps the SIMD units as full as possible, and eliminates using memory bandwidth to check if a neutron in the batch has been terminated or not. Using a remapping vector means the data access pattern is irregular, but this is mitigated by using large batch sizes where the GPU can effectively eliminate the high cost of irregular global memory access. WARP modifies the standard unionized energy grid implementation to reduce memory traffic. Instead of storing a matrix of pointers indexed by reaction type and energy, WARP stores three matrices. The first contains cross section values, the second contains pointers to angular distributions, and a third contains pointers to energy distributions. This linked list type of layout increases memory usage, but lowers the number of data loads that are needed to determine a reaction by eliminating a pointer load to find a cross section value. Optimized, high-performance GPU code libraries are also used by WARP wherever possible. The CUDA performance primitives (CUDPP) library is used to perform the parallel reductions, sorts and sums, the CURAND library is used to seed the linear congruential random number generators, and the OptiX ray tracing framework is used for geometry representation. OptiX is a highly-optimized library developed by NVIDIA that automatically builds hierarchical acceleration structures around user-input geometry so only surfaces along a ray line need to be queried in ray tracing. WARP also performs material and cell number queries with OptiX by using a point-in-polygon like algorithm. WARP has shown that GPUs are an effective platform for performing Monte Carlo neutron transport with continuous energy cross sections. Currently, WARP is the most detailed and feature-rich program in existence for performing continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP has limited capabilities. Despite WARP's lack of features, its novel algorithm implementations show that high performance can be achieved on a GPU despite the inherently divergent program flow and sparse data access patterns. WARP is not ready for everyday nuclear reactor calculations, but is a good platform for further development of GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo neutron transport. In it's current state, it may be a useful tool for multiplication factor searches, i.e. determining reactivity coefficients by perturbing material densities or temperatures, since these types of calculations typically do not require many flux tallies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Monte Carlo evaluation of the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy in pelvic area.

    PubMed

    Chiavassa, Sophie; Buge, Franois; Herv, Chlo; Delpon, Gregory; Rigaud, Jrome; Lisbona, Albert; Supiot, Sthphane

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) in pelvic area. A GATE Monte Carlo model of the INTRABEAM was adapted for the study. Simulations were performed in the CT scan of a cadaver considering a homogeneous segmentation (water) and an inhomogeneous segmentation (5 tissues from ICRU44). Measurements were performed in the cadaver using EBT3 Gafchromic films. Impact of inhomogeneities on dose calculation in cadaver was 6% for soft tissues and greater than 300% for bone tissues. EBT3 measurements showed a better agreement with calculation for inhomogeneous media. However, dose discrepancy in soft tissues led to a sub-millimeter (0.65?mm) shift in the effective point dose in depth. Except for bone tissues, the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy in pelvic area was not significant for the studied anatomy. PMID:26420445

  13. Tests of the Monte Carlo simulation of the photon-tagger focal-plane electronics at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, M. F.; Myers, L. S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Fissum, K. G.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Jebali, R.; Lundin, M.

    2014-04-01

    Rate-dependent effects in the electronics used to instrument the tagger focal plane at the MAX IV Laboratory were recently investigated using the novel approach of Monte Carlo simulation to allow for normalization of high-rate experimental data acquired with single-hit time-to-digital converters (TDCs). The instrumentation of the tagger focal plane has now been expanded to include multi-hit TDCs. The agreement between results obtained from data taken using single-hit and multi-hit TDCs demonstrate a thorough understanding of the behavior of the detector system.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of the IRSN CANEL/T400 realistic mixed neutron-photon radiation field.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V

    2004-01-01

    The calibration of dosemeters and spectrometers in realistic neutron fields simulating those encountered at workplaces is of high necessity to provide true and reliable dosimetric information to the exposed nuclear workers. The CANEL assembly was set-up at IRSN to produce such neutron fields. It comprises a depleted uranium shell, to produce fission neutrons, then iron and water to moderate them and a polyethylene duct. The new presented CANEL facility is used with 3.3 MeV neutrons. Calculations were performed with the MCNP4C code to characterise this mixed neutron-photon expanded radiation field at the position where calibrations are usually performed. The neutron fluence energy and the direction distributions were calculated and the operational quantities were derived from these distributions. The photon fluence and corresponding ambient dose equivalent were also estimated. Comparison with experimental results showed an overall good agreement. PMID:15353634

  15. Optical photon transport in powdered-phosphor scintillators. Part II. Calculation of single-scattering transport parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.; Evans, Philip M.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods based on the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have previously been used to model light transport in powdered-phosphor scintillator screens. Physically motivated guesses or, alternatively, the complexities of Mie theory have been used by some authors to provide the necessary inputs of transport parameters. The purpose of Part II of this work is to: (i) validate predictions of modulation transform function (MTF) using the BTE and calculated values of transport parameters, against experimental data published for two Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens; (ii) investigate the impact of size-distribution and emission spectrum on Mie predictions of transport parameters; (iii) suggest simpler and novel geometrical optics-based models for these parameters and compare to the predictions of Mie theory. A computer code package called phsphr is made available that allows the MTF predictions for the screens modeled to be reproduced and novel screens to be simulated. Methods: The transport parameters of interest are the scattering efficiency (Q{sub sct}), absorption efficiency (Q{sub abs}), and the scatter anisotropy (g). Calculations of these parameters are made using the analytic method of Mie theory, for spherical grains of radii 0.1-5.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity of the transport parameters to emission wavelength is investigated using an emission spectrum representative of that of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb. The impact of a grain-size distribution in the screen on the parameters is investigated using a Gaussian size-distribution ({sigma}= 1%, 5%, or 10% of mean radius). Two simple and novel alternative models to Mie theory are suggested: a geometrical optics and diffraction model (GODM) and an extension of this (GODM+). Comparisons to measured MTF are made for two commercial screens: Lanex Fast Back and Lanex Fast Front (Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.). Results: The Mie theory predictions of transport parameters were shown to be highly sensitive to both grain size and emission wavelength. For a phosphor screen structure with a distribution in grain sizes and a spectrum of emission, only the average trend of Mie theory is likely to be important. This average behavior is well predicted by the more sophisticated of the geometrical optics models (GODM+) and in approximate agreement for the simplest (GODM). The root-mean-square differences obtained between predicted MTF and experimental measurements, using all three models (GODM, GODM+, Mie), were within 0.03 for both Lanex screens in all cases. This is excellent agreement in view of the uncertainties in screen composition and optical properties. Conclusions: If Mie theory is used for calculating transport parameters for light scattering and absorption in powdered-phosphor screens, care should be taken to average out the fine-structure in the parameter predictions. However, for visible emission wavelengths ({lambda} < 1.0 {mu}m) and grain radii (a > 0.5 {mu}m), geometrical optics models for transport parameters are an alternative to Mie theory. These geometrical optics models are simpler and lead to no substantial loss in accuracy.

  16. SU-E-J-09: A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Relationship Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Dose for Electrons, Protons, and X-Ray Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Zhang, R; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A number of recent studies have proposed that light emitted by the Cherenkov effect may be used for a number of radiation therapy dosimetry applications. Here we investigate the fundamental nature and accuracy of the technique for the first time by using a theoretical and Monte Carlo based analysis. Methods: Using the GEANT4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) and BEAMnrc for phase space file generation, the light yield, material variability, field size and energy dependence, and overall agreement between the Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition for electron, proton, and flattened, unflattened, and parallel opposed x-ray photon beams was explored. Results: Due to the exponential attenuation of x-ray photons, Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition were identical for monoenergetic pencil beams. However, polyenergetic beams exhibited errors with depth due to beam hardening, with the error being inversely related to beam energy. For finite field sizes, the error with depth was inversely proportional to field size, and lateral errors in the umbra were greater for larger field sizes. For opposed beams, the technique was most accurate due to an averaging out of beam hardening in a single beam. The technique was found to be not suitable for measuring electron beams, except for relative dosimetry of a plane at a single depth. Due to a lack of light emission, the technique was found to be unsuitable for proton beams. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that optical dosimetry by the Cherenkov effect may be most applicable to near monoenergetic x-ray photon beams (e.g. Co-60), dynamic IMRT and VMAT plans, as well as narrow beams used for SRT and SRS. For electron beams, the technique would be best suited for superficial dosimetry, and for protons the technique is not applicable due to a lack of light emission. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  17. Dosimetry of interface region near closed air cavities for Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chandra P.; Darko, Johnson; Vidyasagar, P. B.; Schreiner, L. John

    2010-01-01

    Underdosing of treatment targets can occur in radiation therapy due to electronic disequilibrium around air-tissue interfaces when tumors are situated near natural air cavities. These effects have been shown to increase with the beam energy and decrease with the field size. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy techniques employ combinations of multiple small radiation beamlets of varying intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. The use of small beamlets in these techniques may therefore result in underdosing of treatment target in the air-tissue interfaces region surrounding an air cavity. This work was undertaken to investigate dose reductions near the air-water interfaces of 111 and 333 cm3 air cavities, typically encountered in the treatment of head and neck cancer utilizing radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT and tomotherapy using small fields of Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photons. Additional investigations were performed for larger photon field sizes encompassing the entire air-cavity, such as encountered in conventional three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) techniques. The EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose reductions (in water) in air-water interface region for single, parallel opposed and four field irradiations with 22 cm2 (beamlet), 102 cm2 (fan beam), 55 and 77 cm2 field sizes. The magnitude of dose reduction in water near air-water interface increases with photon energy; decreases with distance from the interface as well as decreases as the number of beams are increased. No dose reductions were observed for large field sizes encompassing the air cavities. The results demonstrate that Co-60 beams may provide significantly smaller interface dose reductions than 6 MV and 15 MV irradiations for small field irradiations such as used in IMRT and tomotherapy. PMID:20589116

  18. Dosimetry of interface region near closed air cavities for Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chandra P; Darko, Johnson; Vidyasagar, P B; Schreiner, L John

    2010-04-01

    Underdosing of treatment targets can occur in radiation therapy due to electronic disequilibrium around air-tissue interfaces when tumors are situated near natural air cavities. These effects have been shown to increase with the beam energy and decrease with the field size. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy techniques employ combinations of multiple small radiation beamlets of varying intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. The use of small beamlets in these techniques may therefore result in underdosing of treatment target in the air-tissue interfaces region surrounding an air cavity. This work was undertaken to investigate dose reductions near the air-water interfaces of 1x1x1 and 3x3x3 cm(3) air cavities, typically encountered in the treatment of head and neck cancer utilizing radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT and tomotherapy using small fields of Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photons. Additional investigations were performed for larger photon field sizes encompassing the entire air-cavity, such as encountered in conventional three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) techniques. The EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose reductions (in water) in air-water interface region for single, parallel opposed and four field irradiations with 2x2 cm(2) (beamlet), 10x2 cm(2) (fan beam), 5x5 and 7x7 cm(2) field sizes. The magnitude of dose reduction in water near air-water interface increases with photon energy; decreases with distance from the interface as well as decreases as the number of beams are increased. No dose reductions were observed for large field sizes encompassing the air cavities. The results demonstrate that Co-60 beams may provide significantly smaller interface dose reductions than 6 MV and 15 MV irradiations for small field irradiations such as used in IMRT and tomotherapy. PMID:20589116

  19. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  20. Decoupling initial electron beam parameters for Monte Carlo photon beam modelling by removing beam-modifying filters from the beam path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSmedt, B.; Reynaert, N.; Flachet, F.; Coghe, M.; Thompson, M. G.; Paelinck, L.; Pittomvils, G.; DeWagter, C.; DeNeve, W.; Thierens, H.

    2005-12-01

    A new method is presented to decouple the parameters of the incident e- beam hitting the target of the linear accelerator, which consists essentially in optimizing the agreement between measurements and calculations when the difference filter, which is an additional filter inserted in the linac head to obtain uniform lateral dose-profile curves for the high energy photon beam, and flattening filter are removed from the beam path. This leads to lateral dose-profile curves, which depend only on the mean energy of the incident electron beam, since the effect of the radial intensity distribution of the incident e- beam is negligible when both filters are absent. The location of the primary collimator and the thickness and density of the target are not considered as adjustable parameters, since a satisfactory working Monte Carlo model is obtained for the low energy photon beam (6 MV) of the linac using the same target and primary collimator. This method was applied to conclude that the mean energy of the incident e- beam for the high energy photon beam (18 MV) of our Elekta SLi Plus linac is equal to 14.9 MeV. After optimizing the mean energy, the modelling of the filters, in accordance with the information provided by the manufacturer, can be verified by positioning only one filter in the linac head while the other is removed. It is also demonstrated that the parameter setting for Bremsstrahlung angular sampling in BEAMnrc ('Simple' using the leading term of the Koch and Motz equation or 'KM' using the full equation) leads to different dose-profile curves for the same incident electron energy for the studied 18 MV beam. It is therefore important to perform the calculations in 'KM' mode. Note that both filters are not physically removed from the linac head. All filters remain present in the linac head and are only rotated out of the beam. This makes the described method applicable for practical usage since no recommissioning process is required.

  1. Consistent treatment of transport properties for five-species air direct simulation Monte Carlo/Navier-Stokes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, K. A.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for achieving consistency in the transport properties between direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes (CFD) solvers is presented for five-species air. Coefficients of species diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivities are considered. The transport coefficients that are modeled in CFD solvers are often obtained by expressions involving sets of collision integrals, which are obtained from more realistic intermolecular potentials (i.e., ab initio calculations). In this work, the self-consistent effective binary diffusion and Gupta et al.-Yos tranport models are considered. The DSMC transport coefficients are approximated from Chapman-Enskog theory in which the collision integrals are computed using either the variable hard sphere (VHS) and variable soft sphere (VSS) (phenomenological) collision cross section models. The VHS and VSS parameters are then used to adjust the DSMC transport coefficients in order to achieve a best-fit to the coefficients computed from more realistic intermolecular potentials over a range of temperatures. The best-fit collision model parameters are determined for both collision-averaged and collision-specific pairing approaches using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. A consistent treatment of the diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivities is presented, and recommended sets of best-fit VHS and VSS collision model parameters are provided for a five-species air mixture.

  2. Review of Hybrid (Deterministic/Monte Carlo) Radiation Transport Methods, Codes, and Applications at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C; Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W; Evans, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) radiation transport methods and codes used at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and examples of their application for increasing the efficiency of real-world, fixed-source Monte Carlo analyses. The two principal hybrid methods are (1) Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) for optimization of a localized detector (tally) region (e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a particular location) and (2) Forward Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS) for optimizing distributions (e.g., mesh tallies over all or part of the problem space) or multiple localized detector regions (e.g., simultaneous optimization of two or more localized tally regions). The two methods have been implemented and automated in both the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE 6 and ADVANTG, a code that works with the MCNP code. As implemented, the methods utilize the results of approximate, fast-running 3-D discrete ordinates transport calculations (with the Denovo code) to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source and transport (weight windows) biasing parameters. These methods and codes have been applied to many relevant and challenging problems, including calculations of PWR ex-core thermal detector response, dose rates throughout an entire PWR facility, site boundary dose from arrays of commercial spent fuel storage casks, radiation fields for criticality accident alarm system placement, and detector response for special nuclear material detection scenarios and nuclear well-logging tools. Substantial computational speed-ups, generally O(10{sup 2-4}), have been realized for all applications to date. This paper provides a brief review of the methods, their implementation, results of their application, and current development activities, as well as a considerable list of references for readers seeking more information about the methods and/or their applications.

  3. A Monte Carlo study of electron-hole scattering and steady-state minority-electron transport in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadra, K.; Maziar, C. M.; Streetman, B. G.; Tang, D. S.

    1988-11-01

    We report the first bipolar Monte Carlo calculations of steady-state minority-electron transport in room-temperature p-GaAs including multiband electron-hole scattering with and without hole overlap factors. Our results show how such processes, which make a significant contribution to the minority-electron energy loss rate, can affect steady-state minority-electron transport. Furthermore, we discuss several other issues which we believe should be investigated before present Monte Carlo treatments of electron-hole scattering can provide quantitative information.

  4. From force-fields to photons: MD simulations of dye-labeled nucleic acids and Monte Carlo modeling of FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, Lori

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful technique for understanding the structural fluctuations and transformations of RNA, DNA and proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a window into the nature of these fluctuations on a different, faster, time scale. We use Monte Carlo methods to model and compare FRET data from dye-labeled RNA with what might be predicted from the MD simulation. With a few notable exceptions, the contribution of fluorophore and linker dynamics to these FRET measurements has not been investigated. We include the dynamics of the ground state dyes and linkers in our study of a 16mer double-stranded RNA. Water is included explicitly in the simulation. Cyanine dyes are attached at either the 3' or 5' ends with a 3 carbon linker, and differences in labeling schemes are discussed.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with Peker Milas, Benjamin D. Gamari, and Louis Parrot.

  5. SIMULATION OF ION CONDUCTION IN ?-HEMOLYSIN NANOPORES WITH COVALENTLY ATTACHED ?-CYCLODEXTRIN BASED ON BOLTZMANN TRANSPORT MONTE CARLO MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Toghraee, Reza; Lee, Kyu-Il; Papke, David; Chiu, See-Wing; Jakobsson, Eric; Ravaioli, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    Ion channels, as natures solution to regulating biological environments, are particularly interesting to device engineers seeking to understand how natural molecular systems realize device-like functions, such as stochastic sensing of organic analytes. Whats more, attaching molecular adaptors in desired orientations inside genetically engineered ion channels, enhances the system functionality as a biosensor. In general, a hierarchy of simulation methodologies is needed to study different aspects of a biological system like ion channels. Biology Monte Carlo (BioMOCA), a three-dimensional coarse-grained particle ion channel simulator, offers a powerful and general approach to study ion channel permeation. BioMOCA is based on the Boltzmann Transport Monte Carlo (BTMC) and Particle-Particle-Particle-Mesh (P3M) methodologies developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In this paper, we have employed BioMOCA to study two engineered mutations of ?-HL, namely (M113F)6(M113C-D8RL2)1-?-CD and (M113N)6(T117C-D8RL3)1-?-CD. The channel conductance calculated by BioMOCA is slightly higher than experimental values. Permanent charge distributions and the geometrical shape of the channels gives rise to selectivity towards anions and also an asymmetry in I-V curves, promoting a rectification largely for cations. PMID:20938493

  6. Comparison of dose estimates using the buildup-factor method and a Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with Monte Carlo results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1990-01-01

    Continuing efforts toward validating the buildup factor method and the BRYNTRN code, which use the deterministic approach in solving radiation transport problems and are the candidate engineering tools in space radiation shielding analyses, are presented. A simplified theory of proton buildup factors assuming no neutron coupling is derived to verify a previously chosen form for parameterizing the dose conversion factor that includes the secondary particle buildup effect. Estimates of dose in tissue made by the two deterministic approaches and the Monte Carlo method are intercompared for cases with various thicknesses of shields and various types of proton spectra. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement but with some overestimation by the buildup factor method when the effect of neutron production in the shield is significant. Future improvement to include neutron coupling in the buildup factor theory is suggested to alleviate this shortcoming. Impressive agreement for individual components of doses, such as those from the secondaries and heavy particle recoils, are obtained between BRYNTRN and Monte Carlo results.

  7. Ionization chamber dosimetry of small photon fields: a Monte Carlo study on stopping-power ratios for radiosurgery and IMRT beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F.; Andreo, P.; Capote, R.; Leal, A.; Perucha, M.; Arráns, R.; Núñez, L.; Mainegra, E.; Lagares, J. I.; Carrasco, E.

    2003-07-01

    Absolute dosimetry with ionization chambers of the narrow photon fields used in stereotactic techniques and IMRT beamlets is constrained by lack of electron equilibrium in the radiation field. It is questionable that stopping-power ratio in dosimetry protocols, obtained for broad photon beams and quasi-electron equilibrium conditions, can be used in the dosimetry of narrow fields while keeping the uncertainty at the same level as for the broad beams used in accelerator calibrations. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for two 6 MV clinical accelerators (Elekta SL-18 and Siemens Mevatron Primus), equipped with radiosurgery applicators and MLC. Narrow circular and Z-shaped on-axis and off-axis fields, as well as broad IMRT configured beams, have been simulated together with reference 10 × 10 cm2 beams. Phase-space data have been used to generate 3D dose distributions which have been compared satisfactorily with experimental profiles (ion chamber, diodes and film). Photon and electron spectra at various depths in water have been calculated, followed by Spencer-Attix (Delta = 10 keV) stopping-power ratio calculations which have been compared to those used in the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. For water/air and PMMA/air stopping-power ratios, agreements within 0.1% have been obtained for the 10 × 10 cm2 fields. For radiosurgery applicators and narrow MLC beams, the calculated sw,air values agree with the reference within +/-0.3%, well within the estimated standard uncertainty of the reference stopping-power ratios (0.5%). Ionization chamber dosimetry of narrow beams at the photon qualities used in this work (6 MV) can therefore be based on stopping-power ratios data in dosimetry protocols. For a modulated 6 MV broad beam used in clinical IMRT, sw,air agrees within 0.1% with the value for 10 × 10 cm2, confirming that at low energies IMRT absolute dosimetry can also be based on data for open reference fields. At higher energies (24 MV) the difference in sw,air was up to 1.1%, indicating that the use of protocol data for narrow beams in such cases is less accurate than at low energies, and detailed calculations of the dosimetry parameters involved should be performed if similar accuracy to that of 6 MV is sought.

  8. Mathematical simulations of photon interactions using Monte Carlo analysis to evaluate the uncertainty associated with in vivo K X-ray fluorescence measurements of stable lead in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodwick, Camille J.

    This research utilized Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4C (MCNP4C) to simulate K X-ray fluorescent (K XRF) measurements of stable lead in bone. Simulations were performed to investigate the effects that overlying tissue thickness, bone-calcium content, and shape of the calibration standard have on detector response in XRF measurements at the human tibia. Additional simulations of a knee phantom considered uncertainty associated with rotation about the patella during XRF measurements. Simulations tallied the distribution of energy deposited in a high-purity germanium detector originating from collimated 88 keV 109Cd photons in backscatter geometry. Benchmark measurements were performed on simple and anthropometric XRF calibration phantoms of the human leg and knee developed at the University of Cincinnati with materials proven to exhibit radiological characteristics equivalent to human tissue and bone. Initial benchmark comparisons revealed that MCNP4C limits coherent scatter of photons to six inverse angstroms of momentum transfer and a Modified MCNP4C was developed to circumvent the limitation. Subsequent benchmark measurements demonstrated that Modified MCNP4C adequately models photon interactions associated with in vivo K XRF of lead in bone. Further simulations of a simple leg geometry possessing tissue thicknesses from 0 to 10 mm revealed increasing overlying tissue thickness from 5 to 10 mm reduced predicted lead concentrations an average 1.15% per 1 mm increase in tissue thickness (p < 0.0001). An anthropometric leg phantom was mathematically defined in MCNP to more accurately reflect the human form. A simulated one percent increase in calcium content (by mass) of the anthropometric leg phantom's cortical bone demonstrated to significantly reduce the K XRF normalized ratio by 4.5% (p < 0.0001). Comparison of the simple and anthropometric calibration phantoms also suggested that cylindrical calibration standards can underestimate lead content of a human leg up to 4%. The patellar bone structure in which the fluorescent photons originate was found to vary dramatically with measurement angle. The relative contribution of lead signal from the patella declined from 65% to 27% when rotated 30°. However, rotation of the source-detector about the patella from 0 to 45° demonstrated no significant effect on the net K XRF response at the knee.

  9. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  10. Enhancements to the Combinatorial Geometry Particle Tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo Transport Code: Embedded Meshes and Domain Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Greenman, G M; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Two enhancements to the combinatorial geometry (CG) particle tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo transport code are presented. The first enhancement is a hybrid particle tracker wherein a mesh region is embedded within a CG region. This method permits efficient calculations of problems with contain both large-scale heterogeneous and homogeneous regions. The second enhancement relates to the addition of parallelism within the CG tracker via spatial domain decomposition. This permits calculations of problems with a large degree of geometric complexity, which are not possible through particle parallelism alone. In this method, the cells are decomposed across processors and a particles is communicated to an adjacent processor when it tracks to an interprocessor boundary. Applications that demonstrate the efficacy of these new methods are presented.

  11. An improved empirical approach to introduce quantization effects in the transport direction in multi-subband Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestri, P.; Lucci, L.; Dei Tos, S.; Esseni, D.; Selmi, L.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we propose and validate a simple approach to empirically account for quantum effects in the transport direction of MOS transistors (i.e. source and drain tunneling and delocalized nature of the carrier wavepacket) in multi-subband Monte Carlo simulators, that already account for quantization in the direction normal to the semiconductor-oxide interface by solving the 1D Schrdinger equation in each section of the device. The model has been validated and calibrated against ballistic non-equilibrium Green's function simulations over a wide range of gate lengths, voltage biases and temperatures. The proposed model has just one adjustable parameter and our results show that it can achieve a good agreement with the NEGF approach.

  12. Galerkin-based meshless methods for photon transport in the biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chenghu; Tian, Jie; Yang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yan, Guorui; Feng, Jinchao; Lv, Yujie; Xu, Min

    2008-12-01

    As an important small animal imaging technique, optical imaging has attracted increasing attention in recent years. However, the photon propagation process is extremely complicated for highly scattering property of the biological tissue. Furthermore, the light transport simulation in tissue has a significant influence on inverse source reconstruction. In this contribution, we present two Galerkin-based meshless methods (GBMM) to determine the light exitance on the surface of the diffusive tissue. The two methods are both based on moving least squares (MLS) approximation which requires only a series of nodes in the region of interest, so complicated meshing task can be avoided compared with the finite element method (FEM). Moreover, MLS shape functions are further modified to satisfy the delta function property in one method, which can simplify the processing of boundary conditions in comparison with the other. Finally, the performance of the proposed methods is demonstrated with numerical and physical phantom experiments. PMID:19065170

  13. Correlated Cooper pair transport and microwave photon emission in the dynamical Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppäkangas, Juha; Fogelström, Mikael; Marthaler, Michael; Johansson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically electromagnetic radiation emitted by inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling. We consider a dc-voltage-biased superconducting transmission line terminated by a Josephson junction. We show that the generated continuous-mode electromagnetic field can be expressed as a function of the time-dependent current across the Josephson junction. The leading-order expansion in the tunneling coupling, similar to the P (E ) theory, has previously been used to investigate the photon emission statistics in the limit of sequential (independent) Cooper-pair tunneling. By explicitly evaluating the system characteristics up to the fourth order in the tunneling coupling, we account for dynamics between consecutively tunneling Cooper pairs. Within this approach we investigate how temporal correlations in the charge transport can be seen in the first- and second-order coherences of the emitted microwave radiation.

  14. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  15. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Li, Bei-Bei; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-07-01

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1152261 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal’s azimuthal position.

  16. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongchun; Xiao Yunfeng; Li Beibei; Jiang Xuefeng; Li Yan; Gong Qihuang

    2011-07-15

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan et al. [Science 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal's azimuthal position.

  17. Radial quasiballistic transport in time-domain thermoreflectance studied using Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, D.; Chen, X.; Minnich, A. J.

    2014-04-07

    Recently, a pump beam size dependence of thermal conductivity was observed in Si at cryogenic temperatures using time-domain thermal reflectance (TDTR). These observations were attributed to quasiballistic phonon transport, but the interpretation of the measurements has been semi-empirical. Here, we present a numerical study of the heat conduction that occurs in the full 3D geometry of a TDTR experiment, including an interface, using the Boltzmann transport equation. We identify the radial suppression function that describes the suppression in heat flux, compared to Fourier's law, that occurs due to quasiballistic transport and demonstrate good agreement with experimental data. We also discuss unresolved discrepancies that are important topics for future study.

  18. Radial quasiballistic transport in time-domain thermoreflectance studied using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Chen, X.; Minnich, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    Recently, a pump beam size dependence of thermal conductivity was observed in Si at cryogenic temperatures using time-domain thermal reflectance (TDTR). These observations were attributed to quasiballistic phonon transport, but the interpretation of the measurements has been semi-empirical. Here, we present a numerical study of the heat conduction that occurs in the full 3D geometry of a TDTR experiment, including an interface, using the Boltzmann transport equation. We identify the radial suppression function that describes the suppression in heat flux, compared to Fourier's law, that occurs due to quasiballistic transport and demonstrate good agreement with experimental data. We also discuss unresolved discrepancies that are important topics for future study.

  19. Neutron secondary-particle production cross sections and their incorporation into Monte-Carlo transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, D.J.; Prael, R.E.; Little, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Realistic simulations of the passage of fast neutrons through tissue require a large quantity of cross-sectional data. What are needed are differential (in particle type, energy and angle) cross sections. A computer code is described which produces such spectra for neutrons above approx.14 MeV incident on light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen. Comparisons have been made with experimental measurements of double-differential secondary charged-particle production on carbon and oxygen at energies from 27 to 60 MeV; they indicate that the model is adequate in this energy range. In order to utilize fully the results of these calculations, they should be incorporated into a neutron transport code. This requires defining a generalized format for describing charged-particle production, putting the calculated results in this format, interfacing the neutron transport code with these data, and charged-particle transport. The design and development of such a program is described. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  20. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  1. On the dosimetric behaviour of photon dose calculation algorithms in the presence of simple geometric heterogeneities: comparison with Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio; Albers, Dirk; Brink, Carsten; Clivio, Alessandro; Kns, Tommy; Nicolini, Giorgia; Cozzi, Luca

    2007-03-01

    A comparative study was performed to reveal differences and relative figures of merit of seven different calculation algorithms for photon beams when applied to inhomogeneous media. The following algorithms were investigated: Varian Eclipse: the anisotropic analytical algorithm, and the pencil beam with modified Batho correction; Nucletron Helax-TMS: the collapsed cone and the pencil beam with equivalent path length correction; CMS XiO: the multigrid superposition and the fast Fourier transform convolution; Philips Pinnacle: the collapsed cone. Monte Carlo simulations (MC) performed with the EGSnrc codes BEAMnrc and DOSxyznrc from NRCC in Ottawa were used as a benchmark. The study was carried out in simple geometrical water phantoms (? = 1.00 g cm-3) with inserts of different densities simulating light lung tissue (? = 0.035 g cm-3), normal lung (? = 0.20 g cm-3) and cortical bone tissue (? = 1.80 g cm-3). Experiments were performed for low- and high-energy photon beams (6 and 15 MV) and for square (13 13 cm2) and elongated rectangular (2.8 13 cm2) fields. Analysis was carried out on the basis of depth dose curves and transverse profiles at several depths. Assuming the MC data as reference, ? index analysis was carried out distinguishing between regions inside the non-water inserts or inside the uniform water. For this study, a distance to agreement was set to 3 mm while the dose difference varied from 2% to 10%. In general all algorithms based on pencil-beam convolutions showed a systematic deficiency in managing the presence of heterogeneous media. In contrast, complicated patterns were observed for the advanced algorithms with significant discrepancies observed between algorithms in the lighter materials (? = 0.035 g cm-3), enhanced for the most energetic beam. For denser, and more clinical, densities a better agreement among the sophisticated algorithms with respect to MC was observed.

  2. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-02: Estimation of the Dosimetric Error Caused by the Voxelization of Hybrid Computational Phantoms Using Triangle Mesh-Based Monte Carlo Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Badal, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Computational voxel phantom provides realistic anatomy but the voxel structure may result in dosimetric error compared to real anatomy composed of perfect surface. We analyzed the dosimetric error caused from the voxel structure in hybrid computational phantoms by comparing the voxel-based doses at different resolutions with triangle mesh-based doses. Methods: We incorporated the existing adult male UF/NCI hybrid phantom in mesh format into a Monte Carlo transport code, penMesh that supports triangle meshes. We calculated energy deposition to selected organs of interest for parallel photon beams with three mono energies (0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) in antero-posterior geometry. We also calculated organ energy deposition using three voxel phantoms with different voxel resolutions (1, 5, and 10 mm) using MCNPX2.7. Results: Comparison of organ energy deposition between the two methods showed that agreement overall improved for higher voxel resolution, but for many organs the differences were small. Difference in the energy deposition for 1 MeV, for example, decreased from 11.5% to 1.7% in muscle but only from 0.6% to 0.3% in liver as voxel resolution increased from 10 mm to 1 mm. The differences were smaller at higher energies. The number of photon histories processed per second in voxels were 6.4×10{sup 4}, 3.3×10{sup 4}, and 1.3×10{sup 4}, for 10, 5, and 1 mm resolutions at 10 MeV, respectively, while meshes ran at 4.0×10{sup 4} histories/sec. Conclusion: The combination of hybrid mesh phantom and penMesh was proved to be accurate and of similar speed compared to the voxel phantom and MCNPX. The lowest voxel resolution caused a maximum dosimetric error of 12.6% at 0.1 MeV and 6.8% at 10 MeV but the error was insignificant in some organs. We will apply the tool to calculate dose to very thin layer tissues (e.g., radiosensitive layer in gastro intestines) which cannot be modeled by voxel phantoms.

  3. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Bacterial Transport in a Heterogeneous Aquifer With Correlated Hydrologic and Reactive Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.

    2003-12-01

    It has been widely observed in field experiments that the apparent rate of bacterial attachment, particularly as parameterized by the collision efficiency in filtration-based models, decreases with transport distance (i.e., exhibits scale-dependency). This effect has previously been attributed to microbial heterogeneity; that is, variability in cell-surface properties within a single monoclonal population. We demonstrate that this effect could also be interpreted as a field-scale manifestation of local-scale correlation between physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity variability) and reaction heterogeneity (attachment rate coefficient variability). A field-scale model of bacterial transport developed for the South Oyster field research site located near Oyster, Virginia, and observations from field experiments performed at that site, are used as the basis for this study. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of bacterial transport were performed under four alternative scenarios: 1) homogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) and attachment rate coefficient (Kf), 2) heterogeneous K, homogeneous Kf, 3) heterogeneous K and Kf with local correlation based on empirical and theoretical relationships, and 4) heterogeneous K and Kf without local correlation. The results of the 3D simulations were analyzed using 1D model approximations following conventional methods of field data analysis. An apparent decrease with transport distance of effective collision efficiency was observed only in the case where the local properties were both heterogeneous and correlated. This effect was observed despite the fact that the local collision efficiency was specified as a constant in the 3D model, and can therefore be interpreted as a scale effect associated with the local correlated heterogeneity as manifested at the field scale.

  4. The TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron/photon transport code (TORT version 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Simpson, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    TORT calculates the flux or fluence of neutrons and/or photons throughout three-dimensional systems due to particles incident upon the system`s external boundaries, due to fixed internal sources, or due to sources generated by interaction with the system materials. The transport process is represented by the Boltzman transport equation. The method of discrete ordinates is used to treat the directional variable, and a multigroup formulation treats the energy dependence. Anisotropic scattering is treated using a Legendre expansion. Various methods are used to treat spatial dependence, including nodal and characteristic procedures that have been especially adapted to resist numerical distortion. A method of body overlay assists in material zone specification, or the specification can be generated by an external code supplied by the user. Several special features are designed to concentrate machine resources where they are most needed. The directional quadrature and Legendre expansion can vary with energy group. A discontinuous mesh capability has been shown to reduce the size of large problems by a factor of roughly three in some cases. The emphasis in this code is a robust, adaptable application of time-tested methods, together with a few well-tested extensions.

  5. Voxel2MCNP: software for handling voxel models for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Hegenbart, Lars; Plz, Stefan; Benzler, Andreas; Urban, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    Voxel2MCNP is a program that sets up radiation protection scenarios with voxel models and generates corresponding input files for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Its technology is based on object-oriented programming, and the development is platform-independent. It has a user-friendly graphical interface including a two- and three-dimensional viewer. A row of equipment models is implemented in the program. Various voxel model file formats are supported. Applications include calculation of counting efficiency of in vivo measurement scenarios and calculation of dose coefficients for internal and external radiation scenarios. Moreover, anthropometric parameters of voxel models, for instance chest wall thickness, can be determined. Voxel2MCNP offers several methods for voxel model manipulations including image registration techniques. The authors demonstrate the validity of the program results and provide references for previous successful implementations. The authors illustrate the reliability of calculated dose conversion factors and specific absorbed fractions. Voxel2MCNP is used on a regular basis to generate virtual radiation protection scenarios at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology while further improvements and developments are ongoing. PMID:22217596

  6. Monte Carlo study of alpha (?) particles transport in nanoscale gallium arsenide semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Haider F. Abdul; Chee, Fuei Pien

    2012-09-01

    Space and ground level electronic equipment with semiconductor devices are always subjected to the deleterious effects by radiation. The study of ion-solid interaction can show the radiation effects of scattering and stopping of high speed atomic particles when passing through matter. This study had been of theoretical interest and of practical important in these recent years, driven by the need to control material properties at nanoscale. This paper is attempted to present the calculations of final 3D distribution of the ions and all kinetic phenomena associated with the ion's energy loss: target damage, sputtering, ionization, and phonon production of alpha (?) particle in Gallium Arsenide(GaAs) material. This calculation is being simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation, SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter). The comparison of radiation tolerance between the conventional scale and nanoscale GaAs layer will be discussed as well. From the findings, it is observed that most of the damage formed in the GaAs layer induced by the production of lattice defects in the form of vacancies, defect clusters and dislocations. However, when the GaAs layer is scaled down (nanoscaling), it is found that the GaAs layer can withstand higher radiation energy, in term of displacement damage.

  7. High-resolution monte carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 1. Methodology and flow results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the first of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, Various aspects of the modelling effort are examined. In particular, the need to save on core memory causes one to use only specific realizations that have certain initial characteristics; in effect, these transport simulations are conditioned by these characteristics. Also, the need to independently estimate length Scales for the generated fields is discussed. The statistical uniformity of the flow field is investigated by plotting the variance of the seepage velocity for vector components in the x, y, and z directions. Finally, specific features of the velocity field itself are illuminated in this first paper. In particular, these data give one the opportunity to investigate the effective hydraulic conductivity in a flow field which is approximately statistically uniform; comparisons are made with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. The mean cloud velocity is examined to ascertain whether it is identical to the mean seepage velocity of the model. Finally, the variance in the cloud centroid velocity is examined for the effect of source size and differing strengths of local transverse dispersion.

  8. Measurements of photon and neutron leakage from medical linear accelerators and Monte Carlo simulation of tenth value layers of concrete used for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaradat, Adnan Khalaf

    The x ray leakage from the housing of a therapy x ray source is regulated to be <0.1% of the useful beam exposure at a distance of 1 m from the source. The x ray leakage in the backward direction has been measured from linacs operating at 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV using a 100 cm3 ionization chamber and track-etch detectors. The leakage was measured at nine different positions over the rear wall using a 3 x 3 matrix with a 1 m separation between adjacent positions. In general, the leakage was less than the canonical value, but the exact value depends on energy, gantry angle, and measurement position. Leakage at 10 MV for some positions exceeded 0.1%. Electrons with energy greater than about 9 MeV have the ability to produce neutrons. Neutron leakage has been measured around the head of electron accelerators at a distance 1 m from the target at 0, 46, 90, 135, and 180 azimuthal angles; for electron energies of 9, 12, 15, 16, 18, and 20 MeV and 10, 15, and 18 MV x ray photon beam, using a neutron bubble detector of type BD-PND and using Track-Etch detectors. The highest neutron dose equivalent per unit electron dose was at 0 for all electron energies. The neutron leakage from photon beams was the highest between all the machines. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery consists of a summation of small beamlets having different weights that make up each field. A linear accelerator room designed exclusively for IMRT use would require different, probably lower, tenth value layers (TVL) for determining the required wall thicknesses for the primary barriers. The first, second, and third TVL of 60Co gamma rays and photons from 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x ray beams by concrete have been determined and modeled using a Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for cone beams of half-opening angles of 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 14.

  9. Assessment of uncertainties in the lung activity measurement of low-energy photon emitters using Monte Carlo simulation of ICRP male thorax voxel phantom.

    PubMed

    Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Rao, D D; Kulkarni, M S; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of intake due to long-lived actinides by inhalation pathway is carried out by lung monitoring of the radiation workers inside totally shielded steel room using sensitive detection systems such as Phoswich and an array of HPGe detectors. In this paper, uncertainties in the lung activity estimation due to positional errors, chest wall thickness (CWT) and detector background variation are evaluated. First, calibration factors (CFs) of Phoswich and an array of three HPGe detectors are estimated by incorporating ICRP male thorax voxel phantom and detectors in Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA'. CFs are estimated for the uniform source distribution in lungs of the phantom for various photon energies. The variation in the CFs for positional errors of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm in horizontal and vertical direction along the chest are studied. The positional errors are also evaluated by resizing the voxel phantom. Combined uncertainties are estimated at different energies using the uncertainties due to CWT, detector positioning, detector background variation of an uncontaminated adult person and counting statistics in the form of scattering factors (SFs). SFs are found to decrease with increase in energy. With HPGe array, highest SF of 1.84 is found at 18 keV. It reduces to 1.36 at 238 keV. PMID:25468992

  10. Monte carlo study of the effect of collimator thickness on T-99m source response in single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Zakavi, Seyyed Rasoul; Sadeghi, Ramin; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-05-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the collimator is a crucial element of the imaging chain and controls the noise resolution tradeoff of the collected data. The current study is an evaluation of the effects of different thicknesses of a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator on tomographic spatial resolution in SPECT. In the present study, the SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to simulate a SPECT equipped with an LEHR collimator. A point source of (99m)Tc and an acrylic cylindrical Jaszczak phantom, with cold spheres and rods, and a human anthropomorphic torso phantom (4D-NCAT phantom) were used. Simulated planar images and reconstructed tomographic images were evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. According to the tabulated calculated detector parameters, contribution of Compton scattering, photoelectric reactions, and also peak to Compton (P/C) area in the obtained energy spectrums (from scanning of the sources with 11 collimator thicknesses, ranging from 2.400 to 2.410 cm), we concluded the thickness of 2.405 cm as the proper LEHR parallel hole collimator thickness. The image quality analyses by structural similarity index (SSIM) algorithm and also by visual inspection showed suitable quality images obtained with a collimator thickness of 2.405 cm. There was a suitable quality and also performance parameters' analysis results for the projections and reconstructed images prepared with a 2.405 cm LEHR collimator thickness compared with the other collimator thicknesses. PMID:23372440

  11. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  12. A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATION TRANSPORT AROUND KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  13. Transport map-accelerated Markov chain Monte Carlo for Bayesian parameter inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, Y.; Parno, M.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a new framework for efficient posterior sampling in Bayesian inference, using a combination of optimal transport maps and the Metropolis-Hastings rule. The core idea is to use transport maps to transform typical Metropolis proposal mechanisms (e.g., random walks, Langevin methods, Hessian-preconditioned Langevin methods) into non-Gaussian proposal distributions that can more effectively explore the target density. Our approach adaptively constructs a lower triangular transport map—i.e., a Knothe-Rosenblatt re-arrangement—using information from previous MCMC states, via the solution of an optimization problem. Crucially, this optimization problem is convex regardless of the form of the target distribution. It is solved efficiently using Newton or quasi-Newton methods, but the formulation is such that these methods require no derivative information from the target probability distribution; the target distribution is instead represented via samples. Sequential updates using the alternating direction method of multipliers enable efficient and parallelizable adaptation of the map even for large numbers of samples. We show that this approach uses inexact or truncated maps to produce an adaptive MCMC algorithm that is ergodic for the exact target distribution. Numerical demonstrations on a range of parameter inference problems involving both ordinary and partial differential equations show multiple order-of-magnitude speedups over standard MCMC techniques, measured by the number of effectively independent samples produced per model evaluation and per unit of wallclock time.

  14. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  15. Numerical modeling of photon migration in the cerebral cortex of the living rat using the radiative transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Nadamoto, Ken; Okada, Eiji; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko; Watanabe, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling and efficient calculation of photon migration in biological tissues is requested for determination of the optical properties of living tissues by in vivo experiments. This study develops a calculation scheme of photon migration for determination of the optical properties of the rat cerebral cortex (ca 0.2 cm thick) based on the three-dimensional time-dependent radiative transport equation assuming a homogeneous object. It is shown that the time-resolved profiles calculated by the developed scheme agree with the profiles measured by in vivo experiments using near infrared light. Also, an efficient calculation method is tested using the delta-Eddington approximation of the scattering phase function.

  16. Controlling resonant photonic transport along optical waveguides by two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Conghua; Wei Lianfu; Jia Wenzhi; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2011-10-15

    Recent works [Shen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 213001 (2005); Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 100501 (2008)] showed that the incident photons cannot transmit along an optical waveguide containing a resonant two-level atom (TLA). Here we propose an approach to overcome such a difficulty by using asymmetric couplings between the photons and a TLA. Our numerical results show that the transmission spectrum of the photon depends on both the frequency of the incident photons and the photon-TLA couplings. Consequently, this system can serve as a controllable photon attenuator, by which the transmission probability of the resonantly incident photons can be changed from 0% to 100%. A possible application to explain the recent experimental observations [Astafiev et al., Science 327, 840 (2010)] is also discussed.

  17. Monte Carlo portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, P.W. . E-mail: mary.chin@physics.org

    2005-10-15

    This project developed a solution for verifying external photon beam radiotherapy. The solution is based on a calibration chain for deriving portal dose maps from acquired portal images, and a calculation framework for predicting portal dose maps. Quantitative comparison between acquired and predicted portal dose maps accomplishes both geometric (patient positioning with respect to the beam) and dosimetric (two-dimensional fluence distribution of the beam) verifications. A disagreement would indicate that beam delivery had not been according to plan. The solution addresses the clinical need for verifying radiotherapy both pretreatment (without the patient in the beam) and on treatment (with the patient in the beam). Medical linear accelerators mounted with electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were used to acquire portal images. Two types of EPIDs were investigated: the amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the scanning liquid ion chamber (SLIC). The EGSnrc family of Monte Carlo codes were used to predict portal dose maps by computer simulation of radiation transport in the beam-phantom-EPID configuration. Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented on several levels of high throughput computing (HTC), including the grid, to reduce computation time. The solution has been tested across the entire clinical range of gantry angle, beam size (5 cmx5 cm to 20 cmx20 cm), and beam-patient and patient-EPID separations (4 to 38 cm). In these tests of known beam-phantom-EPID configurations, agreement between acquired and predicted portal dose profiles was consistently within 2% of the central axis value. This Monte Carlo portal dosimetry solution therefore achieved combined versatility, accuracy, and speed not readily achievable by other techniques.

  18. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Webb, R Chad; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or 'epidermal', photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively. PMID:25234839

  19. Design studies of volume-pumped photolytic systems using a photon transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelas, M. A.; Jones, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of volume sources, such as nuclear pumping, presents some unique features in the design of photolytically driven systems (e.g., lasers). In systems such as these, for example, a large power deposition is not necessary. However, certain restrictions, such as self-absorption, limit the ability of photolytically driven systems to scale by volume. A photon transport computer program was developed at the University of Missouri-Columbia to study these limitations. The development of this code is important, perhaps necessary, for the design of photolytically driven systems. With the aid of this code, a photolytically driven iodine laser was designed for utilization with a 3He nuclear-pumped system with a TRIGA reactor as the neutron source. Calculations predict a peak power output of 0.37 kW. Using the same design, it is also anticipated that the system can achieve a 14-kW output using a fast burst-type reactor neutron source, and a 0.65-kW peak output using 0.1 Torr of the alpha emitter radon-220 as part of the fill. The latter would represent a truly portable laser system.

  20. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Chad Webb, R.; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or ‘epidermal’, photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  1. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  2. Monte Carlo investigation of the increased radiation deposition due to gold nanoparticles using kilovoltage and megavoltage photons in a 3D randomized cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Investigation of increased radiation dose deposition due to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using a 3D computational cell model during x-ray radiotherapy.Methods: Two GNP simulation scenarios were set up in Geant4; a single 400 nm diameter gold cluster randomly positioned in the cytoplasm and a 300 nm gold layer around the nucleus of the cell. Using an 80 kVp photon beam, the effect of GNP on the dose deposition in five modeled regions of the cell including cytoplasm, membrane, and nucleus was simulated. Two Geant4 physics lists were tested: the default Livermore and custom built Livermore/DNA hybrid physics list. 10{sup 6} particles were simulated at 840 cells in the simulation. Each cell was randomly placed with random orientation and a diameter varying between 9 and 13 {mu}m. A mathematical algorithm was used to ensure that none of the 840 cells overlapped. The energy dependence of the GNP physical dose enhancement effect was calculated by simulating the dose deposition in the cells with two energy spectra of 80 kVp and 6 MV. The contribution from Auger electrons was investigated by comparing the two GNP simulation scenarios while activating and deactivating atomic de-excitation processes in Geant4.Results: The physical dose enhancement ratio (DER) of GNP was calculated using the Monte Carlo model. The model has demonstrated that the DER depends on the amount of gold and the position of the gold cluster within the cell. Individual cell regions experienced statistically significant (p < 0.05) change in absorbed dose (DER between 1 and 10) depending on the type of gold geometry used. The DER resulting from gold clusters attached to the cell nucleus had the more significant effect of the two cases (DER {approx} 55). The DER value calculated at 6 MV was shown to be at least an order of magnitude smaller than the DER values calculated for the 80 kVp spectrum. Based on simulations, when 80 kVp photons are used, Auger electrons have a statistically insignificant (p < 0.05) effect on the overall dose increase in the cell. The low energy of the Auger electrons produced prevents them from propagating more than 250-500 nm from the gold cluster and, therefore, has a negligible effect on the overall dose increase due to GNP.Conclusions: The results presented in the current work show that the primary dose enhancement is due to the production of additional photoelectrons.

  3. Elucidating the electron transport in semiconductors via Monte Carlo simulations: an inquiry-driven learning path for engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Within the context of higher education for science or engineering undergraduates, we present an inquiry-driven learning path aimed at developing a more meaningful conceptual understanding of the electron dynamics in semiconductors in the presence of applied electric fields. The electron transport in a nondegenerate n-type indium phosphide bulk semiconductor is modelled using a multivalley Monte Carlo approach. The main characteristics of the electron dynamics are explored under different values of the driving electric field, lattice temperature and impurity density. Simulation results are presented by following a question-driven path of exploration, starting from the validation of the model and moving up to reasoned inquiries about the observed characteristics of electron dynamics. Our inquiry-driven learning path, based on numerical simulations, represents a viable example of how to integrate a traditional lecture-based teaching approach with effective learning strategies, providing science or engineering undergraduates with practical opportunities to enhance their comprehension of the physics governing the electron dynamics in semiconductors. Finally, we present a general discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of using an inquiry-based teaching approach within a learning environment based on semiconductor simulations.

  4. An investigation of the depth dose in the build-up region, and surface dose for a 6-MV therapeutic photon beam: Monte Carlo simulation and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-01-01

    The percentage depth dose in the build-up region and the surface dose for the 6-MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was investigated for square field sizes of 5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15 and 20 × 20 cm2using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package. The depth dose was found to change rapidly in the build-up region, and the percentage surface dose increased proportionally with the field size from approximately 10% to 30%. The measurements were also taken using four common detectors: TLD chips, PFD dosimeter, parallel-plate and cylindrical ionization chamber, and compared with MC simulated data, which served as the gold standard in our study. The surface doses obtained from each detector were derived from the extrapolation of the measured depth doses near the surface and were all found to be higher than that of the MC simulation. The lowest and highest over-responses in the surface dose measurement were found with the TLD chip and the CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber, respectively. Increasing the field size increased the percentage surface dose almost linearly in the various dosimeters and also in the MC simulation. Interestingly, the use of the CC13 ionization chamber eliminates the high gradient feature of the depth dose near the surface. The correction factors for the measured surface dose from each dosimeter for square field sizes of between 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 cm2are introduced. PMID:23104898

  5. A feasibility study to calculate unshielded fetal doses to pregnant patients in 6-MV photon treatments using Monte Carlo methods and anatomically realistic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2008-07-15

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetus and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.

  6. Study of water transport phenomena on cathode of PEMFCs using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontrapa, Karn

    This dissertation deals with the development of a three-dimensional computational model of water transport phenomena in the cathode catalyst layer (CCL) of PEMFCs. The catalyst layer in the numerical simulation was developed using the optimized sphere packing algorithm. The optimization technique named the adaptive random search technique (ARSET) was employed in this packing algorithm. The ARSET algorithm will generate the initial location of spheres and allow them to move in the random direction with the variable moving distance, randomly selected from the sampling range, based on the Lennard-jones potential of the current and new configuration. The solid fraction values obtained from this developed algorithm are in the range of 0.631 to 0.6384 while the actual processing time can significantly be reduced by 8% to 36% based on the number of spheres. The initial random number sampling range was investigated and the appropriate sampling range value is equal to 0.5. This numerically developed cathode catalyst layer has been used to simulate the diffusion processes of protons, in the form of hydronium, and oxygen molecules through the cathode catalyst layer. The movements of hydroniums and oxygen molecules are controlled by the random vectors and all of these moves has to obey the Lennard-Jones potential energy constrain. Chemical reaction between these two species will happen when they share the same neighborhood and result in the creation of water molecules. Like hydroniums and oxygen molecules, these newly-formed water molecules also diffuse through the cathode catalyst layer. It is important to investigate and study the distribution of hydronium oxygen molecule and water molecules during the diffusion process in order to understand the lifetime of the cathode catalyst layer. The effect of fuel flow rate on the water distribution has also been studied by varying the hydronium and oxygen molecule input. Based on the results of these simulations, the hydronium: oxygen input ratio of 3:2 has been found to be the best choice for this study. To study the effect of metal impurity and gas contamination on the cathode catalyst layer, the cathode catalyst layer structure is modified by adding the metal impurities and the gas contamination is introduced with the oxygen input. In this study, gas contamination has very little effect on the electrochemical reaction inside the cathode catalyst layer because this simulation is transient in nature and the percentage of the gas contamination is small, in the range of 0.0005% to 0.0015% for CO and 0.028% to 0.04% for CO2 . Metal impurities seem to have more effect on the performance of PEMFC because they not only change the structure of the developed cathode catalyst layer but also affect the movement of fuel and water product. Aluminum has the worst effect on the cathode catalyst layer structure because it yields the lowest amount of newly form water and the largest amount of trapped water product compared to iron of the same impurity percentage. For the iron impurity, it shows some positive effect on the life time of the cathode catalyst layer. At the 0.75 wt% of iron impurity, the amount of newly formed water is 6.59% lower than the pure carbon catalyst layer case but the amount of trapped water product is 11.64% lower than the pure catalyst layer. The lifetime of the impure cathode catalyst layer is longer than the pure one because the amount of water that is still trapped inside the pure cathode catalyst layer is higher than that of the impure one. Even though the impure cathode catalyst layer has a longer lifetime, it sacrifices the electrical power output because the electrochemical reaction occurrence inside the impure catalyst layer is lower.

  7. Overview of the MCU Monte Carlo Software Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, M. A.; Oleynik, D. S.; Shkarovsky, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    MCU (Monte Carlo Universal) is a project on development and practical use of a universal computer code for simulation of particle transport (neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons) in three-dimensional systems by means of the Monte Carlo method. This paper provides the information on the current state of the project. The developed libraries of constants are briefly described, and the potentialities of the MCU-5 package modules and the executable codes compiled from them are characterized. Examples of important problems of reactor physics solved with the code are presented.

  8. Vectorizing and macrotasking Monte Carlo neutral particle algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Heifetz, D.B.

    1987-04-01

    Monte Carlo algorithms for computing neutral particle transport in plasmas have been vectorized and macrotasked. The techniques used are directly applicable to Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and photon transport, and Monte Carlo integration schemes in general. A highly vectorized code was achieved by calculating test flight trajectories in loops over arrays of flight data, isolating the conditional branches to as few a number of loops as possible. A number of solutions are discussed to the problem of gaps appearing in the arrays due to completed flights, which impede vectorization. A simple and effective implementation of macrotasking is achieved by dividing the calculation of the test flight profile among several processors. A tree of random numbers is used to ensure reproducible results. The additional memory required for each task may preclude using a larger number of tasks. In future machines, the limit of macrotasking may be possible, with each test flight, and split test flight, being a separate task.

  9. Monte-Carlo simulation for an aerogel Cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, R.; Watanabe, M.; Enomoto, R.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Hattori, H.; Kuniya, T.; Ooba, T.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    1998-02-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo simulation code for an aerogel Cherenkov counter which is operated under a strong magnetic field such as 1.5T. This code consists of two parts: photon transportation inside aerogel tiles, and one-dimensional amplification in a fine-mesh photomultiplier tube. It simulates the output photo-electron yields as accurately as 5% with only a single free parameter. This code is applied to simulations for a B-factory particle identification system.

  10. The All Particle Monte Carlo method: Atomic data files

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J.A.; Cullen, D.E.; Perkins, S.T.

    1990-11-06

    Development of the All Particle Method, a project to simulate the transport of particles via the Monte Carlo method, has proceeded on two fronts: data collection and algorithm development. In this paper we report on the status of the data libraries. The data collection is nearly complete with the addition of electron, photon, and atomic data libraries to the existing neutron, gamma ray, and charged particle libraries. The contents of these libraries are summarized.

  11. A Monte Carlo neutron transport code for eigenvalue calculations on a dual-GPU system and CUDA environment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Ding, A.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.; Carothers, C. D.; Brown, F. B.

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is able to accurately calculate eigenvalues in reactor analysis. Its lengthy computation time can be reduced by general-purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), one of the latest parallel computing techniques under development. The method of porting a regular transport code to GPU is usually very straightforward due to the 'embarrassingly parallel' nature of MC code. However, the situation becomes different for eigenvalue calculation in that it will be performed on a generation-by-generation basis and the thread coordination should be explicitly taken care of. This paper presents our effort to develop such a GPU-based MC code in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) environment. The code is able to perform eigenvalue calculation under simple geometries on a multi-GPU system. The specifics of algorithm design, including thread organization and memory management were described in detail. The original CPU version of the code was tested on an Intel Xeon X5660 2.8 GHz CPU, and the adapted GPU version was tested on NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Double-precision floating point format was used throughout the calculation. The result showed that a speedup of 7.0 and 33.3 were obtained for a bare spherical core and a binary slab system respectively. The speedup factor was further increased by a factor of {approx}2 on a dual GPU system. The upper limit of device-level parallelism was analyzed, and a possible method to enhance the thread-level parallelism was proposed. (authors)

  12. Assessment of Parametric Uncertainty using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods for Surface Complexation Models in Groundwater Reactive Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. L.; Lu, D.; Ye, M.; Curtis, G. P.; Mendes, B. S.; Draper, D.

    2010-12-01

    Parametric uncertainty in groundwater modeling is commonly assessed using the first-order-second-moment method, which yields the linear confidence/prediction intervals. More advanced techniques are able to produce the nonlinear confidence/prediction intervals that are more accurate than the linear intervals for nonlinear models. However, both the methods are restricted to certain assumptions such as normality in model parameters. We developed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to directly investigate the parametric distributions and confidence/prediction intervals. The MCMC results are used to evaluate accuracy of the linear and nonlinear confidence/prediction intervals. The MCMC method is applied to nonlinear surface complexation models developed by Kohler et al. (1996) to simulate reactive transport of uranium (VI). The breakthrough data of Kohler et al. (1996) obtained from a series of column experiments are used as the basis of the investigation. The calibrated parameters of the models are the equilibrium constants of the surface complexation reactions and fractions of functional groups. The Morris method sensitivity analysis shows that all of the parameters exhibit highly nonlinear effects on the simulation. The MCMC method is combined with traditional optimization method to improve computational efficiency. The parameters of the surface complexation models are first calibrated using a global optimization technique, multi-start quasi-Newton BFGS, which employs an approximation to the Hessian. The parameter correlation is measured by the covariance matrix computed via the Fisher information matrix. Parameter ranges are necessary to improve convergence of the MCMC simulation, even when the adaptive Metropolis method is used. The MCMC results indicate that the parameters do not necessarily follow a normal distribution and that the nonlinear intervals are more accurate than the linear intervals for the nonlinear surface complexation models. In comparison with the linear and nonlinear prediction intervals, the prediction intervals of MCMC are more robust to simulate the breakthrough curves that are not used for the parameter calibration and estimation of parameter distributions.

  13. Time-correlated photon-counting probe of singlet excitation transport and restricted rotation in Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Anfinrud, P.A.; Hart, D.E.; Struve, W.S.

    1988-07-14

    Fluorescence depolarization was monitored by time-correlated single-photon counting in organized monolayers of octadecylrhodamine B (ODRB) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOL) at air-water interfaces. At low ORDB density, the depolarization was dominated by restricted rotational diffusion. Increases in surface pressure reduced both the angular range and the diffusion constant for rotational motion. At higher ODRB densities, additional depolarization was observed due to electronic excitation transport. A two-dimensional two-particle theory developed by Baumann and Fayer was found to provide an excellent description of the transport dynamics for reduced chromophore densities up to /approximately/ 5.0. The testing of transport theories proves to be relatively insensitive to the orientational distribution assumed for the ODRB transition moments in their two-dimensional systems.

  14. The transport character of quantum state in one-dimensional coupled-cavity arrays: effect of the number of photons and entanglement degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shao-Qiang; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2015-12-01

    The transport properties of the photons injected into one-dimensional coupled-cavity arrays (CCAs) are studied. It is found that the number of photons cannot change the evolution cycle of the system and the time points at which W states and NOON state are obtained with a relatively higher probability. Transport dynamics in the CCAs exhibits that entanglement-enhanced state transmission is more effective phenomenon, and we show that for a quantum state with the maximum concurrence, it can be transmitted completely without considering the case of photon loss.

  15. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  16. Transport calculations for a 14.8 MeV neutron beam in a water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetsch, S. J.

    A coupled neutron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport code (MORSE-CG) was used to calculate neutron and photon doses in a water phantom irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutron from the gas target neutron source. The source-collimator-phantom geometry was carefully simulated. Results of calculations utilizing two different statistical estimators (next collision and track length) are presented.

  17. Verification by Monte Carlo methods of a power law tissue-air ratio algorithm for inhomogeneity corrections in photon beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Webb, S; Fox, R A

    1980-03-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate axial and off-axis depth dose distributions arising from the interaction of an external beam of 60Co radiation with a medium containing inhomogeneities. An approximation for applying the Monte Carlo data to the configuration where the lateral extent of the inhomogeneity is less than the beam area, is also presented. These new Monte Carlo techniques rely on integration over the dose distributions from constituent sub-beams of small area and the accuracy of the method is thus independent of beam size. The power law correction equation (Batho equation) describing the dose distribution in the presence of tissue inhomogeneities is derived in its most general form. By comparison with Monte Carlo reference data, the equation is validated for routine patient dosimetry. It is explained why the Monte Carlo data may be regarded as a fundamental reference point in performing these tests of the extension to the Batho equation. Other analytic correction techniques, e.g. the equivalent radiological path method, are shown to be less accurate. The application of the generalised power law equation in conjunction with CT scanner data is discussed. For ease of presentation, the details of the Monte Carlo techniques and the analytic formula have been separated into appendices. PMID:7384209

  18. Guiding Electromagnetic Waves around Sharp Corners: Topologically Protected Photonic Transport in Metawaveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-03-01

    The wave nature of radiation prevents its reflections-free propagation around sharp corners. We demonstrate that a simple photonic structure based on a periodic array of metallic cylinders attached to one of the two confining metal plates can emulate spin-orbit interaction through bianisotropy. Such a metawaveguide behaves as a photonic topological insulator with complete topological band gap. An interface between two such structures with opposite signs of the bianisotropy supports topologically protected surface waves, which can be guided without reflections along sharp bends of the interface.

  19. Guiding electromagnetic waves around sharp corners: topologically protected photonic transport in metawaveguides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Mousavi, S Hossein; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-03-27

    The wave nature of radiation prevents its reflections-free propagation around sharp corners. We demonstrate that a simple photonic structure based on a periodic array of metallic cylinders attached to one of the two confining metal plates can emulate spin-orbit interaction through bianisotropy. Such a metawaveguide behaves as a photonic topological insulator with complete topological band gap. An interface between two such structures with opposite signs of the bianisotropy supports topologically protected surface waves, which can be guided without reflections along sharp bends of the interface. PMID:25860770

  20. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  1. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, H. Grady

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  2. A combined approach of variance-reduction techniques for the efficient Monte Carlo simulation of linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Sempau, J.; Brualla, L.

    2012-05-01

    A method based on a combination of the variance-reduction techniques of particle splitting and Russian roulette is presented. This method improves the efficiency of radiation transport through linear accelerator geometries simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The method named as ‘splitting-roulette’ was implemented on the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}} and tested on an Elekta linac, although it is general enough to be implemented on any other general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code and linac geometry. Splitting-roulette uses any of the following two modes of splitting: simple splitting and ‘selective splitting’. Selective splitting is a new splitting mode based on the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung photons implemented in the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}}. Splitting-roulette improves the simulation efficiency of an Elekta SL25 linac by a factor of 45.

  3. A combined approach of variance-reduction techniques for the efficient Monte Carlo simulation of linacs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Brualla, L

    2012-05-21

    A method based on a combination of the variance-reduction techniques of particle splitting and Russian roulette is presented. This method improves the efficiency of radiation transport through linear accelerator geometries simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The method named as 'splitting-roulette' was implemented on the Monte Carlo code [Formula: see text] and tested on an Elekta linac, although it is general enough to be implemented on any other general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code and linac geometry. Splitting-roulette uses any of the following two modes of splitting: simple splitting and 'selective splitting'. Selective splitting is a new splitting mode based on the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung photons implemented in the Monte Carlo code [Formula: see text]. Splitting-roulette improves the simulation efficiency of an Elekta SL25 linac by a factor of 45. PMID:22538321

  4. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Wang YY; Peng X; Alharbi M; Dutin CF; Bradley TD; Gérôme F; Mielke M; Booth T; Benabid F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  5. FW-CADIS Method for Global and Semi-Global Variance Reduction of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C; Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) method for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of distributions, such as flux or dose rate distributions (e.g., mesh tallies), as well as responses at multiple localized detectors and spectra. This method, referred to as Forward-Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS), is an extension of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method, which has been used for more than a decade to very effectively improve the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of localized quantities, e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a specific location. The basis of this method is the development of an importance function that represents the importance of particles to the objective of uniform Monte Carlo particle density in the desired tally regions. Implementation of this method utilizes the results from a forward deterministic calculation to develop a forward-weighted source for a deterministic adjoint calculation. The resulting adjoint function is then used to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source biasing parameters and weight windows that are used in a forward Monte Carlo calculation to obtain more uniform statistical uncertainties in the desired tally regions. The FW-CADIS method has been implemented and demonstrated within the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE and the ADVANTG/MCNP framework. Application of the method to representative, real-world problems, including calculation of dose rate and energy dependent flux throughout the problem space, dose rates in specific areas, and energy spectra at multiple detectors, is presented and discussed. Results of the FW-CADIS method and other recently developed global variance reduction approaches are also compared, and the FW-CADIS method outperformed the other methods in all cases considered.

  6. Inclusion of photon production and transport and (e/sup +/e/sup /minus//) pair production in a particle-in-cell code for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkanen, M.E.; Gisler, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    This present study constitutes the first attempt to include, in a particle-in-cell code, the effects of radiation losses, photon production and transport, and charged-particle production by photons scattering in an intense background magnetic field. We discuss the physics and numerical issues that had to be addressed in including these effects in the ISIS code. Then we present a test simulation of the propagation of a pulse of high-energy photons across an intense magnetic field using this modified version of ISIS. This simulation demonstrates dissipation of the photon pulse with charged-particle production, emission of secondary synchrotron and curvature photons and the concomitant momentum dissipation of the charged particles, and subsequent production of lower-energy pairs. 5 refs.

  7. Utilizing Monte-Carlo radiation transport and spallation cross sections to estimate nuclide dependent scaling with altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argento, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Stone, J.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmogenic Nuclides (CNs) are a critical new tool for geomorphology, allowing researchers to date Earth surface events and measure process rates [1]. Prior to CNs, many of these events and processes had no absolute method for measurement and relied entirely on relative methods [2]. Continued improvements in CN methods are necessary for expanding analytic capability in geomorphology. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made in refining these methods and reducing analytic uncertainties [1,3]. Calibration data and scaling methods are being developed to provide a self consistent platform for use in interpreting nuclide concentration values into geologic data [4]. However, nuclide dependent scaling has been difficult to address due to analytic uncertainty and sparseness in altitude transects. Artificial target experiments are underway, but these experiments take considerable time for nuclide buildup in lower altitudes. In this study, a Monte Carlo method radiation transport code, MCNPX, is used to model the galactic cosmic-ray radiation impinging on the upper atmosphere and track the resulting secondary particles through a model of the Earths atmosphere and lithosphere. To address the issue of nuclide dependent scaling, the neutron flux values determined by the MCNPX simulation are folded in with estimated cross-section values [5,6]. Preliminary calculations indicate that scaling of nuclide production potential in free air seems to be a function of both altitude and nuclide production pathway. At 0 g/cm2 (sea-level) all neutron spallation pathways have attenuation lengths within 1% of 130 g/cm2. However, the differences in attenuation length are exacerbated with increasing altitude. At 530 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~5,500 m), the apparent attenuation lengths for aggregate SiO2(n,x)10Be, aggregate SiO2(n,x)14C and K(n,x)36Cl become 149.5 g/cm2, 151 g/cm2 and 148 g/cm2 respectively. At 700 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~8,400m - close to the highest possible sampling altitude), the apparent attenuation lengths become 171 g/cm2, 174 g/cm2 and 165 g/cm2 respectively, a difference of +/-5%. Based on this preliminary data, there may be up to 6% error in production rate scaling. Proton spallation is a small, yet important component of spallation events. This data will be also be presented along with the neutron results. While the differences between attenuation length for individual nuclides are small at sea-level, they are systematic and exacerbate with altitude. Until now, there has been no numeric analysis of this phenomenon, therefore the global scaling schemes for CNs have been missing an aspect of physics critical for achieving close agreement between empiric calibration data and physics based models. [1] T. J. Dunai, "Cosmogenic Nuclides: Principles, Concepts and Applications in the Earth Surface Sciences", Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2010 [2] D. Lal, Annual Rev of Earth Planet Sci, 1988, p355-388 [3] J. Gosse and F. Phillips, Quaternary Science Rev, 2001, p1475-1560 [4] F. Phillips et al.,(Proposal to the National Science Foundation), 2003 [5] K. Nishiizumi etal., Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 2009, p2163-2176 [6] R. C. Reedy, personal com.

  8. The role of plasma evolution and photon transport in optimizing future advanced lithography sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2013-08-28

    Laser produced plasma (LPP) sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons are currently based on using small liquid tin droplets as target that has many advantages including generation of stable continuous targets at high repetition rate, larger photons collection angle, and reduced contamination and damage to the optical mirror collection system from plasma debris and energetic particles. The ideal target is to generate a source of maximum EUV radiation output and collection in the 13.5 nm range with minimum atomic debris. Based on recent experimental results and our modeling predictions, the smallest efficient droplets are of diameters in the range of 2030 ?m in LPP devices with dual-beam technique. Such devices can produce EUV sources with conversion efficiency around 3% and with collected EUV power of 190 W or more that can satisfy current requirements for high volume manufacturing. One of the most important characteristics of these devices is in the low amount of atomic debris produced due to the small initial mass of droplets and the significant vaporization rate during the pre-pulse stage. In this study, we analyzed in detail plasma evolution processes in LPP systems using small spherical tin targets to predict the optimum droplet size yielding maximum EUV output. We identified several important processes during laser-plasma interaction that can affect conditions for optimum EUV photons generation and collection. The importance and accurate description of modeling these physical processes increase with the decrease in target size and its simulation domain.

  9. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Ko?l, Michal; Cvachovec, Frantiek; Mil?k, Jn; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 4545 mm(2) and a 1010 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries. PMID:23434890

  10. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  11. Comparison of experimental and Monte-Carlo simulation of MeV particle transport through tapered/straight glass capillaries and circular collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespeels, F.; Tonneau, R.; Ikeda, T.; Lucas, S.

    2015-11-01

    This study compares the capabilities of three different passive collimation devices to produce micrometer-sized beams for proton and alpha particle beams (1.7 MeV and 5.3 MeV respectively): classical platinum TEM-like collimators, straight glass capillaries and tapered glass capillaries. In addition, we developed a Monte-Carlo code, based on the Rutherford scattering theory, which simulates particle transportation through collimating devices. The simulation results match the experimental observations of beam transportation through collimators both in air and vacuum. This research shows the focusing effects of tapered capillaries which clearly enable higher transmission flux. Nevertheless, the capillaries alignment with an incident beam is a prerequisite but is tedious, which makes the TEM collimator the easiest way to produce a 50 ?m microbeam.

  12. Monte Carlo tests of small-world architecture for coarse-grained networks of the United States railroad and highway transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrich, Preston R.; El-Zabet, Jermeen; Hassan, Seerat; Briguglio, Joseph; Aliaj, Enela; Radcliffe, Maria; Mirza, Taha; Comar, Timothy; Nadolski, Jeremy; Huebner, Cynthia D.

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have shown that human transportation networks exhibit small-world structure, meaning they have high local clustering and are easily traversed. However, some have concluded this without statistical evaluations, and others have compared observed structure to globally random rather than planar models. Here, we use Monte Carlo randomizations to test US transportation infrastructure data for small-worldness. Coarse-grained network models were generated from GIS data wherein nodes represent the 3105 contiguous US counties and weighted edges represent the number of highway or railroad links between counties; thus, we focus on linkage topologies and not geodesic distances. We compared railroad and highway transportation networks with a simple planar network based on county edge-sharing, and with networks that were globally randomized and those that were randomized while preserving their planarity. We conclude that terrestrial transportation networks have small-world architecture, as it is classically defined relative to global randomizations. However, this topological structure is sufficiently explained by the planarity of the graphs, and in fact the topological patterns established by the transportation links actually serve to reduce the amount of small-world structure.

  13. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  14. Effective QCD and transport description of dilepton and photon production in heavy-ion collisions and elementary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this review we address the dynamics of relativistic heavy-ion reactions and in particular the information obtained from electromagnetic probes that stem from the partonic and hadronic phases. The out-of-equilibrium description of strongly interacting relativistic fields is based on the theory of Kadanoff and Baym. For the modeling of the partonic phase we introduce an effective dynamical quasiparticle model (DQPM) for QCD in equilibrium. In the DQPM, the widths and masses of the dynamical quasiparticles are controlled by transport coefficients that can be compared to the corresponding quantities from lattice QCD. The resulting off-shell transport approach is denoted by Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) and includes covariant dynamical transition rates for hadronization and keeps track of the hadronic interactions in the final phase. It is shown that the PHSD captures the bulk dynamics of heavy-ion collisions from lower SPS to LHC energies and thus provides a solid basis for the evaluation of the electromagnetic emissivity, which is calculated on the basis of the same dynamical parton propagators that are employed for the dynamical evolution of the partonic system. The production of direct photons in elementary processes and heavy-ion reactions is discussed and the present status of the photon v2 "puzzle"-a large elliptic flow v2 of the direct photons experimentally observed in heavy-ion collisions-is addressed for nucleus-nucleus reactions at RHIC and LHC energies. The role of hadronic and partonic sources for the photon spectra and the flow coefficients v2 and v3 is considered as well as the possibility to subtract the QGP signal from the experimental observables. Furthermore, the production of e+e- or μ+μ- pairs in elementary processes and A + A reactions is addressed. The calculations within the PHSD from SIS to LHC energies show an increase of the low mass dilepton yield essentially due to the in-medium modification of the ρ-meson and at the lowest energy also due to a multiple regeneration of Δ-resonances. Furthermore, pronounced traces of the partonic degrees-of-freedom are found in the intermediate dilepton mass regime (1.2 GeV < M < 3 GeV) at relativistic energies, which will also shed light on the nature of the very early degrees-of-freedom in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  15. Calculs Monte Carlo en transport d'energie pour le calcul de la dose en radiotherapie sur plateforme graphique hautement parallele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hissoiny, Sami

    Dose calculation is a central part of treatment planning. The dose calculation must be 1) accurate so that the medical physicists and the radio-oncologists can make a decision based on results close to reality and 2) fast enough to allow a routine use of dose calculation. The compromise between these two factors in opposition gave way to the creation of several dose calculation algorithms, from the most approximate and fast to the most accurate and slow. The most accurate of these algorithms is the Monte Carlo method, since it is based on basic physical principles. Since 2007, a new computing platform gains popularity in the scientific computing community: the graphics processor unit (GPU). The hardware platform exists since before 2007 and certain scientific computations were already carried out on the GPU. Year 2007, on the other hand, marks the arrival of the CUDA programming language which makes it possible to disregard graphic contexts to program the GPU. The GPU is a massively parallel computing platform and is adapted to data parallel algorithms. This thesis aims at knowing how to maximize the use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to speed up the execution of a Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation. To answer this question, the GPUMCD platform was developed. GPUMCD implements the simulation of a coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo simulation and is carried out completely on the GPU. The first objective of this thesis is to evaluate this method for a calculation in external radiotherapy. Simple monoenergetic sources and phantoms in layers are used. A comparison with the EGSnrc platform and DPM is carried out. GPUMCD is within a gamma criteria of 2%-2mm against EGSnrc while being at least 1200x faster than EGSnrc and 250x faster than DPM. The second objective consists in the evaluation of the platform for brachytherapy calculation. Complex sources based on the geometry and the energy spectrum of real sources are used inside a TG-43 reference geometry. Differences of less than 4% are found compared to the BrachyDose platforms well as TG-43 consensus data. The third objective aims at the use of GPUMCD for dose calculation within MRI-Linac environment. To this end, the effect of the magnetic field on charged particles has been added to the simulation. It was shown that GPUMCD is within a gamma criteria of 2%-2mm of two experiments aiming at highlighting the influence of the magnetic field on the dose distribution. The results suggest that the GPU is an interesting computing platform for dose calculations through Monte Carlo simulations and that software platform GPUMCD makes it possible to achieve fast and accurate results.

  16. Review of Fast Monte Carlo Codes for Dose Calculation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement in radiation therapy is a fast and accurate treatment planning system. This system, using computed tomography (CT) data, direction, and characteristics of the beam, calculates the dose at all points of the patient's volume. The two main factors in treatment planning system are accuracy and speed. According to these factors, various generations of treatment planning systems are developed. This article is a review of the Fast Monte Carlo treatment planning algorithms, which are accurate and fast at the same time. The Monte Carlo techniques are based on the transport of each individual particle (e.g., photon or electron) in the tissue. The transport of the particle is done using the physics of the interaction of the particles with matter. Other techniques transport the particles as a group. For a typical dose calculation in radiation therapy the code has to transport several millions particles, which take a few hours, therefore, the Monte Carlo techniques are accurate, but slow for clinical use. In recent years, with the development of the fast Monte Carlo systems, one is able to perform dose calculation in a reasonable time for clinical use. The acceptable time for dose calculation is in the range of one minute. There is currently a growing interest in the fast Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and there are many commercial treatment planning systems that perform dose calculation in radiation therapy based on the Monte Carlo technique. PMID:22606661

  17. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  18. Effect of burst and recombination models for Monte Carlo transport of interacting carriers in a-Se x-ray detectors on Swank noise

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yuan; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the modification to a previously developed Monte Carlo model of semiconductor direct x-ray detector required for studying the effect of burst and recombination algorithms on detector performance. This work provides insight into the effect of different charge generation models for a-Se detectors on Swank noise and recombination fraction. Methods: The proposed burst and recombination models are implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation package, ARTEMIS, developed byFang et al. [Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se, Med. Phys. 39(1), 308319 (2012)]. The burst model generates a cloud of electron-hole pairs based on electron velocity, energy deposition, and material parameters distributed within a spherical uniform volume (SUV) or on a spherical surface area (SSA). A simple first-hit (FH) and a more detailed but computationally expensive nearest-neighbor (NN) recombination algorithms are also described and compared. Results: Simulated recombination fractions for a single electron-hole pair show good agreement with Onsager model for a wide range of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. The recombination fraction and Swank noise exhibit a dependence on the burst model for generation of many electron-hole pairs from a single x ray. The Swank noise decreased for the SSA compared to the SUV model at 4 V/?m, while the recombination fraction decreased for SSA compared to the SUV model at 30 V/?m. The NN and FH recombination results were comparable. Conclusions: Results obtained with the ARTEMIS Monte Carlo transport model incorporating drift and diffusion are validated with the Onsager model for a single electron-hole pair as a function of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. For x-ray interactions, the authors demonstrate that the choice of burst model can affect the simulation results for the generation of many electron-hole pairs. The SSA model is more sensitive to the effect of electric field compared to the SUV model and that the NN and FH recombination algorithms did not significantly affect simulation results.

  19. Effect of burst and recombination models for Monte Carlo transport of interacting carriers in a-Se x-ray detectors on Swank noise

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yuan; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the modification to a previously developed Monte Carlo model of semiconductor direct x-ray detector required for studying the effect of burst and recombination algorithms on detector performance. This work provides insight into the effect of different charge generation models for a-Se detectors on Swank noise and recombination fraction. Methods: The proposed burst and recombination models are implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation package, ARTEMIS, developed byFang et al. [“Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 308–319 (2012)]. The burst model generates a cloud of electron-hole pairs based on electron velocity, energy deposition, and material parameters distributed within a spherical uniform volume (SUV) or on a spherical surface area (SSA). A simple first-hit (FH) and a more detailed but computationally expensive nearest-neighbor (NN) recombination algorithms are also described and compared. Results: Simulated recombination fractions for a single electron-hole pair show good agreement with Onsager model for a wide range of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. The recombination fraction and Swank noise exhibit a dependence on the burst model for generation of many electron-hole pairs from a single x ray. The Swank noise decreased for the SSA compared to the SUV model at 4 V/μm, while the recombination fraction decreased for SSA compared to the SUV model at 30 V/μm. The NN and FH recombination results were comparable. Conclusions: Results obtained with the ARTEMIS Monte Carlo transport model incorporating drift and diffusion are validated with the Onsager model for a single electron-hole pair as a function of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. For x-ray interactions, the authors demonstrate that the choice of burst model can affect the simulation results for the generation of many electron-hole pairs. The SSA model is more sensitive to the effect of electric field compared to the SUV model and that the NN and FH recombination algorithms did not significantly affect simulation results.

  20. Thermal photon, dilepton production, and electric charge transport in a baryon rich strongly coupled QGP from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzo, Stefano Ivo; Rougemont, Romulo

    2016-02-01

    We obtain the thermal photon and dilepton production rates in a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at both zero and nonzero baryon chemical potentials using a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton holographic model that is in good quantitative agreement with the thermodynamics of (2 +1 )-flavor lattice QCD around the crossover transition for baryon chemical potentials up to 400 MeV, which may be reached in the beam energy scan at RHIC. We find that increasing the temperature T and the baryon chemical potential μB enhances the peak present in both spectra. We also obtain the electric charge susceptibility, the dc and ac electric conductivities, and the electric charge diffusion as functions of T and μB. We find that electric diffusive transport is suppressed as one increases μB. At zero baryon density, we compare our results for the dc electric conductivity and the electric charge diffusion with the latest lattice data available for these observables and find reasonable agreement around the crossover transition. Therefore, our holographic results may be used to constraint the magnitude of the thermal photon and dilepton production rates in a strongly coupled QGP, which we found to be at least 1 order of magnitude below perturbative estimates.

  1. Quantum Dot Optical Frequency Comb Laser with Mode-Selection Technique for 1-μm Waveband Photonic Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naokatsu Yamamoto,; Kouichi Akahane,; Tetsuya Kawanishi,; Redouane Katouf,; Hideyuki Sotobayashi,

    2010-04-01

    An optical frequency comb was generated from a single quantum dot laser diode (QD-LD) in the 1-μm waveband using an Sb-irradiated InGaAs/GaAs QD active medium. A single-mode-selection technique and interference injection-seeding technique are proposed for selecting the optical mode of a QD optical frequency comb laser (QD-CML). In the 1-μm waveband, a wavelength-tunable single-mode light source and a multiple-wavelength generator of a comb with 100-GHz spacing and ultrafine teeth are successfully demonstrated by applying the optical-mode-selection techniques to the QD-CML. Additionally, by applying the single-mode-selection technique to the QD-CML, a 10-Gbps clear eye opening for multiple-wavelengths in 1-μm waveband photonic transport over a 1.5-km-long holey fiber is obtained.

  2. Quantum Dot Optical Frequency Comb Laser with Mode-Selection Technique for 1-µm Waveband Photonic Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Katouf, Redouane; Sotobayashi, Hideyuki

    2010-04-01

    An optical frequency comb was generated from a single quantum dot laser diode (QD-LD) in the 1-µm waveband using an Sb-irradiated InGaAs/GaAs QD active medium. A single-mode-selection technique and interference injection-seeding technique are proposed for selecting the optical mode of a QD optical frequency comb laser (QD-CML). In the 1-µm waveband, a wavelength-tunable single-mode light source and a multiple-wavelength generator of a comb with 100-GHz spacing and ultrafine teeth are successfully demonstrated by applying the optical-mode-selection techniques to the QD-CML. Additionally, by applying the single-mode-selection technique to the QD-CML, a 10-Gbps clear eye opening for multiple-wavelengths in 1-µm waveband photonic transport over a 1.5-km-long holey fiber is obtained.

  3. Monte Carlo Simulations of a Human Phantom Radio-Pharmacokinetic Response on a Small Field of View Scintigraphic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, N.; Ciavola, C.; Santagata, A.; Iurlaro, G.; Montani, L.; Scaf, R.

    2006-04-01

    The limiting factors for the scintigraphic clinical application are related to i) biosource characteristics (pharmacokinetic of the drug distribution between organs), Detection chain (photons transport, scintillation, analog to digital signal conversion, etc.) Imaging (Signal to Noise ratio, Spatial and Energy Resolution, Linearity etc) In this work, by using Monte Carlo time resolved transport simulations on a mathematical phantom and on a small field of view scintigraphic device, the trade off between the aforementioned factors was preliminary investigated.

  4. Two-Dimensional Radiation Transport in Cylindrical Geometry: Ray-Tracing Compared to Monte Carlo Solutions for a Two-Level Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation plays a critical role in the dynamics of Z-pinch implosions. Modeling of Z-pinch experiments therefore needs to include an accurate but efficient algorithm for photon transport. Such algorithms exist for the one-dimensional (1D) approximation. In the present work, we report progress toward this goal in a 2D (r,z) geometry, intended for use in radiation hydrodynamics calculations of dynamically evolving Z pinches. We have tested a radiation transport algorithm that uses discrete ordinate sets for the ray in 3-space, and the multifrequency integral solution along each ray. The published solutions of Avery et al. [1] for the line source functions are used as a benchmark to ensure the accuracy of our approach. We discuss the coupling between the radiation field and kinetics that results in large departures from LTE, ruling out use of the diffusion approximation. [1] L. W. Avery, L. L. House, and A. Skumanich, JQSRT 9, 519 (1969).

  5. Weak second-order splitting schemes for Lagrangian Monte Carlo particle methods for the composition PDF/FDF transport equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haifeng Popov, Pavel P.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2010-03-01

    We study a class of methods for the numerical solution of the system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) that arises in the modeling of turbulent combustion, specifically in the Monte Carlo particle method for the solution of the model equations for the composition probability density function (PDF) and the filtered density function (FDF). This system consists of an SDE for particle position and a random differential equation for particle composition. The numerical methods considered advance the solution in time with (weak) second-order accuracy with respect to the time step size. The four primary contributions of the paper are: (i) establishing that the coefficients in the particle equations can be frozen at the mid-time (while preserving second-order accuracy), (ii) examining the performance of three existing schemes for integrating the SDEs, (iii) developing and evaluating different splitting schemes (which treat particle motion, reaction and mixing on different sub-steps), and (iv) developing the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) to assess the convergence of Monte Carlo particle methods. Tests using MMS confirm the second-order accuracy of the schemes. In general, the use of frozen coefficients reduces the numerical errors. Otherwise no significant differences are observed in the performance of the different SDE schemes and splitting schemes.

  6. Modification to the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to Read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) Files

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph Schwarz; Leland L. Carter; Alysia Schwarz

    2005-08-23

    Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) is the code of choice for doing complex neutron/photon/electron transport calculations for the nuclear industry and research institutions. The Visual Editor for Monte Carlo N-Particle is internationally recognized as the best code for visually creating and graphically displaying input files for MCNP. The work performed in this grant was used to enhance the capabilities of the MCNP Visual Editor to allow it to read in both 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files, allowing the user to electronically generate a valid MCNP input geometry.

  7. Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly, T.P.; Garrett, D.; House, R.K.; Moses, E.I.; Powell, C.L.; Patterson, R.W.; Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1997-11-11

    The purpose of the PEREGRINE program is to bring high-speed, high- accuracy, high-resolution Monte Carlo dose calculations to the desktop in the radiation therapy clinic. PEREGRINE is a three- dimensional Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed specifically for radiation therapy planning. It provides dose distributions from external beams of photons, electrons, neutrons, and protons as well as from brachytherapy sources. Each external radiation source particle passes through collimator jaws and beam modifiers such as blocks, compensators, and wedges that are used to customize the treatment to maximize the dose to the tumor. Absorbed dose is tallied in the patient or phantom as Monte Carlo simulation particles are followed through a Cartesian transport mesh that has been manually specified or determined from a CT scan of the patient. This paper describes PEREGRINE capabilities, results of benchmark comparisons, calculation times and performance, and the significance of Monte Carlo calculations for photon teletherapy. PEREGRINE results show excellent agreement with a comprehensive set of measurements for a wide variety of clinical photon beam geometries, on both homogeneous and heterogeneous test samples or phantoms. PEREGRINE is capable of calculating >350 million histories per hour for a standard clinical treatment plan. This results in a dose distribution with voxel standard deviations of <2% of the maximum dose on 4 million voxels with 1 mm resolution in the CT-slice plane in under 20 minutes. Calculation times include tracking particles through all patient specific beam delivery components as well as the patient. Most importantly, comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculations with currently-used algorithms reveal significantly different dose distributions for a wide variety of treatment sites, due to the complex 3-D effects of missing tissue, tissue heterogeneities, and accurate modeling of the radiation source.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of light transport in turbid medium with embedded object--spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or cuboidal objects embedded within multilayered tissues.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Vijitha; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-04-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of light transport in multilayered tissue (MCML) is modified to incorporate objects of various shapes (sphere, ellipsoid, cylinder, or cuboid) with a refractive-index mismatched boundary. These geometries would be useful for modeling lymph nodes, tumors, blood vessels, capillaries, bones, the head, and other body parts. Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC) has also been used to compare the results from the MCML with embedded objects (MCML-EO). Our simulation assumes a realistic tissue model and can also handle the transmission/reflection at the object-tissue boundary due to the mismatch of the refractive index. Simulation of MCML-EO takes a few seconds, whereas MMC takes nearly an hour for the same geometry and optical properties. Contour plots of fluence distribution from MCML-EO and MMC correlate well. This study assists one to decide on the tool to use for modeling light propagation in biological tissue with objects of regular shapes embedded in it. For irregular inhomogeneity in the model (tissue), MMC has to be used. If the embedded objects (inhomogeneity) are of regular geometry (shapes), then MCML-EO is a better option, as simulations like Raman scattering, fluorescent imaging, and optical coherence tomography are currently possible only with MCML. PMID:24727908

  9. Application of MINERVA Monte Carlo simulations to targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Descalle, Marie-Anne; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L; Dauffy, Lucile; Nigg, David W; Wemple, Charles A; Yuan, Aina; DeNardo, Gerald L

    2003-02-01

    Recent clinical results have demonstrated the promise of targeted radionuclide therapy for advanced cancer. As the success of this emerging form of radiation therapy grows, accurate treatment planning and radiation dose simulations are likely to become increasingly important. To address this need, we have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA system. The goal of the MINERVA dose calculation system is to provide 3-D Monte Carlo simulation-based dosimetry for radiation therapy, focusing on experimental and emerging applications. For molecular targeted radionuclide therapy applications, MINERVA calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using computed tomography to describe the patient anatomy, combined with a user-defined 3-D radiation source. This paper describes the validation of the 3-D Monte Carlo transport methods to be used in MINERVA for molecular targeted radionuclide dosimetry. It reports comparisons of MINERVA dose simulations with published absorbed fraction data for distributed, monoenergetic photon and electron sources, and for radioisotope photon emission. MINERVA simulations are generally within 2% of EGS4 results and 10% of MCNP results, but differ by up to 40% from the recommendations given in MIRD Pamphlets 3 and 8 for identical medium composition and density. For several representative source and target organs in the abdomen and thorax, specific absorbed fractions calculated with the MINERVA system are generally within 5% of those published in the revised MIRD Pamphlet 5 for 100 keV photons. However, results differ by up to 23% for the adrenal glands, the smallest of our target organs. Finally, we show examples of Monte Carlo simulations in a patient-like geometry for a source of uniform activity located in the kidney. PMID:12667310

  10. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  11. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air. PMID:22859102

  12. Dopamine Transporter Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography Supports Diagnosis of Akinetic Crisis of Parkinsonism and of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martino, G.; Capasso, M.; Nasuti, M.; Bonanni, L.; Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Akinetic crisis (AC) is akin to neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and is the most severe and possibly lethal complication of parkinsonism. Diagnosis is today based only on clinical assessments yet is often marred by concomitant precipitating factors. Our purpose is to evidence that AC and NMS can be reliably evidenced by FP/CIT single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) performed during the crisis. Prospective cohort evaluation in 6 patients. In 5 patients, affected by Parkinson disease or Lewy body dementia, the crisis was categorized as AC. One was diagnosed as having NMS because of exposure to risperidone. In all FP/CIT, SPECT was performed in the acute phase. SPECT was repeated 3 to 6 months after the acute event in 5 patients. Visual assessments and semiquantitative evaluations of binding potentials (BPs) were used. To exclude the interference of emergency treatments, FP/CIT BP was also evaluated in 4 patients currently treated with apomorphine. During AC or NMS, BP values in caudate and putamen were reduced by 95% to 80%, to noise level with a nearly complete loss of striatum dopamine transporter-binding, corresponding to the burst striatum pattern. The follow-up re-evaluation in surviving patients showed a recovery of values to the range expected for Parkinsonisms of same disease duration. No binding effects of apomorphine were observed. By showing the outstanding binding reduction, presynaptic dopamine transporter ligand can provide instrumental evidence of AC in Parkinsonism and NMS. PMID:25837755

  13. Updated version of the DOT 4 one- and two-dimensional neutron/photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    DOT 4 is designed to allow very large transport problems to be solved on a wide range of computers and memory arrangements. Unusual flexibilty in both space-mesh and directional-quadrature specification is allowed. For example, the radial mesh in an R-Z problem can vary with axial position. The directional quadrature can vary with both space and energy group. Several features improve performance on both deep penetration and criticality problems. The program has been checked and used extensively.

  14. Ensemble Monte Carlo analysis of subpicosecond transient electron transport in cubic and hexagonal silicon carbide for high power SiC-MESFET devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhadji, Youcef; Bouazza, Benyounes; Moulahcene, Fateh; Massoum, Nordine

    2015-05-01

    In a comparative framework, an ensemble Monte Carlo was used to elaborate the electron transport characteristics in two different silicon carbide (SiC) polytypes 3C-SiC and 4H-SiC. The simulation was performed using three-valley band structure model. These valleys are spherical and nonparabolic. The aim of this work is to forward the trajectory of 20,000 electrons under high-flied (from 50 kV to 600 kV) and high-temperature (from 200 K to 700 K). We note that this model has already been used in other studies of many Zincblende or Wurtzite semiconductors. The obtained results, compared with results found in many previous studies, show a notable drift velocity overshoot. This last appears in subpicoseconds transient regime and this overshoot is directly attached to the applied electric field and lattice temperature.

  15. Retinoblastoma external beam photon irradiation with a special ‘D’-shaped collimator: a comparison between measurements, Monte Carlo simulation and a treatment planning system calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla, L.; Mayorga, P. A.; Flühs, A.; Lallena, A. M.; Sempau, J.; Sauerwein, W.

    2012-11-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common eye tumour in childhood. According to the available long-term data, the best outcome regarding tumour control and visual function has been reached by external beam radiotherapy. The benefits of the treatment are, however, jeopardized by a high incidence of radiation-induced secondary malignancies and the fact that irradiated bones grow asymmetrically. In order to better exploit the advantages of external beam radiotherapy, it is necessary to improve current techniques by reducing the irradiated volume and minimizing the dose to the facial bones. To this end, dose measurements and simulated data in a water phantom are essential. A Varian Clinac 2100 C/D operating at 6 MV is used in conjunction with a dedicated collimator for the retinoblastoma treatment. This collimator conforms a ‘D’-shaped off-axis field whose irradiated area can be either 5.2 or 3.1 cm2. Depth dose distributions and lateral profiles were experimentally measured. Experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations’ run with the penelope code and with calculations performed with the analytical anisotropic algorithm implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system using the gamma test. penelope simulations agree reasonably well with the experimental data with discrepancies in the dose profiles less than 3 mm of distance to agreement and 3% of dose. Discrepancies between the results found with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data reach 3 mm and 6%. Although the discrepancies between the results obtained with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data are notable, it is possible to consider this algorithm for routine treatment planning of retinoblastoma patients, provided the limitations of the algorithm are known and taken into account by the medical physicist and the clinician. Monte Carlo simulation is essential for knowing these limitations. Monte Carlo simulation is required for optimizing the treatment technique and the dedicated collimator.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations of asymmetric light transport in graded index photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Giden, I. H. Yilmaz, D.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.; Çolak, E.; Ozbay, E.

    2014-01-20

    To provide asymmetric propagation of light, we propose a graded index photonic crystal (GRIN PC) based waveguide configuration that is formed by introducing line and point defects as well as intentional perturbations inside the structure. The designed system utilizes isotropic materials and is purely reciprocal, linear, and time-independent, since neither magneto-optical materials are used nor time-reversal symmetry is broken. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme based on the spatial-inversion symmetry breaking has different forward (with a peak value of 49.8%) and backward transmissions (4.11% at most) as well as relatively small round-trip transmission (at most 7.11%) in a large operational bandwidth of 52.6 nm. The signal contrast ratio of the designed configuration is above 0.80 in the telecom wavelengths of 1523.5–1576.1 nm. An experimental measurement is also conducted in the microwave regime: A strong asymmetric propagation characteristic is observed within the frequency interval of 12.8 GHz–13.3 GHz. The numerical and experimental results confirm the asymmetric transmission behavior of the proposed GRIN PC waveguide.

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigations of asymmetric light transport in graded index photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giden, I. H.; Yilmaz, D.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.; ?olak, E.; Ozbay, E.

    2014-01-01

    To provide asymmetric propagation of light, we propose a graded index photonic crystal (GRIN PC) based waveguide configuration that is formed by introducing line and point defects as well as intentional perturbations inside the structure. The designed system utilizes isotropic materials and is purely reciprocal, linear, and time-independent, since neither magneto-optical materials are used nor time-reversal symmetry is broken. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme based on the spatial-inversion symmetry breaking has different forward (with a peak value of 49.8%) and backward transmissions (4.11% at most) as well as relatively small round-trip transmission (at most 7.11%) in a large operational bandwidth of 52.6 nm. The signal contrast ratio of the designed configuration is above 0.80 in the telecom wavelengths of 1523.5-1576.1 nm. An experimental measurement is also conducted in the microwave regime: A strong asymmetric propagation characteristic is observed within the frequency interval of 12.8 GHz-13.3 GHz. The numerical and experimental results confirm the asymmetric transmission behavior of the proposed GRIN PC waveguide.

  18. PENEPMA: a Monte Carlo programme for the simulation of X-ray emission in EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, X.; Salvat, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Monte Carlo programme PENEPMA performs simulations of X-ray emission from samples bombarded with electron beams. It is both based on the general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE, an elaborate system for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials, and on the geometry subroutine package PENGEOM, which tracks particles through complex material structures defined by quadric surfaces. In this work, we give a brief overview of the capabilities of the latest version of PENEPMA along with several examples of its application to the modelling of electron probe microanalysis measurements.

  19. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  20. Monte Carlo treatment planning with modulated electron radiotherapy: framework development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew William

    Within the field of medical physics, Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are considered to be the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. The McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MMCTP), provides a flexible software environment to integrate Monte Carlo simulations with current and new treatment modalities. A developing treatment modality called energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) is a promising modality, which has the fundamental capabilities to enhance the dosimetry of superficial targets. An objective of this work is to advance the research and development of MERT with the end goal of clinical use. To this end, we present the MMCTP system with an integrated toolkit for MERT planning and delivery of MERT fields. Delivery is achieved using an automated "few leaf electron collimator" (FLEC) and a controller. Aside from the MERT planning toolkit, the MMCTP system required numerous add-ons to perform the complex task of large-scale autonomous Monte Carlo simulations. The first was a DICOM import filter, followed by the implementation of DOSXYZnrc as a dose calculation engine and by logic methods for submitting and updating the status of Monte Carlo simulations. Within this work we validated the MMCTP system with a head and neck Monte Carlo recalculation study performed by a medical dosimetrist. The impact of MMCTP lies in the fact that it allows for systematic and platform independent large-scale