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Sample records for carnosine retards tumor

  1. Carnosine inhibits carbonic anhydrase IX-mediated extracellular acidosis and suppresses growth of HeLa tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a transmembrane enzyme that is present in many types of solid tumors. Expression of CA IX is driven predominantly by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and helps to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis under hypoxic conditions, resulting in acidification of the tumor microenvironment. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an anti-tumorigenic agent that inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the role of CA IX in carnosine-mediated antitumor activity and whether the underlying mechanism involves transcriptional and translational modulation of HIF-1α and CA IX and/or altered CA IX function. Methods The effect of carnosine was studied using two-dimensional cell monolayers of several cell lines with endogenous CA IX expression as well as Madin Darby canine kidney transfectants, three-dimensional HeLa spheroids, and an in vivo model of HeLa xenografts in nude mice. mRNA and protein expression and protein localization were analyzed by real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Cell viability was measured by a flow cytometric assay. Expression of HIF-1α and CA IX in tumors was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Real-time measurement of pH was performed using a sensor dish reader. Binding of CA IX to specific antibodies and metabolon partners was investigated by competitive ELISA and proximity ligation assays, respectively. Results Carnosine increased the expression levels of HIF-1α and HIF targets and increased the extracellular pH, suggesting an inhibitory effect on CA IX-mediated acidosis. Moreover, carnosine significantly inhibited the growth of three-dimensional spheroids and tumor xenografts compared with untreated controls. Competitive ELISA showed that carnosine disrupted binding between CA IX and antibodies specific for its catalytic domain. This finding was supported by reduced formation of the functional metabolon of CA IX

  2. [Conformers of carnosine].

    PubMed

    Kliuev, S A

    2006-01-01

    The geometric and energetic parameters of most stable conformations of carnosine were calculated by the semiempirical guantum-chemical method PM3. The carnosine-water-zinc (II) clusters were simulated. PMID:16909845

  3. Carnosine as a regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Bussygina, O G; Pyatakova, N V

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of the participation of carnosine in the functioning of soluble guanylate cyclase is discussed. It is shown that carnosine inhibits the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by sodium nitroprusside and a derivative of furoxan--1,2,5-oxadiazolo-trioxide (an NO donor). However, carnosine has no effect on stimulation of the enzyme by a structural analog of the latter compound, a furazan derivative (1,2,5-oxadiazolo-dioxide) that is not an NO donor; nor was carnosine involved in the enzyme activation by protoporphyrin IX, whose stimulatory effect is not associated with the guanylate cyclase heme. The inhibition by carnosine of guanylate cyclase activation by an NO donor is due to the interaction of carnosine with heme iron with subsequent formation of a chelate complex. It was first demonstrated that carnosine is a selective inhibitor of NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase and may be used for suppression of activity of the intracellular signaling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP, whose sharp increase is observed in malignant tumors, sepsis, septic shock, asthma, and migraine. PMID:10951096

  4. Treadmill exercise-dependent tumor growth retardation in T-cell lymphoma-bearing host displays gender dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Vivek; Singh, Mahendra Pal; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2010-01-01

    A number of previous investigations have reported that physical exercise renders immunopotentiating and antitumor therapeutic benefits to the tumor-bearing host. As these effects of physical exercise are mainly mediated through the modulation of hormonal and cytokine repertoire, it remains unclear if male and female tumor-bearing hosts show a gender-dependent differential response to the therapeutic action of physical exercise in tumor growth retardation. In the present investigation tumor growth retardation, following physical exercise was investigated in a gender-specific manner in a murine tumor model of a T-cell lymphoma designated as Dalton's lymphoma (DL). The results of the present investigation show that physical exercise of a tumor-bearing host on a treadmill results in a better retardation of tumor progression along with prolongation of survival time in male compared to female tumor-bearing host. Such gender dimorphism of the therapeutic benefits of physical exercise in tumor-bearing host was found to be associated with a gender-dependent variation in cell survival and induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. Moreover, expression of cell growth regulatory proteins-selectin, Hsp70, p53, CAD, SOCS, and IL-2 receptor-was found to vary in a gender-specific manner following physical exercise. The investigation also indicates the role of cytokines and macrophages in manifestation of gender dimorphism in the response of tumor-bearing mice to physical exercise. Thus, the observations of the present investigation suggest for the first time that the beneficial effects of physical exercise in a tumor-bearing host may be variable depending on the gender of the host. PMID:20377130

  5. The Bisecting GlcNAc on N-Glycans Inhibits Growth Factor Signaling and Retards Mammary Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yinghui; Aglipay, Jason A.; Bernstein, Joshua D.; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The branching of complex N-glycans attached to growth factor receptors promotes tumor progression by prolonging growth factor signaling. The addition of the bisecting GlcNAc to complex N-glycans by Mgat3 has varying effects on cell adhesion, cell migration and hepatoma formation. Here we show that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing Mgat3 and the Polyoma Middle T (PyMT) antigen have reduced cell proliferation and growth factor signaling dependent on a galectin lattice. The Mgat3 gene is not expressed in virgin mammary gland but is upregulated during lactation and is expressed in MMTV/PyMT tumors. Mice lacking Mgat3 that cannot transfer the bisecting GlcNAc to N-glycans acquire PyMT-induced mammary tumors more rapidly, have an increased tumor burden, increased migration of tumor cells, and increased early metastasis to lung. Tumors and tumor-derived cells lacking Mgat3 exhibit enhanced signaling through the Ras pathway, and reduced amounts of functionally-glycosylated α-dystroglycan. Constitutive overexpression of an MMTV/Mgat3 transgene inhibits early mammary tumor development and tumor cell migration. Thus the addition of the bisecting GlcNAc to complex N-glycans of mammary tumor cell glycoprotein receptors is a cell-autonomous mechanism serving to retard tumor progression by reducing growth factor signaling. PMID:20395209

  6. Antioxidative and anti-inflammatory protection from carnosine in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jei; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Liu, Wen-Hu; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2010-11-10

    Mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were used to examine the neuroprotective effects of carnosine. Carnosine at 0.5, 1, and 2 g/L was directly added to the drinking water for 4 weeks. MPTP treatment significantly depleted striatal glutathione content, reduced the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase, increased malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species levels, and elevated interleukin-6, nitrite, and tumor necrosis factor-α production as well as enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity in the striatum (P < 0.05). The preintake of carnosine significantly attenuated MPTP-induced glutathione loss, retained the activity of GPX and SOD, diminished oxidative stress, and lowered inflammatory cytokines and nitrite levels as well as suppressed iNOS activity (P < 0.05). MPTP treatment significantly suppressed GPX mRNA expression and enhanced iNOS mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Carnosine preintake significantly elevated GPX mRNA expression and declined iNOS mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Preintake of carnosine also significantly improved MPTP-induced dopamine depletion and maintained 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels (P < 0.05). These results suggest that carnosine could provide antioxidative and anti-inflammatory protection for the striatum against the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:20925384

  7. Carnosine Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells through Both of the Mitochondrial Respiration and Glycolysis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25115854

  8. Constitutional Haploinsufficiency of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Mentally Retarded Patients With Microdeletions in 17p13.1

    PubMed Central

    Krepischi-Santos, A.C.V.; Rajan, D.; Temple, I.K.; Shrubb, V.; Crolla, J.A.; Huang, S.; Beal, S.; Otto, P.A.; Carter, N.P.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome microdeletions or duplications are detected in 10–20% of patients with mental impairment and normal karyotypes. A few cases have been reported of mental impairment with microdeletions comprising tumor suppressor genes. By array-CGH we detected 4 mentally impaired individuals carrying de novo microdeletions sharing an overlapping segment of ∼180 kb in 17p13.1. This segment encompasses 18 genes, including 3 involved in cancer, namely KCTD11/REN, DLG4/PSD95, and GPS2. Furthermore, in 2 of the patients, the deletions also included TP53, the most frequently inactivated gene in human cancers. The 3 tumor suppressor genes KCTD11, DLG4, and GPS2, in addition to the GABARAP gene, have a known or suspected function in neuronal development and are candidates for causing mental impairment in our patients. Among our 4 patients with deletions in 17p13.1, 3 were part of a Brazilian cohort of 300 mentally retarded individuals, suggesting that this segment may be particularly prone to rearrangements and appears to be an important cause (∼1%) of mental retardation. Further, the constitutive deletion of tumor suppressor genes in these patients, particularly TP53, probably confers a significantly increased lifetime risk for cancer and warrants careful oncological surveillance of these patients. Constitutional chromosome deletions containing tumor suppressor genes in patients with mental impairment or congenital abnormalities may represent an important mechanism linking abnormal phenotypes with increased risks of cancer. PMID:19617690

  9. Plasma carnosine, but not muscle carnosine, attenuates high-fat diet-induced metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Stegen, Bram; Aldini, Giancarlo; Altomare, Alessandra; Cannizzaro, Luca; Orioli, Marica; Gerlo, Sarah; Deldicque, Louise; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter; Derave, Wim

    2015-09-01

    There is growing in vivo evidence that the dipeptide carnosine has protective effects in metabolic diseases. A critical unanswered question is whether its site of action is tissues or plasma. This was investigated using oral carnosine versus β-alanine supplementation in a high-fat diet rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats received a control diet (CON), a high-fat diet (HF; 60% of energy from fat), the HF diet with 1.8% carnosine (HFcar), or the HF diet with 1% β-alanine (HFba), as β-alanine can increase muscle carnosine without increasing plasma carnosine. Insulin sensitivity, inflammatory signaling, and lipoxidative stress were determined in skeletal muscle and blood. In a pilot study, urine was collected. The 3 HF groups were significantly heavier than the CON group. Muscle carnosine concentrations increased equally in the HFcar and HFba groups, while elevated plasma carnosine levels and carnosine-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts were detected only in the HFcar group. Elevated plasma and urine N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine in HF rats was reduced by ∼50% in the HFcar group but not in the HFba group. Likewise, inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA was decreased by 47% (p < 0.05) in the HFcar group, but not in the HFba group, compared with HF rats. We conclude that plasma carnosine, but not muscle carnosine, is involved in preventing early-stage lipoxidation in the circulation and inflammatory signaling in the muscle of rats. PMID:26307517

  10. Effects of carnosine on cyclophosphamide-induced hematopoietic suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; He, Rong-Rong; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Abe, Keiichi; Kurihara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents in treating cancers. Chemotherapy drug-induced oxidative stress produces side effects. The severity of myelosuppression increases with a high dose of cyclophosphamide. Chicken soup or chicken essence, a traditional Chinese aliment, is a popular health supplement for patients with cancers or other diseases in Asia. As a major functional component of chicken meat extract, carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), a dipeptide of the amino acids beta-alanine and histidine, has been shown to have strong antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of carnosine on hematopoietic suppression in mice treated with cyclophosphamide. As expected, we found that cyclophosphamide administration (with a single dose of 150 mg/kg) induced a rapid (within 24 hours) and severe hematopoietic suppression in mice. We further showed that carnosine administration (100 mg/kg/day or 200 mg/kg/day for continuous seven days) could substantially improve suppressed hematopoietic functions and accelerate the recovery of leukocyte counts, bone marrow spontaneous proliferation, colony stimulating activity (CSA) in serum, and production of endogenous cytokines such as interleukin-3 (IL-3) and stem cell factor (SCF). These results indicate that carnosine has the potential to promote the recovery from hematopoietic suppression induced by cyclophosphamide. Our data suggest that carnosine holds a potential in clinical application to minimize the side effects induced by chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide and thus will substantially improve the overall anti-tumor effects of the standard chemotherapies. PMID:24467540

  11. New derivative of carnosine for nanoparticle assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bellia, Francesco; Oliveri, Valentina; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Vecchio, Graziella

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine) is an endogenous dipeptide, extensively studied owing to its multifunctional activity exhibited in tissues of several animal species. This natural compound may act as a physiological buffer, ion-chelating agent (especially for copper(II) and zinc(II)), antioxidant and antiglycating agent. The main limit for the therapeutical uses of carnosine is the rapid hydrolysis mostly in human plasma by carnosinase. The chemical derivatization of carnosine is a promising strategy to improve the bioavailability of the dipeptide and facilitating the site-specific transport to different tissues. On this basis, a new carnosine derivative with biotin was synthesized and structurally characterized by NMR and MS measurements, with aim of exploiting the avidin-biotin technology that offers a universal system for selective delivery of any biotinylated agent. The stability of the new carnosine derivative towards the hydrolytic action of serum carnosinase as well as the copper(II) binding ability of the carnosine-biotin conjugate were also assessed. The binding affinity of the new molecular entity to avidin and streptavidin, investigated by a spectrophotometric assay, was exploited to functionalize avidin- and streptavidin-gold nanoparticles with the carnosine-biotin conjugate. PMID:24158014

  12. Carnosine attenuates early brain injury through its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-yong; Sun, Bao-liang; Yang, Ming-feng; Li, Da-wei; Fang, Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2015-03-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been demonstrated to provide antioxidative and anti-apoptotic roles in the animal of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether carnosine prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) in rats. We found that intraperitoneal administration of carnosine improved neurobehavioral deficits, attenuated brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, and decreased reactive oxygen species level at 48 h following SAH in rat models. Carnosine treatment increased tissue copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzymatic activities, and reduced post-SAH elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHDG), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in rats. Furthermore, carnosine treatment attenuated SAH-induced microglia activation and cortical neuron apoptosis. These results indicated that administration of carnosine may provide neuroprotection in EBI following SAH in rat models. PMID:25179154

  13. Differential Neuroprotective Effects of Carnosine, Anserine, and N-Acetyl Carnosine against Permanent Focal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jiangyong; Senut, Marie-Claude; Rajanikant, Krishnamurthy; Greenberg, Eric; Bandagi, Ram; Zemke, Daniel; Mousa, Ahmad; Kassab, Mounzer; Farooq, Muhammad U.; Gupta, Rishi; Majid, Arshad

    2009-01-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been shown to exhibit neuroprotection in rodent models of cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we further characterized the effects of carnosine treatment in a mouse model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and compared them with its related peptides anserine and N-acetylated carnosine. We also evaluated the efficacy of bestatin, a carnosinase inhibitor, in ameliorating ischemic brain damage. Permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (pMCAO). Mice were subsequently randomly assigned to receive an intraperitoneal injection of vehicle (0.9% saline), carnosine, N-acetyl carnosine, anserine, bestatin alone, or bestatin with carnosine. Infarct size was examined using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining 1, 3, and 7 days following pMCAO, and neurological function was evaluated using an 18-point-based scale. Brain levels of carnosine were measured in treated mice using high-performance liquid chromatography 1 day following pMCAO. We demonstrated that treatment with carnosine, but not its analogues, was able to significantly reduce infarct volume and improve neurological function compared with those in vehicle-treated mice. These beneficial effects were maintained for 7 days post-pMCAO. In contrast, compared with the vehicle-treated group, bestatin-treated mice displayed an increase in the severity of ischemic lesion, which was prevented by the addition of carnosine. These new data further characterize the neuroprotective effects of carnosine and suggest that carnosine may be an attractive candidate for testing as a stroke therapy. PMID:18543335

  14. Depletion of Ascorbic Acid Restricts Angiogenesis and Retards Tumor Growth in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Sucheta; Clem, Amy L; Eaton, John W; Chesney, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis requires the deposition of type IV collagen by endothelial cells into the basement membrane of new blood vessels. Stabilization of type IV collagen triple helix depends on the hydroxylation of proline, which is catalyzed by the iron-containing enzyme prolyl hydroxylase. This enzyme, in turn, requires ascorbic acid to maintain the enzyme-bound iron in its reduced state. We hypothesized that dietary ascorbic acid might be required for tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, tumor growth. Here, we show that, not surprisingly, ascorbic acid is necessary for the synthesis of collagen type IV by human endothelial cells and for their effective migration and tube formation on a basement membrane matrix. Furthermore, ascorbic acid depletion in mice incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid (Gulo-/-) dramatically restricts the in vivo growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Histopathological analyses of these tumors reveal poorly formed blood vessels, extensive hemorrhagic foci, and decreased collagen and von Willebrand factor expression. Our data indicate that ascorbic acid plays an essential role in tumor angiogenesis and growth, and that restriction of ascorbic acid or pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase may prove to be novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of cancer. PMID:17325743

  15. Cortex Moutan Induces Bladder Cancer Cell Death via Apoptosis and Retards Tumor Growth in Mouse Bladders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Yi; Lee, Ying-Ray; Chiang, Su-Yin; Li, Yi-Zhen; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Cortex Moutan is the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andr. It is the herbal medicine widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for the treatment of blood-heat and blood-stasis syndrome. Furthermore, it has been reported that Cortex Moutan has anticancer effect. In this study, the Cortex Moutan extract was evaluated in bladder cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. Cortex Moutan extract reduces cell viability with IC50 between 1~2 mg/ml in bladder cancer cells, and it has lower cytotoxicity in normal urotheliums. It arrests cells in G1 and S phase and causes phosphatidylserine expression in the outside of cell membrane. It induces caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase degradation. The pan caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk reverses Cortex Moutan-induced cell death. Cortex Moutan also inhibits cell invasion activity in 5637 cells. In mouse orthotopic bladder cancer model, intravesical application of Cortex Moutan decreases the bladder tumor size without altering the blood biochemical parameters. In summary, these results demonstrate the antiproliferation and anti-invasion properties of Cortex Moutan in bladder cancer cells and its antibladder tumor effect in vivo. Cortex Moutan may provide an alternative therapeutic strategy for the intravesical therapy of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:24282433

  16. Affinities of organophosphate flame retardants to tumor suppressor gene p53: an integrated in vitro and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Cao, Lulu; Li, Xuehua; Li, Na; Wang, Zijian; Wu, Huifeng

    2015-01-22

    Health concerns have been raised in regards to the environmental impact of the more frequently used organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). In this study, the effects of two typical OPFRs (TCPP and TPhP) on p53 gene expression in human embryo liver L02 cells were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. To better understand the relationship between molecular structural features of OPFRs and binding affinities for the tumor suppressor genes p53, an integrated experimental and in silico approach was used. The interaction of 9 OPFRs with p53 DNA fragment under simulated physiological conditions (phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.40), was explored by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling method. The binding constants of 9 OPFRs with p53 DNA fragment were determined respectively, using ethidium bromide (EB) as fluorescence probe of DNA. From docking analysis, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were found to be the dominant interactions. Based on the observed interactions, appropriate molecular structural parameters were adopted to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. The binding affinities of OPFRs to p53 DNA fragment were related with molecular electrostatic potential. The developed QSAR model had good robustness, predictive ability and mechanism interpretability. PMID:25510514

  17. Oncolytic Adenovirus Loaded with L-carnosine as Novel Strategy to Enhance the Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Mariangela; Iovine, Barbara; Kuryk, Lukasz; Capasso, Cristian; Hirvinen, Mari; Vitale, Andrea; Yliperttula, Marjo; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Oncolytic viruses are able to specifically replicate, infect, and kill only cancer cells. Their combination with chemotherapeutic drugs has shown promising results due to the synergistic action of virus and drugs; the combinatorial therapy is considered a potential clinically relevant approach for cancer. In this study, we optimized a strategy to absorb peptides on the viral capsid, based on electrostatic interaction, and used this strategy to deliver an active antitumor drug. We used L-carnosine, a naturally occurring histidine dipeptide with a significant antiproliferative activity. An ad hoc modified, positively charged L-carnosine was combined with the capsid of an oncolytic adenovirus to generate an electrostatic virus-carnosine complex. This complex showed enhanced antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo in different tumor models. In HCT-116 colorectal and A549 lung cancer cell lines, the complex showed higher transduction ratio and infectious titer compared with an uncoated oncolytic adenovirus. The in vivo efficacy of the complex was tested in lung and colon cancer xenograft models, showing a significant reduction in tumor growth. Importantly, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of complex on tumor growth reduction. We found that complex induces apoptosis in both cell lines, by using two different mechanisms, enhancing viral replication and affecting the expression of Hsp27. Our system could be used in future studies also for delivery of other bioactive drugs. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 651-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26861248

  18. Carnosine facilitates nitric oxide production in endothelial f-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Nakashima, Yukiko; Toda, Ken-Ichi

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effect of carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) on nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in endothelial F-2 cells. Carnosine enhanced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, and the stimulatory effect of carnosine was observed at concentrations exceeding 5 mM. The carnosine-stimulated NO production was inhibited by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not by N(G)-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester. In contrast, beta-alanine, histidine (carnosine components) and anserine (N-methyl carnosine) failed to increase NO production. Carnosine had no effect on NO production for the initial 5 min, but thereafter resulted in a gradual increase in NO production up to 15 min. Carnosine did not induce phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. The carnosine-induced increase in NO production was observed even when extracellular Ca2+ was depleted by ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'-N'-tetraacetic acid however, the effect was abolished upon depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA. After F-2 cells were incubated with carnosine for 4 min, intracellular Ca2+ concentration gradually increased. The carnosine-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration occurred even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carnosine facilitates NO production in endothelial F-2 cells. It is also suggested that eNOS is activated by Ca2+, which might be released from intracellular Ca2+ stores in response to carnosine. PMID:19881293

  19. Physiological role of carnosine in contracting muscle.

    PubMed

    Begum, Gulshanara; Cunliffe, Adam; Leveritt, Michael

    2005-10-01

    High-intensity exercise leads to reductions in muscle substrates (ATP, PCr6, and glycogen) and a subsequent accumulation of metabolites (ADP, P, H(+), and Mg(+)) with a possible increase in free radical production. These factors independently and collectively have deleterious effects on muscle, with significant repercussions on high-intensity performance or training sessions. The effect of carnosine on overcoming muscle fatigue appears to be related to its ability to buffer the increased H(+) concentration following high-intensity work. Carnosine, however, has other roles such as an antioxidant, a metal chelator, a Ca(2+) and enzyme regulator, an inhibitor of protein glycosylation and protein-protein cross-linking. To date7comma; only 1 study has investigated the effects of carnosine supplementation (not in pure form) on exercise performance in human subjects and found no improvement in repetitive high-intensity work. Much data has come from in vitro work on animal skeletal muscle fibers or other components of muscle contractile mechanisms. Thus further research needs to be carried out on humans to provide additional understanding on the effects of carnosine in vivo. PMID:16327029

  20. Metabolite Proofreading in Carnosine and Homocarnosine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Chevalier, Nathalie; Stroobant, Vincent; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine synthase is the ATP-dependent ligase responsible for carnosine (β-alanyl-histidine) and homocarnosine (γ-aminobutyryl-histidine) synthesis in skeletal muscle and brain, respectively. This enzyme uses, also at substantial rates, lysine, ornithine, and arginine instead of histidine, yet the resulting dipeptides are virtually absent from muscle or brain, suggesting that they are removed by a “metabolite repair” enzyme. Using a radiolabeled substrate, we found that rat skeletal muscle, heart, and brain contained a cytosolic β-alanyl-lysine dipeptidase activity. This enzyme, which has the characteristics of a metalloenzyme, was purified ≈200-fold from rat skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry analysis of the fractions obtained at different purification stages indicated parallel enrichment of PM20D2, a peptidase of unknown function belonging to the metallopeptidase 20 family. Western blotting showed coelution of PM20D2 with β-alanyl-lysine dipeptidase activity. Recombinant mouse PM20D2 hydrolyzed β-alanyl-lysine, β-alanyl-ornithine, γ-aminobutyryl-lysine, and γ-aminobutyryl-ornithine as its best substrates. It also acted at lower rates on β-alanyl-arginine and γ-aminobutyryl-arginine but virtually not on carnosine or homocarnosine. Although acting preferentially on basic dipeptides derived from β-alanine or γ-aminobutyrate, PM20D2 also acted at lower rates on some “classic dipeptides” like α-alanyl-lysine and α-lysyl-lysine. The same activity profile was observed with human PM20D2, yet this enzyme was ∼100–200-fold less active on all substrates tested than the mouse enzyme. Cotransfection in HEK293T cells of mouse or human PM20D2 together with carnosine synthase prevented the accumulation of abnormal dipeptides (β-alanyl-lysine, β-alanyl-ornithine, γ-aminobutyryl-lysine), thus favoring the synthesis of carnosine and homocarnosine and confirming the metabolite repair role of PM20D2. PMID:24891507

  1. Prevention of radiation esophagitis by polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yanase, Komei; Funaguchi, Norihiko; Iihara, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Maya; Kaito, Daizo; Endo, Junki; Ito, Fumitaka; Ohno, Yasushi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Itoh, Yoshinori; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) plays an important role in multimodality therapy for non-small cell lung cancer. However, esophagitis often develops as a complication of CCRT, causing treatment delays and reducing the patient’s quality of life. We examined the efficacy of polaprezinc (PZ), zinc L-carnosine used for the therapy of gastric ulcer, against the onset of esophagitis caused by CCRT for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients who concurrently underwent chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel and thoracic radiotherapy at Gifu University Hospital during a period of January 2011 and May 2015 were the subjects of the present study. Patients received a mixture of sodium alginate solution and aluminum-magnesium hydroxide gel with (PZ group) or without (control group) PZ for prevention of radiation esophagitis. Results: PZ significantly inhibited the development of grade ≥2 radiation esophagitis (HR 0.397, 95% confidence interval, 0.160-0.990; P=0.047). In addition, PZ lowered the incidence of grade ≥2 esophagitis at the time point of 40 Gy irradiation (26.3% versus 63.2%, P=0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the incident rates of other adverse events associated with chemoradiotherapy between the PZ group and control group. Moreover, PZ had no significant influence on the tumor response rate. Conclusion: PZ significantly retarded the development as well as the incidence of grade ≥2 esophagitis without affecting the tumor response. PMID:26629136

  2. Free radical scavenging and radioprotective effects of carnosine and anserine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Hata, Kuniki; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Hatano, Yoshihiko

    2009-12-01

    Two histidine-containing natural dipeptides, carnosine and anserine (β-alanyl-1-methyl- L-histidine), have been examined for their antioxidant and radioprotective abilities. Pulse radiolysis studies indicated the antioxidative properties of carnosine and anserine aqueous solutions at different pH. The rate constants for the reaction OH radical with carnosine at neutral pH were determined to be 5.3×10 9 M -1 s -1 at 300 nm, and 4.1×10 9 M -1 s -1 at 400 nm, respectively. Carnosine and anserine also protected plasmid pUC18 DNA from X-ray radiation-induced strand breaks as evidenced from the studies by agarose gel electrophoresis. Carnosine showed higher protective efficiency under the experimental conditions. Our data demonstrated that carnosine and anserine may play an important role in the maintenance of the antioxidant system.

  3. Clinicopathologic significance of immunostaining of α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein and death domain-associated protein in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Fan; Kasajima, Atsuko; Yazdani, Samaneh; Chan, Monica S M; Wang, Lin; He, Yang-Yang; Gao, Hong-Wen; Sasano, Hironobu

    2013-10-01

    α-Thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein (ATRX) and death domain-associated protein (DAXX) genes are tumor suppressors whose mutations have been identified in sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors as well as in patients with MEN1. However, it is unknown whether ATRX and DAXX alterations are specific for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In addition, the association of ATRX/DAXX protein loss with tumor cell proliferation has not been examined. We, therefore, immunostained ATRX and DAXX in 10 gastric, 15 duodenal, 20 rectal, 70 pancreatic, and 22 pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors with 15 nonneoplastic pancreases and 27 pancreatic adenocarcinomas to elucidate the site-specific roles of ATRX/DAXX abnormalities. At least 1 loss of ATRX and DAXX immunoreactivity was detected in all neuroendocrine tumor cases but not in any of nonneoplastic pancreatic tissues or pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The loss of DAXX protein was correlated with the Ki-67 index (ATRX, P = .904; DAXX, P = .044). The status of DAXX immunoreactivity correlated positively with World Health Organization histologic grade (P = .026). These results suggest that the status of ATRX or DAXX protein loss in neuroendocrine tumor differed among the organs in which these tumors arose, and these proteins may play site-specific roles in the development of these tumors. PMID:23954140

  4. Use of Carnosine for Oxidative Stress Reduction in Different Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Prokopieva, V. D.; Yarygina, E. G.; Bokhan, N. A.; Ivanova, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties and biological effects of the antioxidant carnosine, the natural dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine, are considered. Data on the effective use of carnosine in different pathologies are presented. Special attention is paid to issues of use of carnosine in neurologic and mental diseases, in alcoholism as well as in physiological states accompanied by activation of free-radical processes and formation of oxidative stress. PMID:26904160

  5. Use of Carnosine for Oxidative Stress Reduction in Different Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Prokopieva, V D; Yarygina, E G; Bokhan, N A; Ivanova, S A

    2016-01-01

    The main properties and biological effects of the antioxidant carnosine, the natural dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine, are considered. Data on the effective use of carnosine in different pathologies are presented. Special attention is paid to issues of use of carnosine in neurologic and mental diseases, in alcoholism as well as in physiological states accompanied by activation of free-radical processes and formation of oxidative stress. PMID:26904160

  6. Carnosine induced formation of silver nanochains: A radiolytic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkar, Vishwabharati V.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2015-02-01

    Interaction of carnosine with silver clusters and its nanoparticles is studied at pH 8.2 and 9.2. Using time resolved kinetic measurements we show that carnosine interacts with the charged silver clusters. Using ionizing radiation silver particles are also produced in aqueous solution. In the presence of carnosine distinct differences in the surface plasmon absorption band of Ag nanoparticles is observed with change in pH. The results suggest that silver nanochains get formed through dipole-dipole interaction due to weak interaction with carnosine. UV-Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the nanoparticles.

  7. Could carnosine or related structures suppress Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, copper and zinc ions, glycating agents and reactive aldehydes, protein cross-linking and proteolytic dysfunction may all contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is a naturally-occurring, pluripotent, homeostatic agent. The olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc. Loss of olfactory function and oxidative damage to olfactory tissue are early symptoms of AD. Amyloid peptide aggregates in AD brain are enriched in zinc ions. Carnosine can chelate zinc ions. Protein oxidation and glycation are integral components of the AD pathophysiology. Carnosine can suppress amyloid-beta peptide toxicity, inhibit production of oxygen free-radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and reactive aldehydes, and suppresses protein glycation. Glycated protein accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients. Homocarnosine levels in human CSF dramatically decline with age. CSF composition and turnover is controlled by the choroid plexus which possesses a specific transporter for carnosine and homocarnosine. Carnosine reacts with protein carbonyls and suppress the reactivity of glycated proteins. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity is diminished in AD patient brains. Administration of CA activators improves learning in animals. Carnosine is a CA activator. Protein cross-links (gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-amino) are present in neurofibrillary tangles in AD brain. gamma-Glutamyl-carnosine has been isolated from biological tissue. Carnosine stimulates vimentin expression in cultured human fibroblasts. The protease oxidised-protein-hydrolase is co-expressed with vimentin. Carnosine stimulates proteolysis in cultured myocytes and senescent cultured fibroblasts. These observations suggest that carnosine and related structures should be explored for therapeutic potential towards AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17522447

  8. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  9. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL(-1) for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL(-1). The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  10. Effect of carnosine on erythrocyte deformability in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yapislar, Hande; Aydogan, Sami

    2012-12-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays an important role in the chronic complications of diabetes. Lipid peroxidation is one of the consequences of oxidative stress. Erythrocyte deformability abilities are reduced as a result of lipid peroxidation. Conversely, a decrease nitric oxide (NO) production seems to be responsible in endothelial dysfunction which occurs in diabetic vascular complications. Carnosine is a molecule with anti-oxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate erythrocyte deformability indices and the effects of carnosine on erythrocyte deformability in diabetes and to determine a possible relationship between carnosine and nitric oxide. Male Wistar albino rats were used in the study. Injections were administered to seven groups consisting of eight rats each. The groups were: Control, Carnosine, L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), Diabetic, STZ (Streptozotocin) +Carnosine, STZ+L-NAME and STZ+Carnosine+L-NAME. In addition, glucose, insulin, MDA (Malondialdehyde) and NO levels were measured and erythrocyte deformability indices were calculated in all groups. Erythrocyte deformability indices and NO levels were decreased and MDA levels were found to be increased in diabetic group. It was also found that carnosine can significantly reverse erythrocyte deformability, reduce lipid peroxidation and increase NO levels in diabetes. It can be concluded that carnosine can recover from microvascular circulation problems by increasing erythrocyte deformability, can protect cells and tissues against lipid peroxidation and can be used as a multi-functional anti-oxidant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus to prevent the complications of diabetes. PMID:22946660

  11. Carnosine and its possible roles in nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2009-01-01

    The dipeptide carnosine has been observed to exert antiaging activity at cellular and whole animal levels. This review discusses the possible mechanisms by which carnosine may exert antiaging action and considers whether the dipeptide could be beneficial to humans. Carnosine's possible biological activities include scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), chelator of zinc and copper ions, and antiglycating and anticross-linking activities. Carnosine's ability to react with deleterious aldehydes such as malondialdehyde, methylglyoxal, hydroxynonenal, and acetaldehyde may also contribute to its protective functions. Physiologically carnosine may help to suppress some secondary complications of diabetes, and the deleterious consequences of ischemic-reperfusion injury, most likely due to antioxidation and carbonyl-scavenging functions. Other, and much more speculative, possible functions of carnosine considered include transglutaminase inhibition, stimulation of proteolysis mediated via effects on proteasome activity or induction of protease and stress-protein gene expression, upregulation of corticosteroid synthesis, stimulation of protein repair, and effects on ADP-ribose metabolism associated with sirtuin and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) activities. Evidence for carnosine's possible protective action against secondary diabetic complications, neurodegeneration, cancer, and other age-related pathologies is briefly discussed. PMID:19595386

  12. Fragmentation pathways analysis for the gas phase dissociation of protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Moustafa, Eslam M; Sicilia, Emilia; Russo, Nino; Shoeib, Tamer

    2015-03-14

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complex, [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) using several collision energies were shown to yield nine different fragment ions. Energy-resolved CID experiments on [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) showed that the generation of the product ion [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+) (where dach is 1,2-diaminocyclohexane) is the lowest energy process. At slightly higher collision energies, the loss of neutral carnosine from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) to produce [OxPt + H](+) was observed, followed by the loss of oxaliplatin from the same precursor ion to produce [Carnosine + H](+). At significantly higher energies, the ion [OxPt - CO2 + H](+) was shown to be formed, while the last two investigated ions [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) did not attain any significant relative abundance. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were employed to probe the fragmentation mechanisms that account for all experimental data. The lowest free energy barriers for the generation of each of the ions [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+), [OxPt + H](+), [Carnosine + H](+), [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) according to the fragmentation mechanisms offered here were calculated to be 31.9, 38.8, 49.3, 75.2, and 85.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. PMID:25325236

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Carnosine in THz Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hai-Tao; Wang, Wei-Ning

    2005-12-01

    The characteristic fingerprints of carnosine from 0.2 to 2.6 THz are first measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at room temperature. For the pure carnosine, the refractive index varies between 1.79 and 1.85 with the average value 1.84, while for the carnosine-polyethylene mixture, four absorption peaks centred at 1.37, 1.56, 1.85 and 2.49 THz are detected. A comparison of the theoretical predictions using the density functional theory with the experimental results shows satisfactory agreement except somewhat blue shift.

  14. Possible Benefit of Dietary Carnosine towards Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Many stress-related and depressive disorders have been shown to be associated with one or more of the following; shortened telomeres, raised cortisol levels and increased susceptibility to age-related dysfunction. It is suggested here that insufficient availability of the neurological peptide, carnosine, may provide a biochemical link between stress- and depression-associated phenomena: there is evidence that carnosine can enhance cortisol metabolism, suppress telomere shortening and exert anti-aging activity in model systems. Dietary supplementation with carnosine has been shown to suppress stress in animals, and improve behaviour, cognition and well-being in human subjects. It is therefore proposed that the therapeutic potential of carnosine dietary supplementation towards stress-related and depressive disorders should be examined. PMID:26425385

  15. Possible Benefit of Dietary Carnosine towards Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2015-09-01

    Many stress-related and depressive disorders have been shown to be associated with one or more of the following; shortened telomeres, raised cortisol levels and increased susceptibility to age-related dysfunction. It is suggested here that insufficient availability of the neurological peptide, carnosine, may provide a biochemical link between stress- and depression-associated phenomena: there is evidence that carnosine can enhance cortisol metabolism, suppress telomere shortening and exert anti-aging activity in model systems. Dietary supplementation with carnosine has been shown to suppress stress in animals, and improve behaviour, cognition and well-being in human subjects. It is therefore proposed that the therapeutic potential of carnosine dietary supplementation towards stress-related and depressive disorders should be examined. PMID:26425385

  16. Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A., Ed.

    Thirteen papers by different authors consider the application of research findings and theoretical formulations to the practical appraisal and treatment of mental retardation. All suggest methods for shaping appropriate and adaptive behaviors in retarded individuals. The papers include "Definition, Diagnosis, and Classification" by D.W. Brison,…

  17. Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, Dominick P.; And Others

    Evidence today indicates that the causes of mental retardation are biological, psychological, and social in origin and that a combination of these causes frequently occur in a single individual. Mental retardation is identified clinically by the presence of several signs that include, but are not limited to, a significant impairment of…

  18. Fabrication and Intracellular Delivery of Doxorubicin/Carbonate Apatite Nanocomposites: Effect on Growth Retardation of Established Colon Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque; Wu, Xin; Hirose, Hajime; Haque, Amranul; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    In continuing search for effective treatments of cancer, the emerging model aims at efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutics into tumor cells in order to increase the drug concentration. However, the implementation of this strategy suffers from inefficient cellular uptake and drug resistance. Therefore, pH-sensitive nanosystems have recently been developed to target slightly acidic extracellular pH environment of solid tumors. The pH targeting approach is regarded as a more general strategy than conventional specific tumor cell surface targeting approaches, because the acidic tumor microclimate is most common in solid tumors. When nanosystems are combined with triggered release mechanisms in endosomal or lysosomal acidic pH along with endosomolytic capability, the nanocarriers demonstrated to overcome multidrug resistance of various tumors. Here, novel pH sensitive carbonate apatite has been fabricated to efficiently deliver anticancer drug Doxorubicin (DOX) to cancer cells, by virtue of its pH sensitivity being quite unstable under an acidic condition in endosomes and the desirable size of the resulting apatite-DOX for efficient cellular uptake as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Florescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated significant uptake of drug (92%) when complexed with apatite nanoparticles. In vitro chemosensitivity assay revealed that apatite-DOX nanoparticles executed high cytotoxicity in several human cancer cell lines compared to free drugs and consequently apatite-DOX-facilitated enhanced tumor inhibitory effect was observed in colorectal tumor model within BALB/cA nude mice, thereby shedding light on their potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:23613726

  19. [The use of carnosine in medical practice. Priorities: past and future].

    PubMed

    Formaziuk, V E; Sergienko, V I

    1992-09-01

    The history of the discovery of curative effects of carnosine and its perspective applications in the clinical practice are reviewed. The molecular mechanisms of carnosine interactions with free oxygen radicals (hypochlorite anion, in particular) are considered. PMID:1334708

  20. Structural Elucidation of a Carnosine-Acrolein Adduct and its Quantification in Human Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Vanderson S.; de Arruda Campos, Ivan P.; Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehydes accumulate in inflammation, during myocardial infarction and have been associated with pain symptoms. One pathway of aldehyde detoxification is the conjugation with carnosine. A 3-methylpyridinium carnosine adduct from the reaction of carnosine and acrolein was characterized using extensive spectroscopic measurements. The adduct with urinary concentrations of 1.82 ± 0.68 nmol/mg of creatinine is one of the most abundant acrolein metabolites in urine and opens promising therapeutic strategies for carnosine. PMID:26783107

  1. Structural Elucidation of a Carnosine-Acrolein Adduct and its Quantification in Human Urine Samples.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Vanderson S; de Arruda Campos, Ivan P; Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2016-01-01

    Aldehydes accumulate in inflammation, during myocardial infarction and have been associated with pain symptoms. One pathway of aldehyde detoxification is the conjugation with carnosine. A 3-methylpyridinium carnosine adduct from the reaction of carnosine and acrolein was characterized using extensive spectroscopic measurements. The adduct with urinary concentrations of 1.82 ± 0.68 nmol/mg of creatinine is one of the most abundant acrolein metabolites in urine and opens promising therapeutic strategies for carnosine. PMID:26783107

  2. Muscle Carnosine Is Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Humans

    PubMed Central

    de Courten, Barbora; Kurdiova, Timea; de Courten, Maximilian P. J.; Belan, Vitazoslav; Everaert, Inge; Vician, Marek; Teede, Helena; Gasperikova, Daniela; Aldini, Giancarlo; Derave, Wim; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Carnosine is a naturally present dipeptide abundant in skeletal muscle and an over-the counter food additive. Animal data suggest a role of carnosine supplementation in the prevention and treatment of obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease but only limited human data exists. Methods and Results Samples of vastus lateralis muscle were obtained by needle biopsy. We measured muscle carnosine levels (high-performance liquid chromatography), % body fat (bioimpedance), abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adiposity (magnetic resonance imaging), insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp), resting energy expenditure (REE, indirect calorimetry), free-living ambulatory physical activity (accelerometers) and lipid profile in 36 sedentary non-vegetarian middle aged men (45±7 years) with varying degrees of adiposity and glucose tolerance. Muscle carnosine content was positively related to % body fat (r = 0.35, p = 0.04) and subcutaneous (r = 0.38, p = 0.02) but not visceral fat (r = 0.17, p = 0.33). Muscle carnosine content was inversely associated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.44, p = 0.008), REE (r = -0.58, p<0.001) and HDL-cholesterol levels (r = -0.34, p = 0.048). Insulin sensitivity and physical activity were the best predictors of muscle carnosine content after adjustment for adiposity. Conclusion Our data shows that higher carnosine content in human skeletal muscle is positively associated with insulin resistance and fasting metabolic preference for glucose. Moreover, it is negatively associated with HDL-cholesterol and basal energy expenditure. Intervention studies targeting insulin resistance, metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors are necessary to evaluate its putative role in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26439389

  3. Carnosine Treatment for Gulf War Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib U.; Timbol, Christian R.

    2013-01-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  4. Carnosine treatment for gulf war illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James Nicholas; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib; Timbol, Christian

    2013-05-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (B-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  5. Carnosine has antinociceptive properties in the inflammation-induced nociceptive response in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Asato, Megumi; Yamamoto, Shohei; Ono, Hideki; Hisa, Hiroaki; Kamei, Junzo

    2012-05-01

    Carnosine is a biologically active dipeptide that is found in fish and chicken muscle. Recent studies have revealed that carnosine has neuroprotective activity in zinc-induced neural cell apoptosis and ischemic stroke. In the present study, we examined the expression of carnosine in the spinal cord, and the antinociceptive potency of carnosine in a mouse model of inflammation-induced nociceptive pain. Immunohistochemical studies with antiserum against carnosine showed an abundance of carnosine-immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord. Double-immunostaining techniques revealed that carnosine was expressed in the neurons and astrocytes in the spinal cord. Oral administration of carnosine attenuated the number of writhing behaviors induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 0.6% acetic acid. Treatment with carnosine also attenuated the second phase, but not the first phase, of the nociceptive response to formalin. Moreover, intrathecal, but not intraplanter, administration of carnosine attenuated the second phase of the nociceptive response to formalin. Our immunohistochemical and behavioral data suggest that carnosine has antinociceptive effects toward inflammatory pain, which may be mediated by the attenuation of nociceptive sensitization in the spinal cord. PMID:22366199

  6. Protection of neuronal cells against reactive oxygen species by carnosine and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, Alexander; Bulygina, Elena; Leinsoo, Toomas; Petrushanko, Irina; Tsubone, Shiori; Abe, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    Carnosine and related compounds were compared in terms of their abilities to decrease the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in suspensions of isolated neurons activated by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) using both stationary fluorescence measurements and flow cytometry. Carnosine was found to suppress the fluorescent signal induced by ROS production and decreased the proportion of highly fluorescent neurons, while histidine showed opposite effects. N-Acetylated derivatives of both carnosine and histidine demonstrated weak (statistically indistinguishable) suppressive effects on the ROS signal. N-Methylated derivatives of carnosine suppressed intracellular ROS generation to the same extent as carnosine. This rank of effectiveness is distinct from that previously obtained for the anti-radical ability of CRCs (anserine>carnosine>ophidine). These differences suggest that the similar ability of carnosine and its N-methylated derivatives to protect neuronal cells against the excitotoxic effect of NMDA is not solely related to the antioxidant properties of these compounds. PMID:14698913

  7. Distribution of carnosine-like peptides in the nervous system of developing and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and embryonic effects of chronic carnosine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Azher, Seema; Margolis, Frank L.; Patel, Kamakshi; Mousa, Ahmad; Majid, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine-like peptides (carnosine-LP) are a family of histidine derivatives that are present in the nervous system of various species and that exhibit antioxidant, anti-matrix-metalloproteinase, anti-excitotoxic, and free-radical scavenging properties. They are also neuroprotective in animal models of cerebral ischemia. Although the function of carnosine-LP is largely unknown, the hypothesis has been advanced that they play a role in the developing nervous system. Since the zebrafish is an excellent vertebrate model for studying development and disease, we have examined the distribution pattern of carnosine-LP in the adult and developing zebrafish. In the adult, immunoreactivity for carnosine-LP is specifically concentrated in sensory neurons and non-sensory cells of the olfactory epithelium, the olfactory nerve, and the olfactory bulb. Robust staining has also been observed in the retinal outer nuclear layer and the corneal epithelium. Developmental studies have revealed immunostaining for carnosine-LP as early as 18 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-fertilization in, respectively, the olfactory, corneal, and retinal primordia. These data suggest that carnosine-LP are involved in olfactory and visual function. We have also investigated the effects of chronic (7 days) exposure to carnosine on embryonic development and show that 0.01 μM to 10 mM concentrations of carnosine do not elicit significant deleterious effects. Conversely, treatment with 100 mM carnosine results in developmental delay and compromised larval survival. These results indicate that, at lower concentrations, exogenously administered carnosine can be used to explore the role of carnosine in development and developmental disorders of the nervous system. PMID:19440736

  8. Flame retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitzsch, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of flame retardants in plastics has grown only slightly in recent years and will probably grow slowly in the future. The reasons for this are slow economic growth and the absence of fundamentally new requirements for future fire prevention. The trends are toward the increasing use of easily handled, dust-free and well-dispersed flame retardant compounds and master batches; there are no spectacular new developments. In the future, questions of smoke evolution, toxicity and corrosiveness of combustion gases will become increasingly important, especially due to new regulations and rising requirements for environmental protection.

  9. A novel miR-451a isomiR, associated with amelanotypic phenotype, acts as a tumor suppressor in melanoma by retarding cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Fleming, Elizabeth; Wu, Rong; Dadras, Soheil S

    2014-01-01

    miRNAs are key regulatory small non-coding RNAs involved in critical steps of melanoma tumorigenesis; however, the relationship between sequence specific variations at the 5' or 3' termini (isomiR) of a miRNA and cancer phenotype remains unclear. Deep-sequencing and qRT-PCR showed reduced expression of miR-144/451a cluster and most abundant isomiR (miR451a.1) in dysplastic nevi, in-situ and invasive melanomas compared to common nevi and normal skin (n = 101). miRNA in situ hybridization reproducibly confirmed lost miR-451a.1 in melanoma compared to nevus cells or adjacent keratinocytes. Significantly higher expression of miR-451a.1 was associated with amelanotic phenotype in melanomas (n = 47). In contrast, miR-451a was associated with melanotic phenotype, absent pagetoid scatter of intraepidermal melanocytes, superficial spreading histological subtype and tumor inflammation. Sequencing miRNAs from cultured melanocytes with cytoplasmic melanin gradient (light, medium to dark) showed absent miR-451a while revealing other melanin-associated miRNAs, e.g. miR-30b, miR-100 and miR-590 in darkly and let-7a, let-7i and let-7f in lightly to moderately pigmented cultured melanocytes. Ectopic expression of miR-144/451a in melanoma cell lines resulted in markedly higher levels of mature miR-451a.1 than miR451a or miR-144; and significantly retarded cell migration and inhibited invasion in a glucose-sensitive manner. Surprisingly, these effects were not mediated by calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39), a proven miR451a gene target. miR-144/miR-451a cluster is a novel miRNA locus with tumor suppressive activity in melanoma. PMID:25237911

  10. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species.

  11. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect.

    PubMed

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species. PMID:27265207

  12. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    PubMed Central

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species. PMID:27265207

  13. [In vitro demonstration of histamine biosynthesis from carnosine by kidneys of pregnant mice].

    PubMed

    Arnould, J M

    1987-01-01

    Kidneys of pregnant mice synthesize histamine when incubated in the presence of carnosine, manganese, and pyridoxal phosphate. Intensity of biosynthesis increases linearly with the amount of enzyme and the incubation time. The reaction can only be catalysed by two enzymes that are located in kidneys and act in succession: carnosinase, which hydrolyzes carnosine into its two moieties, and histidine decarboxylase, which transforms histidine, a product of carnosine degradation, into histamine. The biosynthesis of histamine from carnosine seems to increase with the progress of pregnancy. In nonpregnant mice, kidneys do not effect this biosynthesis. The above results directly demonstrate that carnosine may be used for histamine synthesis when the activity of histidine decarboxylase is high, as in pregnant mouse kidney. Vertebrate carnosine, its role still enigmatic, might thus be mainly a potential histidine reservoir that would be mobilized any time there is a significant requirement for histidine, such as for histamine biosynthesis. PMID:3567723

  14. Neuroprotective Effect of Carnosine on Primary Culture of Rat Cerebellar Cells under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lopachev, A V; Lopacheva, O M; Abaimov, D A; Koroleva, O V; Vladychenskaya, E A; Erukhimovich, A A; Fedorova, T N

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a natural antioxidant, but its protective effect under oxidative stress induced by neurotoxins is studied insufficiently. In this work, we show the neuroprotective effect of carnosine in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells under oxidative stress induced by 1 mM 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), which directly generates free radicals both in the medium and in the cells, and 20 nM rotenone, which increases the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In both models, adding 2 mM carnosine to the incubation medium decreased cell death calculated using fluorescence microscopy and enhanced cell viability estimated by the MTT assay. The antioxidant effect of carnosine inside cultured cells was demonstrated using the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescein. Carnosine reduced by half the increase in the number of ROS in neurons induced by 20 nM rotenone. Using iron-induced chemiluminescence, we showed that preincubation of primary neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine prevents the decrease in endogenous antioxidant potential of cells induced by 1 mM AAPH and 20 nM rotenone. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we showed that a 10-min incubation of neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine leads to a 14.5-fold increase in carnosine content in cell lysates. Thus, carnosine is able to penetrate neurons and exerts an antioxidant effect. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of the peptide transporter PEPT2 in rat cerebellar cells, which suggests the possibility of carnosine transport into the cells. At the same time, Western blot analysis showed no carnosine-induced changes in the level of apoptosis regulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and in the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, which suggests that carnosine could have minimal or no side effects on proliferation and apoptosis control systems in normal cells. PMID:27297901

  15. Inhibitory effect of the carnosine-gallic acid synthetic peptide on MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Rae; Eom, Tae-Kil; Byun, Hee-Guk

    2014-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that degrade extracellular matrix components and play important roles in a variety of biological and pathological processes such as malignant tumor metastasis and invasion. In this study, we constructed carnosine-gallic acid peptide (CGP) to identify a better MMP inhibitor than carnosine. The inhibitory effects of CGP on MMP-2 and MMP-9 were investigated in the human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cell line. As a result, CGP significantly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression levels without a cytotoxic effect. Moreover, CGP may inhibit migration and invasion in HT1080 cells through the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-uPA receptor signaling pathways to inhibit MMP-2 and MMP-9. Based on these results, it appears that CGP may play an important role in preventing and treating several MMP-2 and MMP-9-mediated health problems such as metastasis. PMID:24956509

  16. Vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age, but not CNDP1 genotype, are associated with reduced muscle carnosine levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Inge; Mooyaart, Antien; Baguet, Audrey; Zutinic, Ana; Baelde, Hans; Achten, Eric; Taes, Youri; De Heer, Emile; Derave, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Carnosine is found in high concentrations in skeletal muscles, where it is involved in several physiological functions. The muscle carnosine content measured within a population can vary by a factor 4. The aim of this study was to further characterize suggested determinants of the muscle carnosine content (diet, gender and age) and to identify new determinants (plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone). We investigated a group of 149 healthy subjects, which consisted of 94 men (12 vegetarians) and 55 women. Muscle carnosine was quantified in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior using magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy and blood samples were collected to determine CNDP1 genotype, plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone concentrations. Compared to women, men have 36, 28 and 82% higher carnosine concentrations in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscle, respectively, whereas circulating testosterone concentrations were unrelated to muscle carnosine levels in healthy men. The carnosine content of the M. soleus is negatively related to the subjects' age. Vegetarians have a lower carnosine content of 26% in gastrocnemius compared to omnivores. In contrast, there is no difference in muscle carnosine content between omnivores with a high or low ingestion of β-alanine. Muscle carnosine levels are not related to the polymorphism of the CNDP1 gene or to the enzymatic activity of the plasma carnosinase. In conclusion, neither CNDP1 genotype nor the normal variation in circulating testosterone levels affects the muscular carnosine content, whereas vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age are the factors associated with reduced muscle carnosine stores. PMID:20865290

  17. Studies on adsorption of carnosine on silver nanoparticles by SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Biswas, N.; Malkar, V. V.; Mukherjee, T.; Kapoor, S.

    2010-05-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of L-carnosine was carried out in aqueous silver sol at pH ˜ 9 and compared with the normal Raman spectrum of the molecule. The experimentally observed Raman bands were assigned based on the results of DFT calculations. Significant changes in the relative intensity are seen in the SERS spectrum when compared to the normal Raman spectrum. The studies suggest that the interaction of carnosine is primarily through the carboxylate group with the imidazole ring in an upright position with respect to the silver surface and the alanine moiety assuming a parallel orientation with the surface where NH 2 group is close to the silver surface.

  18. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation. PMID:21693116

  19. Would carnosine or a carnivorous diet help suppress aging and associated pathologies?

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is found exclusively in animal tissues. Carnosine has the potential to suppress many of the biochemical changes (e.g., protein oxidation, glycation, AGE formation, and cross-linking) that accompany aging and associated pathologies. Glycation, generation of advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs), and formation of protein carbonyl groups play important roles in aging, diabetes, its secondary complications, and neurodegenerative conditions. Due to carnosine's antiglycating activity, reactivity toward deleterious carbonyls, zinc- and copper-chelating activity and low toxicity, carnosine and related structures could be effective against age-related protein carbonyl stress. It is suggested that carnivorous diets could be beneficial because of their carnosine content, as the dipeptide has been shown to suppress some diabetic complications in mice. It is also suggested that carnosine's therapeutic potential should be explored with respect to neurodegeneration. Olfactory tissue is normally enriched in carnosine, but olfactory dysfunction is frequently associated with neurodegeneration. Olfactory administration of carnosine could provide a direct route to compromised tissue, avoiding serum carnosinases. PMID:16804013

  20. Inhibitory effect of carnosine on interleukin-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells through translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ok; Satsu, Hideo; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2008-05-01

    The enhanced intestinal production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to inflammation and carcinogenesis, and therefore its down-regulation by nutrients could represent a promising therapeutic approach. We found for the first time that the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in intestinal epithelial cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide or TNF-alpha was suppressed in the presence of carnosine (beta-Ala-His), a dietary dipeptide. Interestingly, carnosine had no influence on the stimulus-induced IL-8 mRNA expression, although the intracellular production and secretion of IL-8 were significantly inhibited by carnosine. The inhibitory effect of carnosine on the IL-8 secretion differed from that of other histidine-containing dipeptides like Gly-His, Ala-His, and anserine (beta-Ala-1-methyl-His), which inhibited both the hydrogen peroxide-induced secretion and mRNA expression of IL-8. These observations indicate that carnosine inhibited IL-8 secretion along a unique pathway, in which IL-8 production was suppressed at a post-transcriptional level, for instance, translation. The hypothesis that carnosine inhibited the translation of IL-8 mRNA is supported by the finding that the phosphorylation of eIF4E, an initiation factor, in stimulated Caco-2 cells was inhibited by carnosine. These results suggest that carnosine is a novel type of anti-inflammatory agent that down-regulates the inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells by a unique mechanism. PMID:18397832

  1. Evaluation of the antioxidant ability of hydrazine-purified and untreated commercial carnosine in beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Escalante, Armida; Djenane, Djamel; Torrescano, Gastón; Giménez, Begoña; Beltrán, José Antonio; Roncalés, Pedro

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this research was to reevaluate the inhibition of oxidative changes in beef patties packaged in modified atmosphere (70% O(2)+20% CO(2)+10% N(2)) by carnosine (50 mM). The need for reevaluation was because it had been postulated that hydrazine present as contaminant in commercial carnosine could contribute to the antioxidant activity. Beef patties with either commercial or purified hydrazine-free carnosine were stored at 2±1 °C for 20 days and evaluated for colour (a* and H*), TBARS, metmyoglobin formation (% of total surface myoglobin), psychrotrophic microbial counts and sensory odour. Results indicated that both forms of carnosine effectively inhibited lipid oxidation and color changes in beef patties throughout storage, showing no significant differences (P>0.05) between them. It was concluded that the antioxidant effect was brought about by the carnosine molecule and not by hydrazine. PMID:22062663

  2. Impairment of jejunal absorption rate of carnosine by glycylglycine in man in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    1976-01-01

    Using a double-lumen tube jejunal perfusion system in vivo, the mutual effects of carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and glycylglycine on their respective absorption rates have been studied in six Zambian African adults. Data on the effect of the constituent amino-acids of carnosine on glycylglycine absorption rate have similarly been obtained. The solutions infused in each subject contained (A) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1), (B) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1) and glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), (C) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), and (D) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), L-histidine (50 mmol l.-1) and beta-alanine (50 mmol l.-1). Glycylglycine produced a significant impairment in the mean rate of histidine absorption from carnosine (P less than 0-01). However, carnosine did not have a significant effect on the mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine. Mean rate of histidine absorption from solution D was significantly higher than that from solution A (P less than 0-01). Mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine was not significantly different during infusion of solutions B, C, and D. The results are consistent with the concept that carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of mechanism; the lack of influence of carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of carnosine for the dipeptide uptake mechanism is relatively low. A gross difference has been shown between mean absorption rate of histidine from free L-histidine (solution D) (25-8 mmol h-1) and when it is given in the form of carnosine in the presence of another dipeptide (solution B) (8-7 mmol h-1); that emphasizes the complexity of amino acid and peptide interaction during absorption, which must be important in nutrition. PMID:773786

  3. Preventive effect of L-carnosine on changes in the thermal nociceptive threshold in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Miyata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    2008-12-14

    Sensory abnormality is one of the serious complications in diabetes. Since the effective therapeutic regimen to ameliorate the diabetic sensory abnormality is very few, the present study was then designed to investigate the effect of zinc L-carnosine on the changes of nociceptive threshold in diabetic mice. Zinc L-carnosine (75-300 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered once daily from 1 day after streptozotocin treatment. Diabetic mice showed shorter tail-flick latency at 1-4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment and longer tail-flick latency at 6-9 weeks after its treatment. The shortened tail-flick latency in early stage of diabetic mice was ameliorated by treatment with zinc L-carnosine. Moreover, zinc L-carnosine also slowed the onset of hypoalgesia in diabetic mice. Tail-flick latency in non-diabetic mice was not affected by the zinc L-carnosine treatment, indicating that zinc L-carnosine did not affect normal nociceptive transmission. Moreover, L-carnosine, but not zinc sulfate, ameliorated the abnormal sensory perception in diabetic mice. Interestingly, the ameliorative effect of zinc l-carnosine on the abnormal sensory perception in diabetic mice is much stronger than that of L-carnosine. These results provide the evidence of the ameliorative potential of zinc L-carnosine on the progressive diabetic neuropathy. Moreover, L-carnosine combined with zinc shows more potent amelioration of abnormal sensory perception in diabetic mice than by itself. PMID:18930724

  4. Protective role of carnosine in mice with cadmium-induced acute hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Qureshi, Habib A; Yacoubi, Mohamed T; Al-Melhim, Walid N

    2009-11-01

    The hepatoprotective effect of carnosine was investigated against cadmium-induced acute liver injury in mice. Hepatotoxicity was induced by a single i.p. injection of cadmium chloride (6.5mg/kg). Carnosine treatment (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for three consecutive days, starting one day before cadmium administration. Carnosine significantly decreased the cadmium-induced elevations in serum aminotransferases. Carnosine suppressed lipid peroxidation and restored the deficits in the antioxidant defense mechanisms (reduced glutathione level, and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities) in liver tissue resulted from cadmium administration. Also, the reductions in hepatic nitric oxide and zinc ion levels, and the increases in hepatic cadmium ion concentration, and myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities following cadmium exposure were significantly attenuated by carnosine treatment. In addition, carnosine markedly ameliorated cadmium-induced liver tissue damage as evidenced by light and electron microscopic examinations. It was concluded that carnosine can be considered a potential candidate to protect the liver against the deleterious effect of acute cadmium intoxication. PMID:19748544

  5. Quantification of Carnosine-Aldehyde Adducts in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    da Silva Bispo, Vanderson; Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa

    2014-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation generates several reactive carbonyl species, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), acrolein (ACR), 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE) and malondialdehyde. One major pathwayof aldehydes detoxification is through conjugation with glutathione catalyzed by glutathione-S-transferases or, alternatively, by conjugation with endogenous histidine containing dipeptides, such as carnosine (CAR). In this study, on-line reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation with tandem mass spectrometry detection was utilized for the accurate quantification of CAR- ACR, CAR-HHE and CAR-HNE adducts in human urinary samples from non-smokers young adults. Standard adducts were prepared and isolated by HPLC. The results showed the presence of a new product from the reaction of CAR with ACR. This new adduct was completely characterized by HPLC/MS-MSn, 1H RMN, COSY and HSQC. The new HPLC/MS/MS methodology employing stable isotope-labeled internal standards (CAR-HHEd5 and CAR-HNEd11) was developed for adducts quantification. This methodology permits quantification of 10pmol CAR-HHE and 1pmol of CAR-ACR and CAR-HNE. Accurate determinations in human urine sample were performed and showed 4.65±1.71 to CAR-ACR, 5.13±1.76 to CAR-HHE and 5.99±3.19nmol/mg creatinine to CAR-HNE. Our results indicate that carnosine pathways can be an important detoxification route of a, ß -unsaturated aldehydes. Moreover, carnosine adducts may be useful as redox stress indicator. PMID:26461323

  6. Carnosine metabolism in diabetes is altered by reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Lanthaler, Barbara; Amberger, Albert; Fleming, Thomas; Forsberg, Elisabete; Hecker, Markus; Wagner, Andreas H; Yue, Wyatt W; Hoffmann, Georg F; Nawroth, Peter; Zschocke, Johannes; Schmitt, Claus P

    2015-11-01

    Carnosinase 1 (CN1) contributes to diabetic nephropathy by cleaving histidine-dipeptides which scavenge reactive oxygen and carbonyl species and increase nitric oxide (NO) production. In diabetic mice renal CN1 activity is increased, the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. We therefore analysed the in vitro and in vivo regulation of CN1 activity using recombinant and human CN1, and the db/db mouse model of diabetes. Glucose, leptin and insulin did not modify recombinant and human CN1 activity in vitro, glucose did not alter renal CN1 activity of WT or db/db mice ex vivo. Reactive metabolite methylglyoxal and Fenton reagent carbonylated recombinant CN1 and doubled CN1 efficiency. NO S-nitrosylated CN1 and decreased CN1 efficiency for carnosine by 70 % (p < 0.01), but not for anserine. Both CN1 cysteine residues were nitrosylated, the cysteine at position 102 but not at position 229 regulated CN1 activities. In db/db mice, renal CN1 mRNA and protein levels were similar as in non-diabetic controls, CN1 efficiency 1.9 and 1.6 fold higher for carnosine and anserine. Renal carbonyl stress was strongly increased and NO production halved, CN1 highly carbonylated and less S-nitrosylated compared to WT mice. GSH and NO2/3 concentrations were reduced and inversely related with carnosine degradation rate (r = -0.82/-0.85). Thus, reactive metabolites of diabetes upregulate CN1 activity by post-translational modifications, and thus decrease the availability of reactive metabolite-scavenging histidine dipeptides in the kidney in a positive feedback loop. Interference with this vicious circle may represent a new therapeutic target for mitigation of DN. PMID:26081982

  7. Optimizing human in vivo dosing and delivery of β-alanine supplements for muscle carnosine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Decombaz, Jacques; Harris, Roger C; Boesch, Chris

    2012-07-01

    Interest into the effects of carnosine on cellular metabolism is rapidly expanding. The first study to demonstrate in humans that chronic β-alanine (BA) supplementation (~3-6 g BA/day for ~4 weeks) can result in significantly augmented muscle carnosine concentrations (>50%) was only recently published. BA supplementation is potentially poised for application beyond the niche exercise and performance-enhancement field and into other more clinical populations. When examining all BA supplementation studies that directly measure muscle carnosine (n=8), there is a significant linear correlation between total grams of BA consumed (of daily intake ranges of 1.6-6.4 g BA/day) versus both the relative and absolute increases in muscle carnosine. Supporting this, a recent dose-response study demonstrated a large linear dependency (R2=0.921) based on the total grams of BA consumed over 8 weeks. The pre-supplementation baseline carnosine or individual subjects' body weight (from 65 to 90 kg) does not appear to impact on subsequent carnosine synthesis from BA consumption. Once muscle carnosine is augmented, the washout is very slow (~2%/week). Recently, a slow-release BA tablet supplement has been developed showing a smaller peak plasma BA concentration and delayed time to peak, with no difference in the area under the curve compared to pure BA in solution. Further, this slow-release profile resulted in a reduced urinary BA loss and improved retention, while at the same time, eliciting minimal paraesthesia symptoms. However, our complete understanding of optimizing in vivo delivery and dosing of BA is still in its infancy. Thus, this review will clarify our current knowledge of BA supplementation to augment muscle carnosine as well as highlight future research questions on the regulatory points of control for muscle carnosine synthesis. PMID:22358258

  8. Mass Spectrometric and Computational Investigation of the Protonated Carnosine-Carboplatin Complex Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer; Korany, Mohamed; Russo, Nino

    2015-08-17

    Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs are square-planar d(8) complexes that, activated by hydrolysis, cause cancer cell death by binding to nuclear DNA and distorting its structure. For that reason, interactions of platinum anticancer drugs with DNA have been extensively investigated, aiming at disentangling the mechanism of action and toxicity. Less attention, however, has been devoted to the formation of adducts between platinum drugs with biological ligands other than DNA. These adducts can cause the loss and deactivation of the drug before it arrives at the ultimate target and are also thought to contribute to the drug's toxicity. Here are reported the outcomes of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) computations carried out to investigate the fragmentation pathways of the protonated carnosine-carboplatin complex, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+). DFT calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level employed to probe fragmentation mechanisms account for all experimental data. Because of the relative rigidity of the structure of the most stable 1A conformer, stabilized by three strong hydrogen bonds, the first step of all of the examined fragmentation pathways is the interconversion of the 1A conformer into the less stable structure 1B. Formation of the [Carnosine + H](+) fragment from the precursor ion, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), is calculated to be the lowest-energy process. At slightly higher energies, the loss of two amino groups is observed to produce the [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) + H](+) ions. At significantly higher energies, the loss of CO2 occurs, yielding the final [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) - CO2 + H](+) products. Formation of the [CarbPt + H](+) fragment from [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), even if not hampered by a high activation barrier, is calculated to be very unfavorable from a thermodynamic point of view. PMID:26238420

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of natural dipeptide carnosine against human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Natural substances have been attracted several researchers in the recent years, because of its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. We have investigated the effect of carnosine on cell viability, apoptosis, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase 3 enzyme expression in human cervical carcinoma and Madin-Darby Kidney Cells (MDCK) cells. Carnosine inhibited cancer cell growth up to 23%. ROS level was increased up to 30 and 31% in MDCK and HeLa cells respectively. Tunnel assay showed 42 and 14% of positive apoptotic cells in cancer and normal cells respectively. The alteration in mitochondrial and nuclear morphology was determined. The extended lace-like network of normal mitochondria found in control cells. Carnosine treatment significantly altered the mitochondrial morphology of normal cervical carcinoma cell. Mitochondria were condensed clump structures in carnosine treated cancer cells. Carnosine reduced the number of colonies of cervical carcinoma cells. Caspase 3 expression was corresponded to the appearance of immunofluorescence in the cytoplasm. Caspase 3 expression was gradually increased in cervical carcinoma cells. In Silico, docking study was performed to recognize the binding activity of carnosine against a subunit of the caspase 3, and carnosine was able to bind to the drug binding pocket of caspase 3. The glide energy is -5.2 kcal/mol, suggesting the high binding affinity of carnosine to caspase 3. Taking all these data together, the natural dipeptide L-carnosine could be a suitable antiproliferative agent in cervical carcinoma cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27000946

  10. Antioxidant activity of carnosine, homocarnosine, and anserine present in muscle and brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kohen, R; Yamamoto, Y; Cundy, K C; Ames, B N

    1988-01-01

    Carnosine, homocarnosine, and anserine are present in high concentrations in the muscle and brain of many animals and humans. However, their exact function is not clear. The antioxidant activity of these compounds has been examined by testing their peroxyl radical-trapping ability at physiological concentrations. Carnosine, homocarnosine, anserine, and other histidine derivatives all showed antioxidant activity. All of these compounds showing peroxyl radical-trapping activity were also electrochemically active as reducing agents in cyclic voltammetric measurements. Furthermore, carnosine inhibited the oxidative hydroxylation of deoxyguanosine induced by ascorbic acid and copper ions. Other roles of carnosine, such as chelation of metal ions, quenching of singlet oxygen, and binding of hydroperoxides, are also discussed. The data suggest a role for these histidine-related compounds as endogenous antioxidants in brain and muscle. PMID:3362866

  11. Carnosine inhibits KRAS-mediated HCT116 proliferation by affecting ATP and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Nocella, Francesca; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2012-02-28

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide that has generated particular interest for its antioxidant, anti-aging and especially for its antiproliferative properties. In this study, we demonstrate that carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human HCT116 colon cancer cells. In this cell line, the activating KRAS mutation induces mitochondrial ROS, the signaling molecules for cell proliferation. We observed that 50-100 mM carnosine decreases ATP and ROS concentration and induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. In HCT116 cells these effects are related to decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased p21waf1 protein. Our findings support the concept that carnosine could inhibit HCT116 cell growth via its antioxidant activity and its ability to affect glycolysis. PMID:22137144

  12. Introduction to Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc of the United States, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define mental retardation and answer questions related to this topic. According to the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR), mental retardation is a disability that occurs before age 18. It is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviors as expressed in…

  13. Effects of sprint training combined with vegetarian or mixed diet on muscle carnosine content and buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Baguet, Audrey; Everaert, Inge; De Naeyer, Hélène; Reyngoudt, Harmen; Stegen, Sanne; Beeckman, Sam; Achten, Eric; Vanhee, Lander; Volkaert, Anneke; Petrovic, Mirko; Taes, Youri; Derave, Wim

    2011-10-01

    Carnosine is an abundant dipeptide in human skeletal muscle with proton buffering capacity. There is controversy as to whether training can increase muscle carnosine and thereby provide a mechanism for increased buffering capacity. This study investigated the effects of 5 weeks sprint training combined with a vegetarian or mixed diet on muscle carnosine, carnosine synthase mRNA expression and muscle buffering capacity. Twenty omnivorous subjects participated in a 5 week sprint training intervention (2-3 times per week). They were randomized into a vegetarian and mixed diet group. Measurements (before and after the intervention period) included carnosine content in soleus, gastrocnemius lateralis and tibialis anterior by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), true-cut biopsy of the gastrocnemius lateralis to determine in vitro non-bicarbonate muscle buffering capacity, carnosine content (HPLC method) and carnosine synthase (CARNS) mRNA expression and 6 × 6 s repeated sprint ability (RSA) test. There was a significant diet × training interaction in soleus carnosine content, which was non-significantly increased (+11%) with mixed diet and non-significantly decreased (-9%) with vegetarian diet. Carnosine content in other muscles and gastrocnemius buffer capacity were not influenced by training. CARNS mRNA expression was independent of training, but decreased significantly in the vegetarian group. The performance during the RSA test improved by training, without difference between groups. We found a positive correlation (r = 0.517; p = 0.002) between an invasive and non-invasive method for muscle carnosine quantification. In conclusion, this study shows that 5 weeks sprint training has no effect on the muscle carnosine content and carnosine synthase mRNA. PMID:21373871

  14. Inhibition of oxidative stress in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis by carnosine, trolox and novel trolox-carnosine.

    PubMed

    Poništ, S; Slovák, L; Kuncírová, V; Fedorova, T; Logvinenko, A; Muzychuk, O; Mihalová, D; Bauerová, K

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine (CARN) is an anti-glycating agent able to quench superoxide, and to neutralize 4-hydroxynonenal. Trolox-carnosine (CARN-T) was synthesized because of its resistance against degradation and to improve CARN antioxidant capacity. We evaluated the impact of trolox (TRO), CARN and its derivative CARN-T on oxidative stress (OS) in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis (AA). The experiments were done on healthy, control arthritic and arthritic animals with administration of CARN 150 mg/kg b.w., TRO 41 mg/kg b.w. and CARN-T 75 mg/kg b.w. in a daily dose during 28 days. Antioxidants did not affect the body weight on day 14, but on day 28 TRO enhanced the weight reduction. On day 14 and 28 CARN-T and TRO reduced arthritic score. IL-1beta, MCP-1 and MMP-9 were measured in plasma on day 14. MCP-1 was decreased by CARN-T and TRO. All antioxidants reduced IL-1beta and MMP-9 levels. Malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and protein carbonyls were increased in brain. CARN, CARN-T and TRO prevented higher lipid and protein oxidation in brain. CARN and CARN-T caused no weight reduction like TRO that has an advantage in inflammatory arthritis. Moreover the antioxidants administered had a similar therapeutic effects on arthritic score, markers of inflammation in plasma and OS in brain. PMID:26681078

  15. Protective effects of L-carnosine on CCl4 -induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Alsheblak, Mehyar Mohammad; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; El-Karef, Amro; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M

    2016-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effect of L-carnosine (CAR), an endogenous dipeptide of alanine and histidine, on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury. Liver injury was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of CCl4, twice weekly for six weeks. CAR was administered to rats daily, at dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. At the end of six weeks, blood and liver tissue specimens were collected. Results show that CAR treatment attenuated the hepatic morphological changes, necroinflammation and fibrosis induced by CCl4, as indicated by hepatic histopathology scoring. In addition, CAR treatment significantly reduced the CCl4-induced elevation of liver-injury parameters in serum. CAR treatment also combatted oxidative stress; possibly by restoring hepatic nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) levels. Moreover, CAR treatment prevented the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), as indicated by reduced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in the liver, and decreased hepatic inflammation as demonstrated by a reduction in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and restoration of interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels. In conclusion, CCl4-induced hepatic injury was alleviated by CAR treatment. The results suggest that these beneficial, protective effects are due, at least in part, to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities. PMID:27094155

  16. Impairment of electron transfer chain induced by acute carnosine administration in skeletal muscle of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I-III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I-III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  17. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  18. Protective effect of carnosine after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion possibly through suppressing astrocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Jihui; Bo, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) induced by chronic hypoperfusion is a common cause of vascular dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of carnosine on white matter lesion after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through suppressing astrocyte activation. Methods: Adult male mice (C57BL/6 strain) were subjected to permanent occlusion of the right unilateral common carotid arteries (rUCCAO) and treated with carnosine or histidine. Open field test, freezing test, Klüver-Barrera staining, immunohistochemical analyses and western blot were performed after rUCCAO. Results: We found that carnosine ameliorated white matter lesion and cognitive impairment after rUCCAO. Carnosine suppressed the activation of astrocyte in both wide type mice and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice. However, administration of histidine did not show the same effect. We found that there were no differences between rUCCAO group and sham group for the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Furthermore, carnosine significantly attenuated the increase of inflammatory cytokine interferon gama. Conclusion: These data suggest carnosine induced neuroprotection during SIVD in mice is not dependent on the histaminergic pathway or the regulation of the expression of GLT-1 and GLAST, but may be due to a suppression of astrocyte activation and inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:26885268

  19. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carnosine in Early Stage of Focal Ischemia Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hui-Seung; Han, Kyung-Hoon; Shin, Jeoung-A; Park, Joo-Hyun; Song, Kwan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to elucidate neuroprotective effect of carnosine in early stage of stroke. Methods Early stage of rodent stroke model and neuroblastoma chemical hypoxia model was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion and antimycin A. Neuroprotective effect of carnosine was investigated with 100, 250, and 500 mg of carnosine treatment. And antioxidant expression was analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot in brain and blood. Results Intraperitoneal injection of 500 mg carnosine induced significant decrease of infarct volume and expansion of penumbra (p<0.05). The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed significant increase than in saline group in blood and brain (p<0.05). In the analysis of chemical hypoxia, carnosine induced increase of neuronal cell viability and decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Conclusion Carnosine has neuroprotective property which was related to antioxidant capacity in early stage of stroke. And, the oxidative stress should be considered one of major factor in early ischemic stroke. PMID:24851146

  20. Efficient targeting and tumor retardation effect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF)-specific RNA replacement in pancreatic cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Heo, Kyun; Lee, Yusun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Daehong; Song, Min Sun; Lee, Seoung-Wook; Lee, Yangsoon; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, In-Hoo

    2014-03-28

    The soluble protein pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) plays an important role in pancreatic tumor progression and has begun to attract attention as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. We herein present PAUF RNA-targeting gene therapy strategies with both targeting and therapeutic function using trans-splicing ribozyme (TSR) in pancreatic cancer. We developed adenoviral PAUF-targeting TSR (Rz) containing a PAUF-specific internal guide sequence (IGS) determined by library screening. This Rz harbors suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) or firefly luciferase (Luc) as a transgene for 3' exon replacement of PAUF RNAs. Ad-Rz-TK, Rz harboring the HSV-tk, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in vivo as well as PAUF-dependent cell death in vitro via a successful trans-splicing reaction. Selective induction of Rz-controlled transgene in PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer was confirmed through noninvasive in vivo imaging; a luminescence signal from Rz harboring Luc (Ad-Rz-Luc) was detectable only in pancreatic tumor sites, not in normal mice. In addition, a [(125)I] FIAU signal reflecting thymidine kinase expression through SPECT and ex vivo biodistribution was co-localized with the tumor sites when we treated with Ad-Rz-TK in orthotopic xenograft model. Taken together, these results imply that PAUF-targeting TSR can contribute to successful targeted gene therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24189457

  1. Carnosine Content in Skeletal Muscle Is Dependent on Vitamin B6 Status in Rats.

    PubMed

    Suidasari, Sofya; Stautemas, Jan; Uragami, Shinji; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Derave, Wim; Kato, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine, a histidine-containing dipeptide, is well known to be associated with skeletal muscle performance. However, there is limited information on the effect of dietary micronutrients on muscle carnosine level. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, is involved in amino acid metabolisms in the body as a cofactor. We hypothesized that enzymes involved in β-alanine biosynthesis, the rate-limiting precursor of carnosine, may also be PLP dependent. Thus, we examined the effects of dietary vitamin B6 on the muscle carnosine content of rats. Male and female rats were fed a diet containing 1, 7, or 35 mg pyridoxine (PN) HCl/kg for 6 weeks. Carnosine in skeletal muscles was quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In the gastrocnemius muscle of male rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+70 and +61%, respectively) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group, whereas that in the soleus muscle of male rats was significantly higher only in the 7 mg group (+43%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). In both muscles of female rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+32 to +226%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). We also found that, compared to the 1 mg group, β-alanine concentrations in the 7 and 35 mg groups were markedly elevated in gastrocnemius muscles of male (+153 and +148%, respectively, P < 0.05) and female (+381 and +437%, respectively, P < 0.05) rats. Noteworthy, the concentrations of ornithine in the 7 and 35 mg groups were decreased in gastrocnemius muscles of male rats (-46 and -54%, respectively, P < 0.05), which strongly inversely correlated with β-alanine concentration (r = -0.84, P < 0.01). In humans, 19% lower muscle carnosine content was found in soleus muscle of women of the lower plasma PLP tertile, but this was not observed in

  2. Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Hamdy; Longman, Michael R; Alany, Raid G; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on L-carnosine phytosomes as an alternative for the prodrug N-acetyl-L-carnosine as a novel delivery system to the lens. L-carnosine was loaded into lipid-based phytosomes and hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed phytosomes. L-carnosine-phospholipid complexes (PC) of different molar ratios, 1:1 and 1:2, were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. These complexes were characterized with thermal and spectral analyses. PC were dispersed in either phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 or HA (0.1% w/v) in phosphate buffered saline to form phytosomes PC1:1, PC1:2, and PC1:2 HA, respectively. These phytosomal formulations were studied for size, zeta potential, morphology, contact angle, spreading coefficient, viscosity, ex vivo transcorneal permeation, and cytotoxicity using primary human corneal cells. L-carnosine-phospholipid formed a complex at a 1:2 molar ratio and phytosomes were in the size range of 380–450 nm, polydispersity index of 0.12–0.2. The viscosity of PC1:2 HA increased by 2.4 to 5-fold compared with HA solution and PC 1:2, respectively; significantly lower surface tension, contact angle, and greater spreading ability for phytosomes were also recorded. Ex vivo transcorneal permeation parameters showed significantly controlled corneal permeation of L-carnosine with the novel carrier systems without any significant impact on primary human corneal cell viability. Ex vivo porcine lenses incubated in high sugar media without and with L-carnosine showed concentration-dependent marked inhibition of lens brunescence indicative of the potential for delaying changes that underlie cataractogenesis that may be linked to diabetic processes. PMID:27366062

  3. Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Hamdy; Longman, Michael R; Alany, Raid G; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on L-carnosine phytosomes as an alternative for the prodrug N-acetyl-L-carnosine as a novel delivery system to the lens. L-carnosine was loaded into lipid-based phytosomes and hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed phytosomes. L-carnosine-phospholipid complexes (PC) of different molar ratios, 1:1 and 1:2, were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. These complexes were characterized with thermal and spectral analyses. PC were dispersed in either phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 or HA (0.1% w/v) in phosphate buffered saline to form phytosomes PC1:1, PC1:2, and PC1:2 HA, respectively. These phytosomal formulations were studied for size, zeta potential, morphology, contact angle, spreading coefficient, viscosity, ex vivo transcorneal permeation, and cytotoxicity using primary human corneal cells. L-carnosine-phospholipid formed a complex at a 1:2 molar ratio and phytosomes were in the size range of 380-450 nm, polydispersity index of 0.12-0.2. The viscosity of PC1:2 HA increased by 2.4 to 5-fold compared with HA solution and PC 1:2, respectively; significantly lower surface tension, contact angle, and greater spreading ability for phytosomes were also recorded. Ex vivo transcorneal permeation parameters showed significantly controlled corneal permeation of L-carnosine with the novel carrier systems without any significant impact on primary human corneal cell viability. Ex vivo porcine lenses incubated in high sugar media without and with L-carnosine showed concentration-dependent marked inhibition of lens brunescence indicative of the potential for delaying changes that underlie cataractogenesis that may be linked to diabetic processes. PMID:27366062

  4. Protective activity of carnosine and anserine against zinc-induced neurotoxicity: a possible treatment for vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Dai; Konoha-Mizuno, Keiko; Mori, Miwako; Sadakane, Yutaka; Koyama, Hironari; Ohkawara, Susumu; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2015-08-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a small dipeptide with numerous beneficial effects, including the maintenance of the acid-base balance, antioxidant properties, chelating agent, anti-crosslinking, and anti-glycation activities. High levels of carnosine and its analogue anserine (1-methyl carnosine) are found in skeletal muscle and the brain. Zinc (Zn)-induced neurotoxicity plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia (VD), and carnosine inhibits Zn-induced neuronal death. Here, the protective activity of carnosine against Zn-induced neurotoxicity and its molecular mechanisms such as cellular Zn influx and Zn-induced gene expression were investigated using immortalised hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7 cells). Carnosine and anserine protected against Zn-induced neurotoxicity not by preventing increases in intracellular Zn(2+) but by participating in the regulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway and the activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein (Arc). Accordingly, carnosine and anserine protected against neurotoxicity induced by ER-stress inducers thapsigargin and tunicamycin. Hence, carnosine and anserine are expected to have future therapeutic potential for VD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25846004

  5. Interactions between carnosine and captopril on free radical scavenging activity and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Ueno, Akemi; Nishikawa, Yukari

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), being plentiful in skeletal muscles and neuronal tissues, and captopril, a widely used angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were examined concerning free radical scavenging activity and ACE activity in vitro. Not only captopril, but also carnosine, at concentrations less than those ordinarily found in muscles and neuronal tissues, significantly scavenged 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) radical cations, and inhibited ACE activity. Cupric ions reversed the ABTS scavenging activity of carnosine and captopril, whereas cupric ions strengthened the inhibitory action of carnosine on ACE activity. In contrast, cupric ions antagonized the inhibition of ACE activity induced by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating that the inhibitory effect of carnosine on ACE activity is not related to the chelating action of carnosine. On the other hand, carnosine and captopril synergistically enhanced the free radical scavenging activity, but not the inhibitory effect on the ACE activity. These data suggest that carnosine in its concurrent use with captopril could act as a beneficial free radical scavenger, with less danger of overdose, in the inhibition of ACE activity. PMID:16394648

  6. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  7. [Increased manganese superoxide dismutase and cyclin B1 expression in carnosine-induced inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, Yu S; Kalen, A L; Eckers, J C; Fedorova, T N; Goswami, P C; Sarsour, E H

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine is an endogenous dipeptide with antiproliferative properties. Here we show that carnosine selectively inhibits proliferation of human glioblastoma cells (U-118-MG) compared to breast (MB231) and oral (Cal27 and FaDu) cancer cells. Carnosine-induced inhibition of U-118-MG proliferation is associated with a significant: decrease in cellular reactive oxygen species levels, increase in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and increase in cyclin B1 expression resulting in G2-block. We conclude that the antiproliferative property of carnosine is due to its ability to enhance MnSOD and cyclin B1 expression. These results will be of significance to the potential application of carnosine in brain cancer therapy. PMID:26350743

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of carnosine and its oxygenated adducts. The reaction with the nickel ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlos, Dimitrios; Petropouleas, Panayiotis; Hatzipanayioti, Despina

    2015-11-01

    DFT theoretical calculations at B3LYP/TZVP or LANL2DZ level of theory, for neutral, zwitterions, protonated and anionic carnosine, were performed. Energies, the structural and spectroscopic parameters were calculated in the gas phase and aqueous medium. Additional H-bonds stabilize the ionized forms of carnosine, creating "nests" into which metal ions or bio-molecules may be sheltered. Based on Fukui functions, the reactivity of the abovementioned forms of carnosine, with 1O2, may lead to oxygenated species. The theoretical spectroscopic parameters have been correlated to our experimental results. The effect of H2O2 and the electrochemistry of aqueous carnosine solutions were examined. Theoretical models containing Ni(II), carnosine and water were constructed. In the isolated mauve solid, formulated [Ni(carn)2(H2O)5], the COOsbnd , Nπ and/or NH2 were bonded. When H2O2 was added, the imidazole NMR signals disappeared. A redox couple clearly indicates one electron process, the electron coming from either the oxidation of imidazole ring or the nickel(II)/Ni(III) couple.

  9. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Mahir S.; Reyngoudt, Harmen; DeDeene, Yves; Sazak, Hakan S.; Fieremans, Els; Delputte, Steven; D'Asseler, Yves; Derave, Wim; Lemahieu, Ignace; Achten, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pHi range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 ± 0.57/4.8 ± 1.59 mM (mean ± SD) for athletes and 2.58 ± 0.65/3.3 ± 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that 1H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo.

  10. Modulation of mitochondrial function and autophagy mediates carnosine neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-A; Akram, Muhammad; Shin, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Yu, Seong Woon; Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the rapidly increasing global burden of ischemic stroke, no therapeutic options for neuroprotection against stroke currently exist. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a key role in ischemic neuronal death and treatments that target autophagy may represent a novel strategy in neuroprotection. We investigated whether autophagy is regulated by carnosine, an endogenous pleiotropic dipeptide which has robust neuroprotective activity against ischemic brain damage. Methods We examined the effect of carnosine on mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic processes in rat focal ischemia and in neuronal cultures. Results Autophagic pathways such as reduction of phosphorylated mTOR/p70S6K and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II were enhanced in the ischemic brain. However, treatment with carnosine significantly attenuated autophagic signaling in the ischemic brain, with improvement of brain mitochondrial function and mitophagy signaling. The protective effect of carnosine against autophagy was also confirmed in primary cortical neurons. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of carnosine is at least partially mediated by mitochondrial protection, and attenuation of deleterious autophagic processes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanistic pathways that this exciting neuroprotective agent influences. PMID:24938837

  11. Carnosine's Effect on Amyloid Fibril Formation and Induced Cytotoxicity of Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Josephine W.; Liu, Kuan-Nan; How, Su-Chun; Chen, Wei-An; Lai, Chia-Min; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Wang, Steven S. -S.

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24349167

  12. Inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by l-carnosine in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun-Mi; Jang, Eun-Hee; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Ju-Hee; Park, Chang-Shin; Han, Seung Baik; Kim, Jun Sig; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Pie, Jae-Eun; Shin, Dong Wun

    2009-07-31

    Conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum malfunction (ER stress) play a key role in the development of various human diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Carnosine is an endogenous peptide, present in excitable tissues such as brain and skeletal muscle. Although there are reports suggesting that carnosine has a biological role independent of its antioxidant activity, there have been no reports of the effects of carnosine on the ER stress response. We investigated the effects of carnosine on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death and ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells. After assessing control cell viability in serum-free conditions for 24h (100% viability), we found that 50 microM 6-OHDA reduced cell viability to 76.4% of control values, whereas addition of 10mM carnosine significantly reduced cell death to 96.1% viability in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with its cytoprotective action, carnosine markedly inhibited subsequent ER stress responses, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) and c-jun, expression of glucose regulatory protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein, and mRNA splicing of X-box protein 1. The measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by 6-OHDA showed that addition of 10mM carnosine slightly but obviously inhibits the 6-OHDA-induced ROS production. In conclusion, our results show that carnosine almost completely inhibits 6-OHDA-induced ER stress responses and cytotoxicity, and that slight antioxidant activity of carnosine against 6-OHDA is observed. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate clinical uses for carnosine. PMID:19394406

  13. THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JORDAN, THOMAS E.

    THIS BOOK PROVIDES A GUIDE TO THE BASIC CONCEPTS AND ISSUES IN THE FIELD OF MENTAL RETARDATION. THERE ARE MANY SOURCES OR CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION AND THE FOLLOWING TYPES ARE EXPLAINED--(1) GENETIC OR CHEMICAL DISORDERS, (2) BIRTH TRAUMA, (3) SUBSEQUENT ACCIDENTS OR DISEASE, AND (4) ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES. IT IS NOTED THAT MOST CASES INVOLVE…

  14. Mental Retardation in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Michael; And Others

    This monograph presents a general introduction to the history, classification, and characteristics of mental retardation. It begins with a discussion of the history of mental retardation from ancient Greece and Rome to the present. The beginnings of special education are traced to the early 19th century in Europe. Major influences in treatment of…

  15. Vignettes in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissey, Marie Skodak

    1983-01-01

    The use of the family history chart and the "Binet-Simon Scale" to study mental retardation in the early 20th century are considered, along with the implications of this practice. With the thesis that mental retardation was primarily familial and hereditary, limiting reproduction and segregation were viewed as appropriate approaches. (SEW)

  16. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  17. Consanguinity and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T; Narayan, J

    1991-04-01

    Consanguinity among parents as a cause of mental retardation in their children is debatable. The present study was conducted to find out the effect of consanguinity on mental retardation where the causative factor is not established. A total of 517 mentally retarded persons and their families were studied out of which 160 were born of consanguineous marriage and 357 were of non-consanguineous marriage. The results indicated that, when there is a history of mental retardation in the family and if the parents are consanguineously married, the risk of mental retardation in the offspring is significantly high (chi 2 = 11.52; P less than 0.001). Among the consanguineously married families, the blood relationship of uncle-niece seems to have the highest risk of affecting the offsprings. The implications are discussed in detail. PMID:2072392

  18. Fire-Retardant, Decorative Inks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D.; Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J.

    1987-01-01

    Effectiveness of fire-retardant additives evaluated. Fire retardance of decorative acrylic printing inks for aircraft interiors enhanced by certain commercial and experimental fire-retardant additives, according to study.

  19. Carnosine decreases IGFBP1 production in db/db mice through suppression of HIF-1.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elisabete A; Botusan, Ileana R; Wang, Jing; Peters, Verena; Ansurudeen, Ishrath; Brismar, Kerstin; Catrina, Sergiu Bogdan

    2015-06-01

    IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) is a member of the binding proteins for the IGF with an important role in glucose homeostasis. Circulating IGFBP1 is derived essentially from the liver where it is mainly regulated negatively by insulin. Carnosine, a natural antioxidant, has been shown to improve metabolic control in different animal models of diabetes but its mechanisms of action are still not completely unraveled. We therefore investigate the effect of carnosine treatment on the IGFBP1 regulation in db/db mice. Db/db mice and heterozygous non-diabetic mice received for 4 weeks regular water or water supplemented with carnosine. Igfbp1 mRNA expression in the liver was evaluated using qPCR and the protein levels in plasma by western blot. Plasma IGF1 and insulin were analyzed using immunoassays. HepG2 cells were used to study the in vitro effect of carnosine on IGFBP1. The modulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) which is the central mediator of hypoxia-induction of IGFBP1 was analyzed using: WB, reporter gene assay and qPCR. Carnosine decreased the circulating IGFBP1 levels and the liver expression Igfbp1, through a complex mechanism acting both directly by suppressing the HIF-1α-mediated IGFBP1 induction and indirectly through increasing circulating insulin level followed by a decrease in the blood glucose levels and increased the plasma levels or IGF1. Reduction of IGFBP1 in diabetes through insulin-dependent and insulin-independent pathways is a novel mechanism by which carnosine contributes to the improvement of the metabolic control in diabetes. PMID:25869614

  20. Vibrational study on the cobalt binding mode of Carnosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Taddei, Paola; Tinti, Anna; Fini, Giancarlo

    2002-10-01

    The Co(II)- L-Carnosine (Carnos) system was investigated at different pH and metal/ligand molar ratios by Raman and IR spectroscopy. Raman spectra present some marker bands yielding information on the ability of the Co(II)/Carnos system to bind molecular oxygen and to identify the metal co-ordination site of the imidazole ring (N π or N τ atom) of Carnos. The existence of different oxygenated species is greatly affected by pH and the structure of the predominant complexes depends on the available nitrogen atoms. Under basic conditions, binuclear complexes binding molecular oxygen are the predominant species and two forms (monobridged and dibridged) were identified by the Raman νO-O band (750-850 cm -1). Decreasing pH to 7, the species present in the system are less able to bind oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide and a Co(III) chelate not binding O 2, were formed with a significant conversion of peroxo into superoxo complexes. A slight excess of Carnos does not enhance metal chelation. In slightly acidic conditions, the formation of H 2O 2 and superoxo species is more enhanced than at pH 7 and another Co(III) chelate is probably formed.

  1. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  2. Preventing Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Fotheringham, John B.

    1974-01-01

    Influences producing mental retardation can be divided into three categories: inherited factors, health problems and social-emotional influences. This article outlines steps which can be taken to reduce the first two categories, both pre and postnatally. PMID:20469133

  3. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  4. Litter-Spinning Retarders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Aerodynamic plates stop litter from spinning during hoisting by helicopter. Features of proposed litter-spinning retarders include convenience of deployment and independence from ground restraint. Retarder plate(s) folded flat against bottom of litter during storage or while litter is loaded. Plate(s) held in storage position by latch that releases manually or automatically as litter is hoisted. Upon release, springs move plates into deployed position.

  5. Synergistic effect of L-Carnosine and EGCG in the prevention of physiological brain aging.

    PubMed

    Davinelli, Sergio; Di Marco, Roberto; Bracale, Renata; Quattrone, Alessandro; Zella, Davide; Scapagnini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of multi-target action are well established in a variety of pathological models. Many dietary supplements and nutraceuticals may be useful to slow age-related cognitive declines and the risk of developing neurodegenerative disease. L-Carnosine and EGCG are natural compounds that have received particular attention because of their potential role in modulating oxidative stress associated with aging and chronic conditions. The biological activities of these naturally occurring substances have frequently been used to prevent or reduce senile features; however they have never been evaluated as a combined treatment. In the present study we investigated the combined effect of L-Carnosine and EGCG on the activation of two stress-responsive pathways: HO-1 and Hsp72 (the inducible form of Hsp70), which play an important role in cytoprotection against oxidative stress-induced cell damage. We demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of EGCG and L-Carnosine are achieved through the modulation of HO-1/Hsp72 systems. Furthermore, the combined action of both compounds resulted in a synergistic increase of HO-1 expression which suggests a crosstalk between the HO-1 and the Hsp72-mediated pathways. Our results indicate that the combined administration of EGCG and L-Carnosine would benefit the treatment and prevention of neurodegenerative diseases by reducing the neuronal damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:23092324

  6. Analytical and physicochemical characterisation of the senile cataract drug dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine).

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Hamdy; Swinden, Julian; Pierscionek, Barbara K; Alany, Raid G

    2015-10-10

    This study presents a simple but sensitive HPLC chromatographic method with a stability-indicating assay for determination and physicochemical characterisation of L-carnosine, a promising senile cataract prophylactic agent. Chromatographic analysis was conducted using a reverse phase (RP)-HPLC system and an isocratic mobile phase of 98% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (0.1% v/v) and 2% v/v acetonitrile with detection at 220 nm. L-carnosine was subjected to stress conditions to force its degradation using chemical and thermal agents and was subsequently detected from its degradation products using ESI-MS. The lipophilicity of the drug and 1:1 drug to phospholipid complex (PC) mol/mol was determined by estimating the partition coefficient (P). Lipophilicity was greatly enhanced when L-carnosine was formulated as a phospholipid complex using the solvent evaporation method. L-carnosine-phospholipid complex could be a promising approach for effective delivery to the human lens as offers a potential novel treatment for senile cataract. PMID:26073114

  7. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. PMID:26364584

  8. Physiological and therapeutic effects of carnosine on cardiometabolic risk and disease.

    PubMed

    Baye, Estifanos; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Hipkiss, Alan; Aldini, Giancarlo; de Courten, Barbora

    2016-05-01

    Obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are the most common preventable causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. They represent major public health threat to our society. Increasing prevalence of obesity and T2DM contributes to escalating morbidity and mortality from CVD and stroke. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a dipeptide with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-glycation, anti-ischaemic and chelating roles and is available as an over-the-counter food supplement. Animal evidence suggests that carnosine may offer many promising therapeutic benefits for multiple chronic diseases due to these properties. Carnosine, traditionally used in exercise physiology to increase exercise performance, has potential preventative and therapeutic benefits in obesity, insulin resistance, T2DM and diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications (CVD and stroke) as well as number of neurological and mental health conditions. However, relatively little evidence is available in humans. Thus, future studies should focus on well-designed clinical trials to confirm or refute a potential role of carnosine in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases in humans, in addition to advancing knowledge from the basic science and animal studies. PMID:26984320

  9. The carnosine content of vastus lateralis is elevated in resistance-trained bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Tallon, Mark J; Harris, Roger C; Boobis, Les H; Fallowfield, Joanne L; Wise, John A

    2005-11-01

    Resistance training is associated with periods of acute intracellular hypoxia with increased H(+) production and low intramuscular pH. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible adaptive response in muscle carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) in bodybuilders. Extracts of biopsies of m. vastus lateralis of 6 national-level competitive bodybuilders and 6 age-matched untrained but moderately active healthy subjects were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Significant differences were shown in carnosine (p < 0.001) and histidine (p < 0.05). Muscle carnosine in bodybuilders was twice that in controls. The carnosine contents measured are the highest recorded in human muscle and represent a 20% contribution to muscle buffering capacity. Taurine was 38% lower in bodybuilders, though the difference was not significant. Possible causes for the changes observed are prolonged repetitive exposure to low muscle pH, change of diet or dietary supplement use, or the use of anabolic steroids. The increase in buffering capacity could influence the ability to carry out intense muscular activity. PMID:16287364

  10. Simple enzymatic procedure for L-carnosine synthesis: whole-cell biocatalysis and efficient biocatalyst recycling.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Jan; Antweiler, Nicolai; Lutz, Jochen; Heck, Tobias; Geueke, Birgit; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Blank, Lars M; Schmid, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    β-Peptides and their derivates are usually stable to proteolysis and have an increased half-life compared with α-peptides. Recently, β-aminopeptidases were described as a new enzyme class that enabled the enzymatic degradation and formation of β-peptides. As an alternative to the existing chemical synthesis routes, the aim of the present work was to develop a whole-cell biocatalyst for the synthesis and production of β-peptides using this enzymatic activity. For the optimization of the reaction system we chose the commercially relevant β,α-dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanine-L-histidine) as model product. We were able to show that different recombinant yeast and bacteria strains, which overexpress a β-peptidase, could be used directly as whole-cell biocatalysts for the synthesis of L-carnosine. By optimizing relevant reaction conditions for the best-performing recombinant Escherichia coli strain, such as pH and substrate concentrations, we obtained high l-carnosine yields of up to 71%. Long-time as well as biocatalyst recycling experiments indicated a high stability of the developed biocatalyst for at least five repeated batches. Application of the recombinant E. coli in a fed-batch process enabled the accumulation of l-carnosine to a concentration of 3.7 g l(-1). PMID:21255308

  11. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. PMID:26808776

  12. Vignettes in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissey, Marie Skodak

    1983-01-01

    Described are turn-of-the-century (1900) efforts of E. Johnstone, Vineland Training School for the mentally retarded; H. Goddard, psychologist (also at Vineland); and C. Davenport, Carnegie Foundation biological laboratory, Coldspring Harbor; to identify the roles of genetic heredity and environmental impact, and thus to eradicate or ameliorate…

  13. Epidemiology of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heber, Rick

    Prevalence data on mental retardation is presented including international estimates on general prevalence, age directions, geographical variations within the United States, racial and ethnic variations, economic class distributions, family variations, and population distribution in institutions. Statistics are also provided in areas of specific…

  14. Monkey Retardate Learning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamove, A. S.; Molinaro, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Seven rhesus monkeys reared on diets high in phenylalanine to induce phenylketonuria (PKU--a metabolic disorder associated with mental retardation if untreated) were compared with normal, pair-fed, and younger controls; frontal brain-lesioned monkeys; and those raised on high-tryptophan diets in three object discrimination tasks. (Author)

  15. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  16. Mental Retardation, Selected Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerenberger, R.C., Ed.

    A compilation of selected papers includes the following: comprehensive diagnostic services; pediatric aspects of diagnosis; psychological evaluation of the severely retarded; use of social competency devices; diagnosis of the adult retarded; programing for the severely retarded; nursery school experiences for the trainable; a practical approach to…

  17. Teaching the Educable Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Harold D.

    The text discusses the behavior, evaluation, and education of mentally retarded children. Harold D. Love presents an overview of the retarded, a description of intelligence and personality tests, and a historical survey of retardation; Virginia Cantrell reviews the educational philosophies and methods of Itard, Seguin, and Montessori. Shirley K.…

  18. Management of the virulent influenza virus infection by oral formulation of nonhydrolized carnosine and isopeptide of carnosine attenuating proinflammatory cytokine-induced nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoly I

    2012-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important role in mediating inflammation. In our studies, we found that iNOS-derived NO was significantly increased in the serum samples of 150 patients infected with influenza A virus in comparison with samples of 140 healthy individuals. In human lung epithelial cells, infection with influenza A virus or stimulation with poly(I:C) + interferon-gamma resulted in increased mRNA and protein levels of both interleukin-32 and iNOS, with subsequent release of NO. Activated macrophages are also a source of nitric oxide (NO), which is largely produced by iNOS in response to proinflammatory cytokines. In this review article, the presented findings have many important implications for understanding the Influenza A (H1N1) viral pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment. The direct viral cytotoxicity (referred cytopathic effect) is only a fraction of several types of events induced by virus infection. Nitric oxide and oxygen free radicals such as superoxide anion (O₂⁻˙) are generated markedly in influenza A (including H1N1) virus-infected host boosts, and these molecular species are identified as the potent pathogenic agents. The mutual interaction of NO with O₂⁻˙ resulting in formation of peroxynitrite is operative in the pathogenic mechanism of influenza virus pneumonia. The toxicity and reactivity of oxygen radicals, generated in excessive amounts mediate the overreaction of the host's immune response against the organs or tissues in which viruses are replicating, and this may explain the mechanism of tissue injuries observed in influenza virus infection of various types. The authors revealed the protection that carnosine and its bioavailable nonhydrolized forms provide against peroxynitrite damage and other types of viral injuries in which immunologic interactions are usually involved. Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) shows the pharmacologic intracellular correction of NO release which might be one of the

  19. Carnosine and Homocarnosine Degradation Mechanisms by the Human Carnosinase Enzyme CN1: Insights from Multiscale Simulations.

    PubMed

    Pavlin, Matic; Rossetti, Giulia; De Vivo, Marco; Carloni, Paolo

    2016-05-17

    The endogenous dipeptide l-carnosine, and its derivative homocarnosine, prevent and reduce several pathologies like amytrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Their beneficial action is severely hampered because of the hydrolysis by carnosinase enzymes, in particular the human carnosinase, hCN1. This belongs to the metallopeptidase M20 family, where a cocatalytic active site is formed by two Zn(2+) ions, bridged by a hydroxide anion. The protein may exist as a monomer and as a dimer in vivo. Here we used hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations based on the dimeric apoenzyme's structural information to predict the Michaelis complexes with l-carnosine and its derivative homocarnosine. On the basis of our calculations, we suggest that (i) l-carnosine degradation occurs through a nucleophilic attack of a Zn(2+)-coordinated bridging moiety for both monomer and dimer. This mechanistic hypothesis for hCN1 catalysis differs from previous proposals, while it is in agreement with available experimental data. (ii) The experimentally measured higher affinity of homocarnosine for the enzyme relative to l-carnosine might be explained, at least in part, by more extensive interactions inside the monomeric and dimeric hCN1's active site. (iii) Hydrogen bonds at the binding site, present in the dimer but absent in the monomer, might play a role in the experimentally observed higher activity of the dimeric form. Investigations of the enzymatic reaction are required to establish or disprove this hypothesis. Our results may serve as a basis for the design of potent hCN1 inhibitors. PMID:27105448

  20. Fire and smoke retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, M. J.

    Despite a reduction in Federal regulatory activity, research concerned with flame retardancy and smoke suppression in the private sector appears to be increasing. This trend seem related to the increased utilization of plastics for end uses which traditionally have employed metal or wood products. As a result, new markets have appeared for thermally stable and fire resistance thermoplastic materials, and this in turn has spurred research and development activity. In addition, public awareness of the dangers associated with fire has increased as a result of several highly publicized hotel and restaurant fires within the past two years. The consumers recognition of flammability characteristics as important materials property considerations has increased. The current status of fire and smoke retardant chemistry and research are summarized.

  1. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  2. Attenuation of Some Metabolic Deteriorations Induced by Diabetes Mellitus Using Carnosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, K. M.; Mohamed, A. M.; Metwally, N. S.

    The protective ability of carnosine against some metabolic disorders and oxidative stress in Strepotzotocin (STZ) diabetic-induced model was studied. Diabetic rats showed significant increase in serum glucose and cortisol levels indicating disturbance of carbohydrate metabolism, increased triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol as well as iron level indicating abnormal lipid metabolism and iron overload. Marked increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SD) were also demonstrated implying impairment of liver function. Concomitantly, the results revealed an impairment of antioxidant status of diabetic animals as evidenced by significant decrease in vitamin E and HDL-C levels. Administration of either two doses of carnosine (10 mg/100 g b.w. or 20 mg/100 g b.w.) two weeks before and after diabetic induction, was effective in ameliorating serum glucose level of diabetic animals and improving the deterioration in the studied parameters. The best results were obtained with the higher dose. No significant changes were noted in serum bilirubin level among the different studied groups. These data suggest that carnosine is a potential multi-protective agent for diabetic complications prevention or therapy.

  3. Zinc L-carnosine protects colonic mucosal injury through induction of heat shock protein 72 and suppression of NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Odashima, Masaru; Otaka, Michiro; Jin, Mario; Wada, Isao; Horikawa, Youhei; Matsuhashi, Tamotsu; Ohba, Reina; Hatakeyama, Natsumi; Oyake, Jinko; Watanabe, Sumio

    2006-11-10

    In this study, we investigated the effects of zinc L-carnosine, an anti-ulcer drug, on acetic acid-induced colonic mucosal injury and the correlation of these effects with expression of 72-kDa heat shock proteins (HSP72) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation in rat colonic mucosa in vivo. After intrarectal administration of zinc L-carnosine, the rats received intrarectal infusion of 5% acetic acid (1 ml). The colonic mucosal damage was evaluated by macroscopic assessments 24 h after the intrarectal infusion of acetic acid. Expression of HSP72 in rat colonic mucosa was evaluated by Western blot analysis before and after zinc L-carnosine administration. NF-kappaB activation was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Zinc L-carnosine inhibited visible damage in rat colonic mucosa by acetic acid. Expression of HSP72 was significantly increased at 6 h after zinc L-carnosine administration. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in colonic mucosa was suppressed 6 h after zinc L-carnosine treatment. These results suggested that zinc L-carnosine protects the colonic mucosa against acetic acid by induction of HSP72 and suppression of NF-kappaB activation and zinc L-carnosine may be a novel therapeutic agent for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16949620

  4. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and biological activities of new carnosine derivatives stable in human serum as potential neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Bertinaria, Massimo; Rolando, Barbara; Giorgis, Marta; Montanaro, Gabriele; Guglielmo, Stefano; Buonsanti, M Federica; Carabelli, Valentina; Gavello, Daniela; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-01-27

    The synthesis and the physicochemical and biological characterization of a series of carnosine amides bearing on the amido group alkyl substituents endowed with different lipophilicity are described. All synthesized products display carnosine-like properties differentiating from the lead for their high serum stability. They are able to complex Cu(2+) ions at physiological pH with the same stoichiometry as carnosine. The newly synthesized compounds display highly significant copper ion sequestering ability and are capable of protecting LDL from oxidation catalyzed by Cu(2+) ions, the most active compounds being the most hydrophilic ones. All the synthesized amides show quite potent carnosine-like HNE quenching activity; in particular, 7d, the member of the series selected for this kind of study, is able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to protect primary mouse hippocampal neurons against HNE-induced death. These products can be considered metabolically stable analogues of carnosine and are worthy of additional investigation as potential neuroprotective agents. PMID:21182325

  5. Antioxidant potential of date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) seed protein hydrolysates and carnosine in food and biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2015-01-28

    Date seed protein hydrolysates were evaluated for antioxidant activity as well as solubility and water-holding capacity in food and biological model systems. Date seed protein hydrolysates as well as carnosine exhibited >80% of solubility over a pH range of 2-12. The hydrolysates and carnosine at 0.5% (w/w) were also found to be effective in enhancing water-holding capacity and cooking yield in a fish model system, which was nearly similar to sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP; 0.3%, w/w). Incorporation of hydrolysates (200 ppm) in fish model systems resulted in the highest inhibition (30%) of oxidation in comparison to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 9%). In addition, hydrolysates and carnosine inhibited β-carotene oxidation by 75%. The hydrolysates (0.1 mg/mL) inhibited LDL cholesterol oxidation by 60%, whereas carnosine inhibited oxidation by 80% after 12 h of incubation. Additionally, hydrolysates and carnosine effectively inhibited hydroxyl (6 mg/mL) and peroxyl (0.1 mg/mL) radical-induced DNA scission. Therefore, date seed protein hydrolysates could be used as a potential functional food ingredient for health promotion. PMID:25553507

  6. Bioactive peptide carnosin protects against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity by abrogation of oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Kazemian-Mahtaj, Azam; Khodadadi, Iraj

    2016-08-01

    Context Oxidative stress is a common mechanism of liver injury. Carnosine is a dipeptide having strong antioxidant effects. Objectives We investigated the effects of carnosine on lead-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Materials and methods Animals received an aqueous solution of lead acetate (500 mg Pb/L in the drinking water) and/or daily oral gavage of carnosine (10 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. Rats were then weighed and used for the biochemical (commercial kits), molecular (standard chemical methods) and histological (microscopic) evaluations. Results Lead-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue was indicated by a significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) (8.25 ± 0.15 nmol/mg) as well as decrease in the level of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (1.72 ± 0.25 μmol/g) and total thiol (SH) groups) 1.9 ± 0.22 μmol/g). Carnosine treatment decreased MDA (4 ± 0.08 nmol/mg), whereas it increased the contents of total thiol (3.25 ± 0.04 μmol/g) and TAC (3.44 ± 0.32 μmol/g) in the lead group. Carnosine also prevented the decreased body weight (p < 0.001), albumin (p < 0.05) and total protein levels (p < 0.001) and increased liver weight (p < 0.05) and activates of hepatic enzymes (p's < 0.001) (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase) in the lead group. Furthermore, histopathological study showed that carnosine attenuates liver damage by decreasing necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Conclusion Carnosine prevented lead-induced hepatotoxicity, indicated by molecular, biochemical and histopathological analyses through inhibiting lipid peroxidation and enhancing antioxidant defence systems. Therefore, carnosine makes a good candidate to protect against the deleterious effect of chronic lead intoxication. PMID:26808926

  7. Educable Mentally Retarded, Level I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suo, Minnie Alice; Willemin, Helen

    Intended for teachers of special classes of educable mentally retarded children aged 6 to 8 (mental age = 3.5 to 4.9), the guide stresses skills necessary to the development of physical, personal and social, and vocational competency. An introduction defines philosophy and goals, outlines the educable mentally retarded program and the readiness…

  8. China's Approach to Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hittman, Stephan

    History, tradition, culture, and superstition have played significant roles in influencing Chinese attitudes toward the mentally retarded. China's overwhelmingly rural, agricultural society has made it dependent upon a huge force of semi-skilled and unskilled labor, to which the retarded are capable of contribution. The stress on self-reliance,…

  9. The Mentally Retarded in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunewald, Karl

    Described are residential and educational services provided for mentally retarded (MC) children and adults in Sweden. Normalization is the focus of the services which make maximum use of mental and physical capacities to reduce the handicap of mental retardation. Described are general principles, and four stages involving development of services…

  10. Flame retarded asphalt blend composition

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.B.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a flame retarded asphalt composition consisting essentially of a blend of: (a) thermoplastic elastomer modified bitumen; (b) 20-30 wt % inert filler; (c) 1-20 wt % of at least one halogenated flame retardant; and (d) 1-5 wt % of at least one inorganic phosphorus containing compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium phosphate compounds and red phosphorus.

  11. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  12. Laccase mediated-synthesis of hydroxycinnamoyl-peptide from ferulic acid and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Aljawish, Abdulhadi; Chevalot, Isabelle; Madad, Nidal; Paris, Cédric; Muniglia, Lionel

    2016-06-10

    Carnosine (CAR) dipeptide was functionalized with ferulic acid (FA) as substrate using laccase from Myceliophtora thermophila as biocatalyst. The enzymatic reaction was performed in aqueous medium under mild conditions (pH 7.5, 30°C) as an eco-friendly procedure. Results showed that this enzymatic process led to the synthesis of two new derivatives (P1, P2), from the coupling between CAR and FA derived products. Conditions allowing a high production of P1, P2 derivatives were determined with an optimal ratio of (FA: CAR) of (1:1.6) at optimal time reaction of 8h. Under these optimal conditions, the coupling between CAR and FA-products was demonstrated, resulting in the decrease of -NH2 groups (almost 50%) as quantified via derivatization. Due to the presence of FA in the structure of these new derivatives, they exhibited higher hydrophobic property than carnosine. Structural analyses by mass spectrometry showed that P1 and P2 (FA-CAR) derivatives exhibited the same molecular mass (MM 770g/mol) containing one CAR-molecule and three FA-molecules but with different chemical structures. Furthermore, these derivatives presented improved antioxidant (almost 10 times) and anti-proliferative (almost 18 times) properties in comparison with CAR. Moreover, P1 derivative exhibited higher antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities than P2 derivative, which confirmed the different structures of P1 and P2. These results suggested that the oxidized phenols coupling with carnosine is a promising process to enhance the CAR-properties. PMID:27084055

  13. Carnosine decreased neuronal cell death through targeting glutamate system and astrocyte mitochondrial bioenergetics in cultured neuron/astrocyte exposed to OGD/recovery.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Bao, Yun; Xu, Huijuan; Cheng, Jiaoyan; Wang, Bingyu; Shen, Yao; Chen, Zhong; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we showed that carnosine upregulated the expression level of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), which has been recognized as an important participant in the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS), with ischemic model in vitro and in vivo. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of carnosine on neuron/astrocyte co-cultures exposed to OGD/recovery, and to explore whether the ANLS or any other mechanism contributes to carnosine-induced neuroprotection on neuron/astrocyte. Co-cultures were treated with carnosine and exposed to OGD/recovery. Cell death and the extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA were measured. The mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis were detected by Seahorse Bioscience XF96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Results showed that carnosine decreased neuronal cell death, increased extracellular GABA level, and abolished the increase in extracellular glutamate and reversed the mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder induced by OGD/recovery. Carnosine also upregulated the mRNA level of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 at 2h after OGD. Dihydrokainate, a specific inhibitor of GLT-1, decreased glycolysis but it did not affect mitochondrial respiration of the cells, and it could not reverse the increase in mitochondrial OXPHOS induced by carnosine in the co-cultures. The levels of mRNAs for monocarboxylate transporter1, 4 (MCT1, 4), which were expressed in astrocytes, and MCT2, the main neuronal MCT, were significantly increased at the early stage of recovery. Carnosine only partly reversed the increased expression of astrocytic MCT1 and MCT4. These results suggest that regulating astrocytic energy metabolism and extracellular glutamate and GABA levels but not the ANLS are involved in the carnosine-induced neuroprotection. PMID:27040711

  14. Could carnosine suppress zinc-mediated proteasome inhibition and neurodegeneration? Therapeutic potential of a non-toxic but non-patentable dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2005-01-01

    Ageing and neurodegenerative conditions are often associated with proteasome dysfunction, possibly mediated by zinc and/or copper ions. Studies have shown that (i) the olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc, (ii) carnosine can suppress copper and zinc toxicity in olfactory neurones, (iii) olfactory dysfunction is often associated with neurodegenerative conditions and (iv) elevated levels of zinc are found in brains of Alzheimer's patients. It is suggested that nasal administration of carnosine should be explored as a possible way of suppressing zinc/copper-mediated proteasome inhibition and consequent neurodegeneration. PMID:16034682

  15. Carnosine, nerve growth factor receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase expression during the ontogeny of the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Biffo, S; Martí, E; Fasolo, A

    1992-01-01

    The localizations of carnosine, nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were studied in the embryonic and postnatal rat olfactory bulb and epithelium by means of single- and double-immunostaining methods. Tyrosine hydroxylase ontogeny was also evaluated at the mRNA level by in situ hybridization. All these molecules were expressed in the olfactory bulb but with different developmental patterns and cellular localization: carnosine immunoreactivity is seen from embryonic day 17 in primary olfactory neurons scattered in the nasal cavity and in fibres projecting from them to the olfactory bulb. Nerve growth factor-receptor immunoreactivity associated with small glial-like cells is visible in some glomeruli starting from the second day of postnatal life. At postnatal day 10 NGF-receptor immunoreactivity is extended to all glomeruli. Periglomerular neurons expressing TH mRNA and protein are present prenatally and their number sharply increases during the early postnatal development. Double-staining methods show that TH and NGF-receptor immunoreactivity do not overlap in cell bodies and processes. In addition, NGF-receptor immunoreactivity is not colocalized with carnosine. These findings definitely exclude NGF-receptor expression in periglomerular and primary olfactory neurons, suggesting that at least part of NGF-receptor expression in the olfactory bulb is associated with glial cells. In addition, they provide the first immunohistochemical data on carnosine ontogeny and confirm at the mRNA level previous studies on the ontogeny of TH protein. PMID:1376608

  16. Tuning the self-assembly of the bioactive dipeptide L-carnosine by incorporation of a bulky aromatic substituent.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Cheng, G; Greenland, B W; Hamley, I W; Harris, P J F

    2011-03-15

    The dipeptide L-carnosine has a number of important biological properties. Here, we explore the effect of attachment of a bulky hydrophobic aromatic unit, Fmoc [N-(fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl)] on the self-assembly of Fmoc-L-carnosine, i.e., Fmoc-β-alanine-histidine (Fmoc-βAH). It is shown that Fmoc-βAH forms well-defined amyloid fibrils containing β sheets above a critical aggregation concentration, which is determined from pyrene and ThT fluorescence experiments. Twisted fibrils were imaged by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The zinc-binding properties of Fmoc-βAH were investigated by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy since the formation of metal ion complexes with the histidine residue in carnosine is well-known, and important to its biological roles. Observed changes in the spectra may reflect differences in the packing of the Fmoc-dipeptides due to electrostatic interactions. Cryo-TEM shows that this leads to changes in the fibril morphology. Hydrogelation is also induced by addition of an appropriate concentration of zinc ions. Our work shows that the Fmoc motif can be employed to drive the self-assembly of carnosine into amyloid fibrils. PMID:21338121

  17. Daily Carnosine and Anserine Supplementation Alters Verbal Episodic Memory and Resting State Network Connectivity in Healthy Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rokicki, Jaroslav; Li, Lucia; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Kaneko, Jun; Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine and anserine are strong antioxidants, previously demonstrated to reduce cognitive decline in animal studies. We aimed to investigate their cognitive and neurophysiological effects, using functional MRI, on humans. Thirty-one healthy participants (age 40–78, 10 male/21 female) were recruited to a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Participants were assigned to twice-daily doses of imidazole dipeptide formula (n = 14), containing 500 mg (carnosine/anserine, ratio 1/3) or an identical placebo (n = 17). Functional MRI and neuropsychological assessments were carried out at baseline and after 3 months of supplementation. We analyzed resting state functional connectivity with the FSL fMRI analysis package. There were no differences in neuropsychological scores between the groups at baseline. After 3 months of supplementation, the carnosine/anserine group had better verbal episodic memory performance and decreased connectivity in the default mode network, the posterior cingulate cortex and the right fronto parietal network, as compared with the placebo group. Furthermore, there was a correlation between the extents of cognitive and neuroimaging changes. These results suggest that daily carnosine/anserine supplementation can impact cognitive function and that network connectivity changes are associated with its effects. PMID:26640437

  18. Hyperglycemia Does Not Affect Iron Mediated Toxicity of Cultured Endothelial and Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Influence of L-Carnosine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiqi; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Kabtni, Sarah; van den Born, Jaap; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Yard, Benito A.; Hauske, Sibylle J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to affect the clinical course of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as accompanying increased intracellular iron accumulation may provide an alternative source for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although carnosine has proven its therapeutic efficacy in rodent models of T2DM, little is known about its efficacy to protect cells from iron toxicity. We sought to assess if high glucose (HG) exposure makes cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) more susceptible to metal induced toxicity and if this is ameliorated by L-carnosine. HUVECs and PTECs, cultured under normal glucose (5 mM, NG) or HG (30 mM), were challenged for 24 h with FeCl3. Cell viability was not impaired under HG conditions nor did HG increase susceptibility to FeCl3. HG did not change the expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin (IREG), and transferrin receptor protein 1 (TFRC). Irrespective of glucose concentrations L-carnosine prevented toxicity in a dose-dependent manner, only if it was present during the FeCl3 challenge. Hence our study indicates that iron induced cytotoxicity is not enhanced under HG conditions. L-Carnosine displayed a strong protective effect, most likely by chelation of iron mediated toxicity. PMID:26788523

  19. Effects of carnosine supplementation to an all-plant protein diet for rainbow trout(Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish meal may contain “unknown growth factors” that have yet to be identified for their physiological role. Carnosine is a histidine-ß-alanine dipeptide found in muscle and nervous system tissue which has been demonstrated to have biological activity, but its physiological role is not well defined. ...

  20. Daily Carnosine and Anserine Supplementation Alters Verbal Episodic Memory and Resting State Network Connectivity in Healthy Elderly Adults.

    PubMed

    Rokicki, Jaroslav; Li, Lucia; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Kaneko, Jun; Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine and anserine are strong antioxidants, previously demonstrated to reduce cognitive decline in animal studies. We aimed to investigate their cognitive and neurophysiological effects, using functional MRI, on humans. Thirty-one healthy participants (age 40-78, 10 male/21 female) were recruited to a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Participants were assigned to twice-daily doses of imidazole dipeptide formula (n = 14), containing 500 mg (carnosine/anserine, ratio 1/3) or an identical placebo (n = 17). Functional MRI and neuropsychological assessments were carried out at baseline and after 3 months of supplementation. We analyzed resting state functional connectivity with the FSL fMRI analysis package. There were no differences in neuropsychological scores between the groups at baseline. After 3 months of supplementation, the carnosine/anserine group had better verbal episodic memory performance and decreased connectivity in the default mode network, the posterior cingulate cortex and the right fronto parietal network, as compared with the placebo group. Furthermore, there was a correlation between the extents of cognitive and neuroimaging changes. These results suggest that daily carnosine/anserine supplementation can impact cognitive function and that network connectivity changes are associated with its effects. PMID:26640437

  1. Hyperglycemia Does Not Affect Iron Mediated Toxicity of Cultured Endothelial and Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Influence of L-Carnosine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqi; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Kabtni, Sarah; van den Born, Jaap; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Krämer, Bernhard K; Yard, Benito A; Hauske, Sibylle J

    2016-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to affect the clinical course of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as accompanying increased intracellular iron accumulation may provide an alternative source for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although carnosine has proven its therapeutic efficacy in rodent models of T2DM, little is known about its efficacy to protect cells from iron toxicity. We sought to assess if high glucose (HG) exposure makes cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) more susceptible to metal induced toxicity and if this is ameliorated by L-carnosine. HUVECs and PTECs, cultured under normal glucose (5 mM, NG) or HG (30 mM), were challenged for 24 h with FeCl3. Cell viability was not impaired under HG conditions nor did HG increase susceptibility to FeCl3. HG did not change the expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin (IREG), and transferrin receptor protein 1 (TFRC). Irrespective of glucose concentrations L-carnosine prevented toxicity in a dose-dependent manner, only if it was present during the FeCl3 challenge. Hence our study indicates that iron induced cytotoxicity is not enhanced under HG conditions. L-Carnosine displayed a strong protective effect, most likely by chelation of iron mediated toxicity. PMID:26788523

  2. Effect of Anserine/Carnosine Supplementation on Verbal Episodic Memory in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro; Kaneko, Jun; Kurashige, Hiroki; Cao, Yuan; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Katakura, Yoshinori; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to determine whether or not anserine/carnosine supplementation (ACS) is capable of preserving cognitive function of elderly people. In a double-blind randomized controlled trial, volunteers were randomly assigned to an ACS or placebo group at a 1:1 ratio. The ACS group took 1.0 g of an anserine/carnosine (3:1) formula daily for 3 months. Participants were evaluated by psychological tests before and after the 3-month supplementation period. Thirty-nine healthy elderly volunteers (60–78 years old) completed the follow-up tests. Among the tests, delayed recall verbal memory assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Logical Memory showed significant preservation in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0128). Blood analysis revealed a decreased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including CCL-2 and IL-8, in the ACS group. MRI analysis using arterial spin labeling showed a suppression in the age-related decline in brain blood flow in the posterior cingulate cortex area in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0248). In another randomized controlled trial, delayed recall verbal memory showed significant preservation in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0202). These results collectively suggest that ACS may preserve verbal episodic memory and brain perfusion in elderly people, although further study is needed. PMID:26682691

  3. Zinc, copper, and carnosine attenuate neurotoxicity of prion fragment PrP106-126.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Koyama, Hironari; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sadakane, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    Prion diseases are progressive neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with the conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to abnormal pathogenic prion protein (PrP(SC)) by conformational changes. Prion protein is a metal-binding protein that is suggested to be involved in metal homeostasis. We investigated here the effects of trace elements on the conformational changes and neurotoxicity of synthetic prion peptide (PrP106-126). PrP106-126 exhibited the formation of β-sheet structures and enhanced neurotoxicity during the aging process. The co-existence of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) during aging inhibited β-sheet formation by PrP106-126 and attenuated its neurotoxicity on primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Although PrP106-126 formed amyloid-like fibrils as observed by atomic force microscopy, the height of the fibers was decreased in the presence of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+). Carnosine (β-alanyl histidine) significantly inhibited both the β-sheet formation and the neurotoxicity of PrP106-126. Our results suggested that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) might be involved in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. It is also possible that carnosine might become a candidate for therapeutic treatments for prion diseases. PMID:21442127

  4. Effect of Anserine/Carnosine Supplementation on Verbal Episodic Memory in Elderly People.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro; Kaneko, Jun; Kurashige, Hiroki; Cao, Yuan; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Katakura, Yoshinori; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to determine whether or not anserine/carnosine supplementation (ACS) is capable of preserving cognitive function of elderly people. In a double-blind randomized controlled trial, volunteers were randomly assigned to an ACS or placebo group at a 1:1 ratio. The ACS group took 1.0 g of an anserine/carnosine (3:1) formula daily for 3 months. Participants were evaluated by psychological tests before and after the 3-month supplementation period. Thirty-nine healthy elderly volunteers (60-78 years old) completed the follow-up tests. Among the tests, delayed recall verbal memory assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Logical Memory showed significant preservation in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0128). Blood analysis revealed a decreased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including CCL-2 and IL-8, in the ACS group. MRI analysis using arterial spin labeling showed a suppression in the age-related decline in brain blood flow in the posterior cingulate cortex area in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0248). In another randomized controlled trial, delayed recall verbal memory showed significant preservation in the ACS group, compared to the placebo group (p = 0.0202). These results collectively suggest that ACS may preserve verbal episodic memory and brain perfusion in elderly people, although further study is needed. PMID:26682691

  5. Neurotoxicity of brominated flame retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been commonly used as commercial flame retardants in a variety of products including plastics and textiles. Despite their decreasing usage worldwide, congeners continue to accumulate in the environment, including soil, dust, food, anima...

  6. Can earthworms survive fire retardants?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Olson, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most common fire retardants are foams or are similar to common agricultural fertilizers, such as ammonium sulfate and ammonium phosphate. Although fire retardants are widely applied to soils, we lack basic information about their toxicities to soil organisms. We measured the toxicity of five fire retardants (Firetrol LCG-R, Firetrol GTS-R, Silv-Ex Foam Concentrate, Phos-chek D-75, and Phos-chek WD-881) to earthworms using the pesticide toxicity test developed for earthworms by the European Economic Community. None was lethal at 1,000 ppm in the soil, which was suggested as a relatively high exposure under normal applications. We concluded that the fire retardants tested are relatively nontoxic to soil organisms compared with other environmental chemicals and that they probably do not reduce earthworm populations when applied under usual firefighting conditions.

  7. INTRODUCTION TO BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large and diverse class of major industrial products used to provide fire safety. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), Hexabromocylocodecane (HBCD), and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are the major commercial compounds. TBBPA is a react...

  8. Intumescent Coatings as Fire Retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. H.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A.; Sawko, P. M.

    1970-01-01

    Fire-retardant paint, when activated by the heat of fire, reacts to form a thick, low-density, polymeric coating or char layer. Water vapor and sulphur dioxide are released during the intumescent reaction.

  9. Oxaliplatin complexes with carnosine and its derivatives: in vitro cytotoxicity, mass spectrometric and computational studies with a focus on complex fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Eslam M; Camp, Claire L; Youssef, Ahmed S; Amleh, Asma; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L; Shoeib, Tamer

    2013-11-01

    The complexation of the Pt-based anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxPt) with biological ligands other than DNA is believed to be a major cellular sink for the drug reducing its therapeutic potential and acting as a potential cause of toxicity. In this paper, the very first hypothesis driven investigation of the role of the naturally abundant cytoplasmic dipeptide ligand β-alanyl-l-histidine dipeptide (carnosine) in OxPt detoxification is presented. In vitro studies on hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells suggest that carnosine may inhibit the cytotoxic action of OxPt most likely through the formation of complexes that are less cytotoxic than OxPt alone. Evidence is provided to suggest that pre-exposure of HepG2 cells to elevated levels of carnosine appears to have a lasting effect on reducing the cytotoxicity of OxPt even after the removal of the externally added carnosine. This effect, however, is likely under kinetic control as its magnitude was shown not to vary significantly with the level of carnosine exposure within the concentration range used in this study. Various mass spectrometry techniques employing electrospray ionization and chip nanospray were employed to study the interaction of oxaliplatin with carnosine as well as two of its derivatives β-alanyl-N-methylhistidine (anserine) and N-acetylcarnosine (NAC). Evidence of complexation between OxPt and each of the three ligands examined is presented. Most species observed were unambiguously assigned and compared to their theoretical isotopic patterns. Common fragmentation products due to the collisionally-activated protonated complexes of each of the ligands examined with OxPt, [M + OxPt + H](+), where M = carnosine, anserine or NAC, were reported. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were used to obtain structural information and relative free energies of different isomers of the observed precursor [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) both in the gas phase and in solution as well as to probe its

  10. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  11. Understanding and Teaching the Dependent Retarded Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Louis E.; Long, Julia

    Levels of mental retardation and school admission procedures for the dependent retarded (IQ's 30 to 50) are reviewed. Goals for all retarded and the application of goals to the dependent retarded are considered. Plans and procedures for both teacher and child activities along with suggestions for audiovisual and other materials are provided in the…

  12. The Mentally Retarded Offender: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilit, Jeffrey; And Others

    An annotated bibliography of approximately 150 books and articles on the mentally retarded offender as well as 30 nonannotated entries are provided. Topics covered include such areas as characteristics of mentally retarded delinquents, rehabilitation of the retarded offender, community services for retarded persons, rights of the mentally…

  13. Development of novel fire retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigdel Regmi, Bhawani

    Numerous candidate environmentally-friendly, water-soluble, and non-toxic fire retardants and fire-retarding processes were developed and tested according to the ASTM D 3801 flammability test and the NRL 8093 smoldering test. Flame retardants that passed the ASTM D 3801 flammability test with the highest V0 rating were boron esters of guanidinium hydroxycarboxylate (glycolate, salicylate and dihydroxybenzoate), zinc gluconate borate ester, and cyanoacetate salts of organic bases (melaminium, cyanoguanidinium, and ammonium). Several related compounds pass this test with the lower V1 rating. Two new synergistic flame and smolder retarding systems were developed in which the individual components were incapable of preventing flame spread or smoldering but in combination they were highly effective. These systems were mixtures of either guanyl urea phosphate and boric acid or beta-alanine and boric acid. Compositions leading to the maximum solubility of boron oxides in the ammonium borate/sodium borate system were determined at several temperatures and the formation of mixtures exceeding 50% dissolved boric acid equivalents was found possible. These mixtures were applied as flame retardants for wood, paper, and carbon-loaded polyurethane foam both directly and indirectly by in situ precipitation of boric acid or zinc borate by appropriate chemical treatments. These all passed the ASTM flammability test with V0 rating. The performance of the boron-containing fire retardants is likely due to deposition of protective boron oxide coatings at elevated temperatures except where phosphate was present and a protective boron phosphate was deposited instead. In all cases, the oxidation of carbonaceous char was strongly inhibited. The hydroxycarboxylate groups generally formed intumescent chars during thermal decomposition that also contributed to fire retardancy.

  14. Carnosine and Related Peptides: Therapeutic Potential in Age-Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cararo, José H; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patricia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C

    2015-09-01

    Imidazole dipeptides (ID), such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine), are compounds widely distributed in excitable tissues of vertebrates. ID are also endowed of several biochemical properties in biological tissues, including antioxidant, bivalent metal ion chelating, proton buffering, and carbonyl scavenger activities. Furthermore, remarkable biological effects have been assigned to such compounds in age-related human disorders and in patients whose activity of serum carnosinase is deficient or undetectable. Nevertheless, the precise biological role of ID is still to be unraveled. In the present review we shall discuss some evidences from clinical and basic studies for the utilization of ID as a drug therapy for age-related human disorders. PMID:26425391

  15. Carnosine and Related Peptides: Therapeutic Potential in Age-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cararo, José H; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patricia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C

    2015-01-01

    Imidazole dipeptides (ID), such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine), are compounds widely distributed in excitable tissues of vertebrates. ID are also endowed of several biochemical properties in biological tissues, including antioxidant, bivalent metal ion chelating, proton buffering, and carbonyl scavenger activities. Furthermore, remarkable biological effects have been assigned to such compounds in age-related human disorders and in patients whose activity of serum carnosinase is deficient or undetectable. Nevertheless, the precise biological role of ID is still to be unraveled. In the present review we shall discuss some evidences from clinical and basic studies for the utilization of ID as a drug therapy for age-related human disorders. PMID:26425391

  16. Effect of transition metal binding on the tautomeric equilibrium of the carnosine imidazolic ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, A.; Fini, G.; Bottura, G.

    2001-05-01

    A Raman study of carnosine (Carn) and its complexes with Cu(II), Zn(II) and Co(II) at different pH values was carried out. At pH 7 and 9, Carn exists in equilibrium between two tautomeric forms. Raman spectroscopy appears to be a useful tool for analysing the tautomeric equilibrium of the imidazole ring of Carn since the sites involved in metal chelation can be identified by some bands (e.g. νC4C5) that change in wavenumber depending on whether the imidazole ring takes the tautomeric form I or II. Form I (N π-H) is predominant in the free ligand, but the metal coordination can affect the tautomeric equilibrium. Although weak compared to those of aromatic residues, the Raman marker bands may be useful in analysing metal-histidine interaction in proteins.

  17. Auto cannibalism in mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rohit; Mina, Shaily; Sachdeva, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR) deems an individual more vulnerable to psychopathologies. The individual may develop an array of behavioral disturbances manifesting themselves in the form of aggressive and destructive conduct, violent fits of anger, stereotyped, or self-injuring behavior. Self-injurious behavior is heterogeneous in nature ranging from mild to severe variant. We report a case of a 7-year-old boy with MR with self-inflicted severe oral injuries of cannibalistic nature presenting as cleft lip and palate. A more extensive research is needed on the problem behaviors in mentally retarded patients for early detection and effective and timely intervention leading to a better outcome. PMID:24891909

  18. Determination of carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents in meat from different animal species.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Giancotti, Valeria; Zunino, Valentina; Meineri, Giorgia

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the content of the histidinic antioxidants, advanced glycation end products (pentosidine) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in the meat from different animal species. Carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine and pentosidine were quantified by HPLC/MS, while TBARS was determined by photometric measurements. The total CRCs (carnosine+anserine+homocarnosine) content was in the increasing order: beef

  19. Effects of carnosine on contractile apparatus Ca²⁺ sensitivity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ release in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in potential ergogenic and therapeutic effects of increasing skeletal muscle carnosine content, although its effects on excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in human muscle have not been defined. Consequently, we sought to characterize what effects carnosine, at levels attained by supplementation, has on human muscle fiber function, using a preparation with all key EC coupling proteins in their in situ positions. Fiber segments, obtained from vastus lateralis muscle of human subjects by needle biopsy, were mechanically skinned, and their Ca(2+) release and contractile apparatus properties were characterized. Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus was significantly increased by 8 and 16 mM carnosine (increase in pCa(50) of 0.073 ± 0.007 and 0.116 ± 0.006 pCa units, respectively, in six type I fibers, and 0.063 ± 0.018 and 0.103 ± 0.013 pCa units, respectively, in five type II fibers). Caffeine-induced force responses were potentiated by 8 mM carnosine in both type I and II fibers, with the potentiation in type II fibers being entirely explicable by the increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus caused by carnosine. However, the potentiation of caffeine-induced responses caused by carnosine in type I fibers was beyond that expected from the associated increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and suggestive of increased Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Thus increasing muscle carnosine content likely confers benefits to muscle performance in both fiber types by increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and possibly also by aiding Ca(2+) release in type I fibers, helping to lessen or slow the decline in muscle performance during fatiguing stimulation. PMID:22174397

  20. Effect of carnosine supplementation on apoptosis and irisin, total oxidant and antioxidants levels in the serum, liver and lung tissues in rats exposed to formaldehyde inhalation.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suna; Ogeturk, Murat; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kavakli, Ahmet; Aydin, Suleyman

    2015-02-01

    The main objective of the study has been to show whether carnosine has positive effects on liver and lung tissues of rats exposed to a range of formaldehyde concentrations, and to explore how irisin expression and antioxidant capacity are altered in these tissues by carnosine supplementation. Sprague-Dawley type male rats were divided into 8 groups with 6 animals in each: (I) Control; no chemical supplementation); (II) sham (100mg/kg/day carnosine); (III) low dose formaldehyde (LDFA) for 5 days/week; (IV) LDFA for 5 days/week and carnosine); (V) moderate dose formaldehyde (MDFA) for 5 days/week); (VI) MDFA for 5 days/week and carnosine; (VII) high dose formaldehyde (HDFA) for 5 days/week; (VIII) and HDFA for 5 days/week and carnosine. Sham and control groups were exposed to normal air. Irisin levels of the serum, liver and lung tissue supernatants were analyzed by ELISA, while the REL method was used to determine total oxidant/antioxidant capacity. Irisin production by the tissues was detected immunohistochemically. Increasing doses of FA decreased serum/tissue irisin and total antioxidant levels relative to the controls, as also to increases in TUNEL expressions, total oxidant level, oxidant and apoptosis index. Irisin expression was detected in hepatocyte and sinusoidal cells of the liver and parenchymal cells of the lung. In conclusion, while FA exposure reduces irisin and total oxidant in the serum, liver and lung tissues in a dose-dependent manner and increases the total antioxidant capacity, carnosine supplementation reduces the oxidative stress and restores the histopathological and biochemical signs. PMID:25541044

  1. Intravitreal injection of forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine affords neuroprotection to retinal ganglion cells following retinal ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Adornetto, Annagrazia; Cavaliere, Federica; Varano, Giuseppe Pasquale; Rusciano, Dario; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Nucci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is the final event leading to visual impairment in glaucoma; therefore, identification of neuroprotective strategies able to slow down or prevent the process is one of the main challenges for glaucoma research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective potential of RGC death induced by the in vivo transient increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) of a combined treatment with forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine. Forskolin (7beta-acetoxy-8, 13-epoxy-1a, 6β, 9a-trihydroxy-labd-14-en-11-one) is an activator of adenylate cyclase that decreases IOP by reducing aqueous humor production and functions as a neuroprotector due to its neurotrophin-stimulating activity. Homotaurine is a natural aminosulfonate compound endowed with neuromodulatory effects, while the dipeptide L-carnosine is known for its antioxidant properties. Methods Retinal ischemia was induced in the right eye of adult male Wistar rats by acutely increasing the IOP. Forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine were intravitreally injected and RGC survival evaluated following retrograde labeling with FluoroGold. Total and phosphorylated Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) protein levels, as well as calpain activity, were analyzed with western blot. Protein kinase A (PKA) was inhibited by intravitreal injection of H89. Results A synergic neuroprotective effect on RGC survival was observed following the combined treatment with forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine compared to forskolin alone. The observed neuroprotection was associated with reduced calpain activity, upregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, and inhibition of GSK-3β but was independent from PKA activation and distinct from the hypotensive effects of forskolin. Conclusions A multidrug/multitarget approach, by interfering with several pathways involved in RGC degeneration, may be promising to achieve glaucoma neuroprotection. PMID:26167113

  2. Effects of Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Brain Homocarnosine/Carnosine Signal and Cognitive Function: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Ruth M; Artioli, Guilherme G.; Otaduy, Maria C.; Roschel, Hamilton; Robertson, Jacques; Martin, Daniel; S. Painelli, Vitor; Harris, Roger C.; Gualano, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1) and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2). Methods In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men) and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation), with a battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing task) being performed before and after exercise on each occasion. Results In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99) or omnivores (p = 0.27); nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19). Similarly, there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27). In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P<0.05), although there was no effect (P>0.05) of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise. Conclusion 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4g d-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive function before or after exercise in trained cyclists. PMID:25875297

  3. Graphene Oxides Decorated with Carnosine as an Adjuvant To Modulate Innate Immune and Improve Adaptive Immunity in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chunchun; Zhi, Xiao; Li, Chao; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Qiu, Xusheng; Ding, Chan; Ma, Lijun; Lu, Hongmin; Chen, Di; Liu, Guangqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-23

    Current studies have revealed the immune effects of graphene oxide (GO) and have utilized them as vaccine carriers and adjuvants. However, GO easily induces strong oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction at the site of injection. It is very necessary to develop an alternative adjuvant based on graphene oxide derivatives for improving immune responses and decreasing side effects. Carnosine (Car) is an outstanding and safe antioxidant. Herein, the feasibility and efficiency of ultrasmall graphene oxide decorated with carnosine as an alternative immune adjuvant were explored. OVA@GO-Car was prepared by simply mixing ovalbumin (OVA, a model antigen) with ultrasmall GO covalently modified with carnosine (GO-Car). We investigated the immunological properties of the GO-Car adjuvant in model mice. Results show that OVA@GO-Car can promote robust and durable OVA-specific antibody response, increase lymphocyte proliferation efficiency, and enhance CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell activation. The presence of Car in GO also probably contributes to enhancing the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through modulating the expression of some cytokines, including IL-6, CXCL1, CCL2, and CSF3. In addition, the safety of GO-Car as an adjuvant was evaluated comprehensively. No symptoms such as allergic response, inflammatory redness swelling, raised surface temperatures, physiological anomalies of blood, and remarkable weight changes were observed. Besides, after modification with carnosine, histological damages caused by GO-Car in lung, muscle, kidney, and spleen became weaken significantly. This study sufficiently suggest that GO-Car as a safe adjuvant can effectively enhance humoral and innate immune responses against antigens in vivo. PMID:26766427

  4. Low taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and carnosine levels in plasma of diabetic pregnant rats: consequences for the offspring.

    PubMed

    Aerts, L; Van Assche, F A

    2001-01-01

    Gestational diabetes compromises fetal development and induces a diabetogenic effect in the offspring, including the development of gestational diabetes and the transmission of the effect to the next generation. Changes are not limited to glucose and insulin metabolism, and appear to be modulated by alterations at the hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis. In the present work, serum concentrations are given for the non-protein amino-acids taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), both neurotransmitters essential for normal brain development, and for the endogenous neuroprotector carnosine, a known anti-oxydans. Taurine levels are significantly below normal values in mildly diabetic mothers, in their fetal and adult offspring, virgin and pregnant, and in the fetuses of these pregnant offspring. GABA and carnosine levels are at the limit of detection in the diabetic mothers and their offspring at every stage. It is concluded that the low taurine, GABA and carnosine levels in diabetic mothers and their fetuses might compromise the normal structural and functional development of the fetal brain. When adult, these offspring present a deficiency of the circulating levels of these neurotransmitters involved in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal regulation of insulin secretion. This might contribute to the development of impaired glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes, thereby transmitting the effect to the next generation. PMID:11234622

  5. Carnosine as a protective factor in diabetic nephropathy: association with a leucine repeat of the carnosinase gene CNDP1.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bart; Hohenadel, Daniela; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Peters, Verena; Rind, Nina; Fischer, Christine; Rychlik, Ivan; Cerna, Marie; Romzova, Marianna; de Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Bakker, Stephan J L; Zirie, Mahmoud; Rondeau, Eric; Mathieson, Peter; Saleem, Moin A; Meyer, Jochen; Köppel, Hannes; Sauerhoefer, Sibylle; Bartram, Claus R; Nawroth, Peter; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Yard, Benito A; Zschocke, Johannes; van der Woude, Fokko J

    2005-08-01

    The risk of diabetic nephropathy is partially genetically determined. Diabetic nephropathy is linked to a gene locus on chromosome 18q22.3-q23. We aimed to identify the causative gene on chromosome 18 and to study the mechanism by which the product of this gene could be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. DNA polymorphisms were determined in 135 case (diabetic nephropathy) and 107 control (diabetes without nephropathy) subjects. The effect of carnosine on the production of extracellular matrix components and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) after exposure to 5 and 25 mmol/l d-glucose was studied in cultured human podocytes and mesangial cells, respectively. A trinucleotide repeat in exon 2 of the CNDP1 gene, coding for a leucine repeat in the leader peptide of the carnosinase-1 precursor, was associated with nephropathy. The shortest allelic form (CNDP1 Mannheim) was more common in the absence of nephropathy (P = 0.0028, odds ratio 2.56 [95% CI 1.36-4.84]) and was associated with lower serum carnosinase levels. Carnosine inhibited the increased production of fibronectin and collagen type VI in podocytes and the increased production of TGF-beta in mesangial cells induced by 25 mmol/l glucose. Diabetic patients with the CNDP1 Mannheim variant are less susceptible for nephropathy. Carnosine protects against the adverse effects of high glucose levels on renal cells. PMID:16046297

  6. Idiots Savants: Retarded and Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yewchuk, Carolyn

    The paper reviews the paradoxical nature of idiots savants, persons who, although retarded, have exceptional skills in certain areas. Various explanations for the phenomenon are discussed, such as a specific genetic endowment, a specialized compensatory response to general intellectual deficiency, and possession of an eidetic memory. Various…

  7. Books for Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cincinnati - Hamilton County Public Library, OH.

    Presented is an annotated list of approximately 300 books for educable (EMR) and trainable mentally retarded (TMR) children and adolescents, 6 to 15 years of age. Books are arranged in the following groups for EMR students: Group I contains approximately 84 entries for students 6 to 9 years of age; Group II lists approximately 81 stories and books…

  8. Transportation and the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    Reported were the results of a contract that involved identification, description, and categorization of the nature of transportation problems for the mentally retarded by means of analysis of existing studies, two surveys, and an inventory of specialized programs and systems operating in the United States. One major problem was found to be…

  9. Detection of Malingered Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shandera, Anne L.; Berry, David T. R.; Clark, Jessica A.; Schipper, Lindsey J.; Graue, Lili O.; Harp, Jordan P.

    2010-01-01

    In a cross-validation of results from L. O. Graue et al. (2007), standard psychological assessment instruments, as well as tests of neurocognitive and psychiatric feigning, were administered under standard instructions to 24 participants diagnosed with mild mental retardation (MR) and 10 demographically matched community volunteers (CVH). A 2nd…

  10. Toilet Training the Retarded Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Jeffrey K.

    The booklet offers guidelines in both Spanish and English to parents who are toilet training a mentally retarded child. The toilet training process is broken down into tasks that the child must learn, and the importance of positive reinforcement for each successfully accomplished task is emphasized. It is recommended that parents keep charts…

  11. HANDBOOK OF MENTAL RETARDATION SYNDROMES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, CHARLES H.

    THE CLINICAL SYNDROMES WHICH CONTRIBUTE TO THE PRODUCTION OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE DESCRIBED BY SIGNS, SYMPTOMS, AND ETIOLOGY. SYNDROMES TREATED ARE (1) PRENATAL AND POSTNATAL INFECTIONS, (2) PRENATAL INTOXICATION AND ALLERGIC REACTIONS, (3) PRENATAL TRAUMA, PHYSICAL AGENTS, OR INTOXICATION, (4) BIRTH INJURIES, (5) POSTNATAL POISONS AND ALLERGIC…

  12. Dichotic Stimulation and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, James L.; Virbancic, Mirna I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on the use of dichotic stimulation in individuals with mental retardation, and examines how noninvasive dichotic stimulation relates to hemisphere lateralization. Common findings are discussed concerning direction and magnitude of ear asymmetries, patterns of intrusion errors, and speech lateralization of Down…

  13. Genetic Counseling in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Peter

    The task of the genetic counselor who identifies genetic causes of mental retardation and assists families to understand risk of recurrence is described. Considered are chromosomal genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome, inherited disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, identification by testing the amniotic fluid cells (amniocentresis) in time…

  14. Fire-retardant epoxy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akawie, R. I.; Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms in molecular structure of epoxies make them fire-retardant without degrading their adhesive strength. Moreover, polymers are transparent, unlike compounds that contain arsenic or other inorganics. They have been used to bond polyvinylfluoride and polyether sulfone films onto polyimide glass laminates.

  15. Mental Retardation: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poser, Charles M., Ed.

    A collection of writings by 17 authors, the text includes the following discussions: general principles of diagnosis and management of mental retardation, neurologic evaluation of the infant and child, psychological evaluation, educational information, and treatment of pseudoretardation, communicative disorders, and metabolic and endocrine causes.…

  16. VOCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR THE RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRICE, CARL R.

    A SUCCESSFUL PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED IS BEING CARRIED ON AT THE MADISON (WISCONSIN) VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND ADULT SCHOOLS. THE TRAINEES MUST BE 17 YEARS OR OLDER, WITH AN IQ OF APPROXIMATELY 50-75. THE SCHOOL OF QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION CONTRIBUTES GREATLY TO THIS PROGRAM, FOR WHILE IT MAINLY TEACHES CHEFS AND…

  17. The Supreme Court V. Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biklen, Douglas

    1981-01-01

    The author examines the Supreme Court decisions regarding the rights of retarded children not to be institutionalized and rights of retarded people to have aggressive medical treatment that will help prolong their lives. (SB)

  18. L-carnosine enhanced reproductive potential of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast growing on medium containing glucose as a source of carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Molon, Mateusz; Kaszycki, Pawel; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-08-01

    Carnosine is an endogenous dipeptide composed of β-alanine and L-histidine, which occurs in vertebrates, including humans. It has a number of favorable properties including buffering, chelating, antioxidant, anti-glycation and anti-aging activities. In our study we used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast as a model organism to examine the impact of L-carnosine on the cell lifespan. We demonstrated that L-carnosine slowed down the growth and decreased the metabolic activity of cells as well as prolonged their generation time. On the other hand, it allowed for enhancement of the yeast reproductive potential and extended its reproductive lifespan. These changes may be a result of the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ATP content in the yeast cells. However, due to reduction of the post-reproductive lifespan, L-carnosine did not have an influence on the total lifespan of yeast. In conclusion, L-carnosine does not extend the total lifespan of S. cerevisiae but rather it increases the yeast's reproductive capacity by increasing the number of daughter cells produced. PMID:27040824

  19. Rehearsal Capacity and Dimensional Independence in Retardates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBane, Bonnie M.

    1976-01-01

    Retardate use of retention strategies and the independence of color and form retention were compared with predictions of the Attention-Retention theory of retardate discrimination learning. Institutional retardates were selected from two MA ranges, 6 to 8 and 9 to 12 years, without regard to diagnostic categories. (Author/JH)

  20. Endocrine Disorders Associated with Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Churku Mohan

    1980-01-01

    Endocrine disorders associated with mental retardation are described in relation to clinical characteristics, pathogenesis, diagnostic procedures, and treatment. Some endocrine disorders, particularly hypothyroidism, nephrogenic-diabetes insipidus, and hypoglycemic conditions, are frequently associated with mental retardation. Early diagnosis and prompt and proper management reduce mortality and the incidence of mental retardation associated with endocrine disorders. PMID:7392067

  1. Low Elevated Lead Levels and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    The relationship between low elevated lead absorption and mild mental retardation was investigated in 40 rural children (preschool to grade 12) without demonstrable cause for their retardation. Trace mineral analysis of hair samples from Ss and a control group (N=20) indicated the mean hair lead concentrations for the retarded Ss were considerably…

  2. Mental Retardation: Prevention Strategies That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    The report by the President's Committee on Mental Retardation reviews the current state of knowledge in the area of biological and environmental prevention of mental retardation and describes programs on the frontiers of research or service delivery. Section I examines programs that are effectively preventing mental retardation through biomedical…

  3. THE TEACHER OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHARNEY, LEON; LACROSSE, EDWARD

    BASIC INFORMATION IS PROVIDED FOR PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS OF MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN. THE FIRST FOUR CHAPTERS ARE DEVOTED TO CLASSROOM CONDITIONS, PARENTAL ATTITUDES, AND TEACHER-PUPIL INTERACTION IN THE SPECIAL CLASS FOR RETARDATES. CHAPTER ONE GIVES A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILD AS HE APPEARS TO THE TEACHER. CHAPTER TWO…

  4. [Sterilization of mentally retarded women].

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, W; Petersen, P; Schneider, J

    1982-07-01

    Seven mentally retarded women were sterilized in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Medical School Hannover between 1.6.74 and 1.6.81. The decision to operate proceeded only after careful consideration by the director of the clinic. Each case was documented with proof that improvement of the mental situation was unprobable and that sterilization seemed highly desirable. In spite of strong reservation the sterilization of a mentally retarded may medically and ethically be justified in exceptional cases. The operation seems possible by the following: The sterilization may only be performed if the patient does not obviously refuse it. Diagnosis and prognosis of the mental handicap must undoubtedly be proven. If the patient cannot judge the consequence of the operation the legal guardian must decide for her. The court must consent in these cases. Regarding legal theory the decision by the guardian is an open question. PMID:6922080

  5. L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) act as natural antioxidants with hydroxyl-radical-scavenging and lipid-peroxidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Babizhayev, M A; Seguin, M C; Gueyne, J; Evstigneeva, R P; Ageyeva, E A; Zheltukhina, G A

    1994-01-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) are natural imidazole-containing compounds found in the non-protein fraction of mammalian tissues. Carcinine was synthesized by an original procedure and characterized. Both carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) are capable of inhibiting the catalysis of linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine liposomal peroxidation (LPO) by the O2(-.)-dependent iron-ascorbate and lipid-peroxyl-radical-generating linoleic acid 13-monohydroperoxide (LOOH)-activated haemoglobin systems, as measured by thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substance. Carcinine and carnosine are good scavengers of OH. radicals, as detected by iron-dependent radical damage to the sugar deoxyribose. This suggests that carnosine and carcinine are able to scavenge free radicals or donate hydrogen ions. The iodometric, conjugated diene and t.l.c. assessments of lipid hydroperoxides (13-monohydroperoxide linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide) showed their efficient reduction and deactivation by carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) in the liberated and bound-to-artificial-bilayer states. This suggests that the peroxidase activity exceeded that susceptible to direct reduction with glutathione peroxidase. Imidazole, solutions of beta-alanine, or their mixtures with peptide moieties did not show antioxidant potential. Free L-histidine and especially histamine stimulated iron (II) salt-dependent LPO. Due to the combination of weak metal chelating (abolished by EDTA), OH. and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biological membranes and aqueous environments. PMID:7998987

  6. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  7. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Oliviero, Giorgia; Garofalo, Mariangela; Orefice, Maria; Nocella, Francesca; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Vincenzo; Centore, Roberto; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Piccialli, Gennaro; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively). Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia-related diseases. PMID

  8. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  9. The protective effects of carnosine in alcohol-induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Baykara, B; Micili, S Cilaker; Tugyan, K; Tekmen, I; Bagriyanik, Ha; Sonmez, U; Sonmez, A; Oktay, G; Yener, N; Ozbal, S

    2014-02-01

    Consumption of alcohol leads to oxidative stress in liver by inducing lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carnosine (CAR) in alcohol-induced liver injury by biochemical and histomorphological evaluations. The rats were divided into four groups, namely, control group, alcohol (AL) group, CAR group and AL + CAR group. Three doses of ethanol (5 g/kg, 25% (v/v) in distilled water) were given by nasogastric catheter for twice-a-day. CAR (100 mg/kg) was given 1 h before the administration of ethanol using the same method. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde were significantly increased in the AL group compared with control, CAR and AL + CAR groups. Glutathione level was significantly decreased in the AL group, while it was increased in the AL + CAR group. Immunoreactivity of caspase-3 and bax increased in the hepatocytes of AL group when compared with control and AL + CAR groups. Expression of bcl-2 was decreased in AL group than AL + CAR group. Under electron microscopy, dense mitochondria, accumulation of lipid, sinusoidal dilatation, vacuolization and decrease in the number of microvilli were observed in AL group, while these findings were markedly less in the AL + CAR group. In conclusion, pretreatment of CAR is effective for recovering biochemical alterations and morphologic damage in the liver of rats treated with ethanol. PMID:22661399

  10. Circulating Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 Associates with Weight Loss and Poor Prognosis in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Peter; Henjes, Frauke; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Darmanis, Spyros; Dahlman, Ingrid; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Naredi, Peter; Agustsson, Thorhallur; Lundholm, Kent; Nilsson, Peter; Rydén, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer cachexia (CC) is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia. Design/Subjects Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32) or without (n = 27) cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins) from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer. Results Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1) was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008). In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results. Conclusions In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC. PMID:25898255

  11. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  12. Accurate analysis of taurine, anserine, carnosine and free amino acids in a cattle muscle biopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Imanari, Mai; Higuchi, Mikito; Shiba, Nobuya; Watanabe, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We have established an analysis method for some free amino acids (FAAs), as well as taurine (Tau), anserine (Ans) and carnosine (Car), in a fresh biopsy sample from cattle muscle. A series of model biopsy samples, corresponding to the mixtures of lean meat, fat and connective tissue, was prepared and showed high correlation coefficients between the compound concentration and the 3-methylhistidine (3-MeHis) content derived from hydrolysis of the biopsy sample (r = 0.74-0.95, P < 0.01). Interference from blood contamination could not be neglected, because the concentration of some FAAs in blood was comparable to that in muscle. However, it was possible to control the contamination of Tau, Ans, Car, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparatic acid and alanine to less than 5.0% when the blood contamination was controlled to less than 23%.These results suggest the necessity of measuring 3-MeHis as an index of lean meat and hemoglobin as an index of blood contamination when compounds in muscle biopsy samples are evaluated. We have carried out a series of these analyses using one biopsy sample and reveal differences in Tau, Ans, Car and some FAAs in beef muscle after different feeding regimes. PMID:20597895

  13. The detox strategy in smoking comprising nutraceutical formulas of non-hydrolyzed carnosine or carcinine used to protect human health.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2014-03-01

    The increased oxidative stress in patients with smoking-associated disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is the result of an increased burden of inhaled oxidants as well as increased amounts of reactive oxygen species generated by various inflammatory, immune and epithelial cells of the airways. Nicotine sustains tobacco addiction, a major cause of disability and premature death. In addition to the neurochemical effects of nicotine, behavioural factors also affect the severity of nicotine withdrawal symptoms. For some people, the feel, smell and sight of a cigarette and the ritual of obtaining, handling, lighting and smoking a cigarette are all associated with the pleasurable effects of smoking. For individuals who are motivated to quit smoking, a combination of pharmacotherapy and behavioural therapy has been shown to be most effective in controlling the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. In the previous studies, we proposed the viability and versatility of the imidazole-containing dipeptide-based compounds in the nutritional compositions as the telomere protection targeted therapeutic system for smokers in combination with in vitro cellular culture techniques being an investigative tool to study telomere attrition in cells induced by cigarette smoke (CS) and smoke constituents. Our working therapeutic concept is that imidazole-containing dipeptide-based compounds (non-hydrolyzed carnosine and carcinine) can modulate the telomerase activity in the normal cells and can provide the redox regulation of the cellular function under the terms of environmental and oxidative stress and in this way protect the length and the structure of telomeres from attrition. The detoxifying system of non-hydrolyzed carnosine or carcinine can be applied in the therapeutic nutrition formulations or installed in the cigarette filter. Patented specific oral formulations of non-hydrolyzed carnosine and carcinine provide a powerful manipulation tool for targeted therapeutic

  14. Fire retardancy using applied materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, R.

    1971-01-01

    An example of advanced technology transfer from the Little Joe, Surveyor, Comsat, re-entry and Apollo age to everyday fire protection needs is presented. Utilizing the principle of sublimation cooling for thermostatic temperature control, the material meets a wide range of fire retardancy and heat transmission control requirements. Properties vary from flexible tape for conduits and electrical cables to rigid coatings for column protection, with a broad spectrum of sublimation temperatures available. The material can be applied in the field or in the factory, utilizing mass production techniques, yielding a product that is reliable, effective, widely available and low in cost.

  15. Orthopaedic Problems of the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSweeney, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    Problems encountered by orthopedic surgeons treating the mentally retarded are identified, and cooperation among pediatricians, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and orthopedic surgeons is recommended. (GW)

  16. You and Your Retarded Child. A Manual for Parents of Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Samuel A.; And Others

    The book offers advice to parents of retarded children in recognizing and facing inherent problems and provides insight into their own emotional needs and those of their child. Levels of retardation are described and assistance given to aid parents in determining how retarded their child is and whether to send the child to a residential school or…

  17. l-carnosine dipeptide overcomes acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in HT29 human colon cancer cells via downregulation of HIF1-alpha and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Guardia, Francesca; Irace, Carlo; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) protein is over-expressed in many human cancers and is a major cause of resistance to drugs. HIF-1α up-regulation decreases the effectiveness of several anticancer agents, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), because it induces the expression of drug efflux transporters, alters DNA repair mechanisms and modifies the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic factors. These findings suggest that inhibition of HIF-1α activity may sensitize cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. We previously reported that l-carnosine reduces HIF-1α expression by inhibiting the proliferation of colon cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the effect of l-carnosine on HT29 colon cancer cells with acquired resistance to 5-FU. We found that l-carnosine reduces colon cancer cell viability, decreases HIF-1α and multi-drug resistant protein MDR1-pg expression, and induces apoptosis. Moreover, the l-carnosine/5-FU combination lowers the expression of some chemoresistance markers. The combination index evaluated in vitro on the HT29-5FU cell line by median drug effect analysis reveals a significant synergistic effect. PMID:27234614

  18. Effect of Four Weeks of β-alanine Supplementation on Muscle Carnosine and Blood Serum Lactate during Exercise in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Alireza; Hemat Far, Ahmad; Willems, Mark E T; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine (BA) supplementation may increase muscle buffering capacity and affect physiological responses during exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of BA supplementation on muscle carnosine and serum lactate in male rats. Rats (n = 24, age: 2 months, body weight: 265±22 g) were divided into a BA supplementation or control group. Along with aerobic acclimatization exercise (15 m·min(-1), 8-10 min·day(-1), 4 days·week(-1) for 4 weeks), the BA group had access to BA powder in their drinking water (1.8%) with the control group having access to plain water for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, rats ran on a treadmill at speeds of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 m·min(-1), respectively, each for 4 min, in order to measure post-exercise serum lactate. Muscle carnosine and serum lactate levels were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) procedures, respectively. Following BA supplementation, carnosine content in the m.rectus femoris increased by 117% (p < .01) and serum lactate decreased by 7.4% (p < .01). It was concluded that β-alanine supplementation increases muscle carnosine content and reduces serum lactate; these changes may indicate an adaptation of rat skeletal muscles to postpone peripheral muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise. PMID:26745664

  19. The effects of ascorbic acid, taurine, carnosine and rosemary powder on colour and lipid stability of beef patties packaged in modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Escalante, A; Djenane, D; Torrescano, G; Beltrán, J A; Roncalés, P

    2001-08-01

    This research was aimed at evaluating the inhibition of oxidative changes of beef patties packaged in modified atmosphere (70% O(2)+20% CO(2)+10% N(2)) by natural antioxidants: ascorbic acid (500 ppm), taurine (50 mM), carnosine (50 mM), rosemary powder (1000 ppm) and their combinations with the first. Beef patties stored at 2±1°C for 20 days were evaluated for colour (L*, a*, b*, C* and H*), TBARS, metmyoglobin formation (% of total myoglobin), psychrotrophic microbial counts and sensory odour and discolouration. Rosemary, either alone or with ascorbic acid, was highly effective in inhibiting both metmyoglobin formation and lipid oxidation; sensory analysis was in agreement with these results. Ascorbic acid, ascorbic acid+taurine and ascorbic acid+carnosine treatments showed a limited inhibitory effect of myoglobin oxidation, while carnosine and carnosine+ascorbic acid were effective in inhibiting lipid oxidation. Taurine alone failed to exert any antioxidant effect. Principal components analysis confirmed these results. PMID:22062434

  20. Nitrogen metabolism, tissue carnosine concentration and blood chemistry of gravid swine fed graded levels of histidine.

    PubMed

    Easter, R A; Baker, D H

    1977-01-01

    Three nitrogen metabolism experiments were conducted to determine the qualitative and quantitative histidine need of first-litter gilts during the last third of pregnancy. A completely purified, crystalline 8amino acid diet was formulated to meet all nutrient needs of the gravid gilt when 2 kg/day was fed. Experiments 1 and 2 were 9-day nitrogen balance studies, each consisting of three littermate gilts subjected to three levels of dietary L-histidine in a Latin square arrangement of treatments. Nitrogen retention was depresed, but not significantly, when less than 0.12% histidine was fed. Complete deletion of histidine, however, did not depress retention below that observed when 0.06% was fed. This suggested that either histidine biosynthesis or its release from endogenous reserves was confounding retention data. Therefore in a third experiment, two gilts were fed a histidine-free diet for 24 days in an attempt to deplete endogenous reserves. For comparison, two siblings were fed 0.12% histidine during this same period. Nitrogen retention tended to be lower for gilts fed the histidine-free diet during each of three consecutive collection periods. Blood hemoglobin, muscle and olfactory bulb carnosine concentration, plasma protein and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase activity, and blood urea nitrogen were all unaffected by treatment. Offspring from gilts fed the histidine-free diet had lower blood hemoglobin concentrations than their counterparts from gilts receiving histidine. A tentative recommendation of 0.12% dietary L-histidine would seem justified for gravid swine. PMID:833672

  1. The carbonyl scavenger carnosine ameliorates dyslipidaemia and renal function in Zucker obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Giancarlo; Orioli, Marica; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Savi, Federica; Braidotti, Paola; Vistoli, Giulio; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Negrisoli, Gianpaolo; Carini, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor that increases the risk for development of renal and vascular complications. This study addresses the effects of chronic administration of the endogenous dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine, L-CAR) and of its enantiomer (β-alanyl-D-histidine, D-CAR) on hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, advanced glycation end products, advanced lipoxidation end products formation and development of nephropathy in the non-diabetic, Zucker obese rat. The Zucker rats received a daily dose of L-CAR or D-CAR (30 mg/kg in drinking water) for 24 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was recorded monthly. At the end of the treatment, plasma levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, glucose, insulin, creatinine and urinary levels of total protein, albumin and creatinine were measured. Several indices of oxidative/carbonyl stress were also measured in plasma, urine and renal tissue. We found that both L- and D-CAR greatly reduced obese-related diseases in obese Zucker rat, by significantly restraining the development of dyslipidaemia, hypertension and renal injury, as demonstrated by both urinary parameters and electron microscopy examinations of renal tissue. Because the protective effect elicited by L- and D-CAR was almost superimposable, we conclude that the pharmacological action of L-CAR is not due to a pro-histaminic effect (D-CAR is not a precursor of histidine, since it is stable to peptidic hydrolysis), and prompted us to propose that some of the biological effects can be mediated by a direct carbonyl quenching mechanism. PMID:20518851

  2. Carnosine and taurine treatments diminished brain oxidative stress and apoptosis in D-galactose aging model.

    PubMed

    Aydın, A Fatih; Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-04-01

    D-galactose (GAL) has been used as an animal model for brain aging and antiaging studies. GAL stimulates oxidative stress in several tissues including brain. Carnosine (CAR; β-alanil-L-histidine) and taurine (TAU; 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) exhibit antioxidant properties. CAR and TAU have anti-aging and neuroprotective effects. We investigated the effect of CAR and TAU supplementations on oxidative stress and brain damage in GAL-treated rats. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with CAR (250 mg/kg/daily; i.p.; 5 days per week) or TAU (2.5% w/w; in rat chow) for 2 months. Brain malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione transferase (GST) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brains by immunohistochemistry. GAL treatment increased brain MDA and PC levels and AChE activities. It decreased significantly brain GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px but not GST activities. GAL treatment caused histopathological changes and increased apoptosis. CAR and TAU significantly reduced brain AChE activities, MDA and PC levels and elevated GSH levels in GAL-treated rats. CAR, but not TAU, significantly increased low activities of SOD and GSH-Px. Both CAR and TAU diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR and TAU may be effective to prevent the development of oxidative stress, apoptosis and histopathological deterioration in the brain of GAL-treated rats. PMID:26518192

  3. Intumescent Coatings as Fire Retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Fohlen, G. M.; Sawko, P. M.; Fish, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The development of fire-retardant coatings to protect surfaces which may be exposed to fire or extreme heat is a subject of intense interest to many industries. A fire-retardant paint has been developed which represents a new chemical approach for preparing intumescent coatings, and potentially, is very important to fire-prevention authorities. The requirements for a superior coating include ease of application, suitability to a wide variety of surfaces and finishes, and stability over an extended period of time within a broad range of ambient temperature and humidity conditions. These innovative coatings, when activated by the heat of a fire, react to form a thick, low-density, polymeric coating or char layer. Water vapor and sulphur dioxide are released during the intumescent reaction. Two fire-protection mechanisms thus become available: (1) the char layer retards the flow of heat, due to the extremely low thermal conductivity; and (2) water vapor and sulfur dioxide are released, providing fire quenching properties. Still another mechanism functions in cases where the char, by virtue of its high oxidation resistance and low thermal conductivity, reaches a sufficiently high temperature to re-radiate much of the incident heat load. The coatings consist of dispersions of selective salts of a nitro-amino-arornatic compound. Specifically, para-nitroaniline bisulfate and the ammonium salt of para-nitroaniline-ortho sulphuric acid (2-amino-5-nitrobenzenesulphuric acid) are used. Suitable vehicles are cellulose nitrate of lacquer grade, a nitrite-phenolic modified rubber, or epoxy-polysulfide copolymer. Three separate formulations have been developed. A solvent is usually employed, such as methylethyl ketone, butyl acetate, or toluene, which renders the coatings suitably thin and which evaporates after the coatings are applied. Generally, the intumescent material is treated as insoluble in the vehicle, and is ground and dispersed in the vehicle and solvent like an

  4. Epidemiological issues in mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Fryers, T

    1987-12-01

    The basic epidemiological issues have not changed fundamentally in 30 years but emphases are different. Clarity of concept and definition is essential; we need several definitions for different purposes, and should distinguish global criteria defining groups in some way specifically 'retarded' and partial criteria defining groups not exclusive to retardation. Of global definitions, we can distinguish Intellectual Impairment based on IQ, Learning Disability based on educational criteria, and Mental Handicap or Retardation based on service or administrative criteria. The first and second may be co-terminous for children. The first and third are usually co-terminous below a certain IQ level, conventionally 50, as SII and SMH/R. This is not so for higher ability groups: MII and MMR are conceived and defined differently, and suit different research purposes. There may be much unknown need because there have been so few studies of total IQ defined groups above 50. Although organic and psychological factors are very important, the study of MMR needs to recognize its primarily social nature, reflecting determinants of selection into MMR status in legal, organizational and professional structures, activities and attitudes characteristic of particular communities and cultures. If the primary focus is on aetiological factors, natural history, and preventive possibilities, study group should be aetiologically defined and preferably not limited to MR. The same applies to specific impairments, disabilities, diseases, behaviours and disadvantages. The services are also susceptible to epidemiological approaches, descriptive, analytic, interventionist and evaluative, but little is yet available on agency structure and function, professional activities, attitudes and training, legal contexts, and financial constraints. Rigorous outcome studies would greatly benefit rapidly developing services. We know quite a lot about the distribution and associations of SII/SMR, though more is

  5. Effects of Beta-Alanine on Muscle Carnosine and Exercise Performance:A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Julie Y.; Kreider, Richard B.; Greenwood, Mike; Cooke, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Muscle carnosine has been reported to serve as a physiological buffer, possess antioxidant properties, influence enzyme regulation, and affect sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. Beta-alanine (β-ALA) is a non-essential amino acid. β-ALA supplementation (e.g., 2-6 grams/day) has been shown to increase carnosine concentrations in skeletal muscle by 20-80%. Several studies have reported that β-ALA supplementation can increase high-intensity intermittent exercise performance and/or training adaptations. Although the specific mechanism remains to be determined, the ergogenicity of β-ALA has been most commonly attributed to an increased muscle buffering capacity. More recently, researchers have investigated the effects of co-ingesting β-ALA with creatine monohydrate to determine whether there may be synergistic and/or additive benefits. This paper overviews the theoretical rationale and potential ergogenic value of β-ALA supplementation with or without creatine as well as provides future research recommendations. PMID:22253993

  6. Identifying Depression in Students with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Laura M.; Baker, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Offers guidelines to teachers for identifying depression in students with mental retardation. Discusses prevalence and symptoms of depression, causes of depression, difficulty of diagnosis in students with mental retardation, detecting symptoms in the classroom, treatment of depression, and psychological services. Inserts list ideas for helping…

  7. Teaching Language Arts to Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Janet K.

    Suggestions are made for teaching language arts to mentally retarded children. The nature of language arts, the effect of mental retardation on the learning of language arts, and the need for home-school cooperation are treated. Also described are language arts areas, the school program, methods of beginning instruction, speech training,…

  8. Arm Tremor, Tardive Dyskinesia, and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Emmerik, R. E. A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The arm tremor of adults (n=32) diagnosed as having mental retardation and/or tardive dyskinesia was examined through an analysis of the acceleration properties of several arm postures. The degree of arm acceleration was increased in all subjects compared to a control group without mental retardation. Effects of neuroleptic medication were noted.…

  9. Innovations in Vocational Rehabilitation and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, George E., Ed.

    Conference proceedings of the Vocational Rehabilitation Subdivision Meetings held at the American Association on Mental Deficiency contain discussions of innovative aspects of vocational rehabilitation and mental retardation. In the area of training rehabilitation counselors, George Baroff describes the Mental Retardation Training Institute in…

  10. Political Philosophy and the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    The effects of Social Darwinism, eugenics, and contemporary political conservatism on the status of advocacy efforts for the mentally retarded are reviewed. Provided are historical sketches of Social Darwinism, which viewed the retarded as members of an inferior race, and eugenics, which argued for sterilization of the "genetically unfit". The…

  11. Retarded Children of the Poor: A Casebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkland, Majorie H.

    Written for welfare and social workers, the publication concerns families which have problems of retardation, usually mild or borderline, and which are heavily represented on welfare rolls. A brief discussion of retardation and family and child welfare services is followed by a list of suggested readings dealing with social and child welfare…

  12. Assertiveness Training and the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granat, Jay P.

    1978-01-01

    This article reviews some of the basic principles of assertiveness training and explains the application of this treatment to the habilitation of mentally retarded adults. It presents qualitative data regarding the value of assertiveness training in a counseling group of mentally retarded persons and proposes several guidelines for counselors.…

  13. Body Awareness in Children with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Johan; Dedroog, Inge

    2009-01-01

    The body awareness of 124 toddlers with mental retardation and of 124 children developing normally matched to them on age and gender was examined. Twenty-nine of the children with mental retardation were diagnosed as Down syndrome (DS). The "Pointing and Naming" Test of Berges and Lezine [Berges, J., & Lezine, I. (1978). "Test d'imitation de…

  14. Mental Retardation: Update 2002. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourcade, Jack

    This digest provides an overview of mental retardation in children and adults. It begins by discussing the definition of mental retardation and the three components that are required for an accurate diagnosis: an IQ score of approximately 70 or below, a determination of deficits in adaptive behavior, and origins of the disability prior to age 18.…

  15. UNDERSTANDING AND HELPING THE RETARDED READER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STRANG, RUTH, ED.

    THE PROCEEDINGS OF A 1962 STATEWIDE ARIZONA CONFERENCE ON READING DEVELOPMENT AND READING DIFFICULTIES INCLUDE 15 PAPERS. ARTICLES ON THE ABLE RETARDED READER ARE "UNDERSTANDING THE ABLE RETARDED READER" BY HELEN M. ROBINSON, AND "CLASSROOM PROCEDURES" BY ROSEMARY YOAKUM. PAPERS ON EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN ARE "IDENTIFICATION OF EMOTIONAL…

  16. Residential Facilities for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A., Ed.; Butterfield, Earl, Ed.

    The handbook on residential institutions, for professionals and students in the field of mental retardation, attempts to interpret the institution as a part of the culture which it serves, avoiding emotional responses but suggesting formulas for change. Characteristics of contemporary institutions for the mentally retarded are examined and…

  17. Mental Retardation's Two Cultures of Behavioral Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    1994-01-01

    This survey of nine journals identified two distinct cultures in mental retardation research: classification by level of retardation (usually by psychologists and special educators) or etiology (usually by geneticists and psychiatric researchers). The paper discusses varied effects that genetic etiology may have on behavior, issues in reconciling…

  18. Flame retardant cotton based highloft nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardancy has been a serious bottleneck to develop cotton blended very high specific volume bulky High loft fabrics. Alternately, newer approach to produce flame retardant cotton blended High loft fabrics must be employed that retain soft feel characteristics desirable of furnishings. Hence, ...

  19. Teaching Physical Education to Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Patricia A.

    Methods for teaching physical education activities and skills to mentally retarded children are presented. General objectives are listed and the physical education program is outlined. Hints are offered for teaching the retarded child; and basic skills and rhythms are described. The following are then described; rhythm games, a volleyball unit and…

  20. A Case of Pseudo-Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, D. H.

    Review of a case study of a 4-year-old girl who assumed the role of a retardate reveals that the girl probably suffered multiple congenital impairments of a minor character that affected the central nervous system and the structures governing social behavior and maturation. The stated basis for pseudo-retardation is the person's ability to…

  1. Poverty and Mental Retardation: A Causal Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Rodger L.

    The incidence of mental retardation among the poor and the reasons for such high prevalence are the focus of the text which is based largely on the state of New Jersey. Mental retardation is viewed as a social pathology which thrives in the ghetto; the effects of poverty and racial prejudice are explored as are the assessment of intelligence and…

  2. Counseling the Mentally Retarded: A Psychoeducational Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spragg, Paul A.

    The paper suggests that a cognitive or psychoeducational perspective is valuable in counseling mentally retarded individuals. Psychoeducational considerations in pretreatment assessment, with an emphasis on process rather than product, are noted; and it is explained that counseling of mentally retarded persons can be enhanced through the use of…

  3. Noncitizen: Plight of the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarnulis, Ed

    1974-01-01

    Mentally retarded citizens have been denied their human and civil rights, not only by the public, but by professionals--including social workers. The author claims that most programs for the mentally retarded are, at best, dehumanizing. Professionals have an ethical obligation to refuse to refer children to such programs. (Author)

  4. Computational Errors of Mentally Retarded Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janke, Robert W.

    1980-01-01

    Examined computational errors made by educable mentally retarded students on the arithmetic subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test. Retarded students had a lower percent of grouping and inappropriate inversion errors and a higher percent of incorrect operation errors than regular students had in Engelhardt's study. (Author)

  5. The synergistic effect of ribose, carnosine, and ascorbic acid on the sensory and physico-chemical characteristics of minced bison meat

    PubMed Central

    Aliani, Michel; Ryland, Donna; Williamson, Jennifer; Rempel, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Ingredients such as ascorbic acid used to preserve redness of the raw meat, and carnosine and ribose used for flavor improvement have been incorporated into minced meats to increase consumer acceptance. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible synergistic effect of ascorbic acid, carnosine, and ribose on the sensory and physico-chemical characteristics of minced bison meat. Samples included control (Co) ±1% carnosine (C), 0.1% ascorbic acid (A), 2% ribose (R) (w/w), and combinations of RC, RA, RCA in the same concentrations as the single ingredient samples. A trained sensory panel (n = 7) measured the intensity of the aromas and flavors of salty, sour, beef, and liver of the bison patties. A consumer acceptance panel (n = 59) evaluated color, aroma, flavor, texture, and overall acceptability of the patties. Hunterlab colorimetry, shear force, cook loss, and drip loss percentage were measured on the cooked patties, and color and pH on the raw patties. The sample containing 2% ribose (R), 1% carnosine (C), and 0.1% ascorbic acid (A) in combination (RCA) showed a significantly higher consumer acceptance for aroma, which could possibly be attributed to the high beef aroma intensity measured by the descriptive analysis panel. RCA had the highest color acceptance which may be related to the high a* value for the cooked sample. RCA also had high overall acceptance corresponding to “like slightly.” Raw and cooked color values, shear force, pH, cook loss and drip loss percentages, and aroma and flavor attribute intensities for RCA were not significantly different from the control sample. The synergistic effect of ribose, carnosine, and ascorbic acid may positively affect the aroma and color of minced bison meat leading to higher overall acceptability without compromising sensory and physico-chemical quality. PMID:24804026

  6. Effect of cooking method on carnosine and its homologues, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance contents in beef and turkey meat.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Dal Bello, Federica; Meineri, Giorgia

    2012-05-01

    Commercial samples of beef and turkey meat were prepared by commonly used cooking methods with standard cooking times: (1) broiled at 200°C for 10min, (2) broiled at a medium temperature (140°C) for 10min, (3) cooked by microwave (MW) for 3min and then grilled (MW/grill) for 7min, (4) cooked in a domestic microwave oven for 10min, and (5) boiled in water for 10min. The raw and cooked meats were then analysed to determine the carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) contents. It was observed that boiling beef caused a loss of approximately 50% of the carnosine, probably because of the high water solubility of carnosine and its homologues; cooking by microwave caused a medium loss of the anti-oxidants of approximately 20%; cooking by MW/grill led to a reduction in carnosine of approximately 10%. As far as the anserine and homocarnosine contents were concerned, a greater loss was observed for the boiling method (approximately 70%) while, for the other cooking methods, the value ranged from 30% to 70%. The data oscillate more for the turkey meat: the minimum carnosine decrease was observed in the cases of MW/grill and broiling at high temperature (25%). Analogously, the anserine and homocarnosine contents decreased slightly in the case of MW/grill and broiling at a high temperature (2-7%) and by 10-30% in the other cases. No analysed meat sample showed any traces of pentosidine above the instrumental determination limits. The cooked beef showed an increased TBARS value compared to the raw meat, and the highest values were found when the beef was broiled at a high temperature, cooked by microwave or boiled in water. The TBARS value of the turkey meat decreased for all the cooking methods in comparison to the TBARS value of the fresh meat. PMID:26434266

  7. Evidence for rapid inter- and intramolecular chlorine transfer reactions of histamine and carnosine chloramines: implications for the prevention of hypochlorous-acid-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H(2)O(2) and Cl(-) by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that is implicated in a wide range of human diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis). Histamine and carnosine have been proposed as protective agents against such damage. However, as recent studies have shown that histidine-containing compounds readily form imidazole chloramines that can rapidly chlorinate other targets, it was hypothesized that similar reactions may occur with histamine and carnosine, leading to propagation, rather than prevention, of HOCl-mediated damage. In this study, the reactions of HOCl with histamine, histidine, carnosine, and other compounds containing imidazole and free amine sites were examined. In all cases, rapid formation (k, 1.6 x 10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) of imidazole chloramines was observed, followed by chlorine transfer to yield more stable, primary chloramines (R-NHCl). The rates of most of these secondary reactions are dependent upon substrate concentrations, consistent with intermolecular mechanisms (k, 10(3)-10(4) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)). However, for carnosine, the imidazole chloramine transfer rates are independent of the concentration, indicative of intramolecular processes (k, 0.6 s(-)(1)). High-performance liquid chromatography studies show that in all cases the resultant R-NHCl species can slowly chlorinate N-alpha-acetyl-Tyr. Thus, the current data indicate that the chloramines formed on the imidazole and free amine groups of these compounds can oxidize other target molecules but with limited efficiency, suggesting that histamine and particularly carnosine may be able to limit HOCl-mediated oxidation in vivo. PMID:16800640

  8. The Expression of Carnosine and Its Effect on the Antioxidant Capacity of Longissimus dorsi Muscle in Finishing Pigs Exposed to Constant Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peige; Hao, Yue; Feng, Jinghai; Lin, Hai; Feng, Yuejin; Wu, Xin; Yang, Xin; Gu, Xianhong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of constant high ambient temperatures on meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and carnosine expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of finishing pigs. Castrated 24 male DLY (crossbreeds between Landrace×Yorkshire sows and Duroc boars) pigs were allocated to one of three treatments: constant ambient temperature at 22°C and ad libitum feeding (CON, n = 8); constant high ambient temperature at 30°C and ad libitum feeding (H30, n = 8); and constant ambient temperature at 22°C and pair-fed with H30 (PF, n = 8). Meat quality, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, antioxidant capacity, carnosine content, and carnosine synthetase (CARNS1) mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle were measured after three weeks. The results revealed that H30 had lower pH24 h, redness at 45 min, and yellowness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.05), and higher drip loss at 48 h and lightness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.01). Constant heat stress disrupted the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in longissimus dorsi muscle with higher MDA content (p<0.01) and lower antioxidant capacity (p<0.01). Carnosine content and CARNS1 mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of H30 pigs were significantly decreased (p<0.01) after three weeks at 30°C. In conclusion, constant high ambient temperatures affect meat quality and antioxidant capacity negatively, and the reduction of muscle carnosine content is one of the probable reasons. PMID:25358371

  9. Care Of The Mentally Retarded

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, J.

    1979-01-01

    Mental retardation is a clinical syndrome, not an intellectual defect or brain disease per se. As such, physicians should not participate in the downgrading labelling of moron, idiot and imbecile. Such labelled people are difficult to relate to and this results in the concept of 'nil expectations' in which the whole of society participates. Maladaptation in this syndrome is more related to poor environmental input than to basic organic defect, and is a family problem. The family doctor is in an ideal situation to help the family handle the problems of anger, shame, guilt, rejection. If aware of his own feelings, he should also be the coordinator of the physical needs of the child and the alternatives available for maximal input. Imagesp1344-a PMID:21297810

  10. Toward a positive psychology of mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2006-04-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike have long focused on the external life conditions, adaptive behavior, and inclusion of persons with mental retardation. Using breakthroughs in positive psychology, this article proposes a new research agenda focused on the positive, internal states of those with mental retardation. It shows how major movements in the mental retardation field--quality of life, dual diagnosis, personality motivation, and families--have succeeded in some arenas but failed to address happiness and well-being. Examples of happiness--of positive emotions, flow, strengths, and virtues--are offered in people with genetic causes of mental retardation. Complexities related to etiology, measurement, flow, and a meaningful life are described, as is the vital role that mental retardation can play in the emerging science of positive psychology. PMID:16719637

  11. Postnatal Organic Causes of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, G. G.

    1962-01-01

    A study of 1137 retarded children from Western Ontario revealed 129 (11.3%) in whom retardation was first noted after a specific postnatal event. Eighty-three of these were boys. The most common cause of postnatal cerebral injury in this series was a syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by the sudden onset of fever, convulsions and coma which occurred in 45 patients. The nature of this syndrome is discussed and the necessity for early treatment emphasized. Other postnatal causes of retardation are classified according to frequency, as encephalitis, accidents, meningitis and a miscellaneous group consisting of epilepsy and tumours. PMID:13907577

  12. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking. PMID:26748263

  13. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  14. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  15. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  16. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  17. Video Tape and the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Three uses of video tape recordings with the mentally retarded; discussed briefly are staff training or teacher education, parental involvement in the child's education, and therapeutic uses by psychiatrists and psychologists. (CB)

  18. Job Enrichment and the Mentally Retarded Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jerry L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The effect of job enrichment on the production rate of 14 mentally retarded adult workers was evaluated. Job enrichment led to increases in standard rates of production for high IQ Ss and lower rates for low IQ Ss. (Author)

  19. Sterilization of Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Thomas E.; Andersen, H. Frank

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the historical, legal, and ethical concerns regarding sterilization for persons with mental retardation and offers guidelines to help counsel individuals with disabilities or their families regarding decision making about sterilization. (DB)

  20. Retarded Children at Camp with Normal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Norman; Peters, Edward N.

    1969-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from written forms and scales (designed to measure children's behavior in groups), observations, and interviews indicated that many educalble mentally retarded children can participate successfully in camp activities with normal children. (DR)

  1. Retardation Measurements of Infrared PVA Wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Z, H.; W, D.; D, Y.; Z, Z.; S, J.

    The wave plate made of Polyvinyl Alcohol PVA plastic film has several advantages such as its lower cost and insensitivity to temperature and incidence angle so it has been used in the Solar Multi-Channel Telescope SMCT in China But the important parameter retardations of PVA wave plates in the near infrared wavelength have never been provided In this paper a convenient and high precise instrument to get the retardations of discrete wavelengths or a continuous function of wavelength in near infrared is developed In this method the retardations of wave plates have been determined through calculating the maximum and minimum of light intensity The instrument error has been shown Additionally we can get the continuous direction of wavelength retardations in the ultraviolet visible or infrared spectral in another way

  2. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  3. Improved spectral resolution and high reliability of in vivo 1H MRS at 7 T allow the characterization of the effect of acute exercise on carnosine in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Just Kukurová, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Ukropec, Jozef; de Courten, Barbora; Chmelík, Marek; Ukropcová, Barbara; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the behavior of carnosine peaks in human soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GM) muscles following acute exercise, to determine the relaxation times and to assess the repeatability of carnosine quantification by 1H MRS at 7 T. Relaxation constants in GM and SOL were measured by a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) localization sequence. For T 1 measurement, an inversion recovery sequence was used. The repeatability of the measurement and the absolute quantification of carnosine were determined in both muscles in five healthy volunteers. For absolute quantification, an internal water reference signal was used. The effect of acute exercise on carnosine levels and resonance lines was tested in eight recreational runners/cyclists. The defined carnosine measurement protocol was applied three times – before and twice after (approximately 20 and 40 min) a 1‐h submaximal street run and additional toe‐hopping. The measured T 1 relaxation times for the C2‐H carnosine peak at 7 T were 2002 ± 94 and 1997 ± 259 ms for GM and SOL, respectively, and the T 2 times were 95.8 ± 9.4 and 81.0 ± 21.8 ms for GM and SOL, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the carnosine quantification measurement was 9.1% for GM and 6.3% for SOL, showing high repeatability, and the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.93 for GM and 0.98 for SOL indicate the high reliability of the measurement. Acute exercise did not change the concentration of carnosine in the muscle, but affected the shape of the resonance lines, in terms of the shifting and splitting into doublets. Carnosine measurement by 1H MRS at 7 T in skeletal muscle exhibits high repeatability and reliability. The observed effects of acute exercise were more prominent in GM, probably as a result of the larger portion of glycolytic fibers in this muscle and the more pronounced exercise‐induced change in pH. Our results support the application of the MRS‐based assessment

  4. Improved spectral resolution and high reliability of in vivo (1) H MRS at 7 T allow the characterization of the effect of acute exercise on carnosine in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Just Kukurová, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Ukropec, Jozef; de Courten, Barbora; Chmelík, Marek; Ukropcová, Barbara; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the behavior of carnosine peaks in human soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GM) muscles following acute exercise, to determine the relaxation times and to assess the repeatability of carnosine quantification by (1) H MRS at 7 T. Relaxation constants in GM and SOL were measured by a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) localization sequence. For T1 measurement, an inversion recovery sequence was used. The repeatability of the measurement and the absolute quantification of carnosine were determined in both muscles in five healthy volunteers. For absolute quantification, an internal water reference signal was used. The effect of acute exercise on carnosine levels and resonance lines was tested in eight recreational runners/cyclists. The defined carnosine measurement protocol was applied three times - before and twice after (approximately 20 and 40 min) a 1-h submaximal street run and additional toe-hopping. The measured T1 relaxation times for the C2-H carnosine peak at 7 T were 2002 ± 94 and 1997 ± 259 ms for GM and SOL, respectively, and the T2 times were 95.8 ± 9.4 and 81.0 ± 21.8 ms for GM and SOL, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the carnosine quantification measurement was 9.1% for GM and 6.3% for SOL, showing high repeatability, and the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.93 for GM and 0.98 for SOL indicate the high reliability of the measurement. Acute exercise did not change the concentration of carnosine in the muscle, but affected the shape of the resonance lines, in terms of the shifting and splitting into doublets. Carnosine measurement by (1) H MRS at 7 T in skeletal muscle exhibits high repeatability and reliability. The observed effects of acute exercise were more prominent in GM, probably as a result of the larger portion of glycolytic fibers in this muscle and the more pronounced exercise-induced change in pH. Our results support the application of the MRS-based assessment of

  5. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Bernard; Vermeesch, Joris; Devriendt, Koen

    2006-07-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis or hairy throat is a rare dysmorphic sign described in a total of 19 patients so far. The association with a number of additional features has been reported, including mental retardation. We report on another patient with this condition who also had moderate mental retardation, mildly dysmorphic facial features, obesity, hypermetropia and additional hair anomalies (low dorsal hair line on the neck, lumbosacral hypertrichosis). Karyotype and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis at 1 Mb resolution were normal. PMID:16760744

  6. Carbonic anhydrase activators: gold nanoparticles coated with derivatized histamine, histidine, and carnosine show enhanced activatory effects on several mammalian isoforms.

    PubMed

    Saada, Mohamed-Chiheb; Montero, Jean-Louis; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-03-10

    Lipoic acid moieties were attached to amine or amino acids showing activating properties against the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The obtained lipoic acid conjugates of histamine, L-histidine methyl ester, and L-carnosine methyl ester were attached to gold nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction with Au(III) salts in reducing conditions. The CA activators (CAAs)-coated NPs showed low nanomolar activation (K(A)s of 1-9 nM) of relevant cytosolic, membrane-bound, mitochondrial, and transmembrane CA isoforms, such as CA I, II, IV, VA, VII, and XIV. These NPs also effectively activated CAs ex vivo, in whole blood experiments, with an increase of 200-280% of the CA activity. This is the first example of enzyme activation with nanoparticles and may lead to biomedical applications for conditions in which the CA activity is diminished, such as aging, Alzheimer's disease, or CA deficiency syndrome. PMID:21291238

  7. Peptide-lanthanide cation equilibria in aqueous phase. I. Bound shifts for L-carnosine-praseodymium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossoyan, J.; Asso, M.; Benlian, D.

    L-Carnosine complexes of Pr 3+ were characterized in aqueous solution by 1H NMR and potentiometric titration. A rigorous treatment of chemical shifts and pH variation data with lanthanide concentration is presented. Two different forms of the peptide ligand, forming simultaneously two complexes, were taken into account. At low pH values the cation is only coordinated at the carboxylate site of the ligand in a weak complex ( β2 = 6) whereas in neutral solution a stronger complex ( β1 = 37) is present as a consequence of the deprotonation of the imidazole ring. The computation of induced bound shifts † 2 and Δ1 for resonating nuclei of the peptide in both forms yields consistent figures. These provide the experimental basis for a conformational model which is usually not obtainable for labile complexes with low stability constants.

  8. Oral treatment of pressure ulcers with polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine complex): 8-week open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Kensaku; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine complex) is a tablet commonly prescribed for gastric ulcers in Japan. Recently, we reported the effects of polaprezinc on pressure ulcer healing at 4-week follow-up. We aimed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of polaprezinc in 8-week treatment for chronic pressure ulcers. Patients with stage II-IV pressure ulcers for ≥ 8 weeks received 150 mg/day polaprezinc (containing 116 mg L-carnosine and 34 mg zinc) per os for a maximum of 8 weeks. We measured the severity of pressure ulcers weekly using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) score and monitored blood biochemistry. Fourteen patients (nine men; 68.4 ± 11.8 years) were enrolled. Pressure ulcer stages were II (one patient; 7 %), III (nine; 64 %), and IV (four; 29 %). The PUSH score improved significantly from 8.1 [95 % CI, 6.0-10.3] at baseline to -1.4 [-4.0 to 1.1] after 8 weeks (P < 0.001). Differences from baseline were significant after 1 week (P < 0.05). The mean weekly improvement in PUSH score was 2.0. Eleven patients healed within 8 weeks and none dropped out. Serum zinc levels increased significantly (P < 0.001), whereas serum copper levels (P = 0.001) and copper/zinc ratios (P < 0.001) decreased significantly. In one patient, preexisting copper deficiency deteriorated. These preliminary data suggest that polaprezinc may be effective and well-tolerated in 8-week treatment of pressure ulcers and could be a candidate for their oral treatment. PMID:24691900

  9. Realidades Acerca de la Deficiencia Mental = Facts about Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, Austin.

    This document consists of two booklets, one in Spanish and one in English, both covering the same text: the characteristics of mentally retarded individuals, the prevalence of mentally retarded persons in Texas, causes of mental retardation, prevention possibilities, and services available to mentally retarded persons in Texas. A distinction is…

  10. Trends in Classification Usage in the Mental Retardation Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.; Kaufmann, Steve

    1991-01-01

    A total of 685 articles in "Mental Retardation,""American Journal of Mental Deficiency," and "American Journal on Mental Retardation" from 1980 through 1989 were examined. The mental retardation classification system developed by the American Association on Mental Retardation was used in over 50 percent of the articles, whereas the American…

  11. Reactivity, Selectivity, and Reaction Mechanisms of Aminoguanidine, Hydralazine, Pyridoxamine, and Carnosine as Sequestering Agents of Reactive Carbonyl Species: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Colzani, Mara; De Maddis, Danilo; Casali, Gaia; Carini, Marina; Vistoli, Giulio; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-08-19

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are endogenous or exogenous byproducts involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of different oxidative-based disorders. Detoxification of RCS by carbonyl quenchers is a promising therapeutic strategy. Among the most studied quenchers are aminoguanidine, hydralazine, pyridoxamine, and carnosine; their quenching activity towards four RCS (4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and malondialdehyde) was herein analyzed and compared. Their ability to prevent protein carbonylation was evaluated in vitro by using an innovative method based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The reactivity of the compounds was RCS dependent: carnosine efficiently quenched 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, pyridoxamine was particularly active towards malondialdehyde, aminoguanidine was active towards methylglyoxal and glyoxal, and hydralazine efficiently quenched all RCS. Reaction products were generated in vitro and were characterized by HRMS. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the reactivity was controlled by specific stereoelectronic parameters that could be used for the rational design of improved carbonyl quenchers. PMID:26891408

  12. Analysis of products of animal origin in feeds by determination of carnosine and related dipeptides by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schönherr, Jens

    2002-03-27

    Products of animal origin such as meat meal were commonly used as sources of protein and amino acids for the production of compound feeds. Because the feeding of such products is prohibited in Germany, the official feedstuff control of the government must evaluate feeds for the forbidden use of products of animal origin. Microscope examination is the official method to prove animal-originated adulterations of feeds. This paper proposes a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of the dipeptide carnosine and related dipeptides (anserine and balenine) and shows the dependence of the contents of anserine, balenine, and carnosine in compound feeds on the content of meat meal in feeds. The presented method can complete and confirm the result of the microscopic method for evidence of components of animal origin in feeds. PMID:11902938

  13. Natural antioxidant L-carnosine inhibits LPO intensification in structures of the auditory analyzer under conditions of chronic exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhuravskii, S G; Aleksandrova, L A; Sirot, V S; Ivanov, S A

    2004-10-01

    Intragastric administration of L-carnosine suspension to Wistar-Kyoto rats 3 days before and after 7-day course of intraperitoneal injections of ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin compensated expenditures of tissue antioxidant systems and significantly eliminated kanamycin-induced intensification of MDA production in tissues of the membrane part of the cochlea and in the auditory cortex of the temporal lobe. L-NAME (competitive NO synthase inhibitor) also inhibited LPO, increased total antioxidant activity, and decreased ototoxicity of kanamycin, which confirms the contribution of NO into LPO intensification under conditions of aminoglycoside treatment. Inhibition of pathological intensification of LPO processes and increase in total antioxidant activity under conditions of induced acute aminoglycoside ototoxicity characterizes L-carnosine as a highly effective otoprotector. PMID:15665945

  14. Intrauterine radiation exposures and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1988-08-01

    Small head size and mental retardation have been known as effects of intrauterine exposure to ionizing radiation since the 1920s. In the 1950s, studies of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors revealed that at 4-17 wk of gestation, the greater the dose, the smaller the brain (and head size), and that beginning at 0.5 Gy (50 rad) in Hiroshima, mental retardation increased in frequency with increasing dose. No other excess of birth defects was observed. Otake and Schull (1984) pointed out that the period of susceptibility to mental retardation coincided with that for proliferation and migration of neuronal elements from near the cerebral ventricles to the cortex. Mental retardation could be the result of interference with this process. Their analysis indicated that exposures at 8-15 wk to 0.01-0.02 Gy (1-2 rad) doubled the frequency of severe mental retardation. This estimate was based on small numbers of mentally retarded atomic-bomb survivors. Although nuclear accidents have occurred recently, new cases will hopefully be too rare to provide further information about the risk of mental retardation. It may be possible, however, to learn about lesser impairment. New psychometric tests may be helpful in detecting subtle deficits in intelligence or neurodevelopmental function. One such test is PEERAMID, which is being used in schools to identify learning disabilities due, for example, to deficits in attention, short- or long-term memory, or in sequencing information. This and other tests could be applied in evaluating survivors of intrauterine exposure to various doses of ionizing radiation. The results could change our understanding of the safety of low-dose exposures.

  15. Modulation of PARP-1 and PARP-2 expression by L-carnosine and trehalose after LPS and INFγ-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Spina-Purrello, Vittoria; Giliberto, Salvatrice; Barresi, Vincenza; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Giuffrida Stella, Anna Maria; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) play a crucial role in DNA damage surveillance through their nick sensor functions. Since PARPs' over activation leads to an excessive consumption of NAD(+) and ATP depletion, these enzymes also are involved in the early events of programmed cell death as well as in necrosis. In order to verify the protective action of L: -carnosine and trehalose against NO induced cell death, in the present study we examined their effects on the expression of PARP-1, PARP-2 and iNOS in primary rat astrocyte and oligodendrocyte cells, treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (INFγ), through semi-quantitative PCR and western analysis. To further characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying L-carnosine and trehalose action, we measured cell viability, nitrite production and LDH release. The data obtained clearly demonstrate that in the stress model employed L-carnosine and trehalose down regulate PARP-1 and PARP-2 expression in both cell phenotypes, thus suggesting their possible application in clinical trials. PMID:21053069

  16. Reactions to the Labels "Institutionalized" and "Mentally Retarded" by Retarded and Nonretarded Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Frederick X.; Gibbons, Barbara N.

    The effects of labels, "mentally retarded" and "institutionalized" on the evaluations and causal attributions of nonretarded persons, and on the social distance preferences of EMR persons, were assessed. In addition, each group was asked to predict the likelihood of a labeled (mentally retarded) or a nonlabeled target person achieving success at a…

  17. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, F L

    2006-01-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non‐syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non‐syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed. PMID:16118346

  18. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Puberty in the Girl Who is Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattullo, Ann

    Designed to help mothers of mentally retarded girls deal with the problems and concerns of puberty, the booklet provides information on physical and emotional changes, menstruation, masturbation, heterosexual behavior, contraception, protection against sexual aggression, the possibilities of marriage, and additional sources of information.…

  1. Do the Mentally Retarded Have Poor Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Norman R.

    1978-01-01

    A reevaluation of a number of experiments suggests that normal and retarded persons differ on short-term memory tasks from the time of initial stimulus exposure. The hypothesis that memory differences are due to differential encoding as a result of more adequate rehearsal by the normal subjects is unacceptable. (Author/BW)

  2. Brominated flame retardants as food contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews analytical methods for the three major brominated flame retardant (BFR) classes in use today, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a "legacy" BFR no longer in use, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and a...

  3. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  4. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  5. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  6. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  7. Jean Piaget Archives Bibliography on Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Susie; And Others

    This bibliography lists all entries from the Jean Piaget Archives Catalogues dealing with mental retardation. The list, including almost 200 entries, encompasses four works by Piaget himself, one collaboration, and 189 works by other authors. Entries are arranged in order by their publication in one of the 12 catalogues of the archives, providing…

  8. Abandoning the Myth of Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the concept underlying the term metal retardation and the effort to define it in a way that is scientifically accurate and in a way that promotes greater sensitivity to the needs of people described by the term which has been continuous for centuries. The author states that a scientifically sound and…

  9. Computer Assisted Instruction for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Providence Coll., RI.

    Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) for the mentally retarded is described; the advantages of CAI (which generally follows the pattern of programed instruction) are listed; and the roles of the teacher and the student are summarized. The coursewriter is explained, and its use as an experimental tool discussed. Guidelines are given covering…

  10. Language Transference by Mentally Retarded Spanish Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Carol

    In an investigation of language transference vs. language interference, 12 trainable mentally retarded Spanish speakers (5 to 9 years old) were trained to name in English objects previously identified receptively and objects not previously identified receptively in Spanish. Results indicated no significant difference in the number of words learned…

  11. Implementing Programs for Trainable Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis.

    Guidelines for the development of programs for trainable mentally retarded children are presented. Major task areas identified are the family group, communication skills, physical development, socialization, recreational interests and skills, and preparation for work oriented activity. Six papers are presented: precision teaching and behavior…

  12. READINESS AND READING FOR THE RETARDED CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERNSTEIN, BEBE

    THIS TEACHER'S BOOK AND MANUAL, DESIGNED TO ACCOMPANY TWO WORKBOOKS, PRESENTS A FUNCTIONAL APPROACH TO READINESS AND READING FOR YOUNG EDUCABLE RETARDED CHILDREN. THE WORKBOOKS THEMSELVES OFFER PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN AT THE READINESS LEVEL AND SEQUENTIAL ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS FOR THOSE AT THE BEGINNING READING STAGE. THE TEACHER'S…

  13. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  14. Noncompliant Behavior of People with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rex G.

    1993-01-01

    This literature review on antecedents, behaviors, and consequences in the noncompliant behavior of people with mental retardation found that noncompliance is more likely when instructions are vague or task demands are too difficult and that noncompliance responds well to programs utilizing combinations of social and tangible rewards. (Author/JDD)

  15. New fire retardant foams and intumescents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of fire retardant foams and intumescent paints for protection of commercial aircraft passengers in the event of fire is discussed. Recommended materials and methods for evaluating the effectiveness of the materials are presented. Typical problems resulting from aircraft fires and the basic protective mechanisms to cope with these problems are examined.

  16. Teaching the Mentally Retarded Job Interviewing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinnell, Jr., Richard M.; Lieberman, Alice

    1977-01-01

    Examined the most effective usage of videotape in job interview skill training for 24 mentally retarded young adults utilizing the microcounseling model of instruction. Data revealed the microcounseling model is most effective with the two skill areas of eye contact and body posture regardless of the method of videotape utilization. (Author)

  17. Mental Retardation: Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissey, Marie Skodak

    1975-01-01

    Notes that two developments had major impacts on policies towards the mentally retarded between the 1880s and the 1920s: (1) the swing toward the eugenics-heredity-genetics movement, and (2) the development of individual intelligence testing. (Author/JM)

  18. Euthanasia and Mental Retardation: Suggesting the Unthinkable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Russell

    1989-01-01

    The article examines current opinions toward euthanasia of persons with mental retardation in light of the history of public and professional attitudes. It also discusses the rejection of euthanasia on moral and religious grounds, and notes the use of lifelong incarceration, based on eugenics principles, to accomplish similar ends. (DB)

  19. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  20. STUDYING LEARNING PATTERNS IN MENTAL RETARDATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANDLAND, DOUGLAS K.; MANNING, SIDNEY ALPERN

    FIVE EXPERIMENTS WERE CONDUCTED IN AN ATTEMPT TO ISOLATE SPECIFIC LEARNING PATTERNS IN CHILDREN OF VARYING DEGREES OF MENTAL RETARDATION AND TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE PHYLOGENETIC DEVELOPMENT OF INTELLIGENCE. FACTORS STUDIED WERE THOSE KNOWN TO INFLUENCE LEARNING IN NORMAL CHILDREN AND ADULTS--KIND OF REINFORCEMENT (VERBAL OR…

  1. Ophthalmologic Screening of Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Joel G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Ophthalmological screening was conducted on 113 clients in a work activity center for adults with mental retardation. Abnormalities that were neither refractive nor strabismic were found in 32 percent of clients. Findings suggest the value of conducting screenings in settings familiar to such clients. (Author/DB)

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  3. Vocational Horticulture for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, William H.; And Others

    The study explored methods and techniques for training mentally retarded adults to perform gardening tasks. A total of 31 subjects ages 21 to 48 (IQ range 32-89) participated in the study, which consisted of three phases. In an initial pilot study, experimentation without subjects resulted in the development of modified tools (e.g., notched…

  4. Teaching Laundry Skills to Mentally Retarded Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuvo, Anthony J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Five moderately and mildly retarded students (19 to 21 years old) were taught to sort garments to be laundered and to use a clothes washer and dryer. Rapid acquisition and maintenance of the laundry skills were obtained through praise and response contingent feedback as a consequence for behavior. (Author/CL)

  5. Aging, Mental Retardation and Physical Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to provide an overview of what physical fitness is and how it relates to people with mental retardation. Questions address the following topics: the fitness movement; a definition of physical fitness; the different components of physical fitness (muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, body…

  6. PARENT ATTITUDES IN REARING MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEICHMAN, NATHAN S.; WILLENBERG, ERNEST P.

    POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE ASPECTS OF REARING MENTAL RETARDATES WERE IDENTIFIED AND MEASURED DURING THIS STUDY BY EXAMINATIONS OF PARENTAL ATTITUDES AND HOW THESE ATTITUDES OFTEN AFFECT THE DAILY BEHAVIOR AND LEARNING READINESS OF CHILDREN WHILE IN SCHOOL. BEHAVIORAL FACTORS OF THE INDIVIDUAL CHILD WERE ANALYZED AND COMPARED WITH STATISTICS COVERING…

  7. Fully variable elliptical phase retarder composed of two linear phase retarders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Jen

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a fully variable elliptical phase retarder was developed by combining a variable linear phase retarder and a half-wave plate. All three polarization parameters of the elliptical phase retarder (elliptical phase retardation γ, azimuth angle θ, and ellipticity angle ɛ) were adjustable. Experimental verification was performed by measuring the polarization parameters with a polarizer-sample-analyzer polarimeter. The polarization parameters were set to γ = 120°, ɛ = 15°, and θ = 20°. The measurement results, γ = 119.838° ± 0.006°, ɛ = 14.659° ± 0.002°, and θ = 20.084° ± 0.002°, agreed with theoretical prediction.

  8. L-carnosine modulates respiratory burst and reactive oxygen species production in neutrophil biochemistry and function: may oral dosage form of non-hydrolized dipeptide L-carnosine complement anti-infective anti-influenza flu treatment, prevention and self-care as an alternative to the conventional vaccination?

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2014-05-01

    Influenza A is a viral disease of global dimension, presenting with high morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics, and in pandemics which are of infrequent occurrence but which have very high attack rates. Influenza vaccines of the future must be directed toward use of conserved group-specific viral antigens, such as are present in transitional proteins which are exposed during the fusion of virus to the host cell. Influenza probes revealed a continuing battle for survival between host and parasite in which the host population updates the specificity of its pool of humoral immunity by contact with and response to infection with the most recent viruses which possess altered antigenic specificity in their hemagglutinin (HA) ligand. It is well known that the HA protein is found on the surface of the influenza virus particle and is responsible for binding to receptors on host cells and initiating infection. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have been reported to be involved in the initial host response to influenza A virus (IAV). Early after IAV infection, neutrophils infiltrate the airway probably due to release of chemokines that attract PMN. Clearly, severe IAV infection is characterized by increased neutrophil influx into the lung or upper respiratory tract. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) and anserine (N-β-alanyl-1-methyl-L-histidine) are found in skeletal muscle of most vertebrates, including those used for food; for example, 100 g of chicken breast contains 400 mg (17.6 mmol/L) of carnosine and 1020 mg (33.6 mmol/l) of anserine. Carnosine-stimulated respiratory burst in neutrophils is a universal biological mechanism of influenza virus destruction. Our own studies revealed previously unappreciated functional effects of carnosine and related histidine containing compounds as a natural biological prevention and barrier against Influenza virus infection, expand public understanding of the antiviral properties of imidazole-containing dipeptide based

  9. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Levels in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors (blood lipids, obesity, and smoking) in 329 adults with mental retardation residing in various settings with subjects in the Framingham Offspring Study found that adults with mental retardation had cardiovascular risk profiles similar to those of individuals without mental retardation. (Author/DB)

  10. Mental Retardation: The Search for Cures. Research Monograph Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menolascino, Frank J.; Neman, Ronald

    The booklet describes the Association for Retarded Citizens' (ARC's) goal of coordinating efforts to seek a cure for mental retardation. Cures are defined as any intervention that would significantly increase intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior beyond the upper level of retardation. It is explained that because of the variety of causes…

  11. The Problem of Typological Thinking in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelb, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Asserts that typological thinking, the belief that individual differences diverge around an underlying type of essence, has persisted regarding mental retardation and prevents the appreciation of individual differences and human dignity in the mental retardation field. Past and present controversies over the definition of mental retardation are…

  12. Low Elevated Lead Levels and Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    To investigate the relation between low level lead absorption and mild mental retardation, hair lead concentrations were compared in a group of 40 mildly retarded children "etiology unknown" with a control group of 20 children. Children with probable cause for retardation were excluded from the sample as were children with a history of lead…

  13. Attitudes of High School Students toward Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski, Junean; Flaherty, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The attitudes of 144 high school students toward individuals with mental retardation were examined using the Mental Retardation Attitude Inventory-Revised. Results indicated that gender and frequency of contact both influenced attitudes. Females and students with more frequent contacts with individuals with mental retardation indicated more…

  14. Conjunctive Visual Search in Individuals with and without Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlin, Michael; Chrysler, Christina; Sullivan, Kate

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the basic visual and cognitive abilities of individuals with mental retardation is critical for understanding the basis of mental retardation and for the design of remediation programs. We assessed visual search abilities in individuals with mild mental retardation and in MA- and CA-matched comparison groups. Our…

  15. Neuropsychological Profiles of Persons with Mental Retardation and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Glen A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the use of neuropsychological tests to assist in the differential diagnosis of dementia among persons with mental retardation. The author compared performances of persons with mental retardation and dementia ("n" = 10) to persons with mental retardation without dementia ("n" = 12). Participants were matched by IQ (mild or…

  16. Stimulus Overselectivity: A Common Feature in Autism and Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovaas, O. Ivar; Wilhelm, Hannelore

    1976-01-01

    Overselective attention in discrimination between picture cards was investigated with three groups of children with different IQ levels: 10 severely retarded (IQ = 29 - 51, CA = 9.6 - 18 years), 10 moderately retarded (IQ = 56 - 85, CA = 12.8 - 16.3 years), and 10 non-retarded (CA = 10 - 12 years). (Author/IM)

  17. Repair Behaviors of Children with and without Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scudder, Rosalind R.; Tremain, Deborah Hobbs

    1992-01-01

    Communication repair behaviors of 10 children with mental retardation (ages 11-13) and 10 mental age-matched children without mental retardation were examined. The children with mental retardation did not respond as often and rarely used details to expand their utterances. Results have implications for the development of conversational skills in…

  18. Motor Task Persistence of Children with and without Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Porretta, David L.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2000-01-01

    Task persistence by 31 children (ages 9-13) with and without mental retardation during two challenging motor tasks was investigated. A main effect was found for group affiliation: children without mental retardation attempted more trials over three sessions. Results indicated children with mental retardation were less persistent than typical…

  19. Guidelines for Library Services for People with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies, Chicago, IL.

    This guide is designed to assist all libraries, including school, public, academic, and specialized libraries such as prison and institutional libraries, to better serve the needs of people of all ages who are mentally retarded. An overview provides a definition of mental retardation, places services for people with mental retardation in…

  20. Serving Young Children Whose Parents Are Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Eleanor W.; Bakley, Sue

    1989-01-01

    The article reviews the cognitive and social/emotional characteristics associated with mental retardation, the literature on parents with mental retardation, and the interaction between these characteristics in relation to child abuse and neglect. Three case studies of mentally retarded parents illustrate the range of problems and needs service…

  1. Older Mentally Retarded Persons: Demographic Profile and Service Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    An overview is presented on current knowledge about elderly mentally retarded persons. Definitional and incidence issues are addressed, and support is voiced for use of a lower cut-off for the beginning of old age among the retarded than for the general population. Conflicting findings of age-related differences in mentally retarded adults are…

  2. The membrane-stabilizing action of zinc carnosine (Z-103) in stress-induced gastric ulceration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.H.; Luk, C.T.; Ogle, C.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Zinc compounds have been shown to antagonize various types of gastric ulceration in rats. Zinc carnosine (Z-103), a newly developed agent was, therefore, examined for its antiulcer effect in stress-induced ulceration and also its membrane stabilizing action in rat stomachs. Cold-restraint stress induced severe hemorrhagic lesions together with increased mast cell degranulation and {beta}-glucuronidase release in the gastric glandular mucosa. A-103 pretreatment with a single oral dose reversed these actions in a dose-dependent manner. When the compound was incubated in concentrations of 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}6}, 10{sup {minus}5} or 10{sup {minus}4} M, with isolated hepatic lysosomes, it significantly reduced the spontaneous release of {beta}-glucuronidase in the medium. The present study not only demonstrates the antiulcer effect of Z-103 but also indicates that the protective action is likely to be mediated by its membrane-stabilizing action on mast cells and lysosomes in the gastric glandular mucosa.

  3. Zinc-L-carnosine binds to molecular chaperone HSP70 and inhibits the chaperone activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Haga, Asami; Okamoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Shintaroh; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sanpei, Ann; Takahashi, Shota; Nakayama, Masahiro; Nagai, Miki; Otaka, Michiro; Miyazaki, Toshio; Nunomura, Wataru; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the specific binding proteins of Zinc-L-carnosine (Polaprezinc) using Polaprezinc-affinity column chromatography in vitro. A protein having a 70-kDa molecular mass was eluted by the linear gradient of 0-1.0 mM Polaprezinc from the affinity column and the protein was identified as the molecular chaperone HSP70 by immunoblotting. The chaperone activity of HSP70 was completely suppressed by Polaprezinc. The ATPase activity of HSP70 was affected to some extent by the reagent. In the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, the secondary structure of HSP70 was changed in the presence of Polaprezinc, i.e. it decreased in the α-helix. We have determined the Polaprezinc-binding domain of HSP70 by using recombinant HSP70N- and C-domains. Although Polaprezinc could bind to both the N-terminal and the C-terminal of HSP70, the HSP70N-domain has a high affinity to the drug. Regarding the peptide cleavage of the HSP70N- and C-domains with proteinase K, the intact HSP70N still remained in the presence of Polaprezinc. On the other hand, the quantity of the intact C-domain slightly decreased under the same conditions along with the newly digested small peptides appeared. It has been suggested that Polaprezinc binds to HSP70 especially in the N-domains, suppresses the chaperone activity and delays an ATPase activities of HSP70. PMID:23687308

  4. Protective effects of carnosine alone and together with alpha-tocopherol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus ethanol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kalaz, Esra Betül; Aydın, A Fatih; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Çoban, Jale; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of carnosine (CAR) alone and together with vitamin E (Vit E) on alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in rats. ASH was induced by ethanol (3 times; 5 g/kg; 12 h intervals, via gavage), followed by a single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg; i.p.). CAR (250 mg/kg; i.p.) and Vit E (200 mg D-α-tocopherol/kg; via gavage) were administered 30 min before and 90 min after the LPS injection. CAR treatment lowered high serum transaminase activities together with hepatic histopathologic improvements in rats with ASH. Reactive oxygen species formation, malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activities and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen 1α1 (COL1A1) expressions were observed to decrease. These improvements were more remarkable in CAR plus Vit E-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR may be effective in suppressing proinflammatory, prooxidant, and profibrotic factors in the liver of rats with ASH. PMID:26773358

  5. Chemical relevance of the copper(II)— L-carnosine system in aqueous solution: A thermodynamic and spectrophotometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Pier G.; Prenesti, Enrico; Zelano, Vincenzo; Ostacoli, Giorgio

    1993-08-01

    The copper(II)— L-carnosine (L -) system has been re-investigated in aqueous solution, at I = 0.1 mol dm -1, different temperatures (5⩽ t⩽45°C) and with metal to ligand ratios ranging from 3:1 to 1:3. Both potentiometry and visible spectrophotometry were employed. From an overall consideration of all experiments, [CuLH] 2+, [CuL] +, [CuLH -1]°, [Cu 2L 2H -2]° and [Cu 2LH -1] 2+ were recognized as the species which provide the best interpretation of experimental data. The complex formation constants, determined at different temperatures, allowed us to obtain reliable values of Δ H° and good estimates of Δ C° p. From visible spectrophotometric measurements, carried out at different pH and metal to ligand ratios, it was possible to calculate the electronic spectrum of each complex formed in solution. A structure is also proposed for each species, on the basis of thermodynamic and spectral results.

  6. [ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS - TOXICITY AND INFLUENCE ON HUMAN HEALTH].

    PubMed

    Bruchajzer, Elżbieta; Frydrych, Barbara; Szymańska, Jadwiga Anna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus flame retardants (flame retardants, FRs) have been used for several decades in many industries, including the production of dyes, varnishes, adhesives, synthetic resins, polyvinyl chloride, hydraulic fluids, plastics and textiles. Their importance in recent times has increased due to i.a., significantly reduced use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) - persistent organic pollutants, dangerous for the environment. The aim of this study was to review the available literature data concerning phosphorous FRs primarily for neurotoxic, fertility, reproductive and carcinogenic effects. The analysis concerned the following most commonly used substances: tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-phosphonium chloride (THPC), tributyl phosphate (TBP), tricresyl phosphate (TCP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate (TDCP) and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulphate (THPS). In animal studies neurotoxic effects were found after exposure to TBEP, THPC, TBP and TCP, while in humans they were observed only after exposure to TCP. TCEP, THPS, TBP, TCP and TDCP caused disorders in fertility and/or fetal development of animals. Adverse effects on reproduction in humans may be caused by TPP, TCP, and TDCP. In laboratory animals the development of tumors was observed after high doses of TEHP, TCEP, TBP and TDCP. None of these compounds is classified as a human carcinogen. The environmental toxicity of phosphate FRs is low (except for TPP, TCEP and TBEP). They are not stable compounds, in living organisms they are metabolised and quickly excreted. Therefore, they can be used as an alternative to PBDEs. PMID:26294315

  7. The neurotoxic effect of clindamycin - induced gut bacterial imbalance and orally administered propionic acid on DNA damage assessed by the comet assay: protective potency of carnosine and carnitine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comet assay is a quick method for assessing DNA damage in individual cells. It allows the detection of single and double DNA strand breaks, which represent the direct effect of some damaging agents. This study uses standard comet quantification models to compare the neurotoxic effect of orally administered propionic acid (PA) to that produced as a metabolite of bacterial overgrowth induced by clindamycin. Additionally, the protective effect of carnosine and carnitine as natural dietary supplements is assessed. Methods Single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assays) were performed on brain cortex and medulla samples after removal from nine groups of hamsters including: a control (untreated) group; PA-intoxicated group; clindamycin treated group; clindamycin-carnosine group and; clindamycin-carnitine group. Results There were significant double strand breaks recorded as tail length, tail moment and % DNA damage in PA and clindamycin-treated groups for the cortex and medulla compared to the control group. Neuroprotective effects of carnosine and carnitine were observed. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve (ROC) analysis showed satisfactory values of sensitivity and specificity of the comet assay parameters. Conclusion Percentage DNA damage, tail length, and tail moment are adequate biomarkers of PA neurotoxicity due to oral administration or as a metabolite of induced enteric bacterial overgrowth. Establishing biomarkers of these two exposures is important for protecting children’s health by documenting the role of the imbalance in gut microbiota in the etiology of autism through the gut-brain axis. These outcomes will help efforts directed at controlling the prevalence of autism, a disorder recently related to PA neurotoxicity. PMID:23587115

  8. Brominated flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Staskal, Daniele F

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen because of the occurrence of several classes of BFRs in the environment and in human biota. The widespread production and use of BFRs; strong evidence of increasing contamination of the environment, wildlife, and people; and limited knowledge of potential effects heighten the importance of identifying emerging issues associated with the use of BFRs. In this article, we briefly review scientific issues associated with the use of tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane, and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and discuss data gaps. Overall, the toxicology database is very limited; the current literature is incomplete and often conflicting. Available data, however, raise concern over the use of certain classes of brominated flame retardants. PMID:14698924

  9. [Curing mental retardation: searching for balance].

    PubMed

    Harel, Sharon; Jenna, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR) occurs in 2 to 3 % of the general population and is still not therapeutically addressed. Milder forms of MR result from deficient synaptogenesis and/or impaired synaptic plasticity during childhood. These alterations would result from disequilibrium in signalling pathways regulating the balance between long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) in certain neurons such as hippocampus neurons. To provide mentally retarded children with increased cognitive abilities, novel experimental approaches are currently being developed to characterize signalling status associated with MR and to identify therapeutic targets that would restore lost equilibrium. Several studies also highlighted the major role played by molecular switches like kinases, phosphatases, small G proteins and their regulators in the coordination and integration of signalling pathways associated with synaptic plasticity. These proteins may therefore constitute promising therapeutic targets for a number of cognitive deficiencies. PMID:21299965

  10. Chemistry and toxicity of flame retardants for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Liepins, R; Pearce, E M

    1976-01-01

    An overview of commercially used flame retardants is give. The most used flame retardants are illustrated and the seven major markets, which use 96% of all flame-retarded polymers, are described. Annual flame retardant growth rate for each major market is also projected. Toxicity data are reviewed on only those compositions that are considered commercially significant today. This includes 18 compounds or families of compounds and four inherently flame-retarded polymers. Toxicological studies of flame retardants for most synthetic materials are of recent origin and only a few of the compounds have been evaluated in any great detail. Considerable toxicological problems may exist in the manufacturing of some flame retardants, their by-products, and possible decomposition products. PMID:1026419

  11. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  12. High speed memory scanning in retarded and non-retarded adolescents.

    PubMed

    Todman, J; Gibb, C M

    1985-02-01

    Four groups of 13-14-year-olds, classified on the basis of Raven's Progressive Matrices scores as intellectually above average, average, below average and retarded, were subjects in a Sternberg (1966) type memory scanning task in which memory sets of two, three and four letters were used. Slope values of the memory search function did not differ between groups, whereas intercept values decreased with higher intelligence up to the average intelligence level. There was an overall inverse relation between intercept values and intelligence (r = -0.77) and similar relations obtained within the three non-retarded groups (rs greater than or equal to -0.57), but not within the retarded group (r = -0.06). Possible connections between these results and findings from inspection time studies are discussed. PMID:3978355

  13. Expression and characterization of the biofilm-related and carnosine-hydrolyzing aminoacylhistidine dipeptidase from Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yi-Chin; Kao, Liang-Wei; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Liu, Yen-Hsi; Feng, Jen-Min; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2008-10-01

    The biofilm-related and carnosine-hydrolyzing aminoacylhistidine dipeptidase (pepD) gene from Vibrio alginolyticus was cloned and sequenced. The recombinant PepD protein was produced and biochemically characterized and the putative active-site residues responsible for metal binding and catalysis were identified. The recombinant enzyme, which was identified as a homodimeric dipeptidase in solution, exhibited broad substrate specificity for Xaa-His and His-Xaa dipeptides, with the highest activity for the His-His dipeptide. Sequence and structural homologies suggest that the enzyme is a member of the metal-dependent metallopeptidase family. Indeed, the purified enzyme contains two zinc ions per monomer. Reconstitution of His.Tag-cleaved native apo-PepD with various metal ions indicated that enzymatic activity could be optimally restored when Zn2+ was replaced with other divalent metal ions, including Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Cd2+, and partially restored when Zn2+ was replaced with Mg2+. Structural homology modeling of PepD also revealed a 'catalytic domain' and a 'lid domain' similar to those of the Lactobacillus delbrueckii PepV protein. Mutational analysis of the putative active-site residues supported the involvement of His80, Asp119, Glu150, Asp173 and His461 in metal binding and Asp82 and Glu149 in catalysis. In addition, individual substitution of Glu149 and Glu150 with aspartic acid resulted in the partial retention of enzymatic activity, indicating a functional role for these residues on the catalysis and zinc ions, respectively. These effects may be necessary either for the activation of the catalytic water molecule or for the stabilization of the substrate-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate. Taken together, these results may facilitate the design of PepD inhibitors for application in antimicrobial treatment and antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. PMID:18783432

  14. Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons by zinc, thiol containing redox agents and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Thio, L L; Zhang, H X

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors by zinc (Zn(2+)) and endogenous redox agents such as glutathione may alter inhibition in the mammalian brain. Despite the abundance of Zn(2+) in the hippocampus and its ability to modulate glycine receptors, few studies have examined Zn(2+) modulation of hippocampal glycine receptors. Whether redox agents modulate hippocampal glycine receptors also remains unknown. This study examined Zn(2+) and redox modulation of glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons using whole-cell recordings. Zn(2+) concentrations below 10 microM potentiated currents elicited by low glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine concentrations by 300-400%. Zn(2+) concentrations above 300 microM produced nearly complete inhibition. Potentiating Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for the three agonists to the left and decreased the Hill coefficient for glycine and beta-alanine but not taurine. Inhibiting Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for glycine and beta-alanine to the right but reduced the maximum taurine response. Histidine residues may participate in potentiation because diethyl pyrocarbonate and pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) enhancement of glycine currents. pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) block of glycine currents, but diethyl pyrocarbonate did not. These findings indicate that separate sites mediate Zn(2+) potentiation and inhibition. The redox agents glutathione, dithiothreitol, tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) did not alter glycine currents by a redox mechanism. However, glutathione and dithiothreitol interfered with the effects of Zn(2+) on glycine currents by chelating it. Carnosine had similar effects. Thus, Zn(2+) and thiol containing redox agents that chelate Zn(2+) modulate hippocampal glycine receptors with the mechanism of Zn(2+) modulation being agonist dependent. PMID:16515845

  15. Carnosine Reduces Oxidative Stress and Reverses Attenuation of Righting and Postural Reflexes in Rats with Thioacetamide-Induced Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Krzysztof; Hilgier, Wojciech; Fręśko, Inez; Polowy, Rafał; Podsiadłowska, Anna; Zołocińska, Ewa; Grymanowska, Aneta W; Filipkowski, Robert K; Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral oxidative stress (OS) contributes to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Existing evidence suggests that systemic administration of L-histidine (His) attenuates OS in brain of HE animal models, but the underlying mechanism is complex and not sufficiently understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine, Car) may be neuroprotective in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver failure in rats and that, being His metabolite, may mediate the well documented anti-OS activity of His. Amino acids [His or Car (100 mg/kg)] were administrated 2 h before TAA (i.p., 300 mg/kg 3× in 24 h intervals) injection into Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were thus tested for: (i) brain prefrontal cortex and blood contents of Car and His, (ii) amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), GSSG/GSH ratio and thioredoxin reductase (TRx) activity, and (iii) behavioral changes (several models were used, i.e. tests for reflexes, open field, grip test, Rotarod). Brain level of Car was reduced in TAA rats, and His administration significantly elevated Car levels in control and TAA rats. Car partly attenuated TAA-induced ROS production and reduced GSH/GSSG ratio, whereas the increase of TRx activity in TAA brain was not significantly modulated by Car. Further, Car improved TAA-affected behavioral functions in rats, as was shown by the tests of righting and postural reflexes. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that (i) Car may be added to the list of neuroprotective compounds of therapeutic potential on HE and that (ii) Car mediates at least a portion of the OS-attenuating activity of His in the setting of TAA-induced liver failure. PMID:26801175

  16. Electrode contamination effects of retarding potential analyzer.

    PubMed

    Fang, H K; Oyama, K-I; Cheng, C Z

    2014-01-01

    The electrode contamination in electrostatic analyzers such as Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers (RPA) is a serious problem for space measurements. The contamination layer acts as extra capacitance and resistance and leads to distortion in the measured I-V curve, which leads to erroneous measurement results. There are two main effects of the contamination layer: one is the impedance effect and the other is the charge attachment and accumulation due to the capacitance. The impedance effect can be reduced or eliminated by choosing the proper sweeping frequency. However, for RPA the charge accumulation effect becomes serious because the capacitance of the contamination layer is much larger than that of the Langmuir probe of similar dimension. The charge accumulation on the retarding potential grid causes the effective potential, that ions experience, to be changed from the applied voltage. Then, the number of ions that can pass through the retarding potential grid to reach the collector and, thus, the measured ion current are changed. This effect causes the measured ion drift velocity and ion temperature to be changed from the actual values. The error caused by the RPA electrode contamination is expected to be significant for sounding rocket measurements with low rocket velocity (1-2 km/s) and low ion temperature of 200-300 K in the height range of 100-300 km. In this paper we discuss the effects associated with the RPA contaminated electrodes based on theoretical analysis and experiments performed in a space plasma operation chamber. Finally, the development of a contamination-free RPA for sounding rocket missions is presented. PMID:24517809

  17. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. The exploitation of "new" effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  18. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    SciTech Connect

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-15

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21{sup st} century. The exploitation of 'new' effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  19. New hybrid halogen-free flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijowska, Dorota; Jankowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The main objective of this work were researches concerning the methods of the in-situ modification of silicate layer-tubular mineral (SL-TM) halloysite, using the salts of melamine, i.e. melamine cyanurate. The modified mineral was used as flame retardant to thermoplastic polymers. In the case of the application of halloysite modified by melamine cyanurate to polyamide 6 (PA6) the highest parameters of vertical and horizontal flammability were achieved. The mechanical properties of filled polyamide 6 have been improved.

  20. Retardation of nanoparticles growth by doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Valentyna; Rudko, Galyna; Fediv, Volodymyr; Savchuk, Andrij; Gule, Evgenij; Vorona, Igor

    2014-12-01

    The process of doping of CdS nanoparticles with Mn during colloidal synthesis is analyzed by EPR and optical studies. Analysis of EPR results demonstrated that Mn2+ ions are successfully incorporated into the nanoparticles and occupy the crystal sites both in the bulk of a NP and near the surface of a NP. Optical absorption measurements revealed the retardation of absorption edge shift during the growth for Mn-doped CdS NPs as compared to the undoped CdS NPs. It was concluded that the presence of Mn in the solution leads to the inhibition of NPs growth.

  1. Optimization of retardance for a complete Stokes polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatke, D. S.; Descour, M. R.; Dereniak, E. L.; Sweatt, W. C.; Kemme, S. A.; Phipps, G. S.

    2000-06-01

    We present two figures of merit based on singular value decomposition, which can be used to assess the noise immunity of a complete Stokes polarimeter. These are used to optimize a polarimeter featuring a rotatable retarder and a fixed polarizer. A retardance of 132 degree sign (approximately three-eighths wave) and retarder orientation angles of {+-}51.7{sup (convolution} {sup sign)} and {+-}15.1{sup (convolution} {sup sign)} are found to be optimal when four measurements are used. Use of this retardance affords a factor-of-1.5 improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over systems employing a quarter-wave plate. A geometric means of visualizing the optimization process is discussed, and the advantages of the use of additional measurements are investigated. No advantage of using retarder orientation angles spaced uniformly through 360 degree sign is found over repeated measurements made at the four retarder orientation angles. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  2. Factors affecting social integration of noninstitutionalized mentally retarded adults.

    PubMed

    Reiter, S; Levi, A M

    1980-07-01

    The social integration of noninstitutionalized moderately and mildly mentally retarded young adults was investigated. A group of moderately and mildly retarded adults (study group) was compared with a group of borderline retarded (control group) adults on employability, behavior at work, social integration and social skills, personality, and self-concept. Findings indicated that the study group was less well integrated at work and in society than was the control group and showed lack of social skills. The retarded adults who had nonretarded friends showed better social-educational skills than did the other subjects. Findings suggest that even retarded individuals who grow up in the community need help in order to become socially independent. The existence of a special social club for retarded adults was found to fulfill the functions of a sheltered framework. Participants in the club showed more positive self-concepts; however, the club did not seem to prepare them for social integration in the general community. PMID:7446566

  3. Fire-retardant decorative inks for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial and experimental fire retardants were screened as potential fire retardants for acrylic printing inks used on aircraft interior sandwich panels. The fire retardants are selected according to their physical properties and their thermostabilities. A criterion for selecting a more stable fire retardant is established. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are used to determine thermostabilities. Results show that the fire retardant formulations are more thermally stable than the acrylic ink control. It is determined that an ink formulation containing a brominated phenol and carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile which has been modified with a brominated polymeric additive (BPA), yields the highest limiting oxygen index (LOI) of all the compounds tested. All of the fire-retardant formulations have a higher oxygen index than the baseline acrylic ink.

  4. Spiritual and religious need of mentally retarded persons.

    PubMed

    Carder, M M

    1984-06-01

    Describes the special spiritual and religious needs of the mentally retarded, at the same time proclaiming the necessity of thinking of them firstly as persons. Gives specific illustrations of how the spiritual and religious needs of the mentally retarded may be met by peers, chaplains, and family members. Offers a personal testimony on how the mentally retarded can contribute to the growth and insight of the caregiver. PMID:10266989

  5. Comparison of Families of Children with Mental Retardation and Families of Children without Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Robert M.; Zigler, Edward

    1993-01-01

    This commentary on EC 605 926 states that families of children with severe mental retardation or autism have problems that might be considered "the same, only more so" compared to issues faced by families with nonhandicapped children, and therefore solutions might involve magnifications of solutions being suggested to help all parents. (JDD)

  6. Evaluation of Still Picture Telephone for Mentally Retarded Persons. Telematics and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane; Bjorck-Akesson, Eva

    This study examined the benefit of using a visual telecommunication system for Sweden's children and adults with mild to moderate mental retardation and speech difficulties. The Panasonic Image Communication Unit connects to standard modular telephones and includes a camera and monitor for the transfer of pictures. Units were placed in eight…

  7. Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes of Institutionalized and Noninstitutionalized Retarded Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Judy E.; Morris, Helen L.

    1976-01-01

    Sixty-one noninstitutionalized and 61 institutionalized educable mentally retarded adolescents were psychometrically assessed on three measures: sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and self-concept. (Author)

  8. Rotatable broadband retarders for far infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T.D.; Carr, G.; Zhou, T.; Kotelyanskii, M.; Sirenko, A.A.

    2010-12-09

    Rotatable retarders have been developed for applications in spectroscopic, full Mueller Matrix ellipsometry in the far-IR spectral range. Several materials, such as silicon, KRS-5, and a commercial polymer plastic (TOPAS) have been utilized to achieve a fully adjustable retardation between 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Experimental characteristics of the rotatable retarders that utilize three- and four-bounce designs are compared with calculations. We discuss the effect of light focusing on the performance of these rotatable retarders. Broadband optical retarders are required for spectroscopic ellipsometry in its full Mueller matrix (MM) realization. Performance of the MM ellipsometer depends on the capability to produce substantially linearly-independent Stokes vectors for the light incident onto the sample. As has been shown, the errors in the measuredMMof the sample are proportional to the condition number of the 4 x 4 matrix composed of the Stokes vectors of four polarization states incident at the sample. It can be proven that it is impossible to cover the Poincare sphere with linearly-independent Stokes vectors by only changing the linear polarization at the input surface of a stationary retarder. As we will illustrate further in this paper, total coverage of the Poincare sphere is possible by rotating a tandem of a linear polarizer and a retarder with a retardation of 90{sup o}. It is this goal that we are trying to achieve in the retarder designs described in this paper.

  9. TG-FTIR characterization of flame retardant polyurethane foams materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Tang, Y.; Li, F.; Ge, X. G.; Zhang, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trichloroethyl phosphtate (TCEP) have been used to enhance the flame retardancy of polyurethane foams materials (PUF). Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of PUF samples have been investigated by the LOI tests and thermal analysis. The results indicate that the excellent flame retardancy can be achieved due to the presence of the flame retardant system containing DMMP and TCEP. TG-FTIR reveals that the addition of DMMP/TCEP can not only improve the thermal stability of PUF samples but can also affect the gaseous phase at high temperature.

  10. Fire-retardant decorative inks for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Commercial and experimental fire retardants were screened for possible use wiith acrylic printing inks on aircraft interior sandwich panels. The fire retardants were selected according to their physical properties and thermostabilities. Thermostabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. A criterion was then established for selecting the more stable agent. Results show that some of the bromine-containing fire retardants are more thermostable than the acrylic ink, alone, used as a control. Also, the bromine-containing fire retardants yield even better limiting oxygen index values when tested after adding carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber.

  11. Teaching about Flame Retardants. A Joint Israeli-Dutch Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Miri; de Vos, Wobbe

    2001-01-01

    Flame retardants make interesting chemistry and moreover, the chemistry is highly relevant from an everyday life point of view. This article reports on a joint Israeli-Dutch project aimed at teaching the production, properties, and applications of some bromine-containing flame retardants, including their environmental aspects, in secondary education. We provide information on the nature of flame retardants in general and the mechanisms of flame retardation. In addition, we offer a complete pedagogical presentation of the topic, including the use of video and some simple laboratory experiments, that was developed and successfully implemented in both countries.

    Featured on the Cover

  12. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  13. In vitro estrogenicity of polybrominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Nakari, Tarja; Pessala, Piia

    2005-09-10

    Estrogenicity of five brominated flame retardants (BFRs), namely BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-205, PBB-153 and technical Firemaster BP-6, were assessed by in vitro assays developed to detect chemicals with estrogenic properties. Recombinant yeast cells containing a human estrogen receptor gene failed to give any response to the chemicals tested. However, the positive control compound, estradiol-17beta, showed that the yeast cell assays had worked properly. The freshly separated fish hepatocyte assay based on the synthesis and secretion of vitellogenin from the isolated liver cells produced a clear dose-response curve in the presence of all tested flame retardants except Firemaster BP-6. The toxicity of the BFRs was detected by determining the cell ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD). The BFRs tested induced hepatic EROD activity at low test concentrations, but started to inhibit activity at higher concentrations. The decreased detoxification capacity of the hepatocytes resulted in a decrease in the vitellogenin production of the cells. The capability of in vitro assays to detect estrogenic properties of chemicals seems to vary. Thus, further work is needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for these reactions. PMID:16024102

  14. LGR4/GPR48 Inactivation Leads to Aniridia-Genitourinary Anomalies-Mental Retardation Syndrome Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Weng, Jinsheng; Siwko, Stefan; Luo, Jian; Li, Dali; Liu, Mingyao

    2014-01-01

    AGR syndrome (the clinical triad of aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation, a subgroup of WAGR syndrome for Wilm's tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) is a rare syndrome caused by a contiguous gene deletion in the 11p13–14 region. However, the mechanisms of WAGR syndrome pathogenesis are elusive. In this study we provide evidence that LGR4 (also named GPR48), the only G-protein-coupled receptor gene in the human chromosome 11p12–11p14.4 fragment, is the key gene responsible for the diseases of AGR syndrome. Deletion of Lgr4 in mouse led to aniridia, polycystic kidney disease, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation, similar to the pathological defects of AGR syndrome. Furthermore, Lgr4 inactivation significantly increased cell apoptosis and decreased the expression of multiple important genes involved in the development of WAGR syndrome related organs. Specifically, deletion of Lgr4 down-regulated the expression of histone demethylases Jmjd2a and Fbxl10 through cAMP-CREB signaling pathways both in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and in urinary and reproductive system mouse tissues. Our data suggest that Lgr4, which regulates eye, kidney, testis, ovary, and uterine organ development as well as mental development through genetic and epigenetic surveillance, is a novel candidate gene for the pathogenesis of AGR syndrome. PMID:24519938

  15. Inter-relationship among degree of mental retardation, living arrangements, and dental health in adults with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Gabre, P; Gahnberg, L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the inter-relationship among the degree of mental retardation, the way of living, and dental health in adults with mental retardation. One hundred and thirty-two adults between the ages of 21 and 40 years who were mentally retarded were examined on two occasions, one year apart. All subjects had had regular dental care for at least 10 years. The clinical examinations included bite-wing radiographs and were made by the same dentist. The degree of mental retardation was assessed by a professional psychologist. The results show that the degree of mental retardation as well as living arrangements are factors influencing the dental health of persons with mental retardation. Subjects who were mildly retarded had higher caries incidence and caries prevalence compared with subjects with moderate or severe mental retardation. From a preventive dental health perspective, special attention should be focused on subjects with mild mental retardation who are not living in institutions. PMID:9582703

  16. Mental Retardation. Fact Sheet = El Retraso Mental. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on mental retardation is written in both English and Spanish. It begins with a vignette of a 15-year-old boy with mental retardation. Mental retardation is briefly explained as are some causes of mental retardation. It notes that a diagnosis of mental retardation looks at two things: first, the ability of a person's brain to learn,…

  17. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  18. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  19. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB. PMID:23773890

  20. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  1. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Further Evidence for Cognitive Inertia of Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Norman R.; Dulaney, Cynthia L.

    1991-01-01

    Forty young adults with mental retardation (MR) were compared to 40 young adults without mental retardation in tests examining postpractice interference effects in naming colors of Stroop words. The study concluded that practice developed automatized reading suppression responses which held greater cognitive inertia for longer periods among MR…

  3. Labeling, Rehearsal, and Short-Term Memory in Retarded Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, John W.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A short-term memory task was used to explore the effects of verbal labeling and rehearsal on serial-position recall in mildly retarded 9-to 11-year-old children. Results support the view that verbal skills affect recall in mildly retarded children similarly to normal children. (Author/SDH)

  4. Classification of Residential Facilities for Mentally Retarded People. Brief #24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, B. K.; Lakin, K. C.

    This paper describes the development of a taxonomy of residential facilities for mentally retarded people based on program model, size, and operation. Data are presented on the use of the classification system in a national survey of 15,633 residential facilities for mentally retarded persons in the United States. Program models are defined…

  5. Burnout in Teachers of Retarded and Nonretarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Cynthia L.; Gargiulo, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    When teachers of moderately retarded, mildly retarded, and nonretarded students were asked to assess their own degree of burnout, special education teachers reported fewer and weaker feelings of inadequateness than did regular classroom teachers. Possible reasons for this finding and suggestions for stress reduction are given. (Authors/PP)

  6. Carbamazepine-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Ted; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study of 40 patients with mental retardation receiving carbamazepine found hyponatremia in only 5 percent of these patients and found a statistically, but not clinically, significant decrease in serum sodium levels in patients receiving anticonvulsant polytherapy. Results support the use of this drug with patients with mental retardation and…

  7. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Vapor Retarder Classification

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research in vapor retarders. Since 2006 the IRC has permitted Class III vapor retarders like latex paint (see list above) in all climate zones under certain conditions thanks to research by Building America teams.

  8. Perceptual-Motor Attributes of Mentally Retarded Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cratty, Bryant J.

    To evaluate six perceptual-motor attributes of trainable and educable mentally retarded children, a battery of tests was constructed which included body perception, gross agility, balance, locomotor ability, throwing, and tracking; 83 retarded subjects provided reliability data, and their scores, with those of 120 additional subjects, provided…

  9. 45 CFR 1308.10 - Eligibility criteria: Mental retardation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.10 Eligibility criteria: Mental retardation. (a) A... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Mental retardation. 1308.10... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH...

  10. Characteristics of the Conditional Reasoning of Educable Retardates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonak, Richard F.; Roberge, James J.

    1978-01-01

    Pictorial conditional reasoning test items which were varied according to principle of inference and type of content were administered to three groups of educably mentally retarded children. Results revealed that retardates' reasoning strategies were congruent with those reported for younger normals in previous studies. (Author/JKS)

  11. Mental Retardation. Selected Articles from the Rehabilitation Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Presented are six articles on residential living, vocational education, employment recreation, deinstitutionalization, and workshop experience of mentally retarded children and adults. K. Grunewald discusses the planning of housing for five- to eight person groups of retarded children and adults in varying kinds of residential facilities in Sweden…

  12. Behavioral Treatment of Aggression in the Mentally Retarded: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldstein, Jerome H.

    The paper reviews 34 behavioral treatment studies (1967-1983) examining reduction of aggressive behavior in mentally retarded people. Research reviewed was limited to treatment of physically aggressive responses such as hits, kicks, bites, chokes, scratches, and throwing objects by persons designated as mentally retarded. Among results reported…

  13. Nutrition and Mental Retardation. An Annotated Bibliography, 1964-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Ninfa Saturnino

    This annotated bibliography is primarily organized for nutritionists. It presents selected articles published from 1964 to the present. All aspects of nutrition in mental retardation are covered excepting inborn errors of metabolism. Sections are included on: (1) nutrition, birthweight, and mental retardation; (2) nutrition, growth, and mental…

  14. Arizona's Comprehensive Plan to Help the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Health, Phoenix. Mental Retardation Section.

    To help combat mental retardation, 136 recommendations are made for the following: establishment by statute of a division of mental retardation, an advisory council, and a coordinating council of agencies; changes in laws governing the Arizona Children's Colony, additional public school legislation, and a study of civil and criminal law; immediate…

  15. Recreation for the Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Ward Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Designed primarily for use by ward personnel in residential facilities for the mentally retarded, the manual presents an overview of recreational services. Four papers introduce the importance of recreation and consider approaches for its provision: "Why Recreation?" (W. Lawler); "The Role of the Attendant in Providing Recreation for the Retarded"…

  16. Association between the Diagnosis of Mental Retardation and Socioeconomic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slone, Michelle; Durrheim, Kevin; Lachman, Peter; Kaminer, Debra

    1998-01-01

    An examination of clinical data from the regional hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, over four years for 538 children with a diagnosis of mental retardation found mild mental retardation referrals were underrepresented in low socioeconomic areas and that paramedical agencies were the primary referral source in these areas. (Author/CR)

  17. Development of the Fear Survey for Adults with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Sylvia Z.; Lukenbill, James F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the fear survey for adults with mental retardation (FSAMR) and provides initial evidence of its psychometric properties. The FSAMR was designed to be sensitive to the assessment needs of individuals with mental retardation. The items were developed through open-ended interviews, a review of existing…

  18. COGNITIVE TRAINING WITH RETARDED CHILDREN, I. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CORTER, HAROLD M.; MCKINNEY, JAMES D.

    THE MAJOR PURPOSE OF THIS RESEARCH WAS TO DETERMINE WHETHER TRAINING IN SPECIFIC COGNITIVE PROCESSES IS EFFECTIVE IN INCREASING THE COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING OF RETARDED CHILDREN. IN PHASE I OF THE PROJECT, 51 EDUCABLE RETARDED AND 18 NORMAL SUBJECTS RECEIVED A 20-DAY PROGRAM IN SIMILARITIES-DIFFERENCES CONCEPT FORMATION AND WERE COMPARED WITH 42…

  19. Flame retardant antibacterial cotton high-loft nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardant treated gray cotton fibers were blended with antibacterial treated gray cotton fibers and polyester/polyester sheath/core bicomponent fibers to form high-loft fabrics. The high flame retardancy (FR) and antibacterial property of these high lofts were evaluated by limiting oxygen inde...

  20. Adaptive Behavior Malingering in Legal Claims of Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlubek, Renee Marie

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to put people with mental retardation to death for capital crimes ("Atkins v. Virginia," 2002). Justice Scalia dissented, suggesting that mental retardation is a condition easy to feign. The current study examined whether participants provided with the definition of mental…

  1. Qualitative Differences in the Structure of Intelligence of Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sheryl L.; Cleaves, Wallace T.

    To examine whether or not retarded individuals have the same structure of intelligence as normal IQ individuals, test scores from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), Reitan's Trail Making Test (TMT), and Beery's Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration (VMI) for both a mildly retarded and normal IQ population of…

  2. Eyewitness Memory and Suggestibility in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared how well 31 children (ages 11-12) with mental retardation, 19 age-matched (CA) children, and 21 mental-age (MA) matched children were able to recall a staged event one day later. Children with mental retardation were more suggestible in response to closed misleading questions than were CA children. (Contains references.)…

  3. Family Problem-Solving with Children Who Have Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Frank J; Harter, Kristina S. M.; Costigan, Catherine L.

    2004-01-01

    Problem-solving discussions were observed within families of children with mental retardation and multiple comparison groups (total N = 162 families). As expected, parents were more persistent and directive with their children who had mental retardation, but they also avoided negative exchanges with these children. These patterns did not spillover…

  4. Psychopharmacology and Mental Retardation: A 10 Year Review (1990- 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Mayville, Erik A.; Pinkston, Jim; Bielecki, Joanne; Kuhn, David; Smalls, Yemonja; Logan, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of the literature on psychopharmacology and mental retardation from 1990-1999 found most studies had major methodological flaws. Also, most drug administrations were not based in science, were not evaluated appropriately, and generally did not follow best practices for treatment of persons with mental retardation. A table lists the studies…

  5. Cone calorimeter evaluation of two flame retardant cotton fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unbleached (grey) cotton needle punched nonwoven (NW) fabrics with 12.5% polypropylene scrim were treated with two phosphate-nitrogen based fire-retardant (FR) formulations, SRRC-1 and SRRC-2. The SRRC-1 formulation contains diammonium phosphate as the flame retardant chemical along with urea and d...

  6. Newborn Screening To Prevent Mental Retardation. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This information fact sheet on screening newborns to prevent mental retardation defines newborn screening and outlines how screening is performed. It discusses the six most common disorders resulting in mental retardation for which states most commonly screen. These include phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, galactosemia, maple syrup…

  7. Serial Memory Span Thresholds of Normal and Mentally Retarded Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1974-01-01

    Educable mental retardates and normal grade school students were presented seven classes of materials in both visual and auditory modalities for the determination of immediate memory span thresholds. Major conclusions included auditory presentation produces higher thresholds than visual, and retarded children may employ different processing…

  8. Programs for Preventing the Causes of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliphant, Peter S.; And Others

    This monograph, which reports findings from the New Jersey Governor's Council on the Prevention of Mental Retardation, discusses the scope of mental retardation (MR), its causes, identification of people at risk, and prevention methods. The Council cites several cost-effective prevention programs, such as vaccination programs and prenatal care…

  9. Implicit Learning in Children and Adolescents with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinter, Annie; Detable, Christelle

    2003-01-01

    A study compared the implicit learning of 58 children (ages 7-14) with mental retardation and 53 controls (ages 3-8). Individuals with mental retardation modified their behavior after an implicit training procedure similar to the controls. The effect of implicit learning did not vary as a function of IQ or age. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. Flame retardant properties of triazine phosphonates derivative with cotton fabric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flame retardant behavior of a cotton fabric treated with phosphorus-nitrogen containing triazine compound was evaluated. It was found that cyanuric chloride (2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine) is an excellent starting material for the preparation of phosphonates flame retardants that interacts wel...

  11. CEC Selected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention: Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    The following articles on mental retardation are provided: translating research findings into classroom activity; camping programs; a measurement device for educable mentally retarded adolescents on their self-concept as a worker; an investigation of the Doman-Delacato Theory in a trainable program in the public schools; and problems of sex…

  12. Pre-Professional Training in Mental Retardation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Irving C., Jr.

    To interest students in mental retardation health services careers, 10 eligible prebaccalaureate students were selected to participate in a 10-week summer training program. The first 2 weeks involved orientation to informational and training aspects of mental retardation and exposure to the health services related disciplines of recreational and…

  13. Communication Problems in Mental Retardation: Diagnosis and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillywhite, Herold S.; Bradley, Doris P.

    Discussed are the problems of communication in mental retardation with an introductory background and definition of this problem, including the etiological factors and general characteristics. A presentation of diagnostic methods leads into discussions of the problem of medical-dental management and educational management of the retarded child.…

  14. Novel phosphonates triazine derivative as economic flame retardant for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorous-containing flame retardants are widely used in standard and engineering plastics, polyurethane foams, thermosets, coatings, and textiles. Organophosphorous flame retardants have been known to be more effective when used in conjunction with nitrogen-containing systems. Their mixture produ...

  15. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  16. Defining Mental Retardation: A Matter of Life or Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichten, William; Simon, Elliot W.

    2007-01-01

    Because persons with mental retardation cannot be executed for murder, the diagnosis becomes a life and death matter. The American Association on Mental Retardation (now the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities) and other associations agree that IQ alone is an insufficient criterion and adaptive functioning also…

  17. 45 CFR 1308.10 - Eligibility criteria: Mental retardation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.10 Eligibility criteria: Mental retardation. (a) A child is classified as mentally retarded who exhibits significantly sub-average intellectual functioning and exhibits deficits in adaptive behavior which adversely affect learning. Adaptive behavior...

  18. PUBLIC PROVISION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED IN THE UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEST, HARRY

    WRITTEN FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE SOCIOLOGIST OR SOCIAL SCIENTIST, THIS BOOK REPORTS DATA OBTAINED FROM STATISTICAL RESEARCH ON MENTAL RETARDATES. ITS CHIEF PURPOSE IS THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED AND PROVISIONS MADE FOR THEM IN THE UNITED STATES. DISCUSSION OF THE GENERAL CONDITION COVERS DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION, ETIOLOGY,…

  19. Estate Planning for Retarded Persons and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruge, Don L.; Green, Karen O.

    Intended for parents and legal guardians of mentally retarded persons, the manual provides guidelines for estate planning. An overview of definitions, causes, and prevalence factors in retardation is followed by reviews of the major financial assistance governmental programs such as Medicare, and Supplemental Security Income, and of legal…

  20. Ocular findings among mentally retarded children in Finland.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, K

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of refractive errors, astigmatism, anisometropia, visual acuity and organic ophthalmic diseases were determined among 149 Finnish mentally retarded (IQ less than 70) children, aged 9-10 years. The case group was classified in 3 categories according to the degree of mental retardation. The control group (n = 100) was selected by random sampling. PMID:6637425

  1. Defining Mental Retardation and Ensuring Access to the General Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of trends in the American Association on Mental Retardation's definition of mental retardation notes a shift toward a support paradigm and a definition stressing the interaction between a person's independent functioning and the various contexts of the person's life. The current definition is seen to promote greater access to the…

  2. School Behavior Problems of Mentally Retarded and Normal Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Douglas; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Female elementary, middle, and high school students (N=146) identified as educable mentally retarded were rated on the Quay-Peterson Behavior Problem Checklist by their teachers. Normal females were also rated for comparison. Analyses indicated that mentally retarded females exceeded normal females on the Conduct Disorder, Personality Problem, and…

  3. Theories on Criminality and Mental Retardation Project CAMIO, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jimmy R.; Friel, Charles M.

    This historical review of theories on criminality and mental retardation is part of Project CAMIO (Correctional Administration and the Mentally Incompetent Offender), a Texas study to determine the incidence of criminal incarceration of the mentally retarded (MR) and to identify laws, procedures, and practices which affect the prosecution and…

  4. 38 CFR 4.127 - Mental retardation and personality disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... personality disorders. 4.127 Section 4.127 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and personality disorders. Mental retardation and personality disorders are not diseases or injuries... superimposed upon mental retardation or a personality disorder may be service-connected. (Authority: 38...

  5. 38 CFR 4.127 - Mental retardation and personality disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... personality disorders. 4.127 Section 4.127 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and personality disorders. Mental retardation and personality disorders are not diseases or injuries... superimposed upon mental retardation or a personality disorder may be service-connected. (Authority: 38...

  6. 38 CFR 4.127 - Mental retardation and personality disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... personality disorders. 4.127 Section 4.127 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and personality disorders. Mental retardation and personality disorders are not diseases or injuries... superimposed upon mental retardation or a personality disorder may be service-connected. (Authority: 38...

  7. 38 CFR 4.127 - Mental retardation and personality disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... personality disorders. 4.127 Section 4.127 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and personality disorders. Mental retardation and personality disorders are not diseases or injuries... superimposed upon mental retardation or a personality disorder may be service-connected. (Authority: 38...

  8. 38 CFR 4.127 - Mental retardation and personality disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... personality disorders. 4.127 Section 4.127 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and personality disorders. Mental retardation and personality disorders are not diseases or injuries... superimposed upon mental retardation or a personality disorder may be service-connected. (Authority: 38...

  9. Muscle Fatigue during Intermittent Exercise in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafeiridis, Andreas; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Dipla, Konstantina; Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Karra, Chrisanthi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2010-01-01

    This study examined fatigue profile during intermittent exercise in 10 men with mild to moderate mental retardation (MR) and 10 men without mental retardation (C). They performed 4 x 30 s maximal knee extensions and flexions with 1-min rest on an isokinetic dynamometer. Peak torque of flexors (PTFL) and extensors (PTEX), total work (TW), and…

  10. TERMINOLOGY AND CONCEPTS IN APPRAISING THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LORGE, IRVING; AND OTHERS

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO MINIMIZE THE VARIABILITY IN LEGAL AND EDUCATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW WAS MADE OF THE SEMANTIC VARIATIONS IN THE DEFINITION OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED IN TERMS OF FUNCTIONAL ADEQUACY FOR EDUCATION, TRAINING, OR CUSTODIAL CARE. THE METHOD INVOLVED THE REVIEW OF STATUTES AND…

  11. A Practical Guide for Teaching the Mentally Retarded to Swim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    A guide for teaching the retarded to swim begins with a general discussion of retardation, the need for individualization, and staff qualifications. Factors discussed in program organization and administration include community agencies, staff training, examples of records and forms, and first aid procedures. Suggested methods consider perceptual…

  12. Physical Trauma as an Etiological Agent in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, Carol R., Ed.; Bering, Edgar A., Jr., Ed.

    The conference on Physical Trauma as a Cause of Mental Retardation dealt with two major areas of etiological concern - postnatal and perinatal trauma. Following two introductory statements on the problem of and issues related to mental retardation (MR) after early trauma to the brain, five papers on the epidemiology of head trauma cover…

  13. Glycyl-histidyl-lysine (GHK) is a quencher of alpha,beta-4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal: a comparison with carnosine. insights into the mechanism of reaction by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and computational techniques.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Giangiacomo; Artali, Roberto; Regazzoni, Luca; Panigati, Monica; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2007-09-01

    Histidine-containing oligopeptides are currently studied as detoxifying agents against cytotoxic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes (prototype: 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, HNE), electrophilic end products formed by decomposition of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, associated with severe pathologies such as diabetes, nephropathy, retinopathy, and neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluated the quenching reaction against HNE of the endogenous tripeptide l-glycyl- l-histidyl- l-lysine (GHK), an oligopeptide discovered to be a growth-modulating factor and also a strong activator of wound healing. We first evaluated the HNE consumption (50 microM, HPLC-UVDAD method) in the presence of GHK (1 mM) in physiomimetic conditions (phosphate buffer, pH 7.4) and confirmed GHK/HNE adduct formation by mass spectrometric analysis (ESI-MS/MS) and (1)H NMR analyses. These results indicated that GHK was an effective quencher of HNE, although significantly less potent than the reference compound carnosine, and that HNE modulation by GHK can contribute to the satisfactory outcome of the wound-healing process. In the second part of the study, we investigated the quenching reaction between GHK and HNE, in parallel to carnosine, using (1)H NMR and computational analyses. At a mechanistic level, this explained the different reactivity of the two peptides: (i) The greater stability of the macrocyclic intermediate HNE/carnosine was compared to HNE/GHK. (ii) GHK in solution has a quasi-folded conformation due to the interaction of four intramolecular hydrogen bonds, three of which need to be broken for the transition state to form (energy barrier, approximately 20 kcal/mol). By contrast, carnosine, with an extended conformation and only one hydrogen bond, requires less energy to reach the transition state ( approximately 7 kcal/mol). (iii) The different stereoelectronic features of the transition state lead to the intramolecular Michael reaction, that is, the favorable superimposition of

  14. Cytogenetic Findings in Mentally Retarded Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, F; Mahjoubi, F; Manouchehry, F; Razazian, F; Mortezapour, F; Rahnama, M

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a cytogenetic study on 865 individuals with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) who were admitted to the Cytogenetics Department of the Iran Blood Transfusion Organisation (IBTO) Research Centre, Tehran, Iran; these were performed on blood samples using conventional staining methods. Chromosome anomalies were identified in 205 of the patients (23.6%). The majority were Down’s syndrome cases (n = 138). In 33 males, a positive fragile X anomaly was found. The remainder (n = 34) had other chromosomal abnormalities including structural chromosome aberrations (n = 23), marker chromosomes with an unknown origin (n = 3), sex chromosome aneuploidy (n = 6) and trisomy 18 (n = 2). The contribution of chromosome aberrations to the cause of MR in this group of patients is discussed. PMID:24052729

  15. A mentally retarded patient with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most incapacitating forms of mental disorder that runs a chronic and relapsing course. It typically starts in adolescence or early adulthood and can be life-long. It is more common in people with learning disabilities than in the general population. Its prodromal features include depression, anxiety, suspiciousness, social isolation and bizarre behaviour. It may result in significant functional, social and economic impairments. The care of patients with schizophrenia places a considerable burden on all carers including patient's family, health and social services. Treatment includes pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions. In this case report we describe a thirteen-year-old patient with schizophrenia who has a background history of mental retardation. PMID:25606140

  16. Environmental monitoring of brominated flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary C.; Kubeldis, Nathan; Nelatury, Charles F.

    2011-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic organobromide compounds which inhibit ignition and combustion processes. Because of their immense ability to retard fire and save life and property, they have been extensively used in many products such as TVs, computers, foam, plastics etc. The five major classes of BFRs are tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromodiphenyl ether, octabromodiphenyl ether, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The last three are also commonly called PBDEs. BDE-85 and BDE-209 are the two prominent congeners of PBDEs and this study reports the adverse effects of these congeners in rodents. Exposure of rat sciatic nerves to 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 respectively lead to significant, concentration dependent reduction in nerve conduction function. Glucose absorption in the rat intestinal segments exposed to 5 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 was significantly reduced for both the compounds tested. Lastly, mice when exposed to 0.25 mg/kg body weight for four days showed a disruption in oxidant and antioxidant equilibrium. The tissues namely liver and brain have shown increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides indicating oxidative stress. Moreover, all the protective enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and glutathione S transferase (GST) have shown tissue specific alterations indicating the induction of damaging oxidative stress and setting in of lipid peroxidation in exposed animals. The results indicate monitoring of PBDEs in the environment is essential because levels as low as 5 μg/mL and 0.25 mg/kg body weight were able to cause damage to the functions of rodents.

  17. Optimization of retardance for a complete Stokes polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatke, D.S.; Descour, M.R.; Dereniak, E.L.; Sweatt, W.C.; Kemme, S.A.; Phipps, G.S.

    2000-01-13

    The authors present two figures of merit based on singular value decomposition which can be used to assess the noise immunity of a complete Stokes polarimeter. These are used to optimize a polarimeter consisting of a rotatable retarder and fixed polarizer. A retardance of 132{degree} (approximately three eights wave) and retarder orientation angles of {+-}51.7{degree} and {+-}15.1{degree} are found to be optimal when four measurements are used. Use of this retardance affords a factor of 1.5 improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over systems employing a quarter wave plate. A geometric means of visualizing the optimization process is discussed, and the advantages of the use of additional measurements are investigated. No advantage of using retarder orientation angles spaced uniformly through 360{degree} is found over repeated measurements made at the four angles given previously.

  18. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Asticio; Mar Sánchez-López, María del; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  19. The Effects of a Retarded Child's Social Initiations on the Behavior of Severely Retarded School-Aged Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Mary Margaret; Young, Clifford C.

    1979-01-01

    To increase the social responsiveness of two severely retarded and withdrawn children (six and ten years old), a five-year-old mildly retarded peer was trained to emit social approach behaviors using a procedure in which edible reinforcement was delivered by the trained peer contingent upon positive social response by the target subjects.…

  20. Residential Programming for Mentally Retarded Persons. Volume I, Prevailing Attitudes and Practices in the Field of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Retarded Children, Arlington, TX. South Central Regional Office.

    The first of a series of four booklets on residential programing for the mentally retarded reviews for parents the prevailing definitions, attitudes and practices in the field. Mental retardation is defined as subaverage functioning which originates during the developmental period and is associated with impairment in adaptive behavior. The need…

  1. Effects of Dietary L-carnosine and Alpha-lipoic Acid on Growth Performance, Blood Thyroid Hormones and Lipid Profiles in Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yinghui; Gao, Chunqi; Hao, Wenbo; Ji, Cheng; Zhao, Lihong; Zhang, Jianyun; Liu, Tao; Ma, Qiugang

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of L-carnosine (LC) and/or alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) supplementation on growth performance, blood thyroid hormones and lipid profiles in finishing pigs. A total of 40 (Landrace×Yorkshire) pigs with an initial body weight of 57.93±3.14 kg were randomly allocated to 4 experimental diets using a 2×2 factorial arrangement with 2 LC supplemental levels (0 or 0.1%) and 2 ALA supplemental levels (0 or 0.03%) in basal diets. The results showed that pigs fed LC-supplemented diets increased final live weight, average daily gain, and average daily feed intake compared to those of pigs fed without LC-supplemented diets (p<0.05). Dietary supplementation with ALA did not affect the growth performance and carcass traits of pigs (p>0.05). Additionally, LC supplementation increased serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine levels, and ALA supplementation increased serum triiodothyronine levels (p<0.05). Serum total cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly decreased in LC and ALA supplemented groups, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower in the ALA-supplemented groups than those of pigs fed without ALA-supplemented diets (p<0.05). However, no significant LC×ALA interaction effect on growth performance, blood thyroid hormones and lipid profiles was found. This study suggested that dietary supplementation of LC resulted in better growth performance compared to that of ALA supplementation. L-carnosine and/or ALA supplementation positively modified blood lipid profiles, which may have the potential to prevent cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26194221

  2. Evidence for an essential role of intradimer interaction in catalytic function of carnosine dipeptidase II using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Nobuaki; Tamura, Jun; Takao, Toshifumi

    2016-02-01

    Carnosine dipeptidase II (CN2/CNDP2) is an M20 family metallopeptidase that hydrolyses various dipeptides including β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine). Crystallographic analysis showed that CN2 monomer is composed of one catalytic and one dimerization domains, and likely to form homodimer. In this crystal, H228 residue of the dimerization domain interacts with the substrate analogue bestatin on the active site of the dimer counterpart, indicating that H228 is involved in enzymatic reaction. In the present study, the role of intradimer interaction of CN2 in its catalytic activity was investigated using electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS). First, a dimer interface mutant I319K was prepared and shown to be present as a folded monomer in solution as examined by using ESI-TOF MS. Since the mutant was inactive, it was suggested that dimer formation is essential to its enzymatic activity. Next, we prepared H228A and D132A mutant proteins with different N-terminal extended sequences, which enabled us to monitor dimer exchange reaction by ESI-TOF MS. The D132A mutant is a metal ligand mutant and also inactive. But the activity was partially recovered time-dependently when H228A and D132A mutant proteins were incubated together. In parallel, H228A/D132A heterodimer was formed as detected by ESI-TOF MS, indicating that interaction of a catalytic center with H228 residue of the other subunit is essential to the enzymatic reaction. These results provide evidence showing that intradimer interaction of H228 with the reaction center of the dimer counterpart is essential to the enzymatic activity of CN2. PMID:26549037

  3. The effect of production system and age on levels of iron, taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine in beef muscles and liver.

    PubMed

    Purchas, R W; Busboom, J R

    2005-08-01

    Samples of longissimus (LL) and triceps brachii (TB) muscles from Angus-cross heifers finished either on a high-concentrate ration in Washington, USA, (US cattle, n=15) or on pasture in New Zealand (NZ cattle, n=16) were assessed for composition characteristics. Half of the NZ cattle were of a similar age to the US cattle (NZAge) and half were of a similar weight (NZWt). Iron concentration was higher in TB (20.9 vs. 17.5μgg(-1); P<0.001) and was higher for the NZWt group than the NZAge group or the US cattle. The proportion of iron as haem iron was highest for the NZWt group (87.3%; P<0.01), but the proportion as soluble haem iron was highest for the US cattle. For a sub-group of 10 pasture-finished cattle, iron levels in cheek muscle were higher than for LL or TB, and liver levels were 66% higher than cheek muscle. The proportion of haem iron, however, was lowest in liver (55.3%) and was lower in cheek muscle (78.4%) than LL or TB. Relative to LL, TB had higher levels of taurine and coenzyme Q(10), but lower levels of carnosine, creatine and creatinine, as expected for a muscle with a more aerobic metabolism. These differences were magnified for the even more aerobic cheek muscle. Differences between the two NZ groups were small, but muscles from the US cattle contained less taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatinine. Reasons for these differences in various meat components for similar cattle from different production systems are not clear. PMID:22063884

  4. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure.

    PubMed

    Keller, Alexander S; Raju, Nikhilesh P; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-02-11

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  5. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  6. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  7. Cellophane film as half wave retarder of wide spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, M.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Sánchez-Villicaña, V.

    2001-08-01

    In this work, we introduce the use of a cellophane film as a half wave retarder plate of wide spectrum. Using a commercial arc lamp as a light source, we have characterized a cellophane film as half wave plate retarder in the spectral range from λ=400 to 700 nm. In addition, we made similar characterizations for several commercial laser emission lines. Although this film behaves as other commercial half wave plate retarder devices, it has the advantages of a low cost and an easy availability.

  8. Flame retardant cotton fabrics treated with organophosphorus polymer.

    PubMed

    Abou-Okeil, A; El-Sawy, S M; Abdel-Mohdy, F A

    2013-02-15

    Organo-phosphorus compounds was prepared and applied onto cotton fabrics as flame retarding agent. methacryloloxyethylorthophoshor tetraethyl diamidate (MPD) was prepared and its structure was confirmed by IR, NMR and mass spectroscopy. Pyrovatex as commercial flame retardant was used for comparative study. Impregnation method was used as coating for the application of the organophosphorus compounds to cotton fabrics. The major factors affecting the reaction were studied. The results show that the prepared organophosphorus compound can be successfully used as flame retardant for cotton fabrics. PMID:23399290

  9. PERSONALITY PATTERN OF PARENTS OF MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN1

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY Parents of fifty mentally retarded children were studied for their personality pattern with the help of Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. In fathers and mothers separately, none of the personality traits were observed to vary at statistically significant level in relation to the degree of retardation in their child, but both the parents of mildly retarded children obtained higher score on scale of anxiety, phobia and depression. Analysis of different factors when compared for fathers and mothers together, revealed a higher degree of neurotic traits in mothers. PMID:21965955

  10. Impaired motor timing control in specific reading retardation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, P H; Cohen, C; Drake, C

    1984-01-01

    The temporal organizations of unimanual and coordinated bimanual finger tapping was compared between adolescent normal and retarded readers of above average intelligence. The same subjects were examined for speech articulation during the timed repetition of single syllables and syllable sequences. Retarded readers had substantially greater difficulty on tasks of interlimb coordination than on unimanual tapping and substantially greater difficulty rapidly sequencing syllable strings than repeating single syllables. An experimental manipulation of movement speed for both tasks indicated that the threshold at which movement speed degrades timing precision for coordinated action best characterizes the motor impairment of retarded readers. PMID:6504299

  11. Separation of N-derivatized di- and tri-peptide stereoisomers by micro-liquid chromatography using a quinidine-based monolithic column - Analysis of l-carnosine in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiqin; Sánchez-López, Elena; Han, Hai; Wu, Huihui; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Marina, Maria Luisa; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a new analytical methodology was developed enabling the enantiomeric determination of N-derivatized di- and tri-peptides in dietary supplements using chiral micro-LC on a monolithic column consisting of poly(O-9-[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethylcarbamoyl]-10,11-dihydroquinidine-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(MQD-co-HEMA-co-EDMA)). After optimization of the mobile phase conditions, a baseline resolution of the stereoisomers of 24 out of 53 N-derivatized di- and tri-peptides was obtained. 3,5-Dinitrobenzoyl- and 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl-peptide stereoisomers were separated with exceptionally high selectivity and resolution. The monolithic column was then applied to the quantitative analysis of l-carnosine and its enantiomeric impurity in three different commercial dietary supplements. Method validation demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy and limits of detection and quantification. The determined amounts of l-carnosine in commercial formulations were in agreement with the labeled content for all analyzed samples, and the enantiomeric impurity was found to be below the limit of detection (LOD), showing the potential of the poly(MQD-co-HEMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column as a reliable tool for the quality control of l-carnosine in dietary supplements by micro-LC. PMID:26410182

  12. Stokes polarimetry using analysis of the nonlinear voltage-retardance relationship for liquid-crystal variable retarders

    SciTech Connect

    López-Téllez, J. M. Bruce, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    We present a method for using liquid-crystal variable retarders (LCVR’s) with continually varying voltage to measure the Stokes vector of a light beam. The LCVR's are usually employed with fixed retardance values due to the nonlinear voltage-retardance behavior that they show. The nonlinear voltage-retardance relationship is first measured and then a linear fit of the known retardance terms to the detected signal is performed. We use known waveplates (half-wave and quarter-wave) as devices to provide controlled polarization states to the Stokes polarimeter and we use the measured Stokes parameters as functions of the orientation of the axes of the waveplates as an indication of the quality of the polarimeter. Results are compared to a Fourier analysis method that does not take into account the nonlinear voltage-retardance relationship and also to a Fourier analysis method that uses experimental voltage values to give a linear retardance function with time. Also, we present results of simulations for comparison.

  13. [Intrauterine growth retardation and adult outcome].

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre

    2011-03-01

    The epidemiologist David Barker was among the first to develop the concept that some adult diseases might have their origins during fetal life, based notably on a strong association between low birth weight and the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood (coronary artery disease, hypertension and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis). Several other groups replicated these results in other populations, thus confirming that birth weight is a determining factor of adult health. Intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR) has been widely used as a marker of poor fetal nutrition and health, but some antenatal nutritional disturbances can increase the risk of diseases later in life without affecting fetal growth. The risk of diseases in adulthood appears to be further increased when IUGR is associated with rapid postnatal catch-up growth. This suggests that fetal malnutrition induces adaptations necessary for fetal survival and health, but that it also undermines future health if the postnatal environment is unfavorable. The fetal origins of adult diseases has major public health implications and calls for reinforced pre- and post-natal prevention strategies. PMID:22292298

  14. Oral rehabilitation and management of mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Jitender; Khetan, Jitendra; Gupta, Sarika; Tomar, Deepak; Singh, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    High level of periodontal problems of dental caries are frequently observed in mentally handicapped children. This group of patients presents various problems when they face dental treatments. Identification of such population and providing them affordable oral health care is the new concept. A systematic method for identification and screening of persons with mental retardation has been developed and is being followed. Cost and fear are the most commonly cited barriers to dental care. Physical or mental may lead to deterioration in self-care, and oral care state have a low priority. Risk factors are inter-related and are often barriers to oral health. With advancements in today's world sufficient information and support is available for each and every individual to lead a healthy life which include the access to the oral health care. Factors such as fear, anxiety and dental phobia plays a vital role in acceptance of dental care and also the delaying of dental care. Lack of knowledge of oral and dental disease, awareness or oral need, oral side-effects of medication and organization of dental services are highlighted in the literature. All health personnel should receive training to support the concept of primary oral health care. Training about dealing with such mentally handicapped people should be addressed urgently among the health professionals. PMID:25738098

  15. Psychomotor Retardation in Elderly Untreated Depressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beheydt, Lieve Lia; Schrijvers, Didier; Docx, Lise; Bouckaert, Filip; Hulstijn, Wouter; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychomotor retardation (PR) is one of the core features in depression according to DSM V (1), but also aging in itself causes cognitive and psychomotor slowing. This is the first study investigating PR in relation to cognitive functioning and to the concomitant effect of depression and aging in a geriatric population ruling out contending effects of psychotropic medication. Methods: A group of 28 non-demented depressed elderly is compared to a matched control group of 20 healthy elderly. All participants underwent a test battery containing clinical depression measures, cognitive measures of processing speed, executive function and memory, clinical ratings of PR, and objective computerized fine motor skill-tests. Statistical analysis consisted of a General Linear Method multivariate analysis of variance to compare the clinical, cognitive, and psychomotor outcomes of the two groups. Results: Patients performed worse on all clinical, cognitive, and PR measures. Both groups showed an effect of cognitive load on fine motor function but the influence was significantly larger for patients than for healthy elderly except for the initiation time. Limitations: Due to the restrictive inclusion criteria, only a relatively limited sample size could be obtained. Conclusion: With a medication free sample, an additive effect of depression and aging on cognition and PR in geriatric patients was found. As this effect was independent of demand of effort (by varying the cognitive load), it was apparently not a motivational slowing effect of depression. PMID:25674065

  16. The Needs Of The Retarded Adult

    PubMed Central

    Armour, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    This article deals primarily with the needs of people with a degree of mental retardation, from mild to moderately severe, who are able to live approximately normal lives with assistance by counselling, advice and family help. It has been found that they do much better living in the community, mixing with normal people, but also with access to the company of persons similarly affected. With adequate advice and counselling, they can become self-sustaining in a number of ways, such as self care, living in their own homes or in small groups, and working either in sheltered employment or in the labor force. Their needs, like those of all others, range from the material such as shelter, food, clothing, possessions, transportation, health care, through the pyschological such as self fulfillment, recreation and enjoyment, love, affection and sex, and social such as legal protection and responsibility. With appropriate arrangements, these needs can be better met in community living, probably at less cost than if they were living in the traditional large institutions. Continued training and rehabilitative measures can often improve their abilities to an astonishing degree. They are rarely unteachable. PMID:21297812

  17. Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke

    2014-12-01

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group. PMID:24745557

  18. Oral Rehabilitation and Management of Mentally Retarded

    PubMed Central

    Khetan, Jitendra; Gupta, Sarika; Tomar, Deepak; Singh, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    High level of periodontal problems of dental caries are frequently observed in mentally handicapped children. This group of patients presents various problems when they face dental treatments. Identification of such population and providing them affordable oral health care is the new concept. A systematic method for identification and screening of persons with mental retardation has been developed and is being followed. Cost and fear are the most commonly cited barriers to dental care. Physical or mental may lead to deterioration in self-care, and oral care state have a low priority. Risk factors are inter-related and are often barriers to oral health. With advancements in today’s world sufficient information and support is available for each and every individual to lead a healthy life which include the access to the oral health care. Factors such as fear, anxiety and dental phobia plays a vital role in acceptance of dental care and also the delaying of dental care. Lack of knowledge of oral and dental disease, awareness or oral need, oral side-effects of medication and organization of dental services are highlighted in the literature. All health personnel should receive training to support the concept of primary oral health care. Training about dealing with such mentally handicapped people should be addressed urgently among the health professionals. PMID:25738098

  19. Radionuclide transport and retardation in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.N.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; DeVilliers, S.J.; Erdal, B.R.; Lawrence, F.O.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1980-12-31

    Batch measurements provide an understanding of which experimental variables are important. For example, sorption ratios vary little with particle size (and surface area); however, groundwater composition and rock composition are quite important. A general correlation has been identified between mineralogy (major phases) and degree of sorption for strontium, cesium, and barium. Although these are approximate, a more detailed analysis may be possible as more samples are studied and the data base increased. Data from crushed tuff columns indicate that, except in simple cases where sorption coefficients are relatively low, and ion-exchange equilibria not only exist but are the dominant mechanism for removal of radioisotopes from solution, the simple relation between the sorption ratio R/sub d/ (or K/sub d/) and the relative velocity of radionuclides with respect to groundwater velocity may be insufficient to permit accurate modeling of the retardation of radionuclides. Additional work on whole core columns and larger blocks of intact material is required to better understand radionuclide sorption and transport through rock.

  20. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  1. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  2. Activational Peaking in Educable and Trainable Mentally Retarded Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargiulo, Richard M.; Uno, Tad

    1977-01-01

    A study involving 10 educable and 10 trainable mentally retarded adolescents indicated that levels of intellectual functioning influenced patterns of autonomic activation as measured by magnitude of the galvanic skin response. (CL)

  3. Horticultural Careers for Persons with Mental Retardation. Expanding Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehart-Bennett, Mary E.; Relf, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Horticulture careers provide therapeutic, rewarding employment for persons with mental retardation. Rehabilitation experts should become aware of the potential employment opportunities in horticulture so that individuals with disabilities can receive the training and job placement support they need. (Author)

  4. Fire Safety Training with Adults Who Are Profoundly Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Rosamond; Roll, David

    1985-01-01

    An intensive fire safety training program for profoundly mentally retarded institutionalized persons resulted in a significant decrease in mean evacuation time and gradual substitution of verbal for physical prompts. (CL)

  5. EFFECT OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased use of organophosphorus compounds as alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has led to widespread human exposure, There is, however, limited information on their potential health effects. This study compared the effects of nii ne organophosphorus flame...

  6. Hierarchical Semantic Organization in Educable Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Nila N.; Johnson, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the extent to which educable mentally retarded (EMR) children make functional use of a hierarchical class inclusion system in a memory retrieval task that does not have experimenter-imposed input organization. (MP)

  7. Adaptive and intellectual functioning in autistic and nonautistic retarded children.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, S; Morgan, S B

    1996-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between adaptive functioning on the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale (VABS) and intellectual functioning on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (SB-IV) in autistic children and nonautistic retarded children of comparable CA and SB-IV composite score (IQ). The autistic group had lower scores than the retarded group in VABS adaptive composite, Socialization domain, and Communication domain, and SB-IV Verbal Reasoning area. VABS domain scores yielded higher classification rates than the SB-IV area scores in discriminating the two groups. Correlations between the two measures were much higher for the autistic group than for the retarded group. Results support the conclusion that the cognitive impairment in autism is reflected in greater impairment in adaptive behaviors than in mental retardation without autism. PMID:8986847

  8. Spectral characterization and tuning with liquid-crystal retarders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-López, María. del Mar; Moreno, Ignacio; Vargas, Asticio; García-Martínez, Pascuala

    2015-09-01

    An accurate characterization of the retardance function of liquid-crystal retarders (LCR) is essential for a proper use of instruments that include these devices. In this paper a simple technique to characterize the retardance of a LCR, both as a function of wavelength and applied voltage, is presented. With the proposed analysis we can describe the spectral modulation properties of the device using few parameters. The method is then extended to the case of non-normal incidence, thus allowing to distinguish between the extraordinary and ordinary axes. The accounting of Fabry-Perot interference effects are used to obtain a very accurate determination of the spectral phase shifts. Finally, such a full characterization of the LCR retardance is applied to a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator and an optical architecture is designed where the spectral content of the light beam can be engineered at will.

  9. Forgotten Children: Maltreated Children of Mentally Retarded Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Lucy S.

    1978-01-01

    Presented is a case study of a family in which mentally retarded parents abused their two normal children. Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. (CL)

  10. BRIEF IN-PATIENT FAMILY INTERVENTION IN MENTAL RETARDATION

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, H.S.; Girimaji, S.R.; Gandhi, D.H.; Raju, K. Maruthai; Rao, P. Madhu; Nardev, G.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY A novel programme of intervention - brief inpatient family intervention - was formulated to impart the training skills to the parents of mentally retarded children to optimise the development of their retarded child. During the period of this study. 106 mentally retarded children with different socio-demographic backgrounds and degrees of handicap participated in this programme, with encouraging results. The individualised management plan, spread over 2 weeks of inpatient stay, included intensive counselling, training of the parents in techniques of multisensory stimulation, speech, motor, and self-help skills training, behaviour modification and medical management, as required. The programme could serve as a suitable model for professionals working with the mentally retarded, to implement with limited resources. PMID:21927322

  11. Aerobic Dance and the Mentally Retarded--A Winning Combination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Bonnie J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a study on an experimental dance program for mentally retarded children show that these children can improve in physical fitness and that success through physical activities can enhance their generally poor self-concept. (JN)

  12. The Overjustification Effect in Retarded Children: Durability and Generalizability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogilvie, Lee; Prior, Margot

    1982-01-01

    Generalizability and durability of the overjustification effect (on decline in intrinsic motivation due to the lack of rewards in behavior modification programs) were examined in 35 normal preschool children and 17 mental age-matched retarded children. (Author/SW)

  13. Behavior Modification in a Profoundly Retarded Child: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harold R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Behavior modification programs with a profoundly retarded 7-year-old boy developed a self-feeding operant, taught him to respond appropriately to a verbal command, and greatly increased his ability to stand without support. (Author/KW)

  14. Cue Selection in Verbal Discrimination Learning of Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Donnell C.; Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a series of these experiments which examined cue function in trigram verbal discrimination learning by retarded subjects. The two variables of chief interest were: (1) trigram meaningfulness, and (2) reinforcement history. (Author/LLK)

  15. Burning To Learn: An Introduction to Flame Retardants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity that demonstrates the effectiveness of flame retardants--substances added to combustible materials to slow down or hinder burning--that can be introduced when discussing combustion reactions or during a practical or everyday chemistry unit. (ASK)

  16. Fire retardant foams developed to suppress fuel fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R.; Gilwee, W. J.; Parker, J. A.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1968-01-01

    Heat insulating polyurethane foam retards and suppresses fuel fires. Uniformly dispersed in the foam is a halogenated polymer capable of splitting off hydrogen halide upon heating and charring of the polyurethane.

  17. Development of Flame Retardants for Engineering Polymers and Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desikan, Anantha

    2013-03-01

    With a broad portfolio of brominated, organophosphorus and inorganic flame retardants, ICL Industrial Products (ICL-IP) is engaged in the development of new flame retardants by exploiting the synergism between bromine based, phosphorus based and other halogen-free flame retardants. ICL-IP is also focusing on the development of polymeric and reactive flame retardants. This presentation will give examples of existing and new polymeric and reactive products for applications in thermoplastics, thermosets and polyurethane foam. This presentation will also show examples of phosphorus-bromine synergism allowing partial or complete elimination of antimony trioxide in many thermoplastics for electronic applications. New synergistic combinations of magnesium hydroxide with phosphorus and other halogen-free FRs will be presented. Work done in collaboration with S. Levchik, ICL-IP America, 430 Saw Mill Rriver Rd., Ardsley, NY, 10502, USA and M. Leifer, ICL-IP, P. O. Box 180, Beer Sheva 84101, Israel.

  18. Halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes environment.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-07-21

    Flame retardants are widely used industrial chemicals that are added to polymers, such as polyurethane foam, to prevent them from rapidly burning if exposed to a small flame or a smoldering cigarette. Flame retardants, especially brominated flame retardants, are added to many polymeric products at percent levels and are present in most upholstered furniture and mattresses. Most of these chemicals are so-called "additive" flame retardants and are not chemically bound to the polymer; thus, they migrate from the polymeric materials into the environment and into people. As a result, some of these chemicals have become widespread pollutants, which is a concern given their possible adverse health effects. Perhaps because of their environmental ubiquity, the most heavily used group of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), was withdrawn from production and use during the 2004-2013 period. This led to an increasing demand for other flame retardants, including other brominated aromatics and organophosphate esters. Although little is known about the use or production volumes of these newer flame retardants, it is evident that some of these chemicals are also becoming pervasive in the environment and in humans. In this Account, we describe our research on the occurrence of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants in the environment, with a specific focus on the Great Lakes region. This Account starts with a short introduction to the first generation of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated biphenyls, and then presents our measurements of their replacement, the PBDEs. We summarize our data on PBDE levels in babies, bald eagles, and in air. Once these compounds came off the market, we began to measure several of the newer flame retardants in air collected on the shores of the Great Lakes once every 12 days. These new measurements focus on a tetrabrominated benzoate, a tetrabrominated phthalate, a hexabrominated diphenoxyethane

  19. Flame Retardant Exposure among Collegiate U.S. Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Carignan, Courtney C.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy; McClean, Michael D.; Roberts, Simon C.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Sjödin, Andreas; Webster, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Gymnastics training facilities contain large volumes of polyurethane foam, a material that often contains additive flame retardants such as PentaBDE. While investigations of human exposure to flame retardants have focused on the general population, potentially higher than background exposures may occur in gymnasts and certain occupational groups. Our objectives were to compare PentaBDE body burden among gymnasts to the general U.S. population and characterize flame retardants levels in gym equipment, air and dust. We recruited 11 collegiate female gymnasts (ages 18–22) from one gym in the Eastern U.S. The geometric mean (GM) concentration of BDE-153 in gymnast sera (32.5 ng/g lipid) was 4–6.5 times higher than general U.S. population groups. Median concentrations of PentaBDE, TBB and TBPH in paired handwipe samples were 2–3 times higher after practice compared to before, indicating the gymnasts contacted these flame retardants during practice. GM concentrations of PentaBDE, TBB and TBPH were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in gym air and dust than in residences. Our findings suggest that these collegiate gymnasts experienced higher exposures to PentaBDE flame retardants compared to the general U.S. population and that gymnasts may also have increased exposure to other additive flame retardants used in polyurethane foam such as TBB and TBPH. PMID:24195753

  20. Fatigue crack retardation of low carbon steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Kojima, T.

    1984-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was examined using a low carbon steel, which has a considerably lower static strength than high strength steel used in previous report. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of O and a frequency of 10 Hz, and the effects of saltwater were evaluated by comparing with the result in air and result on high strength steel. A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater and showed the same value in both environments. This observed trend differed from the result on high strength steel in which the overload affected zone size was larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air, and thus it was found that the effect of saltwater on retardation behavior was different even in the similar steels. Retardation cycles were smaller in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater, the decrease in retardation cycles was attributed to the higher rates of fatigue crack propagation in 3 percent saltwater. Thinner specimen showed stronger retardation than thicker one. The behavior at midthickness of thicker specimen showed delayed retardation as well as the result in air. Moreover, the crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  1. Developing proper mealtime behaviors of the institutionalized retarded1

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, F.; Azrin, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    The institutionalized mentally retarded display a variety of unsanitary, disruptive, and improper table manners. A program was developed that included (1) acquisition-training of a high standard of proper table manners and (2) maintenance procedures to provide continued motivation to maintain proper mealtime behaviors and decrease improper skills. Twelve retardates received acquisition training, individually, by a combination of verbal instruction, imitation, and manual guidance. The students then ate in their group dining arrangement where the staff supervisor provided continuing approval for proper manners and verbal correction and timeout for improper manners. The results were: (1) the trained retardates showed significant improvement, whereas those untrained did not; (2) the trained retardates ate as well in the institution as non-retarded customers did in a public restaurant; (3) proper eating was maintained in the group dining setting; (4) timeout was rarely needed; (5) the program was easily administered by regular staff in a regular dining setting. The rapidity, feasibility, and effectiveness of the program suggests the program as a solution to improper mealtime behaviors by the institutionalized mentally retarded. PMID:16795363

  2. Genetic Causes of Mental Retardation. ARC Q&A #101-50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize what is known about the genetic causes of mental retardation. Questions and answers address the following topics: what genetics is; how a person's genes can cause mental retardation; how often mental retardation is inherited (up to 60 percent of severe mental retardation has genetic…

  3. Molecular and comparative genetics of mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Inlow, Jennifer K; Restifo, Linda L

    2004-01-01

    Affecting 1-3% of the population, mental retardation (MR) poses significant challenges for clinicians and scientists. Understanding the biology of MR is complicated by the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic MR disorders. Detailed analyses of >1000 Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database entries and literature searches through September 2003 revealed 282 molecularly identified MR genes. We estimate that hundreds more MR genes remain to be identified. A novel test, in which we distributed unmapped MR disorders proportionately across the autosomes, failed to eliminate the well-known X-chromosome overrepresentation of MR genes and candidate genes. This evidence argues against ascertainment bias as the main cause of the skewed distribution. On the basis of a synthesis of clinical and laboratory data, we developed a biological functions classification scheme for MR genes. Metabolic pathways, signaling pathways, and transcription are the most common functions, but numerous other aspects of neuronal and glial biology are controlled by MR genes as well. Using protein sequence and domain-organization comparisons, we found a striking conservation of MR genes and genetic pathways across the approximately 700 million years that separate Homo sapiens and Drosophila melanogaster. Eighty-seven percent have one or more fruit fly homologs and 76% have at least one candidate functional ortholog. We propose that D. melanogaster can be used in a systematic manner to study MR and possibly to develop bioassays for therapeutic drug discovery. We selected 42 Drosophila orthologs as most likely to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms of nervous system development or plasticity relevant to MR. PMID:15020472

  4. Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J.

    2006-03-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

  5. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  6. Non-flammable elastomeric fiber from a fluorinated elastomer and containing an halogenated flame retardant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S. G.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions are described comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain halogen containing polyols, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and articles of manufacture comprised of the flame retardant clastomeric materials and non elastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, nylons, etc.

  7. Radiation-Induced Growth Retardation and Microstructural and Metabolite Abnormalities in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zawaski, Janice A.; Sahnoune, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Cranial radiotherapy (CRT) increases survival in pediatric brain-tumor patients but can cause deleterious effects. This study evaluates the acute and long-term impact of CRT delivered during childhood/adolescence on the brain and body using a rodent model. Rats received CRT, either 4 Gy fractions × 5 d (fractionated) or a cumulative dose of 20 Gy (single dose) at 28 d of age. Animals were euthanized 1 d, 5 d, or 3.5 mo after CRT. The 3.5 mo group was imaged prior to euthanasia. At 3.5 mo, we observed significant growth retardation in irradiated animals, versus controls, and the effects of single dose on brain and body weights were more severe than fractionated. Acutely single dose significantly reduced body weight but increased brain weight, whereas fractionation significantly reduced brain but not body weights, versus controls. CRT suppressed cell proliferation in the hippocampal subgranular zone acutely. Fractional anisotropy (FA) in the fimbria was significantly lower in the single dose versus controls. Hippocampal metabolite levels were significantly altered in the single dose animals, reflecting a heightened state of inflammation that was absent in the fractionated. Our findings indicate that despite the differences in severity between the doses they both demonstrated an effect on cell proliferation and growth retardation, important factors in pediatric CRT. PMID:27242931

  8. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  9. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain ... targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get ...

  10. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  11. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  12. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye (aniridia) is a birth ... Nausea Swelling in the abdomen (abdominal hernia or mass) Vomiting Exams and Tests The doctor or nurse ...

  13. Duplication of 5q21 in a mildly retarded male and his non-retarded mother

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, R.; Zurcher, V.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-09-01

    Euchromatic autosomal additions to chromosomal complements are typically associated with global effects including mental retardation (MR) and dysmorphism. We report a familial duplication that does not appear to cause consistent, significant effects. A hyperactive male with mild MR was referred for fra(X) testing at 8 yrs. His karyotype was fra(X) negative and normal except for an addition in one 5q. The abnormal 5 was also in the maternal karyotype, but all other parental chromosomes were normal. The addition (=8.5% the length of a 5) was interpreted as a duplication of band 5q21. FISH with Coatasome 5 (Oncor) showed the addition was from 5. The proband`s karyotype was designated 46,XY,dup(5)(q15q22.1)mat; his mother`s, 46,XX,dup(5)(q15q22.1). Single copy probes are being used to test the cytogenetic interpretation. At 39 yrs, the non-retarded, somewhat inattentive mother, who has a high school diploma and subsequent secretarial courses, cares for the proband and his chromosomally normal, but learning disabled sister at home. The family situation is chaotic with reported paternal psychiatric illness and abuse of the proband and his sister. The mother`s father is dead, but her four younger siblings and mother are reportedly normal. Their chromosomes have not been available. The proband was born at 40 weeks following an uneventful pregnancy, with length and weight at the 5-10th centiles. He walked and talked at about one year. At 9 yrs, his ht/wt ratio was 10th centile. Foot length as <3rd centile; soft masses were present on the anterior ankles. He was otherwise physically normal. His estimated I.Q. was 75 and he was severely hyperactive despite Ritalin. This is the first report of a familial duplication in 5q; no identical, isolated case is known. Although additional family members need evaluation, the presence of the dup(5q) in the non-retarded mother suggests that it may not be associated with the proband`s MR.

  14. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR): epidemiology and etiology.

    PubMed

    Romo, Agustín; Carceller, Raquel; Tobajas, Javier

    2009-02-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is mainly due to a pathologic slow-down in the fetal growth pace, resulting in a fetus that is unable to reach its growth potential. IUGR frequency will vary depending on the discrimination criteria adopted. It is extremely important to use local or national fetal growth graphs in order to avoid some confounding factors. IUGR incidence in newborns would be between 3% and 7% of the total population. In our experience it is 5.13% a figure similar to the one obtained by other authors but with a progressively higher incidence during the last decade. There are multiple maternal factors that can generally be grouped into constitutional and general factors given that they affect age, weight, race, maternal cardiac volume, etc, socioeconomic factors with key incidence in the mother's nutrition level, where a poor maternal nutrition level would be the key factor in this group. We have evaluated multiple factors as possible contributors to the IUGR risk: race, parents' age, mother's height (cm), mother's birth weight and before pregnancy (kg), ponderal gain and blood pressure during pregnancy, and previous SGA newborns. Socioeconomic factors like social class, parents' profession, habitual residence, salary, immigration, and diet were also evaluated. We also included variables such as total daily working time and time mothers spent standing up, daily sleeping time (hrs), stress self-perception test at work and primiparity age. Toxic factors during pregnancy: tobacco (active and passive), alcohol, drugs and coffee consumption. Fetal or utero-placental factors were considered. In our study, the most significant etiologic factors were: Active and passive tobacco consuming, mother's stress level, increase of total months worked during pregnancy, total daily working hours and time mothers spent standing up and finally, the parent's height. Our data support the main objective of reducing the incidence of SGA newborns after IUGR by fighting

  15. Current Issues in Mental Retardation and Human Development: Selected Papers from the 1970 Staff Development Conferences of the President's Committee on Mental Retardation (Washington, D.C., 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Donald J., Ed.

    Six papers discuss some of the current issues in the field of mental retardation and human development. Epidemiology of mental retardation from a sociological and clinical point of view is analyzed by Jane R. Mercer, based on studies of mental retardation in the community in Pomona, California. The role of genetics and intra-uterine diagnosis of…

  16. Exposure to flame retardant chemicals on commercial airplanes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flame retardant chemicals are used in materials on airplanes to slow the propagation of fire. These chemicals migrate from their source products and can be found in the dust of airplanes, creating the potential for exposure. Methods To characterize exposure to flame retardant chemicals in airplane dust, we collected dust samples from locations inside 19 commercial airplanes parked overnight at airport gates. In addition, hand-wipe samples were also collected from 9 flight attendants and 1 passenger who had just taken a cross-country (USA) flight. The samples were analyzed for a suite of flame retardant chemicals. To identify the possible sources for the brominated flame retardants, we used a portable XRF analyzer to quantify bromine concentrations in materials inside the airplanes. Results A wide range of flame retardant compounds were detected in 100% of the dust samples collected from airplanes, including BDEs 47, 99, 153, 183 and 209, tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl)phosphate (TDCPP), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromo-phthalate (TBPH). Airplane dust contained elevated concentrations of BDE 209 (GM: 500 ug/g; range: 2,600 ug/g) relative to other indoor environments, such as residential and commercial buildings, and the hands of participants after a cross-country flight contained elevated BDE 209 concentrations relative to the general population. TDCPP, a known carcinogen that was removed from use in children’s pajamas in the 1970’s although still used today in other consumer products, was detected on 100% of airplanes in concentrations similar to those found in residential and commercial locations. Conclusion This study adds to the limited body of knowledge regarding exposure to flame retardants on commercial aircraft, an environment long hypothesized to be at risk for maximum exposures due to strict flame retardant standards for aircraft materials. Our findings indicate that flame retardants are widely used in many

  17. A Polycarbonate/Magnesium Oxide Nanocomposite with High Flame Retardancy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Quanxiao; Gao, Chong; Ding, Yanfen; Wang, Feng; Wen, Bin; Zhang, Shimin; Wang, Tongxin; Yang, Mingshu

    2014-01-01

    A new flame retardant polycarbonate/magnesium oxide (PC/MgO) nanocomposite, with high flame retardancy was developed by melt compounding. The effect of MgO to the flame retardancy, thermal property, and thermal degradation kinetics were investigated. Limited oxygen index (LOI) test revealed that a little amount of MgO (2 wt %) led to significant enhancement (LOI = 36.8) in flame retardancy. Thermogravimetric analysis results demonstrated that the onset temperature of degradation and temperature of maximum degradation rate decreased in both air and N2 atmosphere. Apparent activation energy was estimated via Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method. Three steps in the thermal degradation kinetics were observed after incorporation of MgO into the matrix and the additive raised activation energies of the composite in the full range except the initial stage. It was interpreted that the flame retardancy of PC was influenced by MgO through the following two aspects: on the one hand, MgO catalyzed the thermal-oxidative degradation and accelerated a thermal protection/mass loss barrier at burning surface; on the other hand, the filler decreased activation energies in the initial step and improved thermal stability in the final period. PMID:24696526

  18. Mental retardation and developmental disabilities influenced by environmental neurotoxic insults.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, S R

    2000-01-01

    This paper sets a framework for the discussion of neurotoxicity as a potentially major contributor to the etiology of many types of mental retardation and developmental disabilities. In the past the literatures on developmental neurotoxicology and on mental retardation have evolved independently, yet we know that the developing brain is a target for neurotoxicity in the developing central nervous system through many stages of pregnancy as well as during infancy and early childhood. Our definitions and theories of mental retardation and developmental disabilities affect the models of neurotoxicity we espouse. For instance, models of developmental risk in neurotoxicology have guided environmental regulation to reduce the likelihood of neurotoxic effects. On the other hand, models of developmental risk for mental retardation aim not only at primary prevention,but also at secondary and tertiary prevention through early intervention. In the future, dynamic models of neuroplasticity based on the study of gene-brain-behavior relationships are likely to guide our views of developmental neurotoxicology and prevention of mental retardation and other disabilities. PMID:10852834

  19. [Craniosinusonasal tumors].

    PubMed

    Blagoveshchenskaia, N S; Egorova, V K

    1997-01-01

    Tumors extending into the nasal cavity, cranium, and paranasal sinuses have a number of distinctive features to take into consideration. Among them are the communication with an open air, high incidence of associated intracranial infections, specific complications (i.e. suppurative sinusitis, polyps, mucocele, pneumocephalus, nasal CSF leak). The features mentioned make these lesions unique. 50 consecutive patients underwent treatment in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. The diagnosis was confirmed either by CT, MRI, or at operation. Rhinological and otoneurological signs were also subjected to analysis. Most frequently these tumors (the majority of which were meningiomas (n = 34) extended into the nasal cavity (40 patients) and paranasal sinuses (n = 50). It was noted that the clinical signs vary depending on the histological type of tumor, its location and direction of growth (i.e. medial or lateral). Medially growing tumors usually involved 2-4 sinuses, while laterally growing tumors involved only one sinus. Among the symptoms, disturbances of smell, conductive hearing impairment, deformation of both the soft and hard palate, slowing of the experimental nystagmus due to disturbed extraocular movements. Some light is shed on the differential diagnosis, indications for various surgical approaches (transcranial, transnasal, and facial). The results of surgical treatment and postoperative complications are presented in the paper. The diagnosis and treatment of such patients require an interdisciplinary approach while would involve a team of a neurosurgeon, neuroradiologist, otoneurologist, and a neuro-ophthalmologist. PMID:9424946

  20. Protective substances against zinc-induced neuronal death after ischemia: carnosine as a target for drug of vascular type of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Konoha, Keiko; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sadakane, Yutaka

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies have indicated the significance of zinc in neurodegeneration after transient global ischemia. After ischemia, excess glutamate and zinc, which are released in the synaptic clefts, cause the apoptotic death of the target neurons, and finally lead the pathogenesis of vascular type of dementia. Considering the removal of zinc using zinc-sensitive chelators was effective in the prevention of neuronal death after transient global ischemia, it is highly possible that substances which protect against zinc-induced neuronal death will become a candidate for drugs of vascular type of dementia. Based on this 'zinc hypothesis', we have searched for such substances among various agricultural products including fruits, vegetables, and fishes using our developed in vitro screening system. Among tested, we found that carnosine (beta-alanyl histidine) protected against zinc-induced death of cultured neurons, and have applied for the patent as a drug of ischemia-induced neuronal death and the treatment/prevention for vascular type of dementia (application No. 2006-145857) in Japan. Here, we review the perspective of protective substances of zinc-induced neuronal death as a drug of vascular type of dementia based on our studies and other numerous studies. PMID:18221226

  1. Glycation of the muscle-specific enolase by reactive carbonyls: effect of temperature and the protection role of carnosine, pyridoxamine and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Pietkiewicz, Jadwiga; Bronowicka-Szydełko, Agnieszka; Dzierzba, Katarzyna; Danielewicz, Regina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    Reactive carbonyls such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), trans-2-nonenal (T2 N), acrolein (ACR) can react readily with nucleophilic protein sites forming of advanced glycation end-products (AGE). In this study, the human and pig muscle-specific enolase was used as a protein model for in vitro modification by 4-HNE, T2 N and ACR. While the human enolase interaction with reactive α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MOG) was demonstrated previously, the effect of 4-HNE, T2N and ACR has not been identified yet. Altering in catalytic function were observed after the enzyme incubation with these active compounds for 1-24 h at 25, 37 and 45 °C. The inhibition degree of enolase activity occurred in following order: 4-HNE > ACR > MOG > T2N and inactivation of pig muscle-specific enolase was more effective relatively to human enzyme. The efficiency of AGE formation depends on time and incubation temperature with glycating agent. More amounts of insoluble AGE were formed at 45 °C. We found that pyridoxamine and natural dipeptide carnosine counteracted AGE formation and protected enolase against the total loss of catalytic activity. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that phosphatidylserine may significantly protect enolase against decrease of catalytic activity in spite of AGE production. PMID:21347838

  2. Achromatic phase retarder applied to MWIR & LWIR dual-band.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guoguo; Tan, Qiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoling; Jin, Guofan

    2010-01-18

    The development of the dual-band IR imaging polarimetry creates the need for achromatic phase retarder used in dual-band. Dielectric grating with the period smaller than the illuminating wavelength presents a strong form-birefringence. With this feature, the combination of several subwavelength gratings can be used as achromatic phase retarders. We proposed a combination of 4 subwavelength structured gratings (SWGs) used as an achromatic quarter-wave plate (QWP) applied to MWIR & LWIR bandwidths. Design method using effective medium theory and optimization algorithms is described in detail. The simulation results led to the possibility of an dual-band achromatic QWP whose retardance deviates from 90 degrees by <+/-0.75 degrees with the fast axis unfixed and by <+/-1.35 degrees with the fast axis fixed over MWIR(3-5microm) & LWIR(8-12microm) bandwiths. PMID:20173997

  3. People with mental retardation as witnesses in court: a review.

    PubMed

    Kebbell, M R; Hatton, C

    1999-06-01

    Evidence concerning eyewitness testimony given by people with mental retardation in court was reviewed. Despite general perceptions that people with mental retardation make incompetent witnesses, available evidence suggests that they can provide accurate accounts of witnessed events. The accounts are usually less complete than those provided by the general population and are greatly influenced by the methods of questioning. The sparse available evidence suggests that cross-examination methods may lead to memory distortion. The use of closed, complex, and leading questions and the absence of aids to recall may have a particularly adverse effect on people with mental retardation. Resulting errors could lead to a false conviction or acquittal. Future policy and research in this much neglected area were discussed. PMID:10473337

  4. [A case of Aicardi syndrome with moderate psychomotor retardation].

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Mitsudome, A; Ogata, H; Ohfu, M; Takakusaki, M

    1990-07-01

    A five-year-old girl of Aicardi syndrome showed moderate psychomotor retardation. She could walk and communicate. At six months of age, she developed salaam convulsion with series. Convulsions disappeared immediately after ACTH treatment. At eighteen months of age, she developed myoclonic seizures. From three years of age, head-nodding seizures with series relapsed and could not be controlled. But she could walk alone at two years old and speak a word at one and half years old. A degree of her psychomotor retardation was more slightly than others published cases of Aicardi syndrome. There were eleven reports, included our case, with mild retardation in Aicardi syndrome. The features of these are 1) late onset of seizures, 2) good response to ACTH therapy, 3) no significant abnormalities of brain except for agenesis of corpus callosum. PMID:2169275

  5. Vortex retarders produced from photo-aligned liquid crystal polymers.

    PubMed

    McEldowney, Scott C; Shemo, David M; Chipman, Russell A

    2008-05-12

    We present developments using photo-aligned liquid crystal polymers for creating vortex retarders, halfwave retarders with a continuously variable fast axis. Polarization properties of components designed to create different polarization vortex modes are presented. We assess the viability of these components using the theoretical and experimental point spread functions and optical transfer functions in Mueller matrix format, point spread matrix (PSM) and optical transfer matrix (OTM). The measured PSM and OTM of these components in an optical system is very close to the theoretically predicted values thus showing that these components should provide excellent performance in applications utilizing polarized optical vortices. The impact of aberrations and of vortex retarder misalignment on the PSM and OTM are presented. PMID:18545435

  6. The smart vapor retarder: An innovation inspired by computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzel, H.M.

    1998-12-31

    Water management is the new trend in civil engineering. Since it is difficult to ensure perfect vapor- and watertightness of building components, a limited moisture ingress is acceptable as long as the drying process is effective enough to avoid moisture damage. Recent computer models for the simulation of heat and moisture transport are valuable tools for the risk assessment of structures and their repair or retrofit. Unventilated, insulated assemblies with a vapor-resistant exterior layer can accumulate water because winter condensation and summer drying are not balanced. The balance can be reestablished if the vapor retarder is more permeable in summer than in winter. Parametric computer studies have defined the required properties of such a vapor retarder. Developed according to the computed specifications, the smart vapor retarder shows a seasonal variation in vapor permeability of a factor of ten. The secret of this behavior lies in the humidity-dependent vapor diffusion resistance of the film material.

  7. [Thymic tumors].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Mahé, M; Bretel, J-J; Roberti, E; Ruffié, P

    2005-11-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas are rare and slow-growing tumors, which develop within the anterior mediastinum. Thymomas are often associated with autoimmune disorders and most particularly myasthenia gravis. The treatment of choice remains a complete surgical resection. Postoperative radiotherapy is often combined in case of invasive thymoma invading into adjacent organs. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage II with invasion into capsule has been more controversial lately. In inoperable locally advanced, or metastatic thymic tumors, neoadjuvant cisplatin-based followed by surgery and radiotherapy has given interesting results in the past years. PMID:16168694

  8. [Validity of care assessment in disabled and mentally retarded children].

    PubMed

    Häussler, M; Streit, A; Strassburg, H-M

    2002-10-01

    16 children with spastic cerebral palsy and 25 mentally retarded children were assessed via the scales "Self-Care" and "Mobility" of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Age-adjusted PEDI scores were compared with the classification according to the three levels of the German statutory nursing insurance. Good correlations and highly significant dependence were found in children with spastic cerebral palsy but no dependence was seen in mentally retarded children. Apparently, assessment guidelines of the German statutory nursing insurance do not guarantee a valid assessment in all disabled children. In conclusion, future assessments of nursing needs in children should employ standardised assessment methods. PMID:12375229

  9. Teaching banking skills to mildly mentally retarded adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aeschleman, S R; Gedig, K S

    1985-01-01

    In this study, two experiments evaluated a classroom training program designed to teach basic banking skills to three mildly mentally retarded adolescents. The participants were taught to open savings and checking accounts during Experiment I and to conduct banking transactions during Experiment II. The banking transaction skills acquired in Experiment II maintained at high levels and generalized to two novel environments for two participants, whereas moderate generalization and maintenance scores were obtained by the third participant. The average performance of the mentally retarded participants compared favorably with the scores obtained by 10 college student volunteers in both the percentage of correct responses and the pattern of incorrect responses. PMID:4073890

  10. Background music for repetitive task performance of severely retarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Richman, J S

    1976-11-01

    Environmental manipulation in the form of specific tempo background music was used to assist in the habilitation of severely retarded persons. Thirty institutionalized retarded males were tested on a repetitive manual performance task judged to be similar to the type of tasks found in sheltered workshops. Each subject received each of the background treatments noncontingently: no music, slow tempo music, regular tempo music, fast tempo music. The results indicated that the regular tempo of background music facilitated the greatest improvement in performance, suggesting that the effect of music on performance is more complex than the issue of contingent presentation. PMID:998661

  11. Fire-Retardant Decorative Inks For Aircraft Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes testing of commercial and experimental fire retardants for incorporation into acrylic printing inks used on aircraft-interior sandwich panels. Films of acrylic ink containing fire-retardant additives prepared by casting on glass plates. Solvent evaporated in vacuum, cast films cured at 80 to 100 degree C for 30 minutes in air-circulating oven. Thermochemical properties of films examined by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Samples of inks cast on sheets of polyvinylfloride (PVF), and their limiting oxygen indices and smoke evolution measured.

  12. Afghan children and mental retardation: information, advocacy and prospects.

    PubMed

    Miles, M

    1997-11-01

    The family and community situation of children with mental retardation (learning difficulties/disabilities) is discussed within the Afghan cultural heritage and the current realities of civil war and refugee villages. Some formal services are being developed for children with physical and visual impairments. Mental retardation and hearing impairments are comparatively neglected, as skills are lacking and progress tends to be much slower. Some casual integration occurs in ordinary schools and kindergartens, which should be supported. Experiences in family counselling can be developed and also extended by enlisting indigenous counsellors and healers. The major strategy for the foreseeable future will be support and enhancement of family resources. PMID:9416446

  13. Biochemical screening for inherited metabolic disorders in the mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H E; Goodman, R; Schram, J; Diamond, E; Daneel, A

    1981-11-01

    A biochemical screening programme for the detection of inherited metabolic disease was carried out on urine and blood samples from inmates of the Alexandra Institute for the mentally retarded, Cape Town. Of the 1087 patients screened, positive results for phenylketonuria were obtained in 3, for cystinuria in 2 and for Hartnup disease in 1. The overall frequency of metabolic disorders was 0,6%. It is evident that genetic metabolic disease as detected by current screening procedures makes only a small contribution to the overall burden of mental retardation. PMID:6795726

  14. A retarding ion mass spectrometer for the Dynamics Explorer-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W.

    1985-01-01

    The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) for Dynamics Explorer-1 is an instrument designed to measure the details of the thermal plasma distribution. It combines the ion temperature determining capability of the retarding potential analyzer with the compositional capabilities of the mass spectrometer and adds multiple sensor heads to sample all directions relative to the spacecraft ram direction. This manual provides a functional description of the RIMS, the instrument calibration, and a description of the commands which can be stored in the instrument logic to control its operation.

  15. Skin beautification with oral non-hydrolized versions of carnosine and carcinine: Effective therapeutic management and cosmetic skincare solutions against oxidative glycation and free-radical production as a causal mechanism of diabetic complications and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Lankin, Vadim Z; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-10-01

    Advanced glycation Maillard reaction end products (AGEs) are causing the complications of diabetes and skin aging, primarily via adventitious and cross-linking of proteins. Long-lived proteins such as structural collagen are particularly implicated as pathogenic targets of AGE processes. The formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds represents an important step for cross-linking proteins in the glycation or Maillard reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of glycation coupled to the glycation free-radical oxidation reactions as markers of protein damage in the aging of skin tissue proteins and diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism for the cross-linking reaction, we studied the reaction between a three-carbon α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal, and amino acids using EPR spectroscopy, a spectrophotometric kinetic assay of superoxide anion production at the site of glycation and a chemiluminescence technique. The transglycating activity, inhibition of transition metal ions peroxidative catalysts, resistance to hydrolysis of carnosine mimetic peptide-based compounds with carnosinase and the protective effects of carnosine, carcinine and related compounds against the oxidative damage of proteins and lipid membranes were assessed in a number of biochemical and model systems. A 4-month randomized, double-blind, controlled study was undertaken including 42 subjects where the oral supplement of non-hydrolized carnosine (Can-C Plus® formulation) was tested against placebo for 3 months followed by a 1-month supplement-free period for both groups to assess lasting effects. Assessment of the age-related skin parameters and oral treatment efficacy measurements included objective skin surface evaluation with Visioscan® VC 98 and visual assessment of skin appearance parameters. The results together confirm that a direct one-electron transfer between a Schiff base methylglyoxal dialkylimine (or its protonated form) and methylglyoxal is responsible for

  16. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  17. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  18. An "enigmatic" L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine)? Cell proliferative activity as a fundamental property of a natural dipeptide inherent to traditional antioxidant, anti-aging biological activities: balancing and a hormonally correct agent, novel patented oral therapy dosage formulation for mobility, skeletal muscle power and functional performance, hypothalamic-pituitary- brain relationship in health, aging and stress studies.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic releasing and inhibiting hormones are major neuroendocrine regulators of human body metabolism being driven directly to the anterior pituitary gland via hypothalamic-hypophyseal portal veins. The alternative physiological or therapeutic interventions utilizing the pharmaco-nutritional boost of imidazole-containing dipeptides (non-hydrolized oral form of carnosine, carcinine, N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops) can maintain health, enhance physical exercise performance and prevent ageing. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is synthesized in mammalian skeletal muscle. There is an evidence that the release of carnosine from the skeletal muscle sarcomeres moieties during physical exercise affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological functions. Carnosine released from skeletal muscle during exercise acts as a powerful afferent physiological signaling stimulus for hypothalamus, may be transported into the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), specifically to TMN-histamine neurons and hydrolyzed herewith via activities of carnosine-degrading enzyme (carnosinase 2) localized in situ. Through the colocalized enzymatic activity of Histidine decarboxylase in the histaminergic neurons, the resulting L-histidine may subsequently be converted into histamine, which could be responsible for the effects of carnosine on neurotransmission and physiological function. Carnosine and its imidazole-containing dipeptide derivatives are renowned for their anti-aging, antioxidant, membrane protective, metal ion chelating, buffering, anti-glycation/ transglycating activities used to prevent and treat a spectrum of age-related and metabolic diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, sight threatening eye diseases, Diabetes mellitus and its complications, cancers and other disorders due to their wide spectrum biological activities. The precursor of carnosine (and related imidazole containing compounds) synthesis in skeletal muscles beta-alanine is used as the

  19. Composing a Tumor Specific Bacterial Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Deyneko, Igor V.; Kasnitz, Nadine; Leschner, Sara; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Systemically applied Salmonella enterica spp. have been shown to invade and colonize neoplastic tissues where it retards the growth of many tumors. This offers the possibility to use the bacteria as a vehicle for the tumor specific delivery of therapeutic molecules. Specificity of such delivery is solely depending on promoter sequences that control the production of a target molecule. We have established the functional structure of bacterial promoters that are transcriptionally active exclusively in tumor tissues after systemic application. We observed that the specific transcriptional activation is accomplished by a combination of a weak basal promoter and a strong FNR binding site. This represents a minimal set of control elements required for such activation. In natural promoters, additional DNA remodeling elements are found that alter the level of transcription quantitatively. Inefficiency of the basal promoter ensures the absence of transcription outside tumors. As a proof of concept, we compiled an artificial promoter sequence from individual motifs representing FNR and basal promoter and showed specific activation in a tumor microenvironment. Our results open possibilities for the generation of promoters with an adjusted level of expression of target proteins in particular for applications in bacterial tumor therapy. PMID:27171245

  20. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Tel: 773-577-8750; 800-886-2282 Fax: 847-827-9918 National Brain Tumor Society 55Chapel ... http://www.braintumor.org Tel: 866-455-3214 Fax: 617-924-9998 Pituitary Network Association P.O. ...

  1. [Effect of soy products on graft tumor growth in rats].

    PubMed

    Zalietok, S P; Orlovs'kyĭ, O A; Hohol', S V; Klenov, O A; Samoĭlenko, O A; Anisimova, Iu M; Borovs'kyĭ, V P; Chekhun, V F

    2006-01-01

    Moderate consumption of a curd-like product made of thermally-treated soy (SPT) led to the retardation of hormone-dependent (Walker W 256 carcinosarcoma in females) and some less hormone-independent (Guerin's carcinoma in males) tumor growth in rats. Excessive (ad libitum) consumption of the same product led to accelaration of W 256 tumor growth. A similar product made of raw soy (SPR) accelerated the growth of W-256 carcinosarcoma and made not any effect on the growth of Guerin's carcinoma. Moderate SPT consumption corrected erythropoesis, decreased lipids peroxidation, retarded peritumoral inflammation, decreased or not changed the content of direct bilirubin in blood serum. SPRconsumption did not lead to those positive effects but sometimes deteriorated those indices. Our experiments have also shown the express-test validity based on dynamical variant of cancerolysis reaction to be practical for evaluation of food quality for cancer patients. PMID:17312888

  2. Spontaneous Rehearsal by Mildly Mentally Retarded Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lisa A.; Bray, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a rehearsal strategy by 10-, 12-, and 14-year-old mildly mentally retarded children and adolescents (N=39) was investigated using a self-paced recall readiness task. The task allowed Ss to study items in any order as many times as desired. Each group used rehearsal, as indicated by increasing study time patterns and the number of…

  3. Strategy Training and Semantic Encoding in Mildly Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Randall W.; Nagle, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    Mildly retarded children were instructed in encoding strategies or rehearsal strategy. Performance was higher for semantic encoding strategies. Seven months later the semantic condition also showed greater improvement after strategies were prompted. Performance on incidental learning tasks was enhanced for 13- but not 10-year olds. (Author/RD)

  4. PERSONALITY AND SUCCESS PROFILES CHARACTERISTIC OF YOUNG ADULT MALE RETARDATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PECK, JOHN R.; AND OTHERS

    MAJOR SUCCESS-FAILURE SYNDROMES WERE STUDIED FROM DATA OBTAINED IN A PREVIOUS STUDY (COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROJECT NO. 1533) ON 100 MENTALLY RETARDED, YOUNG MALE ADULTS. STRUCTURED INTERVIEWS HAD BEEN CONDUCTED WITH THE SUBJECTS, THEIR PARENTS, AND THEIR SUPERVISORS. FACTOR ANALYSIS HAD DEVELOPED 21 BASIC PREDICTORS OF SUCCESS AND 17 AFTER-TRAINING…

  5. RESPONSES OF BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN TO LEARNING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARRIER, NEIL A.; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE VARIABLES OF INTELLIGENCE, LEARNING TASK PERFORMANCE, EMOTIONAL TENSION, AND TASK MOTIVATION WERE STUDIED. ABOUT 120 BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN PERFORMED SIX TRIALS OF NUMBER LEARNING, CONCEPT FORMATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR COORDINATION, AND VERBAL LEARNING TASKS. DURING THE LEARNING SESSIONS,…

  6. Treatment of a Retarded Child's Faeces Smearing and Coprophagic Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedin, B. D.; Johnson, Helene K.

    1979-01-01

    The daily rearrangement of a profoundly retarded seven-year-old boy's routine shower was found to be effective in eliminating his low-frequency feces smearing and coprophagic (eating of feces) behavior during the late afternoon/early evening part of the day. (Author/DLS)

  7. Estimation of Energy Stores of Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchford, Mary Demarest

    1987-01-01

    The study sought to identify reliable measurements for estimating energy stores of retarded adults (N=80) and possible correlations between energy intakes and obesity. Among results were a lack of significant correlations between caloric intake and anthropometric measures (e.g., tricepts skinfold). Body mass index is suggested as a more practical…

  8. Children of Deprivation, Changing the Course of Familial Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Robert B.; Parsons, Mabel H.

    The growth of preschool familial retarded children was recorded, and attempts were made to alter the course of their development. Of lower socioeconomic class, the 16 subjects aged from 3 to 6, had IQ scores from 50 to 84 and no neurological deficits. One or both of their parents and at least one sibling were mentally subnormal. The subjects and…

  9. Motor Fitness of Mentally Retarded Boys to National Age Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brace, D. K.

    The study compared the physical fitness of 65 mentally retarded boys (mean age 14-years, mean IQ 60) at Austin (Texas) State School with national age scales for boys of the same chronological ages on the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Youth Fitness Test, which measures strength, speed, agility, power,…

  10. Aerobic Fitness for the Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    The booklet discusses the aerobic fitness capacities of severely/profoundly retarded students and discusses approaches for improving their fitness. An initial section describes a method for determining the student's present fitness level on the basis of computations of height, weight, blood pressure, resting pulse, and Barach Index and Crampton…

  11. A Physical Education Evaluation for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Albert

    A physical education evaluation was constructed which was flexible enough to measure the varying degrees of retardation. Validity was determined by submitting the test to a jury of experts. Reliability was ascertained by administering the same test to the same students three times with two week intervals between testing. Objectivity was determined…

  12. Psychological Aspects of Sleep Disorders in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David T.

    This paper reviews literature and clinical experiences on the neurobiological and psychological aspects of sleep in children with mental retardation. The lack of a universal, operational definition of sleep disorders is noted, and a study is cited in which 61% of a group of 20 children (ages 2-13) with developmental disabilities were found to have…

  13. Teaching Intermittent Self-Catheterization Skills to Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnowski, Kenneth J.; Drabman, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    In an A-B design with replication, the efficacy of a behavioral training program for teaching two mildly retarded six-year-old children intermittent self-catheterization skills was demonstrated. Component skills were task-analyzed and trained via a graduated prompting procedure. (Author/DB)

  14. Fragile X Syndrome: A Common Etiology of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, R. Curtis; Simensen, Richard J.

    A clinical population of 39 families affected by fragile X syndrome, a sex-linked form of mental retardation, is described. Physical aspects, including such common features as prominent jaw and simple ears, are noted along with psychological aspects such as different mean IQs among various age groups. Findings of intellectual evaluation did not…

  15. Project Job: Vocational Training Program for Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A vocational training program for trainable mentally retarded youth and adults provided instruction on functional skills, travel training, and independent living skills in addition to supervised performance in part time jobs in the community. The program expanded into small business subsidiaries for boat cleaning and detailing and marine serving.…

  16. Varieties of Repetitive Behavior in Autism: Comparisons to Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodfish, James W.; Symons, Frank J.; Parker, Dawn E.; Lewis, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    A study compared specific repetitive behaviors in 32 adults with autism with 34 controls with mental retardation. The occurrence of each behavior category, except dyskinesias, was higher in individuals with autism and they showed a greater number of topographies of stereotypy and compulsions. Repetitive behavior severity also predicated autism…

  17. Standards for Residential Facilities for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, Chicago, IL.

    Presented are standards for residential facilities for the mentally retarded that were developed by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. The accreditation process is said to have two major objects: setting standards for services and determining the degree to which a specific services complies with the designated standards. The…

  18. Promoting Intensive Socialization of Mildly Retarded Within an Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graebner, Oliver E.; And Others

    Eight papers report on the project at Austin State School, funded by a Hospital Improvement (HIP) grant, which used a multidisciplinary team to implement socialization programs for institutionalized mildly retarded persons exhibiting socially inept behavior. Two papers consider social rehabilitation and the task of trying to move residents out…

  19. Teaching Computation/Shopping Skills to Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Long, Sue

    1986-01-01

    Three moderately/mildly retarded adults were trained in adaptive community skills. Treatment involved instructions, performance feedback, social reinforcement, in-vivo modeling, self-evaluation, and social and tangible reinforcement. Rapid and dramatic improvements occurred soon after treatment began. Skills generalized to other shopping…

  20. Advance Organizer Strategy for Educable Mentally Retarded and Regular Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Moon K.

    The study examined the effects of an advance organizer on the learning and retention of facts and concepts obtained from a sound film by educable mentally retarded (N=30) and regular children (N=30) in a mainstreamed secondary public school class. Also examined was the interaction between the advance organizer and ability levels of the Ss. Results…