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Sample records for carolina columbia south

  1. Libraries in South Carolina: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/southcarolina.html Libraries in South Carolina To use the sharing features ... Columbia University of South Carolina School of Medicine Library 6311 Garners Ferry Road Columbia, SC 29208 803- ...

  2. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for Wormser Columbia, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Columbia, South Carolina is developed for this and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. Although budget constraints preclude an economic reevaluation of each of the sites, a similar site, Carlsbad, New Mexico, was done. When 1985 escalated values for fuel, costs, mass production, and improved design and installation techniques were applied, a significantly higher degree of savings was realized.

  3. Resources of South Carolina Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Edward G.; And Others

    The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education and the Postsecondary Planning Commission conducted this study of the library resources and needs of South Carolina postsecondary institutions as part of its goal to improve the quality of South Carolina state higher education programs. Questionnaires sent to college libraries were designed to test…

  4. South Carolina and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with South Carolina and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead…

  5. South Carolina Trade Examinations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Shirley J.

    The South Carolina Trade Examinations for Trade and Industrial Education teachers are administered semi-annually by the South Carolina State Department of Education, Office of Vocational Education, Vocational Teacher Education Programs Unit. This handbook is designed to provide prospective trade and industrial education teachers, vocational…

  6. A finite-element model study of the impact of the proposed I-326 crossing on flood stages of the Congaree River near Columbia, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Bennett, C. S., III

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element surface water model was used to study the hydraulic impact of the proposed Interstate Route 326 crossing of the Congaree River near Columbia, SC. The finite element model was assessed as a potential operational tool for analyzing complex highway crossings and other modifications of river flood plains. Infrared aerial photography was used to define regions of homogeneous roughness in the flood plain. Finite element networks approximating flood plain topography were designed using elements of three roughness types. High water marks established during an 8-yr flood that occurred in October 1976 were used to calibrate the model. The maximum flood of record, an approximately 100-yr flood that occurred in August 1908, was modeled in three cases: dikes on the right bank, dikes on the left bank, and dikes on both banks. In each of the three cases, simulations were performed both without and with the proposed highway embankments in place. Detailed information was obtained about backwater effects upstream from the proposed highway embankments, changes in flow distribution resulting from the embankments, and local velocities in the bridge openings. On the basis of results from the model study, the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation changed the design of several bridge openings. A simulation incorporating the new design for the case with dikes on the left bank indicated that both velocities in the bridge openings and backwater were reduced. A major problem in applying the model was the difficulty in predicting the network detail necessary to avoid local errors caused by roughness discontinuities and large depth gradients. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. South Carolina Guide for Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This guide is intended for teachers conducting industrial technology education (TE) courses in South Carolina. Presented first is introductory information about the mission, clusters and units, and recommended educational format of TE in South Carolina. Discussed in the seven sections are various aspects of South Carolina's modular delivery system…

  8. South Carolina Kids Count, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 41 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  9. South Carolina's High Technology Blitz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, G. William, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a South Carolina project to incorporate high technology training into programs at 16 technical colleges. Also discusses the development of training modules, supervisory training courses, special schools instructor training packages, a statewide system of resource centers, and mobile training units. (CT)

  10. South Carolina Kids Count, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 42 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  11. South Carolina Wins the Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred

    1992-01-01

    Discusses factors involved in locating new BMW car-manufacturing plant in South Carolina. Discusses state's business environment, transportation, and education system. Describes development process, site selection, and implications for economic development. Describes importance of state's labor-force development via regional technical colleges and…

  12. South Carolina Course Alignment Project Newsletter. Volume 1, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In response to the Education and Economic Development Act of 2005 (EEDA), South Carolina has embarked on an exciting initiative called the South Carolina Course Alignment Project. In partnership with the South Carolina Department of Education and the South Carolina Technical College System, the project is led by the South Carolina Commission on…

  13. 75 FR 16097 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice of Availability of Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed South Carolina Electric and Gas Company's application for license for the Saluda Hydroelectric... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice...

  14. 75 FR 43964 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice of Availability of Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice of... Energy Projects has reviewed South Carolina Electric and Gas Company's application for license for the.... Enter the docket number excluding the last three digits in the docket number field to access...

  15. University Affiliated Facilities Program of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winthrop Coll., Rock Hill, SC.

    The University Associated Facilities (UAF) Program of South Carolina is comprised of 24 colleges and universities under a grant awarded to Winthrop College and the University of South Carolina. Objectives of the program are to (1) provide interdisciplinary training to students from a broad range of disciplines in the evaluation and management of…

  16. Teenage Pregnancy in South Carolina: Everybody's Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This publication examines in detail the problem of teenage pregnancy in South Carolina. Following the executive summary and a listing of eight recommendations based on the report, chapter 1 presents tables of selected vital statistics related to teen pregnancy in South Carolina. All statistics are shown by county and by Department of Health and…

  17. 50 CFR 32.60 - South Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false South Carolina. 32.60 Section 32.60 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.60 South Carolina. The following...

  18. Paleoseismic investigations in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Talwani, P.; Rajendran, C.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    In the last decade paleoseismological investigations have been carried out in South Carolina by USC, USGS, and EBASCO. The results of these have led to the detection of over 50 paleoliquefaction features. These are concentrated in the meizoseismal area of the 1886 Charleston earthquake, in the Myrtle Beach-Georgetown area (about 100 km NE of Charleston) and in the Bluffton Hilton Head area (about 100 SW of Charleston). At each location several liquefaction features have been discovered and dated. Radiocarbon dates suggest the occurrence of at least 6 and possibly 7 events in the SC Coastal Plain during the Holocene. In the Bluffton area several locations were associated with events dated at 600, 1,200, 2,200, 3,200, and 5,000 YBP. The 600, 1,200, 3,200, and 5,000 YBP dates were also observed at Charleston. In the northern sites several features dated at 600, 1,200, and 1,800 YBP. The 1,800 YBP event was observed only at the northern site and the 2,200 YBP event only at the southern site. These observations suggest that two sources other than Charleston may have been active in the Holocene, one located 100 km to the NE and another 100 km SW of Charleston.

  19. 76 FR 14436 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority... Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) acting as itself and agent for the South Carolina Public...

  20. 76 FR 11522 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority... Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) acting as itself and agent for the South Carolina Public...

  1. 75 FR 19964 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice of Public Meeting on Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric & Gas Company, South Carolina; Notice of Public.... Enter the docket number (e.g., P-516) excluding the last three digits in the docket number field...

  2. The Ethnic History of South Carolina. American History, South Carolina History. Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston County School District, North Charleston, SC. Div. of Instruction.

    This guide for eighth grade teachers was the product of a Title IX ethnic studies project. The guide was designed to supplement the regular South Carolina state history textbooks and place in a more positive frame of reference the ethnic contributions that specific ethnic groups have made to South Carolina history. Written by teachers, the guide…

  3. Coastal Change Along the Shore of Northeastern South Carolina: The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W. A., (Edited By)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, conducted a 7-year, multi-disciplinary study of coastal erosion in northeastern South Carolina. The main objective was to understand the geologic and oceanographic processes that control sediment movement along the region's shoreline and thereby improve projections of coastal change. The study used high-resolution remote sensing and sampling techniques to define the geologic framework and assess historic shoreline change. Based on these findings, oceanographic-process studies and numerical modeling were carried out to determine the rates and directions of sediment transport along South Carolina's Grand Strand.

  4. South Carolina State Library Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    The current strategic plan of the South Carolina State Library contains five goals: provide information resources and services to meet the needs of the people of South Carolina; provide statewide programs to support local library services; serve as the advocate for libraries in South Carolina; encourage cooperation among libraries of all types;…

  5. South Carolina State Library Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    The current strategic plan of the South Carolina State Library contains five goals: (1) Provide information resources and services to meet the needs of the people of South Carolina; (2) Provide statewide programs to support local library services; (3) Serve as the advocate for libraries in South Carolina; (4) Encourage cooperation among libraries…

  6. RCP Local School Projects in South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    One of 6 state reports of projects and programs operating in cooperation with the Regional Curriculum Project, the document highlights major curriculum-change programs in South Carolina which were initiated in 1966. The 4 projects reported are "Curriculum Study in Berkeley County," which had as its purpose the identification and elimination of…

  7. South Carolina Guide for Small Business Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Ellen C.; Elliott, Ronald T.

    This guide for small business management in South Carolina addresses the three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. The guide contains suggestions for specific classroom activities for each domain. Each of the 11 units or tasks in the guide contains a competency statement followed by performance objectives, job-relevant…

  8. Raising the Economic Level in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Linda

    1976-01-01

    This article reports the activities and successes of the "Special Schools" operated by South Carolina's Technical Education System (TEC), which provide local people with pre-employment training individually designed for new industries moving into the community. In 14 years, 53,903 people have completed job training for 451 new and expanding…

  9. [A Profile of Union County, South Carolina].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen C.; McLean, Edward L.

    Now almost totally dependent on textile production, heavily forested Union County, South Carolina, was primarily agricultural until the 20th century. By 1970, 65% of the population depended on manufacturing and only 4% of the workers on farming. From 1920 to 1970 the population was characterized by a rural-to-urban shift and by outmigration,…

  10. An Ecological Regional Analysis of South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.; Robinson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This study of the counties of South Carolina introduces a limited purpose, modifiable technology that is designed to reproduce the rapid discovery strategy of the natural sciences. It uses factor analysis to identify types of communities and the threats they face, and evaluates their success in dealing with these by comparisons based on…

  11. South Carolina Guide for Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pough, Carmen; Evans, Hattie

    South Carolina's Guide to Child Development addresses three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. The first unit of the guide, Child Development I, concerns the processes of understanding prenatal development, caring for an infant, providing care for children between 1 and 6 years of age, and delivering care for the…

  12. South Carolina Trade Examinations Handbook. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Shirley J.

    The South Carolina Trade Examinations for trade and industrial education teachers are administered semiannually by the Office of Vocational Education. This handbook is designed to provide prospective trade and industrial education teachers, vocational administrators, State Department of Education personnel, and other interested parties with…

  13. [A Profile of Williamsburg County, South Carolina].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen C.; McLean, Edward L.

    Williamsburg County, South Carolina, is an almost entirely rural area near the coast. Although nearly 50% of the population is under 21, there has been a sharp decline in population since its high in 1950. The outmigration, prounounced for black youth, is caused by a lack of industrial opportunities, although there is slow, steady industrial…

  14. The South Carolina Framework for Music Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Ray

    This document is a South Carolina curriculum model that identifies four broad areas of study. These components, which should be present in all music education courses, are: (1) aesthetic perception and concept development; (2) creative expression and skills development; (3) music heritage, both historical and cultural; and (4) aesthetic valuing,…

  15. South Carolina Kids Count Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Kids Count, Columbia.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 44 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  16. Arbovirus surveillance in South Carolina, 1996-98.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, A; Dowda, H E; Tolson, M W; Karabatsos, N; Vaughan, D R; Turner, P E; Ortiz, D I; Wills, W

    2001-03-01

    Arboviruses isolated and identified from mosquitoes in South Carolina (USA) are described, including new state records for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLE), Flanders virus, Tensaw virus (TEN), and a variant of Jamestown Canyon virus (JC). Mosquitoes were collected at 52 locations in 30 of 46 South Carolina counties beginning in June 1996, and ending in October 1998, and tested for arboviruses. Of 1,329 mosquito pools tested by virus isolation (85,806 mosquitoes representing 34 mosquito species or complexes), 15 pools were positive. Virus isolations included EEE from 1 pool each of Anopheles crucians complex and Culex erraticus; a variant of JC from 1 pool of An. crucians complex; a California serogroup virus from 1 pool of Aedes atlanticus/tormentor; TEN from 5 pools of An. crucians complex and 1 pool each of Culex salinarius and Psorophora ciliata; Flanders virus from 1 pool of Culiseta melanura; and Potosi virus from 1 pool each of Aedes vexans, Coquillettidia perturbans, and Psorophora columbiae. Of 300 mosquito pools tested by antigen-capture assay for EEE and SLE (14,303 mosquitoes representing 16 mosquito species or complexes), 21 were positive for EEE and I was positive for SLE. Positive EEE mosquito pools by antigen-capture assay included An. crucians complex (14 pools), Anopheles punctipennis (1 pool), Anopheles quadrimaculatus (1 pool), Cq. perturbans (4 pools), and Cs. melanura (1 pool). One pool of Cx. salinarius was positive for SLE by antigen-capture assay. Arbovirus-positive mosquito pools were identified from 12 South Carolina counties, all located in the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and from 4 of 8 Carolina bays surveyed. PMID:11345423

  17. Coast and river mouths, Columbia, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Numerous rivers in Ecuador and Columbia stand out in this South American Pacific coastal scene (1.5N, 79.0W). This region has one of the highest rainfalls in the world with the consequent heavy cloud cover and it is rare to be able to photograph the surface. The Pacific mountain drainage area is small but produces a large volume of runoff and sediment flow into the ocean.

  18. 76 FR 53672 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment..., 2011. d. Applicant: South Carolina Electric & Gas Company. e. Name of Project: Saluda Hydroelectric... Boozer, Manager, Lake Management Programs, South Carolina Electric & Gas Company, 6248 Bush River...

  19. [Workshop for coordinating South Carolina`s pre-college systemic initiatives in science and mathematics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    On December 19, 1991, South Carolina`s Governor, established the Governor`s Mathematics and Sciences Advisory Board (MSAB) to articulate a vision and develop a statewide plan for improving science and mathematics education in South Carolina. The MSAB recognized that systemic change must occur if the achievement levels of students in South Carolina are to improve in a dramatic way. The MSAB holds two fundamental beliefs about systemic change: (1) All the elements of the science and mathematics education system must be working in harmony towards the same vision; and (2) Each element of the system must be held against high standards and progress must be assessed regularly against these standards.

  20. College Degrees in South Carolina: An Employer's Guide, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This Guide provides basic information to South Carolina employers regarding the nature of college degrees. It covers South Carolina law regarding the use of degrees, how to accurately describe degree needs when advertising for a position, how to evaluate a job applicant's claim of a degree, the growing problem of diploma mill degrees, and related…

  1. Standards Feedback Report. South Carolina Course Alignment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Policy Improvement Center (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report, prepared for the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education by the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC), provides a final list of recommended college readiness reference standards to be used as part of the South Carolina Course Alignment Project (SCCAP). The purpose of these standards is to serve as a common reference point…

  2. Business/Education Partnerships in South Carolina. Model Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Div. of Public Accountability.

    This document contains reports from school districts in South Carolina on the status of their successful partnerships between schools and businesses. They are examples of what is happening in South Carolina today and what could happen between other businesses and schools as new alliances are formed. These accounts describe new ideas for…

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: South Carolina, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in South Carolina for 2010. South Carolina introduced new tests in grades 3-8, so trend data that include 2009 are not available. Progress in narrowing achievement gaps at grade 10 was mixed. Comparable data were available for 2004-2009 at grade 10. (Contains 9 tables.) [For the…

  4. South Carolina State Library Annual Report, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    This report summarizes the activities of the South Carolina State Library for 1999-2000. The current strategic plan contains five strategic goals: provide information resources and services to meet the needs of the people of South Carolina; provide statewide programs to support local library services; serve as the advocate for libraries in South…

  5. Closing Radioactive Waste Tanks in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J.L.

    2000-08-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). Since the early 1950s, the primary mission of the site has been to produce nuclear materials for national defense. The chemical separations processes used to recover uranium and plutonium from production reactor fuel and target assemblies in the chemical separations area at SRS generated liquid high-level radioactive waste. This waste, which now amounts to approximately 34 million gallons, is stored in underground tanks in the F- and H-Areas near the center of the site. DOE is closing the High Level Waste (HLW) tank systems, which are permitted by SCDHEC under authority of the South Carolina Pollution Control Act (SCPCA) as wastewater treatment facilities, in accordance with South Carolina Regulation R.61-82, ''Proper Closeout of Wastewater Treatment Facilities''. To date, two HLW tank systems have been closed in place. Closure of these tanks is the first of its kind in the US. This paper describes the waste tank closure methodologies, standards and regulatory background.

  6. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  7. 76 FR 13962 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina: Prevention of Significant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the South Carolina State Implementation Plan (SIP), submitted by the State of South Carolina, through the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC), to EPA on December 2, 2010, for parallel processing. The proposed SIP revision modifies South Carolina's New Source Review (NSR) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)......

  8. 76 FR 22817 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; South Carolina; Update to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ...EPA is publishing this action to provide the public with notice of the update to the South Carolina State Implementation Plan (SIP) compilation. In particular, materials submitted by South Carolina that are incorporated by reference (IBR) into the South Carolina SIP are being updated to reflect EPA-approved revisions to South Carolina's SIP that have occurred since the last update. In this......

  9. Mineral resource assessment of pegmatite minerals in the Greenville 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; D'Agostino, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral resources of the Greenville 1° x 2° quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina, were assessed between 1984 and 1990 under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The mineral resource assessments were made on the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and on the distribution of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences reported in the literature. This report is an assessment of the minerals associated with mica pegmatites in the Greenville quadrangle. It is based on the geology as mapped by Nelson and others (1989), on field studies conducted from 1952 to 1962 by the USGS for the Defense Minerals Exploration Administration (DMEA) and the concurrent examination of many of the known mica mines and prospects in Georgia, and on the published geologic literature and an unpublished report by K.H. Teague on file with the South Carolina Development Board, Division of Geology, in Columbia, S.C.

  10. The distribution of the bats of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Jennifer M.; Menzel, Michael A.; Ford, W. Mark; Edwards, John W.; Sheffield, Steven R.; Kilgo, John C.; Bunch, Mary S.

    2003-03-01

    Menzel. J.M., M.A. Menzel, W.M. Ford, J.W. Edwards, S.R. Sheffield, J.C. Kilgo, and M.S. Bunch. 2003. The distribution of the bats of South Carolina. Southeastern Nat. 2(1): 121-152. There is a paucity of information available about the distribution of bats in the southeastern United States. We synthesized records from museums, bat captures, and bats submitted for rabies testing to provide a more accurate and useful distribution for natural resource managers and those planning to research bats in South Carolina. Distributional information, including maps, collection localities within counties, and literature references, for all 14 species of bats that occur in South Carolina, has never been synthesized. To provide better information on the state's bat fauna, we have updated distributions for all species that occur in South Carolina.

  11. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes of South Carolina that are potential biomass energy sources.

  12. Connecting Learners: The South Carolina Educational Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This educational technology plan for South Carolina contains the following sections: (1) statewide progress related to the telecommunications infrastructure, professional development, video infrastructure, administrative infrastructure, and funding; (2) introduction to educational technology concepts, including major components and factors…

  13. Coastal Change Along the Shore of Northeastern South Carolina - The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A., (Edited By); Contributing authors: Schwab, W. C.; Gayes, P.T.; Morton, R.A.; Driscoll, N.W.; Baldwin, W.E.; Barnhardt, W.A.; Denny, J.F.; Harris, M.S.; Katuna, M.P.; Putney, T.R.; Voulgaris, G.; Warner, J.C.; Wright, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, conducted a 7-year, multidisciplinary study of coastal erosion in northeastern South Carolina. Shoreline behavior along the coast of Long Bay is dictated by waves, tidal currents, and sediment supply that act within the overall constraints of the regional geologic setting. Beaches are thin ribbons of sand that sit on top of layered sedimentary rocks, which have been deeply eroded by rivers and coastal processes over millions of years. Offshore of the beaches, these sedimentary rocks are exposed as hardgrounds over large expanses of shallow seafloor and are locally overlain by a discontinuous veneer of sandy sediment generally less than 1 m thick. Rates of shoreline retreat largely depend on the geologic framework of the shoreface that is being excavated by ocean processes. Mainland-attached beaches have remained relatively stable, whereas barrier islands have experienced large shifts in shoreline position. In this sediment-limited region, erosion of the shoreface and inner shelf probably contributes a significant amount of new material to the beach system. Oceanographic studies and numerical modeling show that sediment transport varies along the coast, depending on the type and travel path of storms that impact Long Bay, but the long-term net transport direction is generally from north to south. Changes in storm activity that might accompany climate change, coupled with anticipated increases in sea-level rise, are expected to strongly affect low-lying, heavily developed areas of the coast.

  14. Approved Teacher Education Programs in South Carolina 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    In this booklet on approved teacher education programs in South Carolina, brief statements are presented on reciprocity policies, Master of Arts in Teaching certification, required examinations and minimum scores in specific teaching areas, and conditional certification procedures. A list of the 28 teacher education institutions in South Carolina…

  15. Earthquakes in South Carolina and Vicinity 1698-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, Richard L.; Talwani, Pradeep; Stevenson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This map summarizes more than 300 years of South Carolina earthquake history. It is one in a series of three similar State earthquake history maps. The current map and the previous two for Virginia and Ohio are accessible at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1017/ and http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1221/. All three State earthquake maps were collaborative efforts between the U.S. Geological Survey and respective State agencies. Work on the South Carolina map was done in collaboration with the Department of Geological Sciences, University of South Carolina. As with the two previous maps, the history of South Carolina earthquakes was derived from letters, journals, diaries, newspaper accounts, academic journal articles, and, beginning in the early 20th century, instrumental recordings (seismograms). All historical (preinstrumental) earthquakes that were large enough to be felt have been located based on felt reports. Some of these events caused damage to buildings and their contents. The more recent widespread use of seismographs has allowed many smaller earthquakes, previously undetected, to be recorded and accurately located. The seismicity map shows historically located and instrumentally recorded earthquakes in and near South Carolina

  16. Workshop for coordinating South Carolina`s pre-college systemic initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-26

    The goal of the South Carolina Statewide Systemic Initiative (SC SSI) is to provide quality and effective learning experiences in science and mathematics to all people of South Carolina by affecting systemic change. To accomplish this goal, South Carolina must: (1) coordinate actions among many partners for science and mathematics change; (2) place the instruments of change into the hands of the effectors of change - teachers and schools; and (3) galvanize the support of policy makers, parents, and local communities for change. The SC SSI proposes to establish a network of 13 regional mathematics and science HUBs. The central idea of this plan is the accumulation of Teacher Leaders at each HUB who are prepared in special Curriculum Leadership Institutes to assist other teachers and schools. The HUB becomes a regional nexus for delivering services to schools who request assistance by matching schools with Teacher Leaders. Other initiatives such as the use of new student performance assessments, the integration of instructional technologies into the curriculum, a pilot preservice program, and Family Math and Family Science will be bundled together through the Teacher Leaders in the HUBs. Concurrent policy changes at the state level in teacher and administrator certification and recertification requirements, school regulations and accountability, and the student performance assessment system will enable teachers and schools to support instructional practices that model South Carolina`s new state Curriculum Frameworks in Mathematics and Science.

  17. Hydrologic aspects of Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, September 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuck-Kolben, R. E.; Cherry, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Hurricane Hugo, with winds in excess of 135 miles per hour(mi/h), made landfall near Charleston, S.C., early on the morning of September 22, 1989. It was the most destructive hurricane ever experienced in South Carolina. The storm caused 35 deaths and $7 billion in property damage in South Carolina (Purvis, 1990).This report documents some hydrologic effects of Hurricane Hugo along the South Carolina coast. The report includes maps showing storm-tide stage and profiles of the maximum storm-tide stages along the outer coast. Storm-tide stage frequency information is presented and changes in beach morphology and water quality of coastal streams resulting from the storm are described.

  18. Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center at the Medical Univesity for South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center (Center) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC. The DOE is evaluating a grant proposal to authorize the MUSC to construct, equip and operate the lower two floors of the proposed nine-story Center as an expansion of on-going clinical research and out-patient diagnostic activities of the Cardiology Division of the existing Gazes Cardiac Research Institute. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  19. 78 FR 19994 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina: New Source Review-Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... rule. On January 23, 2013, EPA proposed to approve these changes into the South Carolina SIP. See 78 FR... Acid Rain, respectively. However, these regulations are not part of South Carolina's federally approved... South Carolina's State Regulations 61-62.60, 62.61, 62.63 and 62.72 regarding NSPS, NESHAP and Acid...

  20. 78 FR 25069 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application Accepted for..., 2012 and March 19, 2013. d. Applicant: South Carolina Electric & Gas Company. e. Name of Project... Contact: Mr. Tommy Boozer, Manager, Lake Management Programs, South Carolina Electric & Gas Company,...

  1. Review of "How School Choice Can Create Jobs for South Carolina"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Joydeep

    2010-01-01

    The South Carolina Policy Council Education Foundation report, "How School Choice Can Create Jobs for South Carolina," argues that school choice, in the form of vouchers to attend private schools, would create significant job opportunities in five poor, rural counties of South Carolina. The report, however, relies almost exclusively on results of…

  2. 77 FR 11894 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; South Carolina; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ...EPA is proposing a limited approval of a revision to the South Carolina state implementation plan (SIP) submitted by the State of South Carolina, through the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC), on December 17, 2007, that addresses regional haze for the first implementation period. This revision addresses the requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act)......

  3. The High Cost of South Carolina's Low Graduation Rate. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Research has documented a crisis in South Carolina's high school graduation rate. While state officials report a graduation rate above 70 percent, researchers from South Carolina and elsewhere place the rate just above 50 percent, with rates among minority students lower than 50 percent. South Carolina's graduation rate is the worst of all 50…

  4. A Study of the Leadership Practices of South Carolina Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redish, Carlotta D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a report of a mixed method study that examines the leadership practices of black and white public school superintendents in the state of South Carolina. The researcher explored any self-perceived leadership practice differences, if existent, between black and white superintendents and, if so, were the race of the…

  5. South Carolina Job Placement Services Effectiveness Survey. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    A survey was conducted to determine the effectiveness of job placement services provided to secondary vocational students in South Carolina high schools and vocational centers, to identify characteristics of effective placement service programs, and to identify efforts made by schools to overcome sex bias. Survey instruments consisting of a…

  6. 78 FR 62001 - South Carolina Disaster #SC-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION South Carolina Disaster SC-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...: 07/07/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  7. South Carolina and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document details South Carolina's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Each member state receives a number of general services, plus access to targeted programs funded by grants, contracts and fees. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core…

  8. South Carolina Student Accountability System OSIRIS Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This manual expresses the South Carolina State Department of Education's understanding of the new, computerized school administration system called OSIRIS and the policy regarding its use with the Student Accountability System (SAS). The SAS is a method used to obtain a cumulative headcount of students served in certain programs specified in the…

  9. Annual Report of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, Columbia.

    The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education submits its report on significant events of the last year and reports briefly on the following: (1) enrollment information for the colleges and universities; (2) establishment of the Student Intern Program of S.C. designed to utilize qualified college and university students on specific projects of…

  10. Educational Trends in South Carolina. Office of Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Research.

    This publication is designed to provide users with trends in quantitative facts relevant to public education in South Carolina. Information for the 1985-86 school year is presented along with information beginning with the reference or base year of 1969-70. The reference year may vary due to the availability of data. The data are presented in…

  11. Degree Plans of Entering Freshmen at University of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Paul P.; McDill, James

    To assess the degree plans of entering freshmen at the University of South Carolina (U.S.C.), a questionnaire prepared by the American Council on Education was administered to incoming freshmen at U.S.C. and 527 other institutions of higher education during summer and fall orientation 1972. The resulting summary data included information on…

  12. South Carolina Field Recordings in the Archive of Folk Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Stephanie A., Comp.

    This document describes recordings of the Library of Congress's unique collections of folklife and ethnomusicology from South Carolina. Information given includes length of recording, name of recorder, dates of recording, and content of recording. Recordings include songs, spirituals, hymns, sermons, prayers, dialect tales, and street songs.…

  13. Reduction in Force: Policy & Procedure in South Carolina School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Robert E.; Woodson, Marvin C.

    Starting from a survey of research literature and court cases, researchers conducted a study of South Carolina school districts' policies and procedures concerning reductions in force (RIFs). The literature review indicated some of the conditions necessitating RIFs (such as state financial problems), methods of avoiding RIFs, and criteria for RIF…

  14. South Carolina Higher Education Statistical Abstract. Tenth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, Columbia.

    Information on higher education in South Carolina is presented in statistical form. The focus is on 10-year analysis of full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollments by level; 10-year analysis of headcount enrollments by level; 10-year analysis of headcount enrollments, technical colleges; 1987 opening fall enrollments; 1987 opening fall enrollments,…

  15. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of South Carolina. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

  16. Pediatricians' Attitudes Toward Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzemer, William L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey support the statement that pediatricians have a negative attitude toward the pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) in South Carolina, generally due to the physicians' feelings that the PNP is not competent at child illness management. Implications for pediatric residencies are discussed. (LBH)

  17. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  18. Business/Education Partnerships in South Carolina. Model Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Div. of Public Accountability.

    This report describes 38 model school-business partnerships that are being conducted in South Carolina. The 38 reports were gathered from 24 school districts and 3 statewide projects. Criteria for selection were that the partnerships must be in some way exemplary of the program and the school district must have reported in some detail their…

  19. The South Carolina Higher Education Access & Equity Program, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Access and Equity Program vision is to achieve educational equity for all students and faculty in higher education. Success in college should not be affected by a student's race. Minority enrollment should be at least proportional to the minority population in South Carolina and minority graduation rates should be comparable to the graduation…

  20. An Analysis of South Carolina Per Pupil State Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Susan L.

    2004-01-01

    In many states, including South Carolina, school choice is being discussed as perhaps the best way to both improve student achievement and spend education dollars more efficiently. The evidence from the 12 school choice programs currently running around the country is that the increased competition among public and private schools leads to more…

  1. South Carolina Higher Education Statistical Abstract, 2014. 36th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Mim, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The South Carolina Higher Education Statistical Abstract is a comprehensive, single-source compilation of tables and graphs which report data frequently requested by the Governor, Legislators, college and university staff, other state government officials, and the general public. The 2014 edition of the Statistical Abstract marks the 36th year of…

  2. School Financing in South Carolina, Recent Legislation and Funding Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Bobby L.

    This paper discusses five scenarios that have had an impact on school finance in the state of South Carolina during recent years. These scenarios include (1) the Education Finance Act of 1977 (EFA); (2) the Education Improvement Act of 1984 (EIA); (3) the issue of fiscal independence; (4) school fees; and (5) school bonds. The EFA was designed to…

  3. Cracking the Egg: The South Carolina Digital Library's New Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinson, Christopher G.; Boyd, Kate Foster

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the historical foundations of the South Carolina Digital Library, a collaborative statewide program that ties together academic special collections and archives, public libraries, state government archives, and other cultural resource institutions in an effort to provide the state with a comprehensive database of online…

  4. South Carolina Industrial Arts Safety Guide. Administrator and Instructor Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This administrator and instructor section of a South Carolina industrial arts safety guide includes sections on responsibility for school safety, safety programming for the teacher, emergency action, suggested forms and outlines, and facility design and layout. School board and superintendent, administrator, and teacher responsibilities for school…

  5. South Carolina Industrial Arts Safety Guide. Student Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This student section of a South Carolina industrial arts safety guide includes guidelines for developing a student safety program and three sections of shop safety practices. Safety program format, safety committees, safety inspection, and student accident investigation are discussed in the section on developing a student safety program. Set forth…

  6. Support for Instruction about Homosexuality in South Carolina Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lisa L.; Reiniger Belinda M.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed 534 South Carolina registered voters to determine their level of support for school-based sexuality education, including homosexuality education. Overall, support for sexuality education (and many sexuality education topics) was strong, but homosexuality was the least-supported subject in the survey. There was strong support for…

  7. The Education Improvement Act of 1984. State of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Governor's Office, Columbia.

    This booklet sets forth the provisions of the South Carolina Education Improvement Act. Statements of standards mandated by the State in the following areas are presented: (1) increasing academic standards; (2) strengthening student discipline and attendance; (3) providing more effective use of classroom learning time; (4) providing programs of…

  8. The 'Old English District': ESL Problems in South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintelli-Neary, Marguerite

    An examination of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction in York County, South Carolina focuses on community attitudes toward limited-English-proficient (LEP) residents. Factors discussed include the perception that virtually all residents speak English and that children who don't speak English fluently, generally Hispanics, will have left…

  9. South Carolina State Library Annual Report. 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    This report provides a summary of the activities of the South Carolina State Library. The highlight of the year was development and adoption of the "Agenda for Change," a program which makes the Library more responsive to the needs of public libraries. As a result, the Library evaluated its personnel needs and transferred vacant positions to areas…

  10. Approved Teacher Education Programs in South Carolina, 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This document provides information on the status of 28 teacher education institutions in South Carolina. For each institution the information includes accreditation status, approved programs, school level, dates of approval and expiration, and level of degree offered. Information is also given on teacher certification requirements for the state,…

  11. Coaching as Inquiry: The South Carolina Reading Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Diane; Mills, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Embedded within traditional notions of coaching are unstated expectations that (a) the coach is an expert and knows what it is that the other person should be doing and (b) based on his or her expertise, the coach should take actions to achieve his or her vision for the other person. Within the South Carolina Reading Initiative, however, literacy…

  12. Low-head tidal power in South Carolina. Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report details the possibilities of extracting tidal power from sites with moderate tides and naturally occurring storage locations (estuaries). The important points covered include: available power, power extraction, and the best locations and techniques to utilize the tides in South Carolina.

  13. Metamorphosed melange in the central Piedmont of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Mittwede, S.K.; Maybin, A.H. III )

    1989-09-01

    The Enoree melange is exposed in the central Piedmont of South Carolina near the boundary between the Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The melange is composed of ultramafic and mafic blocks in a highly deformed matrix of biotite-feldspar-quartz gneiss which has a composition consistent with a felsic-to-intermediate volcanic precursor. The mafic and ultramafic blocks are separated chemically and petrographically into four compositional groups: metagabbro-clinopyroxenite, websterite, orthopyroxenite, and metasomatized (steatitized) orthopyroxenite. Based on their chemistry and mineralogy, the blocks are clearly exotic relative to their metavolcaniclastic( ) matrix and likely originated as parts of a plutonic suite from the basal or forward part of the Carolina arc terrane. If the Piedmont terrane-Carolina terrane boundary is a continent-arc suture, then the Enoree melange probably formed in the accretionary prism at this convergent margin. The matrix gneisses are interpreted as reworked volcanic debris shed by the Carolina arc terrane edifice and accumulated as graywacke in the accretionary deposits. West-vergent structures in the matrix suggest that the melange was emplaced to its present tectonostratigraphic position either during docking of the Carolina terrane or during widespread Alleghenian thrusting.

  14. Scientists Engage South Carolina Community in Earthquake Education and Preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Beutel, E.; Jaume', S.; Levine, N.; Doyle, B.

    2008-12-01

    Scientists at the College of Charleston are working with the state of South Carolina's Emergency Management Division to increase awareness and understanding of earthquake hazards throughout South Carolina. As part of this mission, the SCEEP (South Carolina Earthquake Education and Preparedness) program was formed at the College of Charleston to promote earthquake research, outreach, and education in the state of South Carolina. Working with local, regional, state and federal offices, SCEEP has developed education programs for everyone from professional hazard management teams to formal and informal educators. SCEEP also works with the media to ensure accurate reporting of earthquake and other hazard information and to increase the public's understanding of earthquake science and earthquake seismology. As part of this program, we have developed a series of activities that can be checked out by educators for use in their classrooms and in informal education venues. These activities are designed to provide educators with the information and tools they lack to adequately, informatively, and enjoyably teach about earthquake and earth science. The toolkits contain seven activities meeting a variety of National Education Standards, not only in Science, but also in Geography, Math, Social Studies, Arts Education, History and Language Arts - providing a truly multidisciplinary toolkit for educators. The activities provide information on earthquake myths, seismic waves, elastic rebound, vectors, liquefaction, location of an epicenter, and then finally South Carolina earthquakes. The activities are engaging and inquiry based, implementing proven effective strategies for peaking learners' interest in scientific phenomena. All materials are provided within the toolkit and so it is truly check and go. While the SCEEP team has provided instructions and grade level suggestions for implementing the activity in an educational setting, the educator has full reign on what to showcase

  15. The Management Academy for Public Health: the South Carolina experience.

    PubMed

    Cumbey, Dorothy A; Ellison, Lu Anne

    2006-01-01

    In the late 1990s, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) was faced with the challenges of a workforce that was not prepared in public health; the impending loss of significant agency expertise, leadership, and institutional knowledge through retirement; the lack of available and accessible training; and continuing state budget cuts. Preparedness for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies was also of concern, a need made more urgent after 2001. To respond to current and emerging public health challenges, the SCDHEC had to have a workforce with the knowledge and skills necessary for the delivery of essential public health services. To address these challenges, the department partnered with the University of North Carolina in the pilot of the Management Academy for Public Health. The Management Academy is now integrated into the South Carolina workforce development strategy, and 199 staff members and 22 community partners have graduated from the program. Along with increased knowledge, skills, and abilities of individual staff and increased organizational and community capacity, a significant result of South Carolina's experience with the Management Academy for Public Health is the development of a training program for emergency preparedness modeled on the Management Academy. This highly successful program illustrates the replicability of the Management Academy model. PMID:16912610

  16. Barriers to a Backyard National Park: Case Study of African American Communities in Columbia, SC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Yen; Holmes, Nancy C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of the recreational behaviors, preferences, and opinions of African Americans in the Columbia, South Carolina area and identify potential barriers to visiting Congaree National Park. Focus groups with African American residents of the Columbia South Carolina area revealed that inadequate information, detachment from…

  17. An Analysis of the Implementation of the South Carolina Anti-Bullying Legislation in the Middle Schools Involved in the Abbeville, South Carolina, School District Lawsuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Canty, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the anti-bullying policies of 24 South Carolina middle schools that were involved in the "Abbeville" lawsuit. These schools sued the state of South Carolina alleging that the school finding system was inadequate. The schools are plagued with numerous problems including being among the lowest performing in the…

  18. A new occurrence of telluride minerals in South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, H.; Larson, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of drill cores from the Haile gold mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina, has revealed grains containing large amounts of Te with various combinations of Pb, Ag and Au in pyrite. These telluride minerals have so far not been identified. The nearby Brewer mine, on the basis of chemical evidence, also contains tellurides. The probable telluride localities in South Carolina are now expanded to three, significantly increasing the few reports of Te minerals from the Au deposits of the southeastern Piedmont, many of which are now considered to be volcanogenic. The occurrence of telluride minerals in gold ore from the Haile-Brewer area may help to explain the divergence in Au/Ag ratios reported in chemical analyses of drill core, ore samples and production records. Te, in addition, may be useful in geochemical exploration programmes in the SE Piedmont, including programmes using heavy mineral concentrates derived from stream alluvium. -R.S.M.

  19. Building a sustainable Academic Health Department: the South Carolina model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lillian Upton; Waddell, Lisa; Kyle, Joseph; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited resources available to public health, it is critical that university programs complement the development needs of agencies. Unfortunately, academic and practice public health entities have long been challenged in building sustainable collaborations that support practice-based research, teaching, and service. The academic health department concept offers a promising solution. In South Carolina, the partners started their academic health department program with a small grant that expanded into a dynamic infrastructure that supports innovative professional exchange and development programs. This article provides a background and describes the key elements of the South Carolina model: joint leadership, a multicomponent memorandum of agreement, and a shared professional development mission. The combination of these elements allows the partners to leverage resources and deftly respond to challenges and opportunities, ultimately fostering the sustainability of the collaboration. PMID:24667204

  20. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  1. Late Paleocene glyptosaur (Reptilia: Anguidae) osteoderms from South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cicimurri, David J.; Knight, James L.; Self-Trail, Jean; Ebersole, Sandy M.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of South Carolina osteoderms is significant because they expand the late Paleocene geographic range of glyptosaurines eastward from the US midcontinent to the Atlantic Coastal Plain and provide one of the few North American records of these lizards inhabiting coastal habitats. This discovery also brings to light a possibility that post-Paleocene expansion of this group into Europe occurred via northeastward migration along the Atlantic coast of North America.

  2. Geohydrologic framework of the coastal plain aquifers of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, Walter R.; Davis, Marvin E.; Speiran, Gary K.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of investigations of aquifers throughout the United States as a part of the RASA (Regional Aquifer System Analysis) program. These investigations provide a comprehensive regional understanding of groundwater resources throughout the Nation. The Coastal Plain aquifers in South Carolina are being studied as a part of this program. An important part of a description of the groundwater resources is the development of a geohydrologic framework. Such a framework delineates the aquifers through which groundwater flows and the confining units which retard the flow of groundwater between aquifers. The Coastal Plain of South Carolina is underlain by a wedge of sediments that thickens from its inner margin, the Fall Line, to the coast and consists of sand, silt, clay, and limestone of Late Cretaceous to Holocene age. These sediments are underlain by pre-Cretaceous rocks consisting of consolidated sedimentary rocks of Triassic age and a complex of metamorphic and igneous rocks similar to those found near the surface in the Piedmont province of the State. The geohydrologic framework that divides the sediments of the South Carolina Coastal Plain into the Coastal Plain aquifer system is delineated by eleven geohydrologic sections and four maps showing the configuration of the top or base of individual aquifers. Although flow within the Coastal Plain aquifer system is three dimensional, simplifying the system by dividing it into a framework of discrete hydrologic units can aid significantly in understanding the hydrology of the system. This framework is the basis for the aquifers used in potentiometric mapping, transmissivity mapping, geochemical analysis, and groundwater flow modeling for the South Carolina RASA program. (Lantz-PTT)

  3. Peat resource estimation in South Carolina. Final report, Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, M.; Andrejko, M.; Corvinus, D.; Tisdale, M.

    1982-01-01

    South Carolina has few indigenous energy resources. Most widely known and utilized are hydropower, wood, and solar. Peat is a material composed of partially decomposed organic matter that, after burial for long periods of time, may eventually become coal. Peat is utilized as an energy resource for the production of electricity and for home heating in Europe and the Soviet Union. There are peat deposits in South Carolina, but peat has never been used as an energy resource within the state. This report presents the results of the two years of a planned four-year study of the quantity and energy potential of peat in South Carolina. In this year's survey two activities were undertaken. The first was to visit highly probable peat deposits to confirm the presence of fuel-grade peat. The second was to survey and characterize in more detail the areas judged to be of highest potential as major resources. The factors carrying the greatest weight in our determination of priority areas were: (1) a description of peat deposits in the scientific literature or from discussions with state and federal soil scientists; (2) mention of organic soils on soil maps or in the literature; and (3) information from farmers and other local citizens.

  4. AN OVERVIEW OF BIOFUELS PROCESS DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.; French, T.

    2010-02-03

    The South Carolina Bio-Energy Research Collaborative is working together on the development and demonstration of technology options for the production of bio-fuels using renewable non-food crops and biomass resources that are available or could be made available in abundance in the southeastern United States. This collaboration consists of Arborgen LLC, Clemson University, Savannah River National Laboratory, and South Carolina State University, with support from Dyadic, Fagen Engineering, Renewed World Energies, and Spinx. Thus far, most work has centered on development of a fermentation-based process to convert switchgrass into ethanol, with the concomitant generation of a purified lignin stream. The process is not feed-specific, and the work scope has recently expanded to include sweet sorghum and wood. In parallel, the Collaborative is also working on developing an economical path to produce oils and fuels from algae. The Collaborative envisions an integrated bio-fuels process that can accept multiple feedstocks, shares common equipment, and that produces multiple product streams. The Collaborative is not the only group working on bio-energy in South Carolina, and other companies are involved in producing biomass derived energy products at an industrial scale.

  5. Modification of selected South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2012-01-01

    Historic scour was investigated at 231 bridges in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces of South Carolina by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation. These investigations led to the development of field-derived envelope curves that provided supplementary tools to assess the potential for scour at bridges in South Carolina for selected scour components that included clear-water abutment, contraction, and pier scour, and live-bed pier and contraction scour. The envelope curves consist of a single curve with one explanatory variable encompassing all of the measured field data for the respective scour components. In the current investigation, the clear-water abutment-scour and live-bed contraction-scour envelope curves were modified to include a family of curves that utilized two explanatory variables, providing a means to further refine the assessment of scour potential for those specific scour components. The modified envelope curves and guidance for their application are presented in this report.

  6. Solar energy system economic evaluation for Wormser Columbia, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Energy System is not economically beneficial under the assumed economic conditions at the sites considered. Economic benefits from this system depend on decreasing the initial investment and the continued increase in the cost of conventional energy. Decreasing the cost depends on favorable tax treatment and continuing development of solar energy technology. Fuel cost would have to increase drastically while the cost of the system would have to remain constant or decrease for the system to become economically feasible.

  7. 76 FR 16593 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina: Prevention of Significant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... 2, 2008 (73 FR 31368), rule which conditionally approved South Carolina's NNSR program. South... in the SIP. \\1\\ On June 2, 2008 (73 FR 31368), EPA disapproved provisions in South Carolina's PSD and... ethanol through a natural fermentation process (hereafter referred to as the ``Ethanol Rule'') from...

  8. LONG-TERM EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS IN CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gori, P.L.; Greene, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Charleston, South Carolina, area offers a unique opportunity to conduct studies that give insight into the implementation of policy for long-term earthquake preparedness at the local level. Research by Greene and Gori documented the low state of preparedness in 1981. Recent studies show that earthquake preparedness activities are now occurring in Charleston. Since 1981, increased national attention has been used by local citizens in Charleston to overcome political, informational, social, organizational, and economic barriers which tend to retard the adoption and implementation of earthquake mitigation policies.

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

  10. Research-Infused STEM Reform at South Carolina State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel M., Jr.; Anderson, J. A.; Adzievski, K.

    2006-12-01

    South Carolina State University (SCSU) has embarked upon a mission to transform its science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines by offering more scholarships to students talented in the sciences, by introducing advanced topics in the introductory STEM courses, and by expanding research opportunities for STEM students. Specific examples will be provided from physics and astronomy. Program accomplishments after one year of operation will be highlighted, along with the difficulties of instituting such a broad-based reform. NSF HBCU-UP Award #0506062

  11. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    McDermott, S; Szwejbka, L; Mann, H; Durkin, M; Callaghan, W

    2001-05-01

    This study presents evidence that over 20 percent of pregnant women with a UTI in South Carolina did not have an antibiotic pharmacy claim within 14 days of diagnosis. Untreated maternal UTI in pregnancy was associated with a 22 percent increased risk for MR/DD in the infant compared to the risk for women who had a UTI and a pharmacy claim for an antibiotic and 31 percent increased risk compared to women who did not have a UTI. The importance of medications compliance should be emphasized in the care of pregnant women. PMID:11381775

  12. Perceptions of a Nearby Exurban Protected Area in South Carolina, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, David B.; Lawton, Laura J.

    2008-03-01

    To address the dearth of literature on the relations between local residents in urban areas and nearby higher-order exurban protected areas, this study examined the perceptions of Columbia (South Carolina) residents toward Congaree National Park. Mail-out survey results from a random sample of 455 adult residents showed positive overall attitudes toward the park, although this did not extend to a desire to personally volunteer in park activities. Cluster analysis on the basis of seven perceptual statements produced three groups: “very enthusiastic park supporters” (VEPS), accounting for one fourth of the sample; “less enthusiastic park supporters” (LEPS), accounting for approximately one half of the sample; and “ambivalents” (AMBS), accounting for the rest. The AMBS tend to be younger than members of the other clusters and have higher income, but enthusiasm was more clearly related to high levels of interaction and awareness relative to the park. Managerial implications of the study are considered, including the need to encourage higher levels of park awareness and visitation, as well as more ecologically responsible behavior, among residents of the greater Columbia urban area.

  13. South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Update. Volume 2, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Dr. Garrison Walters, executive director of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, observes that a better job must be done in making others across the country more aware that South Carolina has an outstanding system of higher education. Despite its considerable strengths in higher education, the state has to do…

  14. South Carolina School Food Service Programs: A Study To Determine Fiscal Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Karl E.; Swann, John M.; Taylor, Susan L.

    This report identifies those qualities and characteristics that are usually associated with efficiently and effectively operated school food-service programs. Data were extracted from district audit reports filed with the South Carolina State Department of Education; from the South Carolina Department of Education Office of School Food-services;…

  15. Access Guide to South Carolina State Parks for People with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism, Columbia. Div. of Engineering and Planning.

    The guide was developed to assist physically handicapped persons in using South Carolina State Parks. It describes some of the accessibility problems identified in a 1986 Inventory of Handicapped Accessibility in South Carolina State Parks and Welcome Centers. It is noted that building construction since 1967 has met handicapped design criteria…

  16. Retaining Graduates of South Carolina Public Colleges and Universities. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    With significant investments being made in higher education, particularly through merit-based student financial aid programs intended to encourage enrollment and graduation from the state's colleges, and the need for increased numbers of college graduates in South Carolina, the question of whether graduates of South Carolina's colleges and…

  17. Graduation Rates in South Carolina Public High Schools: The Effect of School Size and Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Thomas E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study included a comparison of the graduation rates among high schools in South Carolina closely analyzing school size and socioeconomic status. The purpose for the study was to answer two questions: What patterns and relationships exist between school size and graduation rates at high schools in South Carolina? What patterns and…

  18. Longitudinal Trend Analysis of Performance Indicators for South Carolina's Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Mohammad Nurul

    2010-01-01

    This study included an analysis of the trend of performance indicators for the technical college sector of higher education in South Carolina. In response to demands for accountability and transparency in higher education, the state of South Carolina developed sector specific performance indicators to measure various educational outcomes for each…

  19. Higher Education in South Carolina: A Briefing on the State's Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    South Carolina is home to a robust higher education system including 33 public institutions including 3 research universities, 10 comprehensive four-year universities, 4 two-year regional campuses of the University of South Carolina and 16 technical colleges. The State is also home to a number of independent and private colleges including: 23…

  20. The South Carolina Education Finance Act of 1977: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Marvin R.

    The South Carolina Education Finance Act of 1977 aims toward equalization of public school finance in South Carolina. A major goal is the state provision of 70 percent of school funding. The bill contains three other major provisions: the Defined Minimum Program (DMP), the Index of Taxpaying Ability, and the Weighted Pupil/Base Pupil calculation.…

  1. South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Annual Accountability Report, Fiscal Year 2004-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (CHE) serves as the coordinating board for South Carolina's 33 public institutions of higher learning and is responsible for serving a dual role within state government acting both as an advocate for higher education as well as an oversight entity on behalf of the General Assembly. The agency's…

  2. Prepared in Mind and Resources? A Report on Public Higher Education in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alacbay, Armand; Poliakoff, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed into law the South Carolina Higher Education Efficiency and Administrative Policies Act, maintaining the transparency and accountability that lead to increased academic quality and affordability at colleges and universities. It is in this context that ACTA (American Council of Trustees and…

  3. School District Organization in South Carolina: Evaluating Performance and Fiscal Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This report examines school district size and organization in South Carolina and their impact on student achievement and fiscal efficiency. A brief overview discusses the history of school district organization since the Civil War, the current distribution of districts across size categories in South Carolina and the nation, variations in school…

  4. Inherit the Policy: A Sociocultural Approach to Understanding Evolutionary Biology Policy in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    South Carolina biology Indicator 5.6 calls for students to "Summarize ways that scientists use data from a variety of sources to investigate and critically analyze aspects of evolutionary theory" (South Carolina Department of Education, 2006). Levinson and Sutton (2001) offered a sociocultural approach to policy that considers cultural…

  5. 78 FR 57838 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 21-Dorchester County, South Carolina, Authorization of Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... inviting public comment (78 FR 34639, 06-10-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Production Activity, AGFA Materials Corporation, (Photographic Film Cutting), Goose Creek, South Carolina On..., within Site 16 of FTZ 21, in Goose Creek, South Carolina. The notification was processed in...

  6. The Glass Cliff: An Examination of the Female Superintendency in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Blanche Boyd

    2013-01-01

    South Carolina public school districts are confronted with a series of difficult circumstances and rely more on female superintendents than the national average. The investigation of female South Carolina superintendents was guided by the glass cliff conceptual framework. The glass cliff represents situations where females are promoted over males…

  7. 77 FR 70992 - Foreign-Trade Zone 38-Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 38--Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; ZF Transmissions Gray Court, LLC, (Automatic Transmissions), Gray Court, SC The South Carolina State Ports...

  8. 33 CFR 165.709 - Security Zone; Charleston Harbor, Cooper River, South Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Cooper River, South Carolina. 165.709 Section 165.709 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.709 Security Zone; Charleston Harbor, Cooper River, South Carolina. (a) Regulated area. The Coast Guard is establishing a fixed security zone on all waters of the Cooper River, bank-to-bank and...

  9. 33 CFR 165.709 - Security Zone; Charleston Harbor, Cooper River, South Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Cooper River, South Carolina. 165.709 Section 165.709 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.709 Security Zone; Charleston Harbor, Cooper River, South Carolina. (a) Regulated area. The Coast Guard is establishing a fixed security zone on all waters of the Cooper River, bank-to-bank and...

  10. South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment. 92-93 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment, Rock Hill.

    This report outlines and evaluates the 1992-93 accomplishments of the South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment and addresses future directions the Center and its programs will be taking. Following a historical overview and a profile of the South Carolina teacher, the main body of the document evaluates the following programs: (1) Minority…

  11. Annual Report of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, January, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, Columbia.

    The 1977-78 fiscal year annual report of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education is presented. The following topics are addressed: changes in commission membership, federally funded programs, the South Carolina Postsecondary Education Planning Commission (the 1202 commission), program approvals, health education, licensing non-public…

  12. 77 FR 75035 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... the June 6, 2012, proposed rule are being incorporated into the South Carolina SIP.\\1\\ See 77 FR 33386... 128 requirements. 77 FR 33380, 33386. In addition, EPA is correcting the footnote on page 45492 of the... determination that South Carolina's SIP meets certain CAA requirements.'' See 77 FR 45492. EPA has...

  13. A Consideration of the Social and Economic Costs to Citizens of South Carolina for Adult Illiteracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Rose Emily; Harris, Joan, Ed.

    Illiteracy is a social and economic problem in South Carolina. In 1980, 445,202 persons in the state, 25 years of age or older, had less than an elementary school education. In relation to other states, South Carolina is ranked second according to the percentage of the adult population with less than high school completion. Statistics show that…

  14. Planning status report, water resources appraisals for hydroelectric licensing: Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina - South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The water resources of the Cape Fear River Basin which covers approximately 8570 square mile in eastern North Carolina and South Carolina are evaluated. Data are presented on existing and potential water resource development, on water uses, e.g., for irrigation, industrial and municipal water supplies, or in thermal power plant cooling systems, and on the status of hydro plant licensing. Past and current planning studies are summarized. The information presented is current as of September 1981. (LCL)

  15. South Carolina interglacial sites and stage 5 sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollin, John T.; Hearty, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid and other studies have been made on the 30-km Pleistocene sections of the Intracoastal Waterway between Myrtle Beach and Little River, South Carolina. Our ratios differentiate the long-established Waccamaw (oldest), Canepatch, and Socastee formations. The ratios from the four laboratories that have worked in this area agree very well, and apparent conflicts with U-series dates may merely reflect an abundance of reworked corals. Our amino acid correlations with U-series coral dates in South Carolina, Bermuda, and the Mediterranean all argue that the classical Canepatch and its Horry Clay date from isotope stage 5e and not, as has been implied, from stage 7, 9, 11, or 13. Excavations and erosion have increased position-fixing problems along the Waterway, and "Canepatch" amino acid ratios and U-series dates (460,000 ± 100,000 yr B.P.) at "ICW5" may be from an older unit. The Canepatch shows the double marine transgression visible in many stage 5e deposits. Pollen shows that the second transgression occurred late in the interglaciation, and stratigraphic studies show that it reached 14 m. It therefore fits very well Antarctic ice-surge models of stage 5 sea level and climate. The Socastee adds to the evidence for one or more sea levels above 0 m late in stage 5.

  16. Mercury in bald eagle nestlings from South Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Jagoe, Charles H; Bryan, A Lawrence; Brant, Heather A; Murphy, Thomas M; Brisbin, I Lehr

    2002-10-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) may be at risk from contaminants in their diet and young birds may be particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure. To evaluate potential risks from dietary mercury exposure to eagle nestlings in South Carolina (USA), we surveyed mercury concentrations in 34 nestlings over two breeding seasons (1998 and 1999). Samples were also obtained from several post-fledging eagles in the region. Nestling feather mercury ranged from 0.61-6.67 micrograms Hg/g dry weight, nestling down mercury from 0.50-5.05 micrograms Hg/g dry weight, and nestling blood mercury from 0.02-0.25 microgram Hg/g wet weight. We did not detect significant differences in tissue mercury between nestlings from coastal and inland regions in contrast to some other studies of piscivorous birds. Mercury concentrations were much higher in the post fledging birds we sampled. Our data show that nestling eagles in South Carolina are accumulating mercury, and that concentrations in older birds may exceed regulatory guidelines. PMID:12528436

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyls in blue crabs from South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Mathews, T.D.

    1987-11-01

    Blue crabs are important members of the estuarine food web due to their numbers and their multiple roles as scavengers, predators and prey. Because of their omnivorous feeding characteristics, wide distribution an close association with bottom sediments, the potential exists for blue crabs to bioaccumulate pollutants residing in those sediments as has been shown for fiddler crabs. It follows that human health risk upon consumption of such crabs and biomagnification through the food web become primary concerns. During the spring of 1985, commercial crab fishermen in Beaufort County, South Carolina contacted the South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department (SCWMRD) concerning their perceptions of significantly declining catch rates in the Campbell Creek-Whale Branch area. Using knowledge of previously documented elevated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) levels in the sediments of the upper portion of Campbell Creek, the SCWMRD initiated analysis of crab tissue from the area to ascertain the body burdens of PCBs. Initial screening results indicated potentially significant levels of PCBs in blue crabs at which time, SCWMRD contacted the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) for more intensive study and definition of the situation. The work reported here was conducted between June and October 1985.

  18. Microclimates and energetics of free-living box turtles, Terrapene carolina, in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Penick, David N; Congdon, Justin; Spotila, James R; Williams, Joseph B

    2002-01-01

    We measured microclimate, field metabolic rates (FMRs), water flux, and activity patterns of telemetered box turtles (Terrapene carolina) in South Carolina from September 1987 to October 1988. Turtles were inactive for most of the winter and were active only sporadically during the rest of the year. Using the doubly labeled water method, we found that water flux averaged 8.8, 18.9, and 26.4 mL kg(-1) d(-1) in winter, spring, and summer/fall, respectively. FMR for the same periods averaged 0.028, 0.065, and 0.124 mL CO(2) g(-1) h(-1). Differences in FMR among seasons were significant but not between sexes. Using operative temperatures, we predicted standard and maximum metabolic rates of turtles. In winter, FMR was elevated above standard metabolic rates and close to maximum metabolic rates, whereas in spring and summer/fall, FMR fell midway between standard and maximum metabolic rates. We used a model to predict metabolic rates, geographical distribution, and potential reproductive output of box turtles across latitudes in eastern North America. Low FMR and low annual reproductive output may allow box turtles to survive and flourish in unpredictable resource environments by minimizing costs and risks, thereby maintaining greater lifetime reproductive success. PMID:11880978

  19. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 6, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The four States-Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina-that comprise Segment 6 of this Atlas are located adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico, or both. These States are drained by numerous rivers and streams, the largest being the Tombigbee, Alabama, Chattahoochee, Suwannee, St. Johns, Altamaha, and Savannah Rivers. These large rivers and their tributaries supply water to cities such as Columbia, S.C., Atlanta, Ga., and Birmingham, Ala. However, the majority of the population, particularly in the Coastal Plain which comprises more than one-half of the four-State area, depends on ground water as a source of water supply. The aquifers that contain the water are mostly composed of consolidated to unconsolidated sedimentary rocks, but also include hard, crystalline rocks in parts of three of the States. This chapter describes the geology and hydrology of each of the principal aquifers throughout the four-State area. Precipitation is the source of all the water in the four States of Segment 6. Average annual precipitation (1951-80) ranges from about 48 inches per year over a large part of central South Carolina and Georgia to about 80 inches per year in mountainous areas of northeastern Georgia and western South Carolina. (fig. 1) In general, precipitation is greatest in the mountains (because of their orographic effect) and near the coast, where water vapor, which has been evaporated primarily from the ocean and the gulf, is picked up by prevailing winds and subsequently condenses and falls as precipitation when reaching the shoreline. Much of the precipitation either flows directly into rivers and stream as overland runoff or indirectly as baseflow discharging from aquifers where the water has been stored for a short time. Accordingly, the areal distribution of average annual runoff from 1951 to 1980 (fig. 2) directly reflects that of average annual precipitation during the same period: runoff is greater in mountainous areas and near the coast

  20. A guidance manual for assessing scour potential using the South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Feaster, Toby D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a series of three field investigations of bridge scour in order to better understand regional trends of scour within South Carolina. The studies collected historic-scour data at approximately 200 riverine bridges including measurements of clear-water abutment, contraction, and pier scour, as well as live-bed contraction and pier scour. These investigations provided valuable insights for regional scour trends and yielded bridge-scour envelope curves for assessing scour potential associated with all components of scour at riverine bridges in South Carolina. The application and limitations of these envelop cureves were documents in three reports, Each repoort addresses different components of bridge scour and this, there is a need to develop an integrated procedure for applying the South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey and the South Carolina Department of Transportation initiated a cooperative effort to develop an integrated procedure and document the method in a guidance manual. In addition to developing the integrated procedure, field data from other investigations outside of South Carolina were used to verify the South Carolina bridge-source envelope curves.

  1. The 7Q10 in South Carolina water-quality regulation: Nearly fifty years later

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Cantrell, Wade M.

    2010-01-01

    The annual minimum 7-day average streamflow with a 10-year recurrence interval, often referred to as the 7Q10, has a long history of being an important low-flow statistic used in water-quality management in South Carolina as evidenced by its adoption into South Carolina law in 1967. State agencies, such as the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, use such lowflow statistics to determine Wasteload Allocations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System discharges, develop Total Maximum Daily Loads for streams, prepare the State Water Plan, and restrict the quantity of water that can be transferred out of basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, working cooperatively with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, is updating low-flow statistics at continuous-record streamflow gages in South Carolina on a basin-by-basin approach. Such statistics are influenced by length of record and hydrologic conditions under which the record was collected. Statewide low-flow statistics in South Carolina were last updated in 1987. Since that time several droughts have occurred with the most severe occurring from 1998-2002 and the most recent occurring from 2006-2009. The low-flow statistics for the Pee Dee River basin were the first to be completed in this ongoing investigation.

  2. Police as contributors to Healthy Communities: Aiken, South Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Frommer, P; Papouchado, K

    2000-01-01

    In Aiken, South Carolina, community policing has led to numerous innovative programs that have contributed to a healthy community. The MOMS and COPS (Managing Our Maternity System with Community Oriented Policing System) program has played a significant part in the county's 50% decrease in infant mortality since 1989 and contributed to Aiken's designation as an All-America City in 1997. Other programs include a mentoring program for at-risk teen girls; instant crime reporting with donated cellular phones; seminars for seniors to alert them to scams and common crimes; demolition of unsafe homes; free installation of smoke detectors; a child ID program; and parental education on child brain development. Images p251-a p252-a PMID:10968763

  3. Biting midges of the genus Culicoides in South Carolina zoos.

    PubMed

    Nelder, Mark P; Swanson, Dustin A; Adler, Peter H; Grogan, William L

    2010-01-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

  4. Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in South Carolina Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Nelder, Mark P.; Swanson, Dustin A.; Adler, Peter H.; Grogan, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

  5. Fuel Cell Research at the University of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zee, John W.

    2006-09-25

    Five projects were conducted in an effort to supplement the efforts of fuel cell research at the University of South Carolina and to contribute to the Technical Plan for Fuel Cells of the Department of Energy. These efforts include significant interaction with the industrial community through DOE funded projects and through the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (NSF-I/UCRC) for Fuel Cells at USC. The allocation of projects described below leveraged all of these sources of funding without overlap and redundancy. 1. "Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalyst For PEMFCs" (Dr. Branko Popov) 2. "Non Carbon Supported Catalysts" (Dr. John Weidner) 3. "Hydrogen Quality" (Dr. Jean St-Pierre) 4. "Gasket Materials: Mechanical and Chemical Stability in PEMFC" (Dr. Y.J. (Bill) Chao) 5. "Mathematical Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells," (Dr. Sirivatch (Vatch) Shimpalee)

  6. Central Energy System Modernization at Fort Jackson, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; Dirks, James A.

    2006-11-29

    An evaluation of technology options was conducted for the central energy systems at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. There were two objectives in conducting this study. From a broader viewpoint, the Army would like to develop a systematic approach to management of its central energy systems and selected Fort Jackson for this ''pilot'' study for a prospective Central Energy System Modernization Program. From a site-specific perspective, the objective was to identify the lowest life-cycle cost energy supply option(s) at Fort Jackson for buildings currently served by central boilers and chillers. This study was co-funded by the Army's Southeast Region and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Elder Mistreatment in South Carolina: The South Carolina Elder Mistreatment Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Zajac, Kristyn; Strachan, Martha; Hernandez, Melba A.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Acierno, Ron

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) derive prevalence estimates for elder mistreatment (emotional, physical, sexual, neglectful, and financial mistreatment of older adults [age 60 +]) in a randomly selected sample of South Carolinians; (b) examine correlates (i.e., potential risk factors) of mistreatment; and (c) examine incident…

  8. Energetics of free-living box turtles (Terrapene carolina) near Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Penick, D.N. )

    1992-08-01

    I measured field metabolic rates (FMR), water fluxes, and activity patterns of the box turtle Terrapene carolina on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken Co., SC, from September, 1987 to October, 1988. Doubly labeled water (HT[sup 18]O) measurements of production (field metabolic rates, FMR) of telemetered turtles were taken in conjunction with measurements of operative temperatures (T[sub e]), turtle movement patterns, and micrometerological data consisting of air, litter, and substrate temperatures, solar and total radiation, and wind speed. Operative temperatures were used to predict standard (SMR) and maximum (MMR) metabolic rates, and these were compared to field metabolic rates (FMR) of box turtles in South Carolina. Turtles were inactive for most of the winter and for long periods of time during the rest of the year. Water fluxes (ml/ kg*D) were 8.8, 18.9, and 26.4 in the winter, late spring, and early fall, respectively. There was no statistically significant sexual difference in FMR so these results were pooled for each season. Mean mass specific metabolic rates (ml CO[sub 2]/g*h) were 0.028, 0.0654, and 0.124 for the winter, spring, and fall, respectively. There was a significant difference in metabolic rates for the seasons of the year. In winter, FMR is substantially elevated above SMR and close to MMR, while in spring and fall FMRs are midway between SMR and MMR (SMR = 0.004, 0.010, and 0.017, and MMR = 0.034, 0.154, and 0.208 (ml CO[sub 2]/9*h) in the winter, spring, and fall, respectively). The low field metabolic rate of box turtles and low annual reproductive output is characteristic of a low energy specialist. This strategy may allow them to survive and flourish in an uncertain resource and reproductive environment by minimizing costs and risks, thereby maintaining greater lifetime reproductive output.

  9. Energetics of free-living box turtles (Terrapene carolina) near Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Penick, D.N.

    1992-08-01

    I measured field metabolic rates (FMR), water fluxes, and activity patterns of the box turtle Terrapene carolina on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken Co., SC, from September, 1987 to October, 1988. Doubly labeled water (HT{sup 18}O) measurements of production (field metabolic rates, FMR) of telemetered turtles were taken in conjunction with measurements of operative temperatures (T{sub e}), turtle movement patterns, and micrometerological data consisting of air, litter, and substrate temperatures, solar and total radiation, and wind speed. Operative temperatures were used to predict standard (SMR) and maximum (MMR) metabolic rates, and these were compared to field metabolic rates (FMR) of box turtles in South Carolina. Turtles were inactive for most of the winter and for long periods of time during the rest of the year. Water fluxes (ml/ kg*D) were 8.8, 18.9, and 26.4 in the winter, late spring, and early fall, respectively. There was no statistically significant sexual difference in FMR so these results were pooled for each season. Mean mass specific metabolic rates (ml CO{sub 2}/g*h) were 0.028, 0.0654, and 0.124 for the winter, spring, and fall, respectively. There was a significant difference in metabolic rates for the seasons of the year. In winter, FMR is substantially elevated above SMR and close to MMR, while in spring and fall FMRs are midway between SMR and MMR (SMR = 0.004, 0.010, and 0.017, and MMR = 0.034, 0.154, and 0.208 (ml CO{sub 2}/9*h) in the winter, spring, and fall, respectively). The low field metabolic rate of box turtles and low annual reproductive output is characteristic of a low energy specialist. This strategy may allow them to survive and flourish in an uncertain resource and reproductive environment by minimizing costs and risks, thereby maintaining greater lifetime reproductive output.

  10. 40 CFR 81.108 - Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.108 Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia Intrastate Air...

  11. 40 CFR 81.108 - Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.108 Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia Intrastate Air...

  12. 76 FR 81929 - South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Workshop for Santee Cooper Hydroelectric Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Workshop for Santee... Carolina. Participation at the workshop will be limited to Commission staff, NMFS, SCPSA, and the Corps... concerning the workshop should be directed to John Inabinet of SCPSA at (843) 761-4069. The workshop...

  13. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated

  14. "We're Number One!" How a First-Year Principal Won South Carolina's "Finest" Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Describes a number of specific projects undertaken by the new principal of an elementary school in Myrtle Beach (South Carolina) to build staff support and morale, student enthusiasm, and parent and community involvement. (PGD)

  15. South Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The South Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as definied by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Carolina.

  16. Wind Powering America: A New Wind Economy for South Carolina and Georgia Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    SC Energy Office: Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

    2013-02-12

    This report describes all activities undertaken by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) in cooperation with the states of Georgia and South Carolina to develop a public outreach program, including shared analytical and reference tools and other technical assistance.

  17. ASSESSING THE CONDITION OF SOUTH CAROLINA'S ESTUARIES: A NEW APPROACH INVOLVING INTEGRATED MEASURES OF CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP) was initiated in 1999 to assess the condition of the state's coastal habitats using multiple measures of water quality, sediment quality, and biological condition. Sampling has subsequently been expanded to incl...

  18. The utilization of LANDSAT imagery in nuclear power plant siting. [in Pakistan, South Carolina, and Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, A. J.; Rowlands, D.; Rizzo, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    LANDSAT imagery was used primarily to map geologic features such as lineaments, linears, faults, and other major geologic structures which affect site selection for a nuclear power plant. Areas studied include Pakistan, the South Carolina Piedmont, and Huelva, Spain.

  19. Characterization of storm runoff from selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conlon, Kevin J.; Reinhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect sufficient stormwater water-quality and flow data to document the type, concentration, and event load of selected constituents transported from South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) maintenance yards by stormwater runoff.

  20. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  1. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  2. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  3. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  4. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  5. 76 FR 41111 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina; 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ...EPA is taking final action to approve the December 13, 2007, submission submitted by the State of South Carolina, through the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) as demonstrating that the State meets the state implementation plan (SIP) requirements of sections 110(a)(1) and (2) of the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act) for the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient......

  6. 78 FR 37222 - Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... Settlement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Settlement. SUMMARY: Under 122(h... States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Stephen Reichlyn concerning the.... Environmental Protection Agency, Attn: Paula V. Painter, Superfund Division, 61 Forsyth Street SW.,......

  7. Prevalence and correlates of elder mistreatment in South Carolina: the South Carolina elder mistreatment study.

    PubMed

    Amstadter, Ananda B; Zajac, Kristyn; Strachan, Martha; Hernandez, Melba A; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Acierno, Ron

    2011-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) derive prevalence estimates for elder mistreatment (emotional, physical, sexual, neglectful, and financial mistreatment of older adults [age 60 +]) in a randomly selected sample of South Carolinians; (b) examine correlates (i.e., potential risk factors) of mistreatment; and (c) examine incident characteristics of mistreatment events. Random Digit Dialing (RDD) was used to derive a representative sample in terms of age and gender; computer-assisted telephone interviewing was used to standardize collection of demographic, correlate, and mistreatment data. Prevalence estimates and mistreatment correlates were obtained and subjected to logistic regression. A total of 902 participants provided data. Prevalence for mistreatment types (since age 60) were 12.9% emotional, 2.1% physical, 0.3% sexual, 5.4% potential neglect, and 6.6% financial exploitation by family member. The most consistent correlates of mistreatment across abuse types were low social support and needing assistance with daily living activities. One in 10 participants reported either emotional, physical, sexual, or neglectful mistreatment within the past year, and 2 in 10 reported mistreatment since age 60. Across categories, the most consistent correlate of mistreatment was low social support, representing an area toward which preventive intervention may be directed with significant public health implications. PMID:21602200

  8. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Wind Wave Energy Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Voulgaris, G.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) wave and current data were collected offshore of Myrtle Beach, SC for 2 months in 2001-02. This field measurement campaign was the second of a three-part experiment series. While the overall objective of the study is to describe the processes governing the circulation, wave propagation and sediment transport along the northern South Carolina coast, this presentation focuses on the wave energy dissipation over a heterogeneous seafloor over a distance of 6 km. The data were collected between November 9, 2001 and January 17, 2002. The instruments were placed along a transect crossing a large sand shoal in an area otherwise largely deprived of sand, at depths of 8 to 12 meters. The four instruments used, in order of decreasing distance from shore, were 600 and1200 KHz RDI ADCP's, a Nortek Aquadopp and a Sontek Argonaut-XR. Bathymetry and bottom characteristics such as depth and thickness of sand layer are available through USGS's coastal relief model and side scan surveys. Wind data are supplied by a large-scale numerical wind model. Its output is compared with wind data collected at Frying Pan Shoals buoy and at an anemometer placed at Spring Maid pier after the experiment. The SWAN wave model (Booij et al. 1999) was used to model the spectral wave transformation from the offshore buoy to the inner stations and to compare the observed wave energy dissipation to the available models. There was no extreme storm event during the deployment period. The maximum significant wave height observed was 1.6 meters at the offshore wave station, and the mean wave height was 0.8 meters. The mean period was between 5 and 7 seconds most of the time. Significant wave energy dissipation (up to 40% decrease in wave energy flux) across 6 km was observed. A shift of the spectral peak and a change in the spectral shape was observed in many events, which were not generally reproduced by the model. Sand and rock bottom

  9. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency for urban and small, rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are essential for the design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood insurance studies, and flood-plain management. Flood-frequency estimates are particularly important in densely populated urban areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a multistate approach to update methods for determining the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban and small, rural streams that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (Feaster and others, 2014). The multistate approach has the advantage over a single state approach of increasing the number of streamflow-gaging station (streamgages) available for analysis, expanding the geographical coverage that would allow for application of regional regression equations across state boundaries, and building on a previous flood-frequency investigation of rural streamgages in the Southeastern United States. This investigation was funded as part of a cooperative program of water-resources investigations between the USGS, the South Carolina Department of Transportation, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. In addition, much of the data and information for the Georgia streamgages was funded through a similar cooperative program with the Georgia Department of Transportation.

  10. Population demographics of two local South Carolina mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, D.P., Jr.; Otis, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) call-count index had a significant (P 2,300 doves and examined >6,000 individuals during harvest bag checks. An age-specific band recovery model with time- and area-specific recovery rates, and constant survival rates, was chosen for estimation via Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), likelihood ratio, and goodness-of-fit criteria. After-hatching-year (AHY) annual survival rate was 0.359 (SE = 0.056), and hatching-year (HY) annual survival rate was 0.118 (SE = 0.042). Average estimated recruitment per adult female into the prehunting season population was 3.40 (SE = 1.25) and 2.32 (SE = 0.46) for the 2 study areas. Our movement data support earlier hypotheses of nonmigratory breeding and harvested populations in South Carolina. Low survival rates and estimated population growth rate in the study areas may be representative only of small-scale areas that are heavily managed for dove hunting. Source-sink theory was used to develop a model of region-wide populations that is composed of source areas with positive growth rates and sink areas of declining growth. We suggest management of mourning doves in the Southeast might benefit from improved understanding of local population dynamics, as opposed to regional-scale population demographics.

  11. Fall food habits of ducks near Santee Refuge, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGilvrey, F.B.

    1966-01-01

    During the 1961 waterfowl hunting season, 360 stomachs of 10 duck species were collected from hunters near the Santee National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Marion, South Carolina. Based on percentage of total volume, 20 of the most important foods are listed. The six most important duck species in the kill were: mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), wood duck (Aix sponsa), widgeon (Mareca americam), pintail (Anas acuta) , black duck ( Anas rubripes) , and green-winged teal (Anas carolinensis). Six plant species made up 5 percent or more of the total volume of food items found in the stomachs of all ducks. Only seeds of oaks (Quercus sp.), corn, sweet gum (Liquidambar Styraciflua), and buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) were consumed. Some seed, but mostly the vegetative portions of hydrochloa (Hydrochloa carolinensis) and only the vegetative portions of southern rice cutgrass (Leersia hexandra) were taken. The more important game ducks concentrated on the refuge farmlands when water levels were below 72 feet mean sea level (msl). When levels reached 75 feet msl, natural foods became available, ducks dispersed from refuge areas, and hunting success increased greatly.

  12. Shorebird use of South Carolina managed and natural coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, Louise M.; Haig, Susan M.

    1996-01-01

    While many migrating and wintering shorebird (Charadriiformes) species face declines in quality and quantity of natural stopover sites, diked wetlands managed for shorebirds may provide supplemental habitat. We describe an integrative shorebird-waterfowl management strategy used at Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center on South Island, South Carolina, during 3 winter-spring seasons (1991-93). We compared shorebird use and invertebrate density between diked, managed wetlands and adjacent natural coastal mudflat areas. About 3,000 shorebirds overwintered each year at the site. Migration numbers peaked at 15,000-19,000 during late May. In 1991, shorebird density and absolute numbers were higher (P < 0.05) in managed wetlands at high tide than natural mudflats at low tide. In 1993, we counted shorebird density at low tide both in managed wetlands and Mother Norton Shoals, the largest natural area. During February, shorebird frequency was higher in Mother Norton Shoals and lower in managed wetlands than expected values based on area (P < 0.005). In contrast, from March to May, shorebird frequency was higher in managed wetlands and lower in natural mudflats than expected (P < 0.005 for each month). Invertebrate density from March to May was generally greater in managed wetlands than at Mother Norton Shoals, which may explain shorebird preference during that time. Greater invertebrate density did not explain the pattern in February. Mean water depth in managed wetlands for each shorebird species was <5 cm except for American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) which used deeper water (xI? = 8.4 cm, SD = 4.5). Results indicate that an integrative shorebird-waterfowl management strategy provides supplemental shorebird habitat at high tide, and managed wetlands can be preferred to local natural mudflat areas at low tide.

  13. What Is the Penny Buying for South Carolina? Assessment of the Fifth Year of the South Carolina Education Improvement Act of 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Div. of Public Accountability.

    The Education Improvement Act (EIA), legislated in 1984, was one of the steps South Carolina has undertaken to reform and improve its system of public education. The EIA contained provisions addressing seven major educational goals: (1) raising student performance; (2) teaching and testing basic skills; (3) elevating the teaching profession; (4)…

  14. NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research: South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of an appropriate relationship model is critical for reliable prediction of future urban growth. Identification of proper variables and mathematic functions and determination of the weights or coefficients are the key tasks for building such a model. Although the conventional logistic regression model is appropriate for handing land use problems, it appears insufficient to address the issue of interdependency of the predictor variables. This study used an alternative approach to simulation and modeling urban growth using artificial neural networks. It developed an operational neural network model trained using a robust backpropagation method. The model was applied in the Myrtle Beach region of South Carolina, and tested with both global datasets and areal datasets to examine the strength of both regional models and areal models. The results indicate that the neural network model not only has many theoretic advantages over other conventional mathematic models in representing the complex urban systems, but also is practically superior to the logistic model in its capability to predict urban growth with better - accuracy and less variation. The neural network model is particularly effective in terms of successfully identifying urban patterns in the rural areas where the logistic model often falls short. It was also found from the area-based tests that there are significant intra-regional differentiations in urban growth with different rules and rates. This suggests that the global modeling approach, or one model for the entire region, may not be adequate for simulation of a urban growth at the regional scale. Future research should develop methods for identification and subdivision of these areas and use a set of area-based models to address the issues of multi-centered, intra- regionally differentiated urban growth.

  15. Microbial and Geochemical Zoning of the Middendorf Aquifer, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.

    2002-12-01

    The Cretaceous Middendorf aquifer in South Carolina, which extends from the Fall Line to the offshore reaches of the Atlantic Coastal plain, is distinctly zoned in both the chemical composition of the groundwater it contains and its microbial community. Groundwater flowing along the aquifer, which is confined over much of its extent, passes through a series of redox zones that have been inferred to represent segregation of the aquifer­_s microbes according to terminal electron accepting process. The zones include ecological niches supporting microbial aerobic respiration, denitrification, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. We analyzed groundwater from water supply wells across the aquifer along the direction of groundwater flow for chemical species that might serve as electron donor or acceptor for chemilithoautotrophic and acetoclastic organisms in the aquifer. These chemical species included acetate, dihydrogen, dioxygen, ferrous iron, sulfate, sulfide, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, bicarbonate, and methane. We filtered microorganisms from water produced from these wells and then amplified their 16s rDNA genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using universal Eubacterium- and Archaea-specific primers. To characterize the microbial community at each sampling location, we analyzed the amplified genes by terminal restriction fragment polymorphorism (TRFP). Sequencing of cloned genes is currently in progress. We find that along the groundwater flow path the microbial population shifts from a community dominated by bacteria to one dominated by Archaea, and that the community structure is indeed zoned by the predominant terminal electron accepting process. This zoning, furthermore, closely reflects variation along the aquifer in the thermodynamic energy available for inferred metabolisms of the observed microbes, as calculated from the results of the chemical analyses. These results provide the first direct confirmation that the chemical zoning of

  16. Inherit the policy: A sociocultural approach to understanding evolutionary biology policy in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory D.

    South Carolina biology Indicator 5.6 calls for students to "Summarize ways that scientists use data from a variety of sources to investigate and critically analyze aspects of evolutionary theory" (South Carolina Department of Education, 2006). Levinson and Sutton (2001) offered a sociocultural approach to policy that considers cultural and historical influences at all levels of the policy process. Lipsky (1980/2010) and others have identified teachers as de facto policy makers, exercising broad discretion in the execution of their work. This study looks to Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior as an initial framework to inform how evolutionary biology policy in South Carolina is conceptualized and understood at different levels of the policy process. The results of this study indicate that actors in the state's evolutionary biology policy process draw upon a myriad of Discourses (Gee, 1999/2005). These Discourses shape cultural dynamics and the agency of the policy actors as they navigate conflicting messages between testing mandates and evolutionary biology policy. There indeed exist gaps between how evolutionary biology policy in South Carolina is conceptualized and understood at the different levels of the policy process. Evidence from this study suggests that appropriation-level policy actors must be brought into the Discourse related to the critical analysis of evolutionary biology and academic freedom legislation must be enacted if South Carolina biology Indicator 5.6 is to realize practical significance in educational policy.

  17. Brief statement on the hydrology of the Sampit River area near Georgetown, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Carolina Refining and Distributing Company is planning to locate an oil-refining plant near Georgetown, South Carolina. To aid in the preparation of an environmental impact statement, a description of the stratigraphy, ground-water resources, and an assessment of possible seismic activity that may occur in the Winyah Bay vicinity has been prepared. Additional data will be required to quantitatively evaluate the impact of an oil spill on the shallow aquifer in the area. (USGS)

  18. Vegetation establishment success in restored carolina bay depressions on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina - phase one.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, Rebecca, A.; Mulhouse, John, M.

    2004-05-01

    Successful wetlands restoration must re-establish or enhance three parameters: wetland hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 2000). On the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, restoration of small Carolina bay depression-wetlands was initiated in FY 2001 to provide wetland acreage for mitigation banking (US DOE 1997). Sixteen small depressions that had historically been drained for agricultural purposes were selected for restoration, and an additional four were initially chosen to serve as non-restored controls. Restoration treatments included plugging the existing ditches to increase water volume retention and wetland hydroperiod and clear-cutting removal of woody vegetation in the interiors. Planned endpoints of the restoration were herbaceous meadow and forested savanna bay interiors, and pine savanna and pine/hardwood forested bay margins (Barton and Singer 2001). To promote forested savanna interiors, saplings of bald cypress and swamp tupelo were planted following removal of the woody species.

  19. Baseline monitoring of organic sunscreen compounds along South Carolina's coastal marine environment.

    PubMed

    Bratkovics, Stephanie; Wirth, Edward; Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Pennington, Paul; Sanger, Denise

    2015-12-15

    Organic ultraviolet filters (UV-F) are increasingly being used in personal care products to protect skin and other products from the damaging effects of UV radiation. In this study, marine water was collected monthly for approximately one year from six coastal South Carolina, USA sites and analyzed for the occurrence of seven organic chemicals used as UV filters (avobenzone, dioxybenzone, octocrylene, octinoxate, oxybenzone, padimate-o and sulisobenzone). The results were used to examine the relationship between beach use and the distribution of UV-F compounds along coastal South Carolina, USA. Five of the seven target analytes were detected in seawater along coastal South Carolina during this study. Dioxybenzone and sulisobenzone were not detected. The highest concentrations measured were >3700 ng octocrylene/L and ~2200 ng oxybenzone/L and beach use was greatest at this site; a local beach front park. Patterns in concentrations were assessed based on season and a measure of beach use. PMID:26541983

  20. 75 FR 10839 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... environment 75 FR 8756; dated February 25, 2010. This exemption is effective upon issuance. Dated at Rockville... COMMISSION South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Exemption 1.0 Background South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, (SCE&G, the licensee) is the holder of Facility...

  1. Facilities Policies and Procedures Manual. South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. Division of Finance, Facilities, and Statistical Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, Columbia.

    This manual outlines the policies and procedures related to the submission and review of facilities projects at South Carolina's public colleges and universities. It provides an overview of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education's role and responsibilities and its general policy regarding permanent improvements to facilities. The report…

  2. 78 FR 7781 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special elections. SUMMARY: South Carolina...

  3. Book review: Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book entitled Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler. (246 pages, 324 black and white illustrations, 8.5 “ x 11"; ISBN 0-9753471-8-7. Forty dollars, paperback. Biota of South Carolina. Volume 5. Clemson University, Clemson, S. ...

  4. South Carolina's Program of Alternative Certification for Educators (PACE): Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Post-Employment Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Christopher; Gimbert, Belinda G.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated South Carolina's Program of Alternative Certification for Educators (PACE). Specifically, the study analyzed this nontraditional teacher preparation pathway's outcomes: to recruit, train, and retain effective beginning teachers who fill the growing teacher vacancies in rural South Carolina. From an in-depth review of the…

  5. 78 FR 32384 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Notice Denying Motion to Intervene and Rejecting Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Notice Denying Motion to Intervene..., Richland, and Saluda Counties, South Carolina.\\1\\ On May 7, 2013, Pat Kelleher filed a motion to intervene... relevant part that a motion to intervene must show in sufficient detail that the movant's participation...

  6. Imaging the changing shoreface along South Carolina's Grand Strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. C.; Gayes, P. T.; McCoy, C.; Viso, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Grand Strand coastal region of South Carolina is located along Long Bay, a sediment starved embayment with few tidal inlets or fluvial sources of sediment input. The area has been the focus of ongoing coastal erosion, shoreface monitoring and geophysical/geologic framework investigations for more than a decade. We have taken a nested approach to studying shoreface morphology, looking across a range of timescales and spatial resolutions, focusing both onshore and off. Our research combines RTK-GPS beach surveys, ground-based LIDAR, beach cameras and aerial photography of the coastline, along with Chirp subbottom profiles, interferometric/multibeam bathymetry, and sidescan sonar surveys across the innershelf. Focusing on the central portion of the Grand Strand, several trends are apparent in observations across a range of time scales. In recent months, storm events and beach renourishment have influenced sediment patterns on the shoreface and innershelf. Evidence from beach profiles, shoreline surveys and sidescan sonar in the months following renourishment suggest a shift in sediment from the upper to lower shoreface and out onto the inner shelf. Pre and post surveys around Tropical Storm Hanna (September 2008) also appear to show a flux of sediment to the inner shelf. In contrast, past storm events appear to have directed sediment onshore and in many cases, the shelf appears to be the primary source of sediment to the region. Over longer time scales, we have observed seasonal variations in the geometry of the shoreface and a correlation between geologic framework and sediment distribution. Subparallel ledges along the innershelf appear to be funneling sediment offshore. Sidescan sonar and Chirp subbottom profiles suggest preservation of meandering tidal paleochannels along the innershelf that may be an important source of sediment to the region. Beach profiles over the past decade suggest a trend of lower shoreface retreat in areas with sediment cover offshore

  7. Horizon nomenclature for quartzipsamments in the Carolina and Georgia Sand Hills, South Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quartzipsamments comprise about 189,600 hectare (9.5 percent) of the Carolina and Georgia Sand Hills region (MLRA 137). Official Series Descriptions typically have A - C (Lakeland Series; Typic subgroup) or A - E - E and Bt (Alpin Series; Lamellic subgroup) horizon designation. Horizon colors, alon...

  8. 75 FR 51949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; North Carolina and South Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... SIPs. 74 FR 21550. On November 12, 2009, and April 5, 2010, North Carolina submitted all components of... Determination for the Purpose of Stopping Sanctions Clock AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Letter to Governor Regarding Completeness and Stopping of Sanctions Clock. SUMMARY: EPA is...

  9. Close out report for archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP), South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina conducted archaeological investigations under contract AC09-81SR10749 entitled Archaeological Investigations at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant from July 1981 through September 1987. The major emphasis was upon the completion of a 40% stratified sample of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to identify and preserve archaeological resources. The investigations were conducted to bring the Savannah River Operations Office into compliance with specific laws and regulations pertaining to the identification and preservation of archaeological and historical resources on federally owned and controlled properties. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. A geochemical atlas of South Carolina--an example using data from the National Geochemical Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.

    2005-01-01

    National Geochemical Survey data from stream-sediment and soil samples, which have been analyzed using consistent methods, were used to create maps, graphs, and tables that were assembled in a consistent atlas format that characterizes the distribution of major and trace chemical elements in South Carolina. Distribution patterns of the elements in South Carolina may assist mineral exploration, agriculture, waste-disposal-siting issues, health, environmental, and other studies. This atlas is an example of how data from the National Geochemical Survey may be used to identify general or regional patterns of elemental occurrences and to provide a snapshot of element concentration in smaller areas.

  11. Base-flow measurements at partial-record sites on small streams in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Carroll

    1986-01-01

    This report contains site descriptions and base-flow data collected at 362 partial-record sites in South Carolina. These data include site name, site description, latitude, longitude, drainage area, instantaneous streamflow, and date of the streamflow measurement. The base-flow data can be used as an aid to estimate low flow characteristics at ungaged locations on streams in South Carolina. Partial record data collection sites were established in all physiographic provinces except the lower Coastal Plain. Data collection sites were not established in the lower Coastal Plain because of the widespread occurrence of zero during drought periods in all but the larger streams. (USGS)

  12. South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study, Data Report for Observations, October 2003 - April 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Charlene M.; Warner, John C.; Martini, Marinna A.; Voulgaris, George; Work, Paul; Haas, Kevin A.; Hanes, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Oceanographic observations have been made at nine locations in Long Bay, South Carolina from October 2003 through April 2004. These sites are centered around a shore-oblique sand feature that is approximately 10 km long, 2 km wide, and in excess of 3 m thick. The observations were collected through a collaborative effort with the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of South Carolina, and Georgia Institute of Technology Savannah Campus as part of a larger study to understand the physical processes that control the transport of sediments in Long Bay.

  13. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.A.; Gardiner, W.W.; Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The navigational channels of Winyah Bay, Georgetown Harbor, South Carolina require dredging to enable normal shipping traffic to use these areas. Before dredging, environmental assessments must be conducted to determine the suitability of this dredged sediment for unconfined, open-water disposal. The Charleston, South Carolina District Office of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requested that the Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) collect sediment samples and conduct the required physical/chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations as required in the 1991 Implementation Manual. This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the Entrance Channel and Inner Harbor sediments proposed disposal in the ocean.

  14. Outreach to Improve Patient Education at South Carolina Free Medical Clinics

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Karen D.; McConnaughy, Rozalynd P.; Riley, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine (SOM) librarians have partnered with eight free medical clinics in South Carolina to enhance patient education efforts. During these outreach projects, project librarians purchased and installed computers, projectors, screens, LCD monitors, and touch-screen information kiosks equipment in each clinic, conducted MedlinePlus training sessions with clinic staff, and added links to MedlinePlus on the patient education area of the clinics’ websites. As a result, the free medical clinics incorporated MedlinePlus into their patient education classes or use the self-playing tutorials in patient waiting rooms. PMID:22084623

  15. Vegetation disturbance and maintenance of diversity in intermittently flooded Carolina Bays in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkman, L.K.; Sharitz, R.R. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors manipulated the fire regime and soil disturbance in four grass-dominated Carolina bay wetlands during a prolonged drought period and examined vegetation composition and cover within dominant vegetation types prior to and after treatments. The authors used the seedling emergence technique to determine the role of the seed bank in the recovery process. Burning did not affect richness, evenness, or diversity (all vegetation types combined); however, soil tillage increased diversity, including both evenness and richness. Percent similarity of the vegetation before and after disturbance was greater in the burning treatment than in the tillage treatment, probably due to greater disruption of the rhizomes of the perennial vegetation by tillage. Vegetation types varied in degree of recovery, although dominance was not altered by either treatment. Several native fugitive species increased following disturbance, indicating that species coexistence in these Carolina bay wetlands depends on the life history characteristics of residual vegetation, as well as that of seed bank species.

  16. A palynological biozonation for the Maastrichtian Stage (Upper Cretaceous) of South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, R.A.; Prowell, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    Three palynological biozones are proposed for the Maastrichtian Stage of South Carolina. In ascending stratigraphic order, the biozones are the Carolinapollis triangularis (Ct) Interval Biozone, the Holkopollenites chemardensis (Hc) Interval Biozone, and the Sparganiaceaepollenites uniformis (Su) Interval Biozone. Integration of the biostratigraphy with lithologic and geophysical log data suggests that within the study area, the upper and lower boundaries of each zone are bounded by regional unconformities, and that a three-fold subdivision of the Maastrichtian Stage is warranted. The biozonation is based on the analysis of 114 samples from 24 subsurface and three outcrop sections from the Coastal Plain of South Carolina; samples from an additional seven subsurface and 18 outcrop sections from North Carolina and Georgia were examined to evaluate the geographic extent of the biozones. One new genus and five new species of pollen are described, and emendations are presented for two genera and one species of pollen. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. A palynological biozonation for the uppermost Santonian and Campanian Stages (Upper Cretaceous) of South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, R.A.; Prowell, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Five palynological biozones are proposed for the uppermost Santonian and Campanian Stages of South Carolina. In ascending stratigraphic order, these highest-occurrence interval zones are the Osculapollis vestibulus (Ov) Biozone, the Holkopollenites propinquus (Hp) Biozone, the Holkopollenites forix (Hf) Biozone, the Complexiopollis abditus (Ca) Biozone, and the Osculapollis aequalis (Oa) Biozone. These biozones are based on an analysis of more than 400 subsurface and outcrop samples throughout the Coastal Plain Province of South Carolina, and the adjacent states of Georgia and North Carolina. Integration of the biostratigraphy with lithostratigraphy and geophysical log data suggests that the lower and upper boundaries of each biozone are bounded by regional unconformities. Five new species are described, and an emendation is presented for one additional species. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Cheating the Charters: Political and Financial Lessons from South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Jonathan; Medley, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Forty-two states and the District of Columbia have charter school laws today, and the nation's first such law celebrated its 20th anniversary in Minnesota this year. Charters, publicly funded schools formed by parents and community leaders, are expected to provide alternatives to traditional public schools. Yet despite the proliferation of charter…

  19. 77 FR 4541 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the South Carolina Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the South Carolina Advisory Committee Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  20. Massage Therapy Training in South Carolina: What You Should Know before You Enroll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This brochure provides a checklist of information for individuals considering massage therapy training in South Carolina. Areas covered include: (1) Oversight; (2) Requirements to Become a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT); (3) Evaluating a School; (4) How to Decide; (5) While You're Enrolled; (6) After You Graduate; (7) Continuing Education; (8)…

  1. 78 FR 16247 - Foreign-Trade Zone 38-Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 70992-70993, 11-28-2012). The FTZ Board has determined... On November 8, 2012, the South Carolina State Ports Authority, grantee of FTZ 38, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of...

  2. Inservice Education Manual for Long-Term Care Facilities in South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education, Columbia.

    The manual contains comprehensive multidisciplinary training units for supervisors intending to conduct inservice education courses among health personnel in South Carolina nursing homes. The first five units provide a general orientation to inservice education: introduction, the supervisor and inservice education, what inservice can and can't do,…

  3. Health Manpower in South Carolina. Report of the Task Force on Health Manpower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Advisory Council for Comprehensive Health Planning, Columbia.

    The factors contributing to the need for an increasing ratio of health workers to total manpower in South Carolina are: demand for more and better health services, augmented by government support; technological advances in medical science; new organization patterns in medical care; rapid increase in population; development of new kinds of…

  4. A Life History of the Squash Vine Borer, Melittia Cucurbitae (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in South Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The life history of the squash vine borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) was investigated in South Carolina. Duration of life stages, numbers of progeny, and mortality rates for SVB were determined in cages held at 25 plus minus 2C, 65-70% humidity and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h in a rearing room, and ...

  5. Computer Education for the Humanities: Multiple Possibilities at the University of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakman, Robert L.

    Two sequences of courses at the University of South Carolina offer liberal arts students an introduction to computers and to the relationship between technology and the humanities. These provide training in rigorous thinking and new means of probing the record of human experience. The lower level sequence consists of a general computer…

  6. The Internal Structure and Correlates of the South Carolina Needs Assessment Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.; Stewart, Martha W.

    The internal structure and correlates of the South Carolina State Department of Education's Needs Assessment Instruments (NAIs) for teachers, parents, and students were examined for 61, 61, and 36 schools, respectively. The NAIs are questionnaires that assess six indicators of school effectiveness: (1) instructional leadership of the principal;…

  7. Summary Report on South Carolina Scholarships and Grants, 1988-2005. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report provides data and information relating to the Palmetto Fellows, LIFE, and SC HOPE Scholarships, and the Lottery Tuition Assistance and the SC Need-based Grant Programs. The primary purpose of the Palmetto Fellows Scholarship is to recognize the most academically talented high school seniors in South Carolina and to encourage them to…

  8. Epidemiology of a Tuberculosis Outbreak in a South Carolina Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents a case study of a tuberculosis outbreak in which a rural South Carolina seventh-grade student with infectious cavitary, pulmonary tuberculosis was implicated as the source of infections in 40 percent of the junior high-school student body. (KH)

  9. An Analysis of the Charter School Facility Landscape in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In Spring of 2013, the Public Charter School Alliance of South Carolina, the Colorado League of Charter Schools, and the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools worked to collect evidence that would accurately portray both the adequacy of charter school facilities and the average amount of operating funds spent on facilities. Collectively,…

  10. 75 FR 73070 - Lockhart Power Company, South Carolina; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lockhart Power Company, South Carolina; Notice of Availability of... reviewed Lockhart Power Company's application for license for the Pacolet Hydroelectric Project (FERC... Internet. See 18 CFR 385.2001(a)(1)(iii) and the instructions on the Commission's Web site...

  11. The University of South Carolina School of Social Work, 1934-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the School of Social Work at the University of South Carolina from 1934-1954. This first attempt at establishing a school of social work failed after twenty years of inconsistent performance. The primary concern of the study is to uncover and describe the events that led to the closing of the school. To that end, the…

  12. An Assessment of South Carolina Higher Education Facilities Conditions & Measuring Deferred Maintenance. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For the current study, institutions evaluated education and general (E&G) buildings on their campuses using an assessment format established in the original deferred maintenance study conducted in 1994. The joint study, "Deferred Maintenance, An Analysis of South Carolina's Facilities Portfolio," conducted by the Commission on Higher Education…

  13. Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA). South Carolina State-Administration Annual Program, 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    Supporting documentation for the grant and use of Federal Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) funds in South Carolina is presented in this annual program. Under Title I, Library Services, the bulk of the grant money is planned for the following projects: (1) general administration (Project I-A); (2) library interpretation (Project I-B);…

  14. 76 FR 72885 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: South Carolina; Negative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... INFORMATION: On March 12, 2008, EPA issued a revised ozone NAAQS. See 73 FR 16436. EPA subsequently announced a reconsideration of the 2008 NAAQS, and proposed new 8-hour ozone NAAQS in January 2010. See 75 Fr...] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: South Carolina; Negative Declarations...

  15. [The South Carolina Telecommunications System.] Comments at the National Conference on Technology and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Thomas L.

    A central argument for the existence of the South Carolina Educational Television Network (ETV) follows an economic theme. In the last three years ETV has conducted 319 teleconferences to provide specialized training for 74,000 people. The use of teleconferences during that period of time has provided services that could have cost the state eight…

  16. Rice Creek Elementary School and the University of South Carolina: A Shared Vision for Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Kathy; Holley, Jessica; Richburg-Sellers, Felicia; Robey, Susan; Suber, Shawn; Burton, Megan; Field, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Professional Development Schools National Conference recognized Rice Creek Elementary School for its outstanding collaborative accomplishments with the University of South Carolina, naming it as a recipient of the National Association for Professional Development School's Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement.…

  17. South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Mission Resource Requirements (MRR), FY 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Mission Resource Requirement (MRR) represents the level of funding necessary for an institution given its mission, size, and complexity of programs, based on regional and national norms, and the amount of the previous year's appropriation. This document is the MRR for the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education for Fiscal Year 2007-2008.…

  18. Effect of habitat and foraging height on bat activity in the coastal plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Jennifer, M.; Menzel, Michael A.; Kilgo, John C.; Ford, W. Mark; Edwards, John W.; McCracken, Gary F.

    2005-07-01

    A comparison of bat activity levels in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina among 5 habitat types: forested riparian areas, clearcuts, young pine plantations, mature pine plantations and pine savannas, using time expansion radio-microphones and integrated detectors to simultaneously monitor bat activity at three heights in each habitat type.

  19. 76 FR 22734 - South Carolina Electric and Gas; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION South Carolina Electric and Gas; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Units 2 and 3, Combined Licenses Application Review Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear...

  20. The University of South Carolina Professional Development School Network: Twenty Years of Effective Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Bruce E.; Blakeney, Roy; Burton, Megan; Dunlap, Elizabeth; Faile, Jan; Hudson, Zina; Jackson, Margo

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Professional Development Schools National Conference recognized the University of South Carolina's Professional Development School Network for its outstanding collaborative accomplishments, naming it as a recipient of the National Association for Professional Development School's Award for Exemplary Professional Development School…

  1. Analysis of Staining Observed on Structures in the Georgetown, South Carolina Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Govier, R. Dale

    2002-05-01

    Beginning around 1970, the Georgetown, SC, community complained about black dust and red stains collecting on houses, cars, boats, and other structures. The community, through the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), seeks to identify the source or cause of the staining and ways to reduce or eliminate it in the future.

  2. South Carolina Family Independence Program Process Evaluation: Overall Findings, Context, and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pindus, Nancy; Koralek, Robin

    The Family Independence (FI) program transformed South Carolina's welfare program into a transitional assistance program emphasizing engagement in socially responsible behavior and participation in employment and employment-related activities. It helps families become economically independent through reform of: employment and training, welfare…

  3. 75 FR 63166 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project Operation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... the Saluda Hydroelectric Project, filed an Application for a New License pursuant to the Federal Power Act (FPA) and the Commission's regulations thereunder. The Saluda Hydroelectric Project is on the Saluda River in Richland, Lexington, Saluda, and Newberry counties, South Carolina. The license...

  4. 75 FR 30807 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Project: Saluda Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The project is located on the Saluda and Congaree Rivers in Lexington, Newberry, Richland, and Saluda Counties, South Carolina. The proposed action would.... Applicant Contact: Mr. Tommy Boozer, Manager, Lake Management Programs, SCE&G, 6248 Bush River...

  5. 75 FR 48962 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Project: Saluda Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The project is located on the Saluda River in Lexington, Newberry, Richland, and Saluda counties, South Carolina. The proposed action would occur on Lake.... Applicant Contact: Mr. Tommy Boozer, Manager, Lake Management Programs, SCE&G, 6248 Bush River...

  6. Willingness to use corporal punishment among school administrators in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Medway, F J; Smircic, J M

    1992-08-01

    Administrators of 221 South Carolina public elementary and middle schools were surveyed regarding behaviors appropriate for corporal punishment. Analysis indicated that aggressive acts by students, both mild and severe, were rated appropriate for corporal punishment, and these were not typically seen as appropriate for a psychologist's intervention. Rather, psychologists were seen as useful for character problems such as lying, cheating, and tantrums. PMID:1529079

  7. Revisiting First-Year Teacher Burnout: New South Carolina Educators in the Era of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-six percent of the nation's teachers are expected to leave the profession by their fifth year in the classroom. This alarming statistic has grabbed the attention of federal, state, and local leaders. In South Carolina alone, 28,500 teachers left the profession in the last five years, or an average of 5,700 per year. This translates to a…

  8. School and Teacher Characteristics in Relationship to the Academic Performance of Elementary Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Rhonda D.

    2013-01-01

    This correlation research study examined school and teacher characteristics in relationship to the academic performance of students in elementary schools in South Carolina. The school characteristics examined in this study were school size, poverty, minority level, and student teacher ratio. The teacher characteristics examined in this study were…

  9. Rethinking High School Principal Compensation Practices: An Analysis of Salaries in South Carolina and Theoretical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Tim A.

    2012-01-01

    This study described the current state of principal salaries in South Carolina and compared the salaries of similar size schools by specific report card performance and demographic variables. Based on the findings, theoretical models were proposed, and comparisons were made with current salary data. School boards, human resource personnel and…

  10. A Descriptive Study of Eight School Improvement Councils in South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monrad, Diane Mahony; Norman, Jean M.

    Findings of a study that examined eight South Carolina school-improvement councils (SICs) that were identified as effective are presented in this report. The sample included SICs from two high schools, two middle schools, and four elementary schools that had indicated in a previous survey that they had basic organizational structures, effective…

  11. 77 FR 28372 - South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been...

  12. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the South Carolina edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact…

  13. 76 FR 64017 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; South Carolina; Update to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...On April 25, 2011, EPA published a final rule providing the public with notice of the update to the South Carolina State Implementation Plan (SIP) compilation. This action corrects typographical errors in the regulatory language in EPA's April 25, 2011, final...

  14. White Flight in the Context of Education: Evidence from South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Haifeng

    2008-01-01

    In the context of education, "white flight" refers to decreasing white enrollment in poor-performing, inner-city public schools. This article investigates white flight and the concomitant movement to better performing public schools and racially homogenous private schools using elementary school enrollment data from South Carolina, particularly…

  15. Development and Examination of an Alternative School Performance Index in South Carolina. REL 2015-097

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Hughes, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the measures that make up each of the three separate accountability indices of school performance in South Carolina could be used to create an overall, reliable index of school performance. Data from public elementary, middle, and high schools in 2012/13 were used in confirmatory factor…

  16. 1997 SOUTH CAROLINA EPA/EPSCOR PROGRAM—STRATEGIC IMPROVEMENT PLAN (SIP) AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SIP of the 1997 South Carolina EPA/EPSCoR Program encompasses the educational programs and management components.  The educational activities are addressed in terms of pre-college, undergraduate, graduate, and public science programs.  These results are summarized bel...

  17. Help Needed: How Can High-Risk Adults Prepare for Skilled Jobs in South Carolina?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Curtis

    A study examined the job-training needs of high-risk adults to determine who they are, what they need in order to obtain productive careers paying a living wage, what is available, what works and doesn't, and what South Carolina should do to assist this population. Data were obtained from several dozen focus groups across the state, discussion…

  18. Distance Education and Plagiarism Prevention at the University of South Carolina Upstate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Breanne A.; Bradley, Lola

    2012-01-01

    At the University of South Carolina Upstate, two librarians created a series of workshops to proactively prevent plagiarism. To reach distance education students, online workshops were developed in Blackboard including basic and advanced workshops for lower and upper-level courses. The workshops are intended to introduce students to the concepts…

  19. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  20. Never Going Back: An Examination of Financial Health at Selected Private South Carolina Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David C., Sr.

    2014-01-01

    This case study examined the leadership styles and overall financial health of the three South Carolina Baptist Convention universities. Each university share a similar story of financial exigency prior to the current president's arrival. Each institution has increased enrollment, endowment, and facilities over the last decade. This case study…

  1. Evangelical Released Time for Religious Education in South Carolina: A Normative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindewald, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Released time is an arrangement through which students are excused from public schools during regular hours to participate in devotional lessons. South Carolina has become the center of operations for a movement of evangelical Christians to expand proselytizing released time programs throughout the United States. As a result of the movement's…

  2. Design Guidelines: Study of Handicapped Accessibility in South Carolina State Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism, Columbia. Div. of Engineering and Planning.

    The publication provides guidelines for the design of new facilities or rehabilitation of existing facilities to accommodate physically handicapped persons in the South Carolina State Parks system. The guidelines are also recommended for use in regional, special district, county, and municipal parks within the state. The guidelines were developed…

  3. Unlikely Crusader: John Eldred Swearingen and African-American Education in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janak, Edward; Moran, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Although not a well-known figure either in educational or South Carolina history, John Eldred Swearingen had a profound impact on the schools of the Palmetto State. Guiding the schools to transition from 19th-century academies to 20th-century schools, Swearingen held office from 1907-1922. During these years, Swearingen oversaw unprecedented…

  4. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for South Carolina related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  5. South Carolina Higher Education Assessment (SCHEA) Network Recommendations for Defining and Assessing Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Higher Education Assessment Network, Rock Hill.

    This monograph provides definitions, guidelines, and recommended practices for assessing and improving institutions of higher education in South Carolina which are congruent with the accreditation standards and criteria of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The first section defines key terms and states that overall institutional…

  6. Blocking the Bullies: Has South Carolina's Safe School Climate Act Made Public Schools Safer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Troy M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent news in the national media about two students' deaths as a result of harassment in school has highlighted a renewed desire for educators to address the culture of bullying and harassment in public schools, especially when the victims are targeted for their real or perceived differences. South Carolina's legislature responded to this need in…

  7. Public Opinion on School-Based Sex Education in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alton, Forrest L.; Valois, Robert F.; Oldendick, Robert; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine opinions on the use of abstinence only versus comprehensive sex education by registered voters in South Carolina. A cross-sectional, random-digit dial sample was utilized. Approximately 81% of respondents indicated support for sex education that emphasizes abstinence but also teaches about the benefits…

  8. The South Carolina State Library. Tenth Annual Report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    This annual report reviews state supported library programs and services for FY 1979 and presents a comprehensive summary of the state library system over the past 50 years. A highlight of the year was the South Carolina Governor's Conference on Library and Information Services. Resolutions, debated and enacted, on specific library needs, funding,…

  9. South Carolina Maps and Aerial Photographic Systems (SC Maps) Teaching Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Peggy W.; And Others

    South Carolina has mountain chains, monadnocks, rolling hills, varying drainage patterns, rivers, a delta, barrier islands, rocks over a billion years old and land that was once part of another continent. This document contains a set of curriculum activities that have been developed from a diverse collection of aerial photographic, satellite,…

  10. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.114 Section 81.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality...

  11. 77 FR 34037 - Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System of Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... FR 13594 that proposed new rate schedules to replace the current wholesale power schedules for the... Southeastern Power Administration Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System of Projects AGENCY: Southeastern Power... should be submitted to: Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator, Southeastern Power Administration, Department...

  12. The South Carolina Comprehensive Career Development Program for Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This document presents a model Comprehensive Career Development Program for grades K-12 developed for the state of South Carolina. The model provides the framework for local school districts to evolve a program that will meet the specific career development needs for their district's students. The model is planned to organize, expand, and extend…

  13. South Carolina K-12 Online Schools: A Framework for Measuring Success in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Carmen Mellisa Boatwright

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, K-12-12 online schools are growing, but research on the topic is limited. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to determine if there was a relationship between teacher perceptions of the Effective Schools Correlates and student achievement within two South Carolina online high schools. The independent…

  14. FORECASTS AND SENSITIVITY OF PCB BIOACCUMULATION IN FISH OF LAKE HARTWELL, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX was applied to the Twelvemile Creek arm of Lake Hartwell, which received 400,000 lbs of PCBs from the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, South Carolina, USA, from 1955 until the early 1990s. AQUATOX was used to characterize food we...

  15. FARM, MILL, AND CLASSROOM, A HISTORY OF TAX SUPPORTED ADULT EDUCATION IN SOUTH CAROLINA TO 1960.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARDY, NORFLEET

    THE AGRARIAN TRADITION, THE BRITISH LEGACY OF ARISTOCRATIC IDEAS, AND THE ENTRENCHMENT OF CONSERVATIVE ATTITUDES FOLLOWING THE CIVIL WAR WERE ALL INHIBITING FACTORS TO EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS IN SOUTH CAROLINA UNTIL, EARLY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, THEY PRECIPITATED THE NEED FOR PUBLICLY SUPPORTED LITERACY TRAINING AND OTHER REMEDIAL PROGRAMS.…

  16. South Carolina's Model for Initiating Hispanic 4-H Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Robert; Rembert, Kellye

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, through the initiative of several county Extension agents, South Carolina 4-H has established a successful model for bringing Hispanic youth into our program. We have found the most effective method is to initiate contact and establish partnerships with the principals and ESOL instructors in the local schools. Through this…

  17. A Closer Look at Public Higher Education in South Carolina: Institutional Effectiveness, Accountability, and Performance, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Garrison

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an annual overview of data reported by South Carolina's public institutions of higher education as part of institutional effectiveness reporting and as part of the process of performance funding. Prior to the January 2000 edition, this document was entitled "Minding Our P's and Q's: Indications of Productivity and Quality in…

  18. An Inventory to the Records of the 1977 South Carolina International Women's Year Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winthrop Coll., Rock Hill, SC.

    This inventory describes the records of the 1977 South Carolina International Women's Year Conference which, as part of the archives and special collections of Winthrop College's Dacus Library, are available for research. Included in the collection are minutes, correspondence, financial records, resolutions, newspaper clippings, publications,…

  19. Parental Support for Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Programmes in South Carolina Public Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, India; Prince, Mary; Flynn, Shannon; Kershner, Sarah; Taylor, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a major public health issue in the USA; this is especially true in the state of South Carolina (SC). Research shows that well developed, good-quality teenage pregnancy prevention (TPP) programmes can be effective in modifying young people's sexual behaviour. While several quantitative studies have examined parents'…

  20. Approved Teacher Education Programs in South Carolina 1987-88. Edition VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    This booklet provides comprehensive information on schools of education in South Carolina. Background information is given on State policies about interstate reciprocity, the Master of Arts in Teaching program, and required examinations for certification. The 28 colleges are listed alphabetically with complete listings of programs and the…

  1. Guide for Instructors of Practical Nursing in South Carolina, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    The South Carolina Department of Education has printed an instruction manual for teacher use in schools of nursing. The guide covers the areas of medical surgical nursing, diagnosis of disease, dealing with the surgical patient, care of the aged, rehabilitation and chronic illness, nursing the cancer patient, gynecological disorders, respiratory…

  2. From High School to Adulthood: A Survey of South Carolina Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyson, Thomas A.; Stover, Penny W.

    The bulletin presents an overview of what has been learned to date about the various paths 170 South Carolina young adults have taken since they were originally interviewed in 1967, their sophomore year in high school, then again in 1969 and 1979. Data, organized and presented by four race and sex categories, cover: white males (N=62), black males…

  3. STS-94 Columbia Landing at KSC (South Runway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbias 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program.

  4. Update on the NSF PAARE Project at South Carolina State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J.; Hartmann, D.; Hinkle, K. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the progress made over the past six years of “A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)”. This NSF-funded project is part of the “Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. Our partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. We summarize the results to date of our ongoing ground and space-based study of RV Tauri and Semiregular variables. We also examine our work on two unusual stars, R Coronae Borealis and XX Oph. The research on our Kepler objects is nearing completion and includes new international collaborators. We have developed 2 new cosmology labs and 5 new web simulations in the past year. These are being used in the science classes at South Carolina State University and are available to the community at our website listed below. Our success and the challenge of recruiting and retaining underrepresented students into the field as physics majors at South Carolina State University is reviewed. We recently graduated from Clemson a POCA student with a M.S. in astronomy who has since continued on for a Ph.D. in a related field, while another underrepresented student continues toward her Ph.D. in astronomy. Support for the POCA project is provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under awards NNX11AB82G and NNX13AC24G. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu/paare/

  5. Water resources appraisals for hydroelectric licensing: Yadkin-Pee Dee river basin, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Planning status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The water resources of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Basin which covers approximately 17,890 sq mi in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina are evaluated. Data are presented on existing and potential water resource development, on water uses, e.g., for irrigation, municipal water supplies, or in thermal power plant cooling systems, and on the status of hydro plant licensing. Past and current planning studies are summarized. The information presented is current as of Sept. 1981. (LCL)

  6. Support of experimental high energy physics research at the University of South Carolina, 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, M.V.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-06-01

    This brief report summarizes the activities of the University of South Carolina`s high energy physics group during the three-year period of DE-FG02-92ER40719. The activities of the group began in 1980 under a predecessor grant from DOE, and continue today under a successor grant. The retirements of one grant in favor of another were for reasons of administrative convenience or necessity. The characterization of the report as {open_quotes}final{close_quotes} is not reflective of the group`s projects, which by-and-large continue with support from the successor grant.

  7. [Workshop for coordinating South Carolina's pre-college systemic initiatives in science and mathematics]. [A Mathematics and Sciences Education Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    On December 19, 1991, South Carolina's Governor, established the Governor's Mathematics and Sciences Advisory Board (MSAB) to articulate a vision and develop a statewide plan for improving science and mathematics education in South Carolina. The MSAB recognized that systemic change must occur if the achievement levels of students in South Carolina are to improve in a dramatic way. The MSAB holds two fundamental beliefs about systemic change: (1) All the elements of the science and mathematics education system must be working in harmony towards the same vision; and (2) Each element of the system must be held against high standards and progress must be assessed regularly against these standards.

  8. 78 FR 10171 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Carolina Special General Election ] were published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2013 (78 FR 7781... Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special party nominating convention. SUMMARY: The South Carolina Green Party will select their party's nominee at a Special Party Convention on March...

  9. Aeromagnetic map and selected aeroradiometric data for the Ellicott Rock Wilderness and additions, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luce, Robert W.; Daniels, David L.

    1985-01-01

    The aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data presented herin for the Ellicott Rock Wilderness and additions are taken from an airborne survey that covered a larger area in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, and that was flown in December 1980 and January 1981 under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The flight lines were oriented northwest-southeast, approximately perpendicular to the general strike of the geology, at 0.5-mi (0.8-km) separation and at a nominal altitude of 500 ft (150 m) above mean terrain. A small amount of areomagnetic data from previous survey (Riggle and others, 1980) along the southeast edge of the study area is based on east-west flight lines spaced 1 mi (1.6 km) apart. Because of the rugged topography in the region, holding the airplane at a constant elevation abive the terrain was not possible. Actual ground clearance over short distances ranged between about 200 and 1200 ft. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) has been removed from the magnetic data (Barraclough and Fabiano, 1975) and 5000 gammas were added to make all values positive. 

  10. A comparison of resident fish assemblages in managed and unmanaged coastal wetlands in North Carolina and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Kelly F.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant fish species within impounded coastal wetlands in the southeastern US may be different from the species that dominate natural marshes. We tested the hypothesis that resident fish assemblages inhabiting impounded coastal wetlands in South Carolina would differ from resident assemblages in natural marshes of the southeastern United States. We used rarefied species richness, Shannon's H' diversity,J' evenness, Morisita's index of similarity, and the percent similarity index to compare resident fish assemblages from two impoundments to 12 open-marsh resident fish assemblages from previously published studies in North and South Carolina. We used rotenone to sample fish assemblages in impoundments. The assemblages in natural marsh habitat had been sampled with rotenone and seines. We classified comparisons yielding a similarity index ≥0.50 as moderately similar and those with an index ≥0.75 as very similar. Fifty-three percent of the among-impoundment comparisons (Morisita's index) were at least moderately similar, whereas 7% of impoundment—natural marsh comparisons were moderately similar. A difference in tidal influence was the only parameter in the best-fitting model describing the observed Morisita's indices. The index of similarity decreased by 63% when tidal influence differed between compared assemblages. Species richness and diversity were greater in impoundments than natural marshes, but evenness was similar between habitat types. Our results support the hypothesis that resident fish assemblages in impounded wetlands and natural marshes are different, and suggest that a degree of tidal influence is the most important factor behind the difference.

  11. Estimating the magnitude of peak discharges for selected flood frequencies on small streams in South Carolina (1975)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whetstone, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    A program to collect and analyze flood data from small streams in South Carolina was conducted from 1967-75, as a cooperative research project with the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. As a result of that program, a technique is presented for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods on small streams in South Carolina with drainage areas ranging in size from 1 to 500 square miles. Peak-discharge data from 74 stream-gaging stations (25 small streams were synthesized, whereas 49 stations had long-term records) were used in multiple regression procedures to obtain equations for estimating magnitude of floods having recurrence intervals of 10, 25, 50, and 100 years on small natural streams. The significant independent variable was drainage area. Equations were developed for the three physiographic provinces of South Carolina (Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge) and can be used for estimating floods on small streams. (USGS)

  12. Regional implications of Triassic or Jurassic age for basalt and sedimentary red beds in the South Carolina coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, G.S.; Gottfried, D.; Lanphere, M.A.; Higgins, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    Whole rock potassium-argon ages for samples of subsurface basalt recovered near Charleston, South Carolina, are interpreted to indicate a Triassic or Jurassic age for the basalt and underlying sedimentary red beds. This age is consistent with existing evidence indicating that an early Mesozoic basin is present in the subsurface of a large part of the coastal plain of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama.

  13. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

    2008-07-01

    Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  14. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrecengost, J. D.; Kilgo, J. C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H. Scott; Miller, K. V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  15. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.; Lybarger, J.

    1985-06-01

    A health-hazard evaluation was conducted at Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina in July, 1982. The evaluation was requested by the owner to investigate a possible excess of cancer among employees. There was concern that the company's water supply had been contaminated by agricultural chemicals buried in an adjacent lot in 1974. Environmental sampling data at the disposal site obtained by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) were reviewed. The cancer cases involved the stomach, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and head and neck. The authors conclude that a cancer hazard among the employees does not exist. They recommend continued monitoring of the company and community water supply and using bottled drinking water until a municipal water system is available.

  16. Habitat preferences of foraging red-cockaded woodpeckers at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Franzreb, Kathleen, E.

    2004-12-31

    Franzreb, Kathleen, E. 2004. Habitat preferences of foraging red-cockaded woodpeckers at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 9. Habitat Management and Habitat Relationships. Pp 553-561. Abstract: I constructed a foraging study to examine habitat use of red-cockaded woodpeckers at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina. Because much of the land had been harvested in the late 1940s and early 1950s prior to being sold to the Department of Energy, the available habitat largely consisted of younger trees (e.g., less than 40 years old). From 1992 to 1995, I examined the foraging behavior and reproductive success of 7 groups of red-cockaded woodpeckers.

  17. Floodflow characteristics of Filbin Creek at proposed interstate highway 526, north Charleston, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study to determine the impact of two alternative construction plans for proposed interchange between the existing Interstate Highway 26 and Interstate Highway 526 in the Filbin Creek drainage basin near North Charleston, South Carolina was performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation. A computerized reservoir routing technique was used to route synthetic flood hydrographs through the basin system. Simulation results indicate that the new roadway will cause little or no change in water-surface elevations downstream of Interstate Highway 26. Upstream of Interstate Highway 26, approximately 0.5 foot of backwater will be created by either alternative during a 100-year flood as a result of the Interstate Highway 526 embankments and structures. (USGS)

  18. Food and feeding of fish in Hartwell Reservoir tailwater, Georgia-South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, D. Hugh; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1985-01-01

    Food of silver redhorse (Moxostoma anisurum), redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), green sunfish (L. cyanellus), and bluegills (L. macrochirus) was examined to determine whether or not these fish in the Hartwell Reservoir tailwater (Savannah River, Georgia-South Carolina) ate organisms entrained from the reservoir or displaced from the tailwater during water releases associated with the production of hydropower. These fish fed primarily on aquatic insects, crayfish, and terrestrial organisms originating from the tailwater. Major periods of feeding occurred during nongeneration.

  19. An advocacy coalition framework analysis of the development of offshore wind energy in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marines

    Offshore winds blow considerably harder and more uniformly than on land, and can thus produce higher amounts of electricity. Design, installation, and distribution of an offshore wind farm is more difficult and expensive, but is nevertheless a compelling energy source. With its relatively shallow offshore waters South Carolina has the potential to offer one of the first offshore wind farms in the United States, arguably ideal for wind-farm construction and presenting outstanding potential for the state's growth and innovation. This study analyzes the policy process involved in the establishment of an offshore wind industry in South Carolina through the use of Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) concepts. The ACF studies policy process by analyzing policy subsystems, understanding that stakeholders motivated by belief systems influence policy subsystem affairs, and recognizing the assembly of these stakeholders into coalitions as the best way to simplify the analysis. The study interviewed and analyzed responses from stakeholders involved to different but significant degrees with South Carolina offshore wind industry development, allowing for their categorization into coalitions. Responses and discussion analysis through the implementation of ACF concepts revealed, among other observations, direct relationships of opinions to stakeholder's belief systems. Most stakeholders agreed that a potential for positive outputs is real and substantial, but differed in opinion when discussing challenges for offshore wind development in South Carolina. The study importantly considers policy subsystem implications at national and regional levels, underlining the importance of learning from other offshore wind markets and policy arenas worldwide. In this sense, this study's discussions and conclusions are a step towards the right direction.

  20. Selected hydrologic data for urban watersheds in South Carolina, 1983-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Logan, S.W.; Eckenwiler, M.R.; Bohman, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Rainfall and streamflow data were collected at 23 gaging stations located in urban watersheds in South Carolina from 1983-90. The site selection process and the instrumentation used to collect the data are described. A compilation of rainfall and streamflow data in graphic and tabular form for seven selected events at each gaging station are presented. A gaging-station description and a listing of certain streamflow and basin characteristics also are included.

  1. Algal Biofuels Strategy. Proceedings from the March 26-27, 2014, Workshop, Charleston, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-06-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s Algal Biofuel Strategy Workshop on March 26-27, 2014, in Charleston, South Carolina. The workshop objective was to convene stakeholders to engage in discussion on strategies over the next 5 to 10 years to achieve affordable, scalable, and sustainable algal biofuels.

  2. STRONG-MOTION INSTRUMENTATION OF STRUCTURES IN CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA AND ELSEWHERE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Maley, R.

    1986-01-01

    Instrumentation of structures is part of earthquake hazard mitigation program of many institutions, including the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS Strong-Motion Instrumentation of Structures Program is designed to complement other programs and to implement its own, within budget and other constraints. This paper reviews the overall national effort, cites examples of structures implemented and describes progress made to date. A recent example of instrumentation of an eight-story building in Charleston, South Carolina is documented.

  3. Preliminary digital geologic map of the Appalachian Piedmont and Blue Ridge, South Carolina segment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Dicken, Connie L.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary geology coverage of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge in South Carolina has been compiled at 1:5000,000 scale and digitized as part of a patchwork of coverages for the analysis of regional and national geochemical patterns that may have environmental and resource implications. It was produced from other compilations that incorporate more detailed geologic maps as well as additional sources. The compilation is designed to meet short-term needs until better coverage of the regional geology is available.

  4. Water-Level Measurements for the Coastal Plain Aquifers of South Carolina Prior to Development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, Walter R.; Speiran, Gary K.

    1984-01-01

    Tabulations of water-level measurements for the Coastal Plain aquifers of South Carolina representing water levels prior to man-made development are presented. Included with the tabulations are local well number, location, land-surface altitude, well depth, screened interval, depth to water, water- level altitude, and date measured. These water-level measurements were used in compiling regional potentiometric maps for the Coastal Plain aquifers. This data set will be useful in the planning for future water-resource development.

  5. Holocene deposits of reservoir-quality sand along the Central South Carolina coastline

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.J.; Hayes, M.O.

    1996-06-01

    The Holocene coastal sand deposits of the central South Carolina coastline were investigated to estimate volumes of reservoir-quality (RQ) sediments. These sand bodies, which vary considerably in size, thickness, shape, and continuity, were deposited in a variety of depositional settings including barrier islands, ebb-tidal deltas, exposed sand flats, tidal sand ridges, and tidal point bars. To identify the RQ sediment for each sand-body type, a conservative mud cutoff value of 15% was chosen. Average thickness values ranged from 6 m for barrier island deposits to 15 m for ebb-tidal deltas. Of the six most significant RQ sand depositional environments on the central portion of the South Carolina coast, ebb-tidal delta complexes accounted for 77% of all RQ sediments. This dominance of the ebb-tidal delta deposits is attributed to the relatively large tidal range in the area (up to 3 m) and to the presence of a number of large, incised alluvial valleys, which are host to estuarine complexes with large tidal prisms. If the Holocene sand deposits along the central 115 km of the South Carolina coast were preserved in the rock record, a total of 1.3 X 10{sup 6} ac-ft of RQ sands would be present, a significant amount considering the short time interval of approximately 5000 yr.

  6. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS). South Carolina Supplement US Army. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, C.; Gifford, L.A.

    1994-04-01

    In response to the growing number of environmental laws and regulations worldwide, the U.S. Army has adopted an environmental compliance program that identifies compliance problems before they are cited as violations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Beginning in 1985, Major Army Commands (MACOMs) were required to conduct comprehensive environmental assessments at all installations on a 4-year cycle. The installations must also conduct a mid-cycle internal assessment. Because each MACOM was developing a separate assessment system, the Army mandated, through Army Regulation 200-1, one unified Army-wide assessment mechanism. The resulting system combines Federal, Department of Defense (DOD), and Army environmental regulations, along with good management practices and risk management information, into a series of checklists that show legal requirements and which specific items or operations to review. Each assessment protocol lists a point of contact to help assessors review the checklist items as effectively as possible. The Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS) manual incorporates existing checklists from USEPA and private industry. The South Carolina Supplement was developed to be used in conjunction with the U.S. ECAS manual, using existing South Carolina state environmental legislation and regulations as well as suggested management practices. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS), Environmental compliance checklists, Environmental law - South Carolina.

  7. 76 FR 16456 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... (Santee Cooper); Notice of Availability of Application for a Combined License On March 27, 2008, South... Authority also known as Santee Cooper filed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the...

  8. 76 FR 12998 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... (Santee Cooper); Notice of Availability of Application for a Combined License On March 27, 2008, South... Authority also known as Santee Cooper filed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the...

  9. Identification of American shad spawning sites and habitat use in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined spawning site selection and habitat use by American shad Alosa sapidissima in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina, to inform future management in this flow-regulated river. American shad eggs were collected in plankton tows, and the origin (spawning site) of each egg was estimated; relocations of radio-tagged adults on spawning grounds illustrated habitat use and movement in relation to changes in water discharge rates. Most spawning was estimated to occur in the Piedmont physiographic region within a 25-river-kilometer (rkm) section just below the lowermost dam in the system; however, some spawning also occurred downstream in the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region has a higher gradient and is predicted to have slightly higher current velocities and shallower depths, on average, than the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region is dominated by large substrates (e.g., boulders and gravel), whereas the Coastal Plain is dominated by sand. Sampling at night (the primary spawning period) resulted in the collection of young eggs (≤1.5 h old) that more precisely identified the spawning sites. In the Piedmont region, most radio-tagged American shad remained in discrete areas (average linear range = 3.6 rkm) during the spawning season and generally occupied water velocities between 0.20 and 0.69 m/s, depths between 1.0 and 2.9 m, and substrates dominated by boulder or bedrock and gravel. Tagged adults made only small-scale movements with changes in water discharge rates. Our results demonstrate that the upstream extent of migration and an area of concentrated spawning occur just below the lowermost dam. If upstream areas have similar habitat, facilitating upstream access for American shad could increase the spawning habitat available and increase the population's size.

  10. Presence and absence of bats across habitat scales in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.Mark; Menzel, Jennifer M.; Menzel, Michael A.: Edwards, John W.; Kilgo, John C.

    2006-10-01

    Abstract During 2001, we used active acoustical sampling (Anabat II) to survey foraging habitat relationships of bats on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Using an a priori information-theoretic approach, we conducted logistic regression analysis to examine presence of individual bat species relative to a suite of microhabitat, stand, and landscape-level features such as forest structural metrics, forest type, proximity to riparian zones and Carolina bay wetlands, insect abundance, and weather. There was considerable empirical support to suggest that the majority of the activity of bats across most of the 6 species occurred at smaller, stand-level habitat scales that combine measures of habitat clutter (e.g., declining forest canopy cover and basal area), proximity to riparian zones, and insect abundance. Accordingly, we hypothesized that most foraging habitat relationships were more local than landscape across this relatively large area for generalist species of bats. The southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) was the partial exception, as its presence was linked to proximity of Carolina bays (best approximating model) and bottomland hardwood communities (other models with empirical support). Efforts at SRS to promote open longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and loblolly pine (P. taeda) savanna conditions and to actively restore degraded Carolina bay wetlands will be beneficial to bats. Accordingly, our results should provide managers better insight for crafting guidelines for bat habitat conservation that could be linked to widely accepted land management and environmental restoration practices for the region.

  11. Prostate cancer disparities in South Carolina: early detection, special programs, and descriptive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Drake, Bettina F; Keane, Thomas E; Mosley, Catishia M; Adams, Swann Arp; Elder, Keith T; Modayil, Mary V; Ureda, John R; Hebert, James R

    2006-08-01

    Available evidence suggests that there may be qualitative differences in the natural history of PrCA by race. If this is true then additional etiologic research is needed to identify places in the causal chain where we can intervene to lower PrCA rates in AA men. South Carolina may prove to be a useful context in which to study prostate cancer etiology, because of the presence of unique environmental exposures. For example, soil selenium and cadmium concentrations unique to South Carolina might have a differential affect in the rural areas of the state where ground water use is more common and where AAs are more likely to live. These metals are important in terms of prostate metabolism and cancer. The possible interaction of geological factors with underlying biological factors such as metal transporter gene expression by race needs to be explored in South Carolina. Diet and exercise are consistently seen as possible primary prevention strategies for prostate and other cancers, as noted above. There may be very good reasons to intervene on diet and physical activity, but if the intention is to make a health claim with real, specific meaning for PrCA prevention and control then studies must be designed to test the effect of these modalities in rigorous ways at specific points in the natural history of prostate carcinogenesis. Nutrition and exercise programs need to be developed in South Carolina that are seen as acceptable by people at risk of PrCA; and they will need to focus on effective ways to prevent the development of PrCA, other cancers, and other health outcomes. Implementing diet and nutrition programs in rural parts of the state, possibly through schools or churches, offer benefit to both youth and adults alike. So, it would be possible, indeed it would be desirable, to create programs that may be used for research in one part of the population (e.g., men with PrCA), but are equally beneficial for others (e.g., their spouses and children). Organizing

  12. Development of a conceptual model of groundwater flow, Chesterfield County, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Bruce G.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Chesterfield County is located in the north central part of South Carolina (SC) and is adjacent to the North Carolina border. The County lies along the Fall Line, the geologic boundary between the Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) and Piedmont physiographic provinces. Between 2000 and 2007, the population increased from 42,768 to 43,191 people (U.S. Census Bureau, 2007). Associated with this population growth is an increased demand for domestic, public, industrial, and agricultural water supplies. The ACP sediments underlying Chesterfield County contain abundant supplies of highquality groundwater (Newcome, 2004). The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is investigating the ACP groundwater resources of Chesterfield County. The initial task of the study is to establish a hydrologic data-collection network for the ACP part of the County. A groundwater-flow model and derived water budgets for the ACP aquifer that underlies most of the County will be constructed and calibrated later in the study. Both anthropogenic and natural groundwater contaminants that have been identified in the study area will be quantified and described as part of a companion study.

  13. Clear-water abutment and contraction scour in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces of South Carolina, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, collected observations of clear-water aburment and contraction scour at 146 bridges in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of South Carolina. Scour depths ranged from 0 to 23.6 feet. Theoretical scour depths were computed at each bridge and compared with observed scour. This comparison showed that theoretical scour depths, in general, exceeded the observed scour depths and often were excessive. A comparison of field data with dimensionless relations for laboratory data showed that the range of dimensionless variables used in laboratory investigations was outside of the range for field data in South Carolina, suggesting laboratory relations may not be applicable to field conditions in South Carolina. Variables determined to be important in developing scour within laboratory studies were investigated to understand their influence within the South Carolina field data, and many of these variables appeared to be insignificant under field conditions found in South Carolina. The strongest explanatory variables were embankment length, geometric-contraction ratio, approach velocity, and soil cohesion. Envelope curves developed with the field data are useful tools for assessing reasonable ranges of scour depth in South Carolina. These tools are simple to apply and are an improvement over the current methods for predicting theoretical scour. Data from this study have been compiled into a database that includes photographs, figures, observed scour depths, theoretical scour depths, limited basin characteristics, limited soil data, and theoretical hydraulic data. The database can be used to compare studied sites with unstudied sites to assess the potential for scour at the unstudied sites. In addition, the database can be used to assess the performance of various theoretical methods for predicting clear-water abutment and contraction scour.

  14. The 1886-1889 aftershocks of the Charleston, South Carolina, Earthquake: A Widespread burst of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    1987-03-01

    A systematic search of contemporary newspapers in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and eastern Tennessee during the 1886-1889 (inclusive) aftershock sequence of the August 31, 1886 earthquake near Charleston, South Carolina has provided more than 3000 intensity reports for 522 earthquakes as compared to 144 previously known earthquakes for the same period. Of these 144 events, 138 were felt in Charleston/Summerville and had been assigned epicenters in that area. In contrast the new data provide 112 well-constrained macroseismic epicenters. The 1886-1889 seismicity is characterized by a linear relation between log frequency and magnitude with a slope b≈1, a temporal decay of earthquake frequency proportional to time-1, and a low level of seismicity prior to the main shock. These are frequently observed characteristics of aftershock sequences. By 1889, the level of seismicity had decreased more than 2 orders of magnitude, reaching approximately the current level in the same area. The 1886-1889 epicenters delineate a large aftershock zone that extends northwest about 250 km across Appalachian strike from the coast into the Piedmont and at least 100 km along strike near the Fall Line of South Carolina and Georgia. An abrupt change in stress and/or effective strength is required over this zone. If this change can only occur in the near field of a single fault dislocation, this fault must be larger horizontally than the thickness of the seismogenic zone by an order of magnitude and must be shallow dipping. The correlation between the area of intensity VIII in the main shock with the area of large aftershocks is consistent with this hypothesis. The lack of a major fault affecting the post-Upper Jurassic onlap sediments also favors a shallow dipping active fault, possibly a Paleozoic-Mesozoic southeasterly dipping fault or detachment that may outcrop northwest of the aftershock zone. The 1886-1889 aftershocks occupy the same area as the South Carolina

  15. An Examination of the Use of Accounting Information Systems and the Success of Small Businesses in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracina, Tara H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the use and sophistication of accounting information systems (AISs) and the success of small businesses in South Carolina. Additionally, this study explored the variables that influence South Carolinian small business owners/managers in the extent of adoption (sophistication) of…

  16. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina).

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher D.; DeSteven, Diane; Kilgo, John C.

    2004-12-31

    Barton, Christopher, D., Diane DeSteven and John C. Kilgo. 2004. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina). Ecol. Rest. 22(4):291-292. Abstract: Carolina bays and smaller depression wetlands support diverse plant communities and provide critical habitat for semi-aquatic fauna throughout the Coastal Plain region of the southeastern United States. Historically, many depression wetlands were altered or destroyed by surface ditching, drainage, and agricultural or silviculture uses. These important habitats are now at further risk of alteration and loss following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2001 restricting federal regulation of isolated wetlands. Thus, there is increased attention towards protecting intact sites and developing methods to restore others. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 312-mi2 (800-km2) Savannah River Site (SRS) in west-central South Carolina includes about 350 Carolina bays and bay-like wetland depressions, of which about two-thirds were degraded or destroyed prior to federal acquisition of the land. Although some of the altered wetlands have recovered naturally, others still have active active drainage ditches and contain successional forests typical of drained sites. In 1997, DOE established a wetland mitigation bank to compensate for unavoidable wetland impacts on the SRS. This effort provided an opportunity fir a systematic research program to investigate wetland restoration techniques and ecological responses. Consequently, research and management staffs from the USDA Forest Service, Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation, the Savannah River Technology Center, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) and several universities developed a collaborative project to restore degraded depression wetlands on the SRS. The mitigation project seeks cost-effective methods to restore the hydrology and vegetation typical of natural depression wetlands, and so enhance habitats for wetland

  17. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yards and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased impervious surfaces (driveways, parking lots, and buildings) and human activities (residential, industrial, and commercial) have been linked to substantial changes in both the quality and quantity of stormwater on a watershed scale (Brabec and others, 2002; Pitt and Maestre, 2005). Small-scale storage and equipment repair facilities increase impervious surfaces that prevent infiltration of stormwater, and these facilities accommodate activities that can introduce trace metals, organic compounds, and other contaminants to the facility’s grounds. Thus, these small facilities may contribute pollutants to the environment during storm events (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1992). The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. Prior to this investigation, the SCDOT had no data to define the quality of stormwater leaving these facilities. To provide these data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the SCDOT, conducted an investigation to identify and quantify constituents that are transported in stormwater from two maintenance yards and a section shed in three different areas of South Carolina. The two maintenance yards, in North Charleston and Conway, S.C., were selected because they represent facilities where equipment and road maintenance materials are stored and complete equipment repair operations are conducted. The section shed, in Ballentine, S.C., was selected because it is a facility that stores equipment and road maintenance material. Characterization of the constituents that were transported in stormwater from these representative SCDOT maintenance facilities may be used by the SCDOT in the development of stormwater management plans for similar section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State to improve stormwater quality.

  18. Metamorphism of Triassic sediments from the Dunbarton Basin, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, D.S.; Warner, R.D. . Earth Sciences Dept.); Price, V. Jr. ); Thayer, P. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Modal analyses and microprobe studies were performed on eight core samples obtained from the US Geological Survey Well A1 324. The well is situated in the southern part of the buried Triassic Dunbarton Basin, about 1 km south of the US Department of Energy's Westinghouse Savannah River Company Site. The samples came from an interval of 407.0--413.4 m beneath the land surface. At the well site, Triassic red beds are overlain by Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments which have an aggregate thickness of 408 m. The sample from a depth of 407 m is a weathered, poorly sorted, clayey sandstone from the basal portion of the Late Cretaceous Cape Fear Formation. This specimen is not metamorphosed; whereas, the Triassic specimens taken from an interval of 411.6--413.4 m exhibit evidence of thermal metamorphism as well as hydrothermal alteration. In hand specimen, three of the samples (412.8--413.4 m) resemble hornfelses. These samples exhibit decussate texture. Results of modal analyses of the two deepest specimens follow: plagioclase (43-52%), quartz (9-23%), chlorite (22-29%), epidote (1-6%), hematite (3-4%), and magnetite (2-3%). Relict detrital quartz grains, especially the finer ones, are mostly angular-to-subangular and the grain boundaries show little evidence of rounding. The authors feel that hydrothermal alteration was the principal metamorphic process. This belief is supported by the fact that most of the plagioclase has undergone extensive sericitization. In addition, the presence of abundant chlorite together with a minor amount of epidote supports this interpretation. The alteration halo extends upward for 1.8 m. This interpretation is based on the observation that two Triassic arkose sandstone specimens (411.6 m, 412.2 m) contain clouded, slightly sericitized K-feldspar and plagioclase grains in a matrix of red-colored smectite.

  19. Perceived health needs and receipt of services during pregnancy - Oklahoma and South Carolina, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    2010-06-18

    Prenatal care visits present an opportunity for health-care providers to offer services recommended by professional societies and educate women regarding behaviors and exposures that might affect their pregnancies. To determine whether women who identified a need for a service during pregnancy received that service, CDC analyzed 2004-2007 data (the most recent available) from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) for Oklahoma and South Carolina, the only two states to include questions on the topic on their PRAMS questionnaires. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated substantial differences between perceived need and receipt of 1) assistance in reducing violence in the home, 2) counseling information for family or personal problems, 3) help to quit smoking, 4) help with an alcohol or drug problem, and 5) dental care. In South Carolina and Oklahoma, respectively, 1.7% and 2.9% of pregnant women stated a need for help to reduce violence in the home. Of those, only 12.8% and 21.0% reported receiving that help. In South Carolina and Oklahoma, respectively, 7.4% and 12.6% of pregnant women stated a need for help to quit smoking during pregnancy; of those, only 29.1% and 30.4% reported receiving that help. Adherence by health-care providers to established guidance for treating pregnant women might help reduce the differences between perceived need and receipt of services. Additional research to identify obstacles to receipt of services might enable state programs to further narrow these differences. PMID:20559201

  20. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume I: an investigation of live bottom habitats south of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The study areas include nine live bottom areas located off South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  1. Relationship of blood pressures with hair mineral concentrations in South Carolina adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, D.M.; Borgman, R.F.

    1982-08-01

    The relationships of hair mineral concentrations to blood pressures in adolescents from the coastal portion of South Carolina are examined. Blood pressure was measured and hair samples were prepared for mineral analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results show that higher hair zinc concentrations were associated with lower pulse pressures. Higher hair copper concentrations were associated with higher systolic pressures. Higher hair nickel was associated with lower systolic and pulse pressures. Hair cadmium concentrations were related to lower systolic and diastolic pressures. Higher lead concentrations were associated with higher systolic pressures and slightly lower diastolic pressures. Higher copper to zinc ratios were associated with slightly greater systolic and pulse pressures. (JMT)

  2. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  3. Primary feather molt of adult mourning doves in North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, G.H.; Amend, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of 8,141 adult mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in North and South Carolina revealed that substantial numbers complete primary feather molt in September. Adult mourning doves shed primaries at the rate of 1 per 14 days. No difference was found in this rate between sexes or among years, 1969-74. The initiation of molt differed from year to year, and female molt always preceded male molt. Available data show that southern doves complete primary molt a month earlier than northern doves. Therefore, age based on primary molt can be biased upward if all molt-complete wings from southern hunting samples are considered immature.

  4. HOLOCENE AND LATE PLEISTOCENE(? ) EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED SAND BLOWS IN COASTAL SOUTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obermeier, S.F.; Jacobson, R.B.; Powars, D.S.; Weems, R.E.; Hallbick, D.C.; Gohn, G.S.; Markewich, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    Multiple generations of prehistoric sand blows, interpreted as earthquake induced, have been discovered throughout coastal South Carolina. These sand blows extend far beyond 1886 earthquake induced sand blows, in sediments having approximately the same liquefaction susceptibility. The seismic source zone for the prehistoric sand blows is unknown. The different distributions of prehistoric and 1886 sand blows have two possible explanations: (1) moderate to strong earthquakes originated in different seismic source locations through time or (2) at least one earthquake much stronger than the 1886 event also originated from the same seismic source as the 1886 earthquake.

  5. Geologic framework of the long bay inner shelf: implications for coastal evolution in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.; Denny, J.; Baldwin, W.; Schwab, W.; Morton, R.; Gayes, P.; Driscoll, N.

    2007-01-01

    The inner continental shelf off northern South Carolina is a sediment-limited environment characterized by extensive hardground areas, where coastal plain strata and ancient channel-fill deposits are exposed at the sea floor. Holocene sand is concentrated in large shoals associated with active tidal inlets, an isolated shore-detached sand body, and a widespread series of low-relief sand ridges. The regional geologic framework is a strong control on the production, movement and deposition of sediment. High-resolution geologic mapping of the sea floor supports conceptual models indicative of net southwestward sediment transport along the coast.

  6. Reddish Egret extends its breeding range along the North American Atlantic coast into South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferguson, L.M.; Jodice, P.G.R.; Post, W.; Sanders, F.I.

    2005-01-01

    We report the northernmost breeding record of the Reddish Egret (Egretta rufescens) along the North American Atlantic Coast. Nesting activity was first seen in late May 2004, and on 6 July 2004 a nest was discovered with two young chicks on Marsh Island, a barrier island located within Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina, USA. Reddish Egret nestlings were last observed within 1 m of the nest on 30 July 2004. This represents a northward extension of ca. 450 km in the breeding range of this species and, for the U.S. Atlantic Coast, the only recorded instance of nesting north of Florida.

  7. Bathymetry of Lake William C. Bowen and Municipal Reservoir #1, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, D.D.; Campbell, B.G.; Lowery, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use and importance of lakes for water supply to communities enhance the need for an accurate methodology to determine lake bathymetry and storage capacity. A global positioning receiver and a fathometer were used to collect position data and water depth in February 2008 at Lake William C. Bowen and Municipal Reservoir #1, Spartanburg County, South Carolina. All collected data were imported into a geographic information system database. A bathymetric surface model, contour map, and stage-area and -volume relations were created from the geographic information database.

  8. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R.; Looney, B.B.

    1993-07-08

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  9. Synoptic surveys of major reservoirs in South Carolina, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.

    1992-03-01

    Comprehensive synoptic surveys of ten South Carolina airs (L Lake, Savannah River Site (SRS), Par Pond, SRS, Pond B, SRS, Lake Moultrie, Lake Marion, Lake Murray, Lake Monticello, Lake Robinson, Lake Richard B. Russell, and Lake Greenwood) were performed to characterize and compare these basins with regard to water quality, trophic status, and community structure during September 1988 and September 1989. All of the reservoirs were mesoeutrophic to eutrophic having significantly greater productivity rates than oligotrophic ecosystems. This report presents and discusses the results of these surveys.

  10. Drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Arthur P.; Seefelt, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), is drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, S.C. The test well is scheduled to run between mid-March and early May 2011. When completed, the well will be about 1,000 feet deep. The purpose of this test well is to gain knowledge about the regional-scale Floridan aquifer, an important source of groundwater in the Hilton Head area. Also, cores obtained during drilling will enable geologists to study the last 60 million years of Earth history in this area.

  11. A test of an expert-based bird-habitat relationship model in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John, C.; Gartner, David, L.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Dunning, John, B., Jr.; Franzreb, Kathleen, E.; Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Miller, Karl, V.; Pearson, Scott, F.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships models are used widely by land managers to provide information on which species are likely to occur in an area of interest and may be impacted by a proposed management activity. Few such models have been tested. Recent Avian census data from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina was used to validate BIRDHAB, a geographic information system (GIS) model developed by United States Forest Service resource managers to predict relative habitat quality for birds at the stand level on national forests in the southeastern United States. BIRDHAB is based on the species-habitat matrices presented by Hamel (1992).

  12. Drilling of airborne radioactivity anomalies in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, J.B.

    1954-01-01

    From April 22 to May 19, 1953, airborne radioactivity surveys totalling 5,600 traverse miles were made in 10 areas in Florida (Moxham, 1954).  Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in Bradford, Clay, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties, Florida.  Additional airborne surveys were made in the Spring of 1954 in Hardee and Manatee Counties, Florida, on the drainage of the Altamaha River in Georgia, and in the area of the old phosphate workings in and around Charleston County, South Carolina.

  13. Unretrieved shooting loss of mourning doves in north-central South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Unretrieved loss for mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in north-central South Carolina was between 27 and 41 percent of the retrieved kill for the 1973 through 1975 hunting seasons based on 1,396 doves shot by 281 hunters. Dove hunters hunted in groups, fired 8.6 shots per retrieved dove, and engaged in a substantial number of illegal activities. Increased dove populations and hunter bag resulted in increased unretrieved loss, numbers of shots per bagged bird, and illegal activities. Retriever dogs increased the efficiency of dove hunters.

  14. Selected hydrologic data from a wastewater spray disposal site on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, G.K.; Belval, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study presents data collected during a study of the effects on the water table aquifer from wastewater application at rates of up to 5 inches per week on a wastewater spray disposal site on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. The study was conducted from April 1982 through December 1983. The disposal site covers approximately 14 acres. Water level and water quality data from organic, inorganic, and nutrient analyses from the water table aquifer to a depth of 30 ft and similar water quality data from the wastewater treatment plant are included. (USGS)

  15. Fall food habits of wood ducks from Lake Marion, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGilvrey, F.B.

    1966-01-01

    A total of 108 stomachs of wood ducks (Aix sponsa) collected from hunters on the upper end of Lake Marion, South Carolina, between November 29 and December 6, 1961, were examined for information on food habits. Six plants made up over 98 percent of the total volume. Five were tree fruits: water and pin oak (Quercus nigra and Q. palustris), baldcypress (Taxodium distichum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water hickory (Carya aquatica). The sixth important food was corn (Zea mays). In areas being managed for wood ducks and timber, therefore, these tree species should not be removed.

  16. Technical synthesis of prehistoric archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

    1989-12-01

    Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in south Carolina span 16 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory and history.

  17. Remnant colloform pyrite at the haile gold deposit, South Carolina: A textural key to genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, N.; Ayuso, R.A.; Seal, R.R., II

    2001-01-01

    Auriferous iron sulfide-bearing deposits of the Carolina slate belt have distinctive mineralogical and textural features-traits that provide a basis to construct models of ore deposition. Our identification of paragenetically early types of pyrite, especially remnant colloform, crustiform, and layered growth textures of pyrite containing electrum and pyrrhotite, establishes unequivocally that gold mineralization was coeval with deposition of host rocks and not solely related to Paleozoic tectonic events. Ore horizons at the Haile deposit, South Carolina, contain many remnants of early pyrite: (1) fine-grained cubic pyrite disseminated along bedding; (2) fine- grained spongy, rounded masses of pyrite that may envelop or drape over pyrite cubes; (3) fragments of botryoidally and crustiform layered pyrite, and (4) pyritic infilling of vesicles and pumice. Detailed mineral chemistry by petrography, microprobe, SEM, and EDS analysis of replaced pumice and colloform structures containing both arsenic compositional banding and electrum points to coeval deposition of gold and the volcanic host rocks and, thus, confirms a syngenetic origin for the gold deposits. Early pyrite textures are present in other major deposits of the Carolina slate belt, such as Ridgeway and Barite Hill, and these provide strong evidence for models whereby the sulfide ores formed prior to tectonism. The role of Paleozoic metamorphism was to remobilize and concentrate gold and other minerals in structurally prepared sites. Recognizing the significance of paragenetically early pyrite and gold textures can play an important role in distinguishing sulfide ores that form in volcanic and sedimentary environments from those formed solely by metamorphic processes. Exploration strategies applied to the Carolina slate belt and correlative rocks in the eastern United States in the Avalonian basement will benefit from using syngenetic models for gold mineralization.

  18. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yard and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    The South Carolina Department of Transportation operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a cooperative investigation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation to characterize water-quality constituents that are transported in stormwater from representative maintenance yard and section shed facilities in South Carolina. At a section shed in Ballentine, S.C., stormwater discharges to a retention pond outfall (Ballentine). At the Conway maintenance yard, stormwater in the southernmost section discharges to a pipe outfall (Conway1), and stormwater in the remaining area discharges to a grass-lined ditch (Conway2). At the North Charleston maintenance yard, stormwater discharges from the yard to Turkey Creek through a combination of pipes, ditches, and overland flow; therefore, samples were collected from the main channel of Turkey Creek at the upstream (North Charleston1) and downstream (North Charleston2) limits of the North Charleston maintenance yard facility. The storms sampled during this study had a wide range of rainfall amounts, durations, and intensities at each of the facilities and, therefore, were considered to be reasonably representative of the potential for contaminant transport. At all facilities, stormwater discharge was significantly correlated to rainfall amount and intensity. Event-mean unit-area stormwater discharge increased with increasing impervious surface at the Conway and North Charleston maintenance yards. The Ballentine facility with 79 percent impervious surface had a mean unit-area discharge similar to that of the North Charleston maintenance yard (62 percent impervious surface). That similarity may be attributed, in part, to the effects of the retention pond on the stormwater runoff at the Ballentine facility and to the greater rainfall intensities and amounts at the North Charleston facility. Stormwater samples from the facilities were analyzed for multiple

  19. 75 FR 71671 - Draft Report on the Technical Study of the Sofa Super Store Fire-South Carolina, June 18, 2007.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Fire--South Carolina, June 18, 2007. AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST... Super Store Fire--South Carolina, which took place on June 18, 2007. DATES: Comments must be received on..., SC on June 18, 2007, NIST conducted a study to determine the likely technical causes of the...

  20. Languages for the Nation. Dimension 2008. Selected Proceedings of the 2008 Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching and the South Carolina Foreign Language Teachers' Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Carol, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Dimension" is the annual volume containing the selected, refereed, edited Proceedings of each year's conference. The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT), held its annual conference, April 3-5, 2008, at the Springmaid Beach Resort and Conference Center, in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, in collaboration with the South Carolina Foreign…

  1. School Size and Its Relationship to Student Outcomes and School Climate: A Review and Analysis of Eight South Carolina State-Wide Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews eight school size studies performed by doctoral students and graduate faculty at the University of South Carolina. These studies examine the relationship of South Carolina school size to academic achievement and to costs per student at all grade span groupings, including elementary, middle, and high school. The studies are…

  2. The Impact of a State Takeover on Academic Achievement, School Performance, and School Leadership in a Rural South Carolina School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Janice Zissette

    2009-01-01

    This case study on the impact of a state takeover in one of South Carolina's most rural school districts ("referred to as the County School District") was completed using a quasi-experimental mixed methods design to examine the impact on academic achievement, school performance, and school leadership as a result of the South Carolina Department of…

  3. The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province: Age Comparison Between the South Carolina Dykes and Morocco Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youbi, N.; Nomade, S.; Breutel, E.; Knight, K.

    2003-12-01

    Believed to be the largest volcanic province on Earth at more than 6000 km long and 2000 km wide, the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) stretches from Eastern Canada to Brazil and from Western Spain to the Ivory Coast. Due to the massive erosion and subsequent in filling of these areas since the 200 Ma rifting event, dikes and sills constitute the majority of the exposed CAMP volcanics. However, well preserved lava flows have been found in the Triassic basins of the Northeastern United States and Morocco. Despite numerous 40Ar/39Ar dating attempts, very few of the exposed CAMP volcanics have been successfully dated due to a variety of factors including; excess argon and alteration. Especially no age is available in the well-mapped but structurally complex South and North Carolina dykes swarm as well as only few scattered ages in the Moroccan Trias-Liassic basins. Our goal is to better constrain the emplacement timing of the dykes swarm but also to compare age of both intrusive and effusive rocks from the same magmatic event but separated from more than 1000 km, 200 Mys ago. Several questions continue to surround the CAMP volcanic province including its cause and emplacement mechanism. Toward that end we have collected and dated dyke samples from the Carolinas and flows in Morocco, 1000 km away and across the rift. We anticipate that a comparison of these dates will enable us to understand more about the timing between the emplacement of the flows and dykes. We have collected in South Carolina and High Atlas in Morocco 7 and 9 hand samples respectively. Specimens from South Carolina correspond to the three distinct dykes' direction NE-SW, NW-SE and NS. In Morocco, samples were collected in four sections (100 to 300 m thick) located in the High Atlas between Marrakech and Ouarzazate. From each hand sample two different transparent plagioclase fractions, 250-180 and 180 to 100 microns, were separated. We have performed step heating experiments at the Berkeley

  4. Shorebird diet and size selection of nereid polychaetes in South Carolina coastal diked wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, Louise M.; Haig, Susan M.

    1997-01-01

    Coastal wetlands that are diked and managed may supplement declining natural habitat for migrating shorebirds (Charadriiformes). However, data on shorebird diet in these diked wetlands are scarce. We examined shorebird diet and prey size selection in brackish diked wetlands at the Yawkey Center on South Island, South Carolina, USA. Gut contents of seven Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) and seven Short-billed Dowitchers (Limnodromus griseus) were examined. The most common items in gut contents were mandibles of the nereid polychaete, Laeonereis culveri, followed by insects. L. culveri eaten by Short-billed Dowitchers were significantly larger than those eaten by Lesser Yellowlegs. This difference may be related to differences in bill length and feeding tactics. We make suggestions on how to maintain high numbers of L. culveri in diked wetlands, but more research on the timing of colonization by invertebrates is needed in shorebird conservation efforts.

  5. Analysis of Acoustic Wave and Current Data Offshore of Mytle Beach, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, K. A.; Wren, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two bottom boundary layer (BBL) instrument frames have been deployed on the shoreface and inner-shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina offshore of Myrtle Beach as part of a South Carolina Sea Grant funded project to measure sediment transport over two hardbottom habitats. The inshore instrument frame is located on an extensive hardbottom surface 850 meters offshore. The second instrumented frame is secured to a hardbottom surface on the inner-shelf at a distance of approximately 2.5 km offshore. The nearshore BBL observing system is composed of a downward-looking RDI/ Teledyne 1200 kHz Pulse-Coherent Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, an upward-looking Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler (AWAC), and an Aquatec Acoustic Backscatter Sensor. As part of this larger study, the wave and current data from the AWAC have been analyzed. Long-term continuous time series data include wave height, wave period, directional wave spectra, and the magnitude and direction of currents in the water column. Within the data set are several wave events, including several frontal passages and Tropical Storm Hanna which hit the Myrtle Beach area in early September. Wave data have been correlated with meteorological data, and a comparison of shoreface wave characteristics during each type of event are presented.

  6. Stratal architecture of inland dunes along the Pee Dee River, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E. E.; Hill, J. C.; Harris, S.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate conditions during the late Pleistocene allowed for eolian dune formation adjacent to riverine floodplains within South Carolina's coastal plain. As described from aerial photography, these paleo-parabolic dunes have a northeastern orientation and are found along the eastern side of riverine systems. This continuing study uses LiDAR and ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to better understand the geomorphology and internal architecture of a dune field formed between the Pee Dee and Waccamaw Rivers in northeastern South Carolina. Morphology observed in the LiDAR data indicates both isolated and composite dunes of less than a 1000m in length and 6m in height and GPR profiles collected across these features reveal a common northeasterly dip for larger foreset bedding with several reactivation surfaces. In addition to remotely sensed data, subsurface sediment samples will be used to better constrain the development of this dune field and the relationship to differing sediment supply and paleo-climatic conditions during the last glacial period.

  7. Productivity of functional guilds of fishes in managed wetlands in coastal South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Kelly F.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2014-01-01

    In coastal South Carolina, many wetlands are impounded and managed as migratory waterfowl habitat. Impoundment effects on fish production and habitat quality largely are unknown. We used the size-frequency method to estimate summer production of fish guilds in three impoundments along the Combahee River, South Carolina. We predicted that guild-specific production would vary with impoundment salinity, which ranged from 3 to 21 practical salinity units. We expected that marine species that use the estuary as nursery habitat would have greatest production in the impoundment with the highest salinity regime, and that species that inhabit the upper reaches of the estuary would have greatest production in the impoundment with the lowest salinity regime. Finally, we expected that estuarine species would be highly productive in all study impoundments, because these species can reproduce within these structures. We found that guild-specific productivity varied both among years and among impoundments, generally following salinity gradients, though to a lesser extent than expected. Our guild-specific estimates of fish productivity fell on the low end of the range of previously published estuarine fish production estimates. Additionally, we observed large mortality events in the study impoundments each summer. The results of our study indicate that during the summer, the study impoundments provided poor-quality fish habitat to all guilds.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Project at the Medical University of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Eric R.

    2008-04-25

    Department of Energy funds were used to support the development of a Center for Marine Structural Biology at the Marine Resources Center at Ft. Johnson in Charleston, South Carolina. The Ft. Johnson site is home to five institutions in a unique state/federal/academic partnership whose member institutions include the National Ocean Service (NOS), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), the SC Department of Natural Resources, and the College of Charleston. The Center for Marine Structural Biology sits adjacent to the newly completed Hollings Marine Laboratory and houses a 700 and 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resource instruments. The completed center is operational and meets it goal to provide state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance capabilities to resolve the molecular structures of compounds that have direct relevance to human health, including marine-derived biotoxins that are tested against cancer cell lines through collaborative studies with researchers at the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC. Funds from the DOE assisted, in part, with the purchase of NMR probes and ancillary equipment for the 800 MHz NMR instrument. In addition, developmental funds was used to support the visit of an Scientific Advisory Board and for the NMR Planning Team to visit currently operational high field NMR facilities to guide their choice of instrumentation and design of the building.

  9. Factors associated with toothache among African American adolescents living in rural South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hon K; Wiegand, Ryan E; Hill, Elizabeth G; Magruder, Kathryn M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Salinas, Carlos F; London, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore behavioral factors associated with toothache among African American adolescents living in rural South Carolina. Using a self-administered questionnaire, data were collected on toothache experience in the past 12 months, oral hygiene behavior, dental care utilization, and cariogenic snack and nondiet soft drink consumption in a convenience sample of 156 African American adolescents age 10 to 18 years living in rural South Carolina. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations between reported toothache experience and sociodemographic variables, oral health behavior, and snack consumption. Thirty-four percent of adolescents reported having toothache in the past 12 months. In univariable modeling, age, dental visit in the last 2 years, quantity and frequency of cariogenic snack consumption, and quantity of nondiet soft drink consumption were each significantly associated with experiencing toothache in the past 12 months (all p values < 0.05). Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that younger age, frequent consumption of cariogenic snacks, and number of cans of nondiet soft drink consumed during the weekend significantly increased the odds of experiencing toothache in the past 12 months (all p values ≤ 0.01). Findings indicate age, frequent consumption of cariogenic snacks, and number of cans of nondiet soft drinks are related to toothache in this group. Public policy implications related to selling cariogenic snacks and soft drink that targeting children and adolescents especially those from low income families are discussed. PMID:22085328

  10. Fuel ethanol and South Carolina: a feasibility assessment. Volume II. Detailed report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of producing ethanol from carbohydrates in the State of South Carolina is discussed. It is preliminary in the sense that it provides partial answers to some of the questions that exist concerning ethanol production in the state, and is not intended to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. A great deal more work needs to be done as ethanol fuels become a more significant element in South Carolina's energy mix. The existing carbohydrate resource base in the state is reviewed, the extent to which this base can be increased is estimated, and importation of out-of-state feedstocks to expand the base further is discussed. A discussion of the economics of ethanol production is provided for farm-scale and commercial-sized plants, as is a general discussion of environmental impacts and state permitting and approval requirements. Several other considerations affecting the small-scale producer are addressed, including the use of agricultural residues and manure-derived methane to fuel the ethanol production process. Research needs are identified, and brief case studies for Williamsburg and Orangeburg counties are provided.

  11. Relation of environmental factors to breeding status of royal and sandwich terns in South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Prouty, R.M.; Neely, B.S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The population ecology of the royal tern Sterna maxima and sandwich tern Sterna sandvicensis was investigated in South Carolina from 1970 through 1977. Royal and sandwich terns nested together in all of the colonies that we located. The peak in egg laying usually occurred in early May; peak hatching occurred from late May to mid-June. Clutch size for both species was one egg. Tidal flooding was the major factor in egg loss. The breeding population was 15,499 pairs in 1974 and 18,096 pairs in 1975; sandvicensis made up about 5% of the breeding population. The average number of young fledged per nest ranged from 0?36 to 0?44. Residues of organochlorine pollutants in most eggs and tissues were low and posed no identifiable threat to the terns. There was a decline in DDE and dieldrin residues in eggs of maxima. The future of royal and sandwich terns in South Carolina seems fairly secure as the population is apparently at or near carrying capacity and most of the major nesting sites are dedicated to protection of nesting birds.

  12. Anthropometric characteristics of Columbia, South Carolina, youth baseball players and Dixie Youth World Series players.

    PubMed

    French, Karen E; Spurgeon, John H; Nevett, Michael E

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare measures of body size in two samples of youth baseball players with normative data from the United States National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth charts. One sample of youth baseball players participated in a local little league. The second sample of youth baseball players were members of eight of the twelve teams participating in the 1995 Dixie Youth World Series. Normative data for the United States (NCHS) were used as comparative data. Two trained anthropometrists measured standing height, sitting height, lower limb height, upper limb length, arm girth, calf girth, tricep skinfold, and abdomen skinfold on all participants. In both samples, pitchers, short stops, and first basemen were a more highly skilled group and exhibited larger body size (greater standing height, sitting height, lower limb height, upper limb length) than children who played at other positions. The standing height of local little league players was similar to the median of reference data at ages 7, 8, and 9 years. The standing height and weight of skilled players in both samples approximated the 75th percentile for standing height and weight at ages 10, 11, 12, and 13 years. The results suggest that baseball players exhibit larger body size than the normal population at young ages. Body size may be an important criterion used by coaches to select and assign young players to certain positions. PMID:17679491

  13. Anthropometric Characteristics of Columbia, South Carolina, Youth Baseball Players and Dixie Youth World Series Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Karen E.; Spurgeon, John H.; Nevett, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare measures of body size in two samples of youth baseball players with normative data from the United States National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth charts. One sample of youth baseball players participated in a local little league. The second sample of youth baseball players were members of eight…

  14. Solar energy system performance evaluation. Seasonal report for Wormser, Columbia, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Wormser Solar Energy System's operational performance from April 1979 through March 1980 was evaluated. The space heating subsystem met 42 percent of the measured space heating load and the hot water subsystem met 23 percent of the measured hot water demand. Net electrical energy savings were 4.36 million Btu's or 1277 kwh. Fossil energy savings will increase considerably if the uncontrolled solar energy input to the building is considered.

  15. The Impact of Interactive Whiteboard Technology on Ninth Grade English at Selected Rural High Schools in Upstate South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of interactive whiteboard technology on ninth grade English End of Course scores in two high schools in the Upstate of South Carolina in the school year 2011-2012. This study also sought to determine what impact interactive whiteboard technology had on the factors of gender, socio-economic…

  16. South Carolina Statewide Testing Program 1977-78. General Report. Office of Research Report Series. Volume One/Number 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busbee, Cyril B.

    The results and methodology of the South Carolina 1977-78 statewide spring testing program for grades 3, 6, and 11 are presented and discussed. The discussion of the results focuses on a comparison of the 1978 results to national norms, a comparison of 1978 to 1977 results, a performance comparison across grade levels, and a comparison of skill…

  17. Pre-Vocational/Vocational Needs of Deaf-Blind Youths-Conference Proceedings South Carolina Department of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Programs for the Handicapped.

    The document contains proceedings of the June, 1978 conference on the pre-vocational and vocational needs of deaf/blind youth. The report on the conference (which was conducted by the South Carolina Department of Education) consists of the following chapters and authors: "A Declaration of Rights of Deaf/Blind Persons" (G. Lawhorn),…

  18. Giving Teachers the Time To Teach: The Classroom Management System in the Public Schools of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Gary

    The major components of South Carolina's Classroom Management System (CMS) are described, and CMS components are related to the reduction of teacher time and paperwork in the instructional planning and record-keeping processes. Specific detail is given for the instructional management component of CMS because of its potential for managing…

  19. 78 FR 63504 - Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Units 2 and 3; South Carolina Electric and Gas; Changes to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... hearing in connection with these actions, was published in the Federal Register on March 4, 2013 (78 FR... COMMISSION Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Units 2 and 3; South Carolina Electric and Gas; Changes to the... Cooper) (the licensee), for construction and operation of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station...

  20. A Descriptive Study of Veteran Students Attending The University of South Carolina, Fall 1975. No. 30-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Robert G.; And Others

    The Office of Veteran Student Affairs (OVSA) at the University of South Carolina serves a total population of 3,310 veteran students. This survey, conducted during the fall semester of 1975, was designed to obtain data about the personal background of the respondents, their attitudes toward the services provided by the several offices serving…

  1. List of Sources of Selection: Library Materials for South Carolina Elementary and Secondary Media Centers. 6th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    In compliance with Section 59-31-10 of the 1976 School Laws of South Carolina, this document provides a bibliography of standard lists that media specialists, teachers, and administrators may use as a guide for reviewing and selecting instructional materials for elementary and secondary public school library media centers. Sources of selection…

  2. South Carolina applications for industrial waste-heat recovery using heat pumps and Rankine-cycle power-generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrosson, F. J.; Murray, K. A.

    1981-07-01

    The industries include: textile finishing, pulp and paper, noncellulosic fibers, pressed and blown glass, hydraulic cement, and secondary nonferrous metals. Thermodynamic and economic calculations determined system outputs and after-tax rates of return. The number of applications and net system outputs for the United States and for South Carolina were estimated.

  3. Access & Equity... Diversity in Higher Education. South Carolina Access & Equity Statewide Program, Fiscal Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    From 1981 to 1986 South Carolina implemented a federally mandated desegregation plan designed to: (1) enhance the State's public historically black colleges; (2) desegregate student enrollment at the State's baccalaureate degree granting public colleges and universities; and (3) desegregate faculties, staffs, and governing bodies of all public…

  4. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

  5. Health Care Assisting Lesson Planning Guide for Long-Term Care Aide Certification. South Carolina Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This document consists of 13 competency outlines/lesson plans that have been developed for use in preparing students for certification as long-term care aides through South Carolina's health occupations education program. The following competencies are covered in the individual lessons: identify the function and responsibilities of nurses aides;…

  6. 33 CFR 165.769 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Charleston, South Carolina, Captain of the Port Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Escorted vessel means a vessel, other than a large U.S. naval vessel as defined in 33 CFR 165.2015, that is... wake. (b) Regulated area. All navigable waters, as defined in 33 CFR 2.36, within the Captain of the Port Zone, Charleston, South Carolina 33 CFR 3.35-15. (c) Security zone. A 300-yard security zone...

  7. 33 CFR 165.769 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Charleston, South Carolina, Captain of the Port Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Escorted vessel means a vessel, other than a large U.S. naval vessel as defined in 33 CFR 165.2015, that is... wake. (b) Regulated area. All navigable waters, as defined in 33 CFR 2.36, within the Captain of the Port Zone, Charleston, South Carolina 33 CFR 3.35-15. (c) Security zone. A 300-yard security zone...

  8. 33 CFR 165.769 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Charleston, South Carolina, Captain of the Port Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Escorted vessel means a vessel, other than a large U.S. naval vessel as defined in 33 CFR 165.2015, that is... wake. (b) Regulated area. All navigable waters, as defined in 33 CFR 2.36, within the Captain of the Port Zone, Charleston, South Carolina 33 CFR 3.35-15. (c) Security zone. A 300-yard security zone...

  9. An Assessment of a Program for Rural Youth from Low-Income Families in South Carolina. Extension Circular 559.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Virlyn A.; And Others

    The effectiveness of a special South Carolina rural youth project was evaluated. Initiated in 1972, the project was designed to improve the quality of life of rural youth from low income families via community clubs for youth between the ages of 9 and 16. In order to measure the attitude changes (aspirations and expectations) of club members, a…

  10. Commingling of native and exotic wildlife in South Carolina zoological gardens and their position in vector ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zoological parks expose native and exotic wildlife to a wide range of ectoparasites and biting flies. Our study focused on two zoological parks in South Carolina and we report on ticks, lice, flies, fleas, and other ectoparasites from both native and exotic wildlife in these parks. We also report on...

  11. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

  12. 78 FR 76327 - Notice of Approval of South Carolina's Application for Avoidance of 2013 Credit Reduction Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Tax Act (FUTA) provide that employers in a state that has an outstanding balance of advances under... the most recent such January 1 occurs, if a balance of advances remains at the beginning of November 10 of that year. Because the account of South Carolina in the Unemployment Trust Fund had a...

  13. First Report of Bacterial Leaf Blight on Broccoli and Cabbage Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis in South Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In May 2009, leaf spot and leaf blight symptoms were observed on broccoli (B. oleracea var. italica) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) on several farms in Lexington County, the major brassica-growing region of South Carolina. Affected areas ranged from scattered disease foci within fiel...

  14. 77 FR 5781 - Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of a Record of... through a NOA in the Federal Register (Volume 75, Number 122, Page 36386) with a wait period that ended on... Force actions analyzed in the Final EIS. Authority: This NOA is published pursuant to the...

  15. 78 FR 56769 - South Carolina Division of Public Railways, d/b/a Palmetto Railways-Intra-Corporate Family...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption--The Port Utilities Commission of Charleston, S.C., Port Terminal... of Charleston, S.C. (PUCC), Port Terminal Railroad of South Carolina (PTR), and East Cooper and.... 743 (1924) (certificate issued to PUCC to acquire and operate certain railroad terminal facilities...

  16. Leading the Way: State Mandates for School Advisory Councils in California, Florida and South Carolina. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerchykov, Ross; And Others

    This report reviews the pioneering efforts in California, Florida, and South Carolina to foster citizen participation through school councils and provides data and analysis on one promising policy innovation in each of the states. The experience in the three states suggests that institutional mechanisms are in place, precedents have been set, and…

  17. The Availability and Use of 21st Century Technology Tools in South Carolina Secondary Public School Library Media Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuRant, Kathleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of South Carolina secondary school library media specialists to prepare students to meet the "AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner" (American Association of School Librarians, 2009b) by investigating the availability of 21st century technology tools, the confidence level of media…

  18. South Carolina Statewide Testing Program 1983: Summary Report. Office of Research, Report Series, Volume One/Number 71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Vana H.; And Others

    The primary purpose of the 1983 Statewide Testing Program was to assess the achievement of 4th, 7th, and 10th grade students in South Carolina public schools. The results from the Statewide Testing Program provide educators with information which facilitates the decision-making process at the State, district, and school levels. Besides the…

  19. 75 FR 8756 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... revisions to 10 CFR part 73, as discussed in a Federal Register notice dated March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13967... Requirements, 74 FR 13926, 13967 (March 27, 2009)]. The licensee currently maintains a security system... COMMISSION South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1;...

  20. The Limits of Good Intentions: A Historical Analysis of Pioneering Progressive Educators in Upstate South Carolina (1910-1920)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    After 1880, the Upstate of South Carolina found itself in the midst of a textile boom. As families migrated from the mountains and failing farms to find employment in one of the many textile mills, relations re-established roots within the confines of the company-owned mill village. Paternalism, the absence of child labor laws, and the lack of…

  1. Importance of Small Isolated Wetlands for Herpetofaunal Diversity in Managed, Young Growth Forests in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.R.; Guynn, D.C., Jr.; Hanlin, H.G.

    2002-03-27

    Assessment and comparison of richness, abundance and difference of herpetofauna at five small isolated wetlands located within a commercial forest landscape in the South Carolina Coastal Plain. Data indicates small isolated wetlands are focal points of herpetofaunal richness and abundance in managed coastal plain forest and contribute more to regional biodiversity than is implied by their small size or ephemeral hydrology.

  2. 33 CFR 165.769 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Charleston, South Carolina, Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Escorted vessel means a vessel, other than a large U.S. naval vessel as defined in 33 CFR 165.2015, that is... wake. (b) Regulated area. All navigable waters, as defined in 33 CFR 2.36, within the Captain of the Port Zone, Charleston, South Carolina 33 CFR 3.35-15. (c) Security zone. A 300-yard security zone...

  3. Adoption of an Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Curriculum: A Case Study in a South Carolina School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Lauren M.; Flynn, Shannon; Kenison, Kelli; Prince, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Continued efforts are needed to reduce teenage pregnancy in the United States. Implementation of evidence-based curricula in schools is one strategy toward meeting this goal. In 2010, the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) received funding to implement a teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) curriculum. Congruent with South…

  4. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Teacher Attrition in High Performing and Low Performing Elementary Rural Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter-Blocker, Vickie R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors impacting teacher attrition in high-performing and low-performing elementary rural schools in South Carolina. Several factors were identified that interfered with teachers returning to the teaching profession. School districts in rural areas need to be better informed of the factors that affect…

  5. 77 FR 21815 - South Carolina Electric And Gas Company (Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station Units 2 and 3); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0089; Docket Nos. 52-027 and 52-028; License Nos. NPF-93 and NPF-94; EA-12-063] South Carolina Electric And Gas Company (Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station Units 2 and 3); Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Reliable Spent Fuel...

  6. Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo Infection in Cattle in the South Okanagan District of British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Kingscote, Barbara F.

    1985-01-01

    An outbreak of leptospirosis due to Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in the South Okanagan District of British Columbia was investigated. The infection was associated primarily with bulls, but serovar hardjo was isolated from both bulls and cows at slaughter. Kidney and cerebrospinal fluid were found to contain leptospires, independently of the presence and level of serum agglutinins. Treatment of a bull twice in six months with dihydrostreptomycin failed to diminish an agglutinin titer (1/200) which persisted for two years without reexposure of the bull. A serological survey of cull cows sold through a central auction mart revealed the presence of hardjo agglutinins in 15.4% of 1300 sera representing 163 herds in 20 locations. Thirty percent of these herds contained reactor cattle. The number of premises from which reactor cattle came in a given locality varied from 4% to 67.7%. Measures to control leptospirosis in the study are suggested. PMID:17422584

  7. Characterization and closure of the Met Lab Carolina Bay at the Savannah River site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Frazier, W.L.; Haselow, L.A.; Voss, L.

    1993-07-01

    The Met Lab Carolina Bay is subject to Subtitle C of RCRA and CERCLA requirements. Located in the northwestern section of the Savannah River Site, the Met Lab Carolina Bay is a marshy, oval-shaped natural depression covering approximately six acres. The Carolina Bay received wastes from three sources: the Met Lab Basin A-007 drainage outfall, the A-Area coal-fire power plant A-008 drainage outfall and the A/M-Area vehicle maintenance parking lot stormwater runoff A-009 outfall. Two characterization efforts conducted in 1988/89 and 1991 indicate the presence of metals in the sediments and soils of the bay. The greatest concentrations of the metals and organics being in the north-central portion of the bay. The metals and organics were primarily associated with surface sediments and the organic-rich soil layer to a depth of about two feet. Conclusions from the Human Health Baseline Risk indicate the future on-unit resident exposure to sediments and soil poses an unacceptable level of risk to human health. However, the assumptions built into the calculations lead to conservative human health risk findings. A qualitative Ecological Risk Assessment was performed on the Carolina Bay. This ecological assessment, based on historical and existing sampling data, was found to be insufficient to make a definitive decision on the contaminants` effects on the ecology of the bay. The proposed action for the Carolina Bay is to conduct an ecological characterization. It appears that the ecological risks will be in the driving factor in determining the remedial action for the Met Lab Carolina Bay.

  8. The Pauropoda (Myriapoda) of the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, U. )

    1988-09-01

    Though the pauropods of the US have been treated by many authors for more than a hundred years their occurrence not only on the Savannah River Plant (SRP) but in South Carolina as a whole has not been studied. Up to now not a single species has been recorded from these areas. The faunas of the surrounding states give little clue as to what might be expected in the SRP area because they too are almost uninvestigated (eleven species known from Tennessee, twelve from North Carolina, one from Alabama and one from Georgia). In fact, eighteen species in all have been listed from the states mentioned and six of them can now be put on the SRP list together with eight others. Several species not accounted for in this report may appear in future sampling. Among the species found, a high proportion was new to science. This necessarily moved the main emphasis of the study to taxonomic description because new taxa have to be named and described. They must also be included in a review such as this, as there are currently no other means to give a picture of the present state of knowledge. The fourteen species reported here for the SRP are certainly only a fraction of the total fauna. 25 refs., 26 figs.

  9. Microcrustaceans (Branchipoda and Copepoda) of Wetland Impoundments on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, Adrienne E; Taylor, Barbara E

    2005-09-21

    The United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, contains an abundance of freshwater wetlands and impoundments. Four large impoundments, as well as several small, abandoned farm and mill ponds, and about 400 Carolina bays and other small, isolated depression wetland ponds are located within the 893 km2 area of the SRS. Crustaceans of the orders Branchiopoda and Copepoda are nearly ubiquitous in these water bodies. Although small in size, these organisms are often very abundant. They consequently play an important trophic role in freshwater food webs supporting fish, larval salamanders, larval insects, and numerous other animals, aquatic and terrestrial. This report provides an introduction to the free-living microcrustaceans of lentic water bodies on the SRS and a comprehensive list of species known to occur there. Occurrence patterns are summarized from three extensive survey studies, supplemented with other published and unpublished records. In lieu of a key, we provide a guide to taxonomic resources and notes on undescribed species. Taxa covered include the orders Cladocera, Anostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata of the Subclass Branchiopoda and the Superorders Calanoida and Cyclopoida of Subclass Copepoda. Microcrustaceans of the Superorder Harpacticoida of the Subclass Copepoda and Subclass Ostracoda are also often present in lentic water bodies. They are excluded from this report because they have not received much study at the species level on the SRS.

  10. Stocking and hooking mortality of planted rainbow trout in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, D. Hugh

    1985-01-01

    Attempts to establish a 'put-grow-and-take' fishery for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina failed despite plantings of 200,000 fish in 1972-1979 because few of the stocked fish survived to legal size. At the same time, a fishery for brown trout (Salmo trutta) was established successfully by planting far fewer fish. Experiments were conducted to determine if stress at stocking and injuries and stress associated with catch and release of fish by shoreline anglers were responsible for the poor survival of rainbow trout. Only 1 of the 606 rainbow trout stocked in floating wire cages anchored in the reservoir died during the first 3 days, and fewer rainbow trout than brown trout died as a result of catch-and-release fishing during the first 11 days after stocking. Thus, these factors were not responsible for the lack of success in establishing a rainbow trout fishery in this reservoir.

  11. World prosperity, global warming and nuclear power: a possible South Carolina role.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Ernest S

    2007-12-01

    Global population and demand for energy have increased in the past fifteen years, and these trends will continue. One consequence of increased energy production has been the buildup of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere and heightened concern over global warming. Nations are actively seeking energy sources which minimize the release of greenhouse gasses. Nuclear power is one energy source which can safely meet this requirement. The United States is proposing the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), an advanced nuclear strategy with reduced waste and greater protection against using materials in a weapons activity. GNEP activities are consistent with capabilities existing at the Savannah River Site, and two locations in South Carolina are being considered as the location to test these new fuel and reactor concepts. PMID:18284080

  12. Intermittent Elevated Radium Concentrations in Coastal Plain Groundwater of South Carolina, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles; Millings, Margaret; Noonkester, Jay

    2005-09-22

    To learn the cause of intermittent radium concentrations in groundwater of Coastal Plain aquifers, 31 groundwater wells in South Carolina, U.S.A. were sampled for radium and other geochemical parameters. Sediments cored from near the well screens were also sampled to examine any relationship between sediment properties and radium concentration in the groundwater. Elevated radium concentrations only occurred in groundwater with low electrical conductivity and pH values below 6.3. The adsorption edge for radium on hematite--a major surface active mineral in these aquifers--is at a pH value of about 6. Near this value, small changes in pH can result in significant adsorption or desorption of radium. In groundwater with initially low alkalinity, small intermittent decreases in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in groundwater cause decreases in pH and desorption of radium. The result is intermittent elevated radium concentrations.

  13. Surgical team member assessment of the safety of surgery practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Lyen C; Gibbons, Lorri; Kiang, Mathew V; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R

    2015-06-01

    We assessed surgical team member perceptions of multiple dimensions of safe surgical practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals participating in a statewide initiative to implement surgical safety checklists. Primary data were collected using a novel 35-item survey. We calculated the percentage of 1,852 respondents with strongly positive, positive, and neutral/negative responses about the safety of surgical practice, compared results by hospital and professional discipline, and examined how readiness, teamwork, and adherence related to staff perception of care quality. Overall, 78% of responses were positive about surgical safety at respondent's hospitals, but in each survey dimension, from 16% to 40% of responses were neutral/negative, suggesting significant opportunity to improve surgical safety. Respondents not reporting they would feel safe being treated in their operating rooms varied from 0% to 57% among hospitals. Surgeons responded more positively than nonsurgeons. Readiness, teamwork, and practice adherence related directly to staff perceptions of patient safety (p < .001). PMID:25828528

  14. A survey of metal and pesticide levels in stormwater retention pond sediments in coastal South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kevin D; Weinstein, John E; Hemingway, Ronald E; Garner, Thomas R; Globensky, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    During the summer of 2007, sediment samples were collected from 16 stormwater detention ponds and 2 reference ponds located in coastal South Carolina. The sediments were analyzed for more than 30 pesticides with current and historical uses, six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and seven metals. The results are compared with established screening assessment parameters, with copper found to be the contaminant of highest concern. Lead levels were found to correlate well with pond drainage area, while copper and zinc levels correlated with both pond drainage area and pond surface area. Chlorpyrifos levels were found to correlate with pond surface area. Our results also show that ponds draining commercial areas were likely to have higher levels of zinc and lead in the sediments compared to other pond classes. PMID:19499159

  15. Convergance experiments with a hydrodynamic model of Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Baltzer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A two-demensional, depth-averaged, finite-difference, flow/transport model, SIM2D, is being used to simulate tidal circulation and transport in the Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, estuarine system. Models of a subregion of the Port Royal Sound system have been derived from an earlier-developed model of the entire system having a grid size of 600 ft. The submodels were implemented with grid sizes of 600, 300, and 150 ft in order to determine the effects of changes in grid size on computed flows in the subregion, which is characterized by narrow channels and extensive tidal flats that flood and dewater with each rise and fall of the tide. Tidal amplitudes changes less than 5 percent as the grid size was decreased. Simulations were performed with the 300-foot submodel for time steps of 60, 30, and 15 s. Study results are discussed.

  16. Solar heating system installed at Blakedale Professional Center, Greenwood, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information on the solar heating system installed at the Blakedale Professional Center, in Greenwood, South Carolina is presented. The information consists of site and building description, solar system description, performance evaluation, system problems and installation drawings. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 85 percent of the building's heating requirements. The system was installed concurrently with building construction and heats 4,440 square feet of the building. There are 954 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors that are proof-mounted and have a drain-down system to protect the collectors from freezing. A 5,000 gallon steel, polyurethane insulated tank buried underground provides storage. The system was fully instrumented for performance evaluation and integrated into the National Solar Data Network.

  17. Mapping southern Atlantic coastal marshland, South Carolina-Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (Principal Investigator); Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Southeastern coastal marshes are among the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Ground based and low altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's ERTS-1 has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test site selected was an area from the South Carolina border to Saint Catherine's Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS-1 imagery: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities such as Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, Juncus roemerianus; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS-1 will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  18. Point and Fixed Plot Sampling Inventory Estimates at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2004-02-01

    This report provides calculation of systematic point sampling volume estimates for trees greater than or equal to 5 inches diameter breast height (dbh) and fixed radius plot volume estimates for trees < 5 inches dbh at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken County, South Carolina. The inventory of 622 plots was started in March 1999 and completed in January 2002 (Figure 1). Estimates are given in cubic foot volume. The analyses are presented in a series of Tables and Figures. In addition, a preliminary analysis of fuel levels on the SRS is given, based on depth measurements of the duff and litter layers on the 622 inventory plots plus line transect samples of down coarse woody material. Potential standing live fuels are also included. The fuels analyses are presented in a series of tables.

  19. Distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Related Organisms in the Atlantic Ocean off South Carolina and Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Colwell, Rita R.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related organisms in the Atlantic Ocean was determined during the summer of 1971 from samples collected at stations along four transects on the continental shelf off the South Carolina and Georgia coasts. No V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from any of the samples of seawater (surface and bottom), sediment, and plankton which were collected. A numerical taxonomy analysis of data on substrate utilization, including 154 organic compounds serving as single carbon sources, was carried out, and four groups of strains were observed. Each group showed well-separated distribution profiles from shore out to the continental shelf. That is, the groupings were observed to correspond to coastal, off-shore and intermediate distribution patterns for the strains. This study provides a useful example of the kind of ecological distributional analysis of bacteria which can be accomplished with numerical taxonomy. PMID:4451361

  20. Microsite abundance and distribution of woody seedlings in a South Carolina cypress-tupelo swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Huenneke, L.F.; Sharitz, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    At least 16 types of microsites or substrates for vascular plant seedlings can be distinguished in bald cypress-water tupelo (Taxodium distichum-Nyssa aquatica) swamps. We measured the relative abundances of these microsite types, and the distribution of woody seedlings on them, in two riverine swamp forests on the Savannah River floodplain, South Carolina. Microsite abundances in a little disturbed forest differed significantly from those in a more open stand which had experienced much recent sediment deposition from upstream erosion, as well as higher water temperatures. Woody seedlings were distributed nonrandomly among microsite types (i.e., not in proportion to the abundance of a given microsite type). There were significant differences in microsite distribution patterns among growth forms (tree spp. vs. shrubs vs. vines) and among species within growth form. Many human activities may alter substrate nature and abundance in a wetland, thus indirectly altering the abundance and species composition of seedling recruitment.

  1. Elder mistreatment and physical health among older adults: the South Carolina Elder Mistreatment Study.

    PubMed

    Cisler, Josh M; Amstadter, Ananda B; Begle, Angela M; Hernandez, Melba; Acierno, Ron

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), including interpersonal violence, is associated with poorer physical health in young adults. This relation has not been well-investigated among older adults in specific populations. The present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to PTEs and elder mistreatment are associated with physical health status among older adults residing in South Carolina. Older adults aged 60 and above (N = 902) participated in a structured interview assessing elder mistreatment history, PTEs, demographics, and social dependency variables. Results demonstrated that PTEs were associated with poor self-rated health independently and when controlling for other significant predictors. A recent history of emotional mistreatment was associated with poor self-rated health independently, but not when controlling for other significant predictors. PMID:20690195

  2. HELL HOLE BAY, WAMBAW SWAMP, LITTLE WAMBAW SWAMP, AND WAMBAW CREEK WILDERNESSES, SOUTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cornelia C.; Martin, Clay M.

    1984-01-01

    Four wildernesses, including Hell Hole Bay about 10. 6 sq mi, Wambaw Swamp about 8 sq mi, Little Wambaw Swamp about 4 sq mi, and Wambaw Creek about 2. 5 sq mi, are swamp lands in the Francis Marion National Forest on the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, about 30 mi northeast of Charleston. A mineral survey of the wildernesses showed that one of the areas, Wambaw Swamp, has a peat resource potential. An estimated 810,000 tons of demonstrated peat resources on the dry basis occurs in an area of substantiated peat resource potential within easy access to a good road network. No mineral or other energy resources were identified in this study.

  3. Magnitude and extent of sediment toxicity in selected estuaries of South Carolina and Georgia. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.R.; Scott, G.I.; Kucklick, J.; Fulton, M.; Thompson, B.

    1998-04-01

    Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries -- Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons Sound -- in coastal South Carolina and Georgia in a survey of sediment toxicity performed in 1993 and 1994. All samples were tested for toxicity with a battery of complimentary laboratory bioassays. The laboratory bioassays consisted of amphipod survival tests in solid-phase sediments, microbial bioluminescence (Microtox{trademark}) tests of organic solvent extracts, and sea urchin fertilization and embryo development tests of porewaters. Some samples also were tested in copepod reproduction and cytochrome P-450 RGS bioassays. Chemical analyses for a suite of trace metals, organic compounds, and sedimentological factors were performed with portions of most samples.

  4. Potentiometric surfaces of the coastal plain aquifers of South Carolina prior to development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, Walter R.; Speiran, Gary K.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the Coastal Plains aquifers of South Carolina are being studied as a part of the Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis program of the U.S. Geological Survey. A framework has been developed to best represent the hydrology of the Coastal Plain aquifers by dividing them into a system of five aquifers. This framework includes a surficial aquifer consisting of coastal terrace deposits, a limestone and stratigraphically equivalent sand aquifer of Eocene age, and three sand aquifers of Cretaceous age. This report presents a general description of the aquifer framework, potentiometric maps for the aquifers of Eocene and Cretaceous age prior to development, and a general description of the flow system prior to development. In the lower Coastal Plain, flow in the aquifer of Eocene age is generally perpendicular to the coast but is almost parallel to the coast in the aquifers of Cretaceous age. (USGS)

  5. Ground penetrating radar study of a strand shoreline in northeastern South Carolina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Harris, M.; Correia, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 75 km long Grand Strand is the primary shoreline type of northeastern South Carolina and is forming by landward retreat of the shoreline intersecting the paleo Myrtle Beach barrier system. Previous ground penetrating radar studies have examined the geologic architecture of different stages of the regional shoreline transgression: (1) current barrier island systems to the north and south of the central Grand Strand that have transgressed across irregular Pleistocene paleo landscape but have not yet intersected the emergent Quaternary terraces, (2) shorelines with shore-parallel coastal lakes and vegetated wetlands formed at the intersection of the transgressive shoreline and the emergent terraces, and (3) coastal shorelines that are fully welded to the Pleistocene headlands. This study uses GPR to examine the pre- transgressive architecture of shorelines along the emergent paleo barrier system, in particular sections of the coastline with linear paralic wetlands that occupy lows within the paleo barrier system. Study of this pre- transgressive architecture will help to better understand the geologic development of the compound paleo Myrtle Beach barriers as well as refine geologic interpretation of the transgressing shorelines to the north and south that are currently and will be intersecting this paleo barrier system.

  6. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, A.C.; Wright, B.C.; Bennett, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in South Carolina was documented for the 1983 water yr. Data uses and funding sources were identified for the 76 continuous stream gages currently being operated in South Carolina. The budget of $422,200 for collecting and analyzing streamflow data also includes the cost of operating stage-only and crest-stage stations. The streamflow records for one stream gage can be determined by alternate, less costly methods, and should be discontinued. The remaining 75 stations should be maintained in the program for the foreseeable future. The current policy for the operation of the 75 stations including the crest-stage and stage-only stations would require a budget of $417,200/yr. The average standard error of estimation of streamflow records is 16.9% for the present budget with missing record included. However, the standard error of estimation would decrease to 8.5% if complete streamflow records could be obtained. It was shown that the average standard error of estimation of 16.9% could be obtained at the 75 sites with a budget of approximately $395,000 if the gaging resources were redistributed among the gages. A minimum budget of $383,500 is required to operate the program; a budget less than this does not permit proper service and maintenance of the gages and recorders. At the minimum budget, the average standard error is 18.6%. The maximum budget analyzed was $850,000, which resulted in an average standard error of 7.6 %. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Impacts of storms on coastal circulation in Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Warner, J. C.; Voulgaris, G.; Work, P.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the effects of coastal storms on the regional circulation in Long Bay, South Carolina, using a coupled ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System)- SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) model. Meteorological observations during the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (October 2003 April 2004) reveal three dominant types of storms in the region warm fronts, cold fronts, and tropical storms. Each storm has a characteristic progression of wind patterns: (1) Warm fronts start with southwestward winds and change to northeastward after the front passes; (2) Cold fronts begin with northeastward winds and shift to southeastward when the front moves out; and (3) Tropical storms change wind directions from the southwest to the southeast during the storm. It is observed the coastal circulation distinctly responds to such atmospheric disturbances in either a upwelling-favorable condition to the northeastward winds or a downwelling-favorable condition to the southwestward winds. The study domain encompasses 300-km of gently arcing shoreline between Cape Romain to Cape Fear, and approximately 100-km offshore to the shelf edge. The model domain is resolved by a 300×130 mesh at 1-km intervals in the horizontal and twenty terrain-following layers in the vertical. The ROMS model is driven by tides and wind stress, and it includes wave-current interactions via dynamic coupling to the surface wave model SWAN. Salinity and temperature along the open boundaries are included by nudging to climatological values. A time period of six months is simulated from October 2003 to April 2004, concurrent with the observation study. Model results are compared to an extensive set of measurements collected at eight sites in the inner part of Long Bay, and are used to identify varying circulation response to each storm type. In addition, we investigate the significance of the Capes on the development of the alongshore pressure gradients, and examine the importance of wave-current interactions

  8. When folic acid fails: Insights from 20 years of neural tube defect surveillance in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Bupp, Caleb P; Sarasua, Sara M; Dean, Jane H; Stevenson, Roger E

    2015-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common of the severe malformations of the brain and spinal cord. Increased maternal intake of folic acid (FA) during the periconceptional period is known to reduce NTD risk. Data from 1046 NTD cases in South Carolina were gathered over 20 years of surveillance. It was possible to determine maternal periconceptional FA use in 615 NTD-affected pregnancies. In 163 occurrent (26.9%) and two recurrent (22%) NTD cases, the mothers reported periconceptional FA use. These women were older and more likely to be white. Maternal periconceptional FA usage was reported in 40.4% of cases of spina bifida with other anomalies but in only 25.2% of isolated spina bifida cases (P = 0.02). This enrichment for associated anomalies was not noted among cases of anencephaly or of encephalocele. Among the 563 subsequent pregnancies to mothers with previous NTD-affected pregnancies, those taking FA had a 0.4% NTD recurrence rate, but the recurrence without FA was 8.5%. NTDs with other associated findings were less likely to be prevented by FA, suggesting there is a background NTD rate that cannot be further reduced by FA. Nonetheless, the majority (73.9%) of NTDs in pregnancies in which the mothers reported periconceptional FA use were isolated NTDs of usual types. Cases in which FA failed in prevention of NTDs provide potential areas for further study into the causation of NTDs. The measures and techniques implemented in South Carolina can serve as an effective and successful model for prevention of NTD occurrence and recurrence. PMID:26108864

  9. Geology of the area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Secor, D.T. Jr.; Smith, W.A.; Snoke, A.W.; Peck, L.S.; Pitcher, D.M.; Prowell, D.C.; Simpson, D.H.

    1982-08-10

    This study provides geological background information necessary for an evaluation of the earthquake hazard in an area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina. This region contains a thick stratified sequence of Proterozoic Z and Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. In the early to middle Paleozoic, this sequence was recrystallized and deformed under metamorphic conditions that ranged from greenschist to amphibolite facies and experienced at least two episodes of folding. The region has been intruded by late kinematic to postkinematic granitoid plutons of Silurian and Carboniferous ages and by numerous northwest trending diabase diks of Late Traissic and Early Jurassic age. The region south of Monticello Reservoir in the Carolina slate belt experienced two episodes of faulting in the late Paleozoic and/or early to middle Mesozoic. The older group of faults trends approximately east, has only small displacements, and is characterized by extensive silicifiction of the fault zones. The younger group of faults trends approximately north has experienced dip slip displacements up to 1700 m and is characterized by carbonate mineralization in the fault zones. Both sets of faults are cut by an undeformed diabase dike of Late Triassic or Early Jurassic age. The induced seismic activity around Monticello Reservoir is occurring in a heterogeneous quartz monzonite pluton of Carboniferous age. The pluton contains large enclaves of country rock and is cut by numerous, diversely oriented small faults and joint. These local inhomogeneities in the pluton together with an irregular stress field are interpreted to control the diffuse seismic activity around the reservoir. In view of the apparent absence of lengthy faults it is unlikely that a large-magnitude earthquake will occur in response to the stress and pore pressure changes related to the impoundment of Monticello Reservoir.

  10. History and current state of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vibhor; Rauf, Yasmeen; Patel, Sunil; Glazier, Steve; Perot, Phanor; Ellegala, Dilantha B

    2011-07-01

    We review the development of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the emergence of MUSC as a leading academic neurosurgical center in South Carolina. Historical records from the Waring Historical Library were studied, former and current faculty members were interviewed, and the personal records of Dr Phanor J Perot were examined. Dr Frederick E Kredel was the first to perform cerebral revascularization in stroke patients using omental flaps and the first to culture glioma cells in artificial media. The MUSC Neurosurgery residency program was established in 1964 by its first formally trained neurosurgeon, Julian Youmans, MD. The first graduate of the program, Dr Russell Travis, went on to become the President of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. In 1968, the longest serving chairman, Dr Perot, joined the department and conducted significant research in spinal cord injury, receiving a continuous, 20-year award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A major change in the neurosurgery program occurred in 2004 when Dr Sunil Patel accepted the chairmanship. He integrated neurosurgery, neurology, and basic neuroscience departments into a comprehensive Department of Neurosciences to provide integrated clinical care. This department now ranks second in the country in National Institutes of Health research funding. Recently, the Center for Global Health and Global Neurosurgery was established with a vision of caring for patients beyond national borders. Neurosurgery at MUSC has been influenced by Drs Kredel and Perot and the current leadership is moving forward with a uniquely integrated department with novel areas such as global neurosurgery. PMID:21368698

  11. Spatially quantitative seafloor habitat mapping: example from the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Germán Y.; Gayes, Paul T.; Van Dolah, Robert F.; Schwab, William C.

    2004-03-01

    Naturally occurring hard bottom areas provide the geological substrate that can support diverse assemblages of sessile benthic organisms, which in turn, attract many reef-dwelling fish species. Alternatively, defining the location and extent of bottom sand bodies is relevant for potential nourishment projects as well as to ensure that transient sediment does not affect reef habitats, particularly in sediment-starved continental margins. Furthermore, defining sediment transport pathways documents the effects these mobile bedforms have on proximal reef habitats. Thematic mapping of these substrates is therefore crucial in safeguarding critical habitats and offshore resources of coastal nations. This study presents the results of a spatially quantitative mapping approach based on classification of sidescan-sonar imagery. By using bottom video for image-to-ground control, digital image textural features for pattern recognition, and an artificial neural network for rapid, quantitative, multivariable decision-making, this approach resulted in recognition rates of hard bottom as high as 87%. The recognition of sand bottom was less successful (31%). This approach was applied to a large (686 km 2), high-quality, 2-m resolution sidescan-sonar mosaic of the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf. Results of this analysis indicate that both surficial sand and hard bottoms of variable extent are present over the study area. In total, 59% of the imaged area was covered by hard bottom, while 41% was covered by sand. Qualitative spatial correlation between bottom type and bathymetry appears possible from comparison of our interpretive map and available bathymetry. Hard bottom areas tend to be located on flat, low-lying areas, and sandy bottoms tend to reside on areas of positive relief. Published bio-erosion rates were used to calculate the potential sediment input from the mapped hard bottom areas rendering sediment volumes that may be as high as 0.8 million m 3/yr for

  12. Hydrogeologic characterization of a proposed landfill expansion in Pickens County near Easley, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stringfield, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a hydrogeologic study in the Piedmont physiographic province of South Carolina to obtain geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data from the site of a proposed landfill expansion in Pickens County near Easley, South Carolina. The geology of the study area is typical of the Piedmont region. The unconsolidated regolith on the site is soil and saprolite, which is a product of the weathered parent rock. The soil ranges in thickness from about 5 to 20 feet. The saprolite ranges in thickness from about 5 to 134 feet. The most abundant parent rock type in the area is a biotite gneiss. Ground- and surface-water data were collected at the site. Slug tests on the saprolite indicate a mean hydraulic conductivity of 3 x 0.000003 feet per second. Transmissivity ranges from 12 to 27 cubic feet per day per feet (squared per day). The ground-water velocity for the site ranges from 3 to 6 feet per year. The closest major stream to the site is Golden Creek. Based on low-flow data for Golden Creek, the estimated minimum 7 consecutive day flow that has a recurrence interval of 10 years (7Q10) at station 02186102 is 2.4 cubic feet per second. Water samples were collected from five monitoring wells at the proposed landfill expansion site and from one stream adjacent to the expansion site. Measured pH units ranged from 5.5 to 8.1, and alkalinity concentrations ranged from 5.1 to 73 milligrams per liter as CaCO3. Other water- quality data obtained included temperature and specific conductance, and 5-day BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), bicarbonate, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrite-nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, organic carbon, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, and selected trace metal concentrations.

  13. Development of a 14-digit Hydrologic Unit Code Numbering System for South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bower, David E.; Lowry, Claude, Jr.; Lowery, Mark A.; Hurley, Noel M.

    1999-01-01

    A Hydrologic Unit Map showing the cataloging units, watersheds, and subwatersheds of South Carolina has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, funded through a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 319 Grant, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. These delineations represent 8-, 11-, and 14-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes, respectively. This map presents information on drainage, hydrography, and hydrologic boundaries of the water-resources regions, subregions, accounting units, cataloging units, watersheds, and subwatersheds. The source maps for the basin delineations are 1:24,000-scale 7.5-minute series topographic maps and the base maps shown on figure 1 are from 1:100,000-scale Digital Line Graphs; however, the data are published at a scale of 1:500,000. In addition, an electronic version of the data is provided on a compact disc. Of the 1,022 subwatersheds delineated for this project, 1,004 range in size from 3,000 to 40,000 acres (4.69 to 62.5 square miles). Seventeen subwatersheds are smaller than 3,000 acres and one subwatershed, located on St. Helena Island, is larger than 40,000 acres. This map and its associated codes provide a standardized base for use by water-resource managers and planners in locating, storing, retrieving, and exchanging hydrologic data. In addition, the map can be used for cataloging water-data acquisition activities, geographically organizing hydrologic data, and planning and describing water-use and related land-use activities.

  14. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  15. South Carolina DOE/EPSCoR energy-related graduate research traineeships. Final report and progress performance report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, J.D.; Little, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The South Carolina DOE/EPSCoR Graduate Traineeship Program is currently supporting 20 graduate students through Clemson University, the Medical University of South Carolina, and the University of South Carolina. Research areas include lithium batteries, analytical chemistry, supercritical fluid extraction, multiphase flow remediation, estrogenic contaminants, robotic inspection systems, transuranics and beta emitters, organic waste disposal, fiber optic sensors, sediment computer modeling, groundwater geochemistry, effect of CO{sub 2} on plant/insect interactions, molecular structure of organophosphorus compounds, environmental geology, bioremediation, and stratigraphic modeling. Short summaries are given for each project.

  16. Transgressive shoreline deposits seaward of coastal ponds along northeastern South Carolina coastline.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Harris, M. S.; Pender, R.; Ball, M.

    2007-12-01

    The arcuate Long Bay coastline of northeastern South Carolina is dominated by the 75 km long Grand Strand, which is the result of landward retreat of the shoreline intersecting the paleo Myrtle Beach barrier system. As the shoreline transgresses, three stages of development have been recognized in this large coastal embayment: (1) coastal barrier island landforms north and south of the central Grand Strand that are migrating across an irregular Pleistocene paleolandscape and have not intersected emergent Quaternary paralic terraces; (2) an intermediate stage where the transgressing shoreline has created shore parallel coastal lakes and vegetated wetlands between the transgressive sediment mass and the emergent terraces; and (3) coastal segments where the transgressive shoreline is actively eroding into the emergent Pleistocene core. This study uses ground penetrating radar (GPR) and vibracore data to study the intermediate stage lake coastline. The GPR data reveals landward dipping reflectors infilling uneven topography and channels formed in the low between the irregular paleo barrier high and retreating shoreline. Study of the transgressive architecture and intersection with paleo- shoreface is important for understanding future shoreline retreat and for understanding potential storm records preserved in the infill.

  17. 250 years of historic occupation on Steel Creek, Savannah River Plant, Barnwell County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the investigation of seven historic archaeological sites on the uppper coastal plain of the South Atlantic Slope in South Carolina. These seven sites are located on the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant in the Steel Creek watershed. This project has its beginnings in 1980, when the Department of Energy initiated the reactivation of the L Reactor. At that time, the plan called for an increased thermal water discharage. In 1980, the Savannah River Plant Archaeological Research Program (SRP-ARP) conducted an intensive archaeological survey of the Steel Creek terrace edge and bottomland. In early 1984, the Department of Energy made the decision to construct a dam and create a cooling lake (L-Lake) on Steel Creek. This required a new survey. The new project initially was to be an intensive survey of the entire proposed lake area. However, construction time constraints changed the general outline of the project into a two-phased survey of the area. The first phase of the project was a survey of the dam, borrow area, discharge structure, and diversion canal. Ten sites were identified, none of which were considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. The second phase of the project was the intensive survey of the lake and embankment. Twenty-six sites were located in that portion of the survey, 11 of which were considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

  18. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Point Frazer Bend Reach, Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.

    1995-02-01

    The port of Georgetown, South Carolina, is served by navigational channels within Winyah Bay and the lower Sampit River. Dredging is required to maintain these waterways and to facilitate normal shipping traffic. Prior to dredging, ecological evaluations must be conducted to determine the suitability of the proposed dredged material for open-ocean disposal. These evaluations are to be performed under Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and, Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), following the testing protocols presented in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal Testing Manual, hereafter referred to as the 1991 Implementation Manual. The Charleston Intensive Project is a reevaluation of sediments collected from two stations (IH-2 and IH-3) in the Frazier Point Bend reach of the Winyah Bay channel. Reference sediment was also collected from site IH-R2, just south of Hare Island. The results of physical/chemical analyses indicated that some contaminants of concern were present in test treatments representing dredged material when compared with the reference treatment IH-R2. The results of this study indicate that, based on the acute toxicity and chemical analyses, dredged material represented by these test treatments is suitable for open-ocean disposal.

  19. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of the Atlantic Ocean beach, North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach between Edisto Island, South Carolina and Cape Fear, North Carolina. The survey was made May 20, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with areal extent and intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying maps show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity (at left) and the location of the traverse flown (at right). The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  20. Limits and Economic Effects of Distributed PV Generation in North and South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Kyra Moore

    The variability of renewable sources, such as wind and solar, when integrated into the electrical system must be compensated by traditional generation sources in-order to maintain the constant balance of supply and demand required for grid stability. The goal of this study is to analyze the effects of increasing large levels of solar Photovoltaic (PV) penetration (in terms of a percentage of annual energy production) on a test grid with similar characteristics to the Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Progress Energy Carolinas (PEC) regions of North and South Carolina. PV production is modeled entering the system at the distribution level and regional PV capacity is based on household density. A gridded hourly global horizontal irradiance (GHI) dataset is used to capture the variable nature of PV generation. A unit commitment model (UCM) is then used determine the hourly dispatch of generators based on generator parameters and costs to supply generation to meet demand. Annual modeled results for six different scenarios are evaluated to determine technical, environmental and economic effects of varying levels of distributed PV penetration on the system. This study finds that the main limiting factor for PV integration in the DEC and PEC balancing authority regions is defined by the large generating capacity of base-load nuclear plants within the system. This threshold starts to affect system stability at integration levels of 5.7%. System errors, defined by imbalances caused by over or under generation with respect to demand, are identified in the model however the validity of these errors in real world context needs further examination due to the lack of high frequency irradiance data and modeling limitations. Operational system costs decreased as expected with PV integration although further research is needed to explore the impacts of the capital costs required to achieve the penetration levels found in this study. PV system generation was found to mainly displace

  1. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2012-09-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also support an

  2. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  3. Summer Roost Tree Selection by Eastern Red, Seminole, and Evening Bats in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, M.A.; Carter, T.C.; Ford, W.M.; Chapman, B.R.; Ozier, J.

    2000-01-01

    Radiotraction of six eastern red bats, six seminole bats and twenty-four evening bats to 55, 61, and 65 day roosts during 1996 to 1997 in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. For each species, testing was done for differences between used roost trees and randomly located trees. Also tested for differences between habitat characteristics surrounding roost trees and randomly located trees. Eastern Red and Seminole bats generally roosted in canopies of hardwood and pine while clinging to foilage and small branches. Evening bats roosted in cavities or under exfoliating bark in pines and dead snags. Forest management strategies named within the study should be beneficial for providing roosts in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

  4. Assessment of scour-critical data collected at selected bridges and culverts in South Carolina, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, N.M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data at bridges and culverts were collected at 3,506 stream crossings in South Carolina during 1990-92. The data include general information unique to the structure; structural data; and hydraulic, geomorphic, and vegetation information. The data are stored in the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina District Bridge-Scour Data Base. Observed- and potential-scour indexes were computed from the applicable data variables. Sites with observed-scour indexes exceeding ten and (or) potential-scour indexes exceeding 20 are considered to have significant scour-related problems. Of the 3,506 sites inspected, 257 sites had an observed-scour index exceeding ten, 214 sites had a potential-scour index exceeding 20, and 85 sites had observed- and potential-scour indexes exceeding both threshold values.

  5. Preliminary peak stage and streamflow data at selected USGS streamgaging stations for the South Carolina flood of October 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Shelton, John M.; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy rainfall occurred across South Carolina during October 1–5, 2015, as a result of an upper atmospheric low-pressure system that funneled tropical moisture from Hurricane Joaquin into the State. The storm caused major flooding from the central to the coastal areas of South Carolina. Almost 27 inches of rain fell near Mount Pleasant in Charleston County during this period. U.S. Geological Survey streamgages recorded peaks of record at 17 locations, and 15 other locations had peaks that ranked in the top 5 for the period of record. During the October 2015 flood event, U.S. Geological Survey personnel made about 140 streamflow measurements at 86 locations to verify, update, or extend existing rating curves, which are used to compute streamflow from monitored river stage.

  6. Innovative and Community-Driven Communication Practices of the South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Heather M.; Freedman, Darcy A.; Adams, Swann Arp; Young, Vicki M.; Ureda, John R.; McCracken, James Lyndon; Hébert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (SC-CPCRN) is 1 of 10 networks funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) that works to reduce cancer-related health disparities. In partnership with federally qualified health centers and community stakeholders, the SC-CPCRN uses evidence-based approaches (eg, NCI Research-tested Intervention Programs) to disseminate and implement cancer prevention and control messages, programs, and interventions. We describe the innovative stakeholder- and community-driven communication efforts conducted by the SC-CPCRN to improve overall health and reduce cancer-related health disparities among high-risk and disparate populations in South Carolina. We describe how our communication efforts are aligned with 5 core values recommended for dissemination and implementation science: 1) rigor and relevance, 2) efficiency and speed, 3) collaboration, 4) improved capacity, and 5) cumulative knowledge. PMID:25058673

  7. Telestroke Centers as an Option for Addressing Geographical Disparities in Access to Stroke Care in South Carolina, 2013.

    PubMed

    Samson, Marsha; Trivedi, Tushar; Heidari, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Telestroke centers can increase access to proper and timely diagnosis and treatment of stroke, especially for rural populations, thereby reducing disability and death. Census tract information was used to map primary stroke centers geographically and to identify areas that would benefit from additional access to medical care via telestroke centers (health care facilities that provide information on stroke care from a distance). Results indicate that in 2013, approximately half of the South Carolina population did not have access to a primary stroke center within a 30-minute drive of their home, and 30% did not have access within 60 minutes. Increasing access to prompt evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of stroke and improving long-term quality of life requires the addition of telestroke centers in areas without primary stroke centers and examination of the effects of these centers on stroke incidence and mortality in South Carolina. PMID:26704445

  8. The formation of basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, D.R.

    1982-08-01

    The basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia occur within unconsolidated, late Miocene fluvial paleochannel sediments that overlie major fault zones within the Okanagan Highlands Intrusive Complex. Five uranium deposits have been outlined to date, of which the Blizzard (4,020 metric tons U) and Tyee (650 metric tons U) are the largest. The basement intrusive complex underlying the deposits varies in age from early Cretaceous to Eocene and is comprised of quartz monzonite, granodiorite, Coryell monzonite, porphyritic granite, and pegmatite. Uranium mineralization is present in the form of uranous (ningyoite) or uranyl (saleeite, autunite) phosphates coating clastic grains and filling voids. Because of very strong reducing conditions related to large concentrations of marcasite and organic material, ningyoite is the only uranium mineral in the Tyee deposit, whereas the Blizzard deposit contains a more complex assemblage of minerals (saleeite, autunite, ningyoite). The observed paragenetic sequence of mineral precipitation in the Blizzard deposit (autunite-saleeite-ningyoite) indicates that the uranyl minerals, saleeite and autunite, are primary. Investigations of the source of the ore-forming elements (U, Ca, Mg, PO/sub 4/) showed the deposits to be formed by the infiltration into fluvial sediments of deep-seated, structurally controlled, ground waters that migrated in a well-developed regional hydrologic system within the Complex. Research indicates that the ore-forming ground waters were cold, slightly bicarbonated (150-400 ppm), highly uraniferous (10-50 ppb), and slightly oxidizing (dissolved oxygen = 2-4 ppm).

  9. Predation by coyotes on white-tailed deer neonates in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John C.; Ray, H. Scott; Vukovich, Mark; Goode, Matthew J.; Ruth, Charles

    2012-05-07

    Abstract: Coyotes (Canis latrans) are novel predators throughout the southeastern United States and their depredation of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates may explain observed declines in some deer populations in the region, but direct evidence for such a relationship is lacking. Our objective was to quantify neonate survival rates and causes of mortality at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina to directly evaluate degree of predation in this deer population. From 2006 to 2009, we radio-monitored 91 neonates captured with the aid of vaginal implant transmitters in pregnant adult females and opportunistic searches. Overall Kaplan Meier survival rate to 16 weeks of age was 0.230 (95% CI = 0.155-0.328), and it varied little among years. Our best-fitting model estimated survival at 0.220 (95% CI = 0.144-0.320). This model included a quadratic time trend variable (lowest survival rate during the first week of life and increasing to near 1.000 around week 10), and Julian date of birth (survival probability declining as date of birth increased). Predation by coyotes was the most frequent cause of death among the 70 monitored neonates that died, definitively accounting for 37% of all mortalities and potentially accounting for as much as 80% when also including probable coyote predation. Predation by bobcats (Felis rufus) accounted for 7% (definitive) to 9% (including probable bobcat predation) of mortalities. The level of coyote-induced mortality we observed is consistent with the low recruitment rates exhibited in the SRS deer population since establishment of coyotes at the site. If representative of recruitment rates across South Carolina, current harvest levels appear unsustainable. This understanding is consistent with the recent declining trend in the statewide deer population. The effects of coyote predation on recruitment should be considered when setting harvest goals, regardless of whether local deer

  10. Association Between Prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Health-Related Quality of Life, South Carolina, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Heidari, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in various population subgroups in South Carolina and examined associations between COPD and 4 core measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods Data from 12,851 participants of the 2011 South Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were analyzed. COPD prevalence rates were age-adjusted to the 2000 standard US population. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR’s) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The overall age-adjusted prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of COPD among community-dwelling adults in South Carolina in 2011 was 7.1% (standard error [SE] ±0.3). Prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of COPD was highest among women (8.9%; SE, ±0.5), those aged 65 years or older (12.9%; SE, ±0.5), current smokers (15.9%; SE, ±0.7), and those with low levels of education and income. Compared with community-dwelling adults without COPD, those with COPD were more likely to report fair or poor general health status (AOR, 3.97; 95% CI, 3.13–5.03), 14 or more physically unhealthy days (AOR, 2.10, 95% CI, 1.57–2.81), 14 or more mentally unhealthy days (AOR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.21–2.43), and 14 or more days of activity limitation (AOR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.53–3.22) within the previous 30 days. Conclusion COPD is a highly prevalent disease in South Carolina, especially among older people and smokers, and it is associated with poor HRQOL. Future work aimed at reducing risk factors may decrease the disease prevalence, and increasing early detection and improving access to appropriate medical treatments can improve HRQOL for those living with COPD. PMID:24370110

  11. The chrono- and lithostratigraphic significance of the type section of the Middendorf Formation, Chesterfield County, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prowell, D.C.; Christopher, R.A.; Waters, K.E.; Nix, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    The name Middendorf Formation has been widely used in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina, eastern Georgia, and southern North Carolina since 1904, despite conflicting interpretations of the age and stratigraphic relations of the unit at its type locality. Between 1995 and 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, drilled three continuously cored holes to the south and to the east of the type section of the Middendorf Formation, which is located in Chesterfield County, South Carolina. In addition, two outcrops to the northeast of the type section were sampled for biostratigraphic control. The litho- and biostratigraphic relations of the units in these cores and outcrops provide significant insights into the age of the Middendorf Formation at its type locality, and how this age impacts regional correlations of the formation. A projection of formational contacts and thicknesses from downdip areas into the type locality of the Middendorf Formation indicates that the type section is most likely a facies of either the uppermost Bladen Formation (of the Black Creek Group), or the uppermost Bladen and the lowermost part of the Peedee Formations. This report documents the evidence that support this interpretation. The implication of this interpretation is that the name "Middendorf" has been applied to a variety of units throughout the southeastern United States, all of which display a similar lithology, but differ significantly in stratigraphic position and age. For these reasons, we recommend that the name Middendorf be restricted for use with strata that occur only in the vicinity of the type locality, and use of the name "Middendorf" for units elsewhere in the Coastal Plain be reconsidered.

  12. Breeding biology and relation of pollutants to black skimmers and gull-billed terns in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, Lawrence J.; Stafford, Charles J.

    1980-01-01

    The breeding biology and relation of pollutants to black skimmers (Ryn chops niger) and gull-billed terns (Gelochelidon nilotica) were investigated in South Carolina from 1969 through 1975. With few exceptions, the two species nested together in colonies located on barrier islands. We located 10 colonies, 7 of which were on the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge (Cape Romain); references were located that described nesting on seven other islands in South Carolina that no longer support colonies. Gull-billed terns nested from early May through July; the skimmers started later (late May) but also continued later (early September). Both species nested in areas subject to tidal flooding, and the two species persisted in nesting in several colonies despite intense predation by rats and gulls. Estimated reproductive success varied greatly from year to year and colony to colony; success in most colonies seemed low, particularly for the gull-billed tern. Residues of organochlorine pollutants in several eggs seemed of sufficient magnitude to induce adverse effects on reproductivity and eggshell thickness: however, the overall effect of organochlorines appeared negligible. Maximum numbers of nests located in a single year were 790 for the skimmer and 340 for the gull-billed tern: the total breeding population in South Carolina is unknown. Although nesting islands at Cape Romain and Deveaux Bank are sanctuaries for nesting birds, both species will continue to lose nesting habitat as additional sea islands are developed and inhabited by man.

  13. Flood-Inundation Maps of Selected Areas Affected by the Flood of October 2015 in Central and Coastal South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.; Watson, Kara M.; Painter, Jaime A.; Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy rainfall occurred across South Carolina during October 1–5, 2015, as a result of an upper atmospheric low-pressure system that funneled tropical moisture from Hurricane Joaquin into the State. The storm caused major flooding in the central and coastal parts of South Carolina. Almost 27 inches of rain fell near Mount Pleasant in Charleston County during this period. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages recorded peaks of record at 17 locations, and 15 other locations had peaks that ranked in the top 5 for the period of record. During the October 2015 flood event, USGS personnel made about 140 streamflow measurements at 86 locations to verify, update, or extend existing rating curves (which are used to compute streamflow from monitored river stage). Immediately after the storm event, USGS personnel documented 602 high-water marks, noting the location and height of the water above land surface. Later in October, 50 additional high-water marks were documented near bridges for South Carolina Department of Transportation. Using a subset of these high-water marks, 20 flood-inundation maps of 12 communities were created. Digital datasets of the inundation area, modeling boundary, and water depth rasters are all available for download.

  14. New late Precambrian-Cambrian U-PB zircon ages for zoned intrusives in the western Carolina terrane, Spartanburg and Union Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, A.J. . Physical Sciences); Wright, J.E. . Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    The geology of the western Carolina terrane comprises zoned mafic-ultramafic intrusive complexes intruding a volcanic pile of basalts and basaltic andesites; this package is interpreted to represent an episode of intra-arc rifting prior to regional metamorphism and foliation formation. New U-Pb zircon ages from the Mean Crossroads complex in northwestern South Carolina along the central Piedmont suture confirm relative ages obtained by detailed mapping. Two foliated meta-diorites yield U-Pb dates of 580 Ma, interpreted to be crystallization ages. A foliated meta-quartz diorite yields a U-Pb date of 535 Ma interpreted to be a crystallization age. These ages are broadly contemporary with those inferred by other workers for the Battleground Formation in the type locality of the Kings Mountain belt. An undeformed, unmetamorphosed diorite intruding these metamorphosed zoned complex intrusives also yields an age of 535 Ma. Hence the authors believe that intra-arc rifting and regional metamorphism both occurred c. 535 Ma. While petrographic and Ar-Ar studies support subsequent regional metamorphic overprint(s), or at least static recrystallization and/or uplift through hornblende-biotite-muscovite blocking temperatures for Ar in mid- to late-Paleozoic time, the 535 Ma, undeformed, unmetamorphosed intrusive suggest late Precambrian regional metamorphism and deformation was the event responsible for regional greenschist-lower amphibolite facies metamorphism and foliation formation in this area of the Piedmont. This seems to contradict correlations with middle Ordovician fabric elements in the eastern Piedmont as well as the idea that this metamorphism and fabric development are related to presumed early Paleozoic accretion of the Carolina arc to Laurentia. They have also dated a foliated megacrystic granite that cuts the central Piedmont suture (325 Ma, U-Pb zircon), and the Bald Rock granite (326 Ma, U-Pb zircon).

  15. Selected Well Data Used in Determining Ground-Water Availability in the North and South Carolina Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifer Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrelson, Larry G.; Fine, Jason M.

    2006-01-01

    The data presented in this report are for selected wells in North and South Carolina that are located in the Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system. The data represent a partial inventory of wells in the study area and are to be used to update a regional flow model for North and South Carolina. This inventory includes a total of 813 wells in North Carolina and 461 wells in South Carolina. The well data include well-identification numbers, well locations by latitude and longitude, land-surface elevations, hole depths, well depths, open or screened interval(s), well diameters, depth to water, dates of water-level measurements, and aquifer assignment and transmissivity. Ground-water data presented in this report were obtained from field investigations and compiled from existing well records, both published and unpublished.

  16. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-two. South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of South Carolina governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  17. Food of blueback herring and threadfin shad in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Foltz, Jeffrey W.

    1991-01-01

    Threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense and blueback herring Alosa aestivalis were introduced into Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina, in the early 1970s as prey for large piscivores. To assess the potential for trophic competition between these clupeids, we examined their diets and the extent of diet overlap in May, August, and December 1982 and February 1983. The diet of blueback herring consisted mainly of large species of cladocerans and copepods supplemented in August with Chaoborus punctipennis and young fish. Mean length of the organisms eaten by blueback herring was 1.4 mm. Threadfin shad fed on smaller species of cladocerans and copepods, as well as on rotifers and copepod nauplii. The mean length of the organisms eaten by threadfin shad was 0.4 mm, which differed significantly from the mean length of the zooplankton population in Jocassee Reservoir (0.6 mm). Phytoplankton contributed 24 and 32% of the stomach contents of threadfin shad in August and December. Bosmina longirostris was important in the diet of both species, although blueback herring showed negative selection for it. Diet overlap between the two clupeids was low on all four dates. Although we found no evidence of trophic competition between the two species in Jocassee Reservoir, we do not recommend stocking them together, because both species are voracious planktivores and blueback herring are piscivorous.

  18. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free-Ranging Coyotes (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H., Scott; Karl V. Miller, Karl, V.; Baldwin, Charles, A.

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT: Blood and feces were collected from 34 adult (19 males, 15 females) and seven juvenile (three males, one female, three not reported) free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) on the US Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA). Significant (P,0.05) hematologic differences by sex were noted for red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Biochemical differences by sex occurred only for albumen (P,0.05). Twentyone adults were antibody positive for at least one of four viruses: canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1; 68%), West Nile virus (WNV; 60%), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; 38%), and Canine distemper virus (CDV; 15%). Of the seven Leptospira serovars tested for, seven (25%) of 28 adults were positive for one or more of five serovars: Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, and Autumnalis. Three (43%) of seven juveniles had seropositivity for a virus, one each for CDV, CAV-1, and WNV. No juveniles were seropositive for EEEV or any of the seven Leptospira serovars. Blood smears of 12 adults were positive for Dirofilaria immitis microfilaria, but blood smears from all juveniles were negative. Parvovirus was identified by electron microscopy from the feces of one adult. Ancylostoma spp., Trichuris spp., and Isospora spp. were observed in fecal samples. These data may aid in understanding the role of coyotes in disease ecology.

  19. Breeding season demography and movements of Eastern Towhees at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Powell, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) has undergone population declines across much of its range, especially in New England. Despite being a widespread and, at one time, a common species, relatively little is known about its natural history, ecology, or demographics. We conducted baseline research on Eastern Towhees at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, in 1995 and 1996 to estimate breeding season survival rates, nest success rates, breeding densities, and daily movements. We also were interested in whether towhees had differences in survival and movement rates between young and mature managed pine stands. We found that survival rates during the breeding season of radio-marked towhees did not vary by sex or stand type. Daily nest success rates were very low [0.629 + 0.088 (SE)] as a result of high predation levels. Abundance estimates adjusted for sampling effort differed between years. In 1995, the abundance estimate was significantly lower in mature stands (7.1 + 0.47) than in-young stands (9.6 + 0.60) while in 1996, there was no different between mature stands (26.2 ? 5.67) and young stands (16.5 ? 3.39). Average daily movements by radio-marked towhees did not vary by sex or stand type. Movements among adjacent stands were common, and sometimes great distances.

  20. Occupational health services in South Carolina manufacturing plants: results of a survey.

    PubMed

    Chovil, A C; Alexander, G R; Gibson, J J; Altekruse, J M

    1983-01-01

    A mailed survey of occupational health and safety practices in industrial manufacturing plants with more than 50 employees was carried out in South Carolina, with a response rate of 60 percent. The responding plants represented 73 percent of the total workforce in the industries. Data were analyzed in relation to the types of industry as delineated by the Standard Industrial Code. Eighty-three percent of the responding plants (a percentage that represented more than 92 percent of the total workforce in the industries) had some arrangements for the medical or nursing care of employees. For the study, occupational health services were defined at three levels: basic (mandatory), secondary (beneficial to management), and tertiary (health promotion-preventive medicine). The basic services provided by most of the industries surveyed appeared to be adequate. Secondary services were well developed except in the apparel and lumber industries. Tertiary services, in terms of five selected preventive programs, were moderately developed only in the paper, petroleum, and chemical industries. Only alcohol abuse control programs were commonly offered in the other types of industry. The size of the workforce in a plant partly dictated the level of occupational health services it offered but did not always account for all inter-industry variation. PMID:6419275

  1. Life history and demography of the common mud turtle Kinosternon subrubrum in South Carolina, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, N.B. ); Gibbons, J.W.; Greene, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a life table for the common mud turtle, Kinosternon subrubrum, in a fluctuating aquatic habitat on the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA, using data gathered in a 20-yr mark-recapture study. Data on survivorship and fecundity were assessed and compared to previously published life table statistics for the slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, in the same body of water and for the yellow mud turtle, K. flavscens, in Nebraska. The annual survival rate for adult female Kinosternon is significantly higher than that of adult female Trachemys. Similarly, male Kinosternon exhibit an annual survival rate significantly higher than that of male Trachemys. The mean annual proportion of female Kinosternon that are reproductively active also is significantly higher than that of Trachemys. In addition, survival rate from the time eggs are laid by Kinosternon until the hatchlings enter the aquatic environment is significantly higher than that for Trachemys. Comparisons of findings with those for K. flavesens indicate that these geographically separate populations of congeneric species also differ substantially in age at maturity, mean generation time, and the mean proportion of females that are reproductively active in any given year. Differences were also apparent in mean clutch frequencies and adult survival rates.

  2. Classification of hydrostratigraphic units at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1990-12-01

    A detailed synthesis of the hydrologic, geophysical and core data from wells penetrating the updip Mesozoic-Cenozoic Coastal Plain sequence at and near the Savannah River Site (SRS) was conducted to define and classify the hydrostratigraphic units. The purpose of the study was to give the SRS a single unified hydrostratigraphic classification that defines and addresses the hydrogeologic characteristics of the aquifers underlying the site. The characterization, areal distribution and classification of the aquifer and aquifer systems gives SRS the tools to evaluate ground water movement and contaminant transport in a comprehensive regional context. An alpha-numeric nomenclature has been temporarily adopted in this report for classifying the aquifers and aquifer systems at SRS. Formal geographic names for the aquifers and aquifer systems will be proposed in the near future but must be agreed upon and ratified by the South Carolina Hydrostratigraphic Subcommittee which was in part organized for the purpose. The classification utilizes a hierarchy of terms ranked at three levels: Aquifer Systems that transmit ground water regionally; Aquifer Units which are mappable units > 400 square miles in area; and Aquifer Zones that differentiate aquifers internally on the basis of locally significant characteristics.

  3. Soil carbon storage beneath recently established tree plantations in Tennessee and South Carolina, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    2002-02-01

    Rates of soil carbon (C) accumulation under 7 recently established tree plantations in Tennessee and South Carolina (USA) were estimated by comparing soil C stocks under the plantations to adjacent reference (nonplantation) sites. Estimated rates of C accumulation in surface (0-40 cm) mineral soil were 40-170 gCm{sup -2} yr{sup -1} during the first decade following plantation establishment. Most soil C at each site was found in mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., soil C associated with the silt-clay fraction). Soils with high sand content and low initial C stocks exhibited the greatest gains in particulate organic matter C (POM-C). Labile soil C stocks (consisting of forest floor and mineral soil POM-C) became an increasingly important component of soil C storage as loblolly pine stands aged. Rates of mineral soil C accumulation were highly variable in the first decade of plantation growth, depending on location, but the findings support a hypothesis that farm to tree plantation conversions can result in high initial rates of soil C accumulation in the southeastern United States.

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyls in eggs and chlorioallantoic membranes of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from coastal South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, G.P.; Wood, P.D.; O`Quinn, M.

    1997-07-01

    Assessing chemical exposure in threatened or endangered wildlife species presents unique analytical problems. Chorioallantoic membranes (CAMs) have been proposed as surrogate tissues for evaluation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure in oviparous species. Research was undertaken to determine the extent of PCB accumulation in alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at sites along the coast of South Carolina and to evaluate the utility of CAMs as surrogate tissues for determining PCB concentrations in whole alligator eggs. Polychlorinated biphenyls were found in eggs and CAMs of alligators from both sites examined. Concentrations of PCBs were higher in CAMs (p = 0.02) and eggs (p = 0.001) from sites known to contain chlorinated hydrocarbons than from more pristine sites. Total PCBs partitioned predictably (r{sup 2} > 0.59; p < 0.02) between egg and CAM tissues indicating the utility of CAMs to serve as surrogate tissues when comparing total PCB concentrations in whole eggs. Tetrachloro through octachloro biphenyl homologues and total PCBs in CAMs from reference areas were correlated with concentrations of these homologues in eggs. At contaminated sites, total PCB concentrations in CAMs were correlated with total PCB concentrations in eggs.

  5. Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids in Plasma of American Alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis) from Florida and South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangma, Jacqueline T.; Bowden, John A.; Brunell, Arnold M.; Christie, Ian; Finnell, Brendan; Guillette, Matthew P.; Jones, Martin; Lowers, Russell H.; Rainwater, Thomas R.; Reiner, Jessica L.; Wilkinson, Philip M.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to quantitate fourteen perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in 125 adult American alligators at twelve sites across the southeastern US. Of those fourteen PFAAs, nine were detected in 65% - 100% of the samples: PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA, PFTriA, PFTA, PFHxS, and PFOS. Males (across all sites) showed significantly higher concentrations of four PFAAs: PFOS (p = 0.01), PFDA (p = 0.0003), PFUnA (p = 0.021), and PFTriA (p = 0.021). Concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFDA in plasma were significantly different among the sites in each sex. Alligators at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and Kiawah Nature Conservancy both exhibited some of the highest PFOS concentrations (medians 99.5 ng/g and 55.8 ng/g respectively) in plasma measured to date in a crocodilian species. A number of positive correlations between PFAAs and snout-vent length (SVL) were observed in both sexes suggesting PFAA body burdens increase with increasing size. In addition, several significant correlations among PFAAs in alligator plasma may suggest conserved sources of PFAAs at each site throughout the greater study area. This study is the first to report PFAAs in American alligators, reveals potential PFAA hot spots in Florida and South Carolina, and provides and additional contaminant of concern when assessing anthropogenic impacts on ecosystem health.

  6. Validation of tectonic models for an intraplate seismic zone, Charleston, South Carolina, with GPS geodetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Talwani, P.; Kellogg, J.N.; Trenkamp, R.

    1997-02-01

    Although the average strain rate in intraplate settings is 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than at plate boundaries, there are pockets of high strain rates within intraplate regions. The results of a Global Positioning System survey near the location of current seismicity (and the inferred location of the destructive 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake) suggest that there is anomalous strain build-up occurring there. By reoccupying 1930 triangulation and 1980 GPS sites with six Trimble SST dual frequency receivers, a strain rate of 0.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} yr{sup {minus}1} was observed. At the 95% confidence level, this value is not significant; however, at a lower level of confidence ({approximately} 85%) it is about two orders of magnitude greater than the background of 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1}. The direction of contraction inferred from the GPS survey 66{degree} {+-} 11{degree} is in excellent agreement with the direction of the maximum horizontal stress (N 60{degree} E) in the area, suggesting that the observed strain rate is also real. 66 refs.

  7. Ectoparasites and associated pathogens of free-roaming and captive animals in zoos of South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Nelder, Mark P; Reeves, Will K; Adler, Peter H; Wozniak, Arthur; Wills, William

    2009-10-01

    A survey of ectoparasites and their associated pathogens was conducted in two South Carolina zoos, from 2004 to 2007. Dead, wild birds and mammals, as well as captive animals examined during routine veterinary checks constituted the study populations. Ectoparasites were tested for species of Anaplasma, Bartonella, Coxiella burnetii, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Trypanosoma. Forty-six species of ectoparasites were collected from 133 free-roaming and captive hosts and their associated nesting and bedding materials. Six vector-borne pathogens were detected molecularly in the ectoparasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the tick Ixodes dentatus Marx from an eastern cottontail rabbit, Bartonella clarridgeiae in the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) from a Virginia opossum, Bartonella sp. Oh6 in the squirrel flea Orchopeas howardi (Baker) from an eastern grey squirrel, Bartonella sp. T7498 in the sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri Jancke from a squirrel, Rickettsia sp. Rf2125 in C. felis from a zookeeper and a grizzly bear, and Rickettsiales sp. Ib 2006 in Ixodes brunneus Koch from an American crow. While the pathology of some of these pathogens is poorly known, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis) and Bartonella clarridgeiae (causative agent of a disease similar to cat-scratch disease) can infect humans. Ectoparasites and their pathogens, especially those originating from free-roaming animals, present a potential threat to captive animals and humans. PMID:18973443

  8. Variation in Bachman's Sparrow home-range size at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stober, J.M.; Krementz, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    Using radiotelemetry, we studied variation in home-range size of the Bachman's Sparrow (Aimophila aestivalis) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, during the 1995 breeding season. At SRS, sparrows occurred primarily in two habitats: mature pine habitats managed for Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) and pine plantations 1 to 6 years of age. The mean 95% minimum convex polygon home-range size for males and females combined (n = 14) was 2.95 ha + 0.57 SE, across all habitats. Mean homerange size for males in mature pine stands (4.79 ha + 0.27, n = 4) was significantly larger than that in 4-year-old (3.00 ha + 0.31, n = 3) and 2-year-old stands (1.46 ha + 0.31, it = 3). Home-range sizes of paired males and females (it = 4 pairs) were similar within habitat type; mean distances between consecutive locations differed by habitat type and sex. We hypothesize that a gradient in food resources drives home-range dynamics.

  9. Reconnaissance hydrogeologic investigation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility and vicinity, Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennehy, K.F.; Prowell, D.C.; McMahon, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the area around the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina consists of 2 to 3 separate water bearing units. In the northern half of the study area, the Barnwell and underlying McBean aquifers are considered one aquifer owing to the absence of the tan clay-confining unit between them. In the southern half of the study area they are separated by the tan clay into two aquifers. Underlying these aquifers, and separated from them by the green clay-confining unit, is the Congaree aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities of the aquifers range from 0.00000001 to 0.0001 ft/sec. Directions of groundwater flow in the Barnwell and McBean aquifers are to the north, with a component of flow directed downward across the green clay and into the Congaree aquifer. The direction of flow in the Congaree aquifer is to the northwest. Water in these aquifers evolves from an acidic (pH < 6.5) mixed-cation type in the Barnwell aquifer to an alkaline (pH > 8) calcium bicarbonate water in the Congaree aquifer. Laboratory experiments indicate that reactions between sediments of the Barnwell aquifer and a salt-solution waste to be stored at the study area would significantly reduce the permeability of the sediment, thereby limiting the movement of the waste in groundwater at the site. (USGS)

  10. Diagnostic outcomes of inpatient video electroencephalography: nonepileptic events in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Elizabeth H; Hanson, Jarom; Pritchard, Paul B

    2013-09-01

    The Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) was established at the Medical University Hospital to assist in the diagnosis of epilepsy and the evaluation of other paroxysmal neurological symptoms, including non-epileptic events (NEEs), which are often confused with epileptic seizures. Correct diagnosis can prevent inappropriate treatment with antiepileptic drugs, avoid some of the restrictions imposed by epileptic seizures, and facilitate appropriate treatment for NEEs. A retrospective review of patients admitted to the EMU over a two year period showed the percentage of patients diagnosed with NEEs (39%) is greater than those diagnosed with epilepsy alone (36%). This incidence of NEE is higher than in other academic medical centers. The explanations for this disparity are not fully defined, but warrant further study as to patient demographics, risk factors, and referral patterns in South Carolina. The average time from when patients began having events to accurate diagnosis of NEEs was 4.5 years, and 21 patients had NEEs for at least 10 years prior to diagnosis. PMID:24261154

  11. Rapid riparian buffer width and quality analysis using lidar in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Emre

    The importance of protecting water quality and aquatic resources are increasing because of harmful human impacts within and around waterways. Establishing or restoring functional riparian areas protect water quality and are a good mechanism to conserve aquatic systems, plants, and wildlife. Laser-based remote sensing technology offers a high resolution approach to both characterize and document changes in riparian buffer zones (RBZs). The objectives of this study were to build a model to calculate riparian buffer width on both sides of a stream using a LiDAR-derived slope variable, to classify riparian buffers and determine their quality, and to evaluate the appropriateness of using LiDAR in riparian buffer assessment. For this purpose, RBZs were delineated for Hunnicutt and King Creek, which are located in Oconee and Pickens counties, in South Carolina. Results show that LiDAR was effective in delineating required riparian buffer widths based on the topography slope of upstream areas, and to calculate the ratio of tree cover in those riparian buffer zones to qualify them. Furthermore, the riparian buffer assessment model that was created in this research has potential for use in different sites and different studies.

  12. Soil zinc content, groundwater usage, and prostate cancer incidence in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Burch, James B.; Hussey, Jim; Temples, Tom; Bolick-Aldrich, Susan; Mosley-Broughton, Catishia; Liu, Yuan; Hebert, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PrCA) incidence in South Carolina (SC) exceeds the national average, particularly among African Americans (AAs). Though data are limited, low environmental zinc exposures and down-regulation of prostatic zinc transporter proteins among AAs may explain, in part, the racial PrCA disparity. Methods Age-adjusted PrCA rates were calculated by census tract. Demographic data were obtained from the 1990 census. Hazardous waste site locations and soil zinc concentrations were obtained from existing federal and state databases. A geographic information system and Poisson regression were used to test the hypothesis that census tracts with reduced soil zinc concentrations, elevated groundwater use, or more agricultural or hazardous waste sites had elevated PrCA risks. Results Census tracts with high groundwater use and low zinc concentrations had higher PrCA rate ratios (RR: 1.270; 95% confidence interval: 1.079, 1.505). This effect was not more apparent in areas populated primarily by AAs. Conclusion Increased PrCA rates were associated with reduced soil zinc concentrations and elevated groundwater use, although this observation is not likely to contribute to SC’s racial PrCA disparity. Statewide mapping and statistical modeling of relationships between environmental factors, demographics, and cancer incidence can be used to screen hypotheses focusing on novel PrCA risk factors. PMID:18949566

  13. Quaternary eolian dunes in the Savannah River valley, Jasper County, South Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Schultz, Arthur P.; González, Wilma Alemán; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Doar, William R.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Mahan, Shannon A.; McGeehin, John P.

    2013-09-01

    Sand hills in the Savannah River valley in Jasper County (South Carolina, USA) are interpreted as the remnants of parabolic eolian dunes composed of sand derived from the Savannah River and stabilized by vegetation under prevailing climate conditions. Optically stimulated luminescence ages reveal that most of the dunes were active ca. 40 to 19 ka ago, coincident with the last glacial maximum (LGM) through early deglaciation. Modern surface winds are not sufficient for sustained eolian sand transport. When the dunes were active, winds blew at velocities of at least 4 m/s from west to east, and some vegetation was present. The ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P:PE) was less than the modern ratio of 1.23 and may have been < 0.30, caused by stronger winds (which would have resulted in greater evaporation) and/or reduced precipitation. The Savannah River dunes are part of a larger assemblage of eolian dunes that were active in the eastern United States during and immediately after the LGM, suggesting that eolian sediment behavior in this region has been controlled by regional forcing mechanisms during the Quaternary.

  14. Classification of hardwood and swamp forests on the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, S.A.; Wellman, L.H.; Good, B.J.

    1981-04-01

    Fifty-eignt hardwood and swamp forest stands were sampled on the Savannah River Plant (SRP), South Carolina, to describe the relationship between the vegetational composition and the soil, topographic, and flooding characteristics of each stand. The stands were samples over the range from dry upland to deeply flooded (2.4m) sites. Seven forest communities were recognized. The boundaries between these communities are not usually distinct, but the classification serves as a basis for a discussion of the patterns of hardwood and swamp forests on the SRP and a comparison of this forest variation to variation of other forests in the Southeast. The forest communities found on the most deeply flooded sites are dominated almost exclusively by Taxodium distichum and Nyssa aquatica. With shallower flooding or only winter flooding, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Acer rubrum, Liquidambar styraciflua, and Quercus laurifolia become important dominants. Mesic sites that are seldom, if ever, flooded are dominated by N. sylvatica, L. styraciflua, and A. rubrum. The driest upland or upper slope positions are dominated by Q. alba, Carya tomentosa, and L. styraciflua.

  15. Shallow ground-water resources in the Grand Strand of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, G.K.; Lichtler, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The shallow aquifers that underlie the Grand Strand of South Carolina average approximately 60 to 400 ft thick and have variable productivity with some wells producing little water and others producing several hundred gal/min. These aquifers are separated from the underlying Black Creek aquifer by a 200 ft to 300 ft thick clay confining unit. The shallow aquifers are recharged by local rainfall and discharge primarily into the Atlantic Ocean, the Intracoastal Waterway, and other surface waters. In the North Myrtle Beach area a vertical difference in potentiometric levels of < 1 ft was observed within the shallow aquifers in 1983. However, the difference in potentiometric levels between the shallow aquifers and the Black Creek aquifer was probably from 25 ft to > 50 ft. The quality of groundwater is also variable. Calcium and bicarbonate are generally the predominant ions in solution as a result of the dissolution of calcite in the aquifer sediments. Concentrations of chloride may be high in the vicinity of the salty surface waters. Concentrations of iron range from 5 to 35,000 micrograms/L, but generally < 2,000 micrograms/L. (Author 's abstract)

  16. The Impact of WIC on Birth Outcomes: New Evidence from South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Sonchak, Lyudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) on a variety of infant health outcomes using recent South Carolina Vital Statistics data (2004-2012). Methods To account for non-random WIC participation, the study relies on a maternal fixed effects estimation, due to the availability of unique maternally linked data. Results The results indicate that WIC participation is associated with an increase in birth weight and length of gestation, decrease in the probability of low birth weight, prematurity, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admission. Additionally, addressing gestational bias and accounting for the length of gestation, WIC participation is associated with a decrease in the probability of delivering a low weight infant and a small for gestational age infant among black mothers. Conclusions for Practice Accounting for non-random program participation, the study documents a large improvement in birth outcomes among infants of WIC participating mothers. Even in the context of somewhat restrictive gestation-adjusted specification, the positive impact of WIC remains within the subsample of black mothers. PMID:26976280

  17. Inner shelf circulation patterns driven by synoptic weather systems on the South Carolina Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Kumar, N.; Voulgaris, G.

    2015-12-01

    The meteorological forcing on the inner shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina (USA) has been analyzed using wind records extending over a period of 10 years. This analysis identified three synoptic systems classified as cold fronts, warm fronts and tropical storms. The typical temporal evolution of each system has been fully characterized statistically; the associated temporal evolution of the offshore, directional, spectral wave conditions have also been identified for the duration of each event. These typical wind and wave conditions are used to numerically investigate the response of the inner shelf. In addition, the influence of the curved coastline is examined. The numerical experiments were carried out using the ROMS and SWAN models of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment-Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the results are presented. The results to-date suggest that, within the inner shelf a variability in the alongshore pressure gradient that is related to the alongshore variability of the relative angle between the wind forcing and the coastline. This coastline variability seems to affect the relative importance of the cross-shore / alongshore forcings creating different vertical structures of current at locations with different relative angle between wind forcing and coastline. Finally, the inclusion of the waves enhances the spatial differences observed for each case. These differences are explained in terms of momentum balance analysis.

  18. Adolescent Vaccination Performance in South Carolina Compared to the United States.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James R; Naifeh, Monique; Jacobson, Robert M; Hinton, Erin; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Rogacki, Brianna; Thompson, David; Margolis, Benyamin; Darden, Paul M

    National data on vaccine up-to-date (UTD) suggest that insufficient numbers of adolescents receive needed vaccines. This study analyzed public use data of the National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) from 2010 through 2013 for South Carolina (SC) adolescents and compared immunization rates to those of United States (US) adolescents. We also examined trends for each vaccine recommended for adolescents for both SC and US adolescents. UTD rates in SC adolescents for the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) and the tetanus- diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine lag those of US adolescents, despite demonstrating a trend of improvement in SC adolescents from 45% to 69% for MCV and from 48% to 72% for Tdap. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine UTD rates for SC adolescents demonstrated improvement over a 4 year period. HPV vaccination for SC girls improved when compared to the US, however UTD rates for both the SC and US were still well below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80%. For all three vaccines, parental recall for a provider recommendation to vaccinate their adolescent was around or below 50%, except for HPV in females where it reached 65% in SC and 69% in the US. Differences between state and national rates may help SC providers focus on specific interventions needed to improve UTD rates. PMID:27141702

  19. Etropus crossotus, an annual flatfish species; age and growth of the fringed flounder in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Marcel J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Fringed flounder, Etropus crossotus, a small flatfish common along the southeastern coast of the US, were collected along the South Carolina coast in the fall of 1992, and in the North Inlet estuary from August 1992 until July 1994. Standard length was 82% of total length and the relationship between standard length and wet weight showed near-isometric growth with no significant differences between males and females. Dry weight was 21% of wet weight and ash-free dry weight 14% of wet weight with no significant differences between sexes. Daily increments in the sagittal otoliths were used for age determination. No annual structures could be identified. The maximum age was about 14.5 months. Age-at-length was not different between the sexes. The relationship between age and length was exponential, with age (in days) equalling an e power of 4.242 + 0.135 × standard length (in cm). Back-calculated hatch dates and catches of early juveniles indicated a spawning season that lasted from March to October. Females started to be sexually mature at 7 to 7.5 cm standard length, but 50% maturity was reached at 8 to 8.5 cm. Females could grow to that size within one spawning season. Individuals hatched early in the spawning season could produce eggs in the latter portion of that season's spawning period.

  20. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-051-2177, AVX Corporation, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, B.P.; Hanley, K.W.

    1992-02-01

    In response to a joint request from the International Brotherhood of Electrical workers, Local 1591 and the AVX Corporation, an evaluation was undertaken concerning dermatitis and hoarseness in workers in the screener stacker area at the AVX Corporation (SIC-3674), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. AVX Corporation manufactured multilayer ceramic capacitors for electronic applications. Qualitative analysis of air samples identified xylene isomers, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (71556), toluene (108883), methoxy-ethanol (109864), methyl-isobutyl-ketone (108101), limonene (138863), formaldehyde (50000), acetaldehyde (75070), unidentified aliphatic amines and C9 to C12 aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Wipe samples revealed contamination of work surfaces with aluminum (7429905), barium (7440393), cadmium (7440439), lead (7439921), silver (7440224), titanium (7440326), zinc (7440666), chromium (7440473), and palladium (7440053). Of the 36 employees who were interviewed, 20 had histories consistent with work related contact dermatitis. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard existed among workers in the screener stacker and dicer areas due to contact with multiple skin irritants including barium, titanium, palladium, and mineral spirits. The authors recommend specific measures to reduce the potential for skin irritation and dermatitis from chemical contact.

  1. Factors Influencing The Accuracy Of A Macroinvertebrate Bioassessment Protocol In South Carolina Coastal Plain Streams (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M. H.; Martin, F. D.; Wike, L. D.; Specht, W. L.

    2006-01-31

    The Multiple Habitat Sampling Protocol (MHSP) is a bioassessment method designed to assess the ecological health of South Carolina streams on the basis of macroinvertebrate samples collected from natural substrates. The MHSP is computed by averaging the EPT (number of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera taxa) and BI (a biotic index that reflects the pollution tolerances of individual taxa) to produce a bioclassification score. The MHSP produced low bioclassification scores that could falsely indicate environmental degradation in some undisturbed, high quality streams in the Sandhills ecoregion. This problem had two causes: (1) the metrics (especially EPT) were significantly related to stream size, which confounded stream size effects with environmental impacts, and (2) the scoring criteria for EPT were too high for some Sandhills streams, likely because of unrecognized heterogeneity among the Sandhills streams from which the criteria were derived. We corrected these problems by developing new scoring criteria from ecologically comparable undisturbed streams and by utilizing residuals from regressions of the metrics on stream width to normalize for stream size. The MHSP and related protocols are effective methods for assessing environmental quality but allowances must be made for the effects of stream size and the potential ecological heterogeneity that naturally exists among streams in some ecoregions.

  2. Restaurant industry preparedness against intentional food contamination: results of a South Carolina survey.

    PubMed

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Smith, Lillian U; Li, Yi-Jhen; Sros, Lekhena; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Food safety and food defense are both responsibilities of public health agencies. Food safety practices within restaurants are regulated by state and local public health laws based on the US Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code. However, little is known about preemptive practices against intentional food-borne outbreaks within restaurants. The researchers administered a survey to a 50 percent random sample of South Carolina's restaurants, a state that relies heavily on tourism and the restaurant industry for its economic well-being. The survey received a response rate of 15 percent. The food defense practice items fall under three functional categories: employee management and training practices; vendor and delivery-related practices; and physical facilities and operational security practices. This study presents the results, classified by geographic region. Findings indicate some key areas of vulnerability that need attention to protect the public from mass food outbreaks due to intentional contamination. Of concern, there is much variation in practices by geographic region. On the basis of the survey, recommendations are made to improve restaurant preparedness against food-borne outbreaks from terrorism and malevolent contamination. PMID:20520362

  3. Hydrologic data collection at Crowders Creek and Steele Creek, York County, South Carolina, 1991-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gissendanner, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid industrial and urban growth is anticipated in the vicinity of Crowders Creek near Clover, S.C., and Steele Creek near Fort Mill, S.C. These subbasins are in the Catawba River Basin in York County, S.C. To obtain baseline information on these basins prior to urbanization, gaging stations 02145642 (Crowders Creek near Clover, S.C.) and 021467801 (Steele Creek near Fort Mill, S.C.) were established to collect streamflow and water-quality data. Continuous stream-stage and streamflow data were collected during the periods of March 23, 1991 to September 30, 1992, and May 29, 1991 to September 30, 1992, for stations 02145642 and 021467801, respectively. Average streamflows for stations 02145642 and 021467801 for the study period were 80.5 cubic feet per second and 28.6 cubic feet per second, respectively. Water-quality data were collected on four separate occasions at each gage site; two samplings during low-flow events and two samplings during high-flow events. Fecal coliform concentrations exceeded minimum standards for freshwater with other physical and chemical constituents meeting South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control standards.

  4. Avian behavior and mortality at power lines in coastal South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savereno, A.J.; Savereno, L.A.; Boettcher, R.; Haig, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    We compared avian behavior and mortality associated with two 115-kV transmission lines on the central South Carolina coast during 3,392 hours of observation from May 1991 through May 1994. One line was marked with 30-cm-diameter yellow aviation markers. The second line was unmarked, but was similar in most other aspects. We conducted ground searches (n = 445) beneath each line year-round to document avian mortality due to power-line collisions. At marked lines, birds that approached at line height changed behavior more at unmarked lines (P< 0.001), and fewer crossed between static and conductor wires. Collision rate was 53% lower at marked than unmarked lines. Among collisions at both sites, 82% of birds collided with static wires. Based on observed collisions and carcass recoveries, wading birds particularly appeared to be at risk. We concluded that aviation markers were effective at increasing line visibility and reducing collisions and recommend marking static wires of power lines in potentially sensitive areas.

  5. Forest statistics for the northern coastal plain of South Carolina, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.T.; Sheffield, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1986, the area of timberland in the Northern Coastal Plain of South Carolina increased by 3 percent to 4.7 million acres. Nonindustrial private forest landowners control 67 percent of the region's timberland. Area classified as a pine type remained stable at 1.9 million acres. More than 116,000 acres were harvested annually, while 177,000 acres were regenerated by artificial and natural means. The volume of softwood growing stock decreased 26 percent to 2.5 billion cubic feet. The volume of hardwood growing stock declined 13 percent to 3.1 billion cubic feet. Extremely high mortality drove net growth downward. Net annual growth of softwoods declined 84 percent to 28 million cubic feet. Hardwood growth dropped 77 percent to 23 million cubic feet. Annual removals of softwood growing stock increased 9 percent to 175 million cubic feet; hardwood removals jumped 18 percent to 87 million cubic feet. Annual mortality of softwood growing stock was up eight times the level recorded in 1986, whereas hardwood mortality was up four times the previous level.

  6. Biomarker responses in sunfish species and largemouth bass from the Saluda River, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewski, Jessica; Haney, Dennis C; van den Hurk, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The upstate and Piedmont region of South Carolina is a rapidly urbanizing area as a result of a steadily growing population. This increase in population and development has the potential to negatively impact local aquatic systems like the Saluda River due to increased pollution from runoff, and effluents from industrial and wastewater treatment facilities. During the summer months of 2010, 159 fish from the Centrarchidae family (sunfish species (Lepomis) and largemouth bass - Micropterus salmoides) were collected from 13 sites along the Saluda River. A suite of biomarker assays, including ethoxyresosufin-O-deethylase, bile fluorescence, glutathione S-transferase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, bile estrogens, acetylcholinesterase inhibition, metallothionein and tissue metal levels were applied to investigate the impacts of diminished water quality on fish health. Results indicate that fish from the Saluda River are responding to contamination in a site specific manner, with up to four significant biomarker responses in the most impacted sites. Sampling sites in the lower portion of the Saluda watershed are less impacted by pollution than the upper and central sections. The observed biomarker responses can be explained by the proximity of urban areas, point sources and general land use, and demonstrate the applicability of biomarkers in environmental biomonitoring programs. PMID:25173848

  7. THE CHANGING ROLE OF AGRICULTURE IN TOBACCO CONTROL POLICYMAKING: A SOUTH CAROLINA CASE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sarah; Glantz, Stanton

    2010-01-01

    To document the behavior of tobacco manufacturers’ agricultural third-party allies in South Carolina from the 1970s through 2009, we analyzed news reports, public documents and internal tobacco industry documents and conducted interviews with knowledgeable individuals. We found that agriculture-based interest groups (the Farm Bureau), elected state agency heads (Commissioners of Agriculture) and tobacco-area legislators acted as an iron triangle containing strong third-party allies of tobacco manufacturers from the 1970s through the 1990s. The Farm Bureau and Commissioners of Agriculture reacted to national-level changes in the tobacco leaf market structure by shifting towards a neutral position on tobacco control, while some tobacco-area legislators remained manufacturer allies (Sullivan et al, 2009). This shift was reinforced by public health outreach and successes, which were in turn facilitated by the lack of opposition from agricultural groups. We conclude that public health advocates in tobacco-growing states should use the pragmatic shift of agricultural groups’ position to challenge remaining third-party manufacturer alliances and agriculture-based opposition to tobacco control policies. PMID:20828907

  8. Management of chlorine gas-related injuries from the Graniteville, South Carolina, train derailment.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Emily; Svendsen, Erik; Grant, Stephen; Michels, Jill E; Richardson, William H

    2014-10-01

    A widely produced chemical, chlorine is used in various industries including automotive, electronics, disinfectants, metal production, and many others. Chlorine is usually produced and transported as a pressurized liquid; however, as a gas it is a significant pulmonary irritant. Thousands of people are exposed to chlorine gas every year, and while large-scale exposures are uncommon, they are not rare. Symptoms are usually related to the concentration and length of exposure, and although treatment is largely supportive, certain specific therapies have yet to be validated with randomized controlled trials. The majority of those exposed completely recover with supportive care; however, studies have shown the potential for persistent inflammation and chronic hyperreactivity. This case report describes an incident that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina, when a train derailment exposed hundreds of people to chlorine gas. This report reviews the events of January 6, 2005, and the current treatment options for chlorine gas exposure.(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-6). PMID:25225966

  9. Growth of longleaf and loblolly pine planted on South Carolina Sandhill sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, Michelle, M.; Outcalt, Kenneth, W.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2010-07-01

    Performance of longleaf (Pinus palustris Mill.) and loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) were compared 15–19 years after outplanting on 10 different sites in the sandhillsof South Carolina. The study was established from 1988 to 1992 with bareroot seedlings artificially inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pt) or naturally inoculated with mycorrhizae in the nursery. A containerized longleaf pine treatment with and without Pt inoculation was added to two sites in 1992. Effects of the Pt nursery treatment were mixed, with a decrease in survival of bareroot longleaf pine on two sites and an increase in survival on another site. The containerized longleaf pine treatment substantially increased survival, which led to greater volume compared with bareroot longleaf pine. Loblolly pine yielded more volume than longleaf pine on all sites but one, where survival was negatively affected by fire. Depth of sandy surface horizon affected mean annual height growth of both loblolly and longleaf pine. Height growth per year decreased with an increase in sand depth for both species. Multiple regression analysis of volume growth(ft3/ac per year) for both species indicated a strong relationship to depth of sandy soil and survival. After 15–19 years, loblolly pine has been more productive than longleaf pine, although longleaf pine productivity may be equal to or greater than that of loblolly pine on the soils with the deepest sandy surface layers over longer rotations.

  10. Storm-induced inner-continental shelf circulation and sediment transport: Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy; Sylvester, Charlene S.; Voulgaris, George; Nelson, Tim; Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.

    2012-07-01

    Long Bay is a sediment-starved, arcuate embayment located along the US East Coast connecting both South and North Carolina. In this region the rates and pathways of sediment transport are important because they determine the availability of sediments for beach nourishment, seafloor habitat, and navigation. The impact of storms on sediment transport magnitude and direction were investigated during the period October 2003-April 2004 using bottom mounted flow meters, acoustic backscatter sensors and rotary sonars deployed at eight sites offshore of Myrtle Beach, SC, to measure currents, water levels, surface waves, salinity, temperature, suspended sediment concentrations, and bedform morphology. Measurements identify that sediment mobility is caused by waves and wind driven currents from three predominant types of storm patterns that pass through this region: (1) cold fronts, (2) warm fronts and (3) low-pressure storms. The passage of a cold front is accompanied by a rapid change in wind direction from primarily northeastward to southwestward. The passage of a warm front is accompanied by an opposite change in wind direction from mainly southwestward to northeastward. Low-pressure systems passing offshore are accompanied by a change in wind direction from southwestward to southeastward as the offshore storm moves from south to north. During the passage of cold fronts more sediment is transported when winds are northeastward and directed onshore than when the winds are directed offshore, creating a net sediment flux to the north-east. Likewise, even though the warm front has an opposite wind pattern, net sediment flux is typically to the north-east due to the larger fetch when the winds are northeastward and directed onshore. During the passage of low-pressure systems strong winds, waves, and currents to the south are sustained creating a net sediment flux southwestward. During the 3-month deployment a total of 8 cold fronts, 10 warm fronts, and 10 low-pressure systems

  11. Geochemical Profile of Groundwater Discharge Across the Beachface of Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viso, R. F.; Lewis, B.; McCoy, C. A.; Gregory, H.; Stankiewicz, F.

    2008-12-01

    Groundwater discharge from land to sea provides a significant, yet often overlooked pathway for delivery of dissolved nutrients and contaminants to nearshore waters. Recent research is focused on refining groundwater and associated dissolved chemical species flux estimates, geological controls on flow pathways, and geological contributions to the chemistry of the pore water. In Long Bay, South Carolina, extensive seismic imagery provides many clues to control of the geologic framework morphology of the nearshore area. In addition, recent mapping of the electrical structure of the upper few meters of marine nearshore sediment compared with nearby Chirp subbottom profiles provide indications of the relationships between framework geology and submarine groundwater discharge. Continuous electrical resistivity profiles also suggest that mixing between ocean water and upland-derived fresh water within shallow aquifers occurs to a large extent within the surf zone and shoreface. At present, work is underway to estimate shallow groundwater seepage rates of nutrients and metals across the beach face into the adjacent surf zone. A beach perpendicular transect of 1 meter deep wells was installed from the swash zone to approximately 100 meters inland and sampled over two complete tidal cycles. The groundwater salinity gradient ranged from approximately 30 to 2 ppt. All wells showed suboxic conditions and maxima in dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus and iron at mid-range salinity. The latter corresponded to high dissolved organic content, indicating a maximum in decomposition and a concomitant release of nutrients into the groundwater. Measurements of radon and radium isotopes will be used to estimate the net movement of groundwater seaward from the beach. These groundwater discharge estimates will be applied to measured concentrations of N, P and metals in an effort to derive fluxes. Preliminary results from Rn activity measurements indicate groundwater fluxes in the range of 1

  12. Suitability of bedrock for construction stone in the Greenville 1° by 2° Quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agostino, John P.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Nelson, Arthur E.; Clarke, James W.

    1993-01-01

    This map presents a qualitative regional assessment of the resource potential of bedrock for use as construction stone the the Greenville 1° by 2° quadrangle. Other studies will include metallic minerals (D'Agostine and others, in press a), gold (D'Agostino an others, in press b), and non-metallic commodities (D'Agostino and others, in press c). Construction stone, as used here in the context of bedrock suitability, refers mainly to dimension stone and crushed stone. Abundant supplies of bedrock and alluvial sand and gravel are available from numerous sources in the quadrangle. There is a modern quarry industry with 176 active and inactive quarries situated in the quadrangle--153 in Georgia, 23 in South Carolina, and one in North Carolina. Sixty-five dimension-stone quarries are located in a single granite mass, the Elberton Granite, in Elbert, Madison, and Oglethorpe Counties, Ga. There are numerous undeveloped sources of moderate amounts of stream sand and gravel and major abundant upland residual clay deposits in the quadrangle area.

  13. Mines, prospects, and occurrences of nonmetallic mineral commodities in the Greenville 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agostino, John P.; O'Connor, Bruce J.; Zupan, Alan J.W.; Maybin, Arthur H., III

    1994-01-01

    Mines, prospects, and occurrences of nonmetal mineral commodities in the Greenville 1° x 2° quadrangle are tabulated in this report. There are 488 symbols representing 579 mines, prospects, and occurrences located in the quadrangle. There are 379 symbols used for 466 features in Georgia, 106 symbols for 110 features in South Carolina, and 3 symbols for 3 features in North Carolina. The table lists, in consecutive orders for each county (fig. 1), the map number of each feature, which correlates and locates the item on the accompanying Greenville 1° x 2° quadrangle map. Also listed are the known name of the feature; the 7.5 topographic map on which the commodity site is located; the Transverse Mercator (UTM) northing and easting grid coordinates from the appropriate 7.5’ topographic map; the commodity; remarks; and references. Some locations are known, but many sites are not verified and their locations are only approximate. Reference are listed in References Cited and referred to by number to save space. The generalized tectonic framework for the quadrangle is shown in figure 2.

  14. Mineral resource assessment of rare-earth elements, thorium, titanium, and uranium in the Greenville 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Curtin, Gary C.; Daniels, David L.; Jackson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral resources of the Greenville 1° x 2° quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina, were assessed between 1984 and 1990 under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The mineral resource assessments were made on the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and the presence of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences from the literature. This report is an assessment of the rare-earth elements (REE), thorium, titanium, and uranium resources in the Greenville quadrangle and is based on heavy mineral concentrates collected in 1951-54 by the USGS (Overstreet and others, 1968; Caldwell and White, 1973; Cuppels and White, 1973); on the results of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) sampling program (Ferguson, 1978, 1979); on analyses of stream-sediment and heavy-mineral-concentrate samples (Jackson and Moore, 1992, G.C Cullin, USGS, unpub. data, 1992) on maps showing aerial gamma radiation in the Greenville quadrangle (D.L. Daniels, USGS, unpub. data, 1992); and on the geology as mapped by Nelson and others (1987, 1989).

  15. Post-hurricane Joaquin Coastal Oblique Aerial Photographs Collected from the South Carolina/North Carolina Border to Montauk Point, New York, October 7–9, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On October 7–9, 2015, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey of the coast from the South Carolina/North Carolina border to Montauk Point, New York (fig. 1), aboard a Cessna 182 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,200 ft offshore fig. 2. This mission was conducted to collect post-Hurricane Joaquin data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last surveys, mission flown in September 2014 (Virginia to New York: Morgan, 2015), November 2012 (northern North Carolina: Morgan and others, 2014) and May 2008 (southern North Carolina: unpublished report), and the data can be used to assess of future coastal change.The photographs in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file

  16. Transgressive Shoreface Architecture Within a Sediment Starved Arcuate Strand: Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayes, P. T.; Schwab, W. C.; Driscoll, N. W.; Morton, R. A.; Baldwin, W. E.; Denny, J. F.; German, O. Y.; Park, J. Y.

    2002-12-01

    A regional geophysical mapping survey of Long Bay provides a comprehensive image of sea-floor character, bathymetry and shallow subbottom stratigraphy within the shoreface and across the inner shelf along 90 kilometers of the northern South Carolina coast. Chirp subbottom profiles, sidescan-sonar imagery and interferometric swath-bathymetry imaged the shallow stratigraphy and the geometry of the Holocene transgressive surface developing within the modern shoreface. Along a 20 km section of central Long Bay, across the shoreface and inner shelf, centered on Myrtle Beach, SC, oceanographic processes are actively eroding older Tertiary- and Cretaceous-age strata exposed at the sea floor. Long beach profiles are interrupted by these outcrops and deviate substantially from typical concave-up geometries. The modern (mobile) sediment lens is restricted to the surf zone. Along an adjacent area, near North Myrtle Beach, the Holocene erosional unconformity surface continues to exhibit an irregular character eroding into older Cretaceous-age deposits. Within the shoreface, however, a relatively continuous cover of modern mobile sand covers the upper- to mid-shoreface. Cretaceous-age strata crop out across the inner shelf and locally within the lower shoreface. Beach profiles are relatively smooth and linear across the mid-shoreface and become disrupted by strata cropping out near the base of the shoreface and inner shelf. Further north, near the North Carolina border, three planar marine unconformities are visible underlying the shoreface and inner shelf and define seaward thinning wedges of Quaternary deposits. Beach profiles in this area exhibit a low slope and generally define a concave-up low slope profile geometry. The modern mobile sediment lens is more continuous in this area and the Holocene erosional surface can be observed to have eroded previous highstand deposits. The detailed resolution of the chirp subbottom data allows the geometry of the developing marine

  17. Results of NURE detailed sampling in the Aiken County, South Carolina area. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, P.A.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents results of detailed geological and geochemical studies in Aiken and Lexington Counties, South Carolina. The studies were undertaken in the spring of 1979 in order to determine the origin, abundance, and areal extent of uraniferous Carolina Coastal Plain. Gorceixite is a hydrated barium aluminum phosphate mineral. The identification fo gorceixite in Aiken County caused much interest because of the 75 to 960 ppM uranium associated with it. Gorceixite is a rare secondary mineral that was first reported as rolled pebbles in diamond sands of Brazil and Africa. Gorceixite has also been found in Dale Colunty, Alabama and Garland County, Arkansas. In Aiken County, South Carolina, gorceixite is found as thin seams or nodules interlayered with sands and mottled clays of the late Eocene (Jackson) Barnwell Group. Electron microprobe analysis of Aiken County gorceixite indicates that the relative abundances of major elements are: Ba>Al>P>Si, Sr>F>Fe>Ca. Also present in amounts greater than 0.05% are K, Ti, Y, La, and U. Ferguson et al. (1979) noted that the uranium in Aiken County gorceixite is in disequilibrium with its decay products, indicating relatively recent enrichment of uranium. Gamma-ray spectrometry measurements, which measure Bi-214, yield estimated concentrations of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/(eU/sub 3/O/sub 8/) of <5 to 20 ppM, whereas chemical analyses show much higher (75 to 960 ppM) concentrations.

  18. Analysis of Salinity Intrusion in the Waccamaw River and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 1995-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Six reservoirs in North Carolina discharge into the Pee Dee River, which flows 160 miles through South Carolina to the coastal communities near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. During the Southeast's record-breaking drought from 1998 to 2003, salinity intrusions inundated a coastal municipal freshwater intake, limiting water supplies. To evaluate the effects of regulated flows of the Pee Dee River on salinity intrusion in the Waccamaw River and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and a consortium of stakeholders entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to apply data-mining techniques to the long-term time series to analyze and simulate salinity dynamics near the freshwater intakes along the Grand Strand of South Carolina. Salinity intrusion in tidal rivers results from the interaction of three principal forces?streamflow, mean tidal water levels, and tidal range. To analyze, model, and simulate hydrodynamic behaviors at critical coastal gages, data-mining techniques were applied to over 20 years of hourly streamflow, coastal water-quality, and water-level data. Artificial neural network models were trained to learn the variable interactions that cause salinity intrusions. Streamflow data from the 18,300-square-mile basin were input to the model as time-delayed variables and accumulated tributary inflows. Tidal inputs to the models were obtained by decomposing tidal water-level data into a 'periodic' signal of tidal range and a 'chaotic' signal of mean water levels. The artificial neural network models were able to convincingly reproduce historical behaviors and generate alternative scenarios of interest. To make the models directly available to all stakeholders along the Pee Dee and Waccamaw Rivers and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an easy-to-use decision support system (DSS) was developed as a spreadsheet application that integrates the historical database, artificial neural network models

  19. Vocational Agriculture in the Changing South. Proceedings of a Two Day Conference (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liner, Hugh L., Ed.

    Changes occurring in the rural South and the changing educational needs of the southern youth were topics of this conference. Consideration was also given to job opportunities, role of vocational education in developing employee traits and providing training desired by employers, training vocational agriculture teachers, and relationships of…

  20. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

  1. Seismic and tornado evaluation of Building 221H at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-30

    This report summarizes the results of the seismic and tornado evaluation of Building 221-H and Penthouse Additions 221-SH, TH, and UH at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. The main objective of this project was to determine whether Building 221-H and the two-story penthouse addition over Sections 2 through 6 meet the established acceptance criteria for the criterion seismic and tornado loadings. The analyses and evaluations of three related structures -- the exhaust stack 291-H, sand filters 294-H/294-lH, and the connecting air tunnel -- are presented in a separate report. During the progress of the project, both the scope of work and the acceptance criteria for the seismic analyses of Building 221-H went through several revisions since the original criteria were established. As a result, linear elastic, quasi-nonlinear, and nonlinear dynamic analyses were performed to assess the building. The seismic criteria was based on the design response spectrum developed by Dr. George W. Housner with a Design Basis Earthquake ground acceleration of 0.2g and an Operating Basis Earthquake ground acceleration of 0.1g. Chapter 1 discusses the seismic analysis history of this project and the various analysis phases performed. The tornado analysis was performed for a Design Basis Tornado. The analyses considered the effects of wind velocity pressure, atmospheric pressure drop, and missile impact for structural response effects. The evaluation for wind velocity pressure and atmospheric pressure drop effects included consideration of both local and overall structural adequacy. The evaluation of missile impact effects included consideration of overall structural and individual panel response.

  2. Parental attendance and brood success in American Oystercatchers in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thibault, Janet M.; Sanders, Felicia J.; Jodice, Patrick G.

    2010-01-01

    Research on breeding American Oystercatchers has focused on identifying factors that affect reproductive success but little attention has been paid to parent behavior during chick-rearing. Parental attendance of American Oystercatchers was measured in Bulls Bay and along the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Waterway) within the Cape Romain Region, South Carolina, USA, during 2006. Parental attendance rates averaged 90.9% in Bulls Bay and 81.4% along the Waterway. Daily survival of chicks was higher in Bulls Bay (0.989 ± 0.007) compared to the Waterway (0.966 ± 0.012). The extent of shellfish reefs (i.e. foraging areas) adjacent to nest sites was greater in Bulls Bay (5,633 ± 658 m2) compared to the Waterway (3,273 ± 850 m2). Mean parental attendance in Bulls Bay was higher for successful broods (90.5%) compared to failed broods (79.8%). In contrast, mean parental attendance along the Waterway was higher for failed broods (93.4%) compared to successful broods (67.5%). Less extensive shellfish reefs adjacent to nest sites along the Waterway appeared to require parents to depart more frequently to forage and the resultant reduction in attendance may have negatively affected chick survival. Bulls Bay may provide higher quality nesting habitat compared to the Waterway with respect to proximity to food resources and parental attendance. Management and conservation efforts for American Oystercatchers should consider the relationship between foraging and nesting habitat and variability in behavioral attributes, such as parental attendance, in relationship to environmental conditions which ultimately affect reproductive success.

  3. Orientation study: Jasper and Hampton Counties, South Carolina. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, P. A.; Fay, W. M.

    1982-08-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of a ground water and stream sediment orientation study in Jasper and Hampton Counties in southeastern South Carolina. Stream sediment samples were taken at 92 sites and sieved into four fractions for subsequent analysis. Surface water samples were taken at 68 of these sites. Ground water samples were collected at 108 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and nine other elements in ground water samples. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water samples. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data for sediment samples include (1) water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors such as stream characteristics and vegetation are also tabulated. Data for ground water samples include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Helium analyses are given for ground water samples. Key data for surface water samples include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). The report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. 2 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Freshwater supply potential of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, W.J.; Sanders, C.L., Jr.; Johnson, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the low-flow frequency of freshwater flow in the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW) near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and to determine the effects of proposed freshwater withdrawals of 45 cu ft/sec at the location of the saltwater-freshwater interface. Discharges simulated in the AICW for 1982-86 using BRANCH one-dimensional flow model were used to establish a relation of 7-day average flows in the AICW to summed 7-day average flows of four tributary streams. This relation was used with the tributary records for 1954-86 climatic years to generate 7-day minimum flows of the AICW, which were then used to develop a low-flow frequency relation. The relation indicated that the 7-day, 10-year flow of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway is 192 ct ft/s. A relation of the mile position of the saltwater-freshwater interface to recorded specific conductances at Vereen 's Marina was established. The 1982-85 period of record of specific conductance was used to simulate interface positions which were then used to establish a relation of 7-day average interface position to 7-day average discharge of the AICW. This relation indicated that the 7-day average interface position would be at mile 355.5 for the 7Q10 and at mile 356.2 if 45 cu ft were withdrawn during the 7Q10. The analysis indicates that the AICW can provide a reliable supply of freshwater at the proposed withdrawal location at mi 363.3 in the vicinity of Myrtle Beach, even during the 7Q10 low-flow conditions. (USGS)

  5. Transient electromagnetic imaging of a basin margin underneath the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    James, B. , Lakewood, CO ); Price, V. ); Hild, J. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey was performed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina, to assess the viability of a subsurface imaging method. The goal of the survey was improve resolution of mapping the margin of a buried Triassic basin partially underlying SRP. A high data density survey was conducted utilizing multiple large loop transmitters with overlapping profiles of measurements from each transmitter. Any attempt to image subsurface structure requires such data density. A gap in interpretation tolls exists in all electrical methods between layered earth inversion and numerical modeling of two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) structures. Recent TEM research has focused on development of methods to image subsurface geoelectric structure without resorting to numerical modeling. The method described here constructs a subsurface geoelectric image by a novel means of stacking TEM data in both time and space. The stacking procedure is based on knowledge of where currents are flowing in the subsurface of an approximate background model. Weights for stacking of the TEM data into estimates of anomalous current flow on a subsurface grid are calculated from these known current flow patterns as a function of time, measurement position and subsurface grid element position using Biot-Savart's Law. Thus for the SRP survey, a 2D structure is imaged built on knowledge of the fields of an approximate one-dimensional (1D) model. The basin margin under SRP is successfully resolved by the imaging method. The imaging result provides better resolution than obtained by splicing together layered earth inversion models. Various pros and cons of this imaging method are discussed to indicate future directions for TEM imaging. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  6. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution winds indicated

  7. Mineralogic Investigation into Occurrence of High Uranium Well Waters in Upstate South Carolina USA

    SciTech Connect

    R Warner; J Meadows; S Sojda; V Price; T Temples; Y Arai; C Fleisher; B Crawford; P Stone

    2011-12-31

    High levels of U (up to 5570 {micro}g/L) have been discovered in well waters near Simpsonville, South Carolina, USA. In order to characterize the mineralogical source of the U and possible structural controls on its presence, a deep (214 m) well was cored adjacent to one of the enriched wells. The highest gamma-ray emissions in the recovered core occur in coarse biotite granite at a depth just below 52 m. A slickenlined fault plane at 48.6 m and narrow pegmatite layers at depths of 113, 203 and 207 m also yield high gamma-ray counts. Thin sections were made from the above materials and along several subvertical healed fractures. Uraninite and coffinite are the principal U-rich minerals in the core. Other U-bearing minerals include thorite and thorogummite, monazite, zircon and allanite. Primary uraninite occurs in the biotite granite and in pegmatite layers. Secondary coffinite is present as tiny (<5 {micro}m) crystals dispersed along fractures in the granite and pegmatites. Coffinite also occurs along the slickenlined fault plane, where it is associated with calcite and calcic zeolite and also replaces allanite. Coffinite lacks radiogenic Pb, hence is considerably younger than the uraninite. Dissolution of partially oxidized Ca-rich uraninite occurring in the surficial biotite granite (or secondary coffinite in fracture zones) is likely the main source for the current high levels of U in nearby area wells. The high-U well waters have a carbonate signature, consistent with pervasive calcite vein mineralization in the core. Aqueous speciation calculations suggest U transport as an uranyl (U{sup 6+}) hydroxyl-carbonate complex. Later reduction resulted in secondary precipitation along fractures as a U{sup 4+} mineral (i.e., coffinite).

  8. Applications of ichnology to hydrogeology, with examples from the Cape Fear Formation (Cretaceous), South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.J. . Geosciences Program); Simones, G.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Ichnology, the study of modern and ancient traces left by organisms, has provided supplemental information to geologic subdisciplines such as sedimentology and stratigraphy. The major objective of the authors paper is to emphasize the valuable information that can be conveyed by trace fossils in the investigation of hydrogeologic units. Bioturbation has a net effect of mixing different types and layers of sediments, such as introducing clays into sands and vice versa. This mixing can decrease porosity and permeability of sandy units, thus changing potential aquifers into confining units. For example, a sandy fluvial deposit will contain distinctive nonmarine trace fossils, thus defining channel sands that may serve as permeable conduits for ground-water flow. In contrast, a sandy shelf deposit will contain marine trace fossils in a sand body geometry that will be markedly different from aquifers produced in nonmarine environments. Bioturbation also causes geochemical and diagenetic changes in sediments, causing irrigation of previously anoxic sediments and precipitation of ion oxides. The Cretaceous Cape Fear Formation of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, in the subsurface of South Carolina, is presented as an example of a hydrogeologic unit that has been reinterpreted using ichnologic data. Extensive bioturbation caused mixing of clays and sands in Cape Fear sediments, which resulted in the Cape Fear becoming a regional confining system. Trace fossil assemblages indicate a brackish water environment, perhaps estuarine, for the Cape Fear, as opposed to previous interpretations of fluvial and deltaic environments. Bioturbated zones also have significantly more oxidized iron than unbioturbated zones, highlighting potential effects on ground-water quality.

  9. Sea-level rise: Destruction of threatened and endangered species habitat in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Richard C.; White, Tammy W.; Chapman, Kimberly K.

    1993-05-01

    Concern for the environment has increased over the past century, and the US Congress has responded to this concern by passing legislation designed to protect the nation’s ecological biodiversity. This legislation, culminating with the Endangered Species Act of 1973, has been instrumental in defining methods for identifying and protecting endangered or threatened species and their habitats. Current legislation, however, assumes that the range of a protected species will stay constant over time. This assumption may no longer be valid, as the unprecedented increase in the number and concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has the potential to cause a global warming of 1.0-4.5°C and a sea-level rise (SLR) of 31-150 cm by the year 2100. Changes in climate of this magnitude are capable of causing shifts in the population structure and range of most animal species. This article examines the effects that SLR may have on the habitats of endangered and threatened species at three scales. At the regional scale 52 endangered or threatened plant and animal species were found to reside within 3 m of mean sea level in the coastal stages of the US Southeast. At the state level, the habitats of nine endangered or threatened animals that may be at risk from future SLR were identified. At the local level, a microscale analysis was conducted in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina, USA, on the adverse effects that SLR may have on the habitats of the American alligator, brown pelican, loggerhead sea turtle, and wood stork.

  10. Depositional and diagenetic signatures of Late Eocene Oligocene sediments, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, M. P.; Siron, D. L.; Colquhoun, D. J.

    2000-07-01

    Surficial and near-surface soils of the South Carolina Coastal Plain reflect a variety of lithologies and depositional environments that are difficult to differentiate because of intense leaching and abrupt or laterally inconsistent facies changes. Binocular microscopic examination, scanning electron microscopic/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) observations, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that onshore Late Eocene to Late Oligocene Barnwell Group sediments are transitional facies ranging from high-energy fluvial deposits to offshore siliciclastic shelf sands. Interfingering of the units results in alternation of mineralogic signatures within a low-gradient fluvial/transitional/marine depositional system. Late Eocene and Early Oligocene offshore sediments were deposited in a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic, middle- to outer-shelf environment that was subjected to periods of erosion or non-deposition during transgressive events. Detrital and diagenetic characteristics of the onshore kaolinite-enriched, Late Oligocene Upland Unit sediments reflect deposition in a high- to low-energy fluvial system. Differentiation between these uppermost sediments and the underlying low-energy fluvial deposits of the Late Eocene Tobacco Road Sand is based on distinctive hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite (HIV) signatures. Intervals of HIV-enrichment are coincident with accumulations of carbonaceous material and identified as paleosols; these "soils" are used to infer offshore transgressive periods. Onshore sediments of the Late Eocene Dry Branch Formation contain high concentrations of smectite and flocculated, relatively poorly crystallized kaolinite flakes reflective of marine depositional conditions. At the base of this unit, authigenic Ca-minerals (Ca-zeolites and calcite) and quartz lepispheres (opal-CT) form coatings on and between sand grains. Late Eocene siliceous microfossils that contribute to opal-CT formation are identified in southwestern North Atlantic

  11. Assessment of sociodemographic and geographic disparities in cancer risk from air toxics in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sacoby; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Jiang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Murray, Rianna; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith

    2015-07-01

    Populations of color and low-income communities are often disproportionately burdened by exposures to various environmental contaminants, including air pollution. Some air pollutants have carcinogenic properties that are particularly problematic in South Carolina (SC), a state that consistently has high rates of cancer mortality for all sites. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer risk disparities in SC by linking risk estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) with sociodemographic data from the 2000 US Census Bureau. Specifically, NATA risk data for varying risk categories were linked by tract ID and analyzed with sociodemographic variables from the 2000 census using R. The average change in cancer risk from all sources by sociodemographic variable was quantified using multiple linear regression models. Spatial methods were further employed using ArcGIS 10 to assess the distribution of all source risk and percent non-white at each census tract level. The relative risk (RR) estimates of the proportion of high cancer risk tracts (defined as the top 10% of cancer risk in SC) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between the first and latter three quartiles defined by sociodemographic factors, while the variance in the percentage of high cancer risk between quartile groups was tested using Pearson's chi-square. The average total cancer risk for SC was 26.8 people/million (ppl/million). The risk from on-road sources was approximately 5.8 ppl/million, higher than the risk from major, area, and non-road sources (1.8, 2.6, and 1.3 ppl/million), respectively. Based on our findings, addressing on-road sources may decrease the disproportionate cancer risk burden among low-income populations and communities of color in SC. PMID:26037107

  12. Harmful algal blooms: a case study in two mesotrophic drinking water supply reservoirs in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Beaulieu, Karen M.; Knight, Rodney R.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Arrington, Jane M.; West, Rebecca; Westcott, John; Bradley, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Algal blooms can be harmful and a nuisance in a variety of aquatic ecosystems, including reservoirs and lakes. Cyanobacterial(blue-green algae) harmful algal blooms are notorious for producing both taste-and-odor compounds and potent toxins that may affect human health. Taste–and-odor episodes are aesthetic problems often caused by cyanobacterial-produced organic compounds (geosmin and methylisoborneol) and are common in reservoirs and lakes used as source water supplies. The occurrences of these taste-and-odor compounds and toxins (like microcystin) can be sporadic and vary in intensity both spatially and temporally. Recent publications by the U.S. Geological Survey address this complexity and provide protocols for cyanotoxin and taste-and-odor sampling programs. A case study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Spartanburg Water, monitored two mesotrophic reservoirs that serve as public drinking water supplies in South Carolina. Study objectives were (1) to identify spatial and temporal occurrence of the taste-and-odor compound geosmin and the cyanotoxin microcystin and (2) to assess the associated limnological conditions before, during, and after these occurrences. Temporal and spatial occurrence of geosmin and microcystin were highly variable from 2007 to 2009. The highest geosmin concentrations tended to occur in the spring. Microcystin tended to occur in the late summer and early fall, but occurrence was rare and well below World Health Organization guidelines for finished drinking water and recreational activities. No current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards are applicable to cyanotoxins in drinking or ambient water. In general, elevated geosmin and microcystin concentrations were the result of complex interactions between cyanobacterial ⬚community composition, nutrient availability, water clarity, hydraulic residence time, and stratification.

  13. River Responses to Climate Change: Examining the Subsurface Architecture of the Pee Dee River, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. C.; Wright, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    A detailed geological record of climate and landscape change through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles is preserved in the morphology and stratigraphy of South Carolina's coastal plain. High-resolution LiDAR topography across the coastal plain reveals a complex landscape with channel patterns that highlight the dynamic response of coastal river systems to shifts in climate. While the southeastern coastal plain was far from the edge of the North American ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum, much of the relict floodplain morphology is comprised of braided plains with parabolic dunes oriented ENE, large meander scars and sandy scroll bars. These features record a transition from low profile, episodic braided systems during the glacial period to unusually large, overfit meandering systems during deglaciation, and subsequently to the smaller, modern meandering system. Focusing on the confluence of the Great Pee Dee and Little Pee Dee Rivers, we collected a suite of geophysical data (Chirp subbottom and multibeam bathymetry in the river and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) across the floodplain and dunes) and geologic samples to examine the 3-D subsurface architecture of this fluvial system. Preliminary analysis of the Chirp subbottom and GPR data reveals a series of buried surfaces that appear to represent multiple fluvial terraces dissected by paleochannels that may record several cycles of glaciation accompanied by shifts in fluvial morphology. Sediment samples collected along these subsurface profiles will be correlated with the geophysical data to provide age constraints on the timing of channel migration. These newly acquired datasets have been integrated with pre-existing high resolution LiDAR topography data and regional orthophotographs to create a detailed three-dimensional visualization of the study area.

  14. Description and application of capture zone delineation for a wellfield at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water capture zone boundaries for individual pumped wells in a confined aquffer were delineated by using groundwater models. Both analytical and numerical (semi-analytical) models that more accurately represent the $round-water-flow system were used. All models delineated 2-dimensional boundaries (capture zones) that represent the areal extent of groundwater contribution to a pumped well. The resultant capture zones were evaluated on the basis of the ability of each model to realistically rapresent the part of the ground-water-flow system that contributed water to the pumped wells. Analytical models used were based on a fixed radius approach, and induded; an arbitrary radius model, a calculated fixed radius model based on the volumetric-flow equation with a time-of-travel criterion, and a calculated fixed radius model derived from modification of the Theis model with a drawdown criterion. Numerical models used induded the 2-dimensional, finite-difference models RESSQC and MWCAP. The arbitrary radius and Theis analytical models delineated capture zone boundaries that compared least favorably with capture zones delineated using the volumetric-flow analytical model and both numerical models. The numerical models produced more hydrologically reasonable capture zones (that were oriented parallel to the regional flow direction) than the volumetric-flow equation. The RESSQC numerical model computed more hydrologically realistic capture zones than the MWCAP numerical model by accounting for changes in the shape of capture zones caused by multiple-well interference. The capture zone boundaries generated by using both analytical and numerical models indicated that the curnmtly used 100-foot radius of protection around a wellhead in South Carolina is an underestimate of the extent of ground-water capture for pumped wetis in this particular wellfield in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The arbitrary fixed radius of 100 feet was shown to underestimate the upgradient

  15. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  16. Patterns of amphibian infection prevalence across wetlands on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Love, Cara N; Winzeler, Megan E; Beasley, Rochelle; Scott, David E; Nunziata, Schyler O; Lance, Stacey L

    2016-08-31

    Amphibian diseases, such as chytridiomycosis caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranaviral disease caused by ranaviruses, are often linked to global amphibian population declines, yet the ecological dynamics of both pathogens are poorly understood. The goal of our study was to determine the baseline prevalence, pathogen loads, and co-infection rate of Bd and ranavirus across the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, a region with rich amphibian diversity and a history of amphibian-based research. We tested over 1000 individuals, encompassing 21 amphibian species from 11 wetlands for both Bd and ranavirus. The prevalence of Bd across individuals was 9.7%. Using wetland means, the mean (±SE) Bd prevalence was 7.9 ± 2.9%. Among toad species, Anaxyrus terrestris had 95 and 380% greater odds of being infected with Bd than Scaphiopus holbrookii and Gastrophryne carolinensis, respectively. Odds of Bd infection in adult A. terrestris and Lithobates sphenocephalus were 75 to 77% greater in metal-contaminated sites. The prevalence of ranavirus infections across all individuals was 37.4%. Mean wetland ranavirus prevalence was 29.8 ± 8.8% and was higher in post-metamorphic individuals than in aquatic larvae. Ambystoma tigrinum had 83 to 85% higher odds of ranavirus infection than A. opacum and A. talpoideum. We detected a 4.8% co-infection rate, with individuals positive for ranavirus having a 5% higher occurrence of Bd. In adult Anaxyrus terrestris, odds of Bd infection were 13% higher in ranavirus-positive animals and odds of co-infection were 23% higher in contaminated wetlands. Overall, we found the pathogen prevalence varied by wetland, species, and life stage. PMID:27596855

  17. Comparison of fish and macroinvertebrate bioassessments from South Carolina coastal plain streams

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.

    1999-12-03

    Stream bioassessments are often based on a single taxonomic assemblage, such as fishes or macroinvertebrates, with the assumption that this assemblage is representative of other assemblages. However, ecological and physiological differences between taxonomic groups may cause different responses to disturbance and result in different assessment results. In this study, fish and macroinvertebrate bioassessments were conducted concurrently in South Carolina coastal plain streams and compared on the basis of precision, sensitivity, accuracy, and agreement. Fish and macroinvertebrate data were evaluated with previously developed multimetric indices including a modified Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) based on electrofishing data and a benthic macroinvertebrate multimetric index (HDMI) based on data collected with Hester-Dendy artificial substrates. Benthic macroinvertebrates were also collected from natural substrates for comparative purposes. The IBI was more precise than the HDMI but the average difference between disturbed and reference sites was greater for the HDMI, resulting in equal sensitivity (i.e., ability to measure disturbance in relation to index variability). Regression of the HDMI on the IBI was significant (P{lt}0.0001) but moderate (R2 of 0.39). Agreement between indices was strong for highly disturbed sites but weak for slightly and moderately disturbed sites. Ordination of taxonomic data indicated that fish and macroinvertebrates responded differently to some disturbances regardless of whether macroinvertebates were collected from Hester-Dendy samplers or natural substrates. Disagreement between macroinvertebrate and fish assessments at moderately disturbed sites implies that biotic integrity cannot always be adequately evaluated from a single taxonomic group. Identification of disturbed sites was most accurate when HDMI and IBI results were combined. To improve the accuracy of stream bioassessments, future research should emphasize methods for cost

  18. Sea Level Rise Modifies Biogeochemical Cycles in Winyah Bay, South Carolina Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. T.; Conner, W.; Rhew, R. C.; Suhre, D.; Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Rising sea level along the relatively flat southeastern US coastal plain significantly changes both vegetation composition and salinity of coastal wetlands, eventually modifying ecosystem functions and biogeochemical processes of these wetlands. We conducted a two-year study to evaluate the dynamics and relationships among aboveground productivity, greenhouse and halocarbon gas emissions, nutrients, and dissolved organic matter of a freshwater forested wetland, a salt-impacted and degraded forested wetland, and a salt marsh in Winyah Bay, South Carolina, representing the salinity gradient and the transition from freshwater forested wetland to salt marsh due to sea level rise. The degraded forested wetland had significantly lower above-ground productivity with annual stem growth of 102 g/m^2/yr and litterfall of 392 g/m^2/yr compared to the freshwater forested wetland (230 and 612 g/m^2/yr, respectively). High methane emission [> 50 mmol/m2/day, n = 4] was only observed in the freshwater-forested wetland but there was a strong smell of sulfide noticed in the salt marsh, suggesting that different redox processes control the decomposition of natural organic matter along the salinity gradient. In addition, the largest CHCl3 [209 × 183 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emission was observed in the degraded forested wetland, but net CH3Cl [257 × 190 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] and CH3Br [28 × 20 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emissions were only observed in the salt marsh, suggesting different mechanisms in response to salt intrusion at that sites. The highest DOC concentration (28 - 42 mg/L) in monthly water samples was found in degraded forest wetland, followed by the freshwater forested wetland (19 - 38 mg/L) and salt marsh (9 - 18 mg/L). Results demonstrate that the salt-impacted degraded wetland has unique biogeochemical cycles that differ from unaltered freshwater forested wetland and salt marsh.

  19. The Partnership for Cancer Prevention: Addressing Access to Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Medina, Deborah; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K.; Fore, Elizabeth; Mayo, Rachel; Petry, Denyse; Das, Irene Prabhu

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and morality among Hispanics, the fastest growing population group in South Carolina (SC). The Partnership for Cancer Prevention (PCP) was established to build partnerships and community capacity to address cervical cancer early detection and control among the growing Latina population in SC. In this paper we report on the initial PCP community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Methods PCP members engaged in a multi-method, participatory research project to assess cervical cancer related resources and needs among Latinas and healthcare providers. To explore attitudes and behaviors related to women's health in general and more specifically, female cancer, PCP members conducted 8 focus group sessions with 38 Spanish-speaking women. To assess the availability and perceived importance of culturally and linguistically appropriate services, PCP members conducted a survey of providers (n=46) and support personnel (n=30) at 14 clinical sites that provide cancer screening services. Results Health care access issues were Latinas' main concerns. For information and assistance in accessing and navigating the health care system, they relied on informal social networks and community outreach workers. Latina participants voiced misunderstandings about cancer risk and most appeared to lack a prevention orientation. Practitioners’ concerns included the assessment and documentation of patients' language preference and ability, provision of language assistance for limited-English-proficient (LEP) patients, and bilingual staff. Conclusions Building on the findings of this participatory research initiative, PCP members identified the following action strategies to promote cervical cancer screening among Latinas in SC: culturally appropriate cervical cancer awareness messages and outreach strategies geared towards increasing participation in cervical cancer screening and follow-up; maintenance of active community

  20. Assessment of Sociodemographic and Geographic Disparities in Cancer Risk from Air Toxics in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sacoby; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Jiang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Murray, Rianna; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Populations of color and low-income communities are often disproportionately burdened by exposures to various environmental contaminants, including air pollution. Some air pollutants have carcinogenic properties that are particularly problematic in South Carolina (SC), a state that consistently has high rates of cancer mortality for all sites. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer risk disparities in SC by linking risk estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2005 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) with sociodemographic data from the 2000 US Census Bureau. Specifically, NATA risk data for varying risk categories were linked by tract ID and analyzed with sociodemographic variables from the 2000 census using R. The average change in cancer risk from all sources by sociodemographic variable was quantified using multiple linear regression models. Spatial methods were further employed using ArcGIS 10 to assess the distribution of all source risk and percent non-white at each census tract level. The relative risk estimates of the proportion of high cancer risk tracts (defined as the top 10% of cancer risk in SC) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between the first and latter three quartiles defined by sociodemographic factors, while the variance in the percentage of high cancer risk between quartile groups was tested using Pearson’s chi-square. The average total cancer risk for SC was 26.8 people/million (ppl/million). The risk from on-road sources was approximately 5.8 ppl/million, higher than the risk from major, area, and non-road sources (1.8, 2.6, and 1.3 ppl/million), respectively. Based on our findings, addressing on-road sources may decrease the disproportionate cancer risk burden among low-income populations and communities of color in SC. PMID:26037107

  1. A Comparison of Trap Types for Assessing Diversity of Scarabaeoidea on South Carolina Golf Courses.

    PubMed

    Chong, Juang-Horng; Hinson, Kevin R

    2015-10-01

    A 2-yr survey was conducted on golf courses in South Carolina to 1) document the species richness and seasonal activity of Scarabaeoidea; 2) assess any species compositional differences among three trap types (ultraviolet light, unbaited flight-intercept, and unbaited pitfall); and 3) identify any dominant taxa in each trap type. A total of 74,326 scarabaeoid beetles were captured, of which 77.4% were Aphodiinae (not identified to species). The remaining specimens belong to 104 species in 47 genera and 6 families. The most abundant species were Cyclocephala lurida Bland, Dyscinetus morator (F.), Euetheola humilis (Burmeister), Hybosorus illigeri Reiche, and Maladera castanea (Arrow). In all trap types, >90% of all specimens and taxa were collected between April and August. Ultraviolet light traps collected ∼94% of total specimens consisting of 83 taxa (of which 51 were unique to this trap type), whereas flight-intercept traps captured ∼2% of all specimens representing 53 taxa (18 of which were unique), and pitfall traps captured ∼4% of all specimens representing 15 taxa (no unique species; all species also captured by ultraviolet light traps). Indicator species analysis identified 2-3 and 10-13 taxa that were most frequently collected by flight-intercept and ultraviolet light traps, respectively. Flight-intercept traps complemented ultraviolet light traps by capturing more species of dung and carrion beetles and diurnal phytophagous scarab beetles. Results suggested that a similar survey for domestic or exotic scarabaeoid beetles in turfgrass systems should be conducted between April and August using ultraviolet light and flight-intercept traps at 13-58 sites. PMID:26453727

  2. Mercury patterns in wood duck eggs from a contaminated reservoir in South Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Kennamer, Robert A; Stout, Jason R; Jackson, Brian P; Colwell, Sheila V; Brisbin, I Lehr; Burger, Joanna

    2005-07-01

    Mercury contamination of wildlife populations has been documented widely in recent years as biomonitoring has become an important tool for assessing environmental contamination. Avian eggs provide an ideal assay material for Hg biomonitoring, particularly when the collection of eggs is simplified by using cavity-nesting species that nest in easily monitored nest boxes. However, studies are needed that address the dynamics of how Hg is distributed within eggs, and how Hg is deposited naturally within clutches laid by a single female and among clutches laid by different females occupying the same contaminated environment. We collected 138 eggs from 13 complete clutches of box-nesting wood ducks (Aix sponsa) during 1991 and 1992 at a contaminated reservoir of the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, USA. Total Hg residues in egg components and clutches were determined, partitioning of Hg among egg components was examined, and effects of egg-laying sequence on egg component Hg levels were determined. Mean albumen Hg was 0.22 ppm wet mass, mean yolk Hg was 0.04 ppm, and mean shell Hg was 0.03 ppm. On average, 86.1% of total egg Hg was concentrated in the albumen, 11.2% in the yolk, and 2.7% in the shell. Mercury concentrations in all egg components varied significantly among clutches and between successive clutches laid by the same female in the same year. Laying sequence significantly affected Hg concentrations in the albumen and shell, but not in the yolk. Declines of albumen Hg due to laying sequence were more pronounced for clutches that contained higher average Hg levels. Our results suggest that collection of first-laid eggs may be preferable for assessing maximal Hg exposure to developing embryos, and that monitoring Hg levels through the use of empty eggshells following brood departure from nests may be valid only if the laying sequence is known. PMID:16050598

  3. Go tell it on the mountain: Hilla Sheriff and public health in the South Carolina Piedmont, 1929 to 1940.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, P E

    1995-01-01

    As director of the South Carolina units of the American Women's Hospitals and as the state's first female county health official, Hilla Sheriff combined elements of the Progressive Era's social gospel; the New Deal notion that concerned, public-spirited officials could make a difference; and a nascent feminism that led her into the controversial fields of family planning and nutrition. Sheriff's responses to endemic pellagra, innovative maternal and child health campaigns, and contraceptive research for the Milbank Memorial Fund attracted national attention and spawned programs based on her models throughout the South. Her ability to tailor programs to diverse communities--mothers who bore double burdens as textile workers, isolated farm families, mountaineers, and African Americans denied access to most health care facilities in the Jim Crow South--serves as a timeless example for those committed to community medicine. Images p579-a p581-a p582-a PMID:7702129

  4. Go tell it on the mountain: Hilla Sheriff and public health in the South Carolina Piedmont, 1929 to 1940.

    PubMed

    Hill, P E

    1995-04-01

    As director of the South Carolina units of the American Women's Hospitals and as the state's first female county health official, Hilla Sheriff combined elements of the Progressive Era's social gospel; the New Deal notion that concerned, public-spirited officials could make a difference; and a nascent feminism that led her into the controversial fields of family planning and nutrition. Sheriff's responses to endemic pellagra, innovative maternal and child health campaigns, and contraceptive research for the Milbank Memorial Fund attracted national attention and spawned programs based on her models throughout the South. Her ability to tailor programs to diverse communities--mothers who bore double burdens as textile workers, isolated farm families, mountaineers, and African Americans denied access to most health care facilities in the Jim Crow South--serves as a timeless example for those committed to community medicine. PMID:7702129

  5. Geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-minute quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist, and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacksburg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metadiorite and metagabbro (Paleozoic), and High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply-dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently- and moderately-dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence

  6. Geologic Map of the Kings Mountain and Grover Quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-min quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacks-burg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metagabbro and metadiorite (Paleozoic?), and the High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by the Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), the Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently and moderately dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain

  7. Use and applicability of the vegetation component of the national site classification system. [Sumter National Forest, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Existing vegetation on a site in Sumter National Forest, South Carolina was classified using high altitude aerial optical bar color infrared photography in an effort to determine if the National Site Classification (NSC) system could be used in the heterogeneously forested southeastern United States where it had not previously been used. Results show that the revised UNESCO international classification and mapping of vegetation system, as incorporated into the NSCS, is general enough at the higher levels and specific enough at the lower levels to adequately accommodate densely forested, heterogeneous areas as well as the larger, more homogeneous regions of the Pacific Northwest. The major problem is of existing vegetation versus natural vegetation.

  8. Where are the food deserts? An evaluation of policy-relevant measures of community food access in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Hibbert, James D.; Ma, Xiaoguang; Bell, Bethany A.; Battersby, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent United States (US) policies target spatial access to healthier food retailers. We evaluated two measures of community food access developed by two different agencies, using a 2009 food environment validation study in South Carolina as a reference. While the US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service’s (USDA ERS) measure designated 22.5% of census tracts as food deserts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) measure designated 29.0% as non-healthier retail tracts; 71% of tracts were designated consistently between USDA ERS and CDC. Our findings suggest a need for greater harmonization of these measures of community food access. PMID:26294937

  9. Effects of high-rate wastewater spray disposal on the water-table aquifer, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    A study by the U.S. Geological Survey from April 1982 through December 1983 evaluated the effects of high-rate disposal of treated wastewater on the water table aquifer, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Flooding of topographically low areas resulted from the application of 10.8 inches of wastewater in 10 days in January 1983. The water table remained 2-1/2 to 5-1/2 feet below land surface when wastewater was applied at rates of 5 inches per week in August and December 1983. (USGS)

  10. Geology and ground water of the Savannah River Plant and vicinity, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siple, George E.

    1967-01-01

    The area described in this report covers approximately 2,600 square miles in west-central South Carolina and includes the site of the Savannah River Plant, a major production facility of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The climate, surface drainage, and land forms of the study area are typical of the southern part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Precipitation is normally abundant and fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, and the mean annual temperature is moderately warm (64?F). The major streams that drain the area (the Savannah, Salkehatchie, and Edisto Rivers) have low gradients and flow in a southeasterly direction toward the Atlantic Ocean. Surface features of the area include narrow, flat-bottomed, steep-sided valleys and broad gently rolling interfluvial areas. Those parts of the Coastal Plain included within the report area can be subdivided into the Aiken Plateau, the Congaree Sandhills, and the Coastal Terraces. The area is underlain by a sequence of unconsolidated and partly consolidated sediments of Late Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary age. The unconsolidated sediments were deposited unconformably on a basement of igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian and Paleozoic age and sedimentary rocks of Triassic age. The basement rocks are similar to the granite-diorite complex of the Charlotte Belt, the metamorphosed rocks of the Carolina Slate Belt, and the consolidated sediments of the Newark Group. The unconsolidated sediments strike about N. 60 ? E. and dip 6-20 feet per mile to the southeast. They form a wedge-shaped mass that increases in thickness toward the southeast to slightly more than 1,200 feet in the vicinity of Allendale, S.C., on the southeast or downdip side of the study area. The oldest or lowermost unconsolidated sedimentary unit, the Tuscaloosa Formation of Late Cretaceous age, is overlain in the subsurface by beds that are also probably Late Cretaceous in age and that herein are named the Ellenton Formation. The Upper

  11. Native American prehistory of the middle Savannah River Valley. A synthesis of archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

    1990-12-31

    Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina span 17 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory. 400 refs., 130 figs., 39 tabs.

  12. Effects of organochlorine residues on eggshell thickness, reproduction, and population status of brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) in South Carolina and Florida, 1969-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Neely, B.S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Shells of brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) eggs collected in South Carolina from 1969 through 1975 and in Florida during 1969, 1970, and 1974 were significantly thinner (P greater than 0.05) than eggshells collected before 1947. Thickness of South Carolina eggshells increased in 1975, and mean thickness of eggshells collected in Florida during 1974 was greater than that of eggshells collected during 1969 and 1970, primarily in Gulf Coast colonies. Residues of 13 organochlorines were found in eggs and tissues of pelicans found dead during 1974 and 1975, although residues in brains of these specimens were not high enough to cause death. Residues of organochlorines, except PCBs, declined through 1975. PCBs increased in eggs from Atlantic Coast colonies. Reproductive success and population status of brown pelicans in South Carolina have improved markedly since authors began their studies in 1969. Good reproductive success was reported in 3 of 5 years from 1973 through 1977.

  13. Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

  14. Archive of digital Boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS Cruise 94CCT02, south-central South Carolina coastal region, August 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2005-01-01

    In August of 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Coastal Carolina University, conducted marine geophysical surveys in numerous water bodies adjacent to the south-central South Carolina coastal region. Data were collected aboard the MS Coastal in the Ashley, North Edisto, Wadmalaw, Dawho, South Edisto, and Ashepoo Rivers; the Wappoo, North, Steamboat, Bohicket, and Toogoodoo Creeks; Charleston Harbor; Wadmalaw Sound; Fenwick Cut; and the Atlantic Ocean from offshore Isle of Palms to Kiawah Island. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, observers' logbooks, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  15. Spatial disparity in the distribution of superfund sites in South Carolina: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund is a federal government program implemented to clean up uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Twenty-six sites in South Carolina (SC) have been included on the National Priorities List (NPL), which has serious human health and environmental implications. The purpose of this study was to assess spatial disparities in the distribution of Superfund sites in SC. Methods The 2000 US census tract and block level data were used to generate population characteristics, which included race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), education, home ownership, and home built before 1950. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to map Superfund facilities and develop choropleth maps based on the aforementioned sociodemographic variables. Spatial methods, including mean and median distance analysis, buffer analysis, and spatial approximation were employed to characterize burden disparities. Regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the number of Superfund facilities and population characteristics. Results Spatial coincidence results showed that of the 29.5% of Blacks living in SC, 55.9% live in Superfund host census tracts. Among all populations in SC living below poverty (14.2%), 57.2% were located in Superfund host census tracts. Buffer analyses results (0.5mi, 1.0mi, 5.0mi, 0.5km, 1.0km, and 5.0km) showed a higher percentage of Whites compared to Blacks hosting a Superfund facility. Conversely, a slightly higher percentage of Blacks hosted (30.2%) a Superfund facility than those not hosting (28.8%) while their White counterparts had more equivalent values (66.7% and 67.8%, respectively). Regression analyses in the reduced model (Adj. R2 = 0.038) only explained a small percentage of the variance. In addition, the mean distance for percent of Blacks in the 90th percentile for Superfund facilities was 0.48mi. Conclusion Burden disparities exist in the distribution of

  16. Feasibility study of porous media compressed air energy storage in South Carolina, United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Alexandra-Selene

    Renewable Energy Systems (RES) such as solar and wind, are expected to play a progressively significant role in electricity production as the world begins to move away from an almost total reliance on nonrenewable sources of power. In the US there is increasing investment in RES as the Department of Energy (DOE) expands its wind power network to encompass the use of offshore wind resources in places such as the South Carolina (SC) Atlantic Coastal Plain. Because of their unstable nature, RES cannot be used as reliable grid-scale power sources unless power is somehow stored during excess production and recovered at times of insufficiency. Only two technologies have been cited as capable of storing renewable energy at this scale: Pumped Hydro Storage and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Both CAES power plants in existence today use solution-mined caverns as their storage spaces. This project focuses on exploring the feasibility of employing the CAES method to store excess wind energy in sand aquifers. The numerical multiphase flow code, TOUGH2, was used to build models that approximate subsurface sand formations similar to those found in SC. Although the aquifers of SC have very low dips, less than 10, the aquifers in this study were modeled as flat, or having dips of 00. Cycle efficiency is defined here as the amount of energy recovered compared to the amount of energy injected. Both 2D and 3D simulations have shown that the greatest control on cycle efficiency is the volume of air that can be recovered from the aquifer after injection. Results from 2D simulations showed that using a dual daily peak load schedule instead of a single daily peak load schedule increased cycle efficiency as do the following parameters: increased anisotropy, screening the well in the upper portions of the aquifer, reduced aquifer thickness, and an initial water displacement by the continuous injection of air for at least 60 days. Aquifer permeability of 1x10-12 m2 produced a cycle

  17. Long-Term Sediment Dynamics in a Tidal Salt Marsh, North Inlet, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S.; Voulgaris, G.

    2001-05-01

    The salt marshes along the southeastern U.S. coast are in a delicate balance between rates of sediment accretion and relative sea level rise. Short-term sediment flux studies in the region indicate a net export of suspended sediment out of salt marsh systems despite the necessity for these marshes to import sediment in order to keep pace with relative sea level rise. Long-term suspended sediment concentration data collected daily through the Long-Term Ecological Research Program (LTER) are utilized in this study. The objective of this study is to identify the relative importance of different processes including tidal range, rainfall, winds, water temperature and river discharge in effecting suspended sediment concentrations in salt marsh channels. The study area is a small {\\Spartina}- and {\\Juncus}-dominated salt marsh located at North Inlet, South Carolina. Suspended sediment concentrations were collected daily at 3 sites in the marsh basin at approximately 1000 hrs EST for a period of 10 to 15 years. The determination of how suspended sediment concentrations vary with respect to the tidal cycle required identification of the phase within the cycle that the sample was collected. This was achieved predicting tidal phases using sea surface elevation data. Suspended sediment concentrations collected during periods of different rainfall, tidal ranges, wind conditions, water temperatures and freshwater discharge were used to develop "representative" tidal cycles for each of the aforementioned forcings. Mean suspended sediment concentrations were found to be highest during the ebb tide while the lowest concentrations were found following high and low slack water. These concentrations vary spatially throughout the marsh with the highest concentrations located at the most landward site and lowest at the site nearest the inlet. A seasonal bias of suspended sediment concentrations was observed with highest concentrations in the summer months. Import of sediment in the

  18. Mercury in fish and adverse reproductive outcomes: results from South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mercury is a metal with widespread distribution in aquatic ecosystems and significant neurodevelopmental toxicity in humans. Fish biomonitoring for total mercury has been conducted in South Carolina (SC) since 1976, and consumption advisories have been posted for many SC waterways. However, there is limited information on the potential reproductive impacts of mercury due to recreational or subsistence fish consumption. Methods To address this issue, geocoded residential locations for live births from the Vital Statistics Registry (1995–2005, N = 362,625) were linked with spatially interpolated total mercury concentrations in fish to estimate potential mercury exposure from consumption of locally caught fish. Generalized estimating equations were used to test the hypothesis that risk of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 grams) or preterm birth (PTB, <37 weeks clinical gestation) was greater among women living in areas with elevated total mercury in fish, after adjustment for confounding. Separate analyses estimated term LBW and PTB risks using residential proximity to rivers with fish consumption advisories to characterize exposure. Results Term LBW was more likely among women residing in areas in the upper quartile of predicted total mercury in fish (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.09) or within 8 kilometers of a river with a ‘do not eat’ fish advisory (1.05; 1.00-1.11) compared to the lowest quartile, or rivers without fish consumption restrictions, respectively. When stratified by race, risks for term LBW or PTB were 10-18% more likely among African-American (AA) mothers living in areas with the highest total fish mercury concentrations. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between fish total mercury concentrations and adverse reproductive outcomes in a large population-based sample that included AA women. The ecologic nature of exposure assessment in this study

  19. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen of the seasonal wetlands in piedmont ecoregion, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Chow, A. T.; Howard, J. H.; Baldwin, R.

    2013-12-01

    potential to employ them as an indicator for monitoring the water quality of large-scale watersheds. Figure 1 Geographical position of studied seasonal inland wetlands in South Carolina, US Figure 2 DOC, DON and C/N of 40 seasonal wetlands in the upper reach of Savannah River

  20. Significant bed elevation changes related to Gulf Stream dynamics on the South Carolina continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Noble, M.

    1993-01-01

    Photographs of the seabed taken from an instrumented bottom tripod located approximately 100 km east of Charleston, South Carolina, reveal bed elevation changes of over 20 cm between July and November 1978. The tripod was in 85 m of water and was equipped with two current meters at 38.7 and 100 cm from the bed, a pressure sensor, a transmissometer, which fouled early during the deployment, a temperature sensor and a camera. The sediment under the tripod was composed of poorly sorted sand, some shell debris and numerous small biological tubes. Bed roughness varied throughout the deployment from biologically-produced mounds (2-5 cm high and 5-20 cm diameter) to streaks to a smooth bed, depending upon the frequency and magnitude of the sediment transporting events. Even though these events were common, especially during the later part of the deployment, the bed was rarely rippled, and there was no evidence of large bedforms such as dunes or sand waves migrating through the field of view of the camera. Photographs did clearly show, however, a gradual net deposition of the bed of nearly 20 cm, followed by erosion of approximately 5 cm. The flow field near the bed was dominated by sub-tidal period currents. Hourly-averaged currents at 100 cm from the bed typically varied between 10 and 30 cm s-1 and occasionally were as high as 60 cm s-1. The large flow events were predominantly toward the southwest along the shelf in the opposite direction of the northeast flowing Gulf Stream. The cross-shore component of the flow near the bed was predominantly directed offshore due to a local topographic steering effect. Current, temperature and satellite data suggest that the largest flow events were associated with the advection of Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Erosion events, as seen from the photographs, were highly correlated with the passage of these Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Gradual deposition of sediment, which occurred during the first half of the