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Sample records for carota ssp carota

  1. Essential-oil composition of Daucus carota ssp. major (Pastinocello Carrot) and nine different commercial varieties of Daucus carota ssp. sativus fruits.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Cosimi, Elena; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Molfetta, Ilaria; Braca, Alessandra

    2014-07-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the pastinocello carrot, Daucus carota ssp. major (Vis.) Arcang. (flowers and achenes), and from nine different commercial varieties of D. carota L. ssp. sativus (achenes) was investigated by GC/MS analyses. Selective breeding over centuries of a naturally occurring subspecies of the wild carrot, D. carota L. ssp. sativus, has produced the common garden vegetable with reduced bitterness, increased sweetness, and minimized woody core. On the other hand, the cultivation of the pastinocello carrot has been abandoned, even if, recently, there has been renewed interest in the development of this species, which risks genetic erosion. The cultivated carrot (D. carota ssp. sativus) and the pastinocello carrot (D. carota ssp. major) were classified as different subspecies of the same species. This close relationship between the two subspecies urged us to compare the chemical composition of their essential oils, to evaluate the differences. The main essential-oil constituents isolated from the pastinocello fruits were geranyl acetate (34.2%), α-pinene (12.9%), geraniol (6.9%), myrcene (4.7%), epi-α-bisabolol (4.5%), sabinene (3.3%), and limonene (3.0%). The fruit essential oils of the nine commercial varieties of D. carota ssp. sativus were very different from that of pastinocello, as also confirmed by multivariate statistical analyses. PMID:25044588

  2. Anthocyanin composition of black carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.) cultivars Antonina, Beta Sweet, Deep Purple, and Purple Haze.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Elyana Cuevas; Arzaba, Miriam Rodriguez; Hillebrand, Silke; Winterhalter, Peter

    2011-04-13

    This study aimed to identify the pigment composition of black carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.) cultivars Antonina, Beta Sweet, Deep Purple, and Purple Haze. Cyanidin 3-xylosyl(glucosyl)galactosides acylated with sinapic acid, ferulic acid, and coumaric acid were detected as major anthocyanins by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and with electrospray ionization multiple mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS(n)) analyses. The preparative isolation of these pigments was carried out by means of high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC). The color activity concept was applied to the isolated anthocyanins at three pH values. Cyanidin 3-xylosyl(sinapoylglucosyl)galactoside was found to exhibit a lower visual detection threshold and a higher pH stability than cyanidin 3-xylosyl(feruloylglucosyl)galactoside and cyanidin 3-xylosyl(coumaroylglucosyl)galactoside. The color parameters of the fresh roots of the four cultivars were described by the CIELab coordinates L* (lightness), C* (chroma), and h(ab) (hue angles). Total phenolics varied among the cultivars and ranged from 17.9 to 97.9 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g fresh weight (fw). For the content of monomeric anthocyanins, values between 1.5 and 17.7 mg/100 g fw were determined. PMID:21381748

  3. New Claims for Wild Carrot (Daucus carota subsp. carota) Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Silva, Jorge M.; Zuzarte, Mónica; Gonçalves, Maria José; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Cardoso, Susana M.

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil of Daucus carota subsp. carota from Portugal, with high amounts of geranyl acetate (29.0%), α-pinene (27.2%), and 11αH-himachal-4-en-1β-ol (9.2%), was assessed for its biological potential. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, dermatophytes, and Aspergillus strains. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were evaluated showing a significant activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (MIC = 0.32–0.64 μL/mL), Cryptococcus neoformans (0.16 μL/mL), and dermatophytes (0.32–0.64 μL/mL). The inhibition of the germ tube formation and the effect of the oil on Candida albicans biofilms were also unveiled. The oil inhibited more than 50% of filamentation at concentrations as low as 0.04 μL/mL (MIC/128) and decreased both biofilm mass and cell viability. The antioxidant capacity of the oil, as assessed by two in chemico methods, was not relevant. Still, it seems to exhibit some anti-inflammatory potential by decreasing nitric oxide production around 20% in LPS-stimulated macrophages, without decreasing macrophages viability. Moreover, the oils safety profile was assessed on keratinocytes, alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, and hepatocytes. Overall, the oil demonstrated a safety profile at concentrations below 0.64 μL/mL. The present work highlights the bioactive potential of D. carota subsp. carota suggesting its industrial exploitation. PMID:26981143

  4. New Claims for Wild Carrot (Daucus carota subsp. carota) Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Alves-Silva, Jorge M; Zuzarte, Mónica; Gonçalves, Maria José; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Cardoso, Susana M; Salgueiro, Lígia

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil of Daucus carota subsp. carota from Portugal, with high amounts of geranyl acetate (29.0%), α-pinene (27.2%), and 11αH-himachal-4-en-1β-ol (9.2%), was assessed for its biological potential. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, dermatophytes, and Aspergillus strains. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were evaluated showing a significant activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (MIC = 0.32-0.64 μL/mL), Cryptococcus neoformans (0.16 μL/mL), and dermatophytes (0.32-0.64 μL/mL). The inhibition of the germ tube formation and the effect of the oil on Candida albicans biofilms were also unveiled. The oil inhibited more than 50% of filamentation at concentrations as low as 0.04 μL/mL (MIC/128) and decreased both biofilm mass and cell viability. The antioxidant capacity of the oil, as assessed by two in chemico methods, was not relevant. Still, it seems to exhibit some anti-inflammatory potential by decreasing nitric oxide production around 20% in LPS-stimulated macrophages, without decreasing macrophages viability. Moreover, the oils safety profile was assessed on keratinocytes, alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, and hepatocytes. Overall, the oil demonstrated a safety profile at concentrations below 0.64 μL/mL. The present work highlights the bioactive potential of D. carota subsp. carota suggesting its industrial exploitation. PMID:26981143

  5. Essential oils of Daucus carota subsp. carota of Tunisia obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Marzouki, Hanen; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Falconieri, Danilo; Piras, Alessandra; Marongiu, Bruno; Molicotti, Paola; Zanetti, Stefania

    2010-12-01

    The essential oils and supercritical CO2 extracts of wild Daucus carota L. subsp. carota from two different sites in Tunisia were investigated. The main components of the essential oil of the flowering and mature umbels with seeds from Sejnane were eudesm-7(11)-en-4-ol (8.2 - 8.5%), carotol (3.5 - 5.2%), sabinene (12.0 -14.5%), a-selinene (7.4 - 8.6) and 11-alpha-(H)-himachal-4-en-1-beta-ol (12.7 - 17.4%), whereas the oils from Tunis were predominantly composed of elemicin (31.5 - 35.3%) and carotol (48.0 - 55.7%). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were assayed by using the broth dilution method on Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300, and clinical strains of Candida albicans and C. tropicalis 1011 RM. The MIC values obtained were all > 2.5% (v/v). PMID:21299130

  6. Genetic structure and domestication of carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus)(Apiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated domestication and genetic structure in wild and open pollinated cultivated carrots (Daucus carota L.) with 3481 SNPs developed from carrot transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a clear genetic separation between wild and cultivated carrot accessions. Among the wild ...

  7. Reassessment of practical species identifications of the USDA Daucus carota germplasm collection: Morphological data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Daucus includes about 20 species. The most widespread and economically important species, Daucus carota L., occurs on almost every continent. Cultivated carrot, subsp. sativus, has been selected from wild populations that are extremely diverse, especially in the western Mediterranean. Obli...

  8. Reassessment of practical subspecies identifications of the USDA Daucus carota L. germplasm collection: Morphological data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Daucus includes about 20 species. The most widespread and economically important species, Daucus carota L., occurs on almost every continent. Cultivated carrot, subsp. sativus (Hoffm.) Schubl. & G. Martens, has been selected from wild populations that are extremely diverse, especially in t...

  9. Genetic structure and domestication of carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus L.) (Apiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships illuminate the origin and domestication of modern crops. Despite being an important world-wide vegetable, the genetic structure and domestication of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is poorly understood. We provide the first such study using a la...

  10. Genome-wide association of the domestication syndrome in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrots (Daucus carota L.) were domesticated over 1,000 years ago in Central Asia. Two traits selected during domestication were increased carotenoid accumulation (white -> yellow -> orange root color) and decreased lateral root formation. While some preliminary research has been conducted on the un...

  11. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) platform for genotyping and mapping in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot is one of the most important root vegetable crops grown worldwide on more than one million hectares. Its progenitor, wild Daucus carota, is a weed commonly occurring across continents in the temperate climatic zone. Diversity Array Technology (DArT) is a microarray-based molecular marker syst...

  12. Expression Analysis of Carotenoid Biosynthesis Genes in Carrot (Daucus Carota) Using Real Time Quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is an important source of pro-vitamin A in the human diet, as well as other important antioxidant compounds. While essential to human health, very little is currently understood about the accumulation of carotenoids, the vitamin A precursors within the storage root that give ...

  13. Sequential Event Processing: Domain Specificity or Task Specificity? Commentary on Carota and Sirigu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toni, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    The article by Carota and Sirigu addresses a fundamental issue, namely the domain specificity of people's ability to learn and implement sequential structures of events. The authors review theoretical positions and empirical findings related to this issue, providing a useful summary of representative models of sequential event structures, and a

  14. The next generation of carotenoid studies in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange carrot (Daucus carota L.) is one of the richest sources of naturally occurring -carotene while red and yellow carrot varieties contain large quantities of lycopene and lutein. The human body utilizes carotenoids, particularly -carotene (provitamin A) as a precursor for the production of ret...

  15. Understanding the molecular mechanism of carotenoid accumulation in carrot (Daucus carota) using real time quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is an important source of pro-vitamin A in the human diet, as well as other important antioxidant compounds. While essential to human health, very little is currently understood about the accumulation of carotenoids, the vitamin A precursors within the storage root that give ...

  16. Daucus carota Pentane-Based Fractions Suppress Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells by Inhibiting the MAPK and PI3K Pathways.

    PubMed

    Shebaby, Wassim N; Bodman-Smith, K B; Mansour, Anthony; Mroueh, Mohamad; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Daher, Costantine F

    2015-07-01

    Daucus carota L. ssp. carota (Apiacea, wild carrot, Queen Anne's lace) has been used in folk medicine throughout the world and recently was shown to possess anticancer and antioxidant activities. This study aims to determine the anticancer activity of the pentane fraction (F1) and the 1:1 pentane:diethyl ether fraction (F2) of the Daucus Carota oil extract (DCOE) against human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and Caco-2). Treatment of cells with various concentrations of F1 or F2 fractions produced a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that both fractions induced sub-G1 phase accumulation and increased apoptotic cell death. Western blot revealed the activation of caspase-3, PARP cleavage, and a considerable increase in Bax and p53 levels, and a decrease in Bcl-2 level. Treatment of HT-29 cells with either fraction markedly decreased the levels of both phosphorylated Erk and Akt. Furthermore, the combined treatment of F1 or F2 with wortmannin showed no added inhibition of cell survival suggesting an effect of F1 or F2 through the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. This study proposes that DCOE fractions (F1 and F2) inhibit cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HT-29 cells through the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways. PMID:25599142

  17. In vivo antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of methanolic extracts of Daucus carota seeds in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamlesh; Singh, Nisha; Chandy, Anish; Manigauha, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the In vivo antioxidFant and hepatoprotective activity of methanolic extract of Daucus carota (D. carota) seeds in experimental animals. Methods Methanolic extracts of D. carota seeds is used for hepatoprotection assessment. Oxidative stress were induced in rats by thioacetamide 100 mg/kg s.c, in four groups of rats (two test, standard and toxic control). Two test groups received D. carota seeds extract (DCSE) at doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg. Standard group received silymarin (25 mg/kg) and toxic control received only thioacetamide. Control group received only vehicle. On the 8th day animals were sacrificed and liver enzyme like serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were estimated in blood serum and antioxidant enzyme like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated in liver homogenate. Results A significant decrease in SGPT, SGOT and ALP levels was observed in all drug treated groups as compared to thioacetamide group (P < 0.001) and in case of antioxidant enzyme a significant (P < 0.001) increase in SOD, CAT, GRD, GPX and GST was observed in all drug treated groups as compared with thioacetamide group. But in case of LPO a significant (P < 0.001) reduction was observed as compared to toxic control group. Conclusions DCSE has contributed to the reduction of oxidative stress and the protection of liver in experimental rats. PMID:23569935

  18. Crotonic acid as a bioactive factor in carrot seeds (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Wieczorek, Piotr P; Kafarski, Pawe?

    2005-06-01

    Water extracts from the carrot seed (Daucus carota L.) var. Perfekcja exhibit plant growth inhibitory properties against cress, cucumber, onion and carrot in a dose-dependant manner. This property results from the action of low-and high-molecular components of the extract. The low-molecular component was identified as crotonic acid ((E)-2-butenoic acid). Its presence was also confirmed in other late varieties of carrot. The determined strong herbicidal properties of crotonic acid and its availability after release to soil combined with its high level in seeds suggest that it might be considered as an allelopathic and autotoxic factor in the seeds. PMID:15960983

  19. Isolation and characterization of a novel antifreeze protein from carrot (Daucus carota).

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, M; Worrall, D; Byass, L; Elias, L; Ashford, D; Doucet, C J; Holt, C; Telford, J; Lillford, P; Bowles, D J

    1999-01-01

    A modified assay for inhibition of ice recrystallization which allows unequivocal identification of activity in plant extracts is described. Using this assay a novel, cold-induced, 36 kDa antifreeze protein has been isolated from the tap root of cold-acclimated carrot (Daucus carota) plants. This protein inhibits the recrystallization of ice and exhibits thermal-hysteresis activity. The polypeptide behaves as monomer in solution and is N-glycosylated. The corresponding gene is unique in the carrot genome and induced by cold. The antifreeze protein appears to be localized within the apoplast. PMID:10333479

  20. Levels of Lycopene ?-Cyclase 1 Modulate Carotenoid Gene Expression and Accumulation in Daucus carota

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene ?-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of ?-carotene and ?-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of ?-carotene and ?-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and ?-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots. PMID:23555569

  1. Enantioselective Reduction by Crude Plant Parts: Reduction of Benzofuran-2-yl Methyl Ketone with Carrot ("Daucus carota") Bits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravia, Silvana; Gamenara, Daniela; Schapiro, Valeria; Bellomo, Ana; Adum, Jorge; Seoane, Gustavo; Gonzalez, David

    2006-01-01

    The use of biocatalysis and biotransformations are important tools in green chemistry. The enantioselective reduction of a ketone by crude plant parts, using carrot ("Daucus carota") as the reducing agent is presented. The experiment introduces an example of a green chemistry procedure that can be tailored to fit in a regular laboratory session.

  2. Carotenoid biosynthesis structural genes in carrot (Daucus carota): isolation, sequence-characterization, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and genome mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoid pigments are important components in plants and in the human diet. Carrots (Daucus carota var. sativus L.) are an excellent dietary source of '- and '-carotene. While the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigments has been studied in detail in several species, very little comparable informatio...

  3. Development of a high-throughput SNP resource to advance genomic, genetic and breeding research in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advancement in high-throughput SNP genotyping technologies along with next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms has decreased the cost, improved the quality of large-scale genome surveys, and allowed specialty crops with limited genomic resources such as carrot (Daucus carota) to access t...

  4. Enantioselective Reduction by Crude Plant Parts: Reduction of Benzofuran-2-yl Methyl Ketone with Carrot ("Daucus carota") Bits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravia, Silvana; Gamenara, Daniela; Schapiro, Valeria; Bellomo, Ana; Adum, Jorge; Seoane, Gustavo; Gonzalez, David

    2006-01-01

    The use of biocatalysis and biotransformations are important tools in green chemistry. The enantioselective reduction of a ketone by crude plant parts, using carrot ("Daucus carota") as the reducing agent is presented. The experiment introduces an example of a green chemistry procedure that can be tailored to fit in a regular laboratory session.…

  5. Identification and characterization of terpene synthases potentially involved in the formation of volatile terpenes in carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants produce numerous volatile organic compounds, which are important in determining the quality and nutraceutical properties of fruit and root crops, including the taste and the aroma of carrots (Daucus carota L.). A combined chemical, biochemical and molecular study was conducted to evaluate the...

  6. Interruption of Somatic Embryogenesis in Daucus carota L. by 5-Bromodeoxyuridine

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; Nessler, Craig; Katterman, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Embryogenic Daucus carota L. cells grown in 9 micromolar 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid are resistant to greater than 5 micromolar 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). In contrast, 5 micromolar BrdU strongly inhibits somatic embryogenesis within 24 hours after transfer of cells to an auxin-free medium. DNA synthesis rates in control and BrdU-treated cultures are rapid and similar; however, the DNA content does not reach levels as great in the presence of BrdU as in control cultures. BrdU substitutes for thymidine in the DNA in 28% of the available sites 48 hours after auxin removal. Following DNA repair, somatic embryogenesis resumes. BrdU DNA incorporation leads to somatic embryogenesis inhibition and provides an alternative to auxin treatment for the interruption of carrot cell culture differentiation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:16666898

  7. Bioactive C₁₇-Polyacetylenes in Carrots (Daucus carota L.): Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dawid, Corinna; Dunemann, Frank; Schwab, Wilfried; Nothnagel, Thomas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    C17-polyacetylenes (PAs) are a prominent group of oxylipins and are primarily produced by plants of the families Apiaceae, Araliaceae, and Asteraceae, respectively. Recent studies on the biological activity of polyacetylenes have indicated their potential to improve human health due to anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and serotogenic effects. These findings suggest targeting vegetables with elevated levels of bisacetylenic oxylipins, such as falcarinol, by breeding studies. Due to the abundant availability, high diversity of cultivars, worldwide experience, and high agricultural yields, in particular, carrot (Daucus carota L.) genotypes are a very promising target vegetable. This paper provides a review on falcarinol-type C17-polyacetylenes in carrots and a perspective on their potential as a future contributor to improving human health and well-being. PMID:26451696

  8. Myo-Inositol trisphosphate mobilizes calcium from fusogenic carrot (Daucus carota L. ) protoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, M.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-02-01

    To determine whether or not inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) mobilizes calcium in higher plant cells; they investigated the effect of IP/sub 3/ on Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes in fusogenic carrot (Daucus carota L.) protoplasts. The protoplasts were incubated in /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/-containing medium and the /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ associated with the protoplasts was monitored with time. Addition of IP/sub 3/ (20 micromolar) caused a 17% net loss of the accumulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ within 4 minutes. There was a reuptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and the protoplasts recovered to their initial value by 10 minutes. Phytic acid (IP/sub 6/), also stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from the protoplasts. Both the IP/sub 3/- and the IP/sub 6/-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were inhibited by the calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Terpene Synthases Potentially Involved in the Formation of Volatile Terpenes in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Roots.

    PubMed

    Yahyaa, Mosaab; Tholl, Dorothea; Cormier, Guy; Jensen, Roderick; Simon, Philipp W; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2015-05-20

    Plants produce an excess of volatile organic compounds, which are important in determining the quality and nutraceutical properties of fruit and root crops, including the taste and aroma of carrots (Daucus carota L.). A combined chemical, biochemical, and molecular study was conducted to evaluate the differential accumulation of volatile terpenes in a diverse collection of fresh carrots (D. carota L.). Here, we report on a transcriptome-based identification and functional characterization of two carrot terpene synthases, the sesquiterpene synthase, DcTPS1, and the monoterpene synthase, DcTPS2. Recombinant DcTPS1 protein produces mainly (E)-?-caryophyllene, the predominant sesquiterpene in carrot roots, and ?-humulene, while recombinant DcTPS2 functions as a monoterpene synthase with geraniol as the main product. Both genes are differentially transcribed in different cultivars and during carrot root development. Our results suggest a role for DcTPS genes in carrot aroma biosynthesis. PMID:25924989

  10. Freeze Preservation of Somatic Embryos and Clonal Plantlets of Carrot (Daucus carota L) 1

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Lyndsey A.

    1979-01-01

    Cell suspensions of carrot (Daucus carota L.) can be cryopreserved by slow freezing (about 2 C per minute) in medium containing dimethylsulfoxide as a cryoprotectant. After storage in liquid nitrogen and thawing they demonstrate a high viability and are able to resume growth. Such a method entirely fails to preserve clonal plantlets; somatic embryos cease organized development at the time of freezing and recover growth only by secondary embryogenesis. Modification of the procedure, involving the removal of superficial moisture from cryoprotectant-treated embryos and plantlets and enclosing them in a foil envelope before freezing, greatly improves their survival potential. The use of dimethylsulfoxide at levels between 2.5 and 20% (v/v) and freezing at rates between 1 and 5 C per minute yielded viable preparations under appropriate thawing conditions. In general, treatments which increased tissue dehydration before or during freezing were most successful when followed by relatively slow thawing. Conversely where dehydration to a lesser degree was achieved, more rapid thawing was advantageous. Postthawing washing or inoculation into liquid media was inhibitory to recovery. On semisolid regrowth medium, somatic embryos resumed normal development, whereas in plantlets the root and shoot meristem regions gave rise to new growth. In both cases, inclusion of activated charcoal in the medium promoted organized growth. Images PMID:16660748

  11. Actinorugispora endophytica gen. nov., sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Jiao; Zhu, Wen-Yong; Li, Jie; Zhao, Guo-Zhen; Xiong, Zhi; Park, Dong-Jin; Hozzein, Wael N; Kim, Chang-Jin; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-08-01

    An actinomycete strain, designated YIM 690008T, was isolated from Daucus carota collected from South Korea and its taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The strain grew well on most media tested and no diffusible pigment was produced. The aerial mycelium formed wrinkled single spores and short spore chains, some of which were branched. The whole-cell hydrolysates contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, glucose, mannose, ribose, galactose and rhamnose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-10(H4), MK-10(H6), MK-10(H8) and MK-10(H2). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannosides, some unknown phospholipids, glycolipids and polar lipids. The major fatty acids were i-C16 : 0, ai-C17 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c. The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 63.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolate belongs to the family Nocardiopsaceae. However, based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data, it was concluded that strain YIM 690008T represents a novel genus and novel species of the family Nocardiopsaceae, for which the name Actinorugispora endophytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain YIM 690008T = DSM 46770T = JCM 30099T = KCTC 29480T) is proposed. PMID:25948617

  12. Abscisic acid regulation of DC8, a carrot embryonic gene. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzopoulos, P.; Fong, F.; Sung, Z.R. Texas A M Univ., College Station )

    1990-10-01

    DC8 encodes a hydrophylic 66 kilodalton protein located in the cytoplasm and cell walls of carrot (Daucus carota) embryo and endosperm. During somatic embryogenesis, the levels of DC8 mRNA and protein begin to increase 5 days after removal of auxin. To study the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of DC8 gene, fluridone, 1-methyl-3-phenyl,-5(3-trifluoro-methyl-phenyl)-4(1H)-pyridinone, was used to inhibit the endogenous ABA content of the embryos. Fluridone, 50 micrograms per milliliter, effectively inhibits the accumulation of ABA in globular-tage embryos. Western and Northern analysis show that when fluridone is added to the culture medium DC8 protein and mRNA decrease to very low levels. ABA added to fluridone supplemented culture media restores the DC8 protein and mRNA to control levels. Globular-stage embryos contain 0.9 to 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} molar ABA while 10{sup {minus}6} molar exogenously supplied ABA is the optimal concentration for restoration of DC8 protein accumulation in fluridone-treated embryos. The mRNA level is increased after 15 minutes of ABA addition and reaches maximal levels by 60 minutes. Evidence is presented that, unlike other ABA-regulated genes, DC8 is not induced in nonembryonic tissues via desiccation nor addition of ABA.

  13. Regulation of ascorbic acid biosynthesis and recycling during root development in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Long; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Meng-Yao; Tan, Guo-Fei; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA), also known as vitamin C, is an essential nutrient in fruits and vegetables. The fleshy root of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a good source of AsA for humans. However, the metabolic pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in the control of AsA content during root development in carrot have not been elucidated. To gain insights into the regulation of AsA accumulation and to identify the key genes involved in the AsA metabolism, we cloned and analyzed the expression of 21 related genes during carrot root development. The results indicate that AsA accumulation in the carrot root is regulated by intricate pathways, of which the l-galactose pathway may be the major pathway for AsA biosynthesis. Transcript levels of the genes encoding l-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase and l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase were strongly correlated with AsA levels during root development. Data from this research may be used to assist breeding for improved nutrition, quality, and stress tolerance in carrots. PMID:25956452

  14. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  15. Calmodulin stimulation of calcium transport in carrot microsomal vesicles. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.S.; Sze, H.

    1987-04-01

    ATP-dependent /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into microsomal vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers) was stimulated 2-3 fold by 5 ug/ml calmodulin (CaM). Microsomal vesicles separated with a linear sucrose gradient showed two peaks with CaM-stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake activities. One peak (at 1.12 g/cc) comigrated with the activity of the antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. This transport activity was enhanced 10-20 fold by 10 mM oxalate and appeared to be associates with vesicles derived primarily from the ER. The other peak of CaM-stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake (at 1.17 g/cc) was not affected by oxalate. These vesicles are probably derived from the plasma membrane. Preliminary experiments with the low-density vesicles (ER) vesicles, indicate that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate caused a transient reduction in intravesicular Ca/sup 2 +/. These results are consistent with the ER being an important site of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ regulation.

  16. Color evolution of aqueous solutions obtained by thermal processing of carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots: influence of light.

    PubMed

    This, H; Cazor, A; Trinh, D

    2008-05-01

    The color of aqueous solutions obtained by heating carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots in water ("stocks") is different when the thermal treatment is applied with or without exposure to light. CIE L*, a*, and b* scale values of stocks processed for different times were recorded and 4 patterns were initially observed. To explain the 1st part of this evolution (patterns 1 and 2), pectin extraction and beta-elimination in stocks were studied. Light dependence was investigated to explain patterns 3 and 4. A model with 2 compounds is proposed to explain all the color variations. PMID:18460127

  17. Assessment of Antisecretory, Gastroprotective, and In-vitro Antacid Potential of Daucus carota in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Phool; Kishore, Kamal; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In Indo China, carrots have been reported to regulate the functions of the stomach and intestines. The objective of the present investigation was to unravel the therapeutic potential of 50% ethanol extract from Daucus carota roots (EDC) on antisecretory, gastroprotective, and invitro antacid capacity using experimental rats. Methods Assessment of EDC antisecretory and invivo antacid capacities was carried out using a pyloric ligation induced ulcer model. The gastroprotective effect was assessed with an absolute ethanol induced ulcer model. The integrity of gastric mucosa was evaluated using the estimation of glutathione and gastric mucus level and with histopathological examination of gastric mucosal cells. The in-vitro antacid capacity was evaluated using a titration method. The effect of the extract on the liver was assessed by measuring serum biochemical parameters. Results The EDC significantly (p<0.010.001) reduced gastric lesions in both models. Furthermore, the EDC also significantly (p<0.050.001) reduced the volume of gastric content whereas the total acidity was significantly (p<0.050.001) reduced with the doses of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg EDC. Moreover, the mucus content and glutathione level increased significantly (p<0.05) in the absolute alcohol-induced ulcer. The EDC also showed in-vitro antacid capacity. Histopathological studies further confirmed the potential of EDC by inhibiting congestion, edema, hemorrhage, and necrosis in gastric mucosa. Conclusion The EDC exerted antisecretory, gastroprotective, and invitro antacid potential. These activities could be attributed due to the presence of glycosides, phenolics, tannins, alkaloids, and flavonoids. PMID:26835241

  18. Combating photooxidative stress in green hairy roots of Daucus carota cultivated under light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Chiranjit; Sircar, Debabrata; Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2014-01-15

    The light-dependent generation of active oxygen species, which can disrupt normal metabolic process of plant, is termed as photo-oxidative stress. Plants are equipped with enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative defence system to reduce the effect of such stress. Hairy root culture of Daucus carota when cultivated under continuous illumination (250 ?mol m(-2)s(-1)) turned green. To know the reason behind that and photo-oxidative stress response in green hairy roots, activities of several antioxidant enzymes were measured. When compared with normal hairy roots, green hairy roots showed an enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Treatment with a SOD inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate led to suppression of SOD activity in a concentration-dependent manner in green hairy roots. Interestingly, SOD-suppressed root showed three-fold enhanced caffeic acid glucoside accumulation in the soluble fraction as compared to untreated ones. While ascorbate peroxidase activity showed marginal increase in green hairy roots, a decrease in the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were observed. SDS-PAGE of crude protein profile from green hairy roots showed a distinct band, which was absent in normal hairy roots. MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis of the extracted protein confirmed it as the large subunit of RuBisCO. RT-PCR based expression analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase showed enhanced transcript levels in green hairy roots as compared to normal hairy roots, whereas reverse trends were observed with the transcripts accumulation for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase. These findings corroborate with the in vitro BADH activities in hairy roots, and thus indicate an important role of this stress enzyme in combating photo-oxidative stress in green hairy roots upon continuous light exposure. PMID:24331434

  19. Calcium transport in tonoplast and endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells. [Daucus carota Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, D.R.; Sze, H.

    1986-02-01

    Two active calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) transport systems have been identified and partially characterized in membrane vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers). Both transport systems required MgATP for activity and were enhanced by 10 millimolar oxalate. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in membrane vesicles derived from isolated vacuoles equilibrated at 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with Cl/sup -/-stimulated, NO/sub 3//sup -/-inhibited ATPase activity on sucrose density gradients. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in this system was insensitive to vanadate, but was inhibited by nitrate, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), and 4,4-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulfonic acid (DIDS). The K/sub m/ for MgATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ were 0.1 mM and 21 micromolar, respectively. The predominant Ca/sup 2 +/ transport system detectable in microsomal membrane preparations equilibrated at a density of 1.13 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker, antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport activity and the ER marker also shifted in parallel in ER shifting experiments. This transport system was inhibited by vanadate (I/sub 50/ = 12 micromolar) and was insensitive to nitrate, CCCP, DCCD, and DIDS. Transport exhibited cooperative MgATP dependent kinetics. Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent kinetics were complex with an apparent K/sub m/ ranging from 0.7 to 2 micromolar. We conclude that the vacuolar-derived system is a Ca/sup 2 +//H/sup +/ antiport located on the tonoplast and that the microsomal transport system is a Ca,Mg-ATPase enriched on the ER. These two Ca/sup 2 +/ transport systems are proposed to restore and maintain cytoplasmic Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis under changing cellular and environmental conditions.

  20. Quantification of the Ratio of Plastid to Chromosomal Genome in Leaf and Root Tissue of Carrot (Daucus Carota) Using Real Time Quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota), is an important horticultural crop with significant health benefits associated with providing pro-vitamin A carotenoids in the human diet. These carotenoid pigments primarily serve as photoprotectants during photosynthesis, but also provide pigment to attract pollinators and ...

  1. Formation of norisoprenoid flavor compounds in carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots: characterization of a cyclic-specific carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid pigments that upon oxidative cleavage lead to the production of norisoprenoids that have profound effect on flavor and aromas of agricultural produce. The biosynthetic pathway to norisoprenoids in carrots (Daucus carota L.) is still widely unknown. We found that geranial i...

  2. Quantification of the relative abundance of plastome to nuclear genome in leaf and root tissues of carrot (Daucus carota L.) using quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.), is an important horticultural crop with significant health benefits, providing pro-vitamin A carotenoids in the human diet. Carotenoids primarily serve as photoprotectants in leaves during photosynthesis where they accumulate in chloroplasts. Carotenoids can also accumulat...

  3. Eating Quality of Carrots (Daucus carota L.) Grown in One Conventional and Three Organic Cropping Systems over Three Years.

    PubMed

    Bach, Vibe; Kidmose, Ulla; Kristensen, Hanne L; Edelenbos, Merete

    2015-11-11

    The eating quality of carrots (Daucus carota L.) was investigated to evaluate the impact of cropping systems (one conventional and three organic systems) and growing years (2007, 2008, and 2009) on root size, chemical composition, and sensory quality. The content of dry matter, sugars, polyacetylenes, and terpenes as well as the sensory quality and root size were related to the climate during the three growing years. A higher global radiation and a higher temperature sum in 2009 as compared to 2007 and 2008 resulted in larger roots, higher contents of dry matter, sucrose, total sugars, and total polyacetylenes, and lower contents of terpenes, fructose, and glucose. No differences were found between conventional and organic carrots with regard to the investigated parameters. This result shows that organically grown carrots have the same eating quality as conventionally grown carrots, while being produced in a more sustainable way. PMID:26513153

  4. Modeling the transfer of arsenic from soil to carrot (Daucus carota L.)--a greenhouse and field-based study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Zhou, Fen; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2015-07-01

    Reliable empirical models describing arsenic (As) transfer in soil-plant systems are needed to estimate the human As burden from dietary intake. A greenhouse experiment was conducted in parallel with a field trial located at three sites through China to develop and validate soil-plant transfer models to predict As concentrations in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Stepwise multiple linear regression relationships were based on soil properties and the pseudo total (aqua regia) or available (0.5 M NaHCO3) soil As fractions. Carrot As contents were best predicted by the pseudo total soil As concentrations in combination with soil pH and Fe oxide, with the percentage of variation explained being up to 70 %. The constructed prediction model was further validated and improved to avoid overprotection using data from the field trial. The final obtained model is of great practical relevance to the prediction of As uptake under field conditions. PMID:25750050

  5. Substrate Utilization by Suspension Cultures and Somatic Embryos of Daucus carota L. Measured by 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Dijkema, Cor; de Vries, Sacco C.; Booij, Hilbert; Schaafsma, Tjeerd J.; van Kammen, Albert

    1988-01-01

    The uptake and utilization of sucrose by embryogenic suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L.) growing in the presence of 2,4-D and by somatic embryos derived from these cultures was monitored using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. The exogeneously supplied sucrose was completely hydrolyzed before cell entry; glucose was taken up preferentially when the cells were cultured in the presence of 2,4-D, while glucose and fructose were utilized at similar rates by somatic embryos in the absence of 2,4-D. Both suspension cells and somatic embryos accumulated high intracellular levels predominantly of glucose and sucrose, the latter being resynthesized intracellularly from the constitutive hexoses. Initially, fructose was converted mainly into glucose and sucrose rather than being catabolized directly through glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway. Carbohydrate supply that exceeded cellular demand resulted in intracellular accumulation of mono- or disaccharides. The capacity of cultured carrot cells to produce somatic embryos appeared to be positively correlated with high intracellular levels of glucose. Images Fig. 5 PMID:16666463

  6. Comparison of two liquid-state NMR methods for the determination of saccharides in carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Weberskirch, Linda; Luna, Alan; Skoglund, Sara; This, Herv

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine the saccharide content of plant tissues, we studied a new non-destructive and fast analytical method that we call "direct quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy" (d q (1)H NMR): the application of quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (q (1)H NMR) to non modified plant tissues along with capillary tubes containing a reference compound (for quantification) and deuterium oxide (for locking). Using this method, the saccharide content of samples of carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots was compared to the results given from similar samples by the formerly published q (1)H NMR determination of extracts obtained by the O'Donoghue/Davis method. The content in glucose and sucrose is significantly higher with the direct method than when an extraction step is included; the content in fructose is not significantly different. If a possible detection of saccharides included in glycosylated biological compounds is to be excluded, a more complete extraction of saccharides is probably obtained using the direct method. PMID:21046086

  7. Transfer model of lead in soil-carrot (Daucus carota L.) system and food safety thresholds in soil.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2015-09-01

    Reliable empirical models describing lead (Pb) transfer in soil-plant systems are needed to improve soil environmental quality standards. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to develop soil-plant transfer models to predict Pb concentrations in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Soil thresholds for food safety were then derived inversely using the prediction model in view of the maximum allowable limit for Pb in food. The 2 most important soil properties that influenced carrot Pb uptake factor (ratio of Pb concentration in carrot to that in soil) were soil pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC), as revealed by path analysis. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were based on soil properties and the pseudo total (aqua regia) or extractable (0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.005 M diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) soil Pb concentrations. Carrot Pb contents were best explained by the pseudo total soil Pb concentrations in combination with soil pH and CEC, with the percentage of variation explained being up to 93%. The derived soil thresholds based on added Pb (total soil Pb with the geogenic background part subtracted) have the advantage of better applicability to soils with high natural background Pb levels. Validation of the thresholds against data from field trials and literature studies indicated that the proposed thresholds are reasonable and reliable. PMID:25904232

  8. Solubilized proteins from carrot (Daucus carota L.) membranes bind calcium channel blockers and form calcium-permeable ion channels.

    PubMed

    Thuleau, P; Graziana, A; Ranjeva, R; Schroeder, J I

    1993-01-15

    Calcium channels have been suggested to play a major role in the initiation of a large number of signal transduction processes in higher plant cells. However, molecular components of higher plant Ca2+ channels remain unidentified to date. Calcium channel blockers of the phenylalkylamine family and bepridil specifically inhibit Ca2+ influx into carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells. By using a phenylalkylamine azido derivative, a 75-kDa carrot membrane protein has been previously identified. Here we have partially purified this Ca2+ channel blocker-binding protein by lectin-affinity and ion-exchange chromatographies. The protein fraction containing the 75-kDa binding protein was incorporated into giant liposomes. Single-channel patch-clamp studies on these proteoliposomes showed the presence of Ca2+-permeable channel currents. These Ca2+-permeable channels were not stable. Recordings after durations of 2-10 min showed the appearance of nonselective ion channels with a permeability to calcium and chloride ions. These nonselective Ca2+-permeable ion channels, in contrast, were stable and were recorded for extended durations. The addition of the Ca2+ channel-blocker bepridil (10 M) led to the inhibition of these nonselective Ca2+-permeable channels by reducing the probability of channel opening. These results suggest that the 75-kDa Ca2+ channel blocker-binding protein from carrot cells plays a role in channel sensitivity to Ca2+ channel inhibitors and may constitute one of the components of Ca2+ channels in higher plants. PMID:11607356

  9. A Novel Hydroxyproline-Deficient Arabinogalactan Protein Secreted by Suspension-Cultured Cells of Daucus carota (Purification and Partial Characterization).

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, T. C.; McCann, M. C.; Roberts, K.

    1993-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are secreted or membrane-associated glycoproteins that have been operationally defined as binding to [beta]-glucosyl Yariv artificial antigen, being rich in arabinose and galactose, and containing high levels of alanine, serine, and hydroxyproline. Using an anti-AGP monoclonal antibody (MAC 207) bound to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B, we have purified by immunoaffinity chromatography an extracellular AGP from the culture medium of suspension-cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota). The apparent molecular mass of this highly glycosylated proteoglycan is 70 to 100 kD as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Although its sugar analysis, [beta]-glucosyl Yariv binding, and high alanine, serine, and proline content are consistent with it being an AGP, the amino acid composition unexpectedly revealed this molecule to have no detectable hydroxyproline. This suggests that this glycoprotein is not a "classical" AGP, but represents the first example of a new class of hydroxyproline-poor AGPs. Deglycosylation of the AGP with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride revealed that the purified proteoglycan contains probably a single core protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kD. Direct visualization of the native AGP in the electron microscope showed ellipsoidal putative AGP monomers, approximately 25 nm by 15 nm, that showed a strong tendency to self assemble into higher-order structures. Upon desiccation, the glycosylated AGP formed paracrystalline arrays visible in the light microscope. Polarized Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy of these arrays demonstrated a high degree of polarization of the sugar moieties under these conditions. These results put possible constraints on current models of AGP structure; a putative role for these novel AGPs as pectin-binding proteins is discussed. PMID:12231918

  10. Morphological markers for the detection of introgression from cultivated into wild carrot (Daucus carota L.) reveal dominant domestication traits.

    PubMed

    Grebenstein, C; Kos, S P; de Jong, T J; Tamis, W L M; de Snoo, G R

    2013-05-01

    Hybridisation and subsequent introgression have recently received much attention in the context of genetically modified crops. But crop-wild hybrid detection in the field can be difficult, as most domestication traits seem to be recessive, and the hybrid phenotype may also depend on the direction of the cross or environmental factors. Our aim was to develop a reliable set of morphological markers that differ between two wild and 13 cultivated carrots (Daucus carota L.) and to evaluate their inheritance in hybrid lines. We then examined these morphological markers in four F1 hybrids obtained by fertilising plants from the two wild accessions with pollen from two common carrot cultivars. Of the 16 traits that differed between the two carrot subspecies, three took intermediate values in the hybrids, eight resembled the cultivar parent (dominant domestication traits), two resembled the wild parent (domestication traits recessive), and three were not significant or growth condition-dependent. Root:shoot ratio was seven times higher for cultivars than for wild plants, while still attaining equivalent total dry weight, which shows that dry matter production by the shoot is much higher in cultivars than in wild plants. High root:shoot ratios were also present in the hybrids. While we found no maternal effects, the type of cultivar used for pollination had an impact on hybrid characteristics. The morphological markers developed here provide insights into the mode of inheritance of ecologically relevant traits and can be useful for pre-screening wild populations for hybrid detection prior to genetic analysis. PMID:23173917

  11. A phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of phosphate uptake and storage in cultured Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota plant cells.

    PubMed

    Brodelius, P; Vogel, H J

    1985-03-25

    High resolution 31P NMR spectra (103.2 MHz) of oxygenated Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota cells grown in suspension cultures were obtained using a solenoidal perfusion probe. The spectra showed resonances for various phosphorylated metabolites such as ATP, ADP, NAD(P)(H), nucleoside diphosphoglucose, and sugar phosphates. The relative levels of the phosphorylated metabolites remained constant throughout the growth curve. No resonances for storage compounds such as polyphosphates, pyrophosphate, or phytates were observed. Two resolved resonances for Pi indicated an intracellular pH of 7.3 and 5.7 (or below) for the cytoplasm and vacuoles, respectively. The time course of Pi uptake and storage during growth in fresh culture medium was followed by studying the level of vacuolar Pi with 31P NMR (145.7 MHz). Simultaneously, the level of Pi in the culture medium was followed with radioactive 32P. C. roseus quickly takes up all the Pi from the culture medium (maximum rate 1.7 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells]. The Pi is first stored in the vacuoles; subsequently, one part of this pool is used to keep a constant cytoplasmic Pi level while another part is apparently accumulated as an NMR invisible Pi store, probably in another cell organelle. In contrast, D. carota does not accumulate Pi in the vacuoles and consequently it takes up Pi from the medium at a much slower rate (0.05 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells]. PMID:3972837

  12. Variation of the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of natural populations of Tunisian Daucus carota L. (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Rokbeni, Nesrine; M'rabet, Yassine; Dziri, Salma; Chaabane, Hedia; Jemli, Marwa; Fernandez, Xavier; Boulila, Abdennacer

    2013-12-01

    The essential oils of Daucus carota L. (Apiaceae) seeds sampled from ten wild populations spread over northern Tunisia were characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In total, 36 compounds were identified in the D. carota seed essential oils, with a predominance of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in most samples (22.63-89.93% of the total oil composition). The main volatile compounds identified were ?-bisabolene (mean content of 39.33%), sabinene (8.53%), geranyl acetate (7.12%), and elemicin (6.26%). The volatile composition varied significantly across the populations, even for oils of populations harvested in similar areas. The chemometric principal component analysis and the hierarchical clustering identified four groups, each corresponding to a composition-specific chemotype. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the isolated essential oils was preliminarily evaluated, using the disk-diffusion method, against one Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium), as well as against a pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans). All tested essential oils exhibited interesting antibacterial and antifungal activities against the assayed microorganisms. PMID:24327447

  13. Prepenetration Apparatus Assembly Precedes and Predicts the Colonization Patterns of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi within the Root Cortex of Both Medicago truncatula and Daucus carota[W

    PubMed Central

    Genre, Andrea; Chabaud, Mireille; Faccio, Antonella; Barker, David G.; Bonfante, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are widespread, ancient endosymbiotic associations that contribute significantly to soil nutrient uptake in plants. We have previously shown that initial fungal penetration of the host root is mediated via a specialized cytoplasmic assembly called the prepenetration apparatus (PPA), which directs AM hyphae through the epidermis (Genre et al., 2005). In vivo confocal microscopy studies performed on Medicago truncatula and Daucus carota, host plants with different patterns of AM colonization, now reveal that subsequent intracellular growth across the root outer cortex is also PPA dependent. On the other hand, inner root cortical colonization leading to arbuscule development involves more varied and complex PPA-related mechanisms. In particular, a striking alignment of polarized PPAs can be observed in adjacent inner cortical cells of D. carota, correlating with the intracellular root colonization strategy of this plant. Ultrastructural analysis of these PPA-containing cells reveals intense membrane trafficking coupled with nuclear enlargement and remodeling, typical features of arbusculated cells. Taken together, these findings imply that prepenetration responses are both conserved and modulated throughout the AM symbiosis as a function of the different stages of fungal accommodation and the host-specific pattern of root colonization. We propose a model for intracellular AM fungal accommodation integrating peri-arbuscular interface formation and the regulation of functional arbuscule development. PMID:18515499

  14. Influence of Boron on the Membrane Potential in Elodea densa and Helianthus annuus Roots and H+ Extrusion of Suspension Cultured Daucus carota Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Blaser-Grill, Jrgen; Knoppik, Dietmar; Amberger, Anton; Goldbach, Heiner

    1989-01-01

    When following the membrane potential of Elodea densa leaf cells during a dark-light regime and analysing the different phases of the cycle, the pattern under boron deficiency resembled the one reported to occur after 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea application. The potential in the dark slowly decreased when transferring Elodea densa leaflets and Helianthus annuus roots to a B-free medium and increased in the same way after B was added again. Addition of vanadate to inhibit plasmalemma ATPases in part mimicked the effects of B deficiency. It is suggested that B directly or indirectly affects the formation of a proton gradient. The effect of B on proton secretion was observed in various experiments with Daucus carota cell cultures. The results are discussed with respect to the possible involvement of B in membrane function and transport processes. PMID:16666749

  15. Apparent inhibition of. beta. -fructosidase secretion by tunicamycin may be explained by breakdown of the unglycosylated protein during secretion. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Faye, L. ); Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-03-01

    Suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells synthesize and secrete {beta}-fructosidase, a glycoprotein with asparagine-linked glycans. Treatment of the cells with tunicamycin completely inhibits the apparent secretion of {beta}-fructosidase as measured by the accumulation of the {sup 35}S-labelled protein in the cell wall or the culture medium. In the past, such a result has been interpreted as an inhibition of secretion by tunicamycin, but we suggest another explanation based on the following results. In the presence of tunicamycin, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase is synthesized and is associated with an endoplasmic-reticulum-rich microsomal fraction. Pulse-chase experiments show that the unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase does not remain in the cells and appears to be secreted in the same way as glycosylated {beta}-fructosidase; however, no radioactive, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase accumulates extracellularly (cell wall or medium). Protoplasts obtained from carrot cells secrete {beta}-fructosidase protein and activity, and treatment of the protoplasts with tunicamycin results in the synthesis of unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase. In the presence of tunicamycin, there is no accumulation of {beta}-fructosidase activity or unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase polypeptide in the protoplast incubation medium. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the glycans of {beta}-fructosidase are necessary for its stability, and that in these suspension-cultured cells, the unglycosylated enzyme is degraded during the last stage(s) of secretion, or immediately after its arrival in the wall.

  16. Chlorogenic acid biosynthesis: characterization of a light-induced microsomal 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase from carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehnl, T.K.; Koch, U.; Heller, W.; Wellmann, E.

    1987-10-01

    Microsomal preparations from carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspension cultures catalyze the formation of trans-5-O-caffeoyl-D-quinate (chlorogenate) from trans-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate. trans-5-O-(4-Coumaroyl)shikimate is converted to about the same extent to trans-5-O-caffeoylshikimate. trans-4-O-(4-Coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-3-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-4-coumarate, and cis-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate do not act as substrates. The reaction is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen and on NADPH as reducing cofactor. NADH and ascorbic acid cannot substitute for NADPH. Cytochrome c, Tetcyclacis, and carbon monoxide inhibit the reaction suggesting a cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function monooxygenase. Competition experiments as well as induction and inhibition phenomena indicate that there is only one enzyme species which is responsible for the hydroxylation of the 5-O-(4-coumaric) esters of both D-quinate and shikimate. The activity of this enzyme is greatly increased by in vivo irradiation of the cells with blue/uv light. We conclude that the biosynthesis of the predominant caffeic acid conjugates in carrot cells occurs via the corresponding 4-coumaric acid esters. Thus, in this system, 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate can be seen as the final intermediate in the chlorogenic acid pathway.

  17. Influence of variation in soil copper on the yield and nutrition of carrots grown in microplots on two organic soils. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.P.; Belanger, A.

    1987-01-01

    Carrots (Daucus carota L. cv. Gold Pak 128) were grown in microplots of two organic soils at site A (a peat), and site B (a muck) in the summer of 1984. The soil surface (0 to 20 cm) varied in total Cu from 13 to 1659, and 81 to 1745 ..mu..g/g at sites A and B, respectively, mainly due to three levels of applications of CuSO/sub 4/ x 5H/sub 2/O in 1978. Neither the yield nor the nutrition (P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mo and B) of the carrot crop was significantly adversely affected by the copper applications or the resultant total soil copper levels at both sites A and B. There were decreases in some foliar nutrient levels due to dilution effects attributable to the significant positive correlations between both root and leaf yields and total soil copper at site B. At both sites A and B, the copper additions appeared to have increased the availability of soil Mn, in accord with earlier evidence.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of AP2/ERF transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota L.) reveals evolution and expression profiles under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Huang, Ying; Tian, Chang; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    AP2/ERF is a large transcription factor family that regulates plant physiological processes, such as plant development and stress response. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an important economical crop with a genome size of 480 Mb; the draft genome sequencing of this crop has been completed by our group. However, little is known about the AP2/ERF factors in carrot. In this study, a total of 267 putative AP2/ERF factors were identified from the whole-genome sequence of carrot. These AP2/ERF proteins were phylogenetically clustered into five subfamilies based on their similarity to the amino acid sequences from Arabidopsis. The distribution and comparative genome analysis of the AP2/ERF factors among plants showed the AP2/ERF factors had expansion during the evolutionary process, and the AP2 domain was highly conserved during evolution. The number of AP2/ERF factors in land plants expanded during their evolution. A total of 60 orthologous and 145 coorthologous AP2/ERF gene pairs between carrot and Arabidopsis were identified, and the interaction network of orthologous genes was constructed. The expression patterns of eight AP2/ERF family genes from each subfamily (DREB, ERF, AP2, and RAV) were related to abiotic stresses. Yeast one-hybrid and β-galactosidase activity assays confirmed the DRE and GCC box-binding activities of DREB subfamily genes. This study is the first to identify and characterize the AP2/ERF transcription factors in carrot using whole-genome analysis, and the findings may serve as references for future functional research on the transcription factors in carrot. PMID:25971861

  19. Projected Dietary Intake of Zinc, Copper, and Cerium from Consumption of Carrot (Daucus carota) Exposed to Metal Oxide Nanoparticles or Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Ebbs, Stephen D.; Bradfield, Scott J.; Kumar, Pawan; White, Jason C.; Ma, Xingmao

    2016-01-01

    The expanding production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have raised concerns about the potential risk of those materials to food safety and human health. In a prior study, the accumulation of Zn, Cu, and Ce from ZnO, CuO, or CeO2, respectively, was examined in carrot (Daucus carota L.) grown in sand culture in comparison to accumulation from exposure to equivalent concentrations of ionic Zn2+, Cu2+, or Ce4+. The fresh weight concentration data for peeled and unpeeled carrots were used to project dietary intake of each metal by seven age-mass classes from child to adult based on consumption of a single serving of carrot. Dietary intake was compared to the oral reference dose (oral RfD) for chronic toxicity for Zn or Cu and estimated mean and median oral RfD values for Ce based on nine other rare earth elements. Reverse dietary intake calculations were also conducted to estimate the number of servings of carrot, the mass of carrot consumed, or the tissue concentration of Zn, Cu, or Ce that would cause the oral RfD to be exceeded upon consumption. The projections indicated for Zn and Cu, the oral RfD would be exceeded in only a few highly unrealistic scenarios of exceedingly high Zn or Cu concentrations in the substrate from ZnO or CuO or consumption of excessive amounts of unpeeled carrot. The implications associated with the presence of Ce in the carrot tissues depended upon whether the mean or median oral RfD value from the rare earth elements was used as a basis for comparison. The calculations further indicated that peeling carrots reduced the projected dietary intake by one to two orders of magnitude for both ENM- and ionic-treated carrots. Overall in terms of total metal concentration, the results suggested no specific impact of the ENM form on dietary intake. The effort here provided a conservative view of the potential dietary intake of these three metals that might result from consumption of carrots exposed to nanomaterials (NMs) and how peeling mitigated that dietary intake. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of dietary intake projections for examining potential risks of NM exposure from agricultural foods. PMID:26941758

  20. Projected Dietary Intake of Zinc, Copper, and Cerium from Consumption of Carrot (Daucus carota) Exposed to Metal Oxide Nanoparticles or Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Ebbs, Stephen D; Bradfield, Scott J; Kumar, Pawan; White, Jason C; Ma, Xingmao

    2016-01-01

    The expanding production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have raised concerns about the potential risk of those materials to food safety and human health. In a prior study, the accumulation of Zn, Cu, and Ce from ZnO, CuO, or CeO2, respectively, was examined in carrot (Daucus carota L.) grown in sand culture in comparison to accumulation from exposure to equivalent concentrations of ionic Zn(2+), Cu(2+), or Ce(4+). The fresh weight concentration data for peeled and unpeeled carrots were used to project dietary intake of each metal by seven age-mass classes from child to adult based on consumption of a single serving of carrot. Dietary intake was compared to the oral reference dose (oral RfD) for chronic toxicity for Zn or Cu and estimated mean and median oral RfD values for Ce based on nine other rare earth elements. Reverse dietary intake calculations were also conducted to estimate the number of servings of carrot, the mass of carrot consumed, or the tissue concentration of Zn, Cu, or Ce that would cause the oral RfD to be exceeded upon consumption. The projections indicated for Zn and Cu, the oral RfD would be exceeded in only a few highly unrealistic scenarios of exceedingly high Zn or Cu concentrations in the substrate from ZnO or CuO or consumption of excessive amounts of unpeeled carrot. The implications associated with the presence of Ce in the carrot tissues depended upon whether the mean or median oral RfD value from the rare earth elements was used as a basis for comparison. The calculations further indicated that peeling carrots reduced the projected dietary intake by one to two orders of magnitude for both ENM- and ionic-treated carrots. Overall in terms of total metal concentration, the results suggested no specific impact of the ENM form on dietary intake. The effort here provided a conservative view of the potential dietary intake of these three metals that might result from consumption of carrots exposed to nanomaterials (NMs) and how peeling mitigated that dietary intake. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of dietary intake projections for examining potential risks of NM exposure from agricultural foods. PMID:26941758

  1. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. )

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Competitive inhibition and selectivity enhancement by Ca in the uptake of inorganic elements (Be, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sc, Mn, Co, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Ce, Pm, Gd, Hf) by carrot (Daucus carota cv. U.S. harumakigosun).

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takuo; Ambe, Shizuko; Abe, Tomoko; Francis, Arokiasamy J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of inorganic elements (Be, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sc, Mn, Co, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Ce, Pm, Gd, and Hf) and the effect of Ca on their uptake in carrots (Daucus carota cv. U.S. harumakigosun) by the radioactive multitracer technique. The experimental results suggested that Na, Mg, K, and Rb competed for the functional groups outside the cells in roots with Ca but not for the transporter-binding sites on the plasma membrane of the root cortex cells. In contrast, Y, Ce, Pm, and Gd competed with Ca for the transporters on the plasma membrane. The selectivity, which was defined as the value obtained by dividing the concentration ratio of an elemental pair, K/Na, Rb/Na, Be/Sr, and Mg/Sr, in the presence of 0.2 and 2 ppm Ca by that of the corresponding elemental pair in the absence of Ca in the solution was estimated. The selectivity of K and Rb in roots was increased in the presence of Ca. The selectivity of Be in roots was not affected, whereas the selectivity of Mg was increased by Ca. These observations suggest that the presence of Ca in the uptake solution enhances the selectivity in the uptake of metabolically important elements against unwanted elements. PMID:15695849

  3. Dissimilarity of contemporary and historical gene flow in a wild carrot (Daucus carota) metapopulation under contrasting levels of human disturbance: implications for risk assessment and management of transgene introgression

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Jun; Xu, Shuhua; Meirmans, Patrick G.; Vrieling, Klaas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Transgene introgression from crops into wild relatives may increase the resistance of wild plants to herbicides, insects, etc. The chance of transgene introgression depends not only on the rate of hybridization and the establishment of hybrids in local wild populations, but also on the metapopulation dynamics of the wild relative. The aim of the study was to estimate gene flow in a metapopulation for assessing and managing the risks of transgene introgression. Methods Wild carrots (Daucus carota) were sampled from 12 patches in a metapopulation. Eleven microsatellites were used to genotype wild carrots. Genetic structure was estimated based on the FST statistic. Contemporary (over the last several generations) and historical (over many generations) gene flow was estimated with assignment and coalescent methods, respectively. Key Results The genetic structure in the wild carrot metapopulation was moderate (FST = 0082) and most of the genetic variation resided within patches. A pattern of isolation by distance was detected, suggesting that most of the gene flow occurred between neighbouring patches (?1km). The mean contemporary gene flow was 5 times higher than the historical estimate, and the correlation between them was very low. Moreover, the contemporary gene flow in roadsides was twice that in a nature reserve, and the correlation between contemporary and historical estimates was much higher in the nature reserve. Mowing of roadsides may contribute to the increase in contemporary gene flow. Simulations demonstrated that the higher contemporary gene flow could accelerate the process of transgene introgression in the metapopulation. Conclusions Human disturbance such as mowing may alter gene flow patterns in wild populations, affecting the metapopulation dynamics of wild plants and the processes of transgene introgression in the metapopulation. The risk assessment and management of transgene introgression and the control of weeds need to take metapopulation dynamics into consideration. PMID:24052560

  4. Pervasive Mitochondrial Sequence Heteroplasmy in Natural Populations of Wild Carrot, Daucus carota spp. carota L

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; McCauley, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptions to the generally accepted rules that plant mitochondrial genomes are strictly maternally inherited and that within-individual sequence diversity in those genomes, i.e., heteroplasmy, should be minimal are becoming increasingly apparent especially with regard to sequence-level heteroplasmy. These findings raise questions about the potential significance of such heteroplasmy for plant mitochondrial genome evolution. Still studies quantifying the amount and consequences of sequence heteroplasmy in natural populations are rare. In this study, we report pervasive sequence heteroplasmy in natural populations of wild carrot, a close relative of the cultivated crop. In order to assay directly for this heteroplasmy, we implemented a quantitative PCR assay that can detect and quantify intra-individual SNP variation in two mitochondrial genes (Cox1 and Atp9). We found heteroplasmy in > 60% of all wild carrot populations surveyed and in > 30% of the 140 component individuals that were genotyped. Heteroplasmy ranged from a very small proportion of the total genotype (e.g., 0.995:0.005) to near even mixtures (e.g., 0.590:0.410) in some individuals. These results have important implications for the role of intra-genomic recombination in the generation of plant mitochondrial genome genotypic novelty. The consequences of such recombination are evident in the results of this study through analysis of the degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the SNP sites at the two genes studied. PMID:26295342

  5. Morphogenetic responses of cultured totipotent cells of carrot /Daucus carota var. carota/ at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Steward, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    An experiment designed to test whether embryos capable of developing from isolated somatic carrot cells could do so under conditions of weightlessness in space was performed aboard the unmanned Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 782 under the auspices of the joint United States-Soviet Biological Satellite Mission. Space flight and weightlessness seem to have had no adverse effects on the induction of embryoids or on the development of their organs. A portion of the crop of carrot plantlets originated in space and grown to maturity were not morphologically different from controls.

  6. Effect of acidification on carrot (Daucus carota) juice cloud stability.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Alison K; Barrett, Diane M; Dungan, Stephanie R

    2014-11-26

    Effects of acidity on cloud stability in pasteurized carrot juice were examined over the pH range of 3.5-6.2. Cloud sedimentation, particle diameter, and ? potential were measured at each pH condition to quantify juice cloud stability and clarification during 3 days of storage. Acidification below pH 4.9 resulted in a less negative ? potential, an increased particle size, and an unstable cloud, leading to juice clarification. As the acidity increased, clarification occurred more rapidly and to a greater extent. Only a weak effect of ionic strength was observed when sodium salts were added to the juice, but the addition of calcium salts significantly reduced the cloud stability. PMID:25354298

  7. Characterization of inositol phosphates in carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, M.; Chen, Q.; Boss, W.F. )

    1989-01-01

    We have shown previously that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) stimulates an efflux of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} from fusogenic carrot protoplasts. In light of these results, we suggested that IP{sub 3} might serve as a second messenger for the mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in higher plant cells. To determine whether or not IP{sub 3} and other inositol phosphates were present in the carrot cells, the cells were labeled with myo-(2-{sup 3}H)inositol for 18 hours and extracted with ice-cold 10% trichloroacetic acid. The inositol metabolites were separated by anion exchange chromatography and by paper electrophoresis. We found that ({sup 3}H)inositol metabolites coeluted with inositol bisphosphate (IP{sub 2}) and IP{sub 3} when separated by anion exchange chromatography. However, we could not detect IP{sub 2} or IP{sub 3} when the inositol metabolites were analyzed by paper electrophoresis even though the polyphosphoinositides, which are the source of IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, were present in these cells. Thus, ({sup 3}H)inositol metabolites other than IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3} had coeluted on the anion exchange columns. The data indicate that either IP{sub 3} is rapidly metabolized or that it is not present at a detectable level in the carrot cells.

  8. Inositol trisphosphate metabolism in carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Memon, A.R.; Rincon, M.; Boss, W.F. )

    1989-10-01

    The metabolism of exogenously added D-myo-(1-{sup 3}H)inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) has been examined in microsomal membrane and soluble fractions of carrot cells grown in suspension culture. When ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} was added to a microsomal membrane fraction, ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 2} was the primary metabolite consisting of approximately 83% of the total recovered ({sup 3}H) by electrophoresis. ({sup 3}H)IP was only 6% of the ({sup 3}H) recovered, and 10% of the ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} was not further metabolized. In contrast, when ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} was added to the soluble fraction, approximately equal amounts of ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 2} and ({sup 3}H)IP were recovered. Ca{sup 2+} (100 micromolar) tended to enhance IP{sub 3} dephosphorylation but inhibited the IP{sub 2} dephosphorylation in the soluble fraction by about 20%. MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} (1 millimolar) inhibited the dephosphorylation of IP{sub 3} by the microsomal fraction and the dephosphorylation of IP{sub 2} by the soluble fraction. MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, however, did not inhibit the dephosphorylation of IP{sub 3} by the soluble fraction. Li{sup +} (10 and 50 millimolar) had no effect on IP{sub 3} metabolism in either the soluble or membrane fraction; however, Li{sup +} (50 millimolar) inhibited IP{sub 2} dephosphorylation in the soluble fraction about 25%.

  9. The effects of excess boron with niacin on Daucus carota L. (carrot) root callus.

    PubMed

    Demiray, H; Dereboylu, A E

    2006-03-01

    Niacin (Nicotinic acid, B3 vitamin) may be involved in reduction of toxic effects of boron by regulating growth metabolism. This study was designed to examine whether external niacin treatment would improve the boron mobility in carrot callus cells or not. The results showed that excess boron caused tracheary inversions in meristematic root tissue, and also a shortage was seen in tracheary lengths with boric acid treatment. Boron excess induced the plant tolerance to water stress inverting the tracheary cells. This shortage converted nearly to normal size with niacin and boron treatment together. The results showed that boron mobility induced by niacin could reduce significantly the fresh and dry weight of carrot root cells, protein and ABA content was reduced also, in contrary, external boron and boron with niacin treatment considerable increased the two factors after one month stress. Fresh weight reduction and ABA content reduction indicated that niacin treatment caused water stress on the root cells of carrot, but boron treatment and boron with niacin treatment increased drought tolerance in carrot cells by increasing the both factors. In addition, turning the conversion of the length of the trachearies to their normal size proved that niacin treatment ended the polarizing effects of boron on cell walls. PMID:16646529

  10. GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF AN AC/DS - BASED TRANSPOSON TAGGING SYSTEM IN CARROT (DAUCUS CAROTA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize transposable elements, Activator (Ac) and Ds have been transformed into several heterologous plant species for transposon tagging of genes and they have been successfully used to taf and to clone genes in Arabidopsis, flax, pentunia, tobacco, and tomato. To investigate the possibility of tran...

  11. Major Cytogenetic Landmarks and Karyotype Analysis in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Other Apiaceace

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Karyotyping can be helpful for understanding species evolution and relationships. Cytological studies in Apiaceae have provided information on the chromosome number and morphology of several crops. However, karyological data of their wild relatives are scarce. In addition, the number of chromosomes ...

  12. First report of bacterial blight of carrot in Indiana caused by Xanthomonas hortorum pv. carotae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In summer 2012, bacterial blight symptoms were observed on leaves of carrot plants in 7 out of 70 plots of carrot breeding lines at the Purdue University Meig Horticulture Research Farm, Lafayette, IN. Symptoms included small to large, variably shaped, water soaked to dry, necrotic lesions, with or ...

  13. [QTL mapping for contents of main carotenes and lycopene in carrot (Daucus carota L.)].

    PubMed

    Ou, Cheng-Gang; Deng, Bo-Tao; Bao, Sheng-You; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhuang, Fei-Yun; Mao, Shu-Min

    2010-12-01

    An F2 population derived from two carrot inbred lines, P50006 and HCM A.C. with high carotene accumulation, was developed and used to map and analyze quantitative trait locus (QTL) associated with the accumulation of alpha and beta-carotene, total carotene and lycopene. Broad-sense heritabilities of these traits were 0.75, 0.50, 0.31, and 0.93, respectively. A genetic map with 91 SRAP (Sequence-related amplified polymorphism) markers was developed, which spanned 502.9 cM in 9 linkage groups with a mean marker interval of 5.5 cM. Mixed-model-based composite interval mapping was performed to analyze QTL and epistasis effects. One major QTL each for beta-carotene, total carotene and lycopene accumulation were detected which can explain 12.79%, 12.87%, and 14.61% of total phenotypic variations, respectively. Additive genetic variance was primarily responsible for genetic variability in all three major QTL. In addition, a pair of epistasis QTL for beta-carotene and lycopene accumulation was detected, which were able to explain 15.1% and 6.5% of total phenotypic variation, respectively. The dominant x additive and dominant x dominant interaction variance were primary epistasis effect for beta-carotene and lycopene. These SRAP markers linked to QTL could be used in selection or QTL pyramiding for high carotene and lycopene content in carrot breeding. PMID:21513156

  14. Major cytogenetic landmarks and karyotype analysis inDaucus carota and other Apiaceae.

    PubMed

    Iovene, Marina; Grzebelus, Ewa; Carputo, Domenico; Jiang, Jiming; Simon, Philipp W

    2008-07-01

    Karyotype analysis provides insights into genome organization at the chromosome level and into chromosome evolution. Chromosomes were marked for comparative karyotype analysis using FISH localization of rDNA genes for the first time in Apioideae species including taxa of economic importance and several wild Daucus relatives. Interestingly, Daucus species did not vary in number of rDNA loci despite variation in chromosome number (2n = 18, 20, 22, and 44) and previous publications suggesting multiple loci. All had single loci for both 5S and 18S-25S (nucleolar organizing region) rDNA, located on two different chromosome pairs. The 5S rDNA was on the short arm of a metacentric chromosome pair in D. crinitus (2n = 22) and D. glochidiatus (2n = 44) and on the long arm of a metacentric pair in other Daucus species, suggesting possible rearrangement of this chromosome. For other Apiaceae, from two (Apium graveolens), to three (Orlaya grandiflora), to four (Cuminum cyminum) chromosomes had 18S-25S rDNA sites. Variability for number and position of the 5S rDNA was also observed. FISH signals enabled us to identify 20-40% of the chromosome complement among species examined. Comparative karyotype analysis provides insights into the fundamental aspects of chromosome evolution in Daucus. PMID:21632405

  15. Bioaccessibility of Polyphenols from Plant-Processing Byproducts of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Bilen, Fatma Damla; Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van de Wiele, Tom; Van Camp, John

    2016-03-30

    Plant-processing byproducts of black carrot represent an important disposal problem for the industry; however, they are also promising sources of polyphenols, especially anthocyanins. The present study focused on the changes in polyphenols from black carrot, peel, and pomace during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Total phenolic content (TPC), total monomeric anthocyanin content (TMAC), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were determined using spectrophotometric methods, whereas identification and quantification of polyphenols were carried out using UPLC-ESI-MS(E) and HPLC-DAD, respectively. TPC, TMAC, and TAC significantly decreased (23-82%) as a result of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Nevertheless, the amount of pomace anthocyanins released at all stages of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was higher than black carrot anthocyanins, suggesting that pomace may be a better source of bioaccessible anthocyanins. Overall, the current study highlighted black carrot byproducts as substantial sources of polyphenols, which may be used to enrich food products. PMID:26262673

  16. Polyacetylenes from carrots (Daucus carota) improve glucose uptake in vitro in adipocytes and myotubes.

    PubMed

    El-Houri, Rime B; Kotowska, Dorota; Christensen, Kathrine B; Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Oksbjerg, Niels; Wolber, Gerhard; Kristiansen, Karsten; Christensen, Lars P

    2015-07-01

    A dichloromethane (DCM) extract of carrot roots was found to stimulate insulin-dependent glucose uptake (GU) in adipocytes in a dose dependent manner. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the DCM extract resulted in the isolation of the polyacetylenes falcarinol and falcarindiol. Both polyacetylenes were able to significantly stimulate basal and/or insulin-dependent GU in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and porcine myotube cell cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Falcarindiol increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-mediated transactivation significantly at concentrations of 3, 10 and 30 μM, while PPARγ-mediated transactivation by falcarinol was only observed at 10 μM. Docking studies accordingly indicated that falcarindiol binds to the ligand binding domain of PPARγ with higher affinity than falcarinol and that both polyacetylenes exhibit characteristics of PPARγ partial agonists. Falcarinol was shown to inhibit adipocyte differentiation as evident by gene expression studies and Oil Red O staining, whereas falcarindiol did not inhibit adipocyte differentiation, which indicates that these polyacetylenes have distinct modes of action. The results of the present study suggest that falcarinol and falcarindiol may represent scaffolds for novel partial PPARγ agonists with possible antidiabetic properties. PMID:25970571

  17. Cryopreservation of carrot (Daucus carota l.) cell suspensions and protoplasts by vitrification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Jun-Hui

    2003-01-01

    Carrot cell suspensions and protoplasts were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification. Cells were precultured in liquid Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0.175 M sucrose for 3 d and then in liquid MS medium containing 0.4 M sorbitol for 1 d. After loading of the precultured carrot cells in 25 % PVS2 at room temperature for 5 min and treatment with 100 % PVS2 at 0 degrees C for 7.5 min, they were quenched in liquid nitrogen. Optimal survival was 83.3 % (based on the triphenyl tetrazolium chloride reduction assay) following warming and unloading. Recovered cells retained the ability to regenerate plantlets in vitro. In the case of vitrification of protoplasts isolated from carrot cell suspensions, the optimal loading and dehydration durations were 5 min in 25% PVS2 and 3 min 100 % PVS2 respectively. Survival of 47 % of the untreated control (based on the FDA-PI (fluorescein diacetate-propidium iodide) staining) was achieved after cryopreservation. PMID:12644854

  18. Antioxidants and Antioxidant Capacity of Biofortified Carrots (Daucus Carota, L.) of Various Colors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antioxidants and antioxidant capacity of seven colored carrots were determined. Five anthocyanins, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and four carotenoids, were quantified by HPLC. Total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidant capacities of the hydrophilic and hyd...

  19. Polyacetylene diversity and bioactivity in orange market and locally grown colored carrots (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Metzger, Brandon T; Barnes, David M

    2009-12-01

    Carrots contain a wide array of phytochemicals such as carotenoids, phenolics, alpha-tocopherol, and polyacetylenes. Carrots are most known for their pro-vitamin A carotenoids but also contain other phytochemicals with documented health benefits. The phytochemicals in colored carrots present a challenge and opportunity due to the wide diversity of potent bioactive compounds. Two commercial carrots, 1 wild carrot, and 13 colored carrot varieties were characterized phytochemically. The carrots were screened in an anti-inflammatory model of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production. Deep Purple carrot had the highest concentration of total polyacetylenes, alpha-tocopherol, and total phenolics. Commercial fresh market and baby orange carrots both had high concentrations of pro-vitamin A carotenoids. Purple carrots had higher antioxidant capacity values due to their anthocyanin content. Only seven carrot varieties had inhibitory activity (IC(25) = 257-1321 microg/mL) in macrophage cells. Among the varieties tested during the selected growing season, Deep Purple had the highest polyacetylene content and other important antioxidant phytochemicals. Further work is needed to identify other potential anti-inflammatory phytochemicals in colored carrots on the basis of this research. PMID:19950995

  20. Genetic diversity of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars revealed by analysis of SSR loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we evaluate a collection of 88 carrot cultivars and landraces for polymorphisms at SSR loci and use the obtained markers to assess the genetic diversity, and we show molecular evidence for divergence between Asiatic and Western carrot genetic pools. The use of primer pairs flanking repe...

  1. Effect of carrot (Daucus carota) microstructure on carotene bioaccessibility in the upper gastrointestinal tract. 2. In vivo digestions.

    PubMed

    Tydeman, Elizabeth A; Parker, Mary L; Faulks, Richard M; Cross, Kathryn L; Fillery-Travis, Annette; Gidley, Michael J; Rich, Gillian T; Waldron, Keith W

    2010-09-01

    Nutrient bioaccessibility and subsequent absorption will be directly influenced by changes in food structure during gastrointestinal processing. The accompanying paper (Tydeman et al. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2010, 58, doi: 10.1021/jf101034a) reported results on the effect of carrot processing on the release of carotene into lipid phases during in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestions. This paper describes results from in vivo digestion of two of the types of processed carrot used previously, raw grated carrot and cooked carrot mashed to a puree. Ileostomy effluents from human volunteers fed meals containing the carrot material were used to study tissue microstructure and carotene release. Raw carrot shreds and intact cells that had survived the pureeing process were identifiable in ileal effluent. The gross tissue structure in the shreds had not changed following digestion. Carotene-containing particles remained encapsulated in intact cells, but were absent from ruptured cells. Microscopy revealed marked changes to the cell walls including swelling and pectin solubilization, which increased in severity with increasing residence time in the upper gut. These observations were entirely consistent with the in vitro observations. It was concluded that a single intact cell wall is sufficient to reduce carotene bioaccessibility from a cell by acting as a physical barrier, which is not broken down during upper gut digestion. PMID:20806973

  2. Enhanced disease resistance in transgenic carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants over-expressing a rice cationic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wally, O; Punja, Z K

    2010-10-01

    Plant class III peroxidases are involved in numerous responses related to pathogen resistance including controlling hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels and lignin formation. Peroxidases catalyze the oxidation of organic compounds using H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. We examined the mechanisms of disease resistance in a transgenic carrot line (P23) which constitutively over-expresses the rice cationic peroxidase OsPrx114 (previously known as PO-C1) and which exhibits enhanced resistance to necrotrophic foliar pathogens. OsPrx114 over-expression led to a slight enhancement of constitutive transcript levels of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. These transcript levels were dramatically increased in line P23 compared to controls [GUS construct under the control of 35S promoter (35S::GUS)] when tissues were treated with cell wall fragments of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (SS-walls), and to a lesser extent with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid. There was no basal increase in basal H(2)O(2) levels in tissues of the line P23. However, during an oxidative burst response elicited by SS-walls, H(2)O(2) accumulation was reduced in line P23 despite, typical media alkalinization associated with oxidative burst responses was observed, suggesting that OsPrx114 was involved in rapid H(2)O(2) consumption during the oxidative burst response. Tap roots of line P23 had increased lignin formation in the outer periderm tissues, which was further increased during challenge inoculation with Alternaria radicina. Plant susceptibility to a biotrophic pathogen, Erysiphe heraclei, was not affected. Disease resistance to necrotrophic pathogens in carrot as a result of OsPrx114 over-expression is manifested through increased PR transcript accumulation, rapid removal of H(2)O(2) during oxidative burst response and enhanced lignin formation. PMID:20730544

  3. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes. PMID:26975939

  4. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging on bacterial resistance in grated carrots ( Daucus carota)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Lafortune, R.

    2004-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of gamma irradiation combined with modified atmosphere packaging as an alternative treatment to ensure the innocuity and the shelf life extension of pre-cured vegetables. Grated carrots were inoculated with Escherichia coli (10 6 CFU/g) and packed under air or under MAP condition (60% O 2, 30% CO 2 and 10% N 2). The packages were then, gamma irradiated at doses from 0.15 to 0.9 kGy and stored at 4±1°C. E. coli counts were periodically evaluated during 50 days of storage. Results showed that at day 1, an irradiation treatment at a dose of 0.15 kGy reduced by 3 and 4 log the microbial level representing a level of 3 and 2 log CFU/g when samples were irradiated under air and under MAP respectively. However, a level of 3 log CFU/g was detected in both treated samples after 7 days of storage. When samples were irradiated at doses ⩾0.3 kGy no E.coli were detected during the whole storage in samples treated under MAP. However, when samples were treated under air, a level of 1-2 log CFU/g of E.coli was detected after 5 days of storage.

  5. The DcMaster Transposon Display maps polymorphic insertion sites in the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DcMaster is a family of PIF/Harbinger-like class II transposable elements identified in carrot. We present a modified Transposon Display molecular marker system allowing amplification of genomic regions containing DcMaster elements. We scored 77 DcMaster Transposon Display (DcMTD) amplicons, of whic...

  6. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes. PMID:26975939

  7. Characterization of a deep-coverage carrot (Daucus carota L.) BAC library and initial analysis of BAC-end sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 17.3-fold redundant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library has been synthesized for carrot, the most-economically important member of the family Apiaceae. The library consists of 92,160 clones with an average insert size of 121 kb and ~ 2 % organellar DNA content. To provide an overview of ...

  8. AMPLIFICATION OF LOLIUM SSP. MICROSATELLITES IN POA SSP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-species amplification of forty-seven Lolium ssp. microsatellite primers were evaluated across eight Poa species or sub-species. Of these, eighteen Lolium SSR primer pairs generated one or more amplification products in one or more Poa ssp. Sequence evaluation of the amplification products in...

  9. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10...

  10. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10...

  11. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10...

  12. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10...

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10...

  14. Diversity, genetic mapping, and signatures of domestication in the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome, as revealed by Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot is one of the most economically important vegetables worldwide, however, genetic and genomic resources supporting carrot breeding remain limited. We developed a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) platform for wild and cultivated carrot and used it to investigate genetic diversity and to devel...

  15. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.C.; Cerda, A.; Simpson, K.; Lopez-Diaz, I.; Carrera, E; Handford, M.; Stange, C.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  16. Combined effects of coating, modified atmosphere packaging, and gamma irradiation on quality maintenance of ready-to-use carrots (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Lafortune, R; Caillet, S; Lacroix, M

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an edible coating combined with modified atmosphere (MA; 60% O2, 30% CO2, and 10% N2) packaging and gamma irradiation on the microbiological stability and physicochemical quality of minimally processed carrots. A coating based on calcium caseinate and whey protein isolates was used. Coated and uncoated peeled minicarrots were packed under the MA or air (78.1% N2, 20.9% O2, and 0.036% CO2), irradiated at 0.5 or 1 kGy, and stored at 4 +/- 1 degrees C for 21 days. Samples were evaluated periodically for aerobic plates counts (APCs) and physicochemical properties (firmness, white discoloration, and whiteness index). Gamma irradiation did not significantly affect the physicochemical properties of the carrots (P > 0.05). Microbiological analysis revealed that for uncoated carrots irradiation at 0.5 and 1 kGy under air and MA reduced the APCs by 3.5 and 4 log CFU/g and by 4 and 4.5 log CFU/g, respectively. For coated carrots, irradiation at 0.5 and 1 kGy under air and MA reduced the APCs by 4 and 4.5 log CFU/g and by 3 and 4.25 log CFU/g, respectively. The coating was able to protect carrots against dehydration during storage under air. Coating and irradiation at 1 kGy were also able to protect carrot firmness during storage under air. MA packaging retarded whitening of uncoated carrots but had a detrimental effect on firmness. The edible coating used in this study did not significantly inhibit (P > 0.05) microbial growth on carrots. PMID:15726981

  17. Anthocyanins in purple-orange carrots (Daucus carota L.) do not influence the bioavailability of beta-carotene in young women.

    PubMed

    Arscott, Sara A; Simon, Philipp W; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2010-03-10

    Purple carrots contain anthocyanins in addition to the provitamin A carotenoids in typical orange carrots. Simultaneous consumption of these phytochemicals in carrots may affect the bioavailability of carotenoids. The bioavailability of beta-carotene in humans was assessed from an acute feeding of orange (OC) and purple (PC) carrots with white (WC) as a control. Carrot smoothies were served to female subjects (n = 5, aged 21-26 years) for breakfast after 1 week on a low carotenoid diet and overnight fast. OC and PC smoothies were equalized to 10.3 mg of all-trans beta-carotene. Plasma beta-carotene was measured for 144 h following treatments. Peak plasma concentrations of OC and PC treatments did not differ. The PC treatment 0-144 h area-under-the-curve for beta-carotene was 76% of the OC treatment (P < 0.05). However, when the first 24 h were compared, OC and PC treatments did not differ, suggesting that anthocyanins in purple carrots do not affect the absorption of beta-carotene postprandially. PMID:20131807

  18. ASSOCIATION OF REVERSIBLE INACTIVATION OF MAIZE TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT, DS, WITH TISSUE-SPECIFIC PROCESSING OF THE 35S:TPASE TRANSCRIPT IN CARROT (DAUCUS CAROTA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ac/Ds based two-element transposon tagging system has been introduced into carrot. F1 progeny containing both 35S:TPase and the Ds element were derived from crosses between 35S:TPase and Ds bearing parents. While excision of Ds was not detected in any F1 plants carrying both 35S:TPase and the Ds...

  19. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot,Dclcyb1is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes,Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2andNtlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox,NtcpsandNtks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2andNtggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression ofDclcyb1induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  20. Effect of carrot (Daucus carota) microstructure on carotene bioaccessibilty in the upper gastrointestinal tract. 1. In vitro simulations of carrot digestion.

    PubMed

    Tydeman, Elizabeth A; Parker, Mary L; Wickham, Martin S J; Rich, Gillian T; Faulks, Richard M; Gidley, Michael J; Fillery-Travis, Annette; Waldron, Keith W

    2010-09-01

    Studies investigating carotene bioaccessibility (release from the food matrix to a solubilized form) directly from plant material during the process of digestion are scarce, mainly due to the difficulties associated with obtaining such material. Therefore, this paper examines the relationship between tissue microstructure and carotene bioaccessibility using an in vitro digestion model. Dietary oil provides a pool for the initial solubilization. Therefore, carotene partitioning into an emulsified oil phase was assessed using raw carrot tissue and carrot tissue subjected to various degrees of heating and particle size reduction and, in all cases, was found to be greatly reduced compared with juiced carrot. Carotene bioaccessibility was found to be greater from raw tissues than heated tissues of the same size. This is because heating increases the propensity for intact cells to separate, effectively encapsulating the carotene. Although the gross structure of the tissues was found to be relatively unaffected by in vitro digestion, at the cellular level some cell-wall swelling and cell death were observed, particularly close to the surfaces of the tissue. This study suggests that cell-wall rupture prior to digestion is an absolute requirement for carotene bioaccessibility in the upper intestine and that heating does not enhance carotene release from intact cells. PMID:20698537

  1. Influence of thermal processing on hydrolysis and stability of folate poly-gamma-glutamates in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), carrot (Daucus carota) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Munyaka, Ann Wambui; Verlinde, Philippe; Mukisa, Ivan Muzira; Oey, Indrawati; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc

    2010-04-14

    The folate poly-gamma-glutamate profile, their concentrations, and hydrolysis by endogenous gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) were evaluated in broccoli, carrot and tomato. Further studies on the effect of time and temperature on folate poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolysis and stability were carried out in broccoli since this vegetable showed the highest long-chain and total folate poly-gamma-glutamate concentration. The evolution of l-ascorbic acid, total phenols and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values was evaluated in parallel. Upon thermal inactivation of GGH prior to crushing, it was observed that broccoli, carrot and tomato contained poly-gamma-glutamates with one to seven glutamate residues but differed in the predominant poly-gamma-glutamates. Crushing of raw broccoli, carrot and tomato resulted in significant poly-gamma-glutamate profile changes in broccoli and carrot (indicating GGH-catalyzed hydrolysis) but not in tomato. In this study, the actual crushing of raw broccoli matrix had a greater effect on folate poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolysis than incubation conditions (0-30 min at 25-55 degrees C). During treatments at 25-140 degrees C, folate retention was higher at 80 and 100 degrees C than at the other temperatures. A similar trend in thermal stability was observed for folates, vitamin C, total phenols and TEAC value, an indication that conditions that result in endogenous antioxidants degradation might also result in folate degradation. PMID:20329724

  2. Influence of cultivar and harvest year on the volatile profiles of leaves and roots of carrots (Daucus carota spp. sativus Hoffm.).

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Detlef; Nothnagel, Thomas; Schulz, Hartwig

    2015-04-01

    The focus of the present work centers on the diversity of volatile patterns of carrots. In total 15 main volatiles were semiquantified in leaves and roots using isolation by headspace solid phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography with FID and MS detection. Significant differences in the main number of compounds were detected between the cultivars as well as the years. Genotype-environment interactions (G E) are discussed. The most abundant metabolites, ?-myrcene (leaves) and terpinolene (roots), differ in the sum of all interactions (cultivar harvest year) by a factor of 22 and 62, respectively. A statistical test indicates significant metabolic differences between cultivars for nine volatiles in leaves and 10 in roots. In contrast to others the volatiles ?-pinene, ?-terpinene, limonene, and myristicine in leaves as well as ?-pinene, humulene, and bornyl acetate in roots are relatively stable over years. A correlation analysis shows no strict clustering regarding root color. While the biosynthesis in leaves and roots is independent between these two organs for nine of the 15 volatiles, a significant correlation of the myristicine content between leaves and roots was determined, which suggests the use of this compound as a bitter marker in carrot breeding. PMID:25797828

  3. The impact of fermentation with exopolysaccharide producing lactic acid bacteria on rheological, chemical and sensory properties of pureed carrots (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Juvonen, Riikka; Honkapää, Kaisu; Maina, Ndegwa H; Shi, Qiao; Viljanen, Kaarina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Virkki, Liisa; Tenkanen, Maija; Lantto, Raija

    2015-08-17

    Fermentation with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) offers a natural means to modify technological and nutritional properties of foods and food ingredients. This study explored the impact of fermentation with different exopolysaccharide (EPS) producing LAB on rheological, chemical and sensory properties of puréed carrots in water, as a vegetable model, with the focus on texture formation. The screening of 37 LAB strains for starter selection revealed 16 Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Weissella strains capable of EPS (dextran, levan, and/or β-glucan) production in the carrot raw material. Fermentations with five out of six selected EPS producers modified perceived texture of the liquid carrot model (p<0.05). The formation of low-branched dextran correlated with perceived thickness, whereas the production of β-glucan correlated with perceived elasticity. Low-branched dextran producing Weissella confusa and Leuconostoc lactis strains produced thick texture accompanied by pleasant odour and flavour. The fermentation with the selected EPS-producing LAB strains is a promising clean label approach to replace hydrocolloid additives as texturizers in vegetable containing products, not only carrot. PMID:26001525

  4. Development and Characterization of Novel SSR Markers in Carrot (Daucus Carota L.) and Their Application for Mapping and Diversity Analysis in Apiaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic resources in carrot and other Apiaceae are relatively underdeveloped. The availability of a large set of pcr-based codominant markers, such as simple sequence repeats (SSR), would allow integration of the different carrot genetic maps constructed to date (mainly using anonymous dominant mark...

  5. Flavonoids released by carrot (Daucus carota) seedlings stimulate hyphal development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the presence of optimal CO2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Poulin, M J; Bel-Rhlid, R; Pich, Y; Chnevert, R

    1993-10-01

    Carbon dioxide has been previously identified as a critical volatile factor that stimulates hyphal growth ofGigaspora margarita, a vesiculararbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, and we determined the optimal concentration at 2.0%. The beneficial effect of CO2 on fungal development is also visible in the presence of stimulatory (quercetin, myricetin) or inhibitory (naringenin) flavonoids. Sterile root exudates from carrot seedlings stimulate the hyphal development ofG. margarita in the presence of optimal CO2 enrichment. Three flavonols (quercetin, kaempferol, rutin or quercetin 3-rutinoside) and two flavones (apigenin, luteolin) were identified in carrot root exudates by means of HPLC retention time. Flavonols like quercetin and kaempferol are known to have stimulatory effects on hyphal growth ofG. margarita. PMID:24248578

  6. Radiation processing to ensure safety of minimally processed carrot (Daucus carota) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus): optimization of dose for the elimination of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Dhokane, V S; Hajare, S; Shashidhar, R; Sharma, A; Bandekar, J R

    2006-02-01

    Minimally processed vegetables are in demand, because they offer convenience to consumers. However, these products are often unsafe because of possible contamination with pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Shigella species. Therefore, this study was carried out to optimize the radiation dose necessary to ensure the safety of precut carrot and cucumber. Decimal reduction doses (D-values) of Salmonella Typhimurium MTCC 98 were ca. 0.164 kGy in carrot samples and 0.178 kGy in cucumber samples. D-values of Listeria monocytogenes were determined to be 0.312 and 0.345 kGy in carrot and cucumber samples, respectively. Studies of inoculated, packaged, minimally processed carrot and cucumber samples showed that treatment with a 1-kGy dose of gamma radiation eliminated up to 4 log CFU/g of Salmonella Typhimurium and 3 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes. However, treatment with a 2-kGy dose was necessary to eliminate these pathogens by 5 log CFU/g. Storage studies showed that both Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes were able to grow at 10 degrees C in inoculated control samples. Neither of these pathogens could be recovered from radiation-processed samples after storage for up to 8 days. PMID:16496592

  7. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions. PMID:26160425

  8. Isolation, Purification and Characterization of Two Laccases from Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Their Response to Abiotic and Metal Ions Stresses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Laccases, which belong to the blue copper oxidase enzyme family, oxidize many organic and inorganic compounds. The laccase-encoding genes DcLac1 and DcLac2 were isolated from the economically important tuberous root carrot, and their proteins were successfully expressed and purified using the Escherichia coli expression system BL21(DE3). DcLac1 and DcLac2 had molecular masses of approximately 64 and 61.9 kDa, respectively. With 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate acid) as the substrate, DcLac1 and DcLac2 had K m values of 3.9043 and 1.255 mM, respectively, and V max values of 54.0832 and 81.7996 μM mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. Moreover, DcLac1 and DcLac2 had optimal pH values of 2.8 and 2.6, respectively, and optimal temperatures of 45 and 40 °C, respectively. The activities of the two enzymes were promoted by Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Na(+) but inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), K(+), SDS, and EDTA. Expression profiles showed that the two DcLac genes had almost identical responses to high and low temperature stresses but different responses to salt, drought, and metal stresses. This study provided insights into the characteristics and tolerance response mechanisms of laccase in carrot. PMID:26626349

  9. Identification of Independent Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB Functions in Coaggregation with Actinomyces naeslundii

    PubMed Central

    Egland, Paul G.; D, Laurence D.; Kolenbrander, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    The initial stages of dental plaque formation involve the adherence of early colonizing organisms such as Streptococcus gordonii and Actinomyces naeslundii to the saliva-coated tooth surface and to each other. The S. gordonii surface proteins SspA and SspB are known to play a role in adherence to salivary proteins and mediate coaggregation with other bacteria. Coaggregation is the adhesin receptor-mediated interaction between genetically distinct cell types and appears to be ubiquitous among oral isolates. To define the function of SspA and SspB separately on the surface of their natural host, we constructed and analyzed the coaggregation properties of an isogenic sspB mutant of S. gordonii DL1, an sspAB double mutant, and a previously described sspA mutant. A. naeslundii strains have been previously classified into six coaggregation groups based on the nature of their coaggregations with S. gordonii DL1 and other oral streptococci. Coaggregation assays with the sspA and sspB mutants showed that SspA and SspB are the streptococcal proteins primarily responsible for defining these coaggregation groups and, thus, are highly significant in the establishment of early dental plaque. SspA exhibited two coaggregation-specific functions. It participated in lactose-inhibitable and -noninhibitable interactions, while SspB mediated only lactose-noninhibitable coaggregations. Accordingly, the sspAB double mutant lacked these functions and allowed us to detect a third coaggregation interaction with one of these organisms. These proteins may play an important role in development of S. gordonii-A. naeslundii communities in early dental plaque. Understanding these adhesin proteins will aid investigations of complex microbial communities that characterize periodontal diseases. PMID:11705927

  10. The Huygens Surface Science Package (SSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnecki, John C.; Leese, Mark; Hathi, Brijen; SSP Consortium, The

    2015-04-01

    The Huygens Surface Science Package (SSP), one of the six instruments selected by ESA, was the only one whose prime purpose was to study the surface of Titan in-situ. Designed at a time when even the basic nature of the surface (i.e. solid ice or liquid hydrocarbons) was unknown, it consisted of 9 separate compact and relatively simple sensors designed to span all likely surface scenarios. The Huygens landing on a "dry lake bed" allowed some of the sensors to be fully exercised. The results and their subsequent interpretations will be presented as well as perspectives from nearly 25 years since the original instrument selection.

  11. Starvation-induced expression of SspA and SspB: the effects of a null mutation in sspA on Escherichia coli protein synthesis and survival during growth and prolonged starvation.

    PubMed

    Williams, M D; Ouyang, T X; Flickinger, M C

    1994-03-01

    Maxicell labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) have identified the proteins encoded by sspA and sspB (SspA, SspB) as proteins D27.1 and A25.8, respectively, in the Escherichia coli gene-protein database. SspA expression increases with decreasing growth rate and is induced by glucose, nitrogen, phosphate or amino acid starvation. The promoter, Pssp, is similar to gearbox promoters. Inactivation of SspA (sspA::neo) blocks sspB expression. [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins synthesized during growth and during stationary phase are different in delta sspA strains compared to sspA+ strains. This difference is enhanced during extended stationary phase (24-72 h). Long-term (10 d) viability of arginine-starved isogenic strains shows that sspA+ cultures remain viable significantly longer than delta sspA mutants. 2-D PAGE of proteins expressed during exponential growth shows that expression of at least 11 proteins is altered in delta sspA strains. A functional relA gene is required for sspA to affect protein synthesis. PMID:8022275

  12. A Case Study of SSP for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostavan, A.; Kaya, N.

    2002-01-01

    The market of the Solar Power Satellite must be worldwide, because it can be provide electricity anywhre in the world from the Earth's orbits. We have perform case studies of various countries to understand their benefits and disadvantages provide by the Space Solar Power, because each country has much different condition on energy from other countries. We are starting the international collaboration between Indonesia and Japan to carry out the case study for Indonesia. In Japan, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) has already organized a committee to investigate the feasibility of the Space Solar Power and to make a plan to launch a space demonstration of the Solar Power Satellite. While, Indonesia is quickly developing economy and increasing their energy demand. We are investigating the detailed energy conditions of Indonesia and the benefits and disadvantages of he SSP for Indonesia. Especially, we will perform the investigation on the receiving system for the Japanese pilot SPS.

  13. School Teams up for SSP Functional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignolet, G.; Lallemand, R.; Celeste, A.; von Muldau, H.

    2002-01-01

    Space Solar Power systems appear increasingly as one of the major solutions to the upcoming global energy crisis, by collecting solar energy in space where this is most easy, and sending it by microwave beam to the surface of the planet, where the need for controlled energy is located. While fully operational systems are still decades away, the need for major development efforts is with us now. Yet, for many decision-makers and for most of the public, SSP often still sounds like science fiction. Six functional demonstration systems, based on the Japanese SPS-2000 concept, have been built as a result of a cooperation between France and Japan, and they are currently used extensively, in Japan, in Europe and in North America, for executive presentations as well as for public exhibitions. There is demand for more models, both for science museums and for use by energy dedicated groups, and a senior high school in La Reunion, France, has picked up the challenge to make the production of such models an integrated practical school project for pre-college students. In December 2001, the administration and the teachers of the school have evaluated the feasibility of the project and eventually taken the go decision for the school year 2002- 2003, when for education purposes a temporary "school business company" will be incorporated with the goal to study and manufacture a limited series of professional quality SSP demonstration models, and to sell them world- wide to institutions and advocacy groups concerned with energy problems and with the environment. The different sections of the school will act as the different services of an integrated business : based on the current existing models, the electronic section will redesign the energy management system and the microwave projector module, while the mechanical section of the school will adapt and re-conceive the whole packaging of the demonstrator. The French and foreign language sections will write up a technical manual for the operation of the model and a guide to assist users with the basics of space solar power, with versions both in French and in English. The students of the commercial section will conduct global marketing and later handle international sales. Technical and market studies will take place at the end of the year 2002, while actual production, currently estimated at some twenty units, will take place during the first part of 2003. Initial operation will be assisted by institutional support and subscription sales from already identified customers, but later the operation will be self supporting, with eventually some cash benefit the school like in any normal commercial operation, before the "company" eventually will shut down its operation at the end of the school year in June 2003. The benefits of this high level "hands-on" operation will be very important, first because of the promotion of the SSP concepts and the understanding of the potential from space that it will foster. But the greatest reward will be for the students and the teachers involved in the operation, both simple and very complex at the same time, because they will integrate all the aspects of a "real" professional activity, around the great futuristic concept of providing clean and sustainable energy for Mankind and for the Earth...

  14. Risk analysis of Safety Service Patrol (SSP) systems in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Brett D; Santos, Joost R

    2011-12-01

    The transportation infrastructure is a vital backbone of any regional economy as it supports workforce mobility, tourism, and a host of socioeconomic activities. In this article, we specifically examine the incident management function of the transportation infrastructure. In many metropolitan regions, incident management is handled primarily by safety service patrols (SSPs), which monitor and resolve roadway incidents. In Virginia, SSP allocation across highway networks is based typically on average vehicle speeds and incident volumes. This article implements a probabilistic network model that partitions "business as usual" traffic flow with extreme-event scenarios. Results of simulated network scenarios reveal that flexible SSP configurations can improve incident resolution times relative to predetermined SSP assignments. PMID:21605149

  15. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, M. Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G.; Kumar, Sarma R.; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes’ were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  16. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Campos, M Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G; Kumar, Sarma R; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes' were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  17. Vibrio vulnificus bacteriophage SSP002 as a possible biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sung; Choi, Slae; Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Choi, Sang Ho

    2014-01-01

    A novel Vibrio vulnificus-infecting bacteriophage, SSP002, belonging to the Siphoviridae family, was isolated from the coastal area of the Yellow Sea of South Korea. Host range analysis revealed that the growth inhibition of phage SSP002 is relatively specific to V. vulnificus strains from both clinical and environmental samples. In addition, a one-step growth curve analysis and a bacteriophage stability test revealed a latent period of 65 min, a burst size of 23 2 PFU, as well as broad temperature (20C to 60C) and pH stability (pH 3 to 12) ranges. A Tn5 random transposon mutation of V. vulnificus and partial DNA sequencing of the inserted Tn5 regions revealed that the flhA, flhB, fliF, and fleQ mutants are resistant to SSP002 phage infection, suggesting that the flagellum may be the host receptor for infection. The subsequent construction of specific gene-inactivated mutants (flhA, flhB, fliF, and fleQ) and complementation experiments substantiated this. Previously, the genome of phage SSP002 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SSP002 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus phage vB_VpaS_MAR10 showed differences among their tail-related genes, supporting different host ranges at the species level, even though their genome sequences are highly similar. An additional mouse survival test showed that the administration of phage SSP002 at a multiplicity of infection of 1,000 significantly protects mice from infection by V. vulnificus for up to 2 months, suggesting that this phage may be a good candidate for the development of biocontrol agents against V. vulnificus infection. PMID:24212569

  18. Vibrio vulnificus Bacteriophage SSP002 as a Possible Biocontrol Agent

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sung; Choi, Slae; Shin, Hakdong

    2014-01-01

    A novel Vibrio vulnificus-infecting bacteriophage, SSP002, belonging to the Siphoviridae family, was isolated from the coastal area of the Yellow Sea of South Korea. Host range analysis revealed that the growth inhibition of phage SSP002 is relatively specific to V. vulnificus strains from both clinical and environmental samples. In addition, a one-step growth curve analysis and a bacteriophage stability test revealed a latent period of 65 min, a burst size of 23 2 PFU, as well as broad temperature (20C to 60C) and pH stability (pH 3 to 12) ranges. A Tn5 random transposon mutation of V. vulnificus and partial DNA sequencing of the inserted Tn5 regions revealed that the flhA, flhB, fliF, and fleQ mutants are resistant to SSP002 phage infection, suggesting that the flagellum may be the host receptor for infection. The subsequent construction of specific gene-inactivated mutants (flhA, flhB, fliF, and fleQ) and complementation experiments substantiated this. Previously, the genome of phage SSP002 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SSP002 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus phage vB_VpaS_MAR10 showed differences among their tail-related genes, supporting different host ranges at the species level, even though their genome sequences are highly similar. An additional mouse survival test showed that the administration of phage SSP002 at a multiplicity of infection of 1,000 significantly protects mice from infection by V. vulnificus for up to 2 months, suggesting that this phage may be a good candidate for the development of biocontrol agents against V. vulnificus infection. PMID:24212569

  19. Isotopomer-flux analysis of Bifidobactrium ssp. carbohydrate metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacteria are gram-positive microorganisms widely applied in fermented dairy products due to their health-promoting effects. Biofobacterium ssp. may also represent up to 91% of microbial gut population in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Fructose-6 phosphate phosphoketolase ...

  20. Isotopomer-Flux Analysis of Bifidobacterium ssp. Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacteria are gram-positive microorganisms widely applied in fermented dairy products due to their health-promoting effects. Bifidobacterium ssp. may also represent up to 91% of microbial gut population in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Fructose-6 phosphate phosphoketolase...

  1. Bibliography of Selected SCSD, URBS, SSP, SEF, and RAS Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Planning Lab.

    The annotated bibliography contains publications and report listings of the following sources--(1) School Construction Systems Development (SCSD), (2) University Residential Building Systems (URBS), (3) Florida Schoolhouse Systems Project (SSP), (4) Study of Educational Facilities (SEF), and (5) Recherches en Amenagements Scolaires (RAS) Building

  2. Genetic diversity, structure and differentiation within and between cultivated (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) and wild (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sylvestris) grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic characterization of 502 diverse grape accessions including 342 cultivated (V. vinifera ssp. sativa) and 160 wild (V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris) grapes showed considerable genetic diversity among accessions. A total of 117 alleles were detected with the average of 14 alleles per locus. The tot...

  3. Two novel minor alkaloids from Ethiopian Calpurnia aurea Ssp. aurea.

    PubMed

    Asres, K; Phillipson, J D; Mascagni, P

    1986-08-01

    Two novel minor quinolizidine alkaloids 4 beta-hydroxy-13alpha- O-(2'-pyrrolylcarbonyl)-lupanine (digittine) and its amino alcohol, 4 beta, 13alpha-dihydroxylupanine, have been isolated from Ethiopian Calpurnia aurea ssp. aurea. The structures of these alkaloids were determined by chemical transformation and by means of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, CD, MS, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR) including two dimensional NMR. PMID:17345314

  4. Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting 2: SSP TIM 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jim; Hawk, Clark W.

    1998-01-01

    The 2nd Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting (SSP TIM 2) was conducted September 21st through 24th with the first part consisting of a Plenary session. The summary results of this Plenary session are contained in part one of this report. The attendees were then organized into Working Breakout Sessions and Integrated Product Team (IPT) Sessions for the purpose of conducting in-depth discussions in specific topic areas and developing a consensus as to appropriate study plans and actions to be taken. The Second part covers the Plenary Summary Session, which contains the summary results of the Working Breakout Sessions and IPT Sessions. The appendix contains the list of attendees. The ob'jective was to provide an update for the study teams and develop plans for subsequent study activities. This SSP TIM 2 was initiated and the results reported electronically over the Internet. The International Space Station (ISS) could provide the following opportunities for conducting research and technology (R&T) which are applicable to SSP: (1) Automation and Robotics, (2) Advanced Power Generation, (3) Advanced Power Management & Distribution (PMAD), (4) Communications Systems and Networks, (5) Energy Storage, (6) In Space Propulsion (ISP), (7) Structural Dynamics and Control, and Assembly and (8) Wireless Power Transmission.

  5. Rhexocercosporidium panacis sp. nov., a new anamorphic species causing rusted root of ginseng (Panax [corrected] quinquefolius).

    PubMed

    Reeleder, R D

    2007-01-01

    A new species of the anamorphic genus Rhexocercosporidium is described. Isolates of a Rhex-Rhexocercosporidium sp. were obtained from ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) roots with symptoms of rusted root. These isolates were found to be genetically and morphologically distinct from the only described species in this genus, R. carotae. Sequence data from the ribosomal DNA region spanning the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 and from a portion of the 3-tubulin gene of the ginseng Rhexocercosporidium were compared to those of R. carotae. Parsimony analyses of sequence data showed that R. carotae and the ginseng isolates belonged to distinct but closely related clades. Conidia of a typical ginseng isolate were significantly shorter and possessed fewer septa than R. carotae but shared rhexolytic secession of conidia with R. carotae. The binomial Rhexocercosporidium panacis is proposed to accommodate isolates of this genus that are associated with the rusted root disease. PMID:17663127

  6. Serological comparison of selected isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida ssp. Salmonicida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahnel, G.B.; Gould, R.W.; Boatman, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Eight isolates of Acronionus salmonicida ssp. salmonicida were collected during furunculosis epizootics in North American Pacific coast states and provinces. Both virulent and avirulent forms of each isolate, confirmed by challenge and electron microscopy, were examined. Serological comparisons by cross-absorption agglutination tests revealed no serological differences between isolates. Using the double diffusion precipitin test, a single band was observed when antigen from a sonicated virulent strain was reacted with antiserum against a sonicated, virulent strain absorbed with homologous, avirulent strain. The presence of the single band was eliminated by excess sonication.

  7. Multiple origins of cultivated grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) based on chloroplast DNA polymorphisms.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The domestication of the Eurasian grape (Vitis vinifera ssp. sativa) from its wild ancestor (Vitis vinifera ssp. sylvestris) has long been claimed to have occurred in Transcaucasia where its greatest genetic diversity is found and where very early archaeological evidence, including grape pips and ar...

  8. GENETIC STRUCTURE AND PATTERNS OF SELECTION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS OF BETA VULGARIS SSP. MARITIMA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty one accessions, including one sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) 30 wild beet (29 Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima and 1 Beta macrocarpa) were included in this study. 29 Accessions were collected from wild populations along the coast of France (Atlantic and Mediterranean) and have associate...

  9. Calcium-binding properties of SSP-5, the Streptococcus gordonii M5 receptor for salivary agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Y; Fisher, E; Malamud, D; Golub, E; Demuth, D R

    1994-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii M5 expresses a lectin on its surface (SSP-5) which binds to human salivary agglutinin (SAG). This interaction requires sialic acid residues of SAG and divalent cations and may mediate the colonization of oral tissues by this organism. In this report, we show that the binding of SAG to SSP-5 requires calcium and that SSP-5 is a high-affinity calcium-binding protein. SAG-mediated aggregation of S. gordonii M5 was inhibited by 1 mM EDTA, and the restoration of aggregation occurred only upon the readdition of calcium. To ascertain the level at which calcium exerts its effects, the calcium-binding properties of SSP-5 were evaluated by using a 45Ca binding assay. In addition, a kinetic analysis of calcium binding was carried out by using fura2, a fluorescent calcium-binding dye. These analyses showed that SSP-5 is a high-affinity calcium-binding protein that binds 1 mol of calcium per mol of protein and has a dissociation constant of 0.45 +/- 0.2 microM. The calcium-binding capacity of SSP-5 was also calculated independently to be 1.0 +/- 0.2 mol of Ca per mol of SSP-5 by column chromatography on Sephadex G-25 equilibrated with 10 microM 45Ca. To localize the calcium binding site of SSP-5, a series of C-terminal deletion mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated for calcium-binding activity. Deletion of the 250 C-terminal residues of SSP-5 had little effect on calcium binding. However, deletion of residues 1168 to 1250 resulted in the loss of calcium-binding activity, suggesting that this region is important for calcium binding by SSP-5. Images PMID:7960097

  10. Evaluation of RO modules for the SSP ETC/LSS.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Bambenek, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    During the past eight years the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center has supported the development of an Integrated Water and Waste Management System for use in the Space Station Prototype (SSP) Environmental Thermal Control/Life-Support System (ETC/LSS). This system includes the reverse osmosis (RO) process for recycling wash water and the compression distillation process for recovering useable water from urine, urinal flush water, humidity condensate, commode flush water and the wash water concentrated by RO. This paper summarizes the experimental work performed during the past four years to select the best commercially available RO module for this system and to also define which surfactants and germicides are most compatible with the selected module.

  11. Potential SSP Perfluorooctanoic Acid Related Fluoropolymer Materials Obsolescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segars, Matt G.

    2006-01-01

    The Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA) has identified a potential for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to incur materials obsolescence issues due to agreements between the fluoro-chemical industry and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to participate in a Global Stewardship Program for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This presentation will include discussions of the chemistry, regulatory drivers, affected types of fluoropolymer and fluoroelastomer products, timeline for reformulations, and methodology for addressing the issue. It will cover the coordination of assessment efforts with the International Space Station and Head Quarters Air Force Space Command, along with some examples of impacted materials. The presentation is directed at all members of the international aerospace community concerned with identifying potential environmentally driven materials obsolescence issues.

  12. Seed germination characteristics of Chrysothamnus nauseosus ssp. viridulus (Astereae, Asteraceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.A.; Sankhla, N.; Weber, D.J.; McArthur, E.D.

    1987-04-30

    Rubber rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus (Pallas) Britt. ssp. viridulus) may prove to be a source of high-quality cis-isoprene rubber, but its establishment is limited by a lack of information on seed germination. Consequently, seeds were germinated at alternating temperatures (5-15, 5-25, 15-25, and 20-30 C) in light and dark as well as constant temperatures (15-40 C with 5-C increments) to determine temperature response. Seeds were also germinated in solutions of polyethylene glycol 6000, salinity regimes at all the above-mentioned temperatures to determine salinity and temperature interaction. The hormones GA/sub 3/ and kinetin were used to study their effect on overcoming salt- and temperature-induced germination inhibition. Seeds of C. nauseosus ssp. viridulus were very sensitive to low temperature. Best germination was achieved at 25 and 30 C, but these seeds also germinated at a higher temperature (35 C). The seeds of rabbit brush germinated at both constant and alternating temperatures. Light appears to play little or no role in controlling germination of the seeds of rubber rabbitbrush. However, seeds of rabbitbrush were sensitive to salinity, and seed germination was progressively inhibited by increase in salt concentration, although a few seeds still germinated at the highest saline level. Progressively higher concentrations of polyethylene glycol also progressively inhibited germination. Suppression of seed germination induced by high salt concentrations and high temperatures can be partially alleviated by the application of either GA/sub 3/ or kinetin. 34 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Bosom Buddies: The Symbiotic Relationship Between Infants and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum and ssp. infantis. Genetic and Probiotic Features.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Silvia; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene; Ross, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a complex community that plays an important role in human health from the initial steps of its establishment. Its microbial composition has been suggested to result from selective pressures imposed by the host and is modulated by competition among its members. Bifidobacterium longum is one of the most abundant species of the Bifidobacterium genus in the gut microbiota of healthy breast-fed infants and adults. The recent advancements of 'omics techniques have facilitated the genetic and functional studies of different gut microbiota members. They have revealed the complex genetic pathways used to metabolize different compounds that likely contribute to the competitiveness and persistence of B. longum in the colon. The discovery of a genomic island in B. longum ssp. infantis that encodes specific enzymes for the metabolism of human milk oligosaccharides suggests a specific ecological adaptation. Moreover, B. longum is widely used as probiotic, and beneficial effects in infant health have been reported in several studies. PMID:26934170

  14. An abstract class loader for the SSP and its implementation in TL.

    SciTech Connect

    Wickstrom, Gregory Lloyd; Winter, Victor Lono; Fraij, Fares; Roach, Steve; Beranek, Jason

    2004-08-01

    The SSP is a hardware implementation of a subset of the JVM for use in high consequence embedded applications. In this context, a majority of the activities belonging to class loading, as it is defined in the specification of the JVM, can be performed statically. Static class loading has the net result of dramatically simplifying the design of the SSP as well as increasing its performance. Due to the high consequence nature of its applications, strong evidence must be provided that all aspects of the SSP have been implemented correctly. This includes the class loader. This article explores the possibility of formally verifying a class loader for the SSP implemented in the strategic programming language TL. Specifically, an implementation of the core activities of an abstract class loader is presented and its verification in ACL2 is considered.

  15. MglA/SspA complex interactions are modulated by inorganic polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wrench, Algevis P; Gardner, Christopher L; Siegel, Sara D; Pagliai, Fernando A; Malekiha, Mahsa; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogen's virulence and survival within host cells. Our goal was to determine if an intracellular metabolite modulate these protein/protein interactions. In this study, we identified inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) as a signal molecule that promotes the interaction of MglA and SspA from F. tularensis SCHU S4. Analysis of the Mgla/SspA interaction was carried out using a two-hybrid system. The Escherichia coli reporter strain contained a deletion on the ppK-ppX operon, inhibiting polyP synthesis. The interaction between MglA and SspA was significantly impaired, as was the interaction between the MglA/SspA complex and the regulatory protein, FevR, indicating the stabilizing effect of polyP. In F. tularensis, chromatin immune precipitation studies revealed that in the absence of polyP, binding of the MglA/SspA complex to the promoter region of the pdpD, iglA, fevR and ppK genes is decreased. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicated that polyP binds directly to the MglA/SspA complex with high affinity (KD?=?0.3 M). These observations directly correlated with results obtained from calorimetric scans (DSC), where a strong shift in the mid-transition temperature (Tm) of the MglA/SspA complex was observed in the presence of polyP. PMID:24116108

  16. MglA/SspA Complex Interactions Are Modulated by Inorganic Polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Sara D.; Pagliai, Fernando A.; Malekiha, Mahsa; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogens virulence and survival within host cells. Our goal was to determine if an intracellular metabolite modulate these protein/protein interactions. In this study, we identified inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) as a signal molecule that promotes the interaction of MglA and SspA from F. tularensis SCHU S4. Analysis of the Mgla/SspA interaction was carried out using a two-hybrid system. The Escherichia coli reporter strain contained a deletion on the ppK-ppX operon, inhibiting polyP synthesis. The interaction between MglA and SspA was significantly impaired, as was the interaction between the MglA/SspA complex and the regulatory protein, FevR, indicating the stabilizing effect of polyP. In F. tularensis, chromatin immune precipitation studies revealed that in the absence of polyP, binding of the MglA/SspA complex to the promoter region of the pdpD, iglA, fevR and ppK genes is decreased. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicated that polyP binds directly to the MglA/SspA complex with high affinity (KD?=?0.3 M). These observations directly correlated with results obtained from calorimetric scans (DSC), where a strong shift in the mid-transition temperature (Tm) of the MglA/SspA complex was observed in the presence of polyP. PMID:24116108

  17. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces cyaneogriseus ssp. noncyanogenus, the thermotolerant producer of commercial antibiotics nemadectin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Chuang; Zhang, Bo; He, Hairong; Jin, Pinjiao; Wang, Jijia; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2015-06-20

    Streptomyces cyaneogriseus ssp. noncyanogenus is thermotolerant bacterium producing commercially important nemadectin, a kind of macrolide antibiotics, which has been widely used as a biopesticide. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. cyaneogriseus ssp. noncyanogenus, which consists of one chromosome (7,762,396bp) with no plasmid. Genome sequence information contributes to understanding the biosynthesis of nemadectin better and provides the basis for analysis of its thermotolerance and biosynthetical potential. PMID:25842156

  18. [Examination of normal database in three-dimensional SSP].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Haramoto, Masuo; Komatsu, Akio; Kurihara, Hideyuki

    2005-04-20

    The results of statistical image analyses, such as three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP), are affected by the normal database (NDB) used. As a general rule, each institution must establish its own NDB for analysis. However, the numbers of institutions with the ability to establish their own NDB are limited. Therefore, it would be ideal if an NDB suitable for other institutions could be established from standard volunteer data gathered at a single institution. In this study, we examined the validity of establishing an NDB suitable for other institutions from the standard volunteer data gathered at our institution, using E.CAM (used as a reference) and IRIX. We established three NDBs. One was established from E.CAM, and the other two were from IRIX (in which overall FWHM was the same as that of E.CAM with Butterworth filter cutoff frequency and using an identical algorithm for image-reconstruction of E.CAM). We then compared the mean values and standard deviations of the NDBs, and also examined the effects on the Z-score map. We determined that the NDB that had been established was suitable for other institutions, using identical FWHM (resolution of SPECT imaging) and an algorithm for image-reconstruction. PMID:15855876

  19. Positioning Space Solar Power (SSP) as the Next Logical Step after the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charania, A.

    2002-01-01

    At the end of the first decade of the 21st century, the International Space Station (ISS) will stand as a testament of the engineering capabilities of the international community. The choices for the next logical step for this community remain vast and conflicting: a Mars mission, moon colonization, Space Solar Power (SSP), etc. This examination focuses on positioning SSP as one such candidate for consideration. A marketing roadmap is presented that reveals the potential benefits of SSP to both the space community and the global populace at large. Recognizing that scientific efficiency itself has no constituency large enough to persuade entities to outlay funds for such projects, a holistic approach is taken to positioning SSP. This includes the scientific, engineering, exploratory, economic, political, and development capabilities of the system. SSP can be seen as both space exploration related and a resource project for undeveloped nations. Coupling these two non-traditional areas yields a broader constituency for the project that each one alone could generate. Space exploration is many times seen as irrelevant to the condition of the populace of the planet from which the money comes for such projects. When in this new century, billions of people on the planet still have never made a phone call or even have access to clean water, the origins of this skepticism can be understandable. An area of concern is the problem of not living up to the claims of overeager program marketers. Just as the ISS may never live up to the claims of its advocates in terms of space research, any SSP program must be careful in not promising utopian global solutions to any future energy starved world. Technically, SSP is a very difficult problem, even harder than creating the ISS, yet the promise it can hold for both space exploration and Earth development can lead to a renaissance of the relevance of space to the lives of the citizens of the world.

  20. A sporulation-specific, sigF-dependent protein, SspA, affects septum positioning in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Tzanis, Angelos; Dalton, Kate A; Hesketh, Andrew; den Hengst, Chris D; Buttner, Mark J; Thibessard, Annabelle; Kelemen, Gabriella H

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase sigma factor SigF controls late development during sporulation in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The only known SigF-dependent gene identified so far, SCO5321, is found in the biosynthetic cluster encoding spore pigment synthesis. Here we identify the first direct target for SigF, the gene sspA, encoding a sporulation-specific protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that SspA is a secreted lipoprotein with two PepSY signature domains. The sspA deletion mutant exhibits irregular sporulation septation and altered spore shape, suggesting that SspA plays a role in septum formation and spore maturation. The fluorescent translational fusion protein SspAmCherry localized first to septum sites, then subsequently around the surface of the spores. Both SspA protein and sspA transcription are absent from the sigF null mutant. Moreover, in vitro transcription assay confirmed that RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing SigF is sufficient for initiation of transcription from a single sspA promoter. In addition, in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that sspA is a direct target of BldD, which functions to repress sporulation genes, including whiG, ftsZ and ssgB, during vegetative growth, co-ordinating their expression during sporulation septation. PMID:24261854

  1. Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) is associated with lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Florian; Mohner, Amelie; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sren G

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcal lipases have been proposed as pathogenicity factors. In Staphylococcus saprophyticus the surface-associated protein (Ssp) has been previously characterized as a cell wall-associated true lipase. A S. saprophyticus ?ssp::ermB mutant has been described as less virulent in an in vivo model of urinary tract infection compared with its wild-type. This is the first report showing that S. saprophyticus induced a lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans similar to that of S. aureus RN4220. In two S. saprophyticus ?ssp::ermB mutants lifespan reduction in C. elegans was partly abolished. In order to attribute virulence to the lipase activity itself and distinguish this phenomenon from the presence of the Ssp-protein, the conserved active site of the lipase was modified by site-directed ligase-independent mutagenesis and lipase activity-deficient mutants were constructed. These results indicate that the Ssp is associated with pathogenicity in C. elegans and one could speculate that the lipase activity itself is responsible for this virulence. PMID:23959029

  2. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  3. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  4. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  5. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  6. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  7. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  8. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  9. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  10. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Carrot Daucus carota L. Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn. Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia.... Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  11. Assessment of Applying the PMaC Prediction Framework to NERSC-5 SSP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, Noel

    2006-09-30

    NERSC procurement depends on application benchmarks, in particular the NERSC SSP. Machine vendors are asked to run SSP benchmarks at various scales to enable NERSC to assess system performance. However, it is often the case that the vendor cannot run the benchmarks at large concurrency as it is impractical to have that much hardware available. Additionally, there may be difficulties in porting the benchmarks to the hardware. The Performance Modeling and Characterization Lab (PMaC) at San Diego Supercomputing Center (SDSC) have developed a framework to predict the performance of codes on large parallel machines. The goal of this work was to apply the PMaC prediction framework to the NERSC-5 SSP benchmark applications and ultimately consider the accuracy of the predictions. Other tasks included identifying assumptions and simplifications in the process, determining the ease of use, and measuring the resources required to obtain predictions.

  12. Ssp1 CaMKK: A Sensor of Actin Polarization That Controls Mitotic Commitment through Srk1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Gimnez-Zaragoza, David; Lpez-Avils, Sandra; Yance-Chvez, Tula; Montserrat, Marta; Pujol, M. Jess; Bachs, Oriol; Aligue, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) is required for diverse cellular functions. Mammalian CaMKK activates CaMKs and also the evolutionarily-conserved AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe CaMKK, Ssp1, is required for tolerance to limited glucose through the AMPK, Ssp2, and for the integration of cell growth and division through the SAD kinase Cdr2. Results Here we report that Ssp1 controls the G2/M transition by regulating the activity of the CaMK Srk1. We show that inhibition of Cdc25 by Srk1 is regulated by Ssp1; and also that restoring growth polarity and actin localization of ssp1-deleted cells by removing the actin-monomer-binding protein, twinfilin, is sufficient to suppress the ssp1 phenotype. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that entry into mitosis is mediated by a network of proteins, including the Ssp1 and Srk1 kinases. Ssp1 connects the network of components that ensures proper polarity and cell size with the network of proteins that regulates Cdk1-cyclin B activity, in which Srk1 plays an inhibitory role. PMID:26575035

  13. A cellular study of teosinte Zea mays ssp. parviglumis (Poaceae) caryopsis development showing several processes conserved in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although recent molecular studies elucidate the genetic background leading to changed morphology of maize female inflorescence and the structure of the caryopsis during the domestication of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) from its wild progenitor teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis), the mechanisms under...

  14. Identification of Functional Candidates amongst Hypothetical Proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  15. Transfer of soft kernel texture from Triticum aestivum to durum wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. durum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) is a leading cereal grain whose primary use is the production of semolina and then pasta. Its rich culinary relationship to humans is related, in part, to its very hard kernel texture. This very hard texture is due to the loss of the Puroindoline genes whi...

  16. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles W.; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22663564

  17. Ecotypic variation in Elymus elymoides ssp. Brevifolius race C in the northern Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bottlebrush squirreltail (Elymus elymoides [Raf.] Sweezey) is an important native bunchgrass for restoration of degraded rangelands of western North America. It is taxonomically complex and has diverged into as many as four subspecies, including ssp. brevifolius, for which four geographically disti...

  18. The discovery of resistant sources of spring barley, Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum, and unique greenbug biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic sources for host-plant resistance to the greenbug (Schiazphis graminum Ronani) in barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) are limited in that only two single dominant genes Rsg1 and Rsg2 are available for resistance to greenbug biotypes. We evaluated four new barley lines from the Wild...

  19. Occurrence of aphidborne viruses in southernmost South American populations of Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild and cultivated Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis (Fcc) plants were collected at different locations in southern Chile in order to determine the current viral status of this native strawberry. The following aphidborne viruses (ABVs): Strawberry mild yellow edge virus (SMYEV), Strawberry mottle...

  20. INFLUENCE OF MOWING ARTEMISIA TRIDENTATA SSP. WYOMINGENSIS ON WINTER HABITAT FOR WILDLIFE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mowing is commonly implemented to Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh (Wyoming big sagebrush) plant communities to improve wildlife habitat, increase forage production for livestock, and create fuel breaks for fire suppression. However, information detailing the in...

  1. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. INTERSEEDING MEDICAGO SATIVA SSP. FALCATA INTO RANGELANDS TO ENHANCE CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND FORAGE PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangelands of the U.S. Great Plains can generally be characterized as having low nitrogen levels, which along with water, are considered the major limiting factors in forage production. The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of interseeding Medicago sativa ssp. falcata on native range...

  3. Summary of Recent Results from NASA's Space Solar Power (SSP) Programs and the Current Capabilities of Microwave WPT Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSpadden, James; Mankins, John C.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The concept of placing enormous solar power satellite (SPS) systems in space represents one of a handful of new technological options that might provide large-scale, environmentally clean base load power into terrestrial markets. In the US, the SPS concept was examined extensively during the late 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). More recently, the subject of space solar power (SSP) was reexamined by NASA from 1995-1997 in the "fresh look" study, and during 1998 in an SSP "concept definition study". As a result of these efforts, in 1999-2000, NASA undertook the SSP Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) program which pursued preliminary strategic technology research and development to enable large, multi-megawatt SSP systems and wireless power transmission (WPT) for government missions and commercial markets (in-space and terrestrial). During 2001-2002, NASA has been pursuing an SSP Concept and Technology Maturation (SCTM) program follow-on to the SERT, with special emphasis on identifying new, high-leverage technologies that might advanced the feasibility of future SSP systems. In addition, in 2001, the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) released a major report providing the results of a peer review of NASA's SSP strategic research and technology (R&T) road maps. One of the key technologies needed to enable the future feasibility of SSP/SPS is that of wireless power transmission. Advances in phased array antennas and rectennas have provided the building blocks for a realizable WPT system. These key components include the dc-RF converters in the transmitter, the retrodirective beam control system, and the receiving rectenna. Each subject is briefly covered, and results from the SERT program that studied a 5.8 GHz SPS system are presented. This paper presents a summary results from NASA's SSP efforts, along with a summary of the status of microwave WPT technology development.

  4. Leaf Peltate Glandular Trichomes of Vernonia galamensis ssp. galamensis var. ethiopica Gilbert: Development, Ultrastructure and Chemical Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants from the genus Vernonia produce a variety of flavonoids and bitter sesquiterpene lactones important for agriculture and human health. Leaf glandular trichomes of Vernonia galamensis ssp. galamensis var. ethiopica Gilbert (VGAE) were investigated for ultrastructural development and content com...

  5. Chemical, technological, and nutritional characteristics of two lines of "farro" (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum).

    PubMed

    Acquistucci, Rita; Aureli, Gabriella; Codianni, Pasquale; Colonna, Michaela; Galterio, Giovanni

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, the renewed interest for foods with a natural image has increased the demand for dry pasta produced from "hulled" wheat such as the Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum, also known as "farro". In order to contribute to the general knowledge, two lines of farro were considered in this study. To have a comparison, an old cultivar of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Senatore Cappelli) in addition to a commercial semolina were also examined. All semolina samples were used to produce pasta samples. Results showed some differences among pasta samples that seem to be due not to the presence of specific protein subunits but especially to the quantitative ratio between the different subunits. Results also reconfirmed the role played by the drying technology that is able to affect the sensory characteristics of pasta products. PMID:15285114

  6. SSP Technology Investigation of a High-Voltage DC-DC Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, J. A.; Grady, W. M.; George, Patrick J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to establish the feasibility of a high-voltage DC-DC converter based on a rod-array triggered vacuum switch (RATVS) for the Space Solar Power system. The RATVS has many advantages over silicon and silicon-carbide devices. The RATVS is attractive for this application because it is a high-voltage device that has already been demonstrated at currents in excess of the requirement for an SSP device and at much higher per-device voltages than existing or near-term solid state switching devices. The RATVS packs a much higher specific power rating than any solid-state device and it is likely to be more tolerant of its surroundings in space. In addition, pursuit of an RATVS-based system would provide NASA with a nearer-term and less expensive power converter option for the SSP.

  7. Isolation, purification and characterisation of low molecular weight xylanase from Bacillus pumilus SSP-34.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, S

    2012-04-01

    Low molecular weight endo-xylanase from Bacillus pumilus SSP-34 was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatographies. Xylanases were isolated by novel purification protocol which includes the use of anion exchange matrix such as DEAE Sepharose CL 6B with less affinity towards enzyme protein. The purified B. pumilus SSP-34 have a molecular weight of 20 kDa, with optimum pH and temperature at 6.0 and 50 C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at 50 C for 30 min. It showed remarkable stability at pH values ranging from 4.5 to 9 when the reaction was carried out at 50 C. K (m) and V (max) values, determined with oats spelts xylan were 6.5 mg ml? and 1,233 ?mol min? mg? protein, respectively, and the specific activity was 1,723 U mg?. PMID:22350873

  8. Chemical Composition of Different Botanical Origin Honeys Produced by Sicilian Black Honeybees (Apis mellifera ssp. sicula).

    PubMed

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Vista, Silvia; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria

    2015-07-01

    In 2008 a Slow Food Presidium was launched in Sicily (Italy) for an early warning of the risk of extinction of the Sicilian native breed of black honeybee (Apis mellifera L. ssp sicula). Today, the honey produced by these honeybees is the only Sicilian honey produced entirely by the black honeybees. In view of few available data regarding the chemical composition of A. mellifera ssp. sicula honeys, in the present investigation the chemical compositions of sulla honey (Hedysarum coronarium L.) and dill honey (Anethum graveolens L.) were studied with a multimethodological approach, which consists of HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, three unifloral honeys (lemon honey (obtained from Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck), orange honey (Citrus arantium L.), and medlar honey (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl)), with known phenol and polyphenol compositions, were studied with NMR spectroscopy to deepen the knowledge about sugar and amino acid compositions. PMID:25730368

  9. BcMF21 is important for pollen development and germination in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yu, Youjian; Dong, Heng; Yao, Lina; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Jiashu

    2014-01-01

    Brassica campestris Male Fertility 21 (BcMF21) was previously isolated from the flower buds of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis) and expressed specifically in tapetum and microspores during the meiosis stage and the uninucleate stage of microspore development. Here, we used antisense RNA technology to knock down the expression level of BcMF21 in B. campestris and analyzed the phenotype of the transgenic plants. Alexander staining and scanning electron microscope revealed sterility and exine deformities in the mature pollen grains of BcMF21 antisense RNA transgenic plants. The germination furrow of the BcMF21 antisense RNA transgenic pollen was covered by lipid like materials. The pollen tubes burst and could not grow normally in vitro. Therefore, we presented here BcMF21 might be an important gene for pollen development and germination. PMID:24323195

  10. A DNA Vaccine Encoding for TcSSP4 Induces Protection against Acute and Chronic Infection in Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; López-Monteón, Aracely; Salgado-Jiménez, Berenice; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Immunization of mice with plasmids containing genes of Trypanosoma cruzi induces protective immunity in the murine model of Chagas disease. A cDNA clone that codes for an amastigote-specific surface protein (TcSSP4) was used as a candidate to develop a DNA vaccine. Mice were immunized with the recombinant protein rTcSSP4 and with cDNA for TcSSP4, and challenged with bloodstream trypomastigotes. Immunization with rTcSSP4 protein makes mice more susceptible to trypomastigote infection, with high mortality rates, whereas mice immunized with a eukaryotic expression plasmid containing the TcSSP4 cDNA were able to control the acute phase of infection. Heart tissue of gene-vaccinated animals did not show myocarditis and tissue damage at 365 days following infection, as compared with control animals. INF-γ was detected in sera of DNA vaccinated mice shortly after immunization, suggesting the development of a Th1 response. The TcSSP4 gene is a promising candidate for the development of an anti-T. cruzi DNA vaccine. PMID:22110377

  11. A novel protein kinase gene ssp1+ is required for alteration of growth polarity and actin localization in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Matsusaka, T; Hirata, D; Yanagida, M; Toda, T

    1995-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive suppressor mutants were isolated from two fission yeast mutants defective in cell shape control: ppe1, encoding a type 2A-like protein phosphatase, and sts5, one of 11 staurosporine-supersensitive mutants. Complementation tests showed that suppression was due to two chromosomal loci, ssp1 and ssp2. Cells of the ssp1 mutant grown at the restrictive temperature arrested uniformly with an elongated cell body and a 2C content of DNA. Interestingly, these mutant cells grew only in a monopolar manner. At a specific point in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, wild-type cells exhibit a drastic alteration in growth polarity, from mono- to bipolar. This change coincides with the distribution of cortical actin from one end of the cell to both ends. In the ssp1 mutant cells, cortical actin was localized only at one end, suggesting that the mutant fails to change growth polarity. Nucleotide sequence determination showed that ssp1+ encodes a novel protein kinase. Ectopic overexpression of ssp1+ resulted in an altered cell morphology and cortical actin was randomly dispersed within the cells. Immunocytological analysis revealed that the protein was primarily localized in the cytoplasm and that half of the protein existed in an insoluble fraction. These results show that the dynamics of actin-based growth polarity during the cell cycle are regulated, at least in part, by a novel set of protein kinases and phosphatases. Images PMID:7628434

  12. Evaluating the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to Assess the Bond between Dogs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, Therese; McGowan, Ragen T. S.; Keeling, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    The Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) is increasingly being used to study attachment between dogs and humans. It has been developed from the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure, which is used extensively to investigate attachment between children and their parents. In this experiment, 12 female beagle dogs were tested in two treatments to identify possible order effects in the test, a potential weakness in the SSP. In one treatment (FS), dogs participated together with a familiar person and a stranger. In a control treatment (SS), the same dogs participated together with two unfamiliar people, stranger A and stranger B. Comparisons were made between episodes within as well as between treatments. As predicted in FS, dogs explored more in the presence of the familiar person than the stranger. Importantly, they also explored more in the presence of stranger A (who appeared in the same order as the familiar person and followed the same procedure) than stranger B in SS. Furthermore, comparisons between treatments, where a familiar person was present in FS and stranger A was present in SS, showed no differences in exploration. In combination, these results indicate that the effect of a familiar person on dogs' exploratory behaviour, a key feature when assessing secure attachment styles, could not be tested reliably due to the order in which the familiar person and the stranger appear. It is proposed that in the future only counterbalanced versions of the SSP are used. Alternatively, since dogs reliably initiated more contact with the familiar person compared to the strangers, it is suggested that future studies on attachment in dogs towards humans should focus either on the behaviour of the dog in those episodes of the SSP when the person returns, or on reunion behaviour in other studies, specially designed to address dog-human interactions at this time. PMID:23437277

  13. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Human Bile Reveals SSP411 as a Novel Biomarker of Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jian; Wang, Weizhi; Wu, Jindao; Feng, Bing; Chen, Wen; Wang, Meng; Tang, Jincao; Wang, Fuqiang; Cheng, Feng; Pu, Liyong; Tang, Qiyun; Wang, Xuehao; Li, Xiangcheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is an intractable cancer, arising from biliary epithelial cells, which has a poor prognosis and is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis of CC is essential as surgical resection remains the only effective therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify improved biomarkers to facilitate early diagnosis and prognostication in CC. Methods A comparative expression profile of human bile samples from patients with cholangitis and CC was constructed using a classic 2D/MS/MS strategy and the expression of selected proteins was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression levels of selected candidate biomarkers in CC and matched normal tissues. Finally, spermatogenesis associated 20 (SSP411; also named SPATA20) was quantified in serum samples using an ELISA. Results We identified 97 differentially expressed protein spots, corresponding to 49 different genes, of which 38 were upregulated in bile from CC patients. Western blotting confirmed that phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (brain) (PGAM-1), protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 3 (PDIA3), heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (chaperonin) (HSPD1) and SSP411 were significantly upregulated in individual bile samples from CC patients. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated these proteins were also overexpressed in CC, relative to normal tissues. SSP411 displayed value as a potential serum diagnostic biomarker for CC, with a sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity of 83.3% at a cutoff value of 0.63. Conclusions We successfully constructed a proteomic profile of CC bile proteins, providing a valuable pool novel of candidate biomarkers. SSP411 has potential as a biomarker for the diagnosis of CC. PMID:23118872

  14. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Katz, Samantha; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C; Solomon, Anthony W; Chen, Cheng Y; Pillay, Allan

    2015-06-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  15. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Pillay, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  16. Extinction risk assessment for the species survival plan (SSP) population of the Bali mynah (Leucopsar rothschildi).

    PubMed

    Earnhardt, Joanne M; Thompson, Steven D; Faust, Lisa J

    2009-05-01

    The Bali mynah Species Survival Plan (SSP), an Association of Zoos and Aquariums program, strives to maintain the genetic and demographic health of its population, avoid unplanned changes in size, and minimize the risk of population extinction. The SSP population meets current demographic and genetic objectives with a population size of 209 birds at 61 institutions and 96% genetic diversity (GD) retained from the source population. However, participating institutions have expressed concerns regarding space allocation, target population size (TPS), breeding restrictions, inbreeding depression, and harvest in relation to future population availability and viability. Based on these factors, we assess five questions with a quantitative risk assessment, specifically a population viability analysis (PVA) using ZooRisk software. Using an individual-based stochastic model, we project potential population changes under different conditions (e.g. changes in TPS and genetic management) to identify the most effective management actions. Our projections indicate that under current management conditions, population decline and extinction are unlikely and that although GD will decline over 100 years the projected loss does not exceed levels acceptable to population managers (less than 90% GD retained). Model simulations indicate that the combination of two genetic management strategies (i.e. priority breeding based on mean kinship and inbreeding avoidance) benefits the retention of GD and reduces the accumulation of inbreeding. The current TPS (250) is greater than necessary to minimize the risk of extinction for the SSP population but any reduction in TPS must be accompanied by continued application of genetic management. If carefully planned, birds can be harvested for transfer to Bali for a reintroduction program without jeopardizing the SSP population. PMID:19504596

  17. Evaluating the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to assess the bond between dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Therese; McGowan, Ragen T S; Keeling, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    The Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) is increasingly being used to study attachment between dogs and humans. It has been developed from the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure, which is used extensively to investigate attachment between children and their parents. In this experiment, 12 female beagle dogs were tested in two treatments to identify possible order effects in the test, a potential weakness in the SSP. In one treatment (FS), dogs participated together with a 'familiar person' and a 'stranger'. In a control treatment (SS), the same dogs participated together with two unfamiliar people, 'stranger A' and 'stranger B'. Comparisons were made between episodes within as well as between treatments. As predicted in FS, dogs explored more in the presence of the familiar person than the stranger. Importantly, they also explored more in the presence of stranger A (who appeared in the same order as the familiar person and followed the same procedure) than stranger B in SS. Furthermore, comparisons between treatments, where a familiar person was present in FS and stranger A was present in SS, showed no differences in exploration. In combination, these results indicate that the effect of a familiar person on dogs' exploratory behaviour, a key feature when assessing secure attachment styles, could not be tested reliably due to the order in which the familiar person and the stranger appear. It is proposed that in the future only counterbalanced versions of the SSP are used. Alternatively, since dogs reliably initiated more contact with the familiar person compared to the strangers, it is suggested that future studies on attachment in dogs towards humans should focus either on the behaviour of the dog in those episodes of the SSP when the person returns, or on reunion behaviour in other studies, specially designed to address dog-human interactions at this time. PMID:23437277

  18. Antinociceptive effect of some extracts from Ajuga chamaecistus Ging. ssp. tomentella (Boiss.) Rech. f. aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Ajuga is used for the treatment of joint pain, gout, and jaundice in traditional Iranian medicine (TIM). Ajuga chamaecistus ssp. tomentella is an exclusive subspecies of Ajuga chamaecistus in the flora of Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate antinociceptive properties of some extracts from aerial parts of A. chamaecistus ssp. tomentella. Methods Antinociceptive activities of total water and 80% methanol extracts, hexane, diethyl ether and n-butanolic partition fractions of the methanolic extract were analyzed using the formalin test in mice. Indomethacin (10mg/kg) and normal saline were employed as positive and negative controls, respectively. Results Oral administration of all extracts (200, 400 and 600mg/kg) 30min before formalin injection had no effect against the acute phase (05min after formalin injection) of the formalin-induced licking time, but hexane fraction (200mg/kg) caused a significant effect (p?ssp. tomentella have an analgesic property that supports traditional use of Ajuga genus for joint pain and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25022284

  19. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kirsty L; Anderson, Victoria L; Davis, Katie S; Van Den Berg, Albert H; Christie, James S; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J; Van West, Pieter

    2014-07-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments. PMID:25088077

  20. Autophosphorylation of the Smk1 MAPK is spatially and temporally regulated by Ssp2 during meiotic development in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tio, Chong Wai; Omerza, Gregory; Sunder, Sham; Winter, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Smk1 is a meiosis-specific MAPK that controls spore wall morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although Smk1 is activated by phosphorylation of the threonine (T) and tyrosine (Y) in its activation loop, it is not phosphorylated by a dual-specificity MAPK kinase. Instead, the T is phosphorylated by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)activating kinase, Cak1. The Y is autophosphorylated in an intramolecular reaction that requires a meiosis-specific protein named Ssp2. The meiosis-specific CDK-like kinase, Ime2, was previously shown to positively regulate Smk1. Here we show that Ime2 activity is required to induce the translation of SSP2 mRNA at anaphase II. Ssp2 protein is then localized to the prospore membrane, the structure where spore wall assembly takes place. Next the carboxy-terminal portion of Ssp2 forms a complex with Smk1 and stimulates the autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y residue. These findings link Ime2 to Smk1 activation through Ssp2 and define a developmentally regulated mechanism for activating MAPK at specific locations in the cell. PMID:26246597

  1. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Kirsty L.; Anderson, Victoria L.; Davis, Katie S.; Van Den Berg, Albert H.; Christie, James S.; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J.; Van West, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments. PMID:25088077

  2. Establishing Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis on mined lands: Science and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, G.E.; Vicklund, L.E.; Belden, S.E.

    2005-12-01

    In 1996, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality enacted regulations governing the reestablishment of woody shrubs on mined lands. The regulation required that an average density of one shrub m{sup -2} be reestablished on at least 20% of the disturbed land area and that the shrub composition must include dominant premine species. In Wyoming, and much of the Northern Great Plains, that meant that Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle and Young) (Wyoming big sagebrush) had to be reestablished on mined lands. Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis had proven difficult to reestablish on mined lands because of poor quality seed, seed dormancy and a poor understanding of the seedbed ecology of this species. Research in the last two decades has produced significant knowledge in the area of direct-seed establishment of Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis on mined lands. Our research has shown that reducing grass seeding rates will reduce competition and result in larger sagebrush plants that are more likely to survive and provide greater structural diversity to the plant community. Economic analyses demonstrated that big sagebrush can be established at a cost of $0.01-0.05 per seedling using direct seeding methods compared to transplanting nursery grown seedlings, estimated to cost $0.72-$1.65 per seedling (depending on size) to grow and from $1.30-$2.40 to plant (flat land to 2:1 slopes). An adequate level of precipitation will be necessary to ensure successful establishment of this species no matter what method of propagation is selected and direct seeding gives greater opportunity for success because of the demonstrated longevity of the seed to germinate 3-5 years after the initial seeding.

  3. Studies on zoapatle. VIII: Novel cytotoxic sesquiterpene lactones from Montanoa tomentosa ssp. microcephala.

    PubMed

    Topcu, G; Cordell, G A; Farnsworth, N R; Fong, H H

    1988-06-01

    Investigation of the leaves of Montanoa tomentosa Cerv. ssp. microcephala (Sch.-Bip.) Funk (Compositae) resulted in the isolation of three novel guaianolide sesquiterpenes, montacephalin (1), tomencephalin (2), and 5-hydroxytomencephalin (3), which were shown to be cytotoxic (P-388). The structures of these sesquiterpenes were elucidated through analysis of their spectroscopic characteristics, and complete proton and carbon-13 assignments were made for the new compounds. Also isolated were the known terpenes, beta-amyrin, beta-amyrin acetate, stigmasterol, stigmasterol-3 beta-D-glucoside, (-)-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, and monoginoic acid. PMID:3171940

  4. Antifungal activity of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. tolerans isolated from a sourdough bread culture.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Bullerman, Lloyd B

    2008-01-15

    Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from four different sourdough bread cultures previously investigated for antifungal activity. A total of 116 isolates were obtained and screened for antifungal activity against a battery of molds. The most inhibitory isolate obtained was identified by API 50 CHL and 16s ribosomal RNA genotyping and found to be Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. tolerans. This isolate completely inhibited the growth of Fusarium proliferatum M 5689, M 5991 and Fusarium graminearum R 4053 compared to controls in a dual agar plate assay. PMID:18077044

  5. [Campylobacter fetus ssp. jejuni, Aeromonas hydrophila, helicoidal bacteria and coronavirus in the murine intestine].

    PubMed

    Hernndez, F; Rivera, P; Herrera, M L

    1985-11-01

    Intestinal contents of 28 laboratory-bred white mice and 6 wild-caught rats were extracted and observed with phase-contrast and transmission electron microscopy; cultures were made in Butzler agar and aeromonas, incubated in microaerobiosis, at 37 degrees C for 5 days. In three mice and two rats, helicoidal bacteria were observed, with 8 to 11 periplasmic fibers and terminal branches of 8 to 11 structures, similar to flagella. In one of the rats, coronavirus-like particles were observed. Campylobacter fetus ssp. jejuni was isolated in cultures from two mice and Aeromonas hydrophila from two rats. PMID:3916393

  6. A Global Water Resources Assessment under RCP, SSP, and CMIP5 Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, N.; Fujimori, S.

    2012-12-01

    A number of reports have been published on climate change impact assessment on global water resources, but earlier studies need to be updated and refined due to three reasons. First, most of earlier studies were based on an old set of IPCC scenarios consists of SRES (green house gas (GHG) emission and socio-economic scenarios) and CMIP3 (climate scenarios consistent with SRES). A new set of IPCC scenarios is being released (Moss et al., 2008) that consists of RCP (GHG emission scenario), SSP (socio-economic scenario), and CMIP5 (climate scenarios consistent with RCP). In order to take the latest achievements in climate modeling, impact assessments should be based on the new scenario. Second, most of earlier studies focused more on the change in water availability (e.g. runoff and discharge), less for change in water use (agricultural, industrial, domestic water use). Because SSP consists of five scenarios delineating substantially different world, water use scenarios should be developed with care reflecting the difference among them. Third, most of earlier studies assessed water availability and use at annual time resolution. This may overlook seasonal and inter-annual shortage of water due to variability in water availability and use. Here we present a novel assessment on global water resources using a global water resources model called H08 (Hanasaki et al., 2008a,b; 2010). H08 simulates natural water cycle and major human activities, such as water withdrawals and reservoir operation. It estimates water availability and use at daily time interval, which enables to take sub-annual water shortage into account. We first developed water use scenarios for agricultural (irrigation), industrial, and domestic water withdrawal that are consistent with five SSP scenarios. Next, we set up a matrix of scenario combination of RCP, SSP, and CMIP5 for insightful global water resources assessment. Finally we conducted H08 simulation using these scenarios and assessed water stressed region, including analysis on seasonal and inter-annual shortage of water due to variability in water availability and use. The results and implication are discussed in our presentation.

  7. Saliva-mediated aggregation of Enterococcus faecalis transformed with a Streptococcus sanguis gene encoding the SSP-5 surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Demuth, D R; Berthold, P; Leboy, P S; Golub, E E; Davis, C A; Malamud, D

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of a high-molecular-weight salivary glycoprotein (agglutinin) with Streptococcus sanguis M5 leads to the formation of bacterial aggregates. We have previously shown that the SSP-5 surface antigen from S. sanguis M5 binds the salivary agglutinin and therefore may be involved in the aggregation process. Here we report the transformation of a nonaggregating Enterococcus faecalis strain with the SSP-5 gene and show that the protein is expressed on the cell surface and confers an aggregation-positive phenotype. E. faecalis S161 protoplasts were transformed with pAM401 EB-5, a shuttle vector containing the S. sanguis SSP-5 gene, resulting in the isolation of E. faecalis S161EB-5. Crude cell extracts from this transformant and from S. sanguis M5 were analyzed by Western blotting. Extracts from S. sanguis M5 possessed peptides of 190 and 205 kilodaltons that reacted strongly with polyclonal antibodies against the recombinant SSP-5 antigen. E. faecalis S161EB-5 contained only the 190-kilodalton immunoreactive protein, suggesting that the antigen may be processed differently in E. faecalis S161EB-5. The parent strain, E. faecalis S161, did not react with this antibody preparation. Immunogold labeling of intact E. faecalis S161EB-5 and S. sanguis M5 with anti-SSP-5 immunoglobulin G showed that both organisms expressed similar levels of the antigen. Both organisms formed visible aggregates upon incubation with salivary agglutinin. These results suggest that the SSP-5 antigen may mediate both the binding of agglutinin to S. sanguis M5 and the subsequent formation of bacterial aggregates. Images PMID:2651309

  8. Congenital vestibular disease in captive Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) in Australasia.

    PubMed

    Wheelhouse, Jaimee L; Hulst, Frances; Beatty, Julia A; Hogg, Carolyn J; Child, Georgina; Wade, Claire M; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2015-11-01

    The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) is a critically endangered species in the wild. To ensure that demographic and genetic integrity are maintained in the longer term, those Sumatran tigers held in captivity are managed as a global population under a World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Global Species Management Plan (GSMP). A retrospective study, including segregation and pedigree analysis, was conducted to investigate potential cases of congenital vestibular disease (CVD) in captive Sumatran tigers in Australasian zoos using medical and husbandry records, as well as video footage obtained from 50 tigers between 1975 and 2013. Data from the GSMP Sumatran tiger studbook were made available for pedigree and segregation analysis. Fourteen cases of CVD in 13 Sumatran tiger cubs and one hybrid cub (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae × Panthera tigris) were identified. Vestibular signs including head tilt, circling, ataxia, strabismus and nystagmus were observed between birth and 2 months of age. These clinical signs persisted for a median of 237 days and had resolved by 2 years of age in all cases. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected tigers were closely related and shared a single common ancestor in the last four generations. A genetic cause for the disease is suspected and, based on pedigree and segregation analysis, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is likely. Further investigations to determine the world-wide prevalence and underlying pathology of this disorder are warranted. PMID:26403953

  9. The Huygens surface science package (SSP): Flight performance review and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leese, M. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Hathi, B.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    The Surface Science Package (SSP) was one of six instruments flown onboard the Huygens probe to Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, in the framework of the NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens mission (Matson et al., 2002). The SSP operated throughout the probe's descent and after landing on Titan on 14th January 2005. This paper reviews scientific results from the Surface Science Package, and also reports previously unpublished flight data which illustrate the performance of the measurement systems in the Titan environment. This review provides some lessons learned that may be useful for further detailed analysis of the Huygens mission data, and for payloads for future missions to Titan, in which there has been recent interest (e.g., the Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) (Joint TSSM Science Definition Team, 2009), TANDEM (Coustenis et al., 2009) or the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) Discovery-class proposal (Stofan et al., 2010)), as well as for planetary probe missions more generally.

  10. Identification of Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris chromosomes by physical mapping of repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Galasso, I; Schmidt, T; Pignone, D

    2001-01-01

    We describe the characterisation and the chromosomal localisation of two repeated DNA sequences, named pLc30 (466 bp long, 64% AT residues) and pLc7 (408 bp long, 61% AT residues), isolated from lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris) genomic DNA. The pLc30 family is characterised by four internal repeats organised in a head-to-tail orientation, whereas the pLc7 contains many short direct subrepeats. The two families do not share significant sequence similarity. The distribution of these repetitive sequences in different Lens species and in other legumes was investigated. pLc30 is present in all Lens species investigated but absent from other genera examined. In contrast, pLc7 is present also in the genome of other legumes. As determined by FISH, the pLc30 sequence hybridises on six out of seven lentil chromosome pairs, while pLc7 hybridises on one only. The distribution of the nine different hybridisation sites of pLc30 allows the discrimination of all seven chromosome pairs and the construction of a karyotype of L. culinaris ssp. culinaris. Additionally, the combination of simultaneous and successive FISH with pLc7, 5S rRNA, 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA genes, and a telomeric sequence allowed the assembly of a physical map based on lentil karyotype. PMID:11330394

  11. Multiple origins of cultivated grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) based on chloroplast DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Garca, R; Ruiz-Garca, L; Bolling, L; Ocete, R; Lpez, M A; Arnold, C; Ergul, A; Sylemezo?lu, G; Uzun, H I; Cabello, F; Ibez, J; Aradhya, M K; Atanassov, A; Atanassov, I; Balint, S; Cenis, J L; Costantini, L; Goris-Lavets, S; Grando, M S; Klein, B Y; McGovern, P E; Merdinoglu, D; Pejic, I; Pelsy, F; Primikirios, N; Risovannaya, V; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K A; Snoussi, H; Sotiri, P; Tamhankar, S; This, P; Troshin, L; Malpica, J M; Lefort, F; Martinez-Zapater, J M

    2006-10-01

    The domestication of the Eurasian grape (Vitis vinifera ssp. sativa) from its wild ancestor (Vitis vinifera ssp. sylvestris) has long been claimed to have occurred in Transcaucasia where its greatest genetic diversity is found and where very early archaeological evidence, including grape pips and artefacts of a 'wine culture', have been excavated. Whether from Transcaucasia or the nearby Taurus or Zagros Mountains, it is hypothesized that this wine culture spread southwards and eventually westwards around the Mediterranean basin, together with the transplantation of cultivated grape cuttings. However, the existence of morphological differentiation between cultivars from eastern and western ends of the modern distribution of the Eurasian grape suggests the existence of different genetic contribution from local sylvestris populations or multilocal selection and domestication of sylvestris genotypes. To tackle this issue, we analysed chlorotype variation and distribution in 1201 samples of sylvestris and sativa genotypes from the whole area of the species' distribution and studied their genetic relationships. The results suggest the existence of at least two important origins for the cultivated germplasm, one in the Near East and another in the western Mediterranean region, the latter of which gave rise to many of the current Western European cultivars. Indeed, over 70% of the Iberian Peninsula cultivars display chlorotypes that are only compatible with their having derived from western sylvestris populations. PMID:17032268

  12. 4-Hydroxyisoleucine production of recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum ssp. lactofermentum under optimal corn steep liquor limitation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Niu, Tengfei; Fang, Huimin

    2015-05-01

    4-Hydroxyisoleucine (4-HIL) is a nonproteinogenic amino acid that exhibits insulinotropic biological activity. Here, L-isoleucine dioxygenase gene (ido) derived from Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-1520 was cloned and expressed in an L-isoleucine-producing strain, Corynebacterium glutamicum ssp. lactofermentum SN01, in order to directly convert its endogenous L-isoleucine (Ile) into 4-HIL through single-step fermentation. The effects of corn steep liquor limitation as well as ido and truncated idoΔ6 overexpression on 4-HIL production were researched. 4-HIL production by ido-overexpressing strain was improved to 65.44 ± 2.27 mM after fermented for 144 h under corn steep liquor-subsufficient condition, obviously higher than that under corn steep liquor-rich and insufficient conditions. The conversion ratio of Ile to 4-HIL increased to 0.85 mol/mol. In addition, 4-HIL production by ido-overexpressing strain was higher than that by idoΔ6-overexpressing strain, in accord with the relatively higher affinity of Ido as compared to IdoΔ6. This research generated a novel system for 4-HIL de novo biosynthesis and demonstrated corn steep liquor limitation as a useful strategy for improving 4-HIL production in recombinant C. glutamicum ssp. lactofermentum. PMID:25725632

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi SSP4 Amastigote Protein Induces Expression of Immunoregulatory and Immunosuppressive Molecules in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Morán-Utrera, Yadira; López-Monteon, Aracely; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Méndez-Bolaina, Enrique; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    The acute phase of Chagas' disease in mice and human is marked by states of immunosuppression, in which Trypanosoma cruzi replicates extensively and releases immunomodulatory molecules that delay parasite-specific responses mediated by effector T cells. This mechanism of evasion allows the parasite to spread in the host. Parasite molecules that regulate the host immune response during Chagas' disease have not been fully identified, particularly proteins of the amastigote stage. In this work, we evaluated the role of the GPI anchored SSP4 protein of T. cruzi as an immunomodulatory molecule in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). rMBP::SSP4 protein was able to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production. Likewise, rMBP::SSP4 induced the expression of genes and production of molecules involved in the inflammatory process, such as, cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules (CAMs) as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. These results suggest that the amastigote SSP4 molecule could play a key role in the immunoregulatory and/or immunosuppressive process observed in the acute phase of infection with T. cruzi. PMID:23209478

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi SSP4 Amastigote Protein Induces Expression of Immunoregulatory and Immunosuppressive Molecules in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morán-Utrera, Yadira; López-Monteon, Aracely; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Méndez-Bolaina, Enrique; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    The acute phase of Chagas' disease in mice and human is marked by states of immunosuppression, in which Trypanosoma cruzi replicates extensively and releases immunomodulatory molecules that delay parasite-specific responses mediated by effector T cells. This mechanism of evasion allows the parasite to spread in the host. Parasite molecules that regulate the host immune response during Chagas' disease have not been fully identified, particularly proteins of the amastigote stage. In this work, we evaluated the role of the GPI anchored SSP4 protein of T. cruzi as an immunomodulatory molecule in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). rMBP::SSP4 protein was able to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production. Likewise, rMBP::SSP4 induced the expression of genes and production of molecules involved in the inflammatory process, such as, cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules (CAMs) as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. These results suggest that the amastigote SSP4 molecule could play a key role in the immunoregulatory and/or immunosuppressive process observed in the acute phase of infection with T. cruzi. PMID:23209478

  15. Poplar root exudates contain compounds that induce the expression of MiSSP7 in Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Martin, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Communication between organisms is crucial for their survival, especially for sessile organisms such as plants that depend upon interactions with mutualistic organisms to maximize their nutrient acquisition. This communication can take the form of the exchange of volatile compounds, metabolites or effectors - small protein signals secreted from the colonizing cell that change the biology of the host cell. We recently characterized the first mutualistic effector protein from an ectomycorrhizal fungus, a small secreted protein named MiSSP7 encoded by Laccaria bicolor. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are soil-borne mutualistic organisms whose hyphae wrap around host roots and grow into the root apoplastic space where the fungus exchanges nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in return for plant derived sugars. The MiSSP7 protein is induced by root exudates and is highly expressed throughout the root colonization process. Its presence was responsible for alterations to the plant transcriptomic profile, a mechanism by which MiSSP7 may aid in the formation of the symbiotic interface. Here we further discuss the implications of these findings and, further, we demonstrate that the production of MiSSP7 is induced by two flavonoids, rutin and quercitrin, a class of compounds normally found within the exudates of plant roots. We also consider the interesting similarities between the mechanisms of effector induction and action between pathogenic and mutualistic fungi. PMID:22301958

  16. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M.; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-01-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  17. The complete genome sequence of a lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. dextranicum strain DSM 20484(T).

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Jun; Jung, Byung Kwon; Lee, Changhee; Park, Choi Kyu; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-02-10

    Leuconostoc species are widespread in the natural environment and play an important role in several types of industrial and food fermentation processes. Here, we report the 1,854,727-bp complete genome sequence of the Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. dextranicum strain DSM 20484(T). PMID:26689480

  18. Intrascrotal Abscess, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Masciovecchio; Del Rosso, Alessandro; Saldutto, Pietro; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The Propionibacterium acnes and the Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii are occasional pathogenic bacteria. The intrascrotal localization of the Propionibacterium acnes is exceptional. The Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii is not able to colonize the urogenital apparatus but it is the most frequently responsible for blood culture contamination even if it can sustain, in particular conditions, systemic infections. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 72-year-old man who is under observation for pain and swelling of the left hemiscrotum associated to high fever. The scrotal ultrasound shows the presence of a left intra-scrotal abscess with didymus, epididymis, and intact didymus-epididymis tunicae. The blood culture executed for evening fever during antibiotic therapy has underlined an infection with Propionibacterium acnes. A following blood culture has shown an increase in Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii. Due to fever the patient has undergone left orchifunicolectomy with inguino-scrotal toilet. The anatomical pathological examination has also shown the presence of nonspecific granulomatous inflammation compatible with Propionibacterium acnes infection. Conclusion. The onset of an intrascrotal abscess likely sustained by Propionibacterium acnes complicated by a possible systemic Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii suprainfection is an exceptional event that, in our case, has been resolved with surgical toilet. PMID:23227417

  19. Poplar root exudates contain compounds that induce the expression of MiSSP7 in Laccaria bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Plett, Jonathan M.; Martin, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Communication between organisms is crucial for their survival, especially for sessile organisms such as plants that depend upon interactions with mutualistic organisms to maximize their nutrient acquisition. This communication can take the form of the exchange of volatile compounds, metabolites or effectors—small protein signals secreted from the colonizing cell that change the biology of the host cell. We recently characterized the first mutualistic effector protein from an ectomycorrhizal fungus, a small secreted protein named MiSSP7 encoded by Laccaria bicolor. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are soil-borne mutualistic organisms whose hyphae wrap around host roots and grow into the root apoplastic space where the fungus exchanges nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in return for plant derived sugars. The MiSSP7 protein is induced by root exudates and is highly expressed throughout the root colonization process. Its presence was responsible for alterations to the plant transcriptomic profile, a mechanism by which MiSSP7 may aid in the formation of the symbiotic interface. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and, further, we demonstrate that the production of MiSSP7 is induced by two flavonoids, rutin and quercitin, a class of compounds normally found within the exudates of plant roots. We also consider the interesting similarities between the mechanisms of effector induction and action between pathogenic and mutualistic fungi. PMID:22301958

  20. Resistance to race TTKSK of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Emmer Wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race TTKSK (Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is a serious threat to wheat production worldwide because of its wide virulence on many cultivars and rapid spread in eastern Africa and southwestern Asia. Emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum) is known to be a source of resistance to ste...

  1. Prescribed fires in Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana steppe have minor and transient effects on vegetation cover and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very little research has been conducted to determine the impacts of fire in mountain big sagebrush steppe of vegetation cover and frequency. Multiple prescribed fires were lit in 2002 and 2003 at the USDA-ARS U. S. Sheep Experiment Station in a mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. vase...

  2. Identification of a small molecule that modifies MglA/SspA interaction and impairs intramacrophage survival of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Wrench, Algevis P; Gardner, Christopher L; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogen's virulence and survival within host cells. In this study, we used a small molecule screening to identify quinacrine as a thermal stabilizing compound for F. tularensis SCHU S4 MglA and SspA. A bacterial two-hybrid system was used to analyze the in vivo effect of quinacrine on the heterodimer complex. The results show that quinacrine affects the interaction between MglA and SspA, indicated by decreased ?-galactosidase activity. Further in vitro analyses, using size exclusion chromatography, indicated that quinacrine does not disrupt the heterodimer formation, however, changes in the alpha helix content were confirmed by circular dichroism. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that quinacrine makes contact with amino acid residues Y63 in MglA, and K97 in SspA, both located in the "cleft" of the interacting surfaces. In F. tularensis subsp. novicida, quinacrine decreased the transcription of the FPI genes, iglA, iglD, pdpD and pdpA. As a consequence, the intramacrophage survival capabilities of the bacteria were affected. These results support use of the MglA/SspA interacting surface, and quinacrine's chemical scaffold, for the design of high affinity molecules that will function as therapeutics for the treatment of Tularemia. PMID:23372736

  3. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modifies MglA/SspA Interaction and Impairs Intramacrophage Survival of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Wrench, Algevis P.; Gardner, Christopher L.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogens virulence and survival within host cells. In this study, we used a small molecule screening to identify quinacrine as a thermal stabilizing compound for F. tularensis SCHU S4 MglA and SspA. A bacterial two-hybrid system was used to analyze the in vivo effect of quinacrine on the heterodimer complex. The results show that quinacrine affects the interaction between MglA and SspA, indicated by decreased ?-galactosidase activity. Further in vitro analyses, using size exclusion chromatography, indicated that quinacrine does not disrupt the heterodimer formation, however, changes in the alpha helix content were confirmed by circular dichroism. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that quinacrine makes contact with amino acid residues Y63 in MglA, and K97 in SspA, both located in the cleft of the interacting surfaces. In F. tularensis subsp. novicida, quinacrine decreased the transcription of the FPI genes, iglA, iglD, pdpD and pdpA. As a consequence, the intramacrophage survival capabilities of the bacteria were affected. These results support use of the MglA/SspA interacting surface, and quinacrines chemical scaffold, for the design of high affinity molecules that will function as therapeutics for the treatment of Tularemia. PMID:23372736

  4. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Enhanced Podophyllotoxin Production in Cell Cultures of Thracian Flax (Linum thracicum ssp. thracicum).

    PubMed

    Sasheva, Pavlina; Ionkova, Iliana; Stoilova, Nadezhda

    2015-07-01

    The Linum thracicum ssp. thracicum cell lines developed in this study are a feasible source for the sustainable production of podophyllotoxin, a lignan with an aryltetralin skeleton that is used for the manufacture of the chemotherapeutic drugs etopophos and teniposide. We used mass spectrometry to confirm the presence of the aryltetralin lignan in the thracian flax cell cultures. Next, we explored how changes in the culture medium influenced the podophyllotoxin content. Out of six developed cell lines, four were selected for further experiments and challenged with elicitors. The selected cell lines clustered into two groups: developed in full strength medium (Li) vs developed in half strength medium (HS). While podophyllotoxin production in the Li cell lines was boosted by 80% upon administration of the elicitor methyl jasmonate, the HS lines produced high amounts of the target metabolite triggered by reduced concentration of nutrients and were only slightly influenced by the elicitor. PMID:26411016

  5. Lignan formation in hairy root cultures of Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum (Cass.) Greuter)

    PubMed Central

    Wawrosch, Christoph; Schwaiger, Stefan; Stuppner, Hermann; Kopp, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    A hairy root line of Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum (Cass.) Greuter) was obtained upon transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC15834. Elicitation of this line with silver nitrate, sucrose, methyl jasmonate and yeast extract at various concentrations in most cases resulted in a stimulation of lignan biosynthesis. Through elicitation with 6% sucrose the roots accumulated the pharmacologically active lignans leoligin and 5-methoxy-leoligin at levels of 0.0678% and 0.0372%, respectively, without significant growth inhibition. These lignan levels were comparable to those found in intact roots of cultivated Edelweiss. The biotechnological production of leoligin could be an attractive option for the continuous, field culture-independent production of the valuable secondary metabolites leoligin and 5-methoxy-leoligin. PMID:24932777

  6. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Shock Test and Specification Experience for Reusable Flight Hardware Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    As commercial companies are nearing a preliminary design review level of design maturity, several companies are identifying the process for qualifying their multi-use electrical and mechanical components for various shock environments, including pyrotechnic, mortar firing, and water impact. The experience in quantifying the environments consists primarily of recommendations from Military Standard-1540, Product Verification Requirement for Launch, Upper Stage, and Space Vehicles. Therefore, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) formed a team of NASA shock experts to share the NASA experience with qualifying hardware for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and other applicable programs and projects. Several team teleconferences were held to discuss past experience and to share ideas of possible methods for qualifying components for multiple missions. This document contains the information compiled from the discussions

  7. Antioxidant capacities and polyphenolics of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Seong, Gi-Un; Hwang, In-Wook; Chung, Shin-Kyo

    2016-05-15

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis) is a green leafy vegetable used mainly in kimchi, salted and fermented dishes. Consumer preference for the leaf portion differs according to the type of dishes. In this study, Chinese cabbage was divided into three parts, and their antioxidant activities were investigated through in vitro assays. The total phenolic contents (TPC), total flavonoid contents (TFC), and vitamin C contents were also determined as indicators of antioxidant contents. The phenolic acids and flavonoids were separated and identified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The outer leaf had the strongest antioxidant activity with the maximum antioxidant contents, followed by the mid- and inner leaves. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that outer leaf is positively related to caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and myricetin contents, whereas the mid- and inner leaves are negatively related to sinapic acid contents. PMID:26776015

  8. Identification of genes transcribed by Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus in infected porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Wang, Yang; Ma, Zhe; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Huaidong; Yang, Yongchun; Lu, Chengping; Fan, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for respiratory tract infection, septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis and arthritis in swine and humans. However, the expression and regulation of SEZ genes during an infection in vivo are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the identification of SEZ genes preferentially expressed in vivo during infection in pigs. This study identified 45 SEZ genes that were upregulated in infected porcine lung tissues using the selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) technique and comparative dot-blot analysis, followed by quantitative RT-PCR validation. The identified genes were characterized into 6 functional categories: metabolism, cell wall-associated, stress response, transporters, regulators and unknown functions. Our study successfully identified multiple genes, which can deepen our understanding about SEZ pathogenesis and infer probable virulence factors. It will promote the development of novel vaccines and therapies about this pathogen for further study. PMID:23454837

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SSP in NIR. II. Synthesis models (Meneses-Goytia+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Goytia, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Trager, S. C.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-08-01

    The present Single Stellar Populations (SSP) models are derived from my Ph.D.'s thesis and this paper. The following nomenclature is used throughout the paper and the website (http://smg.astro-research.net/ssp-models/the-models/) to describe the models, e.g. MarS models use the M08 isochrones (Mar) and the Salpeter (S) IMF. General information about the models is given in table1. For further information, please refer to the paper. Each set of models and their corresponding predictions are available in the website and VIZIER. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from those pages in ascii format . The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from t hose pages in ascii format . The nomenclature of each SED is as follows: isochroneIMFsedXXXXHZX.XXXXXXXXXTgXX.XXXXXXXe+XX - where XXXX tells whether those models contain C-stars or no (COMBO or NOCS respectively) H is the spectral band in which normalization occurred Z_X.XXXXXXXXX is the metallicity in terms of Z Tg_XX.XXXXXXXe+XX is the age in years. Each set of models contains MarS - 96 SEDs GirS - 96 SEDs BaSS - 116 SEDs We have also included in the websites the Integrated colours and line-strength indices from all our models (MarS, GirS and BaSS). The SEDs were convolved to a velocity dispersion of 350km/s before calculating indices. (5 data files).

  10. Assessing the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in semiarid shrublands dominated by Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Keith A; Smith, James F; White, Merlin M; Serpe, Marcelo D

    2014-05-01

    Variation in the abiotic environment and host plant preferences can affect the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF) assemblages. This study analyzed the AMF taxa present in soil and seedlings of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis collected from sagebrush steppe communities in southwestern Idaho, USA. Our aims were to determine the AMF diversity within and among these communities and the extent to which preferential AMF-plant associations develop during seedling establishment. Mycorrhizae were identified using molecular methods following DNA extraction from field and pot culture samples. The extracted DNA was amplified using Glomeromycota specific primers, and identification of AMF was based on phylogenetic analysis of sequences from the large subunit-D2 rDNA region. The phylogenetic analyses revealed seven phylotypes, two within the Claroideoglomeraceae and five within the Glomeraceae. Four phylotypes clustered with known species including Claroideoglomus claroideum, Rhizophagus irregularis, Glomus microaggregatum, and Funneliformis mosseae. The other three phylotypes were similar to several published sequences not included in the phylogenetic analysis, but all of these were from uncultured and unnamed glomeromycetes. Pairwise distance analysis revealed some phylotypes with high genetic variation. The most diverse was the phylotype that included R. irregularis, which contained sequences showing pairwise differences up to 12 %. Most of the diversity in AMF sequences occurred within sites. The smaller genetic differentiation detected among sites was correlated with differences in soil texture. In addition, multiplication in pot cultures led to differentiation of AMF communities. Comparison of sequences obtained from the soil with those from A. tridentata roots revealed no significant differences between the AMF present in these samples. Overall, the sites sampled were dominated by cosmopolitan AMF taxa, and young seedlings of A. tridentata ssp. wyomingensis were colonized in relation to the abundance of these taxa in the soil. PMID:24249492

  11. [Study of the normal database that affects 3D-SSP Z-score mapping].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Haramoto, Masuo; Komatsu, Akio; Uchida, Kouji

    2004-03-01

    The effects of image reconstruction conditions and devices used on 3D-SSP analysis (Z-score mapping) were investigated. Images of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom were taken with the IRIX device or E.CAM. Using two methods of image reconstruction (FBP and OSEM), several kinds of phantom normal databases (PNDB) and signal data, with or without correction for attenuation, were obtained at varying Butterworth filter cutoff frequencies. The results of 3D-SSP analyses were compared between combinations of PNDB and signal data obtained under the same conditions of image reconstruction and combinations obtained under different conditions. The results of PNDB obtained with different devices were also analyzed. For combinations of PNDB and signal data both obtained with OSEM, the Z-score of signals was high. When FBP was used to obtain both PNDB and signal data, the Z-score and signal size tended to become greater and the false-positive rate tended to decrease as the Butterworth filter cutoff frequency became lower. Whether or not correction for attenuation was incorporated did not affect the results of analysis when the same method was used to collect both PNDB and signal data. If the method for image reconstruction differed between PNDB and signal data, the false-positive rate was relatively high. Using a different device to obtain PNDB resulted in a relatively high false-positive rate. We therefore recommend that the conditions for image reconstruction from signal data should be matched to the conditions for image reconstruction from PNDB. It seems impossible to share the same NDB among different devices. PMID:15131511

  12. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 adhesin SspB V-region mediates coaggregation via receptor polysaccharide of Actinomyces oris T14V.

    PubMed

    Back, C R; Douglas, S K; Emerson, J E; Nobbs, A H; Jenkinson, H F

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB proteins, members of the antigen I/II (AgI/II) family of Streptococcus adhesins, mediate adherence to cysteine-rich scavenger glycoprotein gp340 and cells of other oral microbial species. In this article we investigated further the mechanism of coaggregation between S. gordonii DL1 and Actinomyces oris T14V. Previous mutational analysis of S. gordonii suggested that SspB was necessary for coaggregation with A. oris T14V. We have confirmed this by showing that Lactococcus lactis surrogate host cells expressing SspB coaggregated with A. oris T14V and PK606 cells, while L. lactis cells expressing SspA did not. Coaggregation occurred independently of expression of A. oris type 1 (FimP) or type 2 (FimA) fimbriae. Polysaccharide was prepared from cells of A. oris T14V and found to contain 1,4-, 4,6- and 3,4-linked glucose, 1,4-linked mannose, and 2,4-linked galactose residues. When immobilized onto plastic wells this polysaccharide supported binding of L. lactis expressing SspB, but not binding of L. lactis expressing other AgI/II family proteins. Purified recombinant NAVP region of SspB, comprising amino acid (aa) residues 41-847, bound A. oris polysaccharide but the C-domain (932-1470 aa residues) did not. A site-directed deletion of 29 aa residues (?691-718) close to the predicted binding cleft within the SspB V-region ablated binding of the NAVP region to polysaccharide. These results infer that the V-region head of SspB recognizes an actinomyces polysaccharide ligand, so further characterizing a lectin-like coaggregation mechanism occurring between two important primary colonizers. PMID:25965671

  13. Uptake and translocation of metformin, ciprofloxacin and narasin in forage- and crop plants.

    PubMed

    Eggen, Trine; Asp, Tone Normann; Grave, Kari; Hormazabal, Victor

    2011-09-01

    Transfer of bioactive organic compounds from soil to plants might represent animal and human health risks. Sewage sludge and manure are potential sources for bioactive compounds such as human- and veterinary drugs. In the present study, uptake of the anti-diabetic compound, metformin, the antibiotic agent ciprofloxacin and the anti-coccidial narasin in carrot (Daucuscarota ssp. sativus cvs. Napoli) and barley (Hordeumvulgare) were investigated. The pharmaceuticals were selected in order to cover various chemical properties, in addition to their presence in relevant environmental matrixes. The root concentration factors (RCF) found in the present study were higher than the corresponding leaf concentration factors (LCF) for the three test pharmaceuticals. The uptake of metformin was higher compared with ciprofloxacin and narasin for all plant compartments analyzed. Metformin was studied more explicitly with regard to uptake and translocation in meadow fescue (Festucapratense), three other carrot cultivars (D.carota ssp. sativus cvs. Amager, Rothild and Nutri Red), wheat cereal (Triticumaestivum) and turnip rape seed (Brassicacampestris). Uptake of metformin in meadow fescue was comparable with uptake in the four carrot cultivars (RCF 2-10, LCF approximately 1.5), uptake in wheat cereals were comparable with barley cereals (seed concentration factors, SCF, 0.02-0.04) while the accumulation in turnip rape seeds was as high as 1.5. All three pharmaceuticals produced negative effects on growth and development of carrots when grown in soil concentration of 6-10 mg kg(-1) dry weight. PMID:21757221

  14. Generation and characterization of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis - B. oleracea var. capitata monosomic and disomic alien addition lines.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ai Xia; Shen, Shu Xing; Wang, Yan Hua; Zhao, Jian Jun; Xuan, Shu Xin; Chen, Xue Ping; Li, Xiao Feng; Luo, Shuang Xia; Zhao, Yu Jing

    2015-09-01

    Five monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis - B. oleracea var. capitata were obtained by hybridization and backcrossing between B. rapa ssp. pekinensis (female parent) and B. oleracea var. capitata. The alien linkage groups were identified using 42 B. oleracea var. capitata linkage group-specific markers as B. oleracea linkage groups C2, C3, C6, C7 and C8. Based on the chromosomal karyotype of root tip cells, these five MAALs added individual chromosomes from B. oleracea var. capitata: chr 1 (the longest), chr 2 or 3, chr 5 (small locus of 25S rDNA), chr 7 (satellite-carrying) and chr 9 (the shortest). Five disomic alien addition lines were then generated by selfing their corresponding MAALs. PMID:26440082

  15. Engineering and Safety Partnership Enhances Safety of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duarte, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Project Management must use the risk assessment documents (RADs) as tools to support their decision making process. Therefore, these documents have to be initiated, developed, and evolved parallel to the life of the project. Technical preparation and safety compliance of these documents require a great deal of resources. Updating these documents after-the-fact not only requires substantial increase in resources - Project Cost -, but this task is also not useful and perhaps an unnecessary expense. Hazard Reports (HRs), Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEAs), Critical Item Lists (CILs), Risk Management process are, among others, within this category. A positive action resulting from a strong partnership between interested parties is one way to get these documents and related processes and requirements, released and updated in useful time. The Space Shuttle Program (SSP) at the Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a process which is having positive results and gaining acceptance within the Agency. A hybrid Panel, with equal interest and responsibilities for the two larger organizations, Safety and Engineering, is the focal point of this process. Called the Marshall Safety and Engineering Review Panel (MSERP), its charter (Space Shuttle Program Directive 110 F, April 15, 2005), and its Operating Control Plan emphasizes the technical and safety responsibilities over the program risk documents: HRs; FMEA/CILs; Engineering Changes; anomalies/problem resolutions and corrective action implementations, and trend analysis. The MSERP has undertaken its responsibilities with objectivity, assertiveness, dedication, has operated with focus, and has shown significant results and promising perspectives. The MSERP has been deeply involved in propulsion systems and integration, real time technical issues and other relevant reviews, since its conception. These activities have transformed the propulsion MSERP in a truly participative and value added panel, making a difference for the safety of the Space Shuttle Vehicle, its crew, and personnel. Because of the MSERP's valuable contribution to the assessment of safety risk for the SSP, this paper also proposes an enhanced Panel concept that takes this successful partnership concept to a higher level of 'true partnership'. The proposed panel is aimed to be responsible for the review and assessment of all risk relative to Safety for new and future aerospace and related programs.

  16. The AirSR two-component system contributes to Staphylococcus aureus survival in human blood and transcriptionally regulates sspABC operon

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jeffrey W.; Yang, Junshu; Guo, Haiyong; Ji, Yinduo

    2015-01-01

    To date, genes identified and transcriptionally regulated by the AirSR TCS have been involved in energy production and cellular homeostasis of the staphylococcal cell. It is well accepted that the state of cellular metabolism impacts the expression of virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus. For this reason, we conducted experiments to determine if the AirSR TCS contributes to the pathogenesis of S. aureus using an antisense RNA interference technology, an inducible overexpression system, and gene deletions. Depletion of AirSR by antisense RNA expression or deletion of the genes, results in significant decrease in bacterial survival in human blood. Conversely, overexpression of AirR significantly promotes survival of S. aureus in blood. AirR promotes the secretion of virulence factors that inhibits opsonin-based phagocytosis. This enhanced survival is partially linked to the transcriptional regulation of the sspABC operon, encoding V8 protease (SspA), staphopain B (SspB) and staphostatin B (SspC). SspA and SspB are known virulence factors which proteolytically digest opsonins and inhibit killing of S. aureus by professional phagocytes. This is the first evidence linking the AirSR TCS to pathogenesis of S. aureus. PMID:26191060

  17. Chemical composition and nutritional evaluation of the seeds of Acacia tortilis (Forssk.) Hayne ssp. raddiana.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Hassan E; Rayan, Ahmed M

    2016-06-01

    Chemical composition and nutritional evaluation as well as physicochemical and functional properties of seed flour of Acacia tortilis (Forssk.) Hayne ssp. raddiana were studied. The results indicated that seeds contained 5.30% moisture, 3.99% ash, 9.19% fat, 14.31% fiber, 27.21% protein and 45.30% carbohydrates. Potassium was the predominant element followed by calcium and then phosphorous. Phytic acid, tannins and trypsin inhibitor as antinutrients were detected. The amino acid profile compared well with FAO/WHO recommended pattern except for cystine/methionine, isoleucine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, lysine and threonine. Also, the first limiting amino acid was lysine. Fatty acid composition showed that linoleic acid was the major fatty acid, followed by palmitic, stearic, oleic and arachidic acids. The seed oil showed absorbance in the ultraviolet ranges, thus it can be used as a broad spectrum UV protectant. For physicochemical and functional properties, acacia seeds flour had excellent water holding index, swelling index, foaming capacity and foam stability. PMID:26830561

  18. Polar constituents from the aerial parts of Origanum vulgare L. Ssp. hirtum growing wild in Greece.

    PubMed

    Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Karioti, Anastasia; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Skaltsa, Helen

    2006-07-26

    From the polar extracts of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum 19 compounds have been isolated. The structures and relative stereochemistry have been elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and determined as apigenin, luteolin, chrysoeriol, diosmetin, quercetin, eriodictyol, cosmoside, vicenin-2, caffeic acid, p-menth-3-ene-1,2-diol 1-O-beta-glucopyranoside, thymoquinol 2-O-beta-glucopyranoside, thymoquinol 5-O-beta-glucopyranoside, thymoquinol 2,5-O-beta-diglucopyranoside, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-beta-glucopyranoside, lithospermic acid B, rosmarinic acid, 10-epi-lithospermic acid, and epi-lithospermic acid B. The three latter products display unusual stereochemistry of the 3,4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid unit(s), which to the authors' best knowledge has never been reported before in similar compounds. Moreover, lithospermic acid B (and its stereoisomers), p-menth-3-ene-1,2-diol 1-O-beta-glucopyranoside, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid, and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-beta-glucopyranoside were isolated for the first time from Origanum species. PMID:16848522

  19. Podophyllotoxin and 6-methoxy podophyllotoxin Production in Hairy Root Cultures of Liunm mucronatum ssp. mucronatum

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Afsaneh; Jafari, Morad; Nejhad, Nasim Mohammad; Hossenian, Farah

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Two bacterial strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, A13 and 9534 were evaluated for induction of transformed hairy roots in Linum mucronatum ssp. mucronatum, a high value medicinal plant. Materials and Methods: The hairy roots were successfully initiated, through infecting the hypocotyl and root explants and the A13 strain performed a high transformation frequency for hairy roots induction. Transgenic status of hairy roots was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the rol genes. Growth kinetics of transgenic roots induced by two strains indicated a similar pattern of growth, with maximum growth occurring between 42 to 56 days. The lignan contents in hairy roots were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Results: Transformed cultures showed significant differences (P < 0.05) in lignan content. The highest amount of Podophyllotoxin (PTOX, 5.78 mg/g DW) and 6-methoxy podophyllotoxin (MPTOX, 49.19 mg/g DW) was found in transformed lines induced by strain A13, which was four times higher than those of non-transformed roots. The results showed that hairy root cultures of L. mucronatum are rich sources of MPTOX. Conclusion: hairy root cultures from L. mucronatum can be used as a useful system for scale-up producing MPTOX and precursors for the production of antitumor agents in substitution with PTOX by considering the appropriate optimizations in future studies. PMID:24914281

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Cao, Hua; Cai, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Qu, Su-Ping; Huang, Xing-Qi

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 149,637?bp in length, containing a pair of 24,439?bp inverted repeat regions (IR), which were separated by small and large single copy regions (SSC and LSC) of 17,701 and 83,057?bp, respectively. 53.4% of the sugar beet cpDNA consisted of gene coding regions (protein coding and RNA genes). The gene content and relative positions of 113 individual genes (79 protein encoding genes, 30 tRNA genes, 4 rRNA genes) were almost identical to those of tobacco cpDNA. The overall AT contents of the sugar beet cpDNA were 63.6% and in the LSC, SSC and IR regions were 65.9%, 70.8% and 57.8%, respectively. Fifteen genes contained one intron, while three genes had two introns. PMID:24571405

  1. Influence of light availability on leaf structure and growth of two Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus provenances.

    PubMed

    James, S A; Bell, D T

    2000-09-01

    Light availability strongly affects leaf structure of the distinctive ontogenetic leaf forms of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ssp. globulus. Late-maturing plants from St. Marys, Tasmania and early maturing plants from Wilsons Promontory, Victoria (hereafter referred to as Wilsons Prom.) were grown for 9 months in 100, 50 or 10% sunlight. Growth, biomass and leaf area were significantly reduced when plants were grown in 10% sunlight. Provenance differences were minimal despite retention of the juvenile leaf form by the Tasmanian plants throughout the study. The time taken for initiation of vegetative phase change by the Wilsons Prom. saplings increased with decreasing light availability, but the nodal position of change on the main stem remained the same. Both juvenile and adult leaves remained horizontal in low light conditions, but became vertical with high irradiance. Leaf dimensions changed with ontogenetic development, but were unaffected by light availability. Juvenile leaves retained a dorsiventral anatomy and adult Wilsons Prom. leaves retained an isobilateral structure despite a tenfold difference in light availability. Stomatal density and distribution showed ontogenetic and treatment differences. At all irradiances, juvenile leaves produced the smallest stomata and adult leaves the largest stomata. Amphistomy decreased with decreasing irradiance. Detrended, correspondence analysis ordination highlighted the structural changes influenced by ontogenetic development and light availability. Adult leaves had characteristics similar to the xeromorphic, sun-leaf type found in arid, high-light conditions. Although juvenile leaves had characteristics typical of mesomorphic leaves, several structural features suggest that these leaves are more sun-adapted than adult leaves. PMID:11305455

  2. Subcellular localization of proteins labeled with GFP in Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri: targeting the division septum.

    PubMed

    Martins, Paula M M; Lau, Ivy F; Bacci, Maurício; Belasque, José; do Amaral, Alexandre M; Taboga, Sebastião R; Ferreira, Henrique

    2010-09-01

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus canker, an economically important disease that affects citrus worldwide. To initiate the characterization of essential biological processes of Xac, we constructed integrative plasmids for the ectopic expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled proteins within this bacterium. Here, we show that the disruption of the alpha-amylase gene (amy), the site of plasmid integration into the bacterial chromosome, does not alter its pathogenesis while abolishing completely the ability of Xac to degrade starch. Furthermore, our GFP expression system was used to characterize ORF XAC3408, a hypothetical protein encoded by Xac that shares significant homology to the FtsZ-stabilizing factor ZapA from Bacillus subtilis (ZapA(Bsu)). GFP-XAC3408 expressed in Xac exhibited a septal localization pattern typical of GFP-ZapA(Bsu), which indicates that XAC3408 is the Xac orthologue of the cell division protein ZapA(Bsu). The results demonstrate the potential of GFP labeling for protein functional characterizations in Xac, and, in addition, the Xac mutant strain labeled at the septum constitutes a biological model for the exploration of antibacterial compounds able to inhibit cell division in this plant pathogen. PMID:20629754

  3. FurA contributes to the oxidative stress response regulation of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Eckelt, Elke; Meiner, Thorsten; Meens, Jochen; Laarmann, Kristin; Nerlich, Andreas; Jarek, Michael; Weiss, Siegfried; Gerlach, Gerald-F.; Goethe, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator A (FurA) is known to be involved in iron homeostasis and stress response in many bacteria. In mycobacteria the precise role of FurA is still unclear. In the presented study, we addressed the functional role of FurA in the ruminant pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by construction of a furA deletion strain (MAP?furA). RNA deep sequencing revealed that the FurA regulon consists of repressed and activated genes associated to stress response or intracellular survival. Not a single gene related to metal homeostasis was affected by furA deletion. A decisive role of FurA during intracellular survival in macrophages was shown by significantly enhanced survival of MAP?furA compared to the wildtype, indicating that a principal task of mycobacterial FurA is oxidative stress response regulation in macrophages. This resistance was not associated with altered survival of mice after long term infection with MAP. Our results demonstrate for the first time, that mycobacterial FurA is not involved in the regulation of iron homeostasis. However, they provide strong evidence that FurA contributes to intracellular survival as an oxidative stress sensing regulator. PMID:25705205

  4. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 Protects against Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Permeability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Anna; Saarinen, Markku; Putaala, Heli; Olli, Kaisa; Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.; Madetoja, Mari; Tiihonen, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects such as erosion and increased permeability are common during the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Our objective was to assess whether Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 protects against NSAID-induced GI side effects in a rat model. A total of 120 male Wistar rats were allocated into groups designated as control, NSAID, and probiotic. The NSAID and probiotic groups were challenged with indomethacin (10?mg/kg?1; single dose). The probiotic group was also supplemented daily with 1010?CFU of B. lactis 420 for seven days prior to the indomethacin administration. The control group rats received no indomethacin or probiotic. The permeability of the rat intestine was analysed using carbohydrate probes and the visual damage of the rat stomach mucosa was graded according to severity. B. lactis 420 significantly reduced the indomethacin-induced increase in stomach permeability. However, the protective effect on the visual mucosal damage was not significant. The incidence of severe NSAID-induced lesions was, nevertheless, reduced from 50% to 33% with the probiotic treatment. To conclude, the B. lactis 420 supplementation protected the rats from an NSAID-induced increase in stomach permeability and may reduce the formation of more serious GI mucosal damage and/or enhance the recovery rate of the stomach mucosa. PMID:22848210

  5. Selenium alleviates chromium toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. Pekinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xuejiao; Zhao, Xiaohu; Hu, Chengxiao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Pengcheng; Shi, Hanzhi; Jia, Fen; Qu, Chanjuan

    2015-04-01

    The beneficial role of selenium (Se) in alleviation of chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative stress is well established. However, little is known about the underlying mechanism. The impacts of exogenous Se (0.1mg/L) on Cr(1mg/L)-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant systems in leaves of cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. Pekinensis) were investigated by using cellular and biochemical approaches. The results showed that supplementation of the medium with Se was effective in reducing Cr-induced increased levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide free radicals (O(-)2()), as well as increasing activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). Meanwhile, 1mg/L Cr induced loss of plasma membrane integrity, growth inhibition, as well as ultrastructural changes of leaves were significantly reversed due to Se supplementation in the medium. In addition, Se application significantly altered the subcellular distribution of Cr which transported from mitochondria, nucleus and the cell-wall material to the soluble fraction and chloroplasts. However, Se application did no significant alteration of Cr effects on osmotic adjustment accumulating products. The study suggested that Se is able to protect leaves of cabbage against Cr toxicity by alleviation of Cr induced oxidative stress, and re-distribution of Cr in the subcellular of the leaf. Furthermore, free radicals, lipid peroxides, activity of SOD and POD, and subcellular distribution of Cr can be considered the efficient biomarkers to indicate the efficiency of Se to detoxification Cr. PMID:25638524

  6. Improving green roofs and rail road greening systems using Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus ssp.

    PubMed

    Grneberg, H; Oschmann, C; Dunya, S; Ulrichs, C

    2006-01-01

    Aim of the present study was the improvement of existing methods for green roof and rail road greening systems using soil borne bacteria. Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus ssp. alone and in combination with vinasse applied to different growing substrates were tested. The substrates were brick chips, textile mats, mineral wool mats, and a commercial available substrate for the Swedish company VegTech. All four substrates were tested along an artificial rail track on the experimental station at Humboldt University Berlin, and partly on an existing rail track in Munich, Germany. Plants selected for the experiments belong to the genus Sedum, which is relatively tolerant to dry conditions. Inoculation of plants with bacteria had no effect on plant growth parameters and on coverage of different mobile bedding systems with Sedum plants. There was no significant difference between the various treatments in Munich. In both experiments, the addition of vinasse alone improved plant growth. Plant growth was significantly different on all substrates, whereas brick chips and the commercial roof soil was the best substrate. Brick chips are a cheap substrate which can be used for rail track greening. The results indicate that the quality of the substrate is the most important factor for remediation and greening of rail tracks and roof tops. The rapid growth of plants can be influenced by the application of vinasse as additional nutrient solution (potash (K) source) or nutrient enriched substrate. PMID:17390783

  7. The Discovery of Resistant Sources of Spring Barley, Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum, and Unique Greenbug Biotypes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J Scott; Mornhinweg, Dolores W; Payton, Mark E; Puterka, Gary J

    2016-02-01

    The genetic sources for host-plant resistance to the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rondani) in barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) are limited in that only two single dominant genes Rsg1 and Rsg2 are available for the complex of greenbug biotypes. We evaluated four new barley lines from the Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) that previously showed potential for greenbug resistance. Three of those entries, WBDC 53, WBDC 117, WBDC 336, exhibited very dominant sources of resistance to older known biotypes B, C, E, F, H, I, and TX1, which also add to the host-plant differentials used to separate these greenbug biotypes. We also re-evaluated the earlier known set of greenbug biotypes that have been in culture for several years against the known host-plant differentials, and included seven newer greenbug isolates collected from Wyoming to the full complement of small grain differentials. This resulted in the discovery of five new greenbug biotypes, WY10 MC, WY81, WY10 B, WY12 MC, and WY86. Wyoming isolates WY4 A and WY4 B were identical in their phenotypic profile, and should be combined as a single unique greenbug biotype. These barley trials resulted in finding new sources of host-plant resistance, although more research needs to be conducted on what type of resistance was found, and how it can be used. We also document that the Wheatland, Wyoming area serves as a very conducive environment for the development of new greenbug biotypes. PMID:26527793

  8. Elemental and nutritional analysis of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica) Berries of Pakistani origin.

    PubMed

    Sabir, S M; Maqsood, H; Hayat, Imran; Khan, M Q; Khaliq, A

    2005-01-01

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica) is a very important medicinal plant in northern areas of Pakistan. The fruit of sea buckthorn is rich in nutrients and medicinal compounds such as vitamins, carotene, flavonoids, essential oil, carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, and minerals. In order to compare various populations of sea buckthorn for chemical composition, eight populations from different areas of northern Pakistan were compared using fruit characteristics. Phytochemical analysis of berries showed vitamin C (250-333 mg/100 g), seed oil (7.69-13.7%), oil in softer pulp (19.2-29.1%), phytosterol content of seed oil (3.3-5.5%), and anthocyanin (0.5-25 mg/L), while the mineral element composition analysis revealed high contents of potassium (140-360 ppm), sodium (20-80 ppm), calcium (70-98 ppm), magnesium (150-240 ppm), iron (40-150 ppm), and phosphorus (110-133 ppm). This study established sea buckthorn berries as a good source of biochemical and mineral elements. The high variation between different populations shows the potential of selecting and breeding of the raw material for various defined purposes. PMID:16379565

  9. Antioxidant activity of Nepeta nuda L. ssp. nuda essential oil rich in nepetalactones from Greece.

    PubMed

    Gkinis, George; Bozin, Biljana; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Tzakou, Olga

    2010-10-01

    Essential oils from air-dried leaves and verticillasters of Nepeta nuda ssp. nuda from Greece were analyzed by means of gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The dominant constituent in the verticillaster oils was 4a?,7?,7a-nepetalactone (75.7%). The main metabolites of the leaf oil were 1,8-cineole (16.7%), 4a?,7?,7a-nepetalactone (24.7%), and caryophyllene oxide (16.3%). The oils were examined for their antioxidant activity. Neutralization of stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical ranged from 10.83% (2.50 ?g/mL) to 58.64% (50.00 ?g/mL) for verticillaster oil and from 6.25% (2.50 ?g/mL) to 57.79% (50.00 ?g/mL) for leaf oil. The essential oil from verticillasters had significant effects on lipid peroxidation (in the range of 41.18-59.23%), compared to tert-butylated hydroxytoluene (37.04%). In contrast, the essential oil from leaves exhibited pro-oxidant activity at the highest concentration applied. PMID:20626246

  10. Genetic and phenotypic parameters for dietary selection of mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana.

    PubMed

    Snowder, G D; Walker, J W; Launchbaugh, K L; Van Vleck, L D

    2001-02-01

    The heritability of diet selection for mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana [Rydb] Beetle) by grazing sheep was estimated from fecal samples collected from 549 Rambouillet ewes. Fecal samples were collected in September and October during 1996 and 1997 from free-grazing ewes on intermountain sagebrush-bunchgrass rangelands at the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station in Idaho. The total number of fecal samples was 1,949. Fecal samples were evaluated for composition of big sagebrush by near-infrared spectroscopy. Percentage of sagebrush in the diet was less in September than in October (21.6 vs 31.7%, respectively). Single-trait and bivariate derivative-free REML analyses were performed to genetically compare percentage of sagebrush in the diet in September and October. Heritability estimates were similar between September and October measurements (0.25 and 0.28, respectively). The genetic correlation between September and October percentages of sagebrush in the diet was high (0.91), implying that there is strong genetic similarity between September and October measurements and that an annual measurement may be sufficient for selection. These results contribute to a greater understanding of dietary preferences in freely grazing sheep, and suggest opportunities to improve production efficiency and forage management through selection for dietary preferences. PMID:11219459

  11. Characterization of a sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) die-off on the Handford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, A.; Lewinsohn, J.; Auger, C.; Downs, J.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Burrows, R.

    1997-09-01

    The Hanford Site contains one of the few remaining contiguous areas of shrub-steppe habitat left in Washington State. This habitat is home to many native plant and wildlife species, some of which are threatened with extinction or are unique to the Site. The importance of the Hanford Site increases as other lands surrounding the Site are developed, and these native species and habitats are lost. Stands of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) on the Site are a particularly important component of shrub-steppe habitat, because a number of wildlife require big sagebrush for food and cover. Since 1993, researchers and field biologists have made anecdotal observations of dying and declining sagebrush in stands of shrubs near the 100 Areas. This study was initiated to delineate and document the general boundary where sagebrush stands appear to be declining. We mapped the areal extent of the die-off using a global positioning system and found that the central portion of the die-off encompasses 280 hectares. Shrub stand defoliation was estimated to be near or greater than 80% in this area. The remainder of the die-off area exhibits varying mixtures of completely defoliated, partially defoliated, and healthy-looking stands. Declining sagebrush stands comprise a total of 1776 hectares.

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of polysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    PubMed

    Makino, S; Ikegami, S; Kano, H; Sashihara, T; Sugano, H; Horiuchi, H; Saito, T; Oda, M

    2006-08-01

    The extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are associated with the rheology, texture, and mouthfeel of fermented milk products, including yogurt. This study investigated the immunomodulatory effects of EPS purified from the culture supernatant of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) OLL1073R-1. The crude EPS were prepared from the culture supernatant of L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 by standard chromatographic methods, and were fractionated into neutral EPS and acidic EPS (APS). Acidic EPS were further fractionated into high molecular weight APS (H-APS) and low molecular weight APS (L-APS). High molecular weight APS were shown to be phosphopolysaccharides containing D-glucose, D-galactose, and phosphorus. Stimulation of mouse splenocytes by H-APS significantly increased interferon-gamma production, and, moreover, orally administered H-APS augmented natural killer cell activity. Oral administration of yogurt fermented with L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 and Streptococcus thermophilus OLS3059 to mice showed a similar level of immunomodulation as H-APS. However, these effects were not detected following administration of yogurt fermented with the starter combination of L. bulgaricus OLL1256 and S. thermophilus OLS3295. We conclude from these findings that yogurt fermented with L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1, containing immunostimulative EPS, would have an immunomodulatory effect on the human body. PMID:16840603

  13. Disentangling the causes of heterogeneity in male fecundity in gynodioecious Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, I; Arnaud, J-F; Klein, E K; Dufay, M

    2012-08-01

    Variation among individuals in reproductive success is advocated as a major process driving evolution of sexual polymorphisms in plants, such as gynodioecy where females and hermaphrodites coexist. In gynodioecious Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima, sex determination involves cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes and nuclear restorers of male fertility. Both restored CMS and non-CMS hermaphrodites co-occur. Genotype-specific differences in male fitness are theoretically expected to explain the maintenance of cytonuclear polymorphism. Using genotypic information on seedlings and flowering plants within two metapopulations, we investigated whether male fecundity was influenced by ecological, phenotypic and genetic factors, while taking into account the shape and scale of pollen dispersal. Along with spatially restricted pollen flow, we showed that male fecundity was affected by flowering synchrony, investment in reproduction, pollen production and cytoplasmic identity of potential fathers. Siring success of non-CMS hermaphrodites was higher than that of restored CMS hermaphrodites. However, the magnitude of the difference in fecundity depended on the likelihood of carrying restorer alleles for non-CMS hermaphrodites. Our results suggest the occurrence of a cost of silent restorers, a condition supported by scarce empirical evidence, but theoretically required to maintain a stable sexual polymorphism in gynodioecious species. PMID:22691102

  14. Variation in Nectar Volume and Sugar Concentration of Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum in Three Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, gnes; Molnr, Rka; Morschhauser, Tams; Hahn, Istvn

    2012-01-01

    Floral nectar volume and concentration of ramson (Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum) were investigated in three different habitats, including two types of sessile oak-hornbeam association on brown forest soil with clay illuviation and a silver lime-flowering ash rock forest association on rendzina. Daily nectar production ranged from 0.1 to 3.8??L per flower with sugar concentrations of 25 to 50%. Mean nectar volumes and concentrations showed significant differences between freely exposed flowers and covered flowers, which had been isolated from flower visitors 24?h prior to nectar studies. Both the amount and quality of nectar were affected by microclimatic conditions and soil properties and varied between populations at different habitats. In the silver lime-flowering ash rock-forest association mean nectar volumes and concentrations were lower than in a typical sessile oak-hornbeam association on three occasions, the difference being significant in two cases. During full bloom, the date of sampling did not have a profound effect on either nectar volume or concentration. PMID:22619588

  15. Bioactivity-Guided Isolation of Antiproliferative Sesquiterpene Lactones from Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis.

    PubMed

    Erenler, Ramazan; Sen, Ozkan; Yaglioglu, Ayse Sahin; Demirtas, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis (CSS) has been used as medicine for various diseases. In this work, root, stem and flower parts of the plant were separately extracted with methanol to execute bioassay-guided isolation. Antiproliferative activities of each extracts on C6 cells (Rat Brain tumor cells) and HeLa cells (human uterus carcinoma) were investigated in vitro. The methanol extract of stem exhibited the most antiproliferative activity therefore isolation of active compounds was carried out for stem of the plant. Methanol extract of stem was boiled at 97 C for 2 hours in water and then hexane and ethyl acetate were extracted sequentially. Solstitialin A 1 and 15-dechloro-15-hydroxychlorojanerin 2 were isolated from ethyl acetate extract by column chromatography and identified by spectroscopic techniques. Solstitialin A 1 was isolated from CSS and 15-dechloro-15-hydroxychlorojanerin 2 was isolated from Saussurea lipschitz and Rhaponticum pulchrum previously. These two compounds exhibited very high antiproliferative activity on C6 and HeLa cells. IC50 and IC75 values of compound 1 were obtained as 10.78 and 53.65 against C6 cell and as 48.78 and 68.52 against HeLa, respectively. IC50 and IC75 values of compound 2 were determined as 432.43 and 109.79 against C6 cell. PMID:26632440

  16. Patterns of diversity and recombination along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.).

    PubMed Central

    Tenaillon, Maud I; Sawkins, Mark C; Anderson, Lorinda K; Stack, Stephen M; Doebley, John; Gaut, Brandon S

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between genetic diversity and recombination in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Genetic diversity was measured in three types of markers: single-nucleotide polymorphisms, indels, and microsatellites. All three were examined in a sample of previously published DNA sequences from 21 loci on maize chromosome 1. Small indels (1-5 bp) were numerous and far more common than large indels. Furthermore, large indels (>100 bp) were infrequent in the population sample, suggesting they are slightly deleterious. The 21 loci also contained 47 microsatellites, of which 33 were polymorphic. Diversity in SNPs, indels, and microsatellites was compared to two measures of recombination: C (=4Nc) estimated from DNA sequence data and R based on a quantitative recombination nodule map of maize synaptonemal complex 1. SNP diversity was correlated with C (r = 0.65; P = 0.007) but not with R (r = -0.10; P = 0.69). Given the lack of correlation between R and SNP diversity, the correlation between SNP diversity and C may be driven by demography. In contrast to SNP diversity, microsatellite diversity was correlated with R (r = 0.45; P = 0.004) but not C (r = -0.025; P = 0.55). The correlation could arise if recombination is mutagenic for microsatellites, or it may be consistent with background selection that is apparent only in this class of rapidly evolving markers. PMID:12454083

  17. Intracellular invasion and persistence: survival strategies of Streptococcus suis and Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) suis and Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) differ substantially in their host specificity and tissue tropism. S. suis is a facultative pathogen in swine, which mainly colonises the upper respiratory tract and can cause meningitis, septicemia, arthritis and pneumonia. In contrast, MAP is an obligatory pathogen causing paratuberculosis in ruminants, and shows high tropism for the intestinal tract. Both pathogens are able to invade and persist in host cells. In S. suis, the significance of invasion for pathogenesis is a matter of controversial discussions. In vitro it has been shown that S. suis is internalized by epithelial cells and survives intracellularly for at least 24 h. However, at present there is no evidence that S. suis invades epithelial cells also in vivo. In MAP, on the other hand, persistence in macrophages is generally considered a crucial step in pathogenesis, but it remains to be elucidated, how it contributes to pathophysiology of the disease. The two pathogens exemplify how intracellular invasion and persistence might play different roles in pathogenesis. In S. suis, intracellular life may represent only a transient retreat phase, whereas in MAP it is the predominant in vivo niche of the pathogen. PMID:15584427

  18. Diversity of AMF associated with Ammophila arenaria ssp. arundinacea in Portuguese sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez-Echeverra, Susana; Freitas, Helena

    2006-11-01

    Dune vegetation is essential for the formation and preservation of sand dunes and the protection of the coast line. Coastal sand dunes are harsh environments where arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an important role in promoting plant establishment and growth. We present a study of the diversity of AMF associated with A. arenaria ssp. arundinacea in two locations of the Portuguese coast under a Mediterranean climate. These two locations were selected to compare a well-preserved dune system from a protected area with a degraded dune system from a public beach. AMF diversity was assessed mainly by cloning and sequencing of a fragment of the ribosomal SSU using the primer NS31 and AM1. Most of the 89 AMF clones obtained from the rhizosphere and roots of A. arenaria belonged to the genus Glomus, the largest clade within the Glomeromycota. Higher AMF diversity was found in the least disturbed site, in which spores of Scutellospora persica, Glomus constrictum and Glomus globiferum were found in the rhizosphere of A. arenaria. PMID:17043895

  19. Metal extraction by Alyssum serpyllifolium ssp. lusitanicum on mine-spoil soils from Spain.

    PubMed

    Kidd, P S; Monterroso, C

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of Alyssum serpyllifolium ssp. lusitanicum (Brassicaceae) for use in phytoextraction of polymetallic contaminated soils was evaluated. A. serpyllifolium was grown on two mine-spoil soils (MS1 and MS2): MS1 is contaminated with Cr (283 mg kg(-1)) and MS2 is moderately contaminated with Cr (263 mg kg(-1)), Cu (264 mg kg(-1)), Pb (1433 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (377 mg kg(-1)). Soils were limed to about pH 6.0 (MS1/Ca and MS2/Ca) or limed and amended with NPK fertilisers (MS1/NPK and MS2/NPK). Biomass was reduced on MS2/Ca due to Cu phytotoxicity. Fertilisation increased biomass by 10-fold on MS1/NPK, but root growth was reduced by 7-fold compared with MS1/Ca. Plants accumulated Mn, Ni and Zn in shoots, and both metal content and transportation were generally greater in MS2 than in MS1. Zinc bioaccumulation factors (BF, shoot([metal])/soil([metal])) were significantly greater in MS2 than in MS1. However, metal yields were greatest in plants grown on MS1/NPK. Concentrations of EDTA-, NH(4)Cl- and Mehlich 3 (M3)-extractable Mn and Zn were greater after plant growth. Concentrations of M3-extractable Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn were increased at the rhizosphere. Sequential extractions showed changes in the metal distribution among different soil fractions after growth. This could reflect the buffering capacity of these soils or the plants' ability to mobilise metals from less plant-available soil pools. Results suggest that A. serpyllifolium could be suitable for phytoextraction uses in polymetallic-contaminated soils, provided Cu concentrations were not phytotoxic. However, further optimisation of growth and metal extraction are required. PMID:15589245

  20. The long subclinical phase of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infections explained without adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Klinkenberg, Don; Koets, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an infection of the ruminant intestine. In cows, a long subclinical phase with no or low intermittent shedding precedes the clinical phase with high shedding. It is generally considered that an adaptive cell-mediated immune response controls the infection during the subclinical phase, followed by unprotective antibodies later in life. Based on recent observations, we challenge the importance of adaptive immunity and instead suggest a role of the structural organization of infected macrophages in localized granulomatous lesions. We investigated this hypothesis by mathematical modelling. Our first model describes infection in a villus, assuming a constant lesion volume. This model shows the existence of two threshold parameters, the MAP reproduction ratio R MAP determining if a lesion can develop, and the macrophage replacement ratio R MF determining if recruitment of macrophages is sufficient for unlimited growth. We show that changes in R MF during a cow's life - i.e. changes in the innate immune response - can cause intermittent shedding. Our second model describes infection in a granuloma, assuming a growing lesion volume. This model confirms the results of the villus model, and can explain early slow granuloma development: small granulomas grow slower because bacteria leave the granuloma quickly through the relatively large surface area. In conclusion, our models show that the long subclinical period of MAP infection can result from the structural organization of the infection in granulomatous lesions with an important role for innate rather than adaptive immunity. It thus provides a reasonable hypothesis that needs further investigation. PMID:26092036

  1. Salmonella enterica ssp. arizonae infection in a 43-year-old Italian man with hypoglobulinemia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Salmonella enterica ssp. arizonae is an uncommon human pathogen with serious infections reported in immunocompromised hosts. In Europe, only a few cases have been described. Patients with this infection usually have a history of contact with reptiles or travel abroad. We present a case report of infection in a patient with hypoglobulinemia and a literature review. Case presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian Italian man with hypoglobulinemia who presented to our hospital with sepsis and diarrhea. A stool culture yielded S. enterica ssp. arizonae. Our patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin and made a full recovery. We also present a review of the cases of S. enterica ssp. arizonae infections previously reported in Europe. Conclusions The majority of infections from S. enterica ssp. arizonae occur in patients who are immunocompromised. Data from the literature suggests that it may be difficult to eradicate the bacteria and thus, prolonged antibiotic courses are often used. It would be advisable for clinicians to investigate for pre-existing immune dysfunction if S. enterica ssp. arizonae is isolated. In Italy, although there have only been a few cases, the likely route of transmission remains unclear and requires further surveillance. PMID:21781321

  2. Characterization of a novel y-type HMW-GS with eight cysteine residues from Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenglin; Li, Hongyu; Chen, Gang; Kou, Chunlan; Ning, Shunzong; Yuan, Zhongwei; Jiang, Qi; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai; Zhang, Lianquan

    2015-11-15

    The composition and number of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) play important roles in determining the grain-processing quality of common wheat. The Glu-1Ay allele is silent in common wheat. In this study, an active y-type HMW-GS allele termed 1Ay8.2 (GenBank No. KP137569) was identified from Triticum monococcum L. ssp. monococcum (AmAm, 2n=2x=14), a species with a genome related to the A-genome of common wheat. Compared with previously reported active 1Ay subunits, this novel subunit contained an extra cysteine residue at position 103 of the amino acid sequence in the N-terminal region, in addition to the six cysteines in the N- and C-terminal regions found in most active 1Ay subunits and the one in the repetitive region that appears in only a few 1Ay alleles. This subunit was expressed in an amphiploid (AAAmAmBB, 2n=6x=42) between Triticum turgidum L. ssp. dicoccon and T. monococcum ssp. monococcum. This amphiploid could be used as a bridge to transfer 1Ay8.2 into common wheat cultivars. Replacing the silenced 1Ay in common wheat with the active 1Ay8.2 allele harboring an extra cysteine residue is expected to improve the quality by increasing the number of HMW-GSs and promoting the formation of covalent interactions through disulfide bonds with the extra cysteine residue. PMID:26187064

  3. BrpSPL9 (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis SPL9) controls the earliness of heading time in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yali; Wu, Feijie; Bai, Jinjuan; He, Yuke

    2014-04-01

    The leafy heads of cabbage (Brassica oleracea), Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis), Brussels sprouts (B.oleracea ssp. gemmifera) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) comprise extremely incurved leaves that are edible vegetable products. The heading time is important for high quality and yield of these crops. Here, we report that BrpSPL9-2 (B.rapa ssp. pekinensis SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING-LIKE 9-2), a target gene of microRNA brp-miR156, controls the heading time of Chinese cabbage. Quantitative measurements of leaf shapes, sizes, colour and curvature indicated that heading is a late adult phase of vegetative growth. During the vegetative period, miR156 levels gradually decreased from the seedling stage to the heading one, whereas BrpSPL9-2 and BrpSPL15-1 mRNAs increased progressively and reached the highest levels at the heading stage. Overexpression of a mutated miR156-resistant form of BrpSPL9-2 caused the significant earliness of heading, concurrent with shortening of the seedling and rosette stages. By contrast, overexpression of miR156 delayed the folding time, concomitant with prolongation of the seedling and rosette stages. Morphological analysis reveals that the significant earliness of heading in the transgenic plants overexpressing BrpSPL9-2 gene was produced because the juvenile phase was absent and the early adult phase shortened, whereas the significant delay of folding in the transgenic plants overexpressing Brp-MIR156a was due to prolongation of the juvenile and early adult phases. Thus, miR156 and BrpSPL9 genes are potentially important for genetic improvement of earliness of Chinese cabbage and other crops. PMID:24237584

  4. A study of System Interface Sets (SIS) for the host, target and integration environments of the Space Station Program (SSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Charles; Auty, David; Rogers, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    System interface sets (SIS) for large, complex, non-stop, distributed systems are examined. The SIS of the Space Station Program (SSP) was selected as the focus of this study because an appropriate virtual interface specification of the SIS is believed to have the most potential to free the project from four life cycle tyrannies which are rooted in a dependance on either a proprietary or particular instance of: operating systems, data management systems, communications systems, and instruction set architectures. The static perspective of the common Ada programming support environment interface set (CAIS) and the portable common execution environment (PCEE) activities are discussed. Also, the dynamic perspective of the PCEE is addressed.

  5. Effector MiSSP7 of the mutualistic fungus Laccaria bicolor stabilizes the Populus JAZ6 protein and represses jasmonic acid (JA) responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Daguerre, Yohann; Wittulsky, Sebastian; Vayssières, Alice; Deveau, Aurelie; Melton, Sarah J; Kohler, Annegret; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Brun, Annick; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Martin, Francis

    2014-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi, such as Laccaria bicolor, support forest growth and sustainability by providing growth-limiting nutrients to their plant host through a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with host roots. We have previously shown that the effector protein MiSSP7 (Mycorrhiza-induced Small Secreted Protein 7) encoded by L. bicolor is necessary for the establishment of symbiosis with host trees, although the mechanistic reasoning behind this role was unknown. We demonstrate here that MiSSP7 interacts with the host protein PtJAZ6, a negative regulator of jasmonic acid (JA)-induced gene regulation in Populus. As with other characterized JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins, PtJAZ6 interacts with PtCOI1 in the presence of the JA mimic coronatine, and PtJAZ6 is degraded in plant tissues after JA treatment. The association between MiSSP7 and PtJAZ6 is able to protect PtJAZ6 from this JA-induced degradation. Furthermore, MiSSP7 is able to block--or mitigate--the impact of JA on L. bicolor colonization of host roots. We show that the loss of MiSSP7 production by L. bicolor can be complemented by transgenically varying the transcription of PtJAZ6 or through inhibition of JA-induced gene regulation. We conclude that L. bicolor, in contrast to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and biotrophic pathogens, promotes mutualism by blocking JA action through the interaction of MiSSP7 with PtJAZ6. PMID:24847068

  6. Complement sensitivity and factor H binding of European Francisella tularensis ssp. holarctica strains in selected animal species.

    PubMed

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Bhide, Mangesh; Bencurova, Elena; Dolinska, Saskia; Gyuranecz, Mikls

    2015-09-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularaemia. The bacterium has developed several extracellular and intracellular strategies to evade the hosts' innate and adaptive immune responses. The aims of the study were to examine complement sensitivity of wild and attenuated F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains in animal hosts of distinct sensitivity to the bacterium, to compare the complement-evading ability of wild strains of different phylogeographic background, and to examine the role of factor H in the host-pathogen interactions. Complement sensitivity assays were carried out on various F. tularensis ssp. holarctica wild strains and on the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) with sera of the highly sensitive house mouse (Mus musculus), the moderately sensitive European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and the relatively resistant cattle (Bos taurus). Specific binding of complement regulator factor H to bacterial membrane proteins was examined by Western blot assays. All wild strains interacted with the hosts' complement system and showed no significant differences in their survivability. The attenuated LVS was resistant to serum killing in mouse, but was lysed in the sera of hare and cattle. Direct binding of factor H to F. tularensis membrane proteins was not detected. PMID:26551418

  7. Characterization of a putative pollen-specific arabinogalactan protein gene, BcMF8, from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Cao, Jia-Shu; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Ye, Yi-Qun

    2008-12-01

    The BcMF8 (Brassica campestris male fertility 8) gene, possessing the features of 'classical' arabinogalactan protein (AGP) was isolated from Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis, Makino syn. B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis. This gene was highly abundant in the fertile flower buds but silenced in the sterile ones of genic male sterile A/B line ('ZUBajh97-01A/B') in B. campestris. Expression patterns analysis suggested BcMF8 was a pollen-specific gene, whose transcript started to be expressed at the uninucleate stage and maintained throughout to the pollen at pollination stage. BcMF8 is highly homologous to the known pollen-specific AGP genes Sta 39-4 and Sta 39-3 from B. napus. Isolation and multiple alignment of the homologs of BcMF8 gene in the family Cruciferae indicated that BcMF8 was highly conserved in this family, which reflect the conservation in biological function and importance of this putative AGP gene in plant development. Similarity analysis also demonstrated Sta 39-4 and Sta 39-3 may originate from different genomes. PMID:17786584

  8. GA4 and IAA were involved in the morphogenesis and development of flowers in Agapanthus praecox ssp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Ren, Li; Yue, Jian-hua; Wang, Ling; Zhuo, Li-huan; Shen, Xiao-hui

    2014-07-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive growth represents a major phase change in angiosperms. Hormones play important roles in this process. In this study, gibberellic acid (GA), cytokinins (CKs), indoleacetic acid (IAA), and abscisic acid (ABA) were analyzed during the flowering in Agapanthus praecox ssp. orientalis. Eleven types of endogenous gibberellins in addition to GA1 were detected in various organs. GA9 was detected with the highest concentrations, followed by GA5, GA8, and GA19. However, GA4 was the main bioactive GA that was involved in the regulation of flowering. Eight types of endogenous cytokinins were detected in A. praecox ssp. orientalis, and zeatin, zeatin riboside, zeatin-O-glucoside, and N(6)-isopentenyladenosine-5-monophosphate were present at higher levels throughout the study, of which zeatin plays an important role in the development of various organs. IAA increased by 581% in the shoot tips from the vegetative to inflorescence bud stages and had the most significant changes during flowering. Phytohormone immunolocalization analysis suggested that IAA involved in differentiation and development of each floral organs, GA and zeatin play important roles in floret primordia differentiation and ovule development. Using exogenous plant growth regulators proved that GA signaling regulate the scape elongation and stimulate early-flowering, and IAA signaling is involved in the pedicel and corolla elongation and delay flowering slightly. PMID:24913054

  9. Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis R4 prevents Salmonella typhimurium SL1344-induced damage to tight junctions and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinghua; Zhu, Liqi; Wang, Zhisheng; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Qian

    2012-08-01

    Cell junctions are the gatekeepers of the paracellular route and defend the mucosal barrier. Several enteropathogenic bacteria can invade intestinal epithelial cells by targeting and damaging cell junctions. It is not well understood how Salmonella typhimurium is able to overcome the intestinal barrier and gain access to the circulation, nor is it understood how Lactobacillus prevents the invasion of S. typhimurium. Therefore, we sought to determine whether infection with S. typhimurium SL1344 could regulate the molecular composition of cell junctions and whether Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis R4 could affect this modification. Our data demonstrated that infection of Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium over 2 h resulted in a redistribution of claudin-1, ZO-1, occluding, and E-cadherin. Western blot analysis of epithelial cell lysates demonstrated that S. typhimurium could decrease the expression of cell junction proteins. However, L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis R4 ameliorated this destruction and induced increased expression of ZO-1, occludin, and E-cadherin relative to the levels in the control group. The results of these experiments implied that S. typhimurium may facilitate its uptake and distribution within the host by regulating the molecular composition of cell junctions. Furthermore, Lactobacillus may prevent the adhesion and invasion of pathogenic bacteria by maintaining cell junctions and the mucosal barrier. PMID:22923109

  10. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psyllid-affected carrots in Sweden

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants with symptoms resembling those of the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum damage were observed in 70% of commercial fields in southern Sweden in August 2011; all cultivars grown were affected, at about 1 to 45% symptomatic plants pe...

  11. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' on carrot in Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In March of 2014, carrot plants (Daucus carota L. var. Mascot) exhibiting symptoms of yellowing, purpling, and curling of leaves, proliferation of shoots, formation of hairy secondary roots, general stunting and plant decline were observed in commercial fields in the Gharb region of Morocco. The sym...

  12. FIELD EVALUATION OF CARROT CULTIVARS FOR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO FUNGAL LEAF BLIGHT DISEASES IN NEW YORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot cultivars grown in New York were evaluated for susceptibility to the fungal leaf blight pathogens Alternaria dauci (1999) and Cercospora carotae (2000 to 2003)in an experimental field under continuous carrot cultivation since 1996. Replicated plots were established in a randomized complete b...

  13. HERITABILITIES AND MINIMUM GENE NUMBER ESTIMATES OF CARROT CAROTENOIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimates were made of broad sense heritabilities and the number of factors or genes involved in the production of total carotenoids and the major component carotenoids of carrot (Daucus carota L.) storage roots: phytoene, '-carotene, '-carotene, '-carotene, and lycopene. Two crosses with different ...

  14. Promoter Strength Comparisons of Maize Shrunken 1 and Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 Promoters in Mono- and Dicotyledonous Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, R. M.; Ashraf, M.; Vasil, V.; Hannah, L. C.; Vasil, I. K.; Ferl, R.

    1988-01-01

    Promoter strengths of two maize alcohol dehydrogenase genes, Adh1 and Adh2, and the maize shrunken-1 gene, Sh1, were evaluated by transient expression in cultured protoplasts of Panicum maximum, Triticum monococcum, and Daucus carota. Promoter elements were ligated in correct and opposite orientations as transcriptional gene fusions to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene containing the nopaline synthase 3? polyadenylation signal. The relative levels of gene expression were compared to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The full length Adh1 promoter (?1100 to +15) functioned in all species, but at a reduced level in D. carota. An Adh1 promoter deletion from ?304 to ?1100 did not express at detectable levels in any species nor did the Sh1 promoter construction. The Adh2 promoter (?860 to +90) only expressed in D. carota. The full length Adh1 promoter gave the highest level of CAT expression in the monocot cells but at levels which were approximately 30% compared to the CaMV 35S promoter. This was reduced further in D. carota to approximately 4%. These data suggest that at least some of the regulatory factors responsible for promoter function are somewhat species specific and that these differences should be considered in gene expression studies. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666422

  15. AN IPM PROGRAM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF FUNGAL LEAF BLIGHT DISEASES OF CARROT IN NEW YORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal leaf blight diseases caused by Cercospora carotae and Alternaria dauci occur annually on processing carrots in New York and growers were applying up to eight fungicide sprays to manage them. The use of a 25% disease incidence threshold to prompt the first fungicide application and timing subs...

  16. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psyllid-affected carrots in Norway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants with symptoms resembling those associated with the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis and the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum were observed in 70-80% of commercial fields and experimental plots in southeastern Norway from late July to mid-September 2011; al...

  17. Molecular mapping of vernalization requirement and fertility restoration genes in carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a cool-season vegetable normally classified as a biennial species, requiring vernalization to induce flowering. Nevertheless, some cultivars adapted to warmer climates require less vernalization and can be classified as annual. Most modern carrot cultivars are hybrids wh...

  18. PCR based identification of Pythium spp. causing cavity spot in carrots and sensitive detection in soil samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cavity spot is caused by several Pythium species and is one of the most economically important diseases of carrot (Daucus carota L.). Diagnosis of the pathogens in soil and in carrot tissue has been complicated. On the bases of ITS sequences PCR primers were designed for the identification of the fi...

  19. Meloidogyne incognita nematode resistance QTL in carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are major pests attacking carrots (Daucus carota) worldwide, causing galling and forking of the storage roots, rendering them unacceptable for market. Genetic resistance could significantly reduce the need for broad-spectrum soil fumigants in carrot production....

  20. Association of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' with the Psyllid, Trioza apicalis (Hemiptera: Triozidae) in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis Frster) is a serious pest of carrots (Daucus carota L.) in northern and central Europe. Carrots exhibiting symptoms of psyllid damage were observed in commercial fields in southern Finland in 2008. Symptoms in affected plants included leaf curling, yellow and purple ...

  1. SplinkBES - A Splinkerette-Based Method for Generating Long End Sequences From Large Insert DNA Libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the development of a novel splinkerette-based method for generating long end-sequences from large insert library clones, using a carrot (Daucus carota L.) BAC library as a model. The procedure involves digestion of the BAC DNA with a 6-bp restriction enzyme, followed by ligation of spli...

  2. Comparative FISH mapping of Daucus species (Apiaceae family)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Daucus (Apiaceae family) contains about 20 mostly diploid species with n=9, 10 and 11, including carrot (D. carota L., 2n=18). Here, we report a pachytene chromosome-based karyotype of carrot. We integrated the carrot linkage groups with chromosomes by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FI...

  3. Stimulation of short-term plant growth by glycerol applied as foliar sprays and drenches under greenhouse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar and drench applications of glycerol were tested at 0, 0.1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 ml.l-1 on Chantenay carrot (Daucus carota L.) family Apiaceae. Certain glycerol levels, especially the 1 to 10 ml.L-1 treatments, substantially increased fresh and dry weights of carrots sprayed twice over a 60-day...

  4. Association Between Pachytene Chromosomes and Linkage Groups in Carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of carrot (Daucus carota L.) consists of ~ 480 Mb/1C organized in 9 chromosome pairs. The importance of carrots in human nutrition is triggering the development of genomic resources, including carrot linkage maps, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone library and BAC end sequence...

  5. Daucus for the flora of North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Flora of North America Project will treat more than 20,000 species of plants native or naturalized in North America north of Mexico, about 7% of the world's total. This contribution presents a floristic account of the two species of wild carrots (Daucus) occurring in North America, Daucus carota...

  6. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot... extraction of edible carrots (Daucus carota L.) with subsequent removal of the hexane by vacuum...

  7. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot... extraction of edible carrots (Daucus carota L.) with subsequent removal of the hexane by vacuum...

  8. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot... extraction of edible carrots (Daucus carota L.) with subsequent removal of the hexane by vacuum...

  9. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot... extraction of edible carrots (Daucus carota L.) with subsequent removal of the hexane by vacuum...

  10. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot... extraction of edible carrots (Daucus carota L.) with subsequent removal of the hexane by vacuum...

  11. First Report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in Carrots in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants exhibiting symptoms that resembled those of carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis) damage were observed in commercial fields in southern Finland in August 2008. Carrot psyllid is a serious pest of carrots in northern and central Europe, where it can cause up to 100% yield los...

  12. Molecular detection of aster yellows phytoplasma and 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in carrots affected by the psyllid Trioza apicalis (Hemiptera: triozidae) in Finland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis Förster) causes considerable damage to carrot (Daucus carota L.) in many parts of Europe. It was recently established that the new bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” is associated with carrot psyllid and plants affected by this insect pest. No other path...

  13. PLANT UPTAKE OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL FROM SLUDGE-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of 14C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). lants included all fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum I.). Minimal intact...

  14. Survey of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in carrot crops affected by the psyllid Trioza apicalis (Hemiptera: Triozidae) in Norway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis Förster (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is a serious insect pest of carrot (Daucus carota L.) in northern Europe, where it can cause up to 100% crop loss. Although it was long believed that T. apicalis causes damage to carrot by injection of toxins into the plant, it was re...

  15. Characterization of broad spectrum Potato virus Y resistance in a Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena-derived population and select breeding clones using molecular markers, grafting, and field inoculations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato virus Y causes yield loss in potato and PVY necrotic strains can result in loss of quality due to tissue necrosis in infected tubers The Ryadg gene from Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena has been shown to provide resistance PVYO and PVYN/NTN strains and is useful in breeding for resistance to...

  16. GLUTEN PROTEINS FROM SPELT (TRITICUM AESTIVUM SSP. SPELTA) CULTIVARS: A RHEOLOGICAL AND SIZE-EXCLUSION HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to understand protein chemistry behind gluten quality of spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta), to classify European spelt cultivars based on gluten quality, and to compare their protein composition to modern wheat. Gluten quality of two sets of 25 spelt cultivars was studi...

  17. ARE MOJAVE DESERT ANNUAL SPECIES EQUAL? RESOURCE ACQUISITION AND ALLOCATION FOR THE INVASIVE GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS (POACEAE) AND TWO NATIVE SPECIES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of invasive annual grasses and forbs in the Mojave Desert is often attributed to greater competitiveness of these species compared to natives. We compared resource acquisition and allocation between the invasive grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and two native co-occurring Mojave D...

  18. Enhanced natural killer cell activation by exopolysaccharides derived from yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    PubMed

    Makino, Seiya; Sato, Asako; Goto, Ayako; Nakamura, Marie; Ogawa, Miho; Chiba, Yoshika; Hemmi, Jun; Kano, Hiroshi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Asami, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    Yogurt is generally recognized as a beneficial food for our health, but research into its physiological effects has focused mainly on intestinal dysfunctions such as constipation and diarrhea. We previously found yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 (hereafter OLL1073R-1) could reduce risks of catching the common cold and flu in human trials. It was assumed that immunostimulatory exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced from OLL1073R-1 play an important role in this context. However, few studies have examined the immunostimulatory effects of traditional Bulgarian yogurts fermented with different strains of lactobacilli and their metabolites. Therefore, we screened 139 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains and identified OLL1073R-1 as the most robust producer of EPS. This strain was also the only strain that induced the production of IFN-γ in vitro. Oral administration of the EPS or yogurt fermented with OLL1073R-1 and Streptococcus thermophilus OLS3059 (OLL1073R-1 yogurt) augmented natural killer (NK) cell activity and induced IFN-γ production in spleen cells in mice, whereas 2 other yogurts fermented with other strains had no effect on NK cell activity. Cellular preparations of the OLL1073R-1 strain also slightly augmented NK cell activity, but were less effective than EPS itself. The EPS-dependent stimulation of NK cell activity was abrogated in IFN-γ knockout mice and in myeloid differentiation factor 88 knockout mice. Furthermore, IFN-γ production from spleen cells stimulated with EPS was completely blocked with both anti-IL-12 and anti-IL-18 antibodies in vitro. These findings suggest that NK cell activation by OLL1073R-1 yogurt is EPS-dependent, occurs via IL-12- and IL-18-mediated IFN-γ production, and requires myeloid differentiation factor 88. We showed that traditional Bulgarian yogurt could exert immunostimulatory effects by selecting starter strains and part of the mechanisms depend on IFN-γ inducible EPS produced from L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus. Further investigations on processes of fermentation to increase of the EPS may lead to the development of new functional foods that keep our immune functions stable. PMID:26686726

  19. Crop candidates for the bioregenerative life support systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunxiao, Xu; Hong, Liu

    The use of plants for life support applications in space is appealing because of the multiple life support functions by the plants. Research on crops that were grown in the life support system to provide food and oxygen, remove carbon dioxide was begun from 1960. To select possible crops for research on the bioregenerative life support systems in China, criteria for the selection of potential crops were made, and selection of crops was carried out based on these criteria. The results showed that 14 crops including 4 food crops (wheat, rice, soybean and peanut) and 7 vegetables (Chinese cabbage, lettuce, radish, carrot, tomato, squash and pepper) won higher scores. Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.), rice ( Oryza sativa L.), soybean ( Glycine max L.) and peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) are main food crops in China. Chinese cabbage ( Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis var. communis), lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L. var. longifolia Lam.), radish ( Raphanus sativus L.), carrot ( Daucus carota L. var. sativa DC.), tomato ( Lycopersicon escalentum L.), squash ( Cucurbita moschata Duch.) and pepper ( Capsicum frutescens L. var. longum Bailey) are 7 vegetables preferred by Chinese. Furthermore, coriander ( Coriandum sativum L.), welsh onion ( Allium fistulosum L. var. giganteum Makino) and garlic ( Allium sativum L.) were selected as condiments to improve the taste of space crew. To each crop species, several cultivars were selected for further research according to their agronomic characteristics.

  20. Influence of washing treatment and storage atmosphere on phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity and phenolic acid content of minimally processed carrot sticks.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, Ralph G; Baur, Sascha; Koblo, Arjuna; Carle, Reinhold

    2005-02-23

    The influence of washing uncut and shredded carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativa var. Bangor) with chlorinated and ozonated water, respectively, as well as the storage of the produce under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, on PAL activity and synthesis of phenolic compounds have been evaluated on pilot plant scale. Inherent raw material inhomogeneity was compensated by pooling large sized samples, and frequent sampling ensured significant data. PAL activity was induced by processing and linearly increased throughout storage under aerobic conditions, whereas an anaerobic atmosphere resulted in a maximum activity peak at storage day 2-4. The accumulation of phenolic compounds showed good correlation with the kinetics of PAL activity. Although the influence of the washing treatments was weak, the use of chlorinated water for washing shredded carrots slightly delayed the onset of PAL activity. The phenolic content of the minimally processed carrots was dominated by trans and cis isomers of chlorogenic acid ( approximately 95%). Additionally, the occurrence of p-coumaroylquinic acid ( approximately 5%) and the novel finding of three dicaffeoylquinic acid isomers were reported. The synthesis of phenolic compounds was controlled, depending on storage atmosphere. PMID:15713021

  1. Survival, acid and bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 during storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-01-01

    Survival, acid and bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 were studied during storage at room temperature (25 °C) at low water activity (0.07, 0.1, and 0.2). Two types of alginate-based systems were prepared with and without mannitol as microencapsulant of B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12. Formation of gel beads containing cells was achieved by dropping each emulsion into CaCl(2) solution; then, the beads were freeze dried. Survival, acid tolerance during 2-h exposure in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth at pH 2.0, bile tolerance during 8-h exposure in MRS broth containing taurocholic acid at pH 5.8, and retention of surface hydrophobicity were determined after freeze drying and during storage. The result showed that neither alginate nor alginate-mannitol formulation was effective in protecting B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 during freezing and freeze drying. The viability in alginate-mannitol and alginate formulations after freeze drying was 6.61 and 6.34 log CFU/g, respectively. Storage at low a(w) improved survival, acid tolerance, bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity retention of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 when compared with controlled storage in an aluminum foil (with a(w) of 0.38 and 0.40 for alginate-mannitol and alginate formulations, respectively). Alginate mannitol was more effective than the alginate system during a short period of storage, but its effectiveness decreased during a long period of storage (80% survival at 10 wk). Nevertheless, storage of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 in an aluminum foil without a(w) adjustment during 10 wk at room temperature was not effective (survival was 64% to 65%). PMID:22416710

  2. Inhibitory effect on soybean lipoxygenase and docking studies of some secondary metabolites, isolated from Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum.

    PubMed

    Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Geromichalos, George D; Skaltsa, Helen

    2007-02-01

    In this study, five secondary metabolites (caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, lithospermic acid B, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-beta-glucoside and p-menth-3-ene-1,2-diol 1-O-beta-glucopyranoside) isolated from the polar extracts of the plant Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum, were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit soybean lipoxygenase. Among the examined compounds, lithospermic acid B demonstrated the best inhibitory activity on soybean lipoxygenase with IC50 = 0.1 mM. Docking studies have been undertaken as an attempt for better understanding the interactions of these compounds within the active site of soybean lipoxygenase. The predicted binding energy values correlated well with the observed biological data. PMID:17373554

  3. Evaluation of aldose reductase inhibition and docking studies of some secondary metabolites, isolated from Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum.

    PubMed

    Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Zika, Chariklia; Geromichalos, George D; Demopoulos, Vassilis J; Skaltsa, Helen

    2006-03-01

    Five polar constituents of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum were investigated for their ability to inhibit aldose reductase (ALR2), the first enzyme of the polyol pathway implicated in the secondary complications of diabetes. The most active compound was found to be lithospermic acid B. Caffeic acid was inactive as it showed no inhibitory activity against the enzyme. The order of the inhibitory activity of the remaining compounds was: rosmarinic acid >12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-beta-glucopyranoside > p-menth-3-ene-1,2-diol 1-O-beta-glucopyranoside. Docking studies have been undertaken to gain insight into the binding mode of the investigated compounds at the active site of ALR2. The predicted hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions may explain the observed inhibitory activity. PMID:16249088

  4. Vitamin B12 production from crude glycerol by Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii: optimization of medium composition through statistical experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Ko?mider, Alicja; Bia?as, Wojciech; Kubiak, Piotr; Dro?d?y?ska, Agnieszka; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-02-01

    A two-step statistical experimental design was employed to optimize the medium for vitamin B(12) production from crude glycerol by Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii. In the first step, using Plackett-Burman design, five of 13 tested medium components (calcium pantothenate, NaH(2)PO(4)2H(2)O, casein hydrolysate, glycerol and FeSO(4)7H(2)O) were identified as factors having significant influence on vitamin production. In the second step, a central composite design was used to optimize levels of medium components selected in the first step. Valid statistical models describing the influence of significant factors on vitamin B(12) production were established for each optimization phase. The optimized medium provided a 93% increase in final vitamin concentration compared to the original medium. PMID:22178491

  5. Directional transfer of a multiple-allele male sterile line in Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Makino var. rosularis Tsen et Lee

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu Shi; Zhang, Xi; Li, Cheng Yu; Liu, Zhi Yong; Feng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    To produce hybrid seeds of Wutacai (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Makino var. rosularis Tsen et Lee), a directional transfer program was designed to breed the multiple-allele male sterile line of Wutacai. A multiple-allele male sterile line of Naibaicai (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis L., S01) was used as the male sterile resource, and an inbred line of Wutacai (WT01) was used as the target line. Recurrent backcrossing was employed to transfer the male sterility and other botanical traits simultaneously, while the genotype was identified through test crossing. The male sterility was successfully transferred from S01 to WT01. A new male sterile line, GMS-3, with similar botanical traits to WT01, was bred. Four hybrid combinations were generated with GMS-3 as the female parent. One hybrid (C1) that contained the most desirable traits was developed from the new male sterile line. PMID:24987301

  6. Inactivation of Mycobacterium bovis ssp. caprae in high-temperature, short-term pasteurized pilot-plant milk.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P; Richter, E; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Walte, H-G C; Matzen, S; Kiesner, C

    2015-03-01

    Experiments to determine the efficacy of high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurization of milk in terms of inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms were mainly performed between 1930 and 1960. Among the target organisms were Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a result, the Codex Alimentarius prescribes that HTST treatment of milk should lead to a significant reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during milk pasteurization. Due to the development of improved methods for the detection of survivors and of more advanced heating technology, verification of this requirement seemed to be necessary. To address recent outbreaks of tuberculosis in cattle caused by M. bovis ssp. caprae (M. caprae) in the southern regions of Germany, this organism was tested and compared with M. bovis ssp. bovis (M. bovis). Experiments were performed in a pilot plant for HTST pasteurization of milk with 3 strains of M. caprae and 1 strain of M. bovis. In preliminary trials at a fixed holding time of 25 s, the temperature at which significant inactivation occurred was 62.5°C for all strains. To determine D-values (decimal reduction times) for the inactivation kinetics, the strains were tested at 65, 62.5, and 60°C at holding times of 16.5, 25, and 35 s. At 65°C, the D-values of all strains ranged from 6.8 to 7.8 s, and at 62.5°C, D-values ranged from 14.5 to 18.1 s. Low inactivation was observed at 60°C. When the low slope of the inactivation curve allowed calculation of a D-value, these ranged from 40.8 to 129.9 s. In terms of log10 reductions, the highest values for all strains were 4.1 to 4.9 log at 65°C, with a holding time of 35 s. The tested strains of M. caprae and M. bovis showed similar low resistance to heat. Standard HTST treatment should result in a high reduction of these organisms and thus the requirements of the Codex Alimentarius for inactivation of pathogens by this process are far exceeded. PMID:25597969

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is a member of one of the most important leaf vegetables grown worldwide, which has experienced thousands of years in cultivation and artificial selection. The entire Chinese cabbage genome sequence, and more than forty thousand proteins have been obtained to date. The genome has undergone triplication events since its divergence from Arabidopsis thaliana (13 to 17 Mya), however a high degree of sequence similarity and conserved genome structure remain between the two species. Arabidopsis is therefore a viable reference species for comparative genomics studies. Variation in the number of members in gene families due to genome triplication may contribute to the broad range of phenotypic plasticity, and increased tolerance to environmental extremes observed in Brassica species. Transcription factors are important regulators involved in plant developmental and physiological processes. The AP2/ERF proteins, one of the most important families of transcriptional regulators, play a crucial role in plant growth, and in response to biotic and abiotic stressors. Our analysis will provide resources for understanding the tolerance mechanisms in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis. Results In the present study, 291 putative AP2/ERF transcription factor proteins were identified from the Chinese cabbage genome database, and compared with proteins from 15 additional species. The Chinese cabbage AP2/ERF superfamily was classified into four families, including AP2, ERF, RAV, and Soloist. The ERF family was further divided into DREB and ERF subfamilies. The AP2/ERF superfamily was subsequently divided into 15 groups. The identification, classification, phylogenetic reconstruction, conserved motifs, chromosome distribution, functional annotation, expression patterns, and interaction networks of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily were predicted and analyzed. Distribution mapping results showed AP2/ERF superfamily genes were localized on the 10 Chinese cabbage chromosomes. AP2/ERF transcription factor expression levels exhibited differences among six tissue types based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs). In the AP2/ERF superfamily, 214 orthologous genes were identified between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. Orthologous gene interaction networks were constructed, and included seven CBF and four AP2 genes, primarily involved in cold regulatory pathways and ovule development, respectively. Conclusions The evolution of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in Chinese cabbage resulted from genome triplication and tandem duplications. A comprehensive analysis of the physiological functions and biological roles of AP2/ERF superfamily genes in Chinese cabbage is required to fully elucidate AP2/ERF, which provides us with rich resources and opportunities to understand crop stress tolerance mechanisms. PMID:23972083

  8. Selective enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Tharmaraj, N; Shah, N P

    2003-07-01

    Nineteen bacteriological media were evaluated to assess their suitability to selectively enumerate Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidobacteria, and propionibacteria. Bacteriological media evaluated included Streptococcus thermophilus agar, pH modified MRS agar, MRS-vancomycine agar, MRS-bile agar, MRS-NaCl agar, MRS-lithium chloride agar, MRS-NNLP (nalidixic acid, neomycin sulfate, lithium chloride and paramomycine sulfate) agar, reinforced clostridial agar, sugar-based (such as maltose, galactose, sorbitol, manitol, esculin) media, sodium lactate agar, arabinose agar, raffinose agar, xylose agar, and L. casei agar. Incubations were carried out under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at 27, 30, 37, 43, and 45 degrees C for 24, 72 h, and 7 to 9 d. S. thermophilus agar and aerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h were suitable for S. thermophilus. L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus could be enumerated using MRS agar (pH 4.58 or pH 5.20) and under anaerobic incubation at 45 degrees C for 72 h. MRS-vancomycine agar and anaerobic incubation at 43 degrees C for 72 h were suitable to enumerate L. rhamnosus. MRS-vancomycine agar and anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 72 h were selective for L. casei. To estimate the counts of L. casei by subtraction method, counts of L. rhamnosus on MRS-vancomycine agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h under anaerobic incubation could be subtracted from total counts of L. casei and L. rhamnosus enumerated on MRS-vancomycine agar at 37 degrees C for 72 h under anaerobic incubation. L. acidophilus could be enumerated using MRS-agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h or Basal agar-maltose agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h or BA-sorbitol agar at 37 degrees C for 72 h, under anaerobic incubation. Bifidobacteria could be enumerated on MRS-NNLP agar under anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 72 h. Propionibacteria could be enumerated on sodium lactate agar under anaerobic incubation at 30 degrees C for 7 to 9 d. A subtraction method was most suitable for counting propionibacteria in the presence of other lactic acid bacteria from a product. For this method, counts of lactic bacteria at d 3 on sodium lactate agar under anaerobic incubation at 30 degrees C were subtracted from counts at d 7 of lactic bacteria and propionibacteria. PMID:12906045

  9. A failed tentative to design a super carbonic anhydrase having the biochemical properties of the most thermostable CA (SspCA) and the fastest (SazCA) enzymes.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze a simple reaction in all life domains: the carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons: CO2 + H2O ? [Formula: see text]?+?H(+). Six different, genetically distinct CA families are known to date, the ?-, ?-, ?-, ?-, ?- and ?-CAs. Bacteria encode for CAs belong to the ?-, ?- and ?-classes. Recently, our groups investigated the presence of CAs in two bacteria belonging to the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium living in hot springs all over the world, at temperatures of up to 110 C. The ?-CAs from Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense and Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense, denominated SspCA and SazCA, respectively, are highly thermostable, maintaining a good catalytic activity even after being heated for a prolonged period. Moreover, SazCA was to be the fastest CA known to date with a kcat value of 4.40 10(6) s(-1) and a kcat/KM value of 3.5 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). SspCA also showed a good catalytic activity for the same reaction, with a kcat value of 9.35 10(5) s(-1) and a kcat/KM value of 1.1 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), proving that the "extremo-?-CAs" are between the most effective CAs known to date. Here, we describe a failed tentative to obtain a super-CA, SupCA, by combining the amino acid sequence of SazCA and SspCA. To achieve this goal we introduced six His residues in N-terminal sequence of SspCA. However the obtained SupCA showed lower catalytic activity and thermostability compared to both extremophilic enzymes from which it has been designed. We rationalized the biochemical reasons of this failure, which may be useful to design enzymes with a better catalytic activity. PMID:25683084

  10. Short communication: Genotypic and phenotypic identification of environmental streptococci and association of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis with intramammary infections among different dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Werner, B; Moroni, P; Gioia, G; Lavn-Alconero, L; Yousaf, A; Charter, M E; Carter, B Moslock; Bennett, J; Nydam, D V; Welcome, F; Schukken, Y H

    2014-11-01

    Lactococcus species are counted among a large and closely related group of environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria that include bovine mastitis pathogenic Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Aerococcus species. Phenotypic and biochemical identification methods can be inaccurate and unreliable for species within this group, particularly for Lactococcus spp. As a result, the incidence of Lactococcus spp. on the farm may have been historically underreported and consequently little is known about the clinical importance of this genus as a mastitis pathogen. We used molecular genetic identification methods to accurately differentiate 60 environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria isolated from cows with high somatic cell count and chronic intramammary infection (IMI; >2 somatic cell scores above 4) among 5 geographically distinct farms in New York and Minnesota that exhibited an observed increase in IMI. These isolates were phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus spp. Genetic methods identified 42 isolates (70%) as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, including all 10 isolates originally phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis. Antibiotic inhibition testing of all Lc. lactis ssp. lactis showed that 7 isolates were resistant to tetracycline. In the present study, a predominance of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis was identified in association with chronic, clinical bovine IMI among all 5 farms and characterized antimicrobial resistance for treatment therapies. Routine use by mastitis testing labs of molecular identification methods for environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria can further define the role and prevalence of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis in association with bovine IMI and may lead to more targeted therapies. PMID:25242419

  11. Differential pathogenicity and genetic diversity among Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum isolates from monocot and dicot hosts support early genomic divergence within this taxon.

    PubMed

    Yishay, Moran; Burdman, Saul; Valverde, Angel; Luzzatto, Tal; Ophir, Ron; Yedidia, Iris

    2008-10-01

    The capability of Pectobacterium carotovorum isolates to infect monocotyledonous plants has been previously reported; however, no full consideration was given to characterize the association between such isolates and their monocot hosts. To assess differences in aggressiveness among P. carotovorum ssp. carotovorum isolates originating from monocotyledonous or dicotyledonous plants, we used as model plants two susceptible monocot hosts, the ornamentals Zantedeschia aethiopica and Ornithogalum dubium, as well as two common dicot hosts, Solanum tuberosum and Brassica oleracea. Using virulence assays and different genetic analyses we characterized P. carotovorum ssp. carotovorum isolates from diverse geographical locations which originated from plants belonging to four unrelated orders of monocots and five orders of dicots. Invariably, isolates originating from monocots exhibited higher virulence towards the tested monocot plants than dicot isolates, independently of their geographical source. Moreover, monocot and dicot isolates were clearly differentiated by various genetic analyses, such as 16S rRNA sequence clustering, intergenic transcribed spacer-PCR (ITS-PCR) banding pattern and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). We propose that the observed relationship between pathogenicity and genetic diversity among P. carotovorum ssp. carotovorum isolates reveals a co-evolutionary specialization trend in the interaction between this pathogen and its hosts. PMID:18681897

  12. Transcriptomic profiling of the salt stress response in excised leaves of the halophyte Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima.

    PubMed

    Skorupa, Monika; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Domagalski, Krzysztof; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Abu Nahia, Karim; Złoch, Michał; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2016-02-01

    Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is a halophytic relative of cultivated beets. In the present work a transcriptome response to acute salt stress imposed to excised leaves of sea beet was investigated. Salt treatments consisted of adding NaCl directly to the transpiration stream by immersing the petioles of excised leaves into the salt solutions. Sequencing libraries were generated from leaves subjected to either moderate or strong salt stress. Control libraries were constructed from untreated leaves. Sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We obtained 32970 unigenes by assembling the pooled reads from all the libraries with Trinity software. Screening the nr database returned 18 362 sequences with functional annotation. Using the reference transcriptome we identified 1 246 genes that were differentially expressed after 48h of NaCl stress. Genes related to several cellular functions such as membrane transport, osmoprotection, molecular chaperoning, redox metabolism or protein synthesis were differentially expressed in response to salt stress. The response of sea beet leaves to salt treatments was marked out by transcriptomic up-regulation of genes related to photosynthetic carbon fixation, ribosome biogenesis, cell wall-building and cell wall expansion. Furthermore, several novel and undescribed transcripts were responsive to salinity in leaves of sea beet. PMID:26795151

  13. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the PUB family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinesis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Duan, Weike; Riquicho, Ali RamuliMaquina; Jing, Zange; Liu, Tongkun; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2015-12-01

    U-box proteins are widely distributed among eukaryotic organisms and show a higher prevalence in plants than in other organisms. Plant U-box (PUB) proteins play crucial regulatory roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Previously, 64 and 77 PUB genes have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa), respectively. In this study, 101 putative PUB genes were identified in the Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis line Chiifu-401-42) genome and compared with other 15 representative plants. By specific protein domains and a phylogenetic analysis, the B. rapa PUB (BrPUB) gene family was subdivided into 10 groups. Localization of BrPUB genes showed an uneven distribution on the ten chromosomes of B. rapa. The orthologous and co-orthologous PUB gene pairs were identified between B. rapa and A. thaliana. RNA-seq transcriptome data of different tissues revealed tissue-specific and differential expression profiles of the BrPUBs, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed inverse gene expression patterns of the BrPUB-ARMs in response to cold and heat stresses. Altogether, the identification, classification, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs, and expression patterns of BrPUBs were predicted and analysed. Importantly, this study of BrPUBs provides a rich resource that will aid in the determination of PUB functions in plant development. PMID:26054324

  14. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family

    PubMed Central

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A. Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members. PMID:26042133

  15. Discrimination of cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) cultivars grown in different geographical areas using H NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jahan; Jung, Youngae; Song, Byeongyeol; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Ryu, Do Hyun; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2013-04-15

    Cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is one of the most popular foods in Asia and is widely cultivated in many countries for the production of lightly fermented vegetables. In this study, metabolomic analysis was performed to distinguish two cultivars of cabbage grown in different geographical areas, Korea and China, using H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed clear discrimination between extracts of cabbage grown in Korea and China for two different cultivars (Chunmyeong and Chunjung). The major biochemicals (metabolites) that contributed to discrimination between cabbages grown in the two regions were 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), acetate, asparagine, leucine, isoleucine, O-phosphocholine, phenylacetate, phenylalanine, succinate, sucrose, tyrosine, and valine. These results suggest that the levels of the major metabolites that differ significantly between cabbages grown in these two areas were influenced by environmental factors such as climate and geology. Our study demonstrates that H NMR based on metabolomics, coupled with multivariate statistics, can be applied to identify the regions of cultivation of various cabbage cultivars. PMID:23199992

  16. The Dynamic Growth Exhibition and Accumulation of Cadmium of Pak Choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) Grown in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Bo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals, especially cadmium (Cd), in leafy vegetables was compared with other vegetables. Pak choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) is a leafy vegetable consumed in Taiwan and its safety for consumption after growing in contaminated soils is a public concern. A pot experiment (50 days) was conducted to understand the dynamic accumulation of Cd by pak choi grown in artificially contaminated soils. The edible parts of pak choi were sampled and analyzed every 23 days. The dry weight (DW) of pak choi was an exponential function of leaf length, leaf width, and chlorophyll content. The accumulation of Cd increased when the soil Cd concentration was raised, but was kept at a constant level during different growth stages. Pak choi had a high bioconcentration factor (BCF = ratio of the concentration in the edible parts to that in the soils), at values of 3.54.0. The consumption of pak choi grown in soils contaminated at levels used in this study would result in the ingestion of impermissible amounts of Cd and could possibly have harmful effects on health. PMID:24284350

  17. A Suite of Genetic Markers Useful in Assessing Wildcat (Felis silvestris ssp.) Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; OBrien, Stephen J.; Macdonald, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The wildcat (Felis silvestris ssp.) is a conservation concern largely due to introgressive hybridization with its congener F. s. catus, the common domestic cat. Because of a recent divergence and entirely overlapping ranges, hybridization is common and pervasive between these taxa threatening the genetic integrity of remaining wildcat populations. Identifying pure wildcats for inclusion in conservation programs using current morphological discriminants is difficult because of gross similarity between them and the domestic, critically hampering conservation efforts. Here, we present a vetted panel of microsatellite loci and mitochondrial polymorphisms informative for each of the 5 naturally evolved wildcat subspecies and the derived domestic cat. We also present reference genotypes for each assignment class. Together, these marker sets and corresponding reference genotypes allow for the development of a genetic rational for defining units of conservation within a phylogenetically based taxonomy of the entire F. silvestris species complex. We anticipate this marker panel will allow conservators to assess genetic integrity and quantify admixture in managed wildcat populations and to be a starting point for more in-depth analysis of hybridization. PMID:21846752

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin genes (AQPs) in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Zhong, Xinmin; Li, Biyuan; Wang, Wuhong; Yue, Zhichen; Lei, Juanli; Guo, Weiling; Huang, Xiaoyun

    2014-12-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are members of a superfamily of integral membrane proteins and play a significant role in the transportation of small molecules across membranes. However, currently little is known about the AQP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). In this study, a genome-wide analysis was carried out to identify the AQP genes in Chinese cabbage. In total, 53 non-redundant AQP genes were identified that were located on all of the 10 chromosomes. The number of AQP genes in Chinese cabbage was greater than in Arabidopsis. They were classified into four subfamilies, including PIP, TIP, NIP, and SIP. Thirty-three groups of AQP orthologous genes were identified between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis, but orthologs corresponding to AtNIP1;1 and AtPIP2;8 were not detected. Seventeen groups of paralogous genes were identified in Chinese cabbage. Three-dimensional models of the AQPs of Chinese cabbage were constructed using Phyre2, and ar/R selectivity filters were analyzed comparatively between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. Generally, gene structure was conserved within each subfamily, especially in the SIP subfamily. Intron loss events have occurred during the evolution of the PIP, TIP, and NIP subfamilies. The expression of AQP genes in Chinese cabbage was analyzed in different organs. Most AQP genes were downregulated in response to salt stress. This work shows that the AQP genes of Chinese cabbage have undergone triplication and subsequent biased gene loss. PMID:24972664

  19. Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher; Douarre, Pierre E; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; MacSharry, John; Coffey, Aidan; Sleator, Roy D; O'Mahony, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Subunit and DNA-based vaccines against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) attempt to overcome inherent issues associated with whole-cell formulations. However, these vaccines can be hampered by poor expression of recombinant antigens from a number of disparate hosts. The high G+C content of MAP invariably leads to a codon bias throughout gene expression. To investigate if the codon bias affects recombinant MAP antigen expression, the open reading frame of a MAP-specific antigen MptD (MAP3733c) was codon optimised for expression against a Lactobacillus salivarius host. Of the total 209 codons which constitute MAP3733c, 172 were modified resulting in a reduced G+C content from 61% for the native gene to 32.7% for the modified form. Both genes were placed under the transcriptional control of the PnisA promoter; allowing controlled heterologous expression in L. salivarius. Expression was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and microplate fluorometry via GFP tags translationally fused to the C-termini of the two MptD genes. A > 37-fold increase in expression was observed for the codon-optimised MAP3733synth variant over the native gene. Due to the low cost and improved expression achieved, codon optimisation significantly improves the potential of L. salivarius as an oral vaccine stratagem against Johne's disease. PMID:23620276

  20. Congruence of phytochemical and morphological profiles along an altitudinal gradient in Origanum vulgare ssp. vulgare from Venetian Region (NE Italy).

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Claudia; Maggi, Filippo; Papa, Fabrizio; Maleci Bini, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Plants of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare from the Veneto region (NE Italy) were selected to study the variability of the essential-oil composition from leaves and inflorescences throughout an elevation gradient. We investigated also the morphology of non-glandular and glandular trichomes, their distribution on the vegetative and reproductive organs, as well as the histochemistry of the secreted products, with special focus on the terpenoidic fraction. Since glandular trichomes are prerequisite for the essential-oil synthesis, the second objective was to establish whether its production is related to glandular hair number, and density. Essential-oil contents decline with increasing altitude, and the micromorphological observations revealed a decrease in trichome density along the same direction. Moreover, GC/MS analysis together with principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the three investigated populations were significantly different in chemical composition. Therefore, an important interpopulation variability for low-, mid-, and high-altitude sites was established, suggesting the likely occurrence of different biotypes associated with altitudinal levels. Hence, the involvement of abiotic factors such as temperature and drought in the chemical polymorphism of O. vulgare associated with elevation is briefly discussed. PMID:23576343

  1. Effects of fine-scale genetic structure on male mating success in gynodioecious Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima.

    PubMed

    DE Cauwer, Isabelle; Dufay, Mathilde; Cuguen, Jol; Arnaud, Jean-Franois

    2010-04-01

    Plant mating systems are known to influence population genetic structure because pollen and seed dispersal are often spatially restricted. However, the reciprocal outcomes of population structure on the dynamics of polymorphic mating systems have received little attention. In gynodioecious sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima), three sexual types co-occur: females carrying a cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) gene, hermaphrodites carrying a non-CMS cytoplasm and restored hermaphrodites that carry CMS genes and nuclear restorer alleles. This study investigated the effects of fine-scale genetic structure on male reproductive success of the two hermaphroditic forms. Our study population was strongly structured and characterized by contrasting local sex-ratios. Pollen flow was constrained over short distances and depended on local plant density. Interestingly, restored hermaphrodites sired significantly more seedlings than non-CMS hermaphrodites, despite the previous observation that the former produce pollen of lower quality than the latter. This result was explained by the higher frequency of females in the local vicinity of restored (CMS) hermaphrodites as compared to non-CMS hermaphrodites. Population structure thus strongly influences individual fitness and may locally counteract the expected effects of selection, suggesting that understanding fine scale population processes is central to predicting the evolution of gender polymorphism in angiosperms. PMID:20345690

  2. HrpM is involved in glucan biosynthesis, biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Conforte, Valeria P; Rigano, Luciano A; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, Mara Rosa; Morais do Amaral, Alexandre; Vojnov, Adrian A

    2012-12-01

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xcc) is the causal agent of citrus canker. This bacterium develops a characteristic biofilm on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. A biofilm-deficient mutant was identified in a screening of a transposon mutagenesis library of the Xcc 306 strain constructed using the commercial Tn5 transposon EZ-Tn5 Tnp Transposome (Epicentre). Sequence analysis of a mutant obtained in the screening revealed that a single copy of the EZ-Tn5 was inserted at position 446 of hrpM, a gene encoding a putative enzyme involved in glucan synthesis. We demonstrate for the first time that the product encoded by the hrpM gene is involved in ?-1,2-glucan synthesis in Xcc. A mutation in hrpM resulted in no disease symptoms after 4 weeks of inoculation in lemon and grapefruit plants. The mutant also showed reduced ability to swim in soft agar and decreased resistance to H(2)O(2) in comparison with the wild-type strain. All defective phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels by complementation with the plasmid pBBR1-MCS containing an intact copy of the hrpM gene and its promoter. These results indicate that the hrpM gene contributes to Xcc growth and adaptation in its host plant. PMID:22738424

  3. The zoonotic potential of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analyses of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Waddell, L A; Rajić, A; Stärk, K D C; McEWEN, S A

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review-meta-analysis appraises and summarizes all the available research (128 papers) on the zoonotic potential of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis. The latter has been debated for a century due to pathogenic and clinical similarities between Johne's disease in ruminants and Crohn's disease (108 studies) in humans and recently for involvement in other human diseases; human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (2), sarcoidosis (3), diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) (7) and type 2 (3), multiple sclerosis (5) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (2). Meta-analytical results indicated a significant positive association, consistently across different laboratory methods for Crohn's disease [odds ratio (OR) range 4·26-8·44], T1DM (OR range 2·91-9·95) and multiple sclerosis (OR range 6·5-7·99). The latter two and the thyroiditis hypothesis require further investigation to confirm the association. Meta-regression of Crohn's disease studies using DNA detection methods indicated that choice of primers and sampling frame (e.g. general population vs. hospital-based sample) explained a significant proportion of heterogeneity. Other epidemiological studies demonstrated a lack of association between high-risk occupations and development of Crohn's disease. Due to knowledge gaps in understanding the role of M. paratuberculosis in the development or progression of human disease, the evidence at present is not strong enough to inform the potential public health impact of M. paratuberculosis exposure. PMID:25989710

  4. [Outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta hemolytic group L streptococci (S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis) in an Austrian dairy herd].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Martina; Giffinger, Friederike; Hoppe, Jan Christoph; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This study is reporting an outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta-hemolytic group L streptococci in an Austrian dairy herd with a history of high somatic cell count. At the first survey 16 of 33 lactating cows (28 quarters of 132) were cultured positive for beta-hemolytic, CAMP and esculin negative cocci that grew on Columbia blood agar with small grey catalase negative colonies. With the commercial API 20 Strep system (bioMerieux, F) isolates were classified as members of streptococci group L. All tested strains (eight of 28) produced acid from ribose, lactose, trehalose, amidon and glycogen; they hydrolysed hippurate and showed beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucinaminopeptidase and arginindehydrolase activity. Isolates were sensitive to bacitracin but resistant to tetracycline. Using phenotypic characterisation as well as sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of a representative strain, recovered isolates were identified as Streptococcus (S.) dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis. Mastitis was characterized by normal milk secretions and absence of clinical abnormalities but high elevations of somatic cell count. Based on the characteristics of the strains and on the observations during the first herd survey, contagious transmission during milking as a result of poor milking hygiene was assumed. The mastitis was controlled through implementation of a strict hygiene protocol including use of single-use udder towels, post milking teat desinfection and cluster disinfection between milking cows in combination with antibiotic treatment of infected udders. PMID:22059292

  5. Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus B-30892 can inhibit cytotoxic effects and adhesion of pathogenic Clostridium difficile to Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Pratik; Merkel, Glenn J; Bhunia, Arun K

    2009-01-01

    Background Probiotic microorganisms are receiving increasing interest for use in the prevention, treatment, or dietary management of certain diseases, including antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of AAD and the resulting C. difficile mediated infection (CDI), is potentially deadly. C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) is manifested by severe inflammation and colitis, mostly due to the release of two exotoxins by C. difficile causing destruction of epithelial cells in the intestine. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus B-30892 (LDB B-30892) on C. difficile-mediated cytotoxicity using Caco-2 cells as a model. Methods Experiments were carried out to test if the cytotoxicity induced by C. difficile-conditioned-medium on Caco-2 cells can be altered by cell-free supernatant (CFS) from LDB B-30892 in different dilutions (1:2 to 1:2048). In a similar experimental setup, comparative evaluations of other probiotic strains were made by contrasting the results from these strains with the results from LDB B-30892, specifically the ability to affect C. difficile induced cytotoxicity on Caco-2 monolayers. Adhesion assays followed by quantitative analysis by Giemsa staining were conducted to test if the CFSs from LDB B-30892 and other probiotic test strains have the capability to alter the adhesion of C. difficile to the Caco-2 monolayer. Experiments were also performed to evaluate if LDB B-30892 or its released components have any bactericidal effect on C. difficile. Results and discussion Co-culturing of LDB B-30892 with C. difficile inhibited the C. difficile-mediated cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells. When CFS from LDB B-30892-C. difficile co-culture was administered (up to a dilution of 1:16) on Caco-2 monolayer, there were no signs of cytotoxicity. When CFS from separately grown LDB B-30892 was mixed with the cell-free toxin preparation (CFT) of separately cultured C. difficile, the LDB B-30892 CFS was inhibitory to C. difficile CFT-mediated cytotoxicity at a ratio of 1:8 (LDB B-30892 CFS:C. difficile CFT). We failed to find any similar inhibition of C. difficile-mediated cytotoxicity when other probiotic organisms were tested in parallel to LDB B-30892. Our data of cytotoxicity experiments suggest that LDB B-30892 releases one or more bioactive component(s) into the CFS, which neutralizes the cytotoxicity induced by C. difficile, probably by inactivating its toxin(s). Our data also indicate that CFS from LDB B-30892 reduced the adhesion of C. difficile by 81%, which is significantly (P <0.01) higher than all other probiotic organisms tested in this study. Conclusion This study reveals the very first findings that Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus B-30892 (LDB B-30892) can eliminate C. difficile-mediated cytotoxicity, using Caco-2 cells as a model. The study also demonstrates that LDB B-30892 can reduce the colonization of C. difficile cells in colorectal cells. More study is warranted to elucidate the specific mechanism of action of such reduction of cytotoxicity and colonization. PMID:19397787

  6. Abundance of Alnus incana ssp. rugosa in Adirondack Mountain shrub wetlands and its influence on inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, B D; Hurd, T M; Raynal, D J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the abundance of the nitrogen-fixing shrub, Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (speckled alder), in shrub wetlands of the Adirondack Mountain region of New York State and to determine whether its abundance affects the concentration or accumulation of inorganic nitrogen in wetland substrates. Alder/willow wetlands are the second most common wetland type in the Adirondack region. The Adirondack Park Agency's digital GIS database of wetland types was used to determine the areal extent of alder/willow wetlands in the Adirondacks. Randomly selected wetlands were sampled to determine the size and abundance of alder. Alder densities averaged approximately 7000 stems ha(-1) and alder was present in 75% of the wetlands. As an indication of short-term accumulation of NO(3-) and NH4(+) in wetland substrates, ion exchange resins were used to sample ground water in high and low alder density wetlands as well as from wetlands lacking alder and dominated by conifers. Additionally, NO(3-) and NH(4+) concentrations in ground water samples were measured. NH(4+) accumulation levels from exchange resins were low for all wetland types while groundwater NH(4+) concentration was highest in the low-density alder sites. Wetlands with high alder density had approximately six times higher NO(3-) accumulation than other wetlands. Substrate groundwater NO(3-) concentrations in wetlands of high-density alder exceeded by three times levels in low or no alder wetlands, showing the importance of alder to local N budgets. To assess the recovery of shrub wetlands from acidification, future studies should determine the fate of fixed N in wetland systems. PMID:12667762

  7. The upward shift in altitude of pine mistletoe (Viscum album ssp. austriacum) in Switzerlandthe result of climate warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbertin, Matthias; Hilker, Nadine; Rebetez, Martine; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Rigling, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    Pine mistletoe (Viscum album ssp. austriacum) is common in natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests in the alpine Rhone Valley, Switzerland. This semi-parasite, which is regarded as an indicator species for temperature, increases the drought stress on trees and may contribute to the observed pine decline in the region. We recorded mistletoes on representative plots of the Swiss National Forest Inventory ranging from 450 to 1,550 m a.s.l. We found mistletoe on 37% of the trees and on 56% of all plots. Trees infested with mistletoe had a significantly higher mortality rate than non-infested trees. We compared the current mistletoe occurrence with records from a survey in 1910. The current upper limit, 1,250 m, is roughly 200 m above the limit of 1,000-1,100 m found in the earlier survey 100 years ago. Applying a spatial model to meteorological data we obtained monthly mean temperatures for all sites. In a logistic regression mean winter temperature, pine proportion and geographic exposition significantly explained mistletoe occurrence. Using mean monthly January and July temperatures for 1961-1990, we calculated Skre's plant respiration equivalent (RE) and regressed it against elevation to obtain the RE value at the current mistletoe elevation limit. We used this RE value and temperature from 1870-1899 in the regression and found the past elevation limit to be at 1,060 m, agreeing with the 1910 survey. For the predicted temperature rise by 2030, the limit for mistletoe would increase above 1,600 m altitude.

  8. Seed germination ecology of the annual grass Leptochloa panicea ssp. mucronata and a comparison with L. panicoides and L. fusca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Chester, Edward W.

    1999-09-01

    Leptochloa panicea ssp. mucronata is an annual grass that grows in relatively dry habitats. Requirements for dormancy loss and germination were determined for seeds of this species and compared to those of two species from wet habitats. Seeds of L. panicea were dormant at maturity in autumn, but when exposed to actual or simulated autumn temperatures (e.g. 20/10, 15/6 C), they entered conditional dormancy and thus germinated to high percentages in light at 35/20 C. Seeds buried in non-flooded soil exposed to natural seasonal temperature changes in Kentucky (USA) were non-dormant by the following summer and germinated to 80-100 % in light at 25/15, 30/15 and 35/20 C. Seeds buried in non-flooded soil exhibited an annual conditional dormancy/non-dormancy cycle, with seeds mostly germinating to 80-100 % in light at 30/15 and 35/20 C throughout the year but to 80-100 % in light at 25/15 C only in summer. Results for L. panicea were compared to published data for L. panicoides and L. fusca. Whereas seeds of L. panicea buried in flooded soil failed to come out of dormancy, those of L. panicoides, an annual of moist habitats such as mudflats, exhibited an annual conditional dormancy/non-dormancy cycle, and those of L. fusca, a semi-aquatic, required flooding for both dormancy loss and germination. Differences in dormancy breaking and germination responses of seeds of Leptochloa species may help to explain why this genus occupies a wide range of habitats with regard to soil moisture conditions.

  9. Growth of the dune wintergreen ( Pyrola rotundifolia ssp. maritima) at Braunton Burrows in relation to weather factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R.; Hope-Simpson, J. F.; Snape, J. B.

    1985-12-01

    The dune wintergreen ( Pyrola rotundifolia ssp. maritima) is an evergreen perennial herb which has spread extensively in recent decades to, and on, various British dune systems including Braunton Burrows, N. Devon. Its multiplication is partly vegetative, by rhizomes bearing leaf rosettes. This study primarily concerns the relation between: (i) the growth of one particular invasive colony on Braunton Burrows, as shown by the numbers of living rosettes counted at midsummer from 1964 74 inclusive; and (ii) concurrent meteorological records made nearby. Monthly weather means were calculated on various quarterly bases. After de-trending the Pyrola data statistically, correlations were sought between the growth in numbers achieved in each year and the local air temperature (three bases), rainfall and duration of bright sunshine. While the annual increase in net numbers appears to have been unaffected by sunshine hours, this increase does seem to have been much diminished by cold nights, particularly in early spring and, though less strongly so, by low rainfall in the latter part of the preceding summer. Taking account of the performance of Pyrola in other habitats on the Burrows, it is suggested that the rainfall correlation may reflect the influence of atmospheric humidity rather than water supply to the roots. Local meteorological records over a 51-year period show combined temperature and rainfall conditions consistently favourable to Pyrola growth throughout a 5-year run to a degree which might be expected to occur in only three such runs out of every hundred. The favourable period (1957 61) occurred between the inferred first occurrence of Pyrola on the Burrows and its observed rapid spread.

  10. ANALYSIS OF GENOMIC DNA METHYLATION AND GENE EXPRESSION IN CHINESE CABBAGE (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) AFTER CONTINUOUS SEEDLING BREEDING.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Wang, X L; Guo, M H; Zhang, Y W

    2015-08-01

    Vernalization plays a key role in the bolting and flowering of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis). Plants can switch from vegetative to reproductive growth and then bolt and flower under low temperature induction. The economic benefits of Chinese cabbage will decline significantly when the bolting happens before the vegetative body fully grows due to a lack of the edible value. It was found that continuous seedling breeding reduced the heading of Chinese cabbage and led to bolt and flower more easily. In the present study, two inbred lines, termed A161 and A105, were used as experiment materials. These two lines were subjected to vernalization and formed four types: seeds-seedling breeding once, seedling breeding twice, seedling breeding thrice and normal type. Differences in plant phenotype were compared. DNA methylation analysis was performed based on MSAP method. The differential fragments were cloned and analyzed by qPCR. Results showed that plants after seedling breeding thrice had a loosen heading leaves, elongated center axis and were easier to bolt and flower. It is suggested that continuous seedling breeding had a weaker winterness. It was observed that genome methylation level decreased with increasing generation. Four differential genes were identified, short for BraAPC1, BraEMP3, BraUBC26, and BraAL5. Fluorescent qPCR analysis showed that expression of four genes varied at different reproduction modes and different vernalization time. It is indicated that these genes might be involve in the development and regulation of bolting and flowering of plants. Herein, the molecular mechanism that continuous seedling breeding caused weaker winterness was analyzed preliminarily. It plays an important guiding significance for Chinese cabbage breeding. PMID:26601490

  11. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Tao, P; Guo, W L; Li, B Y; Wang, W H; Yue, Z C; Lei, J L; Zhong, X M

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are essential for the plant's normal development and stress responses, especially the heat stress response. The information regarding sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis) is sparse, hence we performed a genome-wide analysis to identify sHSP genes in this species. We identified 26 non-redundant sHSP genes distributed on all chromosomes, except chromosome A7, with one additional sHSP gene identified from an expressed sequence tag library. Chinese cabbage was found to contain more sHSP genes than Arabidopsis. The 27 sHSP genes were classified into 11 subfamilies. We identified 22 groups of sHSP syntenic orthologous genes between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. In addition, eight groups of paralogous genes were uncovered in Chinese cabbage. Protein structures of the 27 Chinese cabbage sHSPs were modeled using Phyre2, which revealed that all of them contain several conserved ? strands across different subfamilies. In general, gene structure was conserved within each subfamily between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis, except for peroxisome sHSP. Analysis of promoter motifs showed that most sHSP genes contain heat shock elements or variants. We also found that biased gene loss has occurred during the evolution of the sHSP subfamily in Chinese cabbage. Expression analysis indicated that the greatest transcript abundance of most Chinese cabbage sHSP genes was found in siliques and early cotyledon embryos. Thus, genome-wide identification and characterization of sHSP genes is a first and important step in the investigation of sHSPs in Chinese cabbage. PMID:26505345

  12. Comparative chloroplast genomics and phylogenetics of Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale – A wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Logacheva, Maria D; Samigullin, Tahir H; Dhingra, Amit; Penin, Aleksey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Chloroplast genome sequences are extremely informative about species-interrelationships owing to its non-meiotic and often uniparental inheritance over generations. The subject of our study, Fagopyrum esculentum, is a member of the family Polygonaceae belonging to the order Caryophyllales. An uncertainty remains regarding the affinity of Caryophyllales and the asterids that could be due to undersampling of the taxa. With that background, having access to the complete chloroplast genome sequence for Fagopyrum becomes quite pertinent. Results We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of a wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale. The sequence was rapidly determined using a previously described approach that utilized a PCR-based method and employed universal primers, designed on the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of chloroplast genomes. The gene content and order in buckwheat chloroplast genome is similar to Spinacia oleracea. However, some unique structural differences exist: the presence of an intron in the rpl2 gene, a frameshift mutation in the rpl23 gene and extension of the inverted repeat region to include the ycf1 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of 61 protein-coding gene sequences from 44 complete plastid genomes provided strong support for the sister relationships of Caryophyllales (including Polygonaceae) to asterids. Further, our analysis also provided support for Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, but interestingly, in the bayesian phylogeny inference based on first two codon positions Amborella united with Nymphaeales. Conclusion Comparative genomics analyses revealed that the Fagopyrum chloroplast genome harbors the characteristic gene content and organization as has been described for several other chloroplast genomes. However, it has some unique structural features distinct from previously reported complete chloroplast genome sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the dataset, including this new sequence from non-core Caryophyllales supports the sister relationship between Caryophyllales and asterids. PMID:18492277

  13. The effects of progressing and nonprogressing Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca L; Gröhn, Y T; Pradhan, A K; Whitlock, R H; Van Kessel, J S; Smith, J M; Wolfgang, D R; Schukken, Y H

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal data from 3 commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection status and progression path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by MAP test results, was determined through quarterly ELISA serum testing, biannual fecal culture, and culture of tissues and feces at slaughter. Milk production data were collected from the Dairy Herd Information Association. Animals with positive MAP test results were categorized, based on test results over the full course of the study, as high path (at least one high-positive culture) or low path (at least one positive culture or ELISA). The cumulative numbers of positive ELISA and culture results were recorded. The effects of both MAP infection path, status, and number of positive tests on milk production were analyzed using a mixed linear model with an autocorrelation random effect structure. Low- and high-path animals produced more milk before their first positive test than always-negative animals, especially high-path animals. Although mean production decreased after a first positive test, low-path animals were shown to recover some productivity. High-path animals continued to exhibit a decrease in milk production, especially after their first high-positive fecal culture. These results show that not all animals that test positive for MAP will have long-term production losses. Milk production decreased significantly with each additional positive test. Ultimately, production loss appeared to be a function of MAP infection progression. PMID:26686721

  14. Genetic mapping of stem rust resistance gene Sr13 in tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Kristin; Abate, Zewdie; Chao, Shiaoman; Zhang, Wenjun; Rouse, Matt; Jin, Yue; Elias, Elias; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, can cause significant yield losses. To combat the disease breeders have deployed resistance genes both individually and in combinations to increase resistance durability. A new race, TTKSK (Ug99), identified in Uganda in 1999, is virulent on most of the resistance genes currently deployed, and is rapidly spreading to other regions of the world. It is therefore important to identify, map, and deploy resistance genes that are still effective against TTKSK. One of these resistance genes, Sr13, was previously assigned to the long arm of chromosome 6A, but its precise map location was not known. In this study, the genome location of Sr13 was determined in four tetraploid wheat (T. turgidum ssp. durum) mapping populations involving the TTKSK resistant varieties Kronos, Kofa, Medora and Sceptre. Our results showed that resistance was linked to common molecular markers in all four populations, suggesting that these durum lines carry the same resistance gene. Based on its chromosome location and infection types against different races of stem rust, this gene is postulated to be Sr13. Sr13 was mapped within a 1.2 to 2.8 cM interval (depending on the mapping population) between EST markers CD926040 and BE471213, which corresponds to a 285-kb region in rice chromosome 2, and a 3.1-Mb region in Brachypodium chromosome 3. These maps will be the foundation for developing high-density maps, identifying diagnostic markers, and positional cloning of Sr13. PMID:20857083

  15. Regulation of bolting and identification of the α-tubulin gene family in Brassica rapa L. ssp pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Jin, D; Xu, C; Zhang, L; Guo, M H; Fang, Z Y

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are important components of eukaryotic cells, and they play vital roles in cell morphogenesis, carrying of signaling molecules, transport of materials, and establishing the cell polarity. During bolting of biennial plants, cell division and elongation are involved, and cell elongation inevitably involves the microtubules arrangement and expression of related genes. So we deduce that it is of great significance to figure out the mechanism of bolting and flowering in which TUA genes are involved. In the present study, bioinformatic methods were used to predict and identify the α-tubulin gene family (BrTUAs) in Brassica rapa L. ssp pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) through the alignment of AtTUA gene sequence from Arabidopsis thaliana with the B. rapa genome database (http://brassicadb.org/brad/) using the basic local alignment search tool. The change in the structure and functions of BrTUAs during the process of evolution, cis-acting elements in the promoter sequences of BrTUAs, and the expression of the identified genes was also analyzed. Twelve members of the α-tubulin gene family were identified from Chinese cabbage. The gene length, intron, exon, and promoter regions were determined to have changed significantly during the genome evolution. Only five of the 12 members were encoded completely and were observed to differ in their spatial and temporal expression. The five BrTUA promoter sequences contained different numbers of cis-elements responsive to light and low-temperature response, cis-elements responsive among which hormonal responses were significantly different. We also report that the BrTUAs were involved in the regulation of the bolting in Chinese cabbage, and propose that this process could be controlled by regulating the expression of BrTUAs. PMID:26909938

  16. Endothelium-dependent induction of vasorelaxation by Melissa officinalis L. ssp. officinalis in rat isolated thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, S; Orhan, I; Turan, N N; Sahan, G; Ark, M; Tosun, F

    2008-12-01

    In the current study, vasorelaxant effect produced by the aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis L. ssp. officinalis (MOO) (Lamiaceae) and its possible mechanism in isolated rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine were examined. In the first series of experiments, effect of MOO on the baseline and phenylephrine (10(-5)M) precontracted arteries was investigated, while in the second group of experiments, endothelium intact or endothelium denuded effect was determined. The agents used were N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME), an irreversible inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, indomethacin (10 microM), a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, and glibenclamide (10 microM), an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker. The extract was found to exert a vasorelaxant effect and rosmarinic acid quantity, the characteristic compound of the plant, was analyzed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (18.75%), and was further confirmed by LC-MS analysis giving a prominent [M(+1)] molecular ion peak at m/z 365. Total phenol amount in the extract was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (0.284 mg/mg extract). Vasorelaxant effect of the extract was entirely dependent on the presence of endothelium and was abolished by pretreatment with L-NAME, whereas pretreatment with indomethacin and glibenclamide reduced the relaxation to a minor extent. Rosmarinic acid was also tested in the same manner as the extract and was found to exert vasorelaxant effect. These results suggest that the aqueous extract of MOO vasodilates via nitric oxide pathway with the possible involvement of prostacycline and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathways as well. PMID:18606529

  17. The construction of a genetic linkage map of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis Makino).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; Geng, Jianfeng; Zhang, Jingyi; Wang, Qian; Ban, Qingyu; Hou, Xilin

    2009-08-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis Makino) is one of the most important vegetables in eastern China. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 127 doubled haploid (DH) lines, and the DH population was derived from a commercial hybrid "Hanxiao" (lines SW-13 x L-118). Out of the 614 polymorphic markers, 43.49% were not assigned to any of the linkage groups(LGs). Chi-square tests showed that 42.67% markers were distorted from expected Mendelian segregation ratios, and the direction of distorted segregation was mainly toward the paternal parent L-118. After sequentially removing the markers that had an interval distance smaller than 1 cM from the upper marker, the overall quality of the linkage map was increased. Two hundred and sixty-eight molecular markers were mapped into 10 LGs, which were anchored to the corresponding chromosome of the B. rapa reference map based on common simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The map covers 973.38 cM of the genome and the average interval distance between markers was 3.63 cM. The number of markers on each LG ranged from 18 (R08) to 64 (R07), with an average interval distance within a single LG from 1.70 cM (R07) to 6.71 cM (R06). Among these mapped markers, 169 were sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers, 50 were SSR markers and 49 were random amplification polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. With further saturation to the LG, the current map offers a genetic tool for loci analysis for important agronomic traits. PMID:19683673

  18. The influence of collection zone on glucosinolates, polyphenols and flavonoids contents and biological profiles of Capparis sicula ssp. sicula.

    PubMed

    Conforti, F; Marcotullio, M C; Menichini, F; Statti, G A; Vannutelli, L; Burini, G; Menichini, F; Curini, M

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of collection zone on total phenol, flavonoid and glucosinolate contents and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of caper (Capparis sicula ssp. sicula). This species has been characterized through the detection, isolation and quantitative evaluation of chemical markers (polyphenols, flavonoids and glucosinolates). The chemical investigation showed a different composition between the two collection zones. While the total amounts of phenolics and flavonoids of the two samples were quite the same, their high-performance liquid chromatography profiles were very different. In both samples, the most abundant aglycone was quercetin which accounted for 60% of total flavonoids. Nuclear magnetic resonance data analysis allowed the identification of two compounds: 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids which represented 6.67% and 15.94%, respectively, of the total amount of flavonoids in sample 1. In sample 2, these two acids were still present, but their percentages were much less (2.20% and 1.71%, respectively). As far as we know, this is the first report about the presence of dicaffeoylquinic acids in Capparis. With regard to glucosinolate content, sample 1 showed a higher content of glucosinolates. In both samples, glucocapparin was the most abundant compound. Antioxidant activity of the methanolic C. sicula extracts using diphenyl picrylhydrazyl, ?-carotene bleaching test and oxygen radical absorbance capacity showed that the sample 2 was more active than 1. As regards the inhibition of NO production, the extracts from sample 2 were more active than those from sample 1. PMID:21436235

  19. A multiparental cross population for mapping QTL for agronomic traits in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum).

    PubMed

    Milner, Sara Giulia; Maccaferri, Marco; Huang, Bevan Emma; Mantovani, Paola; Massi, Andrea; Frascaroli, Elisabetta; Tuberosa, Roberto; Salvi, Silvio

    2016-02-01

    Multiparental cross designs for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) provide an efficient alternative to biparental populations because of their broader genetic basis and potentially higher mapping resolution. We describe the development and deployment of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) obtained by crossing four elite cultivars. A linkage map spanning 2664cM and including 7594 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was produced by genotyping 338 RILs. QTL analysis was carried out by both interval mapping on founder haplotype probabilities and SNP bi-allelic tests for heading date and maturity date, plant height and grain yield from four field experiments. Sixteen QTL were identified across environments and detection methods, including two yield QTL on chromosomes 2BL and 7AS, with the former mapped independently from the photoperiod response gene Ppd-B1, while the latter overlapped with the vernalization locus VRN-A3. Additionally, 21 QTL with environment-specific effects were found. Our results indicated a prevalence of environment-specific QTL with relatively small effect on the control of grain yield. For all traits, functionally different QTL alleles in terms of direction and size of genetic effect were distributed among parents. We showed that QTL results based on founder haplotypes closely matched functional alleles at known heading date loci. Despite the four founders, only 2.1 different functional haplotypes were estimated per QTL, on average. This durum wheat population provides a mapping resource for detailed genetic dissection of agronomic traits in an elite background typical of breeding programmes. PMID:26132599

  20. Using Small-Scale Studies to Prioritize Threats and Guide Recovery of a Rare Hemiparasitic Plant: Cordylanthus rigidus ssp. littoralis

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sean M.; Uhl, Melissa M.; Maurano, Stephen P.; Nuccio, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recovering endangered species would benefit from identifying and ranking of the factors that threaten them. Simply managing for multiple positive influences will often aid in recovery; however, the relative impacts of multiple threats and/or interactions among them are not always predictable. We used a series of experiments and quantitative observational studies to examine the importance of five potential limiting factors to the abundance of a state-listed endangered hemiparasitic annual forb, Cordylanthus rigidus ssp. littoralis (C.r.l., California, USA): host availability, mammalian herbivores, insect seed predators, fire suppression, and exotic species. While this initial assessment is certainly not a complete list, these factors stem from direct observation and can inform provisional recommendations for management and further research. Methodology and Principal Findings Studies were conducted at five sites and included assessments of the influence of host availability, exotic species, exclusion of mammalian herbivores and insect seed predators on C.r.l. productivity, and simulated effects of fire on seed germination. C.r.l. was limited by multiple threats: individuals with access to host species produced up to three times more inflorescences than those lacking hosts, mammalian herbivory reduced C.r.l. size and fecundity by more than 50% and moth larvae reduced seed production by up to 40%. Litter deposition and competition from exotic plant species also appears to work in conjunction with other factors to limit C.r.l. throughout its life cycle. Conclusions and Significance The work reported here highlights the contribution that a series of small-scale studies can make to conservation and restoration. Taken as a whole, the results can be used immediately to inform current management and species recovery strategies. Recovery of C.r.l. will require management that addresses competition with exotic plant species, herbivore pressure, and availability of preferred host species. PMID:20126657

  1. The insecticidal CryIB crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. thuringiensis has dual specificity to coleopteran and lepidopteran larvae.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D; Harkey, M A; Kim, M K; Biever, K D; Bauer, L S

    1995-03-01

    The crystals found in sporulation extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) contain proteins that are highly toxic to insects. Different crystal proteins exhibit distinct specificities for restricted groups of insects. An uncharacterized strain of B. thuringiensis (BtS2), derived from China, was found to carry several crystal protein genes and to be toxic to a wide variety of insects, including some coleopterans. Surprisingly, the coleopteran toxicity was traced to a CryIB-class protein. The previously cloned CryIB protein from B. thuringiensis ssp. thuringiensis strain HD-290-I, which was believed to be lepidopteran-specific, was also found to be toxic to at least two species of coleopteran larvae under certain conditions. In contrast to CryIB toxicity toward lepidopterans, the coleopteran activity of CryIB is enhanced by solubilization and by truncation with trypsin prior to administration. The magnitude of this effect varies with the host species and is reversed for the one lepidopteran tested. These results suggest that, for at least some insects, the apparent host specificity of CryIB may depend both on differences in midgut environment and on differences in toxin-receptor interaction. The results of insect toxicity experiments with a series of deletion mutants allowed definition of a CryIB protein fragment of ca. 65 kDa as the smallest peptide that retains bioactivity against both lepidopteran and coleopteran larvae. Deletions smaller than this resulted in the production of a protein that was nontoxic to both lepidopteran and coleopteran larvae. PMID:7722342

  2. Impact of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles on the growth and physiological responses in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Venkidasamy; Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were extensively used in various fields, particularly in medicine as an antimicrobial agent. The unavoidable and extensive usage of AgNPs in turn accumulates in the environment. Plants are the essential base of ecosystem and are ready to disturb by environmental pollutants. Therefore, in the present study, we have planned to evaluate the impact of biologically synthesized AgNPs on the essential food crop Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). The effects of AgNP-induced plant morphological and physiological changes were investigated in different concentrations (100, 250, and 500 mg/L). The results of morphological features showed that AgNPs at lower concentrations (100 mg/L) exhibit growth-stimulating activity, whereas at higher concentrations (250 and 500 mg/L), particularly, 500 mg/L exhibited growth-suppressing activities which are in terms of reduced root, shoot growth, and fresh biomass. The increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, malondialdehyde production, anthocyanin biosynthesis, and decreased chlorophyll content were also more obviously present at higher concentrations of AgNPs. The concentration-dependent DNA damage was observed in the AgNP-treated plants. The molecular responses of AgNPs indicate that most of the genes related to secondary metabolism (glucosinolates, anthocyanin) and antioxidant activities were induced at higher concentrations of AgNP treatment. The dose-dependent phytotoxicity effects of AgNPs were also observed. Taken together, the highest concentration of AgNPs (500 mg/L) could induce growth-suppressing activities via the induction of ROS generation and other molecular changes in B. rapa seedlings. PMID:26154034

  3. The evolutionary history and diagnostic utility of the CRISPR-Cas system within Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Ruth E.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Toro, Magaly; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol; Musser, Steven M.; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary studies of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated (cas) genes can provide insights into host-pathogen co-evolutionary dynamics and the frequency at which different genomic events (e.g., horizontal vs. vertical transmission) occur. Within this study, we used whole genome sequence (WGS) data to determine the evolutionary history and genetic diversity of CRISPR loci and cas genes among a diverse set of 427 Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica isolates representing 64 different serovars. We also evaluated the performance of CRISPR loci for typing when compared to whole genome and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approaches. We found that there was high diversity in array length within both CRISPR1 (median = 22; min = 3; max = 79) and CRISPR2 (median = 27; min = 2; max = 221). There was also much diversity within serovars (e.g., arrays differed by as many as 50 repeat-spacer units among Salmonella ser. Senftenberg isolates). Interestingly, we found that there are two general cas gene profiles that do not track phylogenetic relationships, which suggests that non-vertical transmission events have occurred frequently throughout the evolutionary history of the sampled isolates. There is also considerable variation among the ranges of pairwise distances estimated within each cas gene, which may be indicative of the strength of natural selection acting on those genes. We developed a novel clustering approach based on CRISPR spacer content, but found that typing based on CRISPRs was less accurate than the MLST-based alternative; typing based on WGS data was the most accurate. Notwithstanding cost and accessibility, we anticipate that draft genome sequencing, due to its greater discriminatory power, will eventually become routine for traceback investigations. PMID:24765574

  4. ?-Casein hydrolysate generated by the cell envelope-associated proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis CRL 581 protects against trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Espeche Turbay, M B; de Moreno de LeBlanc, A; Perdign, G; Savoy de Giori, G; Hebert, E M

    2012-03-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis CRL 581, a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium used as a starter culture for the manufacture of several fermented dairy products, possesses an efficient proteolytic system that is able to release a series of potentially bioactive peptides (i.e., antihypertensive and phosphopeptides) from ?- and ?-caseins. Considering the potential beneficial health effects of the peptides released by L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis CRL 581 from milk proteins, the aim of this work was to analyze the anti-mutagenic and anti-inflammatory properties of the casein hydrolysates generated by the cell envelope-associated proteinase of this bacterium. The ability of ?- and ?-casein hydrolysates to suppress the mutagenesis of a direct-acting mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide on Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100 increased concomitantly with the time of casein hydrolysis. The anti-inflammatory effect of the ?-casein hydrolysate was evaluated using a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced Crohn's disease murine model. The hydrolysate was administered to mice 10 d before the intrarectal inoculation of TNBS. The mice that received ?-casein hydrolysate previously to TNBS showed decreased mortality rates, faster recovery of initial body weight loss, less microbial translocation to the liver, decreased ?-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase activities in the gut, and decreased colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage compared with the animals that did not receive this hydrolysate. In addition, ?-casein hydrolysate exerted a beneficial effect on acute intestinal inflammation by increased interleukin 10 and decreased IFN-? production in the gut. Our findings are consistent with the health-promoting attributes of the milk products fermented by L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis CRL 581 and open up new opportunities for developing novel functional foods. PMID:22365194

  5. Development of a rapid SNP-typing assay to differentiate Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis strains used in probiotic-supplemented dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, Sara; Furumoto, Emily J; Loquasto, Joseph R; Morra, Patrizia; Grassi, Ausilia; Roberts, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Identification at the genus, species, and strain levels is desirable when a probiotic microorganism is added to foods. Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (BAL) are commonly used worldwide in dairy products supplemented with probiotic strains. However, strain discrimination is difficult because of the high degree of genome identity (99.975%) between different genomes of this subspecies. Typing of monomorphic species can be carried out efficiently by targeting informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Findings from a previous study analyzing both reference and commercial strains of BAL identified SNP that could be used to discriminate common strains into 8 groups. This paper describes development of a minisequencing assay based on the primer extension reaction (PER) targeting multiple SNP that can allow strain differentiation of BAL. Based on previous data, 6 informative SNP were selected for further testing, and a multiplex preliminary PCR was optimized to amplify the DNA regions containing the selected SNP. Extension primers (EP) annealing immediately adjacent to the selected SNP were developed and tested in simplex and multiplex PER to evaluate their performance. Twenty-five strains belonging to 9 distinct genomic clusters of B. animalis ssp. lactis were selected and analyzed using the developed minisequencing assay, simultaneously targeting the 6 selected SNP. Fragment analysis was subsequently carried out in duplicate and demonstrated that the assay yielded 8 specific profiles separating the most commonly used commercial strains. This novel multiplex PER approach provides a simple, rapid, flexible SNP-based subtyping method for proper characterization and identification of commercial probiotic strains of BAL from fermented dairy products. To assess the usefulness of this method, DNA was extracted from yogurt manufactured with and without the addition of B. animalis ssp. lactis BB-12. Extracted DNA was then subjected to the minisequencing protocol, resulting in a SNP profile matching the profile for the strain BB-12. PMID:25547309

  6. Single-channel analysis of the anion channel-forming protein from the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense

    PubMed Central

    Schrholz, Theo; Dloczik, Larissa; Neumann, Eberhard

    1993-01-01

    The anion channel protein from Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense (Schrholz, Th. et al. 1991, J. Membrane Biol. 123: 1-8) was analyzed at different concentrations of KCl and KF. At 0.8 M KCl the conductance G(Vm) increases exponentially from 21 pS at 50 mV up to 53 pS at Vm = 200 mV, 20C. The concentration dependence of G(Vm) corresponds to a Michaelis-Menten type saturation function at all membrane voltage values applied (0-200 mV). The anion concentration K0.5, where G(Vm) has its half-maximum value, increases from 0.12 M at 50 mV to 0.24 M at 175 mV for channels in a soybean phospholipid bilayer. The voltage dependence of the single channel conductance, which is different for charged and neutral lipid bilayers, can be described either by a two-state flicker (2SF) model and the Nernst-Planck continuum theory, or by a two barrier, one-site (2B1S) model with asymmetric barriers. The increase in the number of open channels after a voltage jump from 50 mV to 150 mV has a time constant of 0.8 s. The changes of the single-channel conductance are much faster (<1 ms). The electric part of the gating process is characterized by the (reversible) molar electrical work ?G?el = ?ZgFVm ? -1.3 RT, which corresponds to the movement of one charge of the gating charge number ?Zg? = 1 across the fraction ? = ?Vm/Vm = 0.15 of the membrane voltage Vm = 200 mV. Unlike with chloride, the single channel conductance of fluoride has a maximum at about 150 mV in the presence of the buffer PIPES (?5 mM, pH 6.8) with K0.5 ? 1 M. It is shown that the decrease in conductance is due to a blocking of the channel by the PIPES anion. In summary, the results indicate that the anion transport by the Clavibacter anion channel (CAC) does not require a voltage dependent conformation change of the CAC. PMID:19431871

  7. Implications of PCR and ELISA results on the routes of bulk-tank contamination with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Beaver, A; Cazer, C L; Ruegg, P L; Gröhn, Y T; Schukken, Y H

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiologic agent of Johne's disease in dairy cattle, may enter the bulk tank via environmental contamination or direct excretion into milk. Traditionally, diagnostics to identify MAP in milk target either MAP antibodies (by ELISA) or the organism itself (by culture or PCR). High ELISA titers may be directly associated with excretion of MAP into milk but only indirectly linked to environmental contamination of the bulk tank. Patterns of bulk-milk ELISA and bulk-milk PCR results could therefore provide insight into the routes of contamination and level of infection or environmental burden. Coupled with questionnaire responses pertaining to management, the results of these diagnostic tests could reveal correlations with herd characteristics or on-farm practices that distinguish herds with high and low environmental bulk-tank MAP contamination. A questionnaire on hygiene, management, and Johne's specific parameters was administered to 292 dairy farms in New York, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Bulk-tank samples were collected from each farm for evaluation by real-time PCR and ELISA. Before DNA extraction and testing of the unknown samples, bulk-milk template preparation was optimized with respect to parameters such as MAP fractionation patterns and lysis. Two regression models were developed to explore the relationships among bulk-tank PCR, ELISA, environmental predictors, and herd characteristics. First, ELISA optical density (OD) was designated as the outcome in a linear regression model. Second, the log odds of being PCR positive in the bulk tank were modeled using binary logistic regression with penalized maximum likelihood. The proportion of PCR-positive bulk tanks was highest for New York and for organic farms, providing a clue as to the geographical patterns of MAP-positive bulk-tank samples and relationship to production type. Bulk-milk PCR positivity was also higher for large relative to small herds. The models revealed that bulk-milk PCR result could predict ELISA OD, with PCR-positive results corresponding to high bulk-milk ELISA titers. Similarly, ELISA was a predictor of PCR result, although the association was stronger for organic farms. Despite agreement between high bulk-milk ELISA titers and positive PCR results, a large proportion of high ELISA farms had PCR-negative bulk tanks, suggesting that farms are able to maintain satisfactory hygiene and management despite a presence of MAP in these herds. PMID:26686723

  8. Genetic variability in anthocyanin composition and nutritional properties of blue, purple, and red bread (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum) wheats.

    PubMed

    Ficco, Donatella B M; De Simone, Vanessa; Colecchia, Salvatore A; Pecorella, Ivano; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Finocchiaro, Franca; Papa, Roberto; De Vita, Pasquale

    2014-08-27

    Renewed interest in breeding for high anthocyanins in wheat (Triticum ssp.) is due to their antioxidant potential. A collection of different pigmented wheats was used to investigate the stability of anthocyanins over three crop years. The data show higher anthocyanins in blue-aleurone bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), followed by purple- and red-pericarp durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum), using cyanidin 3-O-glucoside as standard. HPLC of the anthocyanin components shows five to eight major anthocyanins for blue wheat extracts, compared to three anthocyanins for purple and red wheats. Delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside are predominant in blue wheat, with cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-galactoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside in purple wheat. Of the total anthocyanins, 40-70% remain to be structurally identified. The findings confirm the high heritability for anthocyanins, with small genotype year effects, which will be useful for breeding purposes, to improve the antioxidant potential of cereal-based foods. PMID:25130676

  9. Chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil from Helichrysum microphyllum Cambess. ssp. tyrrhenicum Bacch., Brullo e Giusso growing in La Maddalena Archipelago, Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Ornano, Luigi; Venditti, Alessandro; Sanna, Cinzia; Ballero, Mauro; Maggi, Filippo; Lupidi, Giulio; Bramucci, Massimo; Quassinti, Luana; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2015-01-01

    Helichrysum microphyllum Cambess. subsp. tyrrhenicum Bacch., Brullo e Giusso (Asteraceae), previously known as Helichrysum italicum ssp. microphyllum (Willd.) Nyman, is one of the many endemic species growing in Sardinia, Corsica and Balearic Islands. In the present work the composition of the essential oil obtained from a population of H. microphyllum ssp. thyrrenicum growing in a littoral location of La Maddalena Archipelago was investigated by GC-FID and CG-MS. The major compounds of the oil were the monoterpene ester neryl acetate (18.2%), the oxygenated sesquiterpene 5-eudesmen-11-ol (rosifoliol, 11.3%), the sequiterpene hydrocarbons ?-cadinene (8.4%) and ?-cadinene (6.7%), showing a peculiar composition in comparison with other Sardinian populations. The oil was tested for cytotoxicity on three human tumor cell lines (MDA-MB 231, HCT116 and A375) by MTT assay showing a strong inhibitory activity on human malignant melanoma cells A375 (IC50 of 16 g/ml). In addition the oil was assessed for antioxidant activity by DPPH and ABTS assay. PMID:25492232

  10. Effects of genotype, latitude, and weather conditions on the composition of sugars, sugar alcohols, fruit acids, and ascorbic acid in sea buckthorn (Hippopha rhamnoides ssp. mongolica) berry juice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Yang, Baoru; Trpanier, Martin; Kallio, Heikki

    2012-03-28

    Sea buckthorn berries (Hippopha rhamnoides ssp. mongolica) of nine varieties were collected from three growth locations in five inconsecutive years (n = 152) to study the compositional differences of sugars, sugar alcohols, fruit acids, and ascorbic acid in berries of different genotypes. Fructose and glucose (major sugars) were highest in Chuiskaya and Vitaminaya among the varieties studied, respectively. Malic acid and quinic acid (major acids) were highest in Pertsik and Vitaminaya, respectively. Ascorbic acid was highest in Oranzhevaya and lowest in Vitaminaya. Berry samples of nine varieties collected from two growth locations in five years (n = 124) were combined to study the effects of latitude and weather conditions on the composition of H. rhamnoides ssp. mongolica. Sea buckthorn berries grown at lower latitude had higher levels of total sugar and sugar/acid ratio and a lower level of total acid and were supposed to have better sensory properties than those grown at higher latitude. Glucose, quinic acid, and ascorbic acid were hardly influenced by weather conditions. The other components showed various correlations with temperature, radiation, precipitation, and humidity variables. In addition, fructose, sucrose, and myo-inositol correlated positively with each other and showed negative correlation with malic acid on the basis of all the samples studied (n = 152). PMID:22397621

  11. A new mountain lizard from Montes de León (NW Iberian Peninsula): Iberolacerta monticola astur ssp. nov. (Squamata: Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Arribas, Oscar J; Galán, Pedro; Remón, Núria; Naveira, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Iberolacerta populations from the Northern Montes de Leon (NML) were studied by means of external morphology (scalation and biometry), osteology and genetics (mtDNA and microsatellites), searching for their homogeneity ("intrazonalanalysis") and, once verified, comparing them with Iberolacerta monticola s. str. (from Central Cantabrian Mountains)and/. gal ani (from Southern Montes de Leon) ("extrazonal analysis") from neighboring areas.Our "intrazonal analysis" revealed discordances between the different approaches, especially the patterns of variation of nuclear microsatellites (congruent with external morphology) and mtDNA, namely a very low nuclear differentiation between relatively highly differentiated mtDNA lineages. The morphological approach was unable to discriminate any of the populations as significantly different from the others in the NML. Mitochondrial DNA revealed a haplotype lineage closely related to I. galani (MNL-II in our text) in some specimens of Sierra de Villabandfn and Suspiron, but these populations are morphologically indistinguishable from the main part of the other populations that belong to lineage NML-1,phylogenetically closer to/. monticola. After a separation from I. manti cola ca. 1.8 Mya, the populations in this geographic region must have suffered at least two different waves of gene flow from I. gal ani, the second one not much later than 0.5 Mya. Microsatellite results indicate that all the NML populations are genetically similar in terms of their nuclear genomes,independently of their mitochondrial differentiation (NML-I vs. NML-II haplotype groups). Since all the morphological and microsatellite evidences point towards the fact that, independently of the mitochondrial haplotypes that they bear (NML-1 or NML-II), there is only one taxon in the area, we describe it as: Iberolacerta monticola astur ssp. nov.Concerning the relationships of I. m. astur ssp. nov. with I. monticola s. str. and I. gal ani ("extra zonal analysis"), in the female analyses the new taxon centroid is closer to I. monticola s. str. than to I. gal ani (more similarity with I manticolas.str.), whereas in the male analyses the relationship is just the contrary (closer to I. gal ani, paralleling the direction of the hypothesized past hybridization). Moreover, in both sexes' ANOVA, I. m. astur ssp. nov. results more similar (lessP<0.05 differences) to I. galani than to I. monticola s. str. Osteologically, I. m. astur ssp. nov. is slightly more similar toI. monticola s. str. than to I. galani, especially in the squamosal bone, which is regularly arched (primitive shape). Genetically,as indicated above, the NML populations can be subdivided in two groups according to their mitochondrial DNA,namely NML-I (bearing clearly differentiated haplotypes, phylogenetically closer to I. monticola) and NML-II (whose haplotypes could have been mistaken for those of an I. gal ani population). This mitochondrial subdivision has at most a subtle nuclear correlate, however. According to the nuclear microsatellite markers, all the NML populations belong to a single group(/. m. astur ssp. nov.), which would be more similar to I. gal ani than to I monticola, with NML-II populations lying closer to I. galani than those from the NML-I group and, correspondingly, more distant from I. monticola. The discordant phylogenetic signal of mitochondrial and nuclear markers is discussed in terms of past introgression events and sex-biases in phylopatry and dispersion in these species. Iberolacerta manti cola astur ssp. nov., inhabits the Northern Montes de Leon (Sierra de Gistreo sensu latissimo ): Gistredo,Catoute, Tambaron, Nevadfn, Villabandfn (or Macizo del Alto de Ia Canada), Arcos del Agua (or Fernan Perez),Tiendas and Suspiron, mainly in quartzite and slate rock substrates. Its current distribution, cornered in the NW of theNorthern part of the Montes de Leon, suggests a possible competitive exclusion between this taxon and/. galani, as the galani haplotypes (NML-II) appear cornered in the most harsh and continental areas, speaking also about a, even in the past, very limited presence of this species in the area that probably was soon absorbed by I. m. astur ssp. nov. (with NMLI haplotypes). Variation in watershed limits (especially with l montico/a s. str. in the North) and Pleistocene climatic oscillations(with I. gal ani in the South) probably played a crucial role in isolation of the different Iberolacerta colonizationwaves in this zone. These changes in the boundaries among watersheds limited the contact between the NML and the main Cantabrian Mountains, restricting to narrow points (different along time) the contact between the two ranges, and thus,the areas for possible contact between I. m. astur ssp. nov. and I. monticola s. str. (see Fig. lB). The origin of this tax on dates back to the end of Pliocene or Lower Pleistocene (around 1.8 Mya), according to mtDNA divergence. On the other side, climatic oscillations allowed expansion and contact with the more continental harsh climate-dwelling I. gal ani. PMID:24870674

  12. A new phenanthrene derivative and two diarylheptanoids from the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines and LDL-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Yoo, Ki-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Park, Ji-Hae; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Chung, In-Sik; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Chung, Hae-Gon; Bang, Myun-Ho; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-04-01

    Brassica rapa ssp. campestris (Brassicaceae) is a conical, deep purple, edible root vegetable commonly known as a turnip. We initiated phytochemical and pharmacological studies to search for biological active compounds from the roots of B. rapa ssp. campestris. We isolated a novel phenanthrene derivative, 6-methoxy-1-[10-methoxy-7-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)phenanthren-3-yl]undecane-2,4-dione, named brassicaphenanthrene A (3) along with two known diarylheptanoid compounds, 6-paradol (1) and trans-6-shogaol (2), through the repeated silica gel (SiO2), octadecyl silica gel, and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The chemical structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic data analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and infra-red spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited high inhibitory activity against the growth of human cancer lines, HCT-116, MCF-7, and HeLa, with IC50 values ranging from 15.0 to 35.0 ?M and against LDL-oxidation with IC50 values ranging from 2.9 to 7.1 ?M. PMID:23435947

  13. Genome-wide quantitative trait locus mapping identifies multiple major loci for brittle rachis and threshability in Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Luo, Wei; Kong, Xing-Chen; Qi, Peng-Fei; Wang, Ji-Rui; Wei, Yu-Ming; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Liu, Ya-Xi; Peng, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Guo-Yue; Dai, Shou-Fen; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao) is a semi-wild hexaploid wheat resource that is only naturally distributed in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Brittle rachis and hard threshing are two important characters of Tibetan semi-wild wheat. A whole-genome linkage map of T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum was constructed using a recombinant inbred line population (Q1028ZM9023) with 186 lines, 564 diversity array technology markers, and 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Phenotypic data on brittle rachis and threshability, as two quantitative traits, were evaluated on the basis of the number of average spike rachis fragments per spike and percent threshability in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping performed using inclusive composite interval mapping analysis clearly identified four QTLs for brittle rachis and three QTLs for threshability. However, three loci on 2DS, 2DL, and 5AL showed pleiotropism for brittle rachis and threshability; they respectively explained 5.3%, 18.6%, and 18.6% of phenotypic variation for brittle rachis and 17.4%, 13.2%, and 35.2% of phenotypic variation for threshability. A locus on 3DS showed an independent effect on brittle rachis, which explained 38.7% of the phenotypic variation. The loci on 2DS and 3DS probably represented the effect of Tg and Br1, respectively. The locus on 5AL was in very close proximity to the Q gene, but was different from the predicted q in Tibetan semi-wild wheat. To our knowledge, the locus on 2DL has never been reported in common wheat but was prominent in T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum accession Q1028. It remarkably interacted with the locus on 5AL to affect brittle rachis. Several major loci for brittle rachis and threshability were identified in Tibetan semi-wild wheat, improving the understanding of these two characters and suggesting the occurrence of special evolution in Tibetan semi-wild wheat. PMID:25474652

  14. Mechanisms of the proliferation and differentiation of plant cells in cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Ito, M; Sugiyama, M; Komamine, A

    1994-06-01

    Plant cell functions have been investigated in various cell culture systems. In this review, we summarize results obtained from investigations of gene expression during the cell cycle in synchronized cultures of Catharanthus roseus during somatic embryogenesis in suspension cultures of Daucus carota, during organogenesis in tissue cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and during the transdifferentiation of isolated mesophyll cells to tracheary elements in single-cell cultures of Zinnia elegans. PMID:7981037

  15. Glucosinolate Accumulation and Related Gene Expression in Pak Choi (Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis var. communis [N. Tsen & S.H. Lee] Hanelt) in Response to Insecticide Application.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Biao; Yang, Jing; He, Yong; Zang, Yunxiang; Zhu, Zhujun

    2015-11-11

    Glucosinolates and their breakdown products are well-known for their cancer-chemoprotective functions and biocidal activities against pathogens and generalist herbivores. Insecticides are commonly used in the production of pak choi (Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis var. communis [N. Tsen & S.H. Lee] Hanelt). We studied the effects of four commonly used insecticides, namely, ?-cypermethrin, acephate, pymetrozine, and imidacloprid, on glucosinolate metabolism in pak choi. All insecticides significantly increased both the transcription of glucosinolate biosynthetic genes and the aliphatic and total glucosinolate accumulations in pak choi. ?-Cypermethrin and acephate caused gradual and continuous up-regulation of gene expression from 0.5 to 24 h after treatment, whereas pymetrozine and imidacloprid did so more rapidly, reaching a peak at 1 h and returning to normal at 3 h. Our findings indicate that the four insecticides affect glucosinolate metabolism in pak choi plants to various degrees and suggest that glucosinolates may be involved in plant insecticide metabolism. PMID:26485123

  16. Inhibition of human leukocyte function, alanyl aminopeptidase (APN, CD13) and dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DP IV, CD26) enzymatic activities by aqueous extracts of Cistus incanus L. ssp. incanus.

    PubMed

    Lendeckel, Uwe; Arndt, Marco; Wolke, Carmen; Reinhold, Dirk; Khne, Thilo; Ansorge, Siegfried

    2002-02-01

    Short-boiled aqueous extract from leaves of Cistus incanus L. ssp. incanus (CIT) dose-dependently inhibit the enzymatic activities of both alanyl aminopeptidase (APN, CD13, EC 3.4.11.2) and dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DP IV, CD26, EC 3.4.14.5). This inhibition is not reversible and very likely results from a covalent binding of reactive compounds to the enzymes. Furthermore, we show that aqueous CIT extracts decrease the DNA-synthesis of human T cells and mononuclear cells and inhibit the proliferation rate of the human T cell line KARPAS-299 in a dose-dependent manner. Data are presented suggesting that the antiproliferative effects of CIT extracts are due to their strong cytotoxic activity. PMID:11801385

  17. [Effect of Genotype and Medium Culture Content on Microspore-Derived Embryo Formation in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) Cv. Lastochka].

    PubMed

    Shumilina, D V; Shmykova, N A; Bondareva, L L; Suprunova, T P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of different factors on microspore embryogenesis in Chinese cabbage (B. rapa ssp. chinensis) was studied. A genotype dependence for embryo formation was observed. The majority of embryos and plants were obtained from microspores isolated from flower buds (2-2.9 mm in length) and cultured in the NLN liquid medium with 13% sucrose (w/v) supplemented with 24-epibrassinolide and 1% activated charcoal. Embryos cultured on the 1/2 Murashige-Skoog culture medium with 2% sucrose (w/v), 0.1 mg/L benzylaminopurine, and 3g/L Phytagel stimulated the formation of secondary embryos that resulted in development of large number of doubled haploid plants. PMID:26415277

  18. Targeted Sequence Capture Provides Insight into Genome Structure and Genetics of Male Sterility in a Gynodioecious Diploid Strawberry, Fragaria vesca ssp. bracteata (Rosaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Liston, Aaron; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Gynodioecy is a sexual system wherein females coexist with hermaphrodites. It is of interest not only because male-sterile plants are advantageous in plant breeding but also because it can be a crucial step in the evolutionary transition to entirely separate sexes (dioecy) from a hermaphroditic ancestor. The gynodioecious diploid wild strawberry, Fragaria vesca ssp. bracteata (Rosaceae), is a member of a clade with both dioecious and cultivated species, making it an ideal model in which to study the genetics of male sterility. To create a genetic map of F. v. ssp. bracteata, we identified informative polymorphisms from genomic sequencing (3−5x coverage) of two outbred plants from the same population. Using targeted enrichment, we sequenced 200 bp surrounding each of 6575 polymorphisms in 48 F1 offspring, yielding genotypes at 98% of targeted sites with mean coverage >100x, plus more than 600-kb high-coverage nontargeted sequence. With the resulting linkage map of 7802 stringently filtered markers (5417 targeted), we assessed recombination rates and genomic incongruities. Consistent with past work in strawberries, male sterility is dominant, segregates 1:1, and maps to a single location in the female. Further mapping an additional 55 offspring places male sterility in a gene-dense, 338-kb region of chromosome 4. The region is not syntenic with the sex-determining regions in the closely related octoploids, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, suggesting either independent origins or translocation. The 57 genes in this region do not include protein families known to control male sterility and thus suggest alternate mechanisms for the suppression of male function. PMID:23749450

  19. Molecular characterization of BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous transcription factors involved in the regulation of aliphatic glucosinolate profiles in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Venkidasamy; Park, Se Won

    2015-07-01

    Glucosinolates (GSL) are one of the major secondary metabolites of the Brassicaceae family. In the present study, we aim at characterizing the multiple paralogs of aliphatic GSL regulators, such as BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 genes in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis, by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis in different tissues and at various developmental stages. An overlapping gene expression pattern between the BrMYBs as well as their downstream genes (DSGs) was found at different developmental stages. Among the BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous genes, the BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1 genes were dominantly expressed in most of the developmental stages, compared to the other paralogs of the BrMYB genes. Furthermore, the differential expression pattern of the BrMYBs was observed under various stress treatments. Interestingly, BrMYB28.2 showed the least expression in most developmental stages, while its expression was remarkably high in different stress conditions. More specifically, the BrMYB28.2, BrMYB28.3, and BrMYB29.1 genes were highly responsive to various abiotic and biotic stresses, further indicating their possible role in stress tolerance. Moreover, the in silico cis motif analysis in the upstream regulatory regions of BrMYBs showed the presence of various putative stress-specific motifs, which further indicated their responsiveness to biotic and abiotic stresses. These observations suggest that the dominantly expressed BrMYBs, both in different developmental stages and under various stress treatments (BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1), may be potential candidate genes for altering the GSL level through genetic modification studies in B.rapa ssp. pekinensis. PMID:26043798

  20. The Non-universality of the Low-mass End of the IMF is Robust against the Choice of SSP Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2015-04-01

    We perform a direct comparison of two state-of-the art single stellar population (SSP) models that have been used to demonstrate the non-universality of the low-mass end of the initial mass function (IMF) slope. The two public versions of the SSP models are restricted to either solar abundance patterns or solar metallicity, too restrictive if one aims to disentangle elemental enhancements, metallicity changes, and IMF variations in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) with star formation histories different from those in the solar neighborhood. We define response functions (to metallicity and α-abundance) to extend the parameter space for each set of models. We compare these extended models with a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ETG spectra with varying velocity dispersions. We measure equivalent widths of optical IMF-sensitive stellar features to examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the IMF slope down to ∼0.1 M⊙. We demonstrate that the steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF based on a non-degenerate set of spectroscopic optical indicators is robust against the choice of the stellar population model. Although the models agree in a relative sense (i.e., both imply more bottom-heavy IMFs for more massive systems), we find non-negligible differences in the absolute values of the IMF slope inferred at each velocity dispersion by using the two different models. In particular, we find large inconsistencies in the quantitative predictions of the IMF slope variations and abundance patterns when sodium lines are used. We investigate the possible reasons for these inconsistencies.

  1. Spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) as a source of breadmaking flours and bran naturally enriched in oleic acid and minerals but not phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Ruibal-Mendieta, Nike L; Delacroix, Dominique L; Mignolet, Eric; Pycke, Jean-Marie; Marques, Carole; Rozenberg, Raoul; Petitjean, Graldine; Habib-Jiwan, Jean-Louis; Meurens, Marc; Quetin-Leclercq, Jolle; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Larondelle, Yvan

    2005-04-01

    The nutritional value of breadmaking cereal spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) is said to be higher than that of common wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. vulgare), but this traditional view is not substantiated by scientific evidence. In an attempt to clarify this issue, wholemeal and milling fractions (sieved flour, fine bran, and coarse bran) from nine dehulled spelt and five soft winter wheat samples were compared with regard to their lipid, fatty acid, and mineral contents. In addition, tocopherol (a biochemical marker of germ) was measured in all wholemeals, whereas phytic acid and phosphorus levels were determined in fine bran and coarse bran samples after 1 month of storage. Results showed that, on average, spelt wholemeals and milling fractions were higher in lipids and unsaturated fatty acids as compared to wheat, whereas tocopherol content was lower in spelt, suggesting that the higher lipid content of spelt may not be related to a higher germ proportion. Although milling fractionation produced similar proportions of flour and brans in spelt and wheat, it was found that ash, copper, iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus contents were higher in spelt samples, especially in aleurone-rich fine bran and in coarse bran. Even though phosphorus content was higher in spelt than in wheat brans, phytic acid content showed the opposite trend and was 40% lower in spelt versus wheat fine bran, which may suggest that spelt has either a higher endogenous phytase activity or a lower phytic acid content than wheat. The results of this study give important indications on the real nutritional value of spelt compared to wheat. Moreover, they show that the Ca/Fe ratio, combined with that of oleate/palmitate, provides a highly discriminating tool to authenticate spelt from wheat flours and to face the growing issue of spelt flour adulteration. Finally, they suggest that aleurone differences, the nature of which still needs to be investigated, may account for the differential nutrient composition of spelt and wheat. PMID:15796621

  2. Whole Genome Sequences of Three Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue Strains: Yaws and Syphilis Treponemes Differ in Less than 0.2% of the Genome Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Pospilov, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Qin, Xiang; Mikalov, Lenka; Norris, Steven J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; majs, David

    2012-01-01

    Background The yaws treponemes, Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE) strains, are closely related to syphilis causing strains of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA). Both yaws and syphilis are distinguished on the basis of epidemiological characteristics, clinical symptoms, and several genetic signatures of the corresponding causative agents. Methodology/Principal Findings To precisely define genetic differences between TPA and TPE, high-quality whole genome sequences of three TPE strains (Samoa D, CDC-2, Gauthier) were determined using next-generation sequencing techniques. TPE genome sequences were compared to four genomes of TPA strains (Nichols, DAL-1, SS14, Chicago). The genome structure was identical in all three TPE strains with similar length ranging between 1,139,330 bp and 1,139,744 bp. No major genome rearrangements were found when compared to the four TPA genomes. The whole genome nucleotide divergence (dA) between TPA and TPE subspecies was 4.7 and 4.8 times higher than the observed nucleotide diversity (?) among TPA and TPE strains, respectively, corresponding to 99.8% identity between TPA and TPE genomes. A set of 97 (9.9%) TPE genes encoded proteins containing two or more amino acid replacements or other major sequence changes. The TPE divergent genes were mostly from the group encoding potential virulence factors and genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Conclusions/Significance Hypothetical genes, with genetic differences, consistently found between TPE and TPA strains are candidates for syphilitic treponemes virulence factors. Seventeen TPE genes were predicted under positive selection, and eleven of them coded either for predicted exported proteins or membrane proteins suggesting their possible association with the cell surface. Sequence changes between TPE and TPA strains and changes specific to individual strains represent suitable targets for subspecies- and strain-specific molecular diagnostics. PMID:22292095

  3. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima—ancestor of all beet crops—and modern sugar beets

    PubMed Central

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes. PMID:25206350

  4. Comparative sequence analysis of the potato cyst nematode resistance locus H1 reveals a major lack of co-linearity between three haplotypes in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp.)

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Erin; de Boer, Jan; van der Vossen, Edwin; Achenbach, Ute; Golas, Tomasz; Suryaningrat, Suwardi; Smant, Geert; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska

    2010-01-01

    The H1 locus confers resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis pathotypes 1 and 4. It is positioned at the distal end of chromosome V of the diploid Solanum tuberosum genotype SH83-92-488 (SH) on an introgression segment derived from S. tuberosum ssp. andigena. Markers from a high-resolution genetic map of the H1 locus (Bakker et al. in Theor Appl Genet 109:146–152, 2004) were used to screen a BAC library to construct a physical map covering a 341-kb region of the resistant haplotype coming from SH. For comparison, physical maps were also generated of the two haplotypes from the diploid susceptible genotype RH89-039-16 (S. tuberosum ssp. tuberosum/S. phureja), spanning syntenic regions of 700 and 319 kb. Gene predictions on the genomic segments resulted in the identification of a large cluster consisting of variable numbers of the CC-NB-LRR type of R genes for each haplotype. Furthermore, the regions were interspersed with numerous transposable elements and genes coding for an extensin-like protein and an amino acid transporter. Comparative analysis revealed a major lack of gene order conservation in the sequences of the three closely related haplotypes. Our data provide insight in the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the H1 locus and will facilitate the map-based cloning of the H1 resistance gene. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1472-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21049265

  5. Insight into the specific virulence related genes and toxin-antitoxin virulent pathogenicity islands in swine streptococcosis pathogen Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC35246

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is an important pathogen causing swine streptococcosis in China. Pathogenicity islands (PAIs) of S. zooepidemicus have been transferred among bacteria through horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and play important roles in the adaptation and increased virulence of S. zooepidemicus. The present study used comparative genomics to examine the different pathogenicities of S. zooepidemicus. Results Genome of S. zooepidemicus ATCC35246 (Sz35246) comprises 2,167,264-bp of a single circular chromosome, with a GC content of 41.65%. Comparative genome analysis of Sz35246, S. zooepidemicus MGCS10565 (Sz10565), Streptococcus equi. ssp. equi. 4047 (Se4047) and S. zooepidemicus H70 (Sz70) identified 320 Sz35246-specific genes, clustered into three toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems PAIs and one restriction modification system (RM system) PAI. These four acquired PAIs encode proteins that may contribute to the overall pathogenic capacity and fitness of this bacterium to adapt to different hosts. Analysis of the in vivo and in vitro transcriptomes of this bacterium revealed differentially expressed PAI genes and non-PAI genes, suggesting that Sz35246 possess mechanisms for infecting animals and adapting to a wide range of host environments. Analysis of the genome identified potential Sz35246 virulence genes. Genes of the Fim III operon were presumed to be involved in breaking the host-restriction of Sz35246. Conclusion Genome wide comparisons of Sz35246 with three other strains and transcriptome analysis revealed novel genes related to bacterial virulence and breaking the host-restriction. Four specific PAIs, which were judged to have been transferred into Sz35246 genome through HGT, were identified for the first time. Further analysis of the TA and RM systems in the PAIs will improve our understanding of the pathogenicity of this bacterium and could lead to the development of diagnostics and vaccines. PMID:23742619

  6. Functional identification of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl-glucosinolate in Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brassica vegetables contain a class of secondary metabolites, the glucosinolates (GS), whose specific degradation products determine the characteristic flavor and smell. While some of the respective degradation products of particular GS are recognized as health promoting substances for humans, recent studies also show evidence that namely the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl GS might be deleterious by forming characteristic DNA adducts. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of aspects involved in the biosynthesis of indole GS is crucial to design vegetables with an improved secondary metabolite profile. Results Initially the leafy Brassica vegetable pak choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) was established as suitable tool to elicit very high concentrations of 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl GS by application of methyl jasmonate. Differentially expressed candidate genes were discovered in a comparative microarray analysis using the 2 104K format Brassica Array and compared to available gene expression data from the Arabidopsis AtGenExpress effort. Arabidopsis knock out mutants of the respective candidate gene homologs were subjected to a comprehensive examination of their GS profiles and confirmed the exclusive involvement of polypeptide 4 of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase subfamily CYP81F in 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl GS biosynthesis. Functional characterization of the two identified isoforms coding for CYP81F4 in the Brassica rapa genome was performed using expression analysis and heterologous complementation of the respective Arabidopsis mutant. Conclusions Specific differences discovered in a comparative microarray and glucosinolate profiling analysis enables the functional attribution of Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis genes coding for polypeptide 4 of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase subfamily CYP81F to their metabolic role in indole glucosinolate biosynthesis. These new identified Brassica genes will enable the development of genetic tools for breeding vegetables with improved GS composition in the near future. PMID:24886080

  7. Host-specific races in the holoparasitic angiosperm Orobanche minor: implications for speciation in parasitic plants

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, C. J.; Rumsey, F. J.; Hiscock, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Orobanche minor is a root-holoparasitic angiosperm that attacks a wide range of host species, including a number of commonly cultivated crops. The extent to which genetic divergence among natural populations of O. minor is influenced by host specificity has not been determined previously. Here, the host specificity of natural populations of O. minor is quantified for the first time, and evidence that this species may comprise distinct physiological races is provided. Methods A tripartite approach was used to examine the physiological basis for the divergence of populations occurring on different hosts: (1) host–parasite interactions were cultivated in rhizotron bioassays in order to quantify the early stages of the infection and establishment processes; (2) using reciprocal-infection experiments, parasite races were cultivated on their natural and alien hosts, and their fitness determined in terms of biomass; and (3) the anatomy of the host–parasite interface was investigated using histochemical techniques, with a view to comparing the infection process on different hosts. Key Results Races occurring naturally on red clover (Trifolium pratense) and sea carrot (Daucus carota ssp. gummifer) showed distinct patterns of host specificity: parasites cultivated in cross-infection studies showed a higher fitness on their natural hosts, suggesting that races show local adaptation to specific hosts. In addition, histological evidence suggests that clover and carrot roots vary in their responses to infection. Different root anatomy and responses to infection may underpin a physiological basis for host specificity. Conclusions It is speculated that host specificity may isolate races of Orobanche on different hosts, accelerating divergence and ultimately speciation in this genus. The rapid life cycle and broad host range of O. minor make this species an ideal model with which to study the interactions of parasitic plants with their host associates. PMID:19251714

  8. Search path of a fossorial herbivore, Geomys bursarius, foraging in structurally complex plant communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of habitat patchiness and unpalatable plants on the search path of the plains pocket gopher (Geomys bursarius) was examined in outdoor enclosures. Separate experiments were used to evaluate how individual animals explored (by tunnel excavation) enclosures free of plants except for one or more dense patches of a palatable plant (Daucus carota), a dense patch of an unpalatable species (Pastinaca sativa) containing a few palatable plants (D. carota), or a relatively sparse mixture of palatable (D. carota) and unpalatable (Raphanus sativus) species. Only two of eight individuals tested showed the predicted pattern of concentrating search effort in patches of palatable plants. The maintenance of relatively high levels of effort in less profitable sites may reflect the security afforded food resources by the solitary social system and fossorial lifestyle of G. bursarius. Unpalatable plants repelled animals under some conditions, but search paths in the sparsely planted mixed-species treatment suggest animals can use visual or other cues to orient excavations. Evidence supporting area-restricted search was weak. More information about the use of visual cues by G. bursarius and the influence of experience on individual search mode is needed for refining current models of foraging behavior in this species.

  9. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) Flow Control Valve (FCV) Poppet Eddy Current (EC) Inspection Probability of Detection (POD) Study. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Prosser, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The Director of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), requested an independent assessment of the anomalous gaseous hydrogen (GH2) flow incident on the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Vehicle (OV)-105 during the Space Transportation System (STS)-126 mission. The main propulsion system (MPS) engine #2 GH2 flow control valve (FCV) LV-57 transition from low towards high flow position without being commanded. Post-flight examination revealed that the FCV LV-57 poppet had experienced a fatigue failure that liberated a section of the poppet flange. The NESC assessment provided a peer review of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), stress analysis, and impact testing. A probability of detection (POD) study was requested by the SSP Orbiter Project for the eddy current (EC) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that were developed to inspect the flight FCV poppets. This report contains the findings and recommendations from the NESC assessment.

  10. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) Flow Control Valve (FCV) Poppet Eddy Current (EC) Inspection Probability of Detection (POD) Study. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Prosser, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The Director of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), requested an independent assessment of the anomalous gaseous hydrogen (GH2) flow incident on the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Vehicle (OV)-105 during the Space Transportation System (STS)-126 mission. The main propulsion system (MPS) engine #2 GH2 flow control valve (FCV) LV-57 transition from low towards high flow position without being commanded. Post-flight examination revealed that the FCV LV-57 poppet had experienced a fatigue failure that liberated a section of the poppet flange. The NESC assessment provided a peer review of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), stress analysis, and impact testing. A probability of detection (POD) study was requested by the SSP Orbiter Project for the eddy current (EC) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that were developed to inspect the flight FCV poppets. This report contains the Appendices to the main report.

  11. Effect of feeding heat-treated colostrum on risk for infection with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, milk production, and longevity in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Godden, S M; Wells, S; Donahue, M; Stabel, J; Oakes, J M; Sreevatsan, S; Fetrow, J

    2015-08-01

    In summer 2007, a randomized controlled field trial was initiated on 6 large Midwest commercial dairy farms to investigate the effect of feeding heat-treated (HT) colostrum on transmission of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and on future milk production and longevity within the herd. On each farm, colostrum was collected daily from fresh cows, pooled, divided into 2 aliquots, and then 1 aliquot was heat-treated in a commercial batch pasteurizer at 60°C for 60min. A sample from each batch of colostrum was collected for PCR testing (MAP-positive vs. MAP-negative). Newborn heifer calves were removed from the dam within 30 to 60min of birth and systematically assigned to be fed 3.8 L of either fresh (FR; n=434) or heat-treated (HT; n=490) colostrum within 2h of birth. After reaching adulthood (>2 yr old), study animals were tested once annually for 3 yr (2010, 2011, 2012) for infection with MAP using serum ELISA and fecal culture. Lactation records describing milk production data and death or culling events were collected during the 3-yr testing period. Multivariable model logistic and linear regression was used to investigate the effect of feeding HT colostrum on risk for testing positive to MAP during the 3-yr testing period (positive/negative; logistic regression) and on first and second lactation milk yield (kg/cow; linear regression), respectively. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate the effect of feeding HT colostrum on risk and time to removal from the herd. Fifteen percent of all study animals were fed PCR-positive colostrum. By the end of the 3-yr testing period, no difference was noted in the proportion of animals testing positive for MAP, with either serum ELISA or fecal culture, when comparing the HT group (10.5%) versus the FR group (8.1%). There was no effect of treatment on first- (HT=11.797kg; FR=11,671kg) or second-lactation (HT=11,013kg; FR=11,235kg) milk production. The proportion of cows leaving the herd by study conclusion was not different for animals originally fed HT (68.0%) versus FR (71.7%) colostrum. Although a previous study showed that feeding HT colostrum (60°C for 60min) produces short-term benefits, including improved passive transfer of IgG and reduced morbidity in the preweaning period, the current study found no benefit of feeding HT colostrum on long-term outcomes including risk for transmission of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, milk production in the first and second lactation, and longevity within the herd. PMID:26074228

  12. Cucumis melo ssp. Agrestis var. Agrestis Ameliorates High Fat Diet Induced Dyslipidemia in Syrian Golden Hamsters and Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Kripa; Singh, Sumit K.; Kumar, Durgesh; Varshney, Salil; Gupta, Abhishek; Rajan, Sujith; Srivastava, Ankita; Beg, Muheeb; Srivastava, Anurag Kumar; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak K.; Gaikwad, Anil N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cucumis melo ssp. agrestis var. agrestis (CMA) is a wild variety of C. melo. This study aimed to explore anti-dyslipidemic and anti-adipogenic potential of CMA. Materials and Methods: For initial anti-dyslipidemic and antihyperglycemic potential of CMA fruit extract (CMFE), male Syrian golden hamsters were fed a chow or high-fat diet with or without CMFE (100 mg/kg). Further, we did fractionation of this CMFE into two fractions namely; CMA water fraction (CMWF) and CMA hexane fraction (CMHF). Phytochemical screening was done with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry LC- (MS)/MS and direct analysis in real time-MS to detect active compounds in the fractions. Further, high-fat diet fed dyslipidemic hamsters were treated with CMWF and CMHF at 50 mg/kg for 7 days. Results: Oral administration of CMFE and both fractions (CMWF and CMHF) reduced the total cholesterol, triglycerides, low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low‐density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in high fat diet-fed dyslipidemic hamsters. CMHF also modulated expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and reverse cholesterol transport. Standard biochemical diagnostic tests suggested that neither of fractions causes any toxicity to hamster liver or kidneys. CMFE and CMHF also decreased oil-red-O accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Conclusion: Based on these results, it is concluded that CMA possesses anti-dyslipidemic and anti-hyperglycemic activity along with the anti-adipogenic activity. SUMMARY The oral administration of Cucumis melo agrestis fruit extract (CMFE) and its fractions (CMWF and CMHF) improved serum lipid profile in HFD fed dyslipidemic hamsters.CMFE, CMWF and CMHF significantly attenuated body weight gain and eWAT hypertrophy.The CMHF decreased lipogenesis in both liver and adipose tissue.CMFE and CMHF also inhibited adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Abbreviation used: CMA: Cucumis melo ssp. agrestis var. agrestis, CMFE: CMA fruit extract, CMWF: CMA water fraction, CMHF: CMA hexane fraction, FAS: Fatty acid synthase, SREBP1c: Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c, ACC: Acetyl CoA carboxylase, LXR α: Liver X receptor α. PMID:27013786

  13. Efficient production of native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Setrerrahmane, Sarra; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Guangzhi; Lv, Jing; Tan, Shuhua

    2014-09-01

    To develop an efficient and cost-effective approach for the production of small preventive peptide lunasin with correct natural N terminus, a synthetic gene was designed by OPTIMIZER & Gene Designer and cloned into pTWIN1 vector at SapI and PstI sites. Thus, lunasin was N-terminally fused to the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein linked to a chitin binding domain (CBD) with no extra residues. The resultant fusion protein was highly expressed by lactose induction in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a 7-l bioreactor and bound to a chitin affinity column. After washing the impurities, the Ssp DnaB intein mediated on-column self-cleavage was easily triggered by shifting pH and temperature to allow the native lunasin released. The final purified lunasin yielded up to 75 mg/l medium. Tricine/SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)/mass spectrometry (MS) verified the structural authenticity of the product, implying the correct cleavage at the junction between Ssp DnaB intein and lunasin. MTT assay confirmed its potent proliferation inhibitory activity to human cancer cells HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231; however, no cytotoxicity to normal human lens epithelial cell SRA01/04 and hepatoma HepG2. Taken together, we provide a novel strategy to produce recombinant native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein. PMID:25085531

  14. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of the N2-fixing bacterial diversity in soil under Acacia tortilis ssp. raddiana and Balanites aegyptiaca in the dryland part of Senegal.

    PubMed

    Demba Diallo, Moudjahidou; Willems, Anne; Vloemans, Nele; Cousin, Sylvie; Vandekerckhove, Tom T; de Lajudie, Philippe; Neyra, Marc; Vyverman, Wim; Gillis, Monique; Van der Gucht, Katleen

    2004-04-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified nifH gene fragments was used to study the diazotrophic community of soil samples under Acacia tortilis ssp. raddiana (legume tree) and Balanites aegyptiaca (non-legume tree), two dominant plant species growing naturally in the dryland part of Senegal. Samples were taken along transects from the stem up to 10 m distance from it, at depths of 0-0.25 m and 0.25-0.50 m. Sampling was done in the dry season (25 June 1999) and in the rainy season (28 August 1999). The community structure and diversity of the bacterial groups from the different samples was analysed further using different techniques, such as statistical analysis and diversity index evaluation of the band patterns. Diazotrophic diversity was lower under B. aegyptiaca than under A. tortilis ssp. raddiana. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis and ANOSIM tests showed a significant effect of the tree on the diazotroph assemblages. SIMPER analysis showed that the major elements responsible for the dissimilarity are a member of the genus Sinorhizobium, which is characteristic of the samples taken under A. tortilis ssp. raddiana and a member of the cluster Bradyrhizobium for the samples taken under B. aegyptiaca. Forty-four major bands were partially sequenced, yielding 33 different nifH sequences, which were used in phylogenetic reconstructions. Most sequences were affiliated with the alpha- beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. Five nifH sequences were identical to those of Pseudomonas stutzeri, and one sequence showed 100% similarity to that of Azotobacter vinelandii. Four bands were affiliated with the Cyanobacteria and a single one with the Firmicutes. For both trees, there were also clear differences between the samples taken in the dry and rainy seasons. Only for the samples taken under A. tortilis ssp. raddiana was a significant difference found between the two sampling depths. PMID:15008817

  15. Accumulation of Phenylpropanoids by White, Blue, and Red Light Irradiation and Their Organ-Specific Distribution in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Kim, Yeon Bok; Li, Xiaohua; Choi, Su Ryun; Park, Suhyoung; Park, Jong Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo; Park, Sang Un

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated optimum light conditions for enhancing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and the distribution of phenylpropanoids in organs of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). Blue light caused a high accumulation of most phenolic compounds, including p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol, at 12 days after irradiation (DAI). This increase was coincident with a noticeable increase in expression levels of BrF3H, BrF3'H, BrFLS, and BrDFR. Red light led to the highest ferulic acid content at 12 DAI and to elevated expression of the corresponding genes during the early stages of irradiation. White light induced the highest accumulation of kaempferol and increased expression of BrPAL and BrDFR at 9 DAI. The phenylpropanoid content analysis in different organs revealed organ-specific accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol. These results demonstrate that blue light is effective at increasing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Chinese cabbage, with leaves and flowers representing the most suitable organs for the production of specific phenylpropanoids. PMID:26158208

  16. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism. PMID:26476944

  17. Degradation kinetics of peroxidase enzyme, phenolic content, and physical and sensorial characteristics in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) during blanching.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, Elsa M; Pinheiro, Joaquina; Alegria, Carla; Abreu, Marta; Brando, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2009-06-24

    The effects of water blanching treatment on peroxidase inactivation, total phenolic content, color parameters [-a*/b* and hue (h degrees*)], texture (maximum shear force), and sensory attributes (color and texture, evaluated by a trained panel) of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) were studied at five temperatures (70, 75, 80, 85, and 90 degrees C). Experimental results showed that all studied broccoli quality parameters suffered significative changes due to blanching treatments. The vegetal total phenolic content showed a marked decline. Degradation on objective color and texture measurements and alterations in sensorial attributes were detected. Correlations between sensory and instrumental measurements have been found. Under the conditions 70 degrees C and 6.5 min or 90 degrees C and 0.4 min, 90% of the initial peroxidase activity was reduced. At these conditions, no significant alterations were detected by panelists, and a small amount of phenolic content was lost (ca. 16 and 10%, respectively). The peroxidase inactivation and phenolic content degradation were found to follow first-order reaction models. The zero-order reaction model showed a good fit to the broccoli color (-a*/b* and h degrees*), texture, and sensory parameters changes. The temperature effect was well-described by the Arrhenius law. PMID:19441787

  18. Effect of the absence of the CcpA gene on growth, metabolic production, and stress tolerance in Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Sun, J W; Zhang, G F; Liu, L B

    2016-01-01

    The catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is a kind of multi-effect regulatory protein. In the study, the effect of the inactivation of CcpA and aerobic conditions on the growth, metabolic production, and stress tolerance to heat, oxidative, and cold stresses in Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus was investigated. Results showed that inactivation of CcpA distinctly hindered growth. Total lactic acid concentration was significantly lower in aerobiosis for both strains and was lower for the mutant strain than L. bulgaricus. Acetic acid production from the mutant strain was higher than L. bulgaricus in aerobiosis compared with anaerobiosis. Enzyme activities, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), phosphate fructose kinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK), and pyruvic dehydrogenase (PDH), were significantly lower in the mutant strain than L. bulgaricus. The diameters of inhibition zone were 13.590.02mm and 9.760.02mm for L. bulgaricus in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, respectively; and 8.120.02mm and 7.380.02mm for the mutant in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, respectively. For both strains, cells grown under aerobic environment possess more stress tolerance. This is the first study in which the CcpA-negative mutant of L. bulgaricus is constructed and the effect of aerobic growth on stress tolerance of L. bulgaricus is evaluated. Although aerobic cultivation does not significantly improve growth, it does improve stress tolerance. PMID:26585479

  19. Relationships between functional genes in Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus isolates and phenotypic characteristics associated with fermentation time and flavor production in yogurt elucidated using multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Yu, Jie; Sun, Zhihong; Song, Yuqin; Wang, Xueni; Wang, Hongmei; Wuren, Tuoya; Zha, Musu; Menghe, Bilige; Heping, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is well known for its worldwide application in yogurt production. Flavor production and acid producing are considered as the most important characteristics for starter culture screening. To our knowledge this is the first study applying functional gene sequence multilocus sequence typing technology to predict the fermentation and flavor-producing characteristics of yogurt-producing bacteria. In the present study, phenotypic characteristics of 35 L. bulgaricus strains were quantified during the fermentation of milk to yogurt and during its subsequent storage; these included fermentation time, acidification rate, pH, titratable acidity, and flavor characteristics (acetaldehyde concentration). Furthermore, multilocus sequence typing analysis of 7 functional genes associated with fermentation time, acid production, and flavor formation was done to elucidate the phylogeny and genetic evolution of the same L. bulgaricus isolates. The results showed that strains significantly differed in fermentation time, acidification rate, and acetaldehyde production. Combining functional gene sequence analysis with phenotypic characteristics demonstrated that groups of strains established using genotype data were consistent with groups identified based on their phenotypic traits. This study has established an efficient and rapid molecular genotyping method to identify strains with good fermentation traits; this has the potential to replace time-consuming conventional methods based on direct measurement of phenotypic traits. PMID:26547656

  20. Short communication: Herd-level prevalence of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis is not associated with participation in a voluntary Alberta Johne's disease control program.

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Wolf, R; Adams, C L; Kelton, D F; Pickel, C; Mason, S; Orsel, K; De Buck, J; Barkema, H W

    2016-03-01

    Johne's disease (JD) control programs for dairy farms have the general objective of reducing both cow- and herd-level prevalence of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP). An important aspect of many programs is herd testing for MAP to determine the infection status of participating farms. However, it is uncertain whether MAP herd-level prevalence on farms voluntarily participating in a JD control program is different from that on nonparticipating farms. Therefore, the aim was to compare MAP infection status of participants and nonparticipants in the Alberta Johne's Disease Initiative (AJDI), a voluntary JD control program initiated in 2010 in Alberta, Canada. Between September 2012 and August 2013, environmental fecal samples were collected from 93 randomly selected farms not enrolled in the AJDI. Additionally, 81 farms that initially enrolled in the AJDI during the same time interval were also sampled. Samples were collected from 6 defined locations on each farm and cultured for MAP. Results were confirmed using conventional IS900 PCR and F 0285 quantitative PCR. Overall, 51% of participating and 51% of nonparticipating farms were identified as being MAP-infected. Furthermore, based on multivariable logistic regression, the number of MAP-positive samples was not associated with AJDI participation (taking herd size into account as a potentially modifying or confounding variable). In conclusion, there was no indication that voluntary participation in the AJDI was associated with herd-level MAP prevalence. PMID:26778309

  1. Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes suggests that relaxed purifying selection is driving high nonsynonymous evolutionary rate of the NADH2 gene in whitefish (Coregonus ssp.).

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Magnus W; da Fonseca, Rute R; Bernatchez, Louis; Hansen, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have recently reported evidence for positive selection acting on the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome), emphasizing its potential role in adaptive divergence and speciation. In this study we searched 107 full mitogenomes of recently diverged species and lineages of whitefish (Coregonus ssp.) for signals of positive selection. These salmonids show several distinct morphological and ecological differences that may be associated with energetics and therefore potentially positive selection at the mitogenome level. We found that purifying selection and genetic drift were the predominant evolutionary forces acting on the analyzed mitogenomes. However, the NADH dehydrogenase 2 gene (ND2) showed a highly elevated dN/dS ratio compared to the other mitochondrial genes, which was significantly higher in whitefish compared to other salmonids. We therefore further examined nonsynonymous evolution in ND2 by (i) mapping amino acid changes to a protein model structure which showed that they were located away from key functional residues of the protein, (ii) locating them in the sequences of other species of fish (Salmonidae, Anguillidae, Scombridae and Percidae) only to find pronounced overlap of nonsynonymous regions. We thus conclude that relaxed purifying selection is driving the evolution of ND2 by affecting mostly regions that have lower functional relevance. PMID:26654959

  2. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a Cu/Zn SOD gene (BcCSD1) from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lijie; Huang, Qiang; Yan, Bin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhongyin; Pan, Jingxian; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are a family of metalloproteins extensively exists in eukaryote, which plays an essential role in stress-tolerance of higher plants. A full-length cDNA encoding Cu/Zn SOD (BcCSD1) was isolated from young seedlings of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that BcCSD1 belonged to the plant SOD super family and had the closest relationship with SOD from Brassica napus. Tissue expression pattern analysis revealed that the BcCSD1 was constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, and strongest in leaf, moderate in stem, lowest in root. The expression profiles under different stress treatments such as drought, NaCl, high temperature and ABA were also investigated, and the results revealed that BcCSD1 was a stress-responsive gene, especially to ABA. These results provide useful information for further understanding the role of BcCSD1 resistant to abiotic stress in Brassica campestris in the future. PMID:25976826

  3. A 560 yr summer temperature reconstruction for the Western Mediterranean basin based on stable carbon isotopes from Pinus nigra ssp. laricio (Corsica/France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, S.; Joachimski, M. M.; Bruning, A.; Hetzer, T.; Kuhlemann, J.

    2012-10-01

    The Mediterranean is considered as an area which will be affected strongly by current climate change. However, temperature records for the past centuries which can contribute to a better understanding of future climate changes are still sparse for this region. Carbon isotope chronologies from tree-rings often mirror temperature history but their application as climate proxies is difficult due to the influence of the anthropogenic change in atmospheric CO2 on the carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthetic CO2 uptake. We tested the influence of different correction models accounting for plant response to increased atmospheric CO2 on four annually resolved long-term carbon isotope records (between 400 and 800 yr) derived from Corsican pine trees (Pinus nigra ssp. laricio) growing at ecologically varying mountain sites on the island of Corsica. The different correction factors have only a minor influence on the main climate signals and resulting temperature reconstructions. Carbon isotope series show strong correlations with summer temperature and precipitation. A summer temperature reconstruction (1448-2007 AD) reveals that the Little Ice Age was characterised by low, but not extremely low temperatures on Corsica. Temperatures have been to modern temperatures at around 1500 AD. The reconstruction reveals warm summers during 1480-1520 and 1950-2007 AD and cool summers during 1580-1620 and 1820-1890 AD.

  4. Efficient lactic acid production from high salt containing dairy by-products by Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salicinius with pre-treatment by proteolytic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Vasala, Antti; Panula, Johanna; Neubauer, Peter

    2005-06-29

    Lactic acid bacteria have an inefficient proteolytic system. Therefore, cultivation media which may have high protein content are usually supplemented with yeast extract or protein lysates (peptones). These additives might be conveniently replaced by in situ treatment of the cultivation medium with proteolytic enzymes or proteolytic microbes. Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salicinius, a lactic acid bacterium species that can grow at high salt concentration, was used to ferment lactic acid in cheese whey (with 3 gl(-1) whey protein content) and lactose mother liquor (90 gl(-1) lactose, 9 gl(-1) proteins, 30 gl(-1) minerals). The contribution of protease enzymes or proteolytic microbes to acid production by lactobacilli was examined. Efficient conversion of lactose to lactic acid was obtained in the presence of additional proteolytic activity. Fastest acid production was obtained with the addition of protease enzymes. However, almost equally efficient acid production was obtained by treating the medium with Bacillus megaterium. The results show that fast and complete conversion of lactose to lactic acid can be obtained in dairy by-products without expensive additives. PMID:15876466

  5. Cratoxylum formosum (Jack) Dyer ssp. pruniflorum (Kurz) Gogel. (Hng y m) extract induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells through caspase-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cratoxylum formosum (Jack) Dyer ssp. pruniflorum (Kurz) Gogel. (Hng y m) (CF) has been used for treatment of fever, cough, and peptic ulcer. Previously, a 50% ethanol-water extract from twigs of CF was shown highly selective in cytotoxicity against cancer cells. This study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptosis-inducing effect of CF. Methods The cytotoxicity of CF was evaluated in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cell line in comparison with a non-cancerous African green monkey kidney epithelial cell line (Vero) by a neutral red assay. The apoptosis induction mechanisms were investigated through nuclear morphological changes, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential alterations, and caspase enzyme activities. Results CF selectively induced HepG2 cell death compared with non-cancerous Vero cells. A 1.5-fold higher apoptotic effect compared with melphalan was induced by 120?g/mL of the 50% ethanol-water extract of CF. The apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells occurred via extrinsic and intrinsic caspase-dependent pathways in dose- and time-dependent manners by significantly increasing the activities of caspase 3/7, 8, and 9, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, and causing apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. Conclusions CF extract induced a caspase-dependent apoptosis in HepG2 cells. PMID:24708784

  6. Carbohydrate derivatives from the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris and their effects on ROS production and glutamate-induced cell death in HT-22 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Lee, Dong-Sung; Lee, Dae-Young; Song, Na-Young; Kim, Youn-Chul; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Chung, Hae-Gon; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Ahn, Eun-Mi; Kim, Geum-Soog; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-05-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris led to the isolation of three new carbohydrate derivatives, namely sucrose 3,3',4'-triisovalerate (2), sucrose 6,3',4'-triisovalerate (3), and ethanone-1-C-β-d-glucopyranoside (3,7-anhydro-1-deoxy-d-glycero-d-gulo-2-octulose, 6), along with four known carbohydrate derivatives, 2,6,3',4'-tetraisovalerate (1), ethyl β-d-glucopyranoside (4), n-butyl β-d-fructofuranoside (5), and n-pentyl β-d-fructofuranoside (7), which were initially isolated from plants of the Brassica genus. Structures of the isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic analyses, including UV, IR, MS, and NMR. All of the isolated carbohydrate derivatives were evaluated to determine their effect on ROS production and glutamate-induced cell death in HT-22 cells. Compound 6 showed the most significant ROS reduction and a protective effect with IC50 values of 69.4 ± 3.8 μM and 4.96 ± 0.32 μM, respectively, which were equivalent to those of the positive control, Trolox. PMID:23507511

  7. Anthocyanin Accumulation, Antioxidant Ability and Stability, and a Transcriptional Analysis of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Heading Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    He, Qiong; Zhang, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Lugang

    2016-01-13

    Heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) is a significant dietary vegetable for its edible heading leaves in Asia countries. The new purple anthocyanin-rich pure line (11S91) was successfully bred, and the anthocyanins were mainly distributed in 2-3 cell layers beneath the leaf epidermis, whereas siliques and stems accumulated only a cell layer of anthocyanins. The anthocyanins of 11S91 were more stable at pHs below 3.0 and temperatures below 45 °C. The total antioxidant ability was highly positive correlated with the anthocyanin content in 11S91. Thirty-two anthocyanins were separated and identified, and 70% of them were glycosylated and acylated cyanidins. The four major anthocyanins present were cyanidin-3-sophoroside(p-coumaroyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), cyanidin-3-sophoroside(ferulyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), cyanidin-3-sophoroside(sinapyl-p-coumaroyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), and cyanidin-3-sophoroside-(sinapyl-ferulyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl). According to the expression of biosynthetic genes and the component profile of anthocyanins in 11S91 and its parents, regulatory genes BrMYB2 and BrTT8 probably activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis but other factors may govern the primary anthocyanins and the distribution. PMID:26709726

  8. Determining the persistence of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin Danish in select tissues of orally vaccinated feral swine (Sus scrofa ssp.).

    PubMed

    Nol, Pauline; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Rhyan, Jack C; McCollum, Matt P; Triantis, Joni M; Beltrn-Beck, Beatriz; Salman, Mo D

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is being considered for vaccination of feral swine (Sus scrofa ssp.). Since BCG is a live bacterium, evaluation of its safety and persistence in tissues is important. Fifteen feral swine received approximately 4.510(6) colony forming units of BCG Danish via oral bait. Four animals received bait without BCG. At 1, 3, 6, and 9months post-vaccination, four vaccinates were euthanized. Non-vaccinates were euthanized at 9months. Clinical signs were not noted in vaccinated pigs at any time. Tissues from all 20 pigs were culture-negative for mycobacteria. Based on our data, BCG is safe and appears not to persist in feral swine tissues after one month post-oral vaccination. However, further work must be performed at higher doses, and on a larger number of animals representing the target population, and further evaluation of persistence in tissues within the first month post-vaccination is needed. PMID:26850536

  9. Microsatellite analysis of a population crash and bottleneck in the Mauna Kea silversword, Argyroxiphium sandwicense ssp. sandwicense (Asteraceae), and its implications for reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Friar, E A; Ladoux, T; Roalson, E H; Robichaux, R H

    2000-12-01

    The Mauna Kea silversword, Argyroxiphium sandwicense ssp. sandwicense, has experienced both a severe population crash associated with an increase in alien ungulate populations on Mauna Kea, and a population bottleneck associated with reintroduction. In this paper, we address the genetic consequences of both demographic events using eight microsatellite loci. The population crash was not accompanied by a significant reduction in number of alleles or heterozygosity. However, the population bottleneck was accompanied by significant reductions in observed number of alleles, effective number of alleles, and expected heterozygosity, though not in observed heterozygosity. The effective size of the population bottleneck was calculated using both observed heterozygosities and allele frequency variances. Both methods corroborated the historical census size of the population bottleneck of at most three individuals. The results suggest that: (i) small populations, even those that result from severe reductions in historical population size and extent, are not necessarily genetically depauperate; and (ii) species reintroduction plans need to be conceived and implemented carefully, with due consideration to the genetic impact of sampling for reintroduction. PMID:11123615

  10. Recent invasion of the mountain birch Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa above the treeline due to climate change: genetic and ecological study in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Truong, C; Palm, A E; Felber, F

    2007-01-01

    Mountain birch, Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa, forms the treeline in northern Sweden. A recent shift in the range of the species associated with an elevation of the treeline is commonly attributed to climate warming. Using microsatellite markers, we explored the genetic structure of populations along an altitudinal gradient close to the treeline. Low genetic differentiation was found between populations, whereas high genetic diversity was maintained within populations. High level of gene flow compensated for possible losses of genetic diversity at higher elevations and dissipated the founding effect of newly established populations above the treeline. Spatial autocorrelation analysis showed low spatial genetic structure within populations because of extensive gene flow. At the treeline, significant genetic structure within the juvenile age class at small distances did not persist in the adult age class, indicating recent expansion of young recruits due to the warming of the climate. Finally, seedling performance above the treeline was positively correlated with parameters related to temperature. These data confirm the high migration potential of the species in response to fluctuating environmental conditions and indicate that it is now invading higher altitudes due to the recent warming of the climate. PMID:17210030

  11. Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis Cyt1Aa enhances activity of Cry11Aa toxin by facilitating the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Claudia; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Portugal, Leivi C.; Sánchez, Jorge; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis (Bti) has been used worldwide for the control of dipteran insect pests. This bacterium produces several Cry and Cyt toxins that individually show activity against mosquitoes but together show synergistic effect. Previous work demonstrated that Cyt1Aa synergizes the toxic activity of Cry11Aa by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor. In the case of Cry toxins active against lepidopteran insects, receptor interaction triggers the formation of a pre-pore oligomer that is responsible for pore formation and toxicity. In this work we report that binding of Cry11Aa to Cyt1Aa facilitates the formation of a Cry11Aa pre-pore oligomeric structure that is capable of forming pores in membrane vesicles. Cry11Aa and Cyt1A point mutants affected in binding and in synergism had a correlative effect on the formation of Cry11Aa pre-pore oligomer and on pore-formation activity of Cry11Aa. These data further support that Cyt1Aa interacts with Cry11Aa and demonstrate the molecular mechanism by which Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry11Aa, by providing a binding site for Cry11Aa that will result in an efficient formation of Cry11Aa pre-pore that inserts into membranes and forms ionic pores. PMID:17672866

  12. Induced Production of 1-Methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl Glucosinolate by Jasmonic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate in Sprouts and Leaves of Pak Choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  13. Leaf and root glucosinolate profiles of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) as a systemic response to methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid elicitation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yun-xiang; Ge, Jia-li; Huang, Ling-hui; Gao, Fei; Lv, Xi-shan; Zheng, Wei-wei; Hong, Seung-beom; Zhu, Zhu-jun

    2015-08-01

    Glucosinolates (GSs) are an important group of defensive phytochemicals mainly found in Brassicaceae. Plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are major regulators of plant response to pathogen attack. However, there is little information about the interactive effect of both elicitors on inducing GS biosynthesis in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). In this study, we applied different concentrations of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and/or SA onto the leaf and root of Chinese cabbage to investigate the time-course interactive profiles of GSs. Regardless of the site of the elicitation and the concentrations of the elicitors, the roots accumulated much more GSs and were more sensitive and more rapidly responsive to the elicitors than leaves. Irrespective of the elicitation site, MeJA had a greater inducing and longer lasting effect on GS accumulation than SA. All three components of indole GS (IGS) were detected along with aliphatic and aromatic GSs. However, IGS was a major component of total GSs that accumulated rapidly in both root and leaf tissues in response to MeJA and SA elicitation. Neoglucobrassicin (neoGBC) did not respond to SA but to MeJA in leaf tissue, while it responded to both SA and MeJA in root tissue. Conversion of glucobrassicin (GBC) to neoGBC occurred at a steady rate over 3 d of elicitation. Increased accumulation of 4-methoxy glucobrassicin (4-MGBC) occurred only in the root irrespective of the type of elicitors and the site of elicitation. Thus, accumulation of IGS is a major metabolic hallmark of SA- and MeJA-mediated systemic response systems. SA exerted an antagonistic effect on the MeJA-induced root GSs irrespective of the site of elicitation. However, SA showed synergistic and antagonistic effects on the MeJA-induced leaf GSs when roots and leaves are elicitated for 3 d, respectively. PMID:26238545

  14. Short-term, daily intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24384) does not affect colonic transit time in women.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; D'Amico, Frank; Palese, Caren; Hahn, Alexander; Sparenborg, Jessy; Tan, Tina; Scott, Hillary; Polzin, Kayla; Kolberg, Lore; Roberts, Robert

    2014-01-28

    The present study investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24 384) (Bf-6)-supplemented yogurt on colonic transit time (CTT). A triple-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over trial was conducted with sixty-eight women with a self-reported history of straining during bowel movements or hard or lumpy stools in the past 2 years. As per regulatory requirements for probiotic studies, eligible women were generally healthy and not actively constipated at the time of enrolment. Participants consumed both Bf-6 and placebo yogurts for 14 d each in a randomised order, with a 6-week washout period between the treatments. The primary outcome, CTT, was assessed via Sitz marker X-rays. The average CTT was 42·1 h for the active period and 43·3 h for the control period (mean difference 1·2 h, 95 % CI - 4·9, 7·4). Since the statistical tests for the cross-over study implied that the mean CTT for the active and control periods in period 2 were biased, the standard protocol suggests examining the results of only period 1 as a traditional randomised controlled trial. This showed that the mean CTT was 35·2 h for the active period v. 52·9 h for the control period (P= 0·015). Bootstrapping demonstrated that both the mean and median differences remained significant (P= 0·016 and P= 0·045, respectively). Few adverse events were noted, with no differences among the active and control periods. The paired analysis showed no differences between the active and control periods during the cross-over trial. Further trials should be conducted in populations with underlying problems associated with disordered transit to determine the potential value of probiotic supplementation more accurately. PMID:24103188

  15. Reducing the risk of infection in the elderly by dietary intake of yoghurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    PubMed

    Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Kume, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hajime; Orii, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    Immune senescence potentially leads to an increased risk of infections. It is desirable to augment the immune system and protect against infections by daily consumption of immunostimulatory food. The present study evaluated whether the intake of yoghurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) OLL1073R-1 has an effect on resistance to the common cold. We conducted two independent studies, in which fifty-seven (median age 74.5 years) and eighty-five healthy elderly individuals (median age 67.7 years) were participants. In each study, the subjects were divided into two groups based on age and sex and instructed to eat 90 g yoghurt or drink 100 ml milk once per d over an 8- or 12-week period. A meta-analysis of the results of these two independent studies showed the risk of catching the common cold was about 2.6 times lower (OR 0.39; P = 0.019) in the yoghurt group than in the milk group and the increase of natural killer cell activity was significantly higher in the yoghurt group than in the milk group (P = 0.028). In addition, the quality of life score for the 'eye/nose/throat' system after intake was significantly higher in the yoghurt group than in the milk group and the improvement of the score was correlated with the promotion of natural killer cell activity. In conclusion, consumption of yoghurt fermented with L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 augmented natural killer cell activity and reduced the risk of catching the common cold in elderly individuals. PMID:20487575

  16. Phages of non-dairy lactococci: isolation and characterization of ?L47, a phage infecting the grass isolate Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Guinane, Caitriona M.; Neve, Horst; Coffey, Aidan; Ross, R. Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Lactococci isolated from non-dairy sources have been found to possess enhanced metabolic activity when compared to dairy strains. These capabilities may be harnessed through the use of these strains as starter or adjunct cultures to produce more diverse flavor profiles in cheese and other dairy products. To understand the interactions between these organisms and the phages that infect them, a number of phages were isolated against lactococcal strains of non-dairy origin. One such phage, ?L47, was isolated from a sewage sample using the grass isolate L. lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860 as a host. Visualization of phage virions by transmission electron microscopy established that this phage belongs to the family Siphoviridae and possesses a long tail fiber, previously unseen in dairy lactococcal phages. Determination of the lytic spectrum revealed a broader than expected host range, with ?L47 capable of infecting 4 industrial dairy strains, including ML8, HP and 310, and 3 additional non-dairy isolates. Whole genome sequencing of ?L47 revealed a dsDNA genome of 128, 546 bp, making it the largest sequenced lactococcal phage to date. In total, 190 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and comparative analysis revealed that the predicted products of 117 of these ORFs shared greater than 50% amino acid identity with those of L. lactis phage ?949, a phage isolated from cheese whey. Despite their different ecological niches, the genomic content and organization of ?L47 and ?949 are quite similar, with both containing 4 gene clusters oriented in different transcriptional directions. Other features that distinguish ?L47 from ?949 and other lactococcal phages, in addition to the presence of the tail fiber and the genome length, include a low GC content (32.5%) and a high number of predicted tRNA genes (8). Comparative genome analysis supports the conclusion that ?L47 is a new member of the 949 lactococcal phage group which currently includes the dairy ?949. PMID:24454309

  17. Evidence for cross-tolerance to nutrient deficiency in three disjunct populations of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. lyrata in response to substrate calcium to magnesium ratio.

    PubMed

    Veatch-Blohm, Maren E; Roche, Bernadette M; Campbell, Maryjean

    2013-01-01

    Species with widespread distributions that grow in varied habitats may consist of ecotypes adapted to a particular habitat, or may exhibit cross-tolerance that enables them to exploit a variety of habitats. Populations of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. lyrata (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz grow in a wide variety of edaphic settings including serpentine soil, limestone sand, and alluvial flood plains. While all three of these environments share some stressors, a crucial difference among these environments is soil calcium to magnesium ratio, which ranges from 25:1 in the limestone sand to 0.2:1 in serpentine soil. The three populations found on these substrates were subjected to three different Ca to Mg ratios under controlled environmental conditions during germination and rosette growth. Response to Ca to Mg ratio was evaluated through germination success and radicle growth rate, rosette growth rate, and the content of Ca and Mg in the rosette. All three populations were particularly efficient in fueling growth under nutrient deficiency, with the highest nutrient efficiency ratio for Ca under Ca deficiency and for Mg under Mg deficiency. Although the serpentine population had significantly higher leaf Ca to Mg ratio than the limestone or flood plain populations under all three Ca to Mg ratios, this increase did not result in any advantage in growth or appearance of the serpentine plants, during early life stages before the onset of flowering, even in the high Mg substrate. The three populations showed no population by substrate interaction for any of the parameters measured indicating that these populations may have cross-tolerance to substrate Ca to Mg ratio. PMID:23650547

  18. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  19. Identification of conserved gene structures and carboxy-terminal motifs in the Myb gene family of Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cizhong; Gu, Xun; Peterson, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Background Myb proteins contain a conserved DNA-binding domain composed of one to four repeat motifs (referred to as R0R1R2R3); each repeat is approximately 50 amino acids in length, with regularly spaced tryptophan residues. Although the Myb proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants, little is known about the functions of most Myb genes. Here we use computational techniques to classify Myb genes on the basis of sequence similarity and gene structure, and to identify possible functional relationships among subgroups of Myb genes from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica). Results This study analyzed 130 Myb genes from Arabidopsis and 85 from rice. The collected Myb proteins were clustered into subgroups based on sequence similarity and phylogeny. Interestingly, the exon-intron structure differed between subgroups, but was conserved in the same subgroup. Moreover, the Myb domains contained a significant excess of phase 1 and 2 introns, as well as an excess of nonsymmetric exons. Conserved motifs were detected in carboxy-terminal coding regions of Myb genes within subgroups. In contrast, no common regulatory motifs were identified in the noncoding regions. Additionally, some Myb genes with similar functions were clustered in the same subgroups. Conclusions The distribution of introns in the phylogenetic tree suggests that Myb domains originally were compact in size; introns were inserted and the splicing sites conserved during evolution. Conserved motifs identified in the carboxy-terminal regions are specific for Myb genes, and the identified Myb gene subgroups may reflect functional conservation. PMID:15239831

  20. Sequence characterization and expression pattern of BcMF21, a novel gene related to pollen development in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yu, Xiaolin; Miao, Ying; Huang, Li; Yao, Lina; Cao, Jiashu

    2012-07-01

    In this report a full length cDNA, Brassica campestris Male Fertile 21 (BcMF21) was successfully isolated from one of the cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), BBP10, that was found down-regulated in the flower buds of sterile plants in Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino genic male sterile (GMS) AB line system (Bcajh 97-01A/B). BcMF21 protein structure analysis showed a signal peptide at the N-terminus; two protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, five N-myristoylation sites and one casein kinase II phosphorylation site. The promoter region of BcMF21, a 779 bp upstream of ATG was isolated by thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR (TAIL-PCR). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the promoter of BcMF21 contained several classical cis-acting elements and three pollen specific elements. Transient expression analysis showed that the promoter could drive green fluorescence protein (GFP) expression. Quantitative reverse transcript-PCR analysis revealed that BcMF21 was specifically expressed in flower buds. The transcript level of BcMF21 was much lower in the sterile flower buds than in the fertile flower buds in 'Bcajh 97-01A/B' system. In situ hybridization further showed that BcMF21 was only expressed in the tetrads and the microspores at the tetrad stage and the uninucleate stage. In addition, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the BcMF21 was relative conserved within family Crucifereae and might be originated from the ancestor diploid B. campestris within genus Brassica according to the Triangle of U theory. PMID:22311045

  1. Production of 3-nitropropionic acid by endophytic fungus Phomopsis longicolla isolated from Trichilia elegans A. JUSS ssp. elegans and evaluation of biological activity.

    PubMed

    Flores, Andressa Caroline; Pamphile, Joo Alencar; Sarragiotto, Maria Helena; Clemente, Edmar

    2013-05-01

    The compound 3-nitropropionic acid is a potent neurotoxic agent in animals and well-known as a potent inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this research, we were able to extract this compound from the endophytic fungus, Phomopsis longicolla (FJ62759), isolated from Trichilia elegans A. JUSS ssp. elegans. The aim of this study was the isolation of secondary metabolites produced by P. longicolla, the chemical identification of these compounds and evaluation of their antimicrobial and insecticidal activity. To accomplish these goals, the fungus was cultured in BD broth for 25 days without agitation at 28 C, and then the broth was separated from the mycelium. The supernatant was partitioned with dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and butanol (BuOH) solvents resulting in 3 extracts. However, only the EtOAc extract was used for fractionation and chemical identification because it had the greatest mass. After common chromatographic procedures, the fractions were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance to elucidate the chemical components. This procedure resulted in the identification of 3-nitropropionic acid in the D fraction. Evaluation of the insecticidal and antimicrobial activity of this compound has been accomplished, and the results indicate good inhibition of the citrus pathogen Guignardia citricarpa and cocoa pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa and slight inhibition of the human bacterial pathogens Micrococcus luteus, Salmonella typhi and slight inhibition of phytopathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. The evaluation of insecticide activity did not show mortality of the Diatraea saccharalis larvae by the metabolite 3-nitropropionic acid in the D fraction. The results suggest that P. longicolla is a bioactive metabolic producing endophytic fungus with biotechnological properties. PMID:23296917

  2. Identification of novel and conserved miRNAs involved in pollen development in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis by high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, small RNAs that have essential regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and stress response processes. However, limited information is available about their functions in sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Pollen development is an important process in the life cycle of a flowering plant and is a major factor that affects the yield and quality of crop seeds. Results This study aims to identify miRNAs involved in pollen development. Two independent small RNA libraries were constructed from the flower buds of the male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) of Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis. The libraries were subjected to high-throughput sequencing by using the Illumina Solexa system. Eight novel miRNAs on the other arm of known pre-miRNAs, 54 new conserved miRNAs, and 8 novel miRNA members were identified. Twenty-five pairs of novel miRNA/miRNA* were found. Among all the identified miRNAs, 18 differentially expressed miRNAs with over two-fold change between flower buds of male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) were identified. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were preferentially expressed in flower buds of the male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B). Degradome analysis showed that a total of 15 genes were predicted to be the targets of seven miRNAs. Conclusions Our findings provide an overview of potential miRNAs involved in pollen development and interactions between miRNAs and their corresponding targets, which may provide important clues on the function of miRNAs in pollen development. PMID:24559317

  3. The influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC705 together with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS on potentially carcinogenic bacterial activity in human colon.

    PubMed

    Hatakka, Katja; Holma, Reetta; El-Nezami, Hani; Suomalainen, Tarja; Kuisma, Minna; Saxelin, Maija; Poussa, Tuija; Mykknen, Hannu; Korpela, Riitta

    2008-12-10

    The bacterial enzymes beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and urease may contribute to the development of colon cancer by generating carcinogens. A reduction in the activity of these enzymes by certain lactic acid bacteria is considered to be beneficial. This study examined fecal beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and urease activities during administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC705 (LC705) together with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp shermanii JS (PJS). Thirty-eight healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study with treatment periods of 4 weeks. Subjects consumed daily bacterial or placebo capsules. Bacterial capsules contained viable LC705 and PJS (2x10(10) CFU of each strain daily). The activities of beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase and urease, recovery of LC705 and PJS, and counts of total lactobacilli and propionibacteria were determined from feces. The mean fecal counts of total lactobacilli and propionibacteria as well as strains LC705 and PJS were significantly increased during the administration of bacteria (3.5-, 13-, 80- and 11-fold, respectively). beta-glucosidase activity decreased by 10% (P=0.18) and urease activity by 13% (P=0.16) during bacterial supplementation versus placebo. The change in beta-glucosidase activity was negatively correlated with the change in propionibacteria counts (R=-0.350, P=0.039), being -2.68 versus 0.94 nmol/min/mg protein in subjects with increased and unchanged/decreased propionibacteria, respectively (P=0.003). To conclude, the administration of LC705 and PJS was followed by an increase in the fecal counts of lactobacilli and propionibacteria and a decrease in the activity of beta-glucosidase with increasing counts of propionibacteria. PMID:18945506

  4. Responsiveness of different citrus genotypes to the Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri-derived pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22 correlates with resistance to citrus canker.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qingchun; Febres, Vicente J; Jones, Jeffrey B; Moore, Gloria A

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial agent of citrus canker disease (Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri, Xcc) has caused tremendous economic losses to the citrus industry around the world. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) is important to plant immunity. In this study, we compared the defence responses of citrus canker-resistant and citrus canker-susceptible genotypes to the Xcc-derived PAMP flg22 (Xflg22) by analysing the expression of 20 citrus defence-associated genes. We showed that, in the most resistant genotype, 'Nagami' kumquat, there was significant induction of several defence genes (EDS1, NDR1, PBS1, RAR1, SGT1, PAL1, NPR2 and NPR3) as early as 6 h and up to 72 h after Xflg22 treatment. At the other end of the spectrum, highly susceptible 'Duncan' grapefruit showed no induction of the same defence genes, even 120 h after treatment. Citrus genotypes with partial levels of resistance showed intermediate levels of transcriptional reprogramming that correlated with their resistance level. Xflg22 also triggered a rapid oxidative burst in all genotypes which was higher and accompanied by the induction of PTI marker genes (WRKY22 and GST1) only in the more resistant genotypes. Pretreatment with Xflg22 prior to Xcc inoculation inhibited bacterial growth in kumquat, but not in grapefruit. A flagellin-deficient Xcc strain (Xcc?fliC) showed greater growth increase relative to wild-type Xcc in kumquat than in grapefruit. Taken together, our results indicate that Xflg22 initiates strong PTI in canker-resistant genotypes, but not in susceptible ones, and that a robust induction of PTI is an important component of citrus resistance to canker. PMID:25231217

  5. Enzyme stability of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze drying and during storage in low water activity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-08-01

    Stability of enzymes such as β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), hexokinase (HK), and ATPase of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 wk of storage at low water activity (a(w)) at room temperature was studied. Bacteria were microencapsulated using alginate formulation with or without mannitol fortification (sodium alginate and mannitol [SAM] and sodium alginate [SA], respectively) by creating gel beads followed by freeze drying. Two types of dried gel beads were then stored at low a(w), such as 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2; storage in an aluminum foil was used as control. All storage was carried out at room temperature of 25 °C for 10 wk. Measurement of β-gal, β-glu, LDH, PK, HK, and ATPase (with or without exposure to pH 2.0 for 2 h) activities was carried out before freeze drying, after freeze drying, and after 10 wk of storage. There was a significant decrease in almost all enzyme activities, except that of PK. SAM and SA showed no different effect on maintaining enzyme activities during freeze drying. Storage for 10 wk at room temperature at various low a(w) using SAM and SA system had a significant effect on retention of most enzymes studied, except that of PK and LDH. Storage at a(w) of 0.07 and 0.1 was more effective in maintaining enzyme activities than storage at a(w) of 0.2 and in an aluminum foil. However, mannitol fortification into alginate system did not significantly improve retention of enzymes during 10 wk of storage. PMID:21696390

  6. Distribution of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in a German zoological garden determined by IS900 semi-nested and quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Mnster, Pia; Fechner, Kim; Vlkel, Inger; von Buchholz, Aloys; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2013-04-12

    Little data concerning the distribution of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in zoological gardens is available. The presence of MAP in captured wildlife might provide further information on non-ruminant hosts and expand the list of animals susceptible to MAP being potential sources of MAP transmission. Therefore, a German zoological garden with recent history of clinical paratuberculosis in Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) and an alpaca (Lama pacos) was selected to estimate the distribution of MAP infections in 21 mammalian and avian species. Pooled faecal samples from individual animals of each species were tested for the presence of MAP. A previously developed IS900 semi-nested PCR (snPCR) assay, amplifying a 587 bp and a 278 bp fragment, was used for the detection of MAP-DNA. Based on this snPCR, in 14 out of the 21 pooled faecal samples MAP-DNA was detected. MAP positive snPCR results were observed in ruminants and camelids as well as in non-ruminants such as equines, primates, rodents, and birds. Moreover, a quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the concentration of MAP-DNA was within the range of 2.2 10(3)-9.6 10(6) MAP-DNA equivalents per gram faeces. The highest amount was shed by primates such as Black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata) and Cottontop tamarins (Saguinus oedipus). This is the first survey investigating the presence of MAP in a German zoo, which includes non-ruminants. The results of the present study confirm the wide host range of MAP and demonstrate that MAP occurs more frequently in zoo animals than expected. In order to restrict further spread of MAP in European zoos, additional investigations regarding the existing transmission pathways of MAP in zoos are recommended. PMID:23298700

  7. Leaf and root glucosinolate profiles of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) as a systemic response to methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid elicitation*

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yun-xiang; Ge, Jia-li; Huang, Ling-hui; Gao, Fei; Lv, Xi-shan; Zheng, Wei-wei; Hong, Seung-beom; Zhu, Zhu-jun

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSs) are an important group of defensive phytochemicals mainly found in Brassicaceae. Plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are major regulators of plant response to pathogen attack. However, there is little information about the interactive effect of both elicitors on inducing GS biosynthesis in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). In this study, we applied different concentrations of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and/or SA onto the leaf and root of Chinese cabbage to investigate the time-course interactive profiles of GSs. Regardless of the site of the elicitation and the concentrations of the elicitors, the roots accumulated much more GSs and were more sensitive and more rapidly responsive to the elicitors than leaves. Irrespective of the elicitation site, MeJA had a greater inducing and longer lasting effect on GS accumulation than SA. All three components of indole GS (IGS) were detected along with aliphatic and aromatic GSs. However, IGS was a major component of total GSs that accumulated rapidly in both root and leaf tissues in response to MeJA and SA elicitation. Neoglucobrassicin (neoGBC) did not respond to SA but to MeJA in leaf tissue, while it responded to both SA and MeJA in root tissue. Conversion of glucobrassicin (GBC) to neoGBC occurred at a steady rate over 3 d of elicitation. Increased accumulation of 4-methoxy glucobrassicin (4-MGBC) occurred only in the root irrespective of the type of elicitors and the site of elicitation. Thus, accumulation of IGS is a major metabolic hallmark of SA- and MeJA-mediated systemic response systems. SA exerted an antagonistic effect on the MeJA-induced root GSs irrespective of the site of elicitation. However, SA showed synergistic and antagonistic effects on the MeJA-induced leaf GSs when roots and leaves are elicitated for 3 d, respectively. PMID:26238545

  8. Phages of non-dairy lactococci: isolation and characterization of ?L47, a phage infecting the grass isolate Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Guinane, Caitriona M; Neve, Horst; Coffey, Aidan; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2014-01-13

    Lactococci isolated from non-dairy sources have been found to possess enhanced metabolic activity when compared to dairy strains. These capabilities may be harnessed through the use of these strains as starter or adjunct cultures to produce more diverse flavor profiles in cheese and other dairy products. To understand the interactions between these organisms and the phages that infect them, a number of phages were isolated against lactococcal strains of non-dairy origin. One such phage, ?L47, was isolated from a sewage sample using the grass isolate L. lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860 as a host. Visualization of phage virions by transmission electron microscopy established that this phage belongs to the family Siphoviridae and possesses a long tail fiber, previously unseen in dairy lactococcal phages. Determination of the lytic spectrum revealed a broader than expected host range, with ?L47 capable of infecting 4 industrial dairy strains, including ML8, HP and 310, and 3 additional non-dairy isolates. Whole genome sequencing of ?L47 revealed a dsDNA genome of 128, 546 bp, making it the largest sequenced lactococcal phage to date. In total, 190 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and comparative analysis revealed that the predicted products of 117 of these ORFs shared greater than 50% amino acid identity with those of L. lactis phage ?949, a phage isolated from cheese whey. Despite their different ecological niches, the genomic content and organization of ?L47 and ?949 are quite similar, with both containing 4 gene clusters oriented in different transcriptional directions. Other features that distinguish ?L47 from ?949 and other lactococcal phages, in addition to the presence of the tail fiber and the genome length, include a low GC content (32.5%) and a high number of predicted tRNA genes (8). Comparative genome analysis supports the conclusion that ?L47 is a new member of the 949 lactococcal phage group which currently includes the dairy ?949. PMID:24454309

  9. Off-site rearing of heifers reduces the risk of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis ELISA seroconversion and fecal shedding in a California dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Aly, Sharif S; Gardner, Ian A; Adaska, John M; Anderson, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this cohort study was to evaluate whether rearing dairy heifers at different premises than the dairy of origin (off-site) reduced the risk of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection more effectively than rearing on the dairy of origin (on-site). From 2003 to 2005, 3 cohorts of Jersey heifers were born on a single California dairy, with heifers in the first cohort raised on-site until first calving (n=797); heifers in the second cohort raised on-site until approximately 5 mo of age and off-site until about 1 to 2 mo precalving (n=791); and heifers in the third cohort raised off-site from d 1 until about 1 to 2 mo before first calving (n=797). Cohorts were sequentially enrolled, and heifers were followed until death, culling, or up to 6 yr of age. Heifers were tested annually for MAP infection by serum ELISA and bacterial culture of feces, from lactation 1 until they were 6 yr old, and all mortality and culling events were recorded. Compared with cohort 1, cohort 3 had lower hazards of seroconverting and shedding of MAP in feces, approximately 70 and 38%, respectively. Cohort 2 was not significantly different from cohort 1 for the same outcomes. Mortality hazards were only significantly different between cohorts before first calving, with calves raised completely off-site at lower risk than the remaining 2 cohorts. Additionally, the hazards for culling in cohorts 2 and 3 were only significantly different from cohort 1 after the first calving. To our knowledge, the current study is the first cohort study to evaluate the association between off-site heifer rearing and risk of MAP infection, mortality, and culling. Rearing heifer calves off-site, away from infected adult dairy cows, may have allowed for reduced exposure to MAP in the environment of the calves and, hence, served as a control strategy for Johne's disease. PMID:25597977

  10. Three Groups of Transposable Elements with Contrasting Copy Number Dynamics and Host Responses in the Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) Genome

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Concepcion M.; Meca, Esteban; Tenaillon, Maud I.; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2014-01-01

    Most angiosperm nuclear DNA is repetitive and derived from silenced transposable elements (TEs). TE silencing requires substantial resources from the plant host, including the production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Thus, the interaction between TEs and siRNAs is a critical aspect of both the function and the evolution of plant genomes. Yet the co-evolutionary dynamics between these two entities remain poorly characterized. Here we studied the organization of TEs within the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) genome, documenting that TEs fall within three groups based on the class and copy numbers. These groups included DNA elements, low copy RNA elements and higher copy RNA elements. The three groups varied statistically in characteristics that included length, location, age, siRNA expression and 24∶22 nucleotide (nt) siRNA targeting ratios. In addition, the low copy retroelements encompassed a set of TEs that had previously been shown to decrease expression within a 24 nt siRNA biogenesis mutant (mop1). To investigate the evolutionary dynamics of the three groups, we estimated their abundance in two landraces, one with a genome similar in size to that of the maize reference and the other with a 30% larger genome. For all three accessions, we assessed TE abundance as well as 22 nt and 24 nt siRNA content within leaves. The high copy number retroelements are under targeted similarly by siRNAs among accessions, appear to be born of a rapid bust of activity, and may be currently transpositionally dead or limited. In contrast, the lower copy number group of retrolements are targeted more dynamically and have had a long and ongoing history of transposition in the maize genome. PMID:24743518

  11. Genetic characterization and molecular mapping of a Hessian fly-resistance gene transferred from T. turgidum ssp. dicoccum to common wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Brown-Guedira, G L; Hatchett, J H; Owuoche, J O; Chen, M-S

    2005-11-01

    A gene (temporarily designated Hdic) conferring resistance to the Hessian fly (Hf) [Mayetiola destructor (Say)] was previously identified from an accession of German cultivated emmer wheat [Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum (Schrank ex Schübler) Thell] PI 94641, and was transferred to the Hf-resistant wheat germplasm KS99WGRC42. The inheritance of Hdic resistance exhibited incomplete penetrance because phenotypes of some heterozygous progenies are fully resistant and the others are fully susceptible. Five simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers (Xgwm136,Xcfa2153, Xpsp2999,Xgwm33, and Xbarc263) were linked to the Hdic gene on the short arm of wheat chromosome 1A in the same region as the H9, H10, and H11 loci. Flanking markers Xgwm33 and Xcfa2153 were mapped at distances 0.6 cM proximal and 1.4 cM distal, respectively. Marker analysis revealed that a very small intercalary chromosomal segment containing Hdic was transferred from emmer wheat to KS99WGRC42. This is the first emmer-derived Hf-resistance gene that has been mapped and characterized. The Hdic gene confers a high level of antibiosis to biotypes GP and L, as well as to strains vH9 and vH13 of the Hf, which is different from the biotype reaction patterns of the known Hf-resistance genes on chromosome 1A (H5 and H11 susceptible to biotype L, H9 and H10 susceptible to strain vH9). These results suggested that Hdic is either a new gene or a novel allele of a known H gene on chromosome 1A. The broad spectrum of resistance conferred by the Hdic gene makes it valuable for developing Hf resistant wheat cultivars. PMID:16136351

  12. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 1855 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (1854 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentrationtime curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0?) was 23.3 ng h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng h/mL) versus 24.6 ng h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0? and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.801.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion Co-administration of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist revexepride with omeprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetics of revexepride in healthy adults. PMID:25767373

  13. Designing a risk-based surveillance program for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in Norwegian dairy herds using multivariate statistical process control analysis.

    PubMed

    Whist, A C; Liland, K H; Jonsson, M E; Sæbø, S; Sviland, S; Østerås, O; Norström, M; Hopp, P

    2014-11-01

    Surveillance programs for animal diseases are critical to early disease detection and risk estimation and to documenting a population's disease status at a given time. The aim of this study was to describe a risk-based surveillance program for detecting Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Norwegian dairy cattle. The included risk factors for detecting MAP were purchase of cattle, combined cattle and goat farming, and location of the cattle farm in counties containing goats with MAP. The risk indicators included production data [culling of animals >3 yr of age, carcass conformation of animals >3 yr of age, milk production decrease in older lactating cows (lactations 3, 4, and 5)], and clinical data (diarrhea, enteritis, or both, in animals >3 yr of age). Except for combined cattle and goat farming and cattle farm location, all data were collected at the cow level and summarized at the herd level. Predefined risk factors and risk indicators were extracted from different national databases and combined in a multivariate statistical process control to obtain a risk assessment for each herd. The ordinary Hotelling's T(2) statistic was applied as a multivariate, standardized measure of difference between the current observed state and the average state of the risk factors for a given herd. To make the analysis more robust and adapt it to the slowly developing nature of MAP, monthly risk calculations were based on data accumulated during a 24-mo period. Monitoring of these variables was performed to identify outliers that may indicate deviance in one or more of the underlying processes. The highest-ranked herds were scattered all over Norway and clustered in high-density dairy cattle farm areas. The resulting rankings of herds are being used in the national surveillance program for MAP in 2014 to increase the sensitivity of the ongoing surveillance program in which 5 fecal samples for bacteriological examination are collected from 25 dairy herds. The use of multivariate statistical process control for selection of herds will be beneficial when a diagnostic test suitable for mass screening is available and validated on the Norwegian cattle population, thus making it possible to increase the number of sampled herds. PMID:25200769

  14. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies for the rapid detection, enumeration, and growth interaction of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris in milk.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Xu, Yun; Goodacre, Royston

    2011-07-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main pathogenic microorganisms found in milk and dairy products and has been involved in bacterial foodborne outbreaks in the past. Current enumeration techniques for bacteria are very time-consuming, typically taking 24 h or longer, and bacterial antagonism in the form of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may inhibit the growth of S. aureus . Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to establish the accuracy and sensitivity of rapid nondestructive metabolic fingerprinting techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy (RS), in combination with multivariate analysis techniques, for the detection and enumeration of S. aureus in milk, as well as to study the growth interaction between S. aureus and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris , a common LAB. The two bacterial species were investigated both in a pure monoculture and in a combined inoculated coculture after inoculation into ultraheated milk during the first 24 h of growth at 37 °C. Plating techniques were used to obtain primary reference data for viable bacteria counts. Principal component discriminant function analysis, canonical correlation analysis, partial least-squares (PLS), and kernel PLS (KPLS) multivariate statistical techniques were employed to analyze the data. FT-IR provided very reasonable quantification results both with PLS and KPLS, the latter providing marginally better predictions, with correlation coefficients in the test set (Q(2)) and training set (R(2)) varying from 0.64 to 0.76 and from 0.78 to 0.88 for different bacterial sample combinations. RS results were less encouraging with high degrees of error and poor correlation to viable bacterial counts. S. aureus growth was not inhibited by the presence of the LAB, but metabolic fingerprinting of the coculture indicated that the phenotype of this dual bacterial culture was closer to that of pure LAB cultures. In conclusion, FT-IR spectroscopy in combination with the above multivariate techniques appears to be a promising discrimination and enumeration analytical technique for the two bacterial species. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the L. cremoris metabolic effect in milk dominates that of S. aureus even though there was no growth antagonism observed. PMID:21639098

  15. Cost-benefit analysis of vaccination against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in dairy cattle, given its cross-reactivity with tuberculosis tests.

    PubMed

    Groenendaal, Huybert; Zagmutt, Francisco J; Patton, Elisabeth A; Wells, Scott J

    2015-09-01

    Johne's disease (JD), or paratuberculosis, is a chronic enteric disease of ruminants, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Johne's disease causes considerable economic losses to the US dairy industry, estimated to be over $200 million annually. Available control strategies include management measures to improve calf hygiene, test-and-cull strategies, and vaccination. Although the first 2 strategies have shown to reduce the prevalence of MAP, they require dedicated and long-term efforts from dairy producers, with often relatively slow progress. As a result, uptake of both strategies has not been as wide as expected given the economic benefits especially of improved hygiene. Vaccination has also been found to reduce the prevalence and economic losses of JD, but most economic estimates have been based on simulation of hypothetical vaccines. In addition, if an animal is vaccinated, cross-reactivity between MAP antibodies and bovine tuberculosis (BTB) antigens may occur, decreasing the specificity of BTB tests. Therefore, MAP vaccination would cause additional indirect costs to the BTB surveillance and control program. The objective of the present study was to use data from a MAP vaccine trial together with an epidemiologic and economic model to estimate the direct on-farm benefits of MAP vaccination and to estimate the indirect costs of MAP vaccination due to the cross-reactivity with BTB tests. Direct economic benefits of MAP vaccination were estimated at $8.03 (90% predictive interval: -$25.97 to $41.36) per adult animal per year, all accruing to the dairy producers. This estimate is likely an underestimation of the true direct benefits of MAP vaccination. In addition, indirect economic costs due to cross-reactivity were $2.14 per adult animal per year, making MAP vaccination economically attractive. Only in regions or states with a high frequency of BTB testing (because of, for example, Mycobacterium bovis outbreaks in a wild deer population) and areas where typically small groups of animals are BTB tested would MAP vaccination not be economically attractive. PMID:26117348

  16. Evaluation of testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    More, S J; Cameron, A R; Strain, S; Cashman, W; Ezanno, P; Kenny, K; Fourichon, C; Graham, D

    2015-08-01

    As part of a broader control strategy within herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), individual animal testing is generally conducted to identify infected animals for action, usually culling. Opportunities are now available to quantitatively compare different testing strategies (combinations of tests) in known infected herds. This study evaluates the effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness of different testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be MAP infected. A model was developed, taking account of both within-herd infection dynamics and test performance, to simulate the use of different tests at a single round of testing in a known infected herd. Model inputs included the number of animals at different stages of infection, the sensitivity and specificity of each test, and the costs of testing and culling. Testing strategies included either milk or serum ELISA alone or with fecal culture in series. Model outputs included effectiveness (detection fraction, the proportion of truly infected animals in the herd that are successfully detected by the testing strategy), cost, and cost-effectiveness (testing cost per true positive detected, total cost per true positive detected). Several assumptions were made: MAP was introduced with a single animal and no management interventions were implemented to limit within-herd transmission of MAP before this test. In medium herds, between 7 and 26% of infected animals are detected at a single round of testing, the former using the milk ELISA and fecal culture in series 5 yr after MAP introduction and the latter using fecal culture alone 15 yr after MAP introduction. The combined costs of testing and culling at a single round of testing increases with time since introduction of MAP infection, with culling costs being much greater than testing costs. The cost-effectiveness of testing varied by testing strategy. It was also greater at 5 yr, compared with 10 or 15 yr, since MAP introduction, highlighting the importance of early detection. Future work is needed to evaluate these testing strategies in subsequent rounds of testing as well as accounting for different herd dynamics and different levels of herd biocontainment. PMID:26074225

  17. Genetic basis of multiple resistance to the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål) and the green rice leafhopper (Nephotettix cincticeps Uhler) in the rice cultivar ‘ASD7’ (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica)

    PubMed Central

    Van Mai, Tan; Fujita, Daisuke; Matsumura, Masaya; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Yasui, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    The rice cultivar ASD7 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) is resistant to the brown planthopper (BPH; Nilaparvata lugens Stål) and the green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens Distant). Here, we analyzed multiple genetic resistance to BPH and the green rice leafhopper (GRH; Nephotettix cincticeps Uhler). Using two independent F2 populations derived from a cross between ASD7 and Taichung 65 (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica), we detected two QTLs (qBPH6 and qBPH12) for resistance to BPH and one QTL (qGRH5) for resistance to GRH. Linkage analysis in BC2F3 populations revealed that qBPH12 controlled resistance to BPH and co-segregated with SSR markers RM28466 and RM7376 in plants homozygous for the ASD7 allele at qBPH6. Plants homozygous for the ASD7 alleles at both QTLs showed a much faster antibiosis response to BPH than plants homozygous at only one of these QTLs. It revealed that epistatic interaction between qBPH6 and qBPH12 is the basis of resistance to BPH in ASD7. In addition, qGRH5 controlled resistance to GRH and co-segregated with SSR markers RM6082 and RM3381. qGRH5 is identical to GRH1. Thus, we clarified the genetic basis of multiple resistance of ASD7 to BPH and GRH. PMID:26719745

  18. SSP Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Thomas H.; Roth, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Solar Power is a NASA program sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center. The Paper presented here represents the architectural study of a large power management and distribution (PMAD) system. The PMAD supplies power to a microwave array for power beaming to an earth rectenna (Rectifier Antenna). The power is in the GW level.

  19. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging reveals the occurrence of phenylphenalenone-type compounds in red paracytic stomata and red epidermis tissue of Musa acuminata ssp. zebrina cv. 'Rowe Red'.

    PubMed

    Hlscher, Dirk; Fuchser, Jens; Knop, Katrin; Menezes, Riya C; Buerkert, Andreas; Svato, Ale; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schneider, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    The banana epidermis and in particular their stomata are conducive sites for the penetration of pathogenic fungi which can severely limit global banana production. The red pseudostem of the ornamental banana Musa acuminata ssp. zebrina cv. 'Rowe Red' was used to study the chemical constituents of the epidermal cell layer using matrix-free laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric imaging (LDI-FT-ICR-MSI). The high resolution of this technique allowed phenylphenalenone-type compounds to be located in single plant cells. Some of these secondary metabolites were identified as constitutive compounds and found in specialized epidermal cells in banana pseudostem tissue. Especially the red paracytic stomata revealed higher signal intensities of certain phenylphenalenones than normal epidermis cells. The ease of detection of polycyclic aromatic compounds on the cellular level is discussed with regard to future investigations of plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:26004822

  20. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using GOLD, AutoDock Vina, eHiTS, PatchDock and MEDock) followed by rank-sum technique identified compound allium38 with high binding affinity for aldose reductase. PMID:23275691

  1. EPR as an analytical tool in assessing the mineral nutrients and irradiated food products-vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Gopal, N. O.

    2008-12-01

    EPR spectral investigations of some commonly available vegetables in south India, which are of global importance like Daucus carota (carrot), Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (cluster beans), Coccinia indica (little gourd) and Beta vulgaris (beet root) have been carried out. In all the vegetable samples a free radical corresponding to cellulose radical is observed. Almost all the samples under investigation exhibit Mn ions in different oxidation states. The temperature variation EPR studies are done and are discussed in view of the paramagnetic oxidation states. The radiation-induced defects have also been assessed by using the EPR spectra of such irradiated food products.

  2. Genetic Species Concept in Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S.; De Ley, J.

    1965-01-01

    Friedman, S. (State University, Ghent, Belgium), and J. De Ley. Genetic species concept in Xanthomonas. J. Bacteriol. 89:95100. 1965.Deuterated, N15-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Xanthomonas pelargonii forms distinct hybrids with ordinary DNA from X. hederae, X. juglandis, and X. carotae. Hybridization is less pronounced with X. phaseoli and X. begoniae. There is evidence that some hybridization occurs with X. vesicatoria, X. campestris, and X. tamarindi. These results favor the concept of a genetic species, rather than a division of the genus into many separate species based almost entirely on phytopathogenic host specificity. PMID:14255686

  3. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrases from the extremophilic bacteria Sulfurihydrogenibium yellostonense (SspCA) and S. azorense (SazCA) with a new series of sulfonamides incorporating aroylhydrazone-, [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazinyl- or 2-(cyanophenylmethylene)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-3(2H)-yl moieties.

    PubMed

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Vullo, Daniela; Al-Tamimi, Abdul-Malek S; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    A series of new sulfonamides was prepared starting from 2-oxo-N'-(4-sulfamoylphenyl)-propanehydrazonoyl chloride, a sulfanilamide derivative, which was reacted with aroylhydrazides, amines, or thiols. A library of derivatives incorporating aroylhydrazone, [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazinyl- or 2-(cyanophenyl-methylene)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-3(2H)-yl moieties was thus synthesized. The new compounds were investigated as inhibitors of four ?-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), the human (h) isoforms hCA I and II, and the bacterial ones recently isolated from the extremophilic bacteria Sulfurihydrogenibium yellostonense (SspCA) and Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense (SazCA). Low nanomolar activity was observed against hCA II (KIs of 0.56-17.1 nM) whereas hCA I was less inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s of 86.4 nM-32.8 ?M). The bacterial CAs were also effectively inhibited by these derivatives (K(I)s in the range of 0.77-234 nM against SazCA, and of 6.2-89.1 against SspCA, respectively), with several low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors detected against both of them. As SspCA and SazCA are among the most thermostable and catalytically active CAs, it is of interest to find modulators of their activity for potential biotechnologic applications. PMID:24332658

  4. Identification of betalains from petioles of differently colored Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. cicla [L.] Alef. Cv. Bright Lights) by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Florian; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-05-19

    The betalain pattern of differently colored Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. cicla [L.] Alef. cv. Bright Lights) was investigated for the first time. Nineteen betaxanthins and nine betacyanins were identified by RP-HPLC and positive ion electrospray mass spectrometry, co-injection experiments with semisynthetic reference compounds, and standards derived from authentic plant material, respectively. Histamine-betaxanthin and alanine-betaxanthin were found to be novel betaxanthins, which to the best of our knowledge have not been reported as natural compounds until now. Furthermore, tyramine-betaxanthin (miraxanthin III) and 3-methoxytyramine-betaxanthin, which to date were known only from families other than the Chenopodiaceae, were detected for the first time in colored Swiss chard. The betacyanin pattern of purple petioles was composed of betanin, isobetanin, betanidin, and isobetanidin. Although phyllocactin was present in only trace amounts, further acylated structures such as betanidin-monoferuloyl-5-O-beta-diglucoside and lampranthin II, accompanied by their corresponding C(15)-epimers, were identified. In addition, quantification of betalains and CIE LCh degrees measurements were performed with the colored extracts to correlate the visual appearance with the respective pigment patterns. Besides the novel phytochemical findings, the present study is useful for the evaluation of betalainic Swiss chard as a potential coloring foodstuff. PMID:15137842

  5. Ectopic expression of a phytochrome B gene from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) in Arabidopsis thaliana promotes seedling de-etiolation, dwarfing in mature plants, and delayed flowering.

    PubMed

    Song, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Pei; Shang, Hong-Zhong; Gu, Hai-Ke; Li, Jing-Juan; Xiao, Yang; Guo, Lin; Su, Liang; Gao, Jian-Wei; Yang, Jian-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB) is an essential red light receptor that predominantly mediates seedling de-etiolation, shade-avoidance response, and flowering time. In this study, we isolate a full-length cDNA of PHYB, designated BrPHYB, from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis), and we find that BrphyB protein has high amino acid sequence similarity and the closest evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana phyB (i.e., AtphyB). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results indicate that the BrPHYB gene is ubiquitously expressed in different tissues under all light conditions. Constitutive expression of the BrPHYB gene in A. thaliana significantly enhances seedling de-etiolation under red- and white-light conditions, and causes dwarf stature in mature plants. Unexpectedly, overexpression of BrPHYB in transgenic A. thaliana resulted in reduced expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes and delayed flowering under short-day conditions, whereas AtPHYB overexpression caused enhanced expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T and earlier flowering. Our results suggest that BrphyB might play an important role in regulating the development of Chinese cabbage. BrphyB and AtphyB have conserved functions during de-etiolation and vegetative plant growth and divergent functions in the regulation of flowering time. PMID:25724426

  6. An alpha-amylase is a novel receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Gill, Sarjeet S; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberon, Mario; Miranda-Rios, Juan

    2010-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis (Bti) produces four Cry toxins (Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, Cry10Aa and Cry11Aa), and two Cyt proteins (Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba), toxic to mosquito-larvae of the genus Aedes, Anopheles and Culex, important human disease vectors that transmit dengue virus, malaria and filarial parasites respectively. Previous work showed that Bti is highly toxic to Anopheles albimanus, the main vector for transmission of malaria in Mexico. In this work, we analysed the toxicity of isolated Cry proteins of Bti and identified an An. albimanus midgut protein as a putative Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa receptor molecule. Biossays showed that Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa of Bti are toxic to An. albimanus larvae. Ligand blot assays indicated that a 70 kDa glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein present in midgut brush border membrane vesicles of An. albimanus interacts with Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins. This protein was identified as an alpha-amylase by mass spectrometry and enzymatic activity assays. The cDNA that codes for the alpha-amylase was cloned by means of 5'- and 3'-RACE experiments. Recombinant alpha-amylase expressed in Escherichia coli specifically binds Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins. PMID:20002140

  7. An α-amylase is a novel receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberon, Mario; Miranda-Rios, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis (Bti) produces four Cry toxins (Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, Cry10Aa and Cry11Aa), and two Cyt proteins (Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba), toxic to mosquito-larvae of the genus Aedes, Anopheles and Culex, important human disease vectors that transmit dengue virus, malaria and filarial parasites respectively. Previous work showed that Bti is highly toxic to Anopheles albimanus, the main vector for transmission of malaria in Mexico. In this work, we analysed the toxicity of isolated Cry proteins of Bti and identified an An. albimanus midgut protein as a putative Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa receptor molecule. Biossays showed that Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa of Bti are toxic to An. albimanus larvae. Ligand blot assays indicated that a 70 kDa glycosylphosphatidylinositolanchored protein present in midgut brush border membrane vesicles of An. albimanus interacts with Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins. This protein was identified as an α-amylase by mass spectrometry and enzymatic activity assays. The cDNA that codes for the α-amylase was cloned by means of 5′- and 3′-RACE experiments. Recombinant α-amylase expressed in Escherichia coli specifically binds Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa toxins. PMID:20002140

  8. Barcoding Melting Curve Analysis for Rapid, Sensitive, and Discriminating Authentication of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from Its Adulterants

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants. PMID:25548775

  9. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems. Initial assessment of plant DNA mutation spectra as a biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.; Cataldo, D.A.; Fellows, R.J.; Jarrell, A.E.; Harvey, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    Munitions material can enter the environment as a result of manufacturing activities and field usage. Predictor methodologies, or biomarkers would enhance evaluation of environmental impacts. The goal of this exploratory study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation frequency as a biomarker for munitions exposure. The approach e resolution of an effective repetitive sequence probe for the identification of characteristic mutations, and (2) the development of a testing media [a clonal cell line of carrot (Daucus carota) spension cells]. Commercially available probes demonstrated marginal resolution therefore a low-C{sub o}t library was then constructed. Three colonies from the low-C{sub o}t DNA library were screened and the DNA isolates sequenced. A suspension culture of carrot (Daucus carota) was developed. A mutation spectra experiment was initiated at a 10-mg TNT/L exposure concentration with the attempt to clone over 1500 single TNT-exposed cells. Over the following six months greater than 98% of the initially isolated cells were unable to survive and produce micro calluses. The remaining calli were too few to be statistically significant and the experiment was terminated. The biomarker concept itself remains to be disproved, but the need for large numbers of uniform clones to differentiate true mutations suggest that more direct techniques using whole tissues need to be developed.

  10. Mapping genes governing flower architecture and pollen development in a double mutant population of carrot

    PubMed Central

    Budahn, Holger; Barański, Rafał; Grzebelus, Dariusz; Kiełkowska, Agnieszka; Straka, Petra; Metge, Kai; Linke, Bettina; Nothnagel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A linkage map of carrot (Daucus carota L.) was developed in order to study reproductive traits. The F2 mapping population derived from an initial cross between a yellow leaf (yel) chlorophyll mutant and a compressed lamina (cola) mutant with unique flower defects of the sporophytic parts of male and female organs. The genetic map has a total length of 781 cM and included 285 loci. The length of the nine linkage groups (LGs) ranged between 65 and 145 cM. All LGs have been anchored to the reference map. The objective of this study was the generation of a well-saturated linkage map of D. carota. Mapping of the cola-locus associated with flower development and fertility was successfully demonstrated. Two MADS-box genes (DcMADS3, DcMADS5) with prominent roles in flowering and reproduction as well as three additional genes (DcAOX2a, DcAOX2b, DcCHS2) with further importance for male reproduction were assigned to different loci that did not co-segregate with the cola-locus. PMID:25339960

  11. Barcoding melting curve analysis for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating authentication of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants. PMID:25548775

  12. A novel in vivo β carotene biosensor for heavy metals detection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ling Shing; Lee, Bei Ru; Koh, Chia En; Ong, Yun Qiu; Choong, Chieh Wean

    2015-11-01

    A novel whole cell-based biosensor was constructed using Daucus carota cell as a biological component, with in vivo β-carotene as a reporter group. In this biosensor, the cells were immobilized using agarose gel, and change in in vivo β-carotene, before and after exposure of cells to heavy metals was noted using spectrophotometer at λ = 450 nm. Biosensor was found to operate at its optimum condition using cells from day-14 culture with density of 8 x 10(5) cells/cuvette, and immobilized with 0.5 % agarose at 45°C. The performance of biosensor was affected by pH with the best response produced at pH 7.5. Pb and Cu tests showed that biosensor was able to detect the presence of both heavy metals within the range of 0.01 ppm- 10.00 ppm. The performance of biosensor decreased in stability test with prolonged storage of 40 days, with a stable performance obtained after 10 days of storage. The results showed that β-carotene contain in naturally available cell D. carota responded well to the presence of heavy metals. It is a good indication that biosensor designed is a good candidate to be used for environmental toxicity assessment. PMID:26688961

  13. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Plant-Associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 Revealed That the nfrA and RBAM17410 Genes Are Involved in Plant-Microbe-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Dolgova, Olga; Fan, Ben; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Ziegler, Jrg; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 represents the prototype of Gram-positive plant growth promoting and biocontrol bacteria. In this study, we applied transposon mutagenesis to generate a transposon library, which was screened for genes involved in multicellular behavior and biofilm formation on roots as a prerequisite of plant growth promoting activity. Transposon insertion sites were determined by rescue-cloning followed by DNA sequencing. As in B. subtilis, the global transcriptional regulator DegU was identified as an activator of genes necessary for swarming and biofilm formation, and the DegU-mutant of FZB42 was found impaired in efficient root colonization. Direct screening of 3,000 transposon insertion mutants for plant-growth-promotion revealed the gene products of nfrA and RBAM_017140 to be essential for beneficial effects exerted by FZB42 on plants. We analyzed the performance of GFP-labeled wild-type and transposon mutants in the colonization of lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the wild-type strain heavily colonized root surfaces, the nfrA mutant did not colonize lettuce roots, although it was not impaired in growth in laboratory cultures, biofilm formation and swarming motility on agar plates. The RBAM17410 gene, occurring in only a few members of the B. subtilis species complex, was directly involved in plant growth promotion. None of the mutant strains were affected in producing the plant growth hormone auxin. We hypothesize that the nfrA gene product is essential for overcoming the stress caused by plant response towards bacterial root colonization. PMID:24847778

  14. Two types of genetic carrier, the IncP genomic island and the novel IncP-1? plasmid, for the aac(2')-IIa gene that confers kasugamycin resistance in Acidovorax avenae ssp. avenae.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Atsushi; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Koyama, Satoshi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    A unique aminoglycoside antibiotic, kasugamycin (KSM), has been used to control many plant bacterial and fungal diseases in several countries. The emergence of KSM-resistant Acidovorax avenae ssp. avenae and Burkholderia glumae, which cause rice bacterial brown stripe and rice bacterial grain and seedling rot, respectively, is a serious threat for the effective control of these diseases. Previously, we have identified the aac(2')-IIa gene, encoding a KSM 2'-N-acetyltransferase, from both KSM-resistant pathogens. Although all KSM-resistant isolates from both species possess the aac(2')-IIa gene, only A.?avenae strain 83 showed higher resistance than other strains. In this research, kinetic analysis indicates that an amino acid substitution from serine to threonine at position 146 of AAC(2')-IIa in strain 83 is not involved in this increased resistance. Whole draft genome analysis of A.?avenae 83 shows that the aac(2')-IIa gene is carried by the novel IncP-1? plasmid pAAA83, whereas the genetic carrier of other strains, the IncP genomic island, is inserted into their chromosomes. The difference in the nucleotides of the promoter region of aac(2')-IIa between strain 83 and other strains indicates an additional transcription start site and results in the increased transcription of aac(2')-IIa in strain 83. Moreover, biological characterization of pAAA83 demonstrates that it can be transferred by conjugation and maintained in the host cells. These results demonstrate that acquisition of the aac(2')-IIa gene takes place in at least two ways and that the gene module, which includes aac(2')-IIa and the downstream gene, may be an important unit for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25131295

  15. Circular Dichroism and Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cysteinyl-tRNA Synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum ssp. NRC-1 Demonstrates that Group I Cations Are Particularly Effective in Providing Structure and Stability to This Halophilic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Christopher J.; Bushnell, Sarah; Evilia, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Proteins from extremophiles have the ability to fold and remain stable in their extreme environment. Here, we investigate the presence of this effect in the cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum ssp. NRC-1 (NRC-1), which was used as a model halophilic protein. The effects of salt on the structure and stability of NRC-1 and of E. coli CysRS were investigated through far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermal denaturation melts. The CD of NRC-1 CysRS was examined in different group I and group II chloride salts to examine the effects of the metal ions. Potassium was observed to have the strongest effect on NRC-1 CysRS structure, with the other group I salts having reduced strength. The group II salts had little effect on the protein. This suggests that the halophilic adaptations in this protein are mediated by potassium. CD and fluorescence spectra showed structural changes taking place in NRC-1 CysRS over the concentration range of 0–3 M KCl, while the structure of E. coli CysRS was relatively unaffected. Salt was also shown to increase the thermal stability of NRC-1 CysRS since the melt temperature of the CysRS from NRC-1 was increased in the presence of high salt, whereas the E. coli enzyme showed a decrease. By characterizing these interactions, this study not only explains the stability of halophilic proteins in extremes of salt, but also helps us to understand why and how group I salts stabilize proteins in general. PMID:24594651

  16. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(?)-HO-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(?)-H to O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  17. Isolation and Expression of Glucosinolate Synthesis Genes CYP83A1 and CYP83B1 in Pak Choi (Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis var. communis (N. Tsen & S.H. Lee) Hanelt)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Biao; Wang, Zhizhou; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Zhujun; Wang, Huasen

    2012-01-01

    CYP83A1 and CYP83B1 are two key synthesis genes in the glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway. CYP83A1 mainly metabolizes the aliphatic oximes to form aliphatic glucosinolate and CYP83B1 mostly catalyzes aromatic oximes to synthesis corresponding substrates for aromatic and indolic glucosinolates. In this study, two CYP83A1 genes named BcCYP83A1-1 (JQ289997), BcCYP83A1-2 (JQ289996) respectively and one CYP83B1 (BcCYP83B1, HM347235) gene were cloned from the leaves of pak choi (Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis var. communis (N. Tsen & S.H. Lee) Hanelt) Hangzhou You Dong Er cultivar. Their ORFs were 1506, 1509 and 1500 bp in length, encoding 501, 502 and 499 amino acids, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequences of CYP83A1-1, CYP83A1-2 and CYP83B1 shared high sequence identity of 87.65, 86.48 and 95.59% to the corresponding ones in Arabidopsis, and 98.80, 98.61 and 98.80% to the corresponding ones in Brassica pekinensis (Chinese cabbage), respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that both CYP83A1 and CYP83B1 expressed in roots, leaves and petioles of pak choi, while the transcript abundances of CYP83A1 were higher in leaves than in petioles and roots, whereas CYP83B1 showed higher abundances in roots. The expression levels of glucosinolate biosynthetic genes were consistent with the glucosinolate profile accumulation in shoots of seven cultivars and three organs. The isolation and characterization of the glucosinolate synthesis genes in pak choi would promote the way for further development of agronomic traits via genetic engineering. PMID:22754334

  18. Alcataenia fraterculae sp. n. from the horned puffin, Fratercula corniculata (Naumann), Alcataenia cerorhincae sp. n. from the rhinoceros auklet, Cerorhinca monocerata (Pallas), and Alcataenia larina pacifica ssp. n. (Cestoda: Dilepididae) in the North Pacific basin.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P

    1984-01-01

    Three Cestodes representing two species of the genus Alcataenia Spasskaia, 1971 and a subspecies of Alcataenia larina (Krabbe, 1869) are described. Alcataenia fraterculae sp. n. (Cestoda: Dilepididae) was found in horned puffins, Fratercula corniculata (Naumann), and other species of seabirds from localities in the western Aleutian Islands, Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, and Chukchi Sea. Alcataenia cerorhincae sp. n. is described from the rhinoceros auklet, Cerorhinca monocerata (Pallas) in the eastern North Pacific Ocean and western Aleutian Islands. Alcataenia larina pacifica ssp. n. is recognized from species of Laridae and other seabirds in the North Pacific Ocean, Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea and the region of the Arctic Ocean near Bering Strait. It is distinguished from A. larina larina (Krabbe, 1869) by a greater number of testes, a longer cirrus sac, and variation in the position of the genital ducts which may be either dorsal to or between the osmoregulatory canals. A fraterculae and A. cerorhincae are most similar to A. larina and particularly to the North Pacific form A. l. pacifica. Generally specimens of A. fraterculae can be distinguished from the other taxa by larger rostellar hooks, a longer cirrus sac, and a combination of other characters. A. fraterculae, A. cerorhincae, and A. l. pacifica however represent a complex of cryptic species in which there is extensive overlap in some morphological characters. Results of a discriminant analysis among these nominal taxa were significant and, in combination with data about other morphological characters and host and geographic distribution, clearly indicated that these represent three species in the North Pacific basin. PMID:6486621

  19. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  20. Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet is widely grown, however high profitability requires proper land selection and management. This chapter describes the characteristics of sugar beet and reviews its land and soil management, including cultivation techniques, crop rotation, soil tillage, planting and seedbed preparation, di...

  1. The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

    2005-09-18

    Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from among its competitors, something that is the main focus of this paper. This purpose is well discussed in many workshops and reports. The second use of benchmarks is validating the selected system actually works the way expected once it arrives. This purpose may be more important than the first reason. The second purpose is particularly key when systems are specified and selected based on performance projections rather than actual runs on the actual hardware. The third use of benchmarks, seldom mentioned, is to assure the system performs as expected throughout its lifetime1, (e.g. after upgrades, changes, and regular use.) Finally, benchmarks are used to guide system designs, something covered in detail in a companion paper from Berkeley's Institute for Performance Studies (BIPS).

  2. SSP: Sketching Slide Presentations, a Syntactic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, Joan; Sanchez, Gemma; Llads, Josep

    The design of a slide presentation is a creative process. In this process first, humans visualize in their minds what they want to explain. Then, they have to be able to represent this knowledge in an understandable way. There exists a lot of commercial software that allows to create our own slide presentations but the creativity of the user is rather limited. In this article we present an application that allows the user to create and visualize a slide presentation from a sketch. A slide may be seen as a graphical document or a diagram where its elements are placed in a particular spatial arrangement. To describe and recognize slides a syntactic approach is proposed. This approach is based on an Adjacency Grammar and a parsing methodology to cope with this kind of grammars. The experimental evaluation shows the performance of our methodology from a qualitative and a quantitative point of view. Six different slides containing different number of symbols, from 4 to 7, have been given to the users and they have drawn them without restrictions in the order of the elements. The quantitative results give an idea on how suitable is our methodology to describe and recognize the different elements in a slide.

  3. Development of microsatellite markers in Parthenium ssp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers provide the most efficient means to study genetic diversity within and among species of a particular genus. In addition, molecular markers can facilitate breeding efforts by providing tools necessary to reduce the time required to obtain recombinant genotypes with improved agricu...

  4. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa ssp. sativa (L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is known as the Queen of the Forages as it is primarily used as animal feed for dairy cows, beef cattle, horses, sheep, chickens and other domesticated animals. Alfalfa is the forage of choice due to its high feed value and high biomass production along with its ease of establishment; res...

  5. Phytotoxicity and fate of 1,1,2-trichloroethylene: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Inderjit; Asakawa, Chikako; Kakuta, Hideo

    2003-06-01

    1,1,2-Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chlorinated organic contaminant, poses serious environmental concerns. A study was conducted to evaluate the phytotoxicity of TCE to a crop species and its fate in vermiculite. Growth bioassays were carried out using carrot (Daucus carota L.) as the test species. Three different concentrations, 0.25, 0.50, and 1 ppm were used to evaluate phytotoxicity of TCE. When added to petri plates with cotton pads, TCE did not have any effect on carrot seedling growth. However, when added to vermiculite, it significantly suppressed growth. Shoot growth was inhibited only at the 1 ppm concentration. Recovery experiments were carried out to study the fate of TCE in vermiculite. A significant decline in the percent recovery was observed with time. Interestingly, TCE additional peaks (unknown organic molecules) were detected with declining concentrations. The available chloride ion concentration in vermiculite containing 1 ppm of TCE for 24 hr was significantly higher compared to control. PMID:12918919

  6. Metal-accelerated oxidation in plant cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Cadmium and mercury toxicity is further enhanced by external oxidizing conditions O[sub 3] or inherent plant processes. Lepidium sativum L, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., or Phaseolus vulgaris L, were grown inpeat-lite to maturity under continuous cadmium exposure followed by one oxidant (O[sub 3]-6 hr. 30 pphm) exposure, with or without foliar calcium pretreatments. In comparison, Daucus carota, L and other species grown in a 71-V suspension, with or without 2,4-D were exposed continuously to low levels of methylmercury during exponential growth and analyzed in aggregates of distinct populations. Proteins were extracted and analyzed. Mechanisms of toxicity and eventual cell death are Ca-mediated and involve chloroplast, stomatal-water relations and changes in oxidant-anti-oxidant components in cells. Whether the metal-accelerated oxidative damage proceeds to cell death, depends on the species and its differential biotransformation system and cell association component.

  7. Carrot cells: a pioneering platform for biopharmaceuticals production.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Tello-Olea, Marlene Anah

    2015-03-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is of importance in the molecular farming field as it constitutes the first plant species approved to produce biopharmaceuticals for human use. In this review, features that make carrot an advantageous species in the molecular farming field are analyzed and a description of the developments achieved with this crop thus far is presented. A guide for genetic transformation procedures is also included. The state of the art comprises ten vaccine prototypes against Measles virus, Hepatitis B virus, Human immunodeficiency virus, Yersinia pestis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium diphtheria/Clostridium tetani/Bordetella pertussis, and Helicobacter pylori; as well as the case of the glucocerebrosidase, an enzyme used for replacement therapy, and other therapeutics. Perspectives for these developments are envisioned and innovations are proposed such as the use of transplastomic technologies-, hairy roots-, and viral expression-based systems to improve yields and develop new products derived from this advantageous plant species. PMID:25572939

  8. Expression Pattern of the Carrot EP3 Endochitinase Genes in Suspension Cultures and in Developing Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    van Hengel, Arjon J.; Guzzo, Flavia; van Kammen, Ab; de Vries, Sacco C.

    1998-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) extracellular protein 3 (EP3) class IV endochitinases were previously identified based on their ability to rescue somatic embryos of the temperature-sensitive cell line ts11. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that a subset of the morphologically distinguishable cell types in embryogenic and nonembryogenic suspension cultures, including ts11, express EP3 genes. No expression was found in somatic embryos. In carrot plants EP3 genes are expressed in the inner integumentary cells of young fruits and in a specific subset of cells located in the middle of the endosperm of mature seeds. No expression was found in zygotic embryos. These results support the hypothesis that the EP3 endochitinase has a “nursing” function during zygotic embryogenesis and that this function can be mimicked by suspension cells during somatic embryogenesis. PMID:9576773

  9. An improved UHPLC-UV method for separation and quantification of carotenoids in vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Megan M; Mein, Jonathan R; Chaudhuri, Swapan K; Constant, Howard L

    2014-12-15

    Carotenoid identification and quantitation is critical for the development of improved nutrition plant varieties. Industrial analysis of carotenoids is typically carried out on multiple crops with potentially thousands of samples per crop, placing critical needs on speed and broad utility of the analytical methods. Current chromatographic methods for carotenoid analysis have had limited industrial application due to their low throughput, requiring up to 60 min for complete separation of all compounds. We have developed an improved UHPLC-UV method that resolves all major carotenoids found in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica), carrot (Daucus carota), corn (Zea mays), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The chromatographic method is completed in 13.5 min allowing for the resolution of the 11 carotenoids of interest, including the structural isomers lutein/zeaxanthin and α-/β-carotene. Additional minor carotenoids have also been separated and identified with this method, demonstrating the utility of this method across major commercial food crops. PMID:25038701

  10. Long and short term effects of plasma treatment on meristematic plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puač, N.; Živković, S.; Selaković, N.; Milutinović, M.; Boljević, J.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we will present results of plasma treatments of meristematic cells of Daucus carota. Plasma needle was used as an atmospheric pressure/gas composition source of non-equilibrium plasma in all treatments. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was measured immediately after plasma treatment and after two weeks following the treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in samples immediately after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, catalase activity was much higher in treated samples when measured two weeks after plasma treatment. These results show that there is a direct proof of the triggering of signal transduction in the cells by two reactive oxygen species H2O2 and O2-, causing enzyme activity and short and long term effects even during the growth of calli, where the information is passed to newborn cells over the period of two weeks.

  11. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Permyakova, Natalia V.; Zagorskaya, Alla A.; Belavin, Pavel A.; Uvarova, Elena A.; Nosareva, Olesya V.; Nesterov, Andrey E.; Novikovskaya, Anna A.; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Deineko, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  12. Improved method for HPLC analysis of polyamines, agmatine and aromatic monoamines in plant tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucas carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues.

  13. Plant uptake of sludge-borne PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, G.A.; Kiehl, D.; Eiceman, G.A.; Ryan, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Plant uptake of sludge-borne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (similar to Aroclor 1248) was evaluated in a greenhouse study with two food-chain crops and a grass species. Polychlorinated biphenyl loading to two soils was varied in one experiment by adding different rates of a municipal sewage sludge heavily contaminated (52 mg/kg) with PCBs. In a second experiment, Aroclor 1248 was spiked into unamended soils or soils amended with another sludge containing <1mg/kg PCBs. Analysis of PCBs was by GC/MS with a reliable detection limit in plants of 20 microg/kg for individual chlorinated classes (tri, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls) and total PCBs. Only carrots (Daucus carota) were contaminated with PCBs, and contamination was restricted to carrot peels. Current USEPA guidelines for land application of sludges based on sludge PCB content are shown to be extremely conservative.

  14. Radiosensitivity of different tissues from carrot root at different phases of growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Degani, N.; Pickholtz, D.

    1980-09-01

    The present work compares the effect of ..gamma..-radiation dose and time in culture on the growth of cambium and phloem carrot (Daucus carota) root explants. It was found that the phloem is more radiosensitive than the cambium and that both tissues were more radiosensitive when irradiated on excision at the G/sub 1/ phase rather than at the end of the lag phase on the ninth day of growth in culture when cells were predominantly at the G/sub 2/ phase. The nuclear volumes of cells from both tissues were similar but were larger at the end of the more radioresistant lag phase than those of the G/sub 1/ phase on excision. However, nuclear volume could not account for the differences in radiosensitivity between either the tissues or irradiation times in culture.

  15. Control of Wild Carrot Somatic Embryo Development by Antioxidants 1

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Brent A.; Johnson, Morris A.

    1987-01-01

    As we previously reported for glutathione (GSH), both ascorbic acid (AA) and vitamin E were observed to suppress wild carrot (Daucus carota L.) somatic embryogenesis with little concomitant effect on biomass. Endogenous concentrations of AA were lower during embryo development than during cell proliferation, exhibiting a temporal pattern nearly identical to that of GSH. GSSG (oxidized GSH) reductase was found to be considerably more active in proliferating than in developing cultures, whereas no difference was evident in the case of dehydroascorbate (DHA) reductase. Both GSH and AA concentrations in these cells are governed by 2,4-D. These results show that redox status is a strong determinant of proliferative versus developmental growth and indicate that the mode of action of 2,4-D in this system may be explained at least in part by its influence on endogenous antioxidant levels. PMID:16665669

  16. Heat shock factors in carrot: genome-wide identification, classification, and expression profiles response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guang-Long; Ma, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) play key roles in the response to abiotic stress in eukaryotes. In this study, 35 DcHSFs were identified from carrot (Daucus carota L.) based on the carrot genome database. All 35 DcHSFs were divided into three classes (A, B, and C) according to the structure and phylogenetic relationships of four different plants, namely, Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, Brassica rapa, and Oryza sativa. Comparative analysis of algae, gymnosperms, and angiosperms indicated that the numbers of HSF transcription factors were related to the plant's evolution. The expression profiles of five DcHsf genes (DcHsf 01, DcHsf 02, DcHsf 09, DcHsf 10, and DcHsf 16), which selected from each subfamily (A, B, and C), were detected by quantitative real-time PCR under abiotic stresses (cold, heat, high salinity, and drought) in two carrot cultivars, D. carota L. cvs. Kurodagosun and Junchuanhong. The expression levels of DcHsfs were markedly increased by heat stress, except that of DcHsf 10, which was down regulated. The expression profiles of different DcHsfs in the same class also differed under various stress treatments. The expression profiles of these DcHsfs were also different in tissues of two carrot cultivars. This study is the first to identify and characterize the DcHSF family transcription factors in plants of Apiaceae using whole-genome analysis. The results of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the DcHSF family transcription factors' structure, function, and evolution in carrot. PMID:25403331

  17. CarrotDB: a genomic and transcriptomic database for carrot

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tan, Hua-Wei; Wang, Feng; Hou, Xi-Lin; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an economically important vegetable worldwide and is the largest source of carotenoids and provitamin A in the human diet. Given the importance of this vegetable to humans, research and breeding communities on carrot should obtain useful genomic and transcriptomic information. The first whole-genome sequences of ‘DC-27’ carrot were de novo assembled and analyzed. Transcriptomic sequences of 14 carrot genotypes were downloaded from the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and mapped to the whole-genome sequence before assembly. Based on these data sets, the first Web-based genomic and transcriptomic database for D. carota (CarrotDB) was developed (database homepage: http://apiaceae.njau.edu.cn/car rotdb). CarrotDB offers the tools of Genome Map and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. Using these tools, users can search certain target genes and simple sequence repeats along with designed primers of ‘DC-27’. Assembled transcriptomic sequences along with fragments per kilobase of transcript sequence per millions base pairs sequenced information (FPKM) information of 14 carrot genotypes are also provided. Users can download de novo assembled whole-genome sequences, putative gene sequences and putative protein sequences of ‘DC-27’. Users can also download transcriptome sequence assemblies of 14 carrot genotypes along with their FPKM information. A total of 2826 transcription factor (TF) genes classified into 57 families were identified in the entire genome sequences. These TF genes were embedded in CarrotDB as an interface. The ‘GERMPLASM’ part of CarrotDB also offers taproot photos of 45 carrot genotypes and a table containing accession numbers, names, countries of origin and colors of cortex, phloem and xylem parts of taproots corresponding to each carrot genotype. CarrotDB will be continuously updated with new information. Database URL: http://apiaceae.njau.edu.cn/carrotdb/ PMID:25267795

  18. An Ecological Friendly Dragee Technic Application on Crop Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, M.

    2009-04-01

    Summary: In Brazíl, in EMBRAPA/CNPH was developing a dragée technic for seeds of crops and vegetables of carrot (Daucus carota L.), onion (Allium cepa L.), tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), micro tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), Andropogon ssp. and Eucalyptus ssp. using as inert material the dolomite (CaCO3 96%) powder fractions (0.05 to 1.00 mm) and as cementing adhesives the polyvinyl acetate (PVA) and Gumma arabicum (Ga) (0 to 80% in water). On dragée process were using fungicides with agent of metalaxyl, iprodyon, benomyl, mankoceb (1 to 5 g fungicide/kg dolomite powder) and nutrients (N, P2O5, K2O 0.05 to 0.5, MgO, Fe, Zn, Mn, B, Cu, Mo, Co 0.000005 to 0.1 g/ kg dolomite powder) were applied from 1990. to 1993. Best results obtained with fraction of dolomite powder of 0.07 to 0.60 mm of diameter and adhesive of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) with the concentration between 10 to 20%. The dragées obtained presented a mechanical resistance of 0.5 kg/cm2 had show a germination higher than 90% without any phytotoxical effects to the seedlings. Fungicides with agent of metalaxyl, iprodyon, benomyl, mankoceb with the concentration 3-3 and mineral nutrients N, P2O5, K2O, MgO, Fe, Zn, Mn, B, Cu, Mo, Co with the concentration 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, 0.06, 0.00045, 0.00025, 0.0011, 0.00057, 0.00045, 0.000084, 0.00001 g/kg dolomite powder were showed best reultes, respectively. With this dragée utilization we could make possible the intensive use of highest quality seeds wich because of their higher costs are prohibitive in the actual systems of production. Keywords:crops, vegetables, seeds, dragée, nutrients, fungicides Introduction: In Latin America, Brazíl is the far greatest producer of crops and vegetables, with an annual production estimated at 9.631.000 tons in the value of 1.576 million dollars. Fifty species are cultivated of which 35 are producing botanical seeds including 162 varieties commercialized. The average national production of vegetable seeds is of 1.329,73 tons per year with an additional importation of 553,14 tons (Warley and Homero 1991). Most of the seeds of species are small requiring special preparation of the soil or the formation of seedlings and transplantation limiting the possibilities to mechanized planting. Besides the small size of seeds their trichome contents their wrinkle and their sensibility to mechanical damage difficult their uniform and precise distribution at sowing. To avoid error of "stand" and excessive number of seeds is sown followed by thinning out to eliminate exceeding plants. That results in the rise of production costs leding the producer to the utilization of cheaper seeds giving up extra gains that may results from the usage of better cultivars. The dragée facilitates the uniform distribution of seeds and makes precision mechanical planting possible (Márton 1993). In the process of plant productions the use of dragéed seeds facilitates the distribution of seeds that rises productive rentability (Silva and Márton 1992). The National Research Center for Vegetable Crops was developing dragée techniques of seeds based on Hungarian technology viewing the utilization of natural resources from the Brazílian situation from 1990 to 1993 (Márton 1999, 2000). Material and Method: At the first stage an equipment was developed for the production of dragées on the laboratory scale. The apparatus was permitting different material tests of seeds of various species obtaining dragées of carrot (Daucus carota L.), onion (Allium cepa L.), tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and micro tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), Andropogon ssp. and Eucalyptus ssp. using as inert material the dolomite (CaCO3 96%) powder fractions (0.05 to 1.00 mm) and as cementing adhesives the polyvinyl acetate (PVA) and Gumma arabicum (Ga) (0 to 80% in water). On dragée process were using fungicides with agent of metalaxyl, iprodyon, benomyl, mancoceb (1 to 5 g fungicide/kg dolomite powder) and mineral nutrients (N, P2O5, K2O 0.05 to 0.5, MgO, Fe, Zn, Mn, B, Cu, Mo, Co 0.000005 to 0.1 g/kg dolomite powder) were applied from 1990. to 1993. After the first stage of producing dragées a more detailed study was started to produce seeds of tomato varieties for processing being its mechanical seeding the most wide-spread requiring 40.000 tons of seeds per year. Results and Discussion: During the tests with the dragées produced it was verified that those produced from materials of very fine granulometry affected very adversly the germination of the seeds probably because of the lack of gas diffusion. This phenomenon was due to the formation of micro pores that retained water with great intensity not permitting gas exchange between the seeds and environment. At the same time it was observed different that greater fractions of material do not permit the adhesion of seeds and the dragée remained "empty". The tests of granulometric fractions of dolomite powder showed that granule with size over 0.6 mm is not practicable for dragée process because of the lack of sticking of the seeds and because of the formation of deformed dragées the surface of wich is not smooth. Best results were obtained in the intermediary fractions of 0.07 to 0.60 mm when the finer fractions were usable in the final stage in order to obtain smoother surface. When granules finer than 0.07 mm were used this affected adversely the germination of the seeds. As cementing agents adhesives of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) and Gumma arabicum (Ga) were tested in concentrations between 5 to 70% diluted in water. Best results were obtained with PVA with the concentration between 10 to 20%. The dragées produced with adhesives at 5% obtained a mechanical resistance inferior to 0.5 kg/cm2 and the dragées produced easily. The dragées produced with adhesives of concentration superior to 20% presented a mechanical resistance higher than 0.5 kg/cm2 but difficulted the germination. The affinity of contact between the layer of dragée and surface of the seeds is favorable to the formation of a water coat. That coat does not permit the oxygenation of the seeds unable the beginning of the germination. Because of that during the first day after the planting the formation of the water coat layer must be avoided the application of irrigation. Best results with fungicides with agents such metalaxyl, iprodyon, benomyl, mancoceb with the concentration 3-3 and mineral nutrients such N, P2O5, K2O, MgO, Fe, Zn, Mn, B, Cu, Mo, Co with the concentration 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, 0.06, 0.00045, 0.00025, 0.0011, 0.00057, 0.00045, 0.000084 0.00001 g/kg dolomite powder were obtained, respectively. With this fungicides and mineral nutrients concentrations were obtaining very good germinations (higher than 90%) without surging phytotoxication and other abnormalities. In case of this dragée utilization can make possible the intensive use of highest quality seeds wich because of their higher costs are prohibitive in the actual system of production by mechanical seeding, generaly. For example actually 2 to 3 kgs of tomato seeds are use per hectare for planting. However 0.2 to 0.3 kgs of seeds should be sufficient to produce the seedlings to the same area. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by National Research Center for Vegetable Crops (EMBRAPA/CNPH), Brazíl and Research Institute for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary References Márton L (1993) Relatorio final de consultoria. EMBRAPA/CNPH. Brasília-DF. p 151. Brazíl Márton L (2000) Effects of NPK fertilizers on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield. Veszprém University. Keszthely. p 136. Hungary Márton L and José AB (1999) Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production in Brazíl. Acta Agronomica Óváriensis 41:153-158. Hungary Silva JBC and Márton L (1992) Adaptation of pelletization (dragée) techniques of seeds in Brazíl. In proceeding: The application and utilization in the agricultural scientific results in developing countries. Second International Scientific Conference. 286-289. Gödöllő. Hungary Warley MN and Homero BSVP (1991) Encontro sobre producáo e qualidade de sementes de hortalicas. Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Hortalicas-CNPH/EMBRAPA. Brazília-DF. Brasíl

  19. Detection of Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii from maize seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is one of 52 that will compose the second edition of the Laboratory Manual for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria from Seeds and other Planting Material, to be published by the American Phytopathological Society. The chapter presents a description of Pantoea stewartii, the causa...

  20. Evaluation of proposed Skylab and SSP soap products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, F. C.; Durfee, R. L.; Spurlock, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Three personal hygiene cleansing agents and one laundry detergent (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate), which are all candidates for use on long-duration space missions, were evaluated in terms of dermatological effects on human subjects and effects on microbiological species. None of the four materials exhibited adverse dermatological effects from either skin patch tests of two weeks duration or a simulated Skylab personal hygiene regimen of up to four weeks duration. No significant alterations in skin microflora during the use regimen were found. None of the four materials were found to serve as microbiological support media for the species tested, but a species of air-borne mold was observed to grow rapidly in a neutralized aqueous solution. None of the candidate agents was found to be strongly biocidal.

  1. Evaluation of proposed Skylab and SSP soap products.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durfee, R. L.; Spurlock, J. M.; Whitmore, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    Four candidate cleansing agents evaluated in terms of potential hazards to crew members included two soaps (Neutrogena bar soap and Olive Leaf Liquid), one nonfoaming surfactant (Miranol JEM), and one laundry detergent (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate). None of the four exhibited adverse dermatological effects from skin patch tests or supported growth of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Aqueous solutions of Neutrogena did support a mold species. Neutrogena and Miranol JEM were used in a simulated Skylab personal hygiene regimen with no adverse effects on skin or skin microflora. Based on our results, each of these agents appear to be a promising candidate material for the use intended.

  2. The Metabolites of the Herbicide L-Phosphinothricin (Glufosinate) (Identification, Stability, and Mobility in Transgenic, Herbicide-Resistant, and Untransformed Plants).

    PubMed Central

    Droge-Laser, W.; Siemeling, U.; Puhler, A.; Broer, I.

    1994-01-01

    The metabolism of the herbicide L-phosphinothricin (L-Pt) was analyzed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and carrot (Daucus carota). In transgenic, Pt-resistant plants expressing the Pt-N-acetyltransferase gene (pat), L-Pt was acetylated, resulting in two forms of N-acetyl-Pt (ac-Pt). In transgenic plants expressing only low pat-encoded acetylating activity as well as in genetically unmodified plants, three metabolic compounds 4-methylphosphinico-2-oxo-butanoic acid, 3-methylphosphinico-propanoic acid (MPP), and 4-methylphosphinico-2-hydroxy-butanoic acid (MHB) were identified. Hence, the transgene-encoded acetylation of L-Pt competes with a plant-specific degradation. The compounds MPP, MHB, and ac-Pt were found to be the final, stable products of the plant's metabolic pathways. The mobility of these stable compounds in the plant was investigated: L-Pt as well as the derived metabolites were found to be preferentially transported to the upper regions of the plant. PMID:12232195

  3. Carrot antifreeze protein does not exhibit the polygalacturonase-inhibiting activity of PGIP family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dang-Quan; Wang, Hong-Bin; Liu, Bin; Feng, Dong-Ru; He, Yan-Ming; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2006-11-01

    The carrot (Daucus carota) antifreeze protein (DcAFP) has a strong antifreeze activity and identified as belonging to the plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) family based on its sequence similarities, including the presence of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motif. In this study, yeast two-hybrid technology was used to analyze whether the carrot AFP could act as a PGIP. The complete DcAFP and polygalacturonase (PGase; obtained from fungus Alternaria alternata by RT-PCR) coding sequences were cloned into the bait and capture vectors, respectively, and yeast two-hybrid assays were performed. The results revealed that there was no evidence of an interaction between DcAFP and PGase, which suggests that DcAFP probably lacks PGIP activity. An analysis of the electrostatic potential of DcAFP and other PGIPs revealed that a large number of nonconservative residues within the beta-helix of the DcAFP LRR motif had been substituted to basic amino acids, thus changing the surface from negative to positive. This will electrostatically prevent DcAFP from binding with the positively charged surface of PGase. This is the first report that showed the correlation between nonconservative amino acids within the LRR motif of the DcAFP and its loss of polygalacturonase inhibiting activity. PMID:17112975

  4. Phosphoglycerylethanolamine Posttranslational Modification of Plant Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1?1

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Wendy D.; Lao, Pao-Chi; Gage, Douglas A.; Boss, Wendy F.

    1998-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1? (eEF-1A) is a multifunctional protein. There are three known posttranslational modifications of eEF-1A that could potentially affect its function. Except for phosphorylation, the other posttranslational modifications have not been demonstrated in plants. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping, we show that carrot (Daucus carota L.) eEF-1A contains a phosphoglycerylethanolamine (PGE) posttranslational modification. eEF-1A was the only protein labeled with [14C]ethanolamine in carrot cells and was the predominant ethanolamine-labeled protein in Arabidopsis seedlings and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cell cultures. In vivo-labeling studies using [3H]glycerol, [32P]Pi, [14C]myristic acid, and [14C]linoleic acid indicated that the entire phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine is covalently attached to the protein. The PGE lipid modification did not affect the partitioning of eEF-1A in Triton X-114 or its actin-binding activity in in vitro assays. Our in vitro data indicate that this newly characterized posttranslational modification alone does not affect the function of eEF-1A. Therefore, the PGE lipid modification may work in combination with other posttranslational modifications to affect the distribution and the function of eEF-1A within the cell. PMID:9662537

  5. Expression of DcPRP1 is linked to carrot storage root formation and is induced by wounding and auxin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ebener, W; Fowler, T J; Suzuki, H; Shaver, J; Tierney, M L

    1993-01-01

    A carrot (Daucus carota, L.) genomic clone (DcPRP1) was isolated on the basis of its homology to previously described cDNAs encoding a wound-inducible, proline-rich cell wall protein. DNA sequence analysis showed that DcPRP1 contains a single open-reading frame encoding a 235-amino acid protein that is colinear with that predicted from the cDNA sequence with the exception of four amino acids at the N terminus and a 60-nucleotide insertion present within the genomic clone. Genomic Southern hybridization analysis showed that the cloned sequence hybridized with a single restriction enzyme fragment using several restriction enzymes. Primer extension and northern hybridization analysis indicated that the expression of DcPRP1 is developmentally regulated and linked to the formation of storage roots, where this gene is expressed at high levels after wounding. The level of DcPRP1 mRNA was greatest in tissue immediately adjacent to the wound site. Treatment of unwounded carrot storage roots with 10 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, indoleacetic acid, or naphthalene-1-acetic acid also resulted in the accumulation of DcPRP1 transcripts to a level equal to that seen in wounded tissue. PMID:8278498

  6. Cross-talk between signaling pathways: the link between plant secondary metabolite production and wounding stress response.

    PubMed

    Jacobo-Velzquez, Daniel A; Gonzlez-Agero, Mauricio; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Plants subjected to wounding stress produce secondary metabolites. Several of these metabolites prevent chronic diseases and can be used as colorants, flavors, and as antimicrobials. This wound-induced production of plant secondary metabolites is mediated by signaling-molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA). However, their specific role and interactions that modulate the wound-respond in plants is not fully understood. In the present study, a subtractive cDNA library was generated, to better understand the global response of plants to wounding stress. Carrot (Daucus carota) was used as a model system for this study. A total of 335 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequences were obtained. ESTs sequences with a putative identity showed involvement in stress-signaling pathways as well as on the primary and secondary metabolism. Inhibitors of ROS biosynthesis, ET action, and JA biosynthesis alone and in combination were applied to wounded-carrots in order to determine, based on relative gene expression data, the regulatory role of ET, JA, and ROS on the wound-response in plants. Our results demonstrate that ROS play a key role as signaling-molecules for the wound-induced activation of the primary and secondary metabolism whereas ET and JA are essential to modulate ROS levels. PMID:25712739

  7. Construction of a micro-library enriched with genomic replication origins of carrot somatic embryos by laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Murata, Natsuko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Nishiyama, Ryutaro; Nomura, Koji

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an effective method for constructing a micro-library enriched with chromosomal DNA replication origins. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) somatic embryos at early globular stage were incubated for 15 min in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to pulse label newly synthesized DNA strands. Nuclei were isolated from the cells, and the DNA was extracted on microscopic slides. DNA fibers spread on slides were visualized using anti-BrdU and FITC-conjugated secondary antibodies. DNA regions where BrdU was incorporated were clearly visualized under a fluorescent microscope as dots on DNA fibers. Regions of DNA fiber containing many fluorescent dots should contain replicons in them. DNA fibers showing many fluorescence dots, or replicons were easily cut and collected using a laser microdissection system equipped with a pulse laser beam. DNA fragments containing many replicons were able to be collected with an efficiency of 20-30 DNA fragments per 1 h. Using degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR, fragments were randomly amplified from the microdissected fragments, and subcloned to construct a micro-library. This is the first report of the application of a laser microdissection technique for constructing a micro-library enriched with replication origins of chromosomal DNA, although there were some reports on laser microdissection of chromosomes. The simple procedure established here should open up a new application of laser optics. PMID:15936205

  8. Survival of three commercially available natural enemies exposed to Michigan wildflowers.

    PubMed

    Walton, Nathaniel J; Isaacs, Rufus

    2011-10-01

    Flowering plants are often used in habitat management programs to conserve the arthropod natural enemies of insect pests. In this study, nine species of flowering plants representing six families commonly found in North America east of the Rocky Mountains were evaluated based on how much they extended the lifespans of three commercially available natural enemy species in cages with cut flower stems compared with cages containing water only. The natural enemies used in the experiments were a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Hippodamia convergens Gurin-Mneville), a predatory bug (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae: Orius insidiosus (Say)), and an aphid parasitoid (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidius colemani Viereck). The plant species that most extended the lifespans of all three natural enemies were Monarda fistulosa L. (Lamiaceae), Solidago juncea Aiton (Asteraceae), and Daucus carota L. (Apiaceae). Agastache nepetoides (L.) Kuntze (Lamiaceae), Lobelia siphilitica L. (Campanulaceae), and Trifolium pratense L. (Fabaceae) were intermediate in their support of natural enemies. One plant species, Penstemon hirsutus (L.) Willdenow (Scrophulariaceae), did not contribute to the longevity of natural enemies any more than water alone. These results emphasize the need for multi-species evaluations of flowering plants for conservation biocontrol programs, and the variability in plant value for natural enemies. PMID:22251728

  9. Polyamines and Pectins (I. Ion Exchange and Selectivity).

    PubMed Central

    Messiaen, J.; Cambier, P.; Van Cutsem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The ion-binding and -exchange properties of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine on purified walls of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspensions were investigated by producing ion-exchange isotherms and comparing them with the behavior of Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. The cation exchange capacity of the carrot cell walls was 0.8 equivalent kg-1 dry matter, and the ionic selectivity sequence of the walls for polyamines followed the sequence spermine4+ > spermidine3+ [almost equal to] Ca2+ > putrescine2+. The polyamines were subjected to only electroselectivity and probably did not induce any favorable supramolecular conformation of pectin like the one induced by Ca2+. Triangular ion exchanges were also performed with three diamines: ethanediamine, butanediamine, and octanediamine. The shorter the diamine, the higher the total adsorption and selectivity of the exchange. The lower selectivity of the cell wall for putrescine was partly attributed to its inability to access and displace Ca2+ from higher affinity sites within dimerized pectic sequences. The polyamine adsorption and exchange on pectic sequences could result in pectic signal modulation in pathogenesis and in differentiation. PMID:12223613

  10. Involvement of the Golgi Apparatus in the Synthesis and Secretion of Hydroxyproline-rich Cell Wall Glycoproteins 123

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Michael; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1975-01-01

    Pulse labeling of carrot root phloem parenchyma (Daucus carota L. cv. Nantes) tissue with 14C-proline followed by fractionation of the cytoplasmic organelles on sucrose gradients was used to determine the identity of the membranous organelles involved in the secretion of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the cell wall. Identification of the organelles was done through electron-microscopical observations and through the localization of marker enzymes on the sucrose gradients. Enrichment of the organelles involved in secretion was determined by measuring the percentage of the incorporated radioactivity present as 14C-hydroxyproline. The Golgi apparatus (dictyosome) was found to be a major site of glycoprotein transport. This identification was based on the observed enrichment of dictyosomes paralleling the purification of newly synthesized cell-wall glycoproteins. A marker enzyme for the Golgi apparatus, inosinediphosphatase, banded with the newly synthesized cell wall glycoproteins on sequential isopycnic and rate zonal sucrose gradients. Marker enzymes for the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane were clearly separated from the dictyosome-rich fraction. UDP-arabinose arabinosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in the glycosylation of the peptide moiety of this glycoprotein, also banded with the dictyosomes on both kinds of gradients. The results suggest an important role of the Golgi apparatus in the biosynthesis and the secretion of the cell wall glycoproteins of higher plants. Images PMID:16659117

  11. Ambispora granatensis, a new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, associated with Asparagus officinalis in Andalucia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, Javier; Barea, José-Miguel; Ferrol, Nuria; Oehl, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    A new dimorphic fungal species in the arbuscular mycorrhiza-forming Glomeromycota, Ambispora granatensis, was isolated from an agricultural site in the province of Granada (Andalucía, Spain) growing in the rhizosphere of Asparagus officinalis. It was propagated in pot cultures with Trifolium pratense and Sorghum vulgare. The fungus also colonized Ri T-DNA transformed Daucus carota roots but did not form spores in these root organ cultures. The spores of the acaulosporoid morph are 90-150 μm diam and hyaline to white to pale yellow. They have three walls and a papillae-like rough irregular surface on the outer surface of the outer wall. The irregular surface might become difficult to detect within a few hours in lactic acid-based mountings but are clearly visible in water. The structural central wall layer of the outer wall is only 0.8-1.5 μm thick. The glomoid spores are formed singly or in small, loose spore clusters of 2-10 spores. They are hyaline to pale yellow, (25)40-70 μm diam and have a bilayered spore wall without ornamentation. Nearly full length sequences of the 18S and the ITS regions of the ribosomal gene place the new fungus in a separate clade next to Ambispora fennica and Ambispora gerdemannii. The acaulosporoid spores of the new fungus can be distinguished easily from all other spores in genus Ambispora by the conspicuous thin outer wall. PMID:20952800

  12. Differential Selection on Carotenoid Biosynthesis Genes as a Function of Gene Position in the Metabolic Pathway: A Study on the Carrot and Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Clotault, Jrmy; Peltier, Didier; Soufflet-Freslon, Vanessa; Briard, Mathilde; Geoffriau, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. Methodology/Principal Findings Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus), a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. Conclusions/Significance Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history. PMID:22737218

  13. Evaluation of native plant flower characteristics for conservation biological control of Prays oleae.

    PubMed

    Nave, A; Gonçalves, F; Crespí, A L; Campos, M; Torres, L

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that manipulating flowering weeds within an agroecosystem can have an important role in pest control by natural enemies, by providing them nectar and pollen, which are significant sources of nutrition for adults. The aim of this study was to assess if the olive moth, Prays oleae (Bernard, 1788) (Lepidoptera: Praydidae), and five of its main natural enemies, the parasitoid species Chelonus elaeaphilus Silvestri (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Apanteles xanthostigma (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Ageniaspis fuscicollis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Elasmus flabellatus (Fonscolombe) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), as well as the predator Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), can theoretically access the nectar from 21 flowering weeds that naturally occur in olive groves. Thus, the architecture of the flowers as well as the mouthpart structure and/or the head and thorax width of the pest and its enemies were analyzed. The results suggested that all beneficial insects were able to reach nectar of the plant species from Apiaceae family, i.e. Conopodium majus (Gouan) Loret, Daucus carota L. and Foeniculum vulgare Mill., as well as Asparagus acutifolius L., Echium plantagineum L., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., Raphanus raphanistrum L., Lonicera hispanica Boiss. et Reut., Silene gallica L., Spergula arvensis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Calamintha baetica Boiss. et Reut, Malva neglecta Wallr. and Linaria saxatilis (L.) Chaz. P. oleae was not able to access nectar from five plant species, namely: Andryala integrifolia L., Chondrilla juncea L., Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter, Sonchus asper (L.) Hill and Lavandula stoechas L. PMID:26780918

  14. Screening for bioactive metabolites in plant extracts modulating glucose uptake and fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    El-Houri, Rime B; Kotowska, Dorota; Olsen, Louise C B; Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Christensen, Lars P; Grevsen, Kai; Oksbjerg, Niels; Frgeman, Nils; Kristiansen, Karsten; Christensen, Kathrine B

    2014-01-01

    Dichloromethane and methanol extracts of seven different food and medicinal plants were tested in a screening platform for identification of extracts with potential bioactivity related to insulin-dependent glucose uptake and fat accumulation. The screening platform included a series of in vitro bioassays, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ?-mediated transactivation, adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cell cultures, and glucose uptake in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary porcine myotubes, as well as one in vivo bioassay, fat accumulation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that dichloromethane extracts of aerial parts of golden root (Rhodiola rosea) and common elder (Sambucus nigra) as well as the dichloromethane extracts of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) and carrot (Daucus carota) were able to stimulate insulin-dependent glucose uptake in both adipocytes and myotubes while weekly activating PPAR? without promoting adipocyte differentiation. In addition, these extracts were able to decrease fat accumulation in C. elegans. Methanol extracts of summer savory (Satureja hortensis), common elder, and broccoli (Brassica oleracea) enhanced glucose uptake in myotubes but were not able to activate PPAR?, indicating a PPAR?-independent effect on glucose uptake. PMID:25254050

  15. A family of abundant plasma membrane-associated glycoproteins related to the arabinogalactan proteins is unique to flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a family of abundant peripheral plasma membrane glycoproteins that is unique to flowering plants. They are identified by a monoclonal antibody, MAC 207, that recognizes an epitope containing L-arabinose and D-glucuronic acid. Immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling studies locate the MAC 207 epitope to the outer surface of the plasma membrane both in protoplasts and in intact tissues. In some cells MAC 207 also binds to the vacuolar membrane, probably reflecting the movement of the plasma membrane glycoproteins in the endocytic pathway. The epitope recognized by MAC 207 is also present on a distinct soluble proteoglycan secreted into the growth medium by carrot (Daucus carota) suspension culture cells. Biochemical evidence identifies this neutral proteoglycan as a member of the large class of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), and suggests a structural relationship between it and the plasma membrane glycoproteins. AGPs have the property of binding to beta-glycans, and we therefore propose that one function of the AGP-related, plasma membrane-associated glycoproteins may be to act as cell surface attachment sites for cell wall matrix polysaccharides. PMID:2469683

  16. Heterogeneity and Cell Type-Specific Localization of a Cell Wall Glycoprotein from Carrot Suspension Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    van Engelen, Fred A.; Sterk, Peter; Booij, Hilbert; Cordewener, Jan H.G.; Rook, Wim; van Kammen, Ab; de Vries, Sacco C.

    1991-01-01

    EP1, an extracellular protein from carrot (Daucus carota) cell suspensions, has been partially characterized by means of an antiserum and a cDNA clone. In both embryo and suspension cultures different molecular mass EP1 proteins were detected, some of which (31, 32, 52, and 54 kilodaltons) were bound to the cell wall and released into the medium, whereas others (49, 60, and 62 kilodaltons) were more firmly bound to the cell wall and could be extracted with a salt solution. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products revealed a single primary translation product of 45 kilodaltons, suggesting that EP1 heterogeneity is due to differential posttranslational modification. In seedlings organ-specific modification of EP1 proteins was observed, a phenomenon which did not persist in suspension cultures initiated from different seedling organs. In culture EP1 proteins were only found to be associated with vacuolated, nonembryogenic cells, and on these cells they were localized in loosely attached, pectin-containing cell wall material. Purified 52/54 kilodaltons EP1 proteins did not alleviate the inhibitory effect of the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin on somatic embryogenesis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668246

  17. Tissue-specific accumulation of carotenoids in carrot roots.

    PubMed

    Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal; Schulz, Hartwig; Nothnagel, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used for sensitive detection of carotenoids in living tissue and Raman mapping provides further information about their spatial distribution in the measured plant sample. In this work, the relative content and distribution of the main carrot (Daucus carota L.) root carotenoids, alpha-, beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene were assessed using near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The pigments were measured simultaneously in situ in root sections without any preliminary sample preparation. The Raman spectra obtained from carrots of different origin and root colour had intensive bands of carotenoids that could be assigned to beta-carotene (1,520 cm(-1)), lycopene (1,510 cm(-1)) and alpha-carotene/lutein (1,527 cm(-1)). The Raman mapping technique revealed detailed information regarding the relative content and distribution of these carotenoids. The level of beta-carotene was heterogeneous across root sections of orange, yellow, red and purple roots, and in the secondary phloem increased gradually from periderm towards the core, but declined fast in cells close to the vascular cambium. alpha-carotene/lutein were deposited in younger cells with a higher rate than beta-carotene while lycopene in red carrots accumulated throughout the whole secondary phloem at the same level. The results indicate developmental regulation of carotenoid genes in carrot root and that Raman spectroscopy can supply essential information on carotenogenesis useful for molecular investigations on gene expression and regulation. PMID:16699778

  18. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  19. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  20. A predictive nutritional model for plant cells and hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Bouchard-Marchand, E; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2008-01-01

    A structured nutritional model is proposed to describe growth and nutritional behavior of Eschscholtzia californica suspension cells and Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota hairy roots in in vitro culture. The model describes the cells specific growth rate from concentration of intracellular nutrients such as inorganic phosphate (Pi), nitrogen sources (NO(3) (-) and NH(4) (+)) and sugars. Two-level Michaelis-Menten kinetics are used to describe Pi and NO(3) (-) uptake and simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics for description of sugars uptake. Model parameters for each cell line were calibrated using data from batch cultures. The predictive capacity of the model was tested using data from medium exchange hairy root cultures. The model describes growth and nutritional behavior for the cell and hairy root lines. A sensitivity analysis was performed to identify critical model parameters and effect of initial conditions. The cell and hairy roots lines are also compared from their kinetic parameters. The kinetic model is efficient for describing and predicting growth and nutritional behaviors of suspension cells and hairy roots. PMID:17614323

  1. Long-term changes in the extractability and bioavailability of zinc and cadmium after sludge application

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, S.P.; Zhao, F.J.; Dunham, S.J.; Crosland, A.R.; Coleman, K.

    2000-06-01

    Changes in the extractability and uptake by crops of sludge metals in a long-term field experiment, started in 1942, were measured to assess whether Zn and Cd are either fixed by the sludge/soil constituents or are released as the sludge organic matter (OM) decomposes. Total and 0.1 M CaCl{sub 2}-extractable concentrations of Zn and Cd in soil and total concentrations in crops were measured on archived crop and soil samples. Extractability of Zn as a proportion of the total ranged from 0.5 to 3% and that of Cd from 4 to 18%, and were higher in sludge-amended than farmyard manure or fertilizer-amended soils. Over a 23-yr period after 1961, when sludge was last applied, the extractability of both metals fluctuated, but neither decreased nor increased consistently. The relationships between total soil and crop metal concentrations were linear, with no evidence of a plateau across the range of soil metal concentrations achieved. The slopes of the soil-plant relationships depended on the type of crop or crop part examined, but were generally in the order red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) > sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) > carrot (Daucus carota L.) > barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). However, there also were large seasonal differences in metal concentrations in the crops. It is concluded from the available evidence that up to 23 yr after sludge applications cease, Zn and Cd extractability and bioavailability do not decrease.

  2. Screening for Bioactive Metabolites in Plant Extracts Modulating Glucose Uptake and Fat Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Houri, Rime B.; Kotowska, Dorota; Olsen, Louise C. B.; Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Christensen, Lars P.; Oksbjerg, Niels; Frgeman, Nils; Kristiansen, Karsten; Christensen, Kathrine B.

    2014-01-01

    Dichloromethane and methanol extracts of seven different food and medicinal plants were tested in a screening platform for identification of extracts with potential bioactivity related to insulin-dependent glucose uptake and fat accumulation. The screening platform included a series of in vitro bioassays, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ?-mediated transactivation, adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cell cultures, and glucose uptake in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary porcine myotubes, as well as one in vivo bioassay, fat accumulation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that dichloromethane extracts of aerial parts of golden root (Rhodiola rosea) and common elder (Sambucus nigra) as well as the dichloromethane extracts of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) and carrot (Daucus carota) were able to stimulate insulin-dependent glucose uptake in both adipocytes and myotubes while weekly activating PPAR? without promoting adipocyte differentiation. In addition, these extracts were able to decrease fat accumulation in C. elegans. Methanol extracts of summer savory (Satureja hortensis), common elder, and broccoli (Brassica oleracea) enhanced glucose uptake in myotubes but were not able to activate PPAR?, indicating a PPAR?-independent effect on glucose uptake. PMID:25254050

  3. Radical scavenging and iron-chelating activities of some greens used as traditional dishes in Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    El, Sedef Nehir; Karakaya, Sibel

    2004-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the antioxidative activity of nine different families of greens. Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish), Anchusa azurea (bugloss), Daucus carota (wild carrot), Sonchus oleraceus (sowthistle), Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy), Malva sylvestris (blue mallow), Foeniculum vulgare (fennel), Cichorium intybus (chicory) and Salicornia europaea (jointed glasswort) are native to the Mediterranean and are commonly consumed as a salad or an ingredient in some recipes. The antioxidative activities, including the radical scavenging effects, inhibition of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and Fe(2+)-chelating activity, were studied. All samples showed antioxidant activity as a radical scavenger in the experiment using the DPPH* radical. The ratio between the slopes of the kinetic model was used to compare antioxidant efficiency of different greens. Greens also possessed antioxidative activity toward H(2)O(2). Especially, greens exhibited a marked scavenging effect on H(2)O(2) at 0.2 g/ml concentration. The Fe(2+) ion-chelating activities of the samples except jointed glasswort were greater than 70%. The antioxidant activity of samples with different methods based on the inhibition of different reactions could not be compared. The current dietary guidelines include recommendations for an increase in the consumption of plant foods. Greens should provide an optimal supply of antioxidant substances in the diet. PMID:14630594

  4. Ozone degrades into hydroxyl radical under physiological conditions: a spin trapping study

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, H.D.; Perkins, K.K.; Boss, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Defining the reactants is a critical step towards elucidating the mechanism of ozone toxicity to biomembranes. To document ozone-induced HO x radicals, the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was used and the resulting spin adduct was monitored with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Chelexed potassium phosphate buffer a pH 7.2 and 7.8 was exposed to ozone by directing a stream of ozone over the surface for 60 seconds. Under these conditions, no HO x was detected. Using 0.5 x 10/sup -4/ molar caffeic acid in phosphate buffer, strong DMPO x OH electron spin resonance signals were obtained, indicating HO x production. High pH (7.8) enhanced signal strength. Furthermore, with sorbitol a net HO x signal loss of 28% was observed, while a carbon-centered sorbitol radical adduct appeared. Although HO x radicals were produced, no breakage of Daucus carota protoplast plasma membranes was observed nor were differences in membrane fluidity observed as determined by 5-doxyl stearic acid.

  5. Carbonaceous soil amendments to biofortify crop plants with zinc.

    PubMed

    Gartler, Jörg; Robinson, Brett; Burton, Karen; Clucas, Lynne

    2013-11-01

    Carbonaceous soil amendments, comprising mixtures of biosolids and biochar, have been demonstrated to improve fertility while reducing nitrate leaching. We aimed to determine the efficacy of a biosolids/biochar soil amendment in biofortification of vegetables with Zn, an element that is deficient in one third of humanity. We grew beetroot (Beta vulgaris), spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus), broccoli (Brassica oleracea), carrot (Daucus carota), leek (Allium ampeloprsum), onion (Allium cepa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), corn (Zea mays), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and courgette (also called zucchini - Cucurbita pepo) in an unamended soil (silt loam, pH 5.6), and soil amended (by volume) with 10% biosolids, 20% biochar, and 10% biosolids+20% biochar. The biosolids and biosolids+biochar treatments significantly increased the biomass and Zn concentration of most species, with a large interspecific variation. Beetroot showed the greatest increase, with dry weight Zn concentrations of up to 178 and 1200 mg kg(-1) in the bulbs and leaves respectively. Cadmium, Cu and Pb were below guideline levels in all samples, except the leaves of spinach and beetroot, which slightly exceeded the World Health Organisation's maximum permitted concentration of 0.1 mg Cd kg(-1) fresh weight. A mixture of biosolids and biochar is an effective means to biofortify crops with edible leaves as well as beetroot with Zn. Future research should investigate the efficacy of the system in other soil types and the role of biochar in the immobilisation/inactivation of organic contaminants and pathogens contained within the biosolids. PMID:23146312

  6. Further Studies on the Photosynthesis of Carrot Tissue Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K.-H.; Raafat, A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of kinetin and sucrose on the photosynthetic activity of carrot (Daucus carota) tissue cultures in relation to growth was investigated. The results showed that light contributes heavily to the growth of tissue cultures measured in terms of fresh and dry weight and cell division activity. In light, the fresh weight, dry weight, and number of cells per explant were about or more than doubled. This indicated that after the development of chloroplasts, carrot tissue cultures can grow autotrophically at least as far as energy and carbon are concerned. Kinetin was shown to have an important role in developing the photosynthetic apparatus and photosynthetic activity of tissue cultures as manifested by the increase of chlorophyll content (60%), Hill activity (about 3-fold), and 14C-fixation from NaH14CO3 (about 20%). On the other hand, the presence of sucrose in the medium reduced the chlorophyll content by about 30% and 14C-fixation from NaH14CO3 in the soluble fraction by about 60%. A possible correlation between the influence of kinetin on sugar uptake and the effect of kinetin on 14C-fixation from NaH14CO3 was discussed. PMID:16658393

  7. Oral delivery of plant-derived HIV-1 p24 antigen in low doses shows a superior priming effect in mice compared to high doses.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Ingrid; Brve, Andreas; Hallengrd, David; Hadad, Ronza; Kalbina, Irina; Strid, ke; Andersson, Sren

    2014-04-25

    During early infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), there is a rapid depletion of CD4(+) T-cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, immediate protection at these surfaces is of high priority for the development of an HIV-1 vaccine. Thus, transgenic plants expressing HIV-1 antigens, which are exposed to immune competent cells in the GALT during oral administration, can be interesting as potential vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used two HIV-1 p24 antigen-expressing transgenic plant systems, Arabidopsis thaliana and Daucus carota, in oral immunization experiments. Both transgenic plant systems showed a priming effect in mice and induced humoral immune responses, which could be detected as anti-p24-specific IgG in sera after an intramuscular p24 protein boost. Dose-dependent antigen analyses using transgenic A. thaliana indicated that low p24 antigen doses were superior to high p24 antigen doses. PMID:24631072

  8. Bioaccumulation of Antimony and Arsenic in Vegetables and Health Risk Assessment in the Superlarge Antimony-Mining Area, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Defang; Zhou, Saijun; Ren, Bozhi; Chen, Tengshu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution in soils caused by mining and smelting has attracted worldwide attention for its potential health risks to residents. This paper studies the concentrations and accumulations of Sb and As in both soils and vegetables and the human health risks of Sb and As in vegetables from Xikuangshan (XKS) Sb mine, Hunan, China. Results showed that the soils were severely polluted by Sb and As; Sb and As have significant positive correlation. Sb and As concentrations in vegetables were quite different: Coriandrum sativum L. was the highest in Sb, Allium fistulosum L. was the highest in As, and Brassica pekinensis L. was the lowest in both Sb and As; Daucus carota L. and Coriandrum sativum L. showed advantage in accumulating Sb and As; Coriandrum sativum L. had higher capacity of redistributing Sb and As within the plant. Health risk assessment results showed that the hazard quotient (HQ) values of Sb and As in vegetables were in the ranges of 1.61-3.33 and 0.09-0.39, respectively; the chronic daily intake (CDI) and hazard quotient (HQ) values of Sb were over the safe limit recommended by FAO and WHO, indicating that long-term consumption of vegetables from the surrounding soils of XKS mine may bring health risks to residents. PMID:26442167

  9. A novel K+ channel expressed in carrot roots with a low susceptibility toward metal ions.

    PubMed

    Paganetto, A; Bregante, M; Downey, P; Lo Schiavo, F; Hoth, S; Hedrich, R; Gambale, F

    2001-02-01

    Kdc1 is a novel K+-channel gene cloned from carrot roots, and which is also present in cultured carrot cells. We investigated the characteristics of the ionic current elicited in Xenopus oocytes coinjected with KDC1 (K+-Daucus carota 1) and KAT1 (from Arabidopsis thaliana) RNA. Expressed heteromeric channels displayed inward-rectifying potassium currents whose kinetics, voltage characteristics, and inhibition by metal ions depended on KDC1:KAT1 ratios. At low KDC1:KAT1 ratios, Zn2+ inhibition of heteromeric K+ current was less pronounced compared to homomeric KAT1 channels, while at higher KDC1:KAT1 ratios, the addition of Zn2+ even produced an increase in current. Under the same conditions, the Ni2+ inhibition of the current was also reduced, but no current increase was observed. These effects might be explained by the unusual amino acid composition of the KDC1 protein in terms of histidine residues that are absent in the pore region, but abundant (four per subunit) in the proximity of the pore entrance. Channels like KDC1 could be at least partially responsible for the higher resistance of carrot cells in the presence of metals. PMID:11460927

  10. Evaluation of Combined Disinfection Methods for Reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Population on Fresh-Cut Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Eva; Rodríguez, Mariola; García, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Most current disinfection strategies for fresh-cut industry are focused on the use of different chemical agents; however, very little has been reported on the effectiveness of the hurdle technology. The effect of combined decontamination methods based on the use of different sanitizers (peroxyacetic acid and chlorine dioxide) and the application of pressure (vacuum/positive pressure) on the inactivation of the foodborne pathogen E. coli O157:H7 on fresh-cut lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and carrots (Daucus carota) was studied. Fresh produce, inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, was immersed (4 °C, 2 min) in tap water (W), chlorine water (CW), chlorine dioxide (ClO2: 2 mg/L) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA: 100 mg/L) in combination with: (a) vacuum (V: 10 mbar) or (b) positive pressure application (P: 3 bar). The product quality and antimicrobial effects of the treatment on bacterial counts were determined both in process washing water and on fresh-cut produce. Evidence obtained in this study, suggests that the use of combined methods (P/V + sanitizers) results in a reduction on the microorganism population on produce similar to that found at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the application of physical methods led to a significant detrimental effect on the visual quality of lettuce regardless of the solution used. Concerning the process water, PAA proved to be an effective alternative to chlorine for the avoidance of cross-contamination. PMID:26213954

  11. Evaluation of Combined Disinfection Methods for Reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Population on Fresh-Cut Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Petri, Eva; Rodríguez, Mariola; García, Silvia

    2015-08-01

    Most current disinfection strategies for fresh-cut industry are focused on the use of different chemical agents; however, very little has been reported on the effectiveness of the hurdle technology. The effect of combined decontamination methods based on the use of different sanitizers (peroxyacetic acid and chlorine dioxide) and the application of pressure (vacuum/positive pressure) on the inactivation of the foodborne pathogen E. coli O157:H7 on fresh-cut lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and carrots (Daucus carota) was studied. Fresh produce, inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, was immersed (4 °C, 2 min) in tap water (W), chlorine water (CW), chlorine dioxide (ClO2: 2 mg/L) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA: 100 mg/L) in combination with: (a) vacuum (V: 10 mbar) or (b) positive pressure application (P: 3 bar). The product quality and antimicrobial effects of the treatment on bacterial counts were determined both in process washing water and on fresh-cut produce. Evidence obtained in this study, suggests that the use of combined methods (P/V + sanitizers) results in a reduction on the microorganism population on produce similar to that found at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the application of physical methods led to a significant detrimental effect on the visual quality of lettuce regardless of the solution used. Concerning the process water, PAA proved to be an effective alternative to chlorine for the avoidance of cross-contamination. PMID:26213954

  12. [Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of PqERF1 gene in Panax quinquefolius].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Zhen; Niu, Yun-Yun; Li, Ying; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Luo, Hong-Mei; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2011-08-01

    ERF family transcription factor (TF) represented ethylene-responsive protein which harbored a conserved AP2 domain. After searching the plant transcription factor database, a total of 75 unigenes was found which contained AP2 domain from the transcriptome dataset of Panax quinquefolius L. One unique sequence of ERF transcript, named as PqERF1, was cloned with entire open reading frame of 933 base pairs (bp). Protein prediction result indicated that the gene was localized in nucleus and had a conserved AP2 domain. PqERF1 gene could be induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) which was consistent to the inducing profile of triterpene ginsenosides. InterproScan prediction indicated that PqERF1 was probably a pathogenesis-related gene. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated PqERF1 was with high identity and had relative close relationship to the NtERF4 (Nicotiana tabacum), PhERF12 (Petunia x hybrida) and DcERF1 (Daucus carota) which was related to plant defense, regulation of secondary metabolism and the flower senescence respectively. Therefore, the gene was likely involved in regulation of secondary metabolism, plant defense and physical processes which would provide gene resource for further study on secondary metabolite synthesis and molecular breeding of P. quinquefolius. PMID:22007529

  13. Heavy metals bioconcentration from soil to vegetables and assessment of health risk caused by their ingestion.

    PubMed

    Garg, V K; Yadav, Poonam; Mor, Suman; Singh, Balvinder; Pulhani, Vandana

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the non-carcinogenic human health risk of heavy metals through the ingestion of locally grown and commonly used vegetables viz. Raphanus sativus (root vegetable), Daucus carota (root vegetable), Benincasa hispida (fruit vegetable) and Brassica campestris leaves (leafy vegetable) in a semi-urbanized area of Haryana state, India. Heavy metal quantification of soil and vegetable samples was done using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Lead, cadmium and nickel concentration in vegetable samples varied in range of 0.12-6.54 mg kg(-1), 0.02-0.67 mg kg(-1) and <0.05-0.41 mg kg(-1), respectively. Cadmium and lead concentration in some vegetable samples exceeded maximum permissible limit given by World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization and Indian standards. Much higher concentrations of Pb (40-190.5 mg kg(-1)), Cd (0.56-9.85 mg kg(-1)) and Ni (3.21-45.87 mg kg(-1)) were reported in corresponding vegetable fields' soils. Correlation analysis revealed the formation of three primary clusters, i.e. Cu-Cd, Cd-Pb and Ni-Zn in vegetable fields' soils further supported by cluster analysis and principal component analysis. Bioconcentration factor revealed that heavy metals' uptake was more by leafy vegetable than root and fruit vegetables. Hazard index of all the vegetables was less than unity; thus, the ingestion of these vegetables is unlikely to pose health risks to the target population. PMID:24464601

  14. Tissue-dependent distribution and accumulation of chlorobenzenes by vegetables in urban area.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Jun; Qiu, Limin; Zhu, Yinmei

    2005-08-01

    Five seasonal vegetables from three growing sites in Hangzhou city, Zhejiang Province, were studied for the levels of four chlorobenzenes(CBs): o-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB), p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB), m-dichlorobenzene (m-DCB), and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). Samples of each vegetable from each site were subdivided into leaves, stems, and roots, and these subsamples were analyzed separately for the levels of accumulated CBs. Relations between the levels of CBs in vegetables with the total organic carbon (TOC) of the soil, the lipid content of the vegetable, and the physicochemical properties of CBs were established. Results showed that o-DCB, p-DCB, m-DCB, 1,2,4-TCB were present in all vegetables analyzed. For spinaches (Spinacia oleracea), Chinese cabbages (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), and celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce), the highest level of CBs was with roots, followed by leaves. While for radishes (Raphanus sativus), and carrots (Daucus carota subsp. sativus), the highest level was with leaves, followed by stems. The accumulation of CBs was found to have a good correlation with the plant-tissue lipid content, the contaminant air-water Henry's coefficient (H), the contaminant octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)), and the physiological characteristics of the vegetables. PMID:16002141

  15. Purification and Characterization of Aspartate Aminotransferase Isoenzymes from Carrot Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Turano, Frank J.; Wilson, Barbara J.; Matthews, Benjamin F.

    1990-01-01

    Three aspartate aminotransferase isoenzymes were identified from extracts of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspension cultures. These isoenzymes were separated by DEAE chromatography and were analyzed on native gradient polyacrylamide gels. The relative molecular weights of the isoenzymes were 111,000 5000, 105,000 5000, and 94,000 4000 daltons; they were designated forms I, II, and III, respectively. Form I, the predominant form, has been purified to apparent homogeneity (>300-fold) using immunoaffinity chromatography with rabbit anti-pig AAT antibodies. Form I has a subunit size of 43,000 Mr, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing (IEF)-PAGE has resolved three bands at a pl of approximately 5.2. Form I may be composed of subunits of similar molecular weight and different charges, and the three bands with AAT activity on the IEF-PAGE gel are a combination of hetero- and homodimers. Form I has a broad pH optimum of 7.5 to 10.0. Km values of 23.6, 2.8, 0.05, and 0.22 millimolar were obtained for glutamate, aspartate, oxaloacetate, and ?-ketoglutarate, respectively. The mode of action is a ping-pong-bi-bi mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667320

  16. Post-dispersal seed fates of four prairie species.

    PubMed

    Clark, Deborah L; Wilson, Mark V

    2003-05-01

    After dispersal, seeds can germinate and establish as seedlings, persist as seeds, or die. Knowledge of these three seed fates is crucial for understanding the abundance and distribution of plant populations and ultimately, community composition and diversity. Few studies, however, have simultaneously measured these fates, while also examining the factors causing mortality. The goal of this research was to simultaneously quantify the three seed fates and factors causing death (predation and fungal disease) for four species found in prairies in western Oregon, USA. The most common seed fate for the four study species was death (44-80%). Fungal disease, which has seldom been quantified in natural ecosystems, generally caused less than 10% mortality for each of the four species. Vertebrate predation substantially reduced seed numbers only for Bromus carinatus (21%). Of the unmeasured mortality factors, indirect evidence showed invertebrate predation was a cause of death for seeds of only one species, Prunella vulgaris. In addition, competitive pressures caused seedling death for only the two grass species, Bromus carinatus and Cynosurus echinatus. Survival as established seedlings was generally much more common than survival as persistent seed, with the exception of Daucus carota, in which 14% of the sown seeds persisted the first year. PMID:21659169

  17. Asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones to chiral alcohols catalyzed by plants tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Zeng, Rong; Yang, Gai; Wang, Yu; Li, Li-Zhen; Lv, Zao-Sheng; Yao, Man; Lai, Bin

    2008-09-01

    As an important organic compound, chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many single enantiomer pharmaceuticals. Asymmetric reduction of the corresponding prochiral ketones to produce the chiral alcohols by biocatalysis is one of the most promising routes. Asymmetric reduction of different kinds of non-natural prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants tissue was studied in this work. Acetophenone, 4'-chloroacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate were chosen as the model substrates for simple ketone, halogen-containing aromatic ketone and beta-ketoesters, respectively. Apple (Malus pumila), carrot (Daucus carota), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), onion (Allium cepa), potato (Soanum tuberosum), radish (Raphanus sativus) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) were chosen as the biocatalysts. It was found that these kinds of prochiral ketoness could be reduced by these plants tissue with high enantioselectivity. Both R- and S-form configuration chiral alcohols could be obtained. The e.e. and chemical yield could reach about 98 and 80% respectively for acetophenone and 4'-chloroacetophenone reduction reaction with favorable plant tissue. And the e.e. and yield for ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate reduction reaction was about 91 and 45% respectively. PMID:18548304

  18. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyeong; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla. PMID:25289015

  19. Palatability of weeds from different European origins to the slugs Deroceras reticulatum Mller and Arion lusitanicus Mabille

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Michael; Kollmann, Johannes; Edwards, Peter J.

    1999-04-01

    As part of a study on the significance of seed provenances in schemes to enhance biodiversity in agricultural habitats, juvenile plants of Cichorium intybus, Daucus carota, Leucanthemum vulgare and Silene alba of different European origins were exposed to grazing by two slug species, Deroceras reticulatum and Arion lusitanicus. Living plants were offered in trays, either in a glasshouse ( Deroceras) or outdoors ( Arion). The amount of herbivory was origin-dependent, with higher losses for all four species from German and Hungarian provenances compared with English and Swiss plants. The main trend was similar for both slug species except in the case of Daucus, and there was a significant 'origin plant species' interaction. We found strong correlations between provenance-specific herbivory and certain climatic characteristics of the corresponding regions, i.e. winter minimum temperatures, and dryness in spring and late summer, which are crucial for the development of slugs. The results can be interpreted in terms of a SW-NE European climatic gradient and may be a consequence of differences in the need for plant defences against herbivory by slugs. Additionally, the data on palatability were compared with susceptibility towards two parasites which occurred in a field experiment, a leaf miner on Leucanthemum vulgare and a rust fungus on Silene alba. While specific leaf mining frequencies on Leucanthemum contrasted with the palatability of the different provenances to slugs, the rust infection on Silene was low on local and German plants, and higher on the more distant provenances from England and Hungary.

  20. An improved protocol for carrot haploid and doubled haploid plant production using induced parthenogenesis and ovule excision in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kie?kowska, Agnieszka; Adamus, Adela; Baranski, Rafal

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved protocol for induced parthenogenesis and ovule culture of carrot (Daucus carota L.). The effects of pollination with parsley pollen and/or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) treatment on the stimulation of parthenogenesis were studied using heterozygous donor plants of 30 varieties and breeding populations of carrots. Isolated ovules, cultured in vitro, enlarged and developed embryos or calli. The application of 2,4-D on pollinated flowers stimulated callus development but did not increase the frequency of embryo development from ovules and, thus, was not useful for increasing the frequency of haploid plant recovery. The efficiency of embryo development was accession-dependent and varied from 0 to 24.29%. In optimized conditions, most accessions responded by embryo development exclusively. The highest frequency of embryo development was observed from ovules excised from ovaries 20-22d after pollination with parsley pollen. Among several media used for ovule culture, 1/2-strength Murashige and Skoog medium with 0.06?M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was the best. It allowed the production of embryos at a similar frequency as on the media supplemented with kinetin, gibberellic acid, putrescine, or thidiazuron, but restricted callus development. Most plants obtained were haploids and diploids derived from parthenogenesis, as evidenced by homozygosity at three independent loci based on isozyme and PCR analyses. In total, considering haploids and embryo-derived homozygous diploids together, 72.6% of regenerated plants were of gametic origin. PMID:24955000

  1. Assessment of allelopathic properties of Aloe ferox Mill. on turnip, beetroot and carrot.

    PubMed

    Arowosegbe, Sunday; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa L.), beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) are common vegetables in South Africa. The allelopathic potential of aqueous leaf and root extracts of Aloe ferox Mill.- a highly valued medicinal plant- was evaluated against seed germination and seedling growth of the three vegetables in Petri dish experiments. The extracts were tested at concentrations of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/mL. Leaf extract concentrations above 4 mg/mL inhibited the germination of all the crops, while the root extract had no significant effect on germination irrespective of concentration. Interestingly, the lowest concentration of leaf extract stimulated root length elongation of beetroot by 31.71%. Other concentrations significantly inhibited both root and shoot growth of the vegetable crops except the turnip shoot. The most sensitive crop was carrot, with percentage inhibition ranging from 29.15 to 100% for root and shoot lengths. Lower percentage inhibition was observed for the root extract than the leaf extract against shoot growth of beetroot and carrot. The results from this study suggested the presence of allelochemicals mostly in the leaves of A. ferox that could inhibit the growth of the turnip, beetroot and carrot. PMID:23558992

  2. Phytotoxicity, uptake and metabolism of 1,4-dichlorobenzene by plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.J. |; Bokern, M.; Boehme, C.; Harms, H.; Jones, K.C.

    1996-07-01

    Phytotoxicity, uptake, and metabolism of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) by carrot (Daucus carota L.), soybean (Glycine max. L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and red goosefoot (Chenopodiun rubrum L.) cell suspension cultures were studied. Sealed glass systems were utilized for the investigation because 1,4-DCB is volatile. The sealed systems affect the growth of plant cells, but do not provide different results when testing xenobiotic uptake and metabolism. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene (40 {micro}g in 40 ml medium) was taken up by carrot (49%), soybean (50%), and red goosefoot (62%) cells. Only the soybean cell cultures provided evidence of the existence of metabolites of this compound, probably conjugates of chlorophenols. Conditions for phytotoxicity tests were modified because the growth of cell cultures was affected when sealed for longer than 2 d. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene is toxic to cell cultures of the three tested plant species (tomato, soybean, and carrot). Concentrations of 0.5 mM caused 50% growth inhibition in carrot and soybean cultures. The tomato cultures were more sensitive, with 0.05 mM causing 50% growth inhibition.

  3. Low external pH replaces 2,4-D in maintaining and multiplying 2,4-D-initiated embryogenic cells of carrot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed culture comprised of both embryonic globules and nonembryogenic callus was derived from seedling hypocotyls of Daucus carota cv. Scarlet Nantes on 2,4-D- containing medium using well-established methods. Then the mixed cultures were transferred to, and serially subcultured on, a hormone-free medium near pH 4. The medium contained 1 mM NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source. When cultured in this way, embryonic globules were able to multiply without development into later embryo stages. Nonembryogenic callus did not survive. Continuous culture of embryonic globules on this low pH hormone-free medium yielded cultures consisting entirely of preglobular stage proembryos (PGSPs). PGSP cultures have been maintained as such with continuous multiplication for nearly 2 years without loss of embryogenic potential. These hormone-free-maintained PGSPs continue their development to later embryo stages when cultured on the same hormone-free medium buffered at pH 5.8. We show that hormone-free medium near pH 4 can replace 2,4-D in its ability to sustain multiplication of 2,4-D-initiated embryogenic cells of carrot at an acceptable growth rate without their development into later embryo stages. This procedure provides selective conditions that do not permit the growth of non-embryogenic cells while providing an adequate environment for embryogenic cell proliferation and should prove invaluable in studying habituation.

  4. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  5. Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

  6. Methyl mercury toxicity in plant cultures: modification of resistance and demethylation by light and/or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M.

    1987-04-01

    Cultures of Daucus carota, Ca-68-10, and Lactuca sativa, Le-67, were grown at increasing methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations ranging from initial doses of 0.05 to 5.0 micrograms/ml per day for 4 days with or without 0.15 microgram/ml 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in the presence or absence of light. The presence of 2,4-D interacted with light synergistically in the expression of MeHg toxicity within the whole range of concentrations. Demethylation patterns increased or decreased depending on the species, the 2,4-D concentration in the medium, and methyl mercury concentration used in the treatment. Lettuce was more sensitive to this interaction than carrot. In lettuce, the presence of 2,4-D in the light lowered the concentration of total Hg (or MeHg) required to reduce growth by 50%, about 13 times relative to that in the dark (i.e., it sensitized the cells). In the absence of 2,4-D the pattern was reversed. In carrot the pattern was similar but less pronounced. This suggests that, in these cell populations, MeHg toxicity is partly a hormone-mediated and light-sensitive event.

  7. Cadmium-sulfide crystallites in Cd-. gamma. -glutamyl peptide complexes from Lycopersicon and Daucus

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, R.N. ); Winge, D.R. )

    1989-04-01

    Hydroponically-grown tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Mill. cv stone) and suspension-cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota L.) exposed to 100 {mu}M cadmium salts produced metal-{gamma}-glutamyl peptide complexes containing acid labile sulfur. The properties of the complexes resemble the Cd-{gamma}-glutamyl complexes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida glabrata, known to contain a CdS crystallite core. The crystallite core is stabilized by a coating of peptides of the general structure ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub n}-Gly. The Cd-peptide complexes contain predominantly peptides of n{sub 2}, n{sub 3}, n{sub 4} and n{sub 3}desGly. Zn-peptide complexes were also isolated from carrot cultures grown in MS medium supplemented with 2 mM Zn and cysteine. Results of preliminary characterization of these complexes are consistent with the presence of a colloidal particle similar to that of the Cd-complexes.

  8. The incidence and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat vegetables in South-Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajayeoba, Titilayo A; Atanda, Olusegun O; Obadina, Adewale O; Bankole, Mobolaji O; Adelowo, Olawale O

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables: (Cucumber, Cucumis sativas; Cabbage, Brassica olerecea; Carrot, Daucus carota; Tomato, Solanum lycopersicum; Lettuce, Lactuca sativa) in six states in South-Western Nigeria. A total of 555 composite samples were collected from 30 traditional markets within the states and only 244 L. monocytogenes species were isolated by standard methods. The incidence of L. monocytogenes was low and not statistically significant per vegetable type. The percentage distribution of the L. monocytogenes isolates in the RTE vegetables was 28.28, 9.02, 23.36, 19.67, and 19.67 for Cabbage, Carrot, Cucumber, Lettuce, and Tomatoes, respectively. Lagos state had the highest incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination (55%) followed by Ondo (48.89%), Oyo (48.75%), Ogun (44.09%), Osun (34.38%), and Ekiti (33.33%) states, respectively. Although the incidence of L. monocytogenes in the RTE vegetables in South-Western Nigeria is low, its presence should be a source of concern as it could constitute a public health threat for its consumers. PMID:26788311

  9. Geomys bursars burrowing patterns: influence of season and food patch structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between belowground food resources and the pattern and pace of soil excavation by Geomys bursarius, the plains pocket gopher, was assessed during spring and autumn using replicated 18 x 18 m enclosures containing uniform arrays of food plants (Daucus carota) at spacings assumed to result in burrowing being energetically profitable (25 and 50 cm) or unprofitable (100 cm and empty). Soil excavation rate, measured in terms of either daily additions to tunnel length or volume, or the maximum volume excavated during a 3-d interval, varied greatly among individuals. No significant effect due to season or density of belowground plant biomass was detected when burrowing was profitable. Individuals readily initiated aboveground travel in unprofitable treatments. Soil bulk density was negatively related and animal body mass positively related to excavation rate. Individuals deposited from 41 to 87% of excavated soil on the ground surface; the remainder was used to backfill previously created tunnels or chambers. Plant size, but not plant spacing, affected the ratio of the volumes deposited aboveground and belowground. There was no evidence that animals in enclosures disturbed soil in a manner quantitatively or qualitatively different from free-ranging adults. The large proportions and absolute quantities (up to 30 L/d) of soil involved suggest that backfilling may affect ecosystem structure and functioning as much as surface mound-building.

  10. Distinction between Endoplasmic Reticulum-Type and Plasma Membrane-Type Ca2+ Pumps (Partial Purification of a 120-Kilodalton Ca2+-ATPase from Endomembranes).

    PubMed

    Hwang, I.; Ratterman, D. M.; Sze, H.

    1997-02-01

    Two biochemical types of Ca2+-pumping ATPases were distinguished in membranes that were isolated from carrot (Daucus carota) suspension-cultured cells. One type hydrolyzed GTP nearly as well as ATP, was stimulated by calmodulin, and was resistant to cyclopiazonic acid. This plasma membrane (PM)-type pump was associated with PMs and endomembranes, including vacuolar membranes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Another pump ("ER-type") that was associated mainly with the ER hydrolyzed ATP preferentially, was insensitive to calmodulin, and was inhibited partially by cyclopiazonic acid, a blocker of the animal sarcoplasmic/ER Ca2+ pump. Oxalate stimulation of Ca2+ accumulation by ER-type, but not PM-type, pump(s) indicated a separation of the two types on distinct compartments. An endomembrane 120-kD Ca2+ pump was partially purified by calmodulin-affinity chromatography. The purified polypeptide bound calmodulin reacted with antibodies to a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump from cauliflower and displayed [32P]phosphoenzyme properties that are characteristic of PM-type Ca2+ pumps. The purified ATPase corresponded to a phosphoenzyme and a 120-kD calmodulin-binding protein on endomembranes. Another PM-type pump was suggested by a 127-kD PM-associated protein that bound calmodulin. Thus, both ER- and PM-type Ca2+ pumps coexist in most plant tissues, and each type can be distinguished from another by a set of traits, even in partially purified membranes. PMID:12223624

  11. Identification and characterization of a new virus in the genus Potyvirus from wild populations of Angelica lucida L. and A. genuflexa Nutt., family Apiaceae.

    PubMed

    Robertson, N L

    2007-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in Angelica lucida L. (wild celery) and A. genuflexa Nutt. (kneeling Angelica) (family Apiaceae) in the Matanuska- Susitna Valley, Alaska. The experimental plant host range of the virus included species in three families: Chenopodiaceae (Chenopodium amaranticolor Coste et Reyn and Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), Solanaceae (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin, and N. clevlandii Gray.), and Apiaceae (Anethum graveolens L., Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Miller)), Daucus carota L. subspecies sativus (Hoffm.) Arcang., and Petroselinum crispum (Miller) Nyman ex A. W. Hilland). The virus contained flexuous rods with an ssRNA genome approximately 9.5-10 k nts and a CP ( approximately 35 kDa) that reacted to a universal potyvirus monoclonal antibody in Western blot analysis. The sequenced genomic 3'-end ( approximately 1850 nt) contained a potyvirus genomic arrangement that included the 3'-terminus of the NIb (nuclear inclusion) gene, the CP (coat protein) gene, and a 3'-UTR (untranslated region) attached to a poly(A)tail. The CP amino acids had between 54 and 70% identity with 12 selected members from the genus Potyvirus. Phylogenetically, the Alaskan potyvirus clustered with three other apiaceous potyviruses from Australia. The novel Alaskan virus was confined to A. lucida L. and A. genuflexa Nutt. in nature, and was classified in the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, and in part named after its natural plant hosts, angelica virus Y (AnVY). PMID:17558540

  12. Bioaccumulation of Antimony and Arsenic in Vegetables and Health Risk Assessment in the Superlarge Antimony-Mining Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Defang; Zhou, Saijun; Ren, Bozhi; Chen, Tengshu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution in soils caused by mining and smelting has attracted worldwide attention for its potential health risks to residents. This paper studies the concentrations and accumulations of Sb and As in both soils and vegetables and the human health risks of Sb and As in vegetables from Xikuangshan (XKS) Sb mine, Hunan, China. Results showed that the soils were severely polluted by Sb and As; Sb and As have significant positive correlation. Sb and As concentrations in vegetables were quite different: Coriandrum sativum L. was the highest in Sb, Allium fistulosum L. was the highest in As, and Brassica pekinensis L. was the lowest in both Sb and As; Daucus carota L. and Coriandrum sativum L. showed advantage in accumulating Sb and As; Coriandrum sativum L. had higher capacity of redistributing Sb and As within the plant. Health risk assessment results showed that the hazard quotient (HQ) values of Sb and As in vegetables were in the ranges of 1.61–3.33 and 0.09–0.39, respectively; the chronic daily intake (CDI) and hazard quotient (HQ) values of Sb were over the safe limit recommended by FAO and WHO, indicating that long-term consumption of vegetables from the surrounding soils of XKS mine may bring health risks to residents. PMID:26442167

  13. Abscisic Acid Regulation of DC8, A Carrot Embryonic Gene 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Fong, Franklin; Sung, Z. Renee

    1990-01-01

    DC8 encodes a hydrophylic 66 kilodalton protein located in the cytoplasm and cell walls of carrot (Daucus carota) embryo and endosperm. During somatic embryogenesis, the levels of DC8 mRNA and protein begin to increase 5 days after removal of auxin. To study the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of DC8 gene, fluridone, 1-methyl-3-phenyl,-5(3-trifluoro-methyl-phenyl)-4(1H)-pyridinone, was used to inhibit the endogenous ABA content of the embryos. Fluridone, 50 micrograms per milliliter, effectively inhibits the accumulation of ABA in globular-tage enbryos. Western and Northern analysis show that when fluridone is added to the culture medium DC8 protein and mRNA decrease to very low levels. ABA added to fluridone supplemented culture media restores the DC8 protein and mRNA to control levels. Globular-stage embryos contain 0.9 to 1.4 10?7 molar ABA while 10?6 molar exogenously supplied ABA is the optimal concentration for restoration of DC8 protein accumulation in fluridone-treated embryos. The mRNA level is increased after 15 minutes of ABA addition and reaches maximal levels by 60 minutes. Evidence is presented that, unlike other ABA-regulated genes, DC8 is not induced in nonembryonic tissues via desiccation nor addition of ABA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16667766

  14. Biology, ecology, and management of the bulb mites of the genus Rhizoglyphus (Acari: Acaridae).

    PubMed

    Daz, A; Okabe, K; Eckenrode, C J; Villani, M G; Oconnor, B M

    2000-02-01

    Bulb mites of the genus Rhizoglyphus (Claparde) (Acari: Acaridae) have been identified as pests of many crops and ornamentals in storage, in the greenhouse, and in the field. The most important hosts are species in the family Liliaceae (e.g. Allium spp.), but bulb mites will often attack other important crops such as potatoes (Solanum sp.) and carrots (Daucus carota). Despite their economic importance and broad distribution, the systematics of the genus remains in a state of confusion and is in need of a comprehensive revision. In addition, the field biology and ecology of these mites is not well understood, and methods for sampling, monitoring, and loss assessment are limited. Management of bulb mites is complicated by their short generation time, high reproductive potential, broad food niche, interactions with other pests and pathogens, and unique adaptations for dispersal. Historically, control of these acarine pests has relied on the use of synthetic miticides and insecticides, but this option is now limited due to documented resistance and withdrawal of registration of some products. Alternative control strategies, including cultural and biological control, have shown limited success, but need to be further developed and implemented. PMID:11108390

  15. Comparison of Starch and ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Levels in Nonembryogenic Cells and Developing Embryos from Induced Carrot Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Gregory L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Ulrich, Thomas H.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L.) in a medium without added 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid were separated into fractions of embryos at different stages of development (large globular and heart, torpedo, and germinating) and nonembryogenic cells. The average starch content per cell in these fractions was similar. However, due to the smaller sizes of the cells of the embryos relative to the nonembryogenic cells, starch content per weight of tissue was higher in the embryos. The ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity per cell in the nonembryogenic cells was double that of the embryo cells. Furthermore, the ratio of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase to starch was over 2-fold higher in the nonembryogenic cells, indicating that starch content is not simply determined by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase levels. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity of all culture fractions was directly proportional to the level of a single 50 kilodalton polypeptide detected by immunoblot analysis, using antiserum raised to the purified spinach leaf enzyme. In the same immunoblot analysis, novel polypeptides of 63 and 100 kilodalton were detected in embryos but were absent from nonembryogenic cells. This is one of the few reported examples of specific proteins which differentially accumulate in embryos and nonembryogenic cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16665929

  16. A novel protein elicitor (PaNie) from Pythium aphanidermatum induces multiple defense responses in carrot, Arabidopsis, and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Veit, S; Wrle, J M; Nrnberger, T; Koch, W; Seitz, H U

    2001-11-01

    A novel protein elicitor (PaNie(234)) from Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitzp. was purified, microsequenced, and the corresponding cDNA was cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative eukaryotic secretion signal with a proteinase cleavage site. The heterologously expressed elicitor protein without the secretion signal of 21 amino acids (PaNie(213)) triggered programmed cell death and de novo formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota). Programmed cell death was determined using the tetrazolium assay and DNA laddering. Infiltration of PaNie(213) into the intercellular space of leaves of Arabidopsis (Columbia-0, wild type) resulted in necroses and deposition of callose on the cell walls of spongy parenchyma cells surrounding the necrotic mesophyll cells. Necroses were also formed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Wisconsin W38, wild type) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) but not in maize (Zea mays), oat (Avena sativa), and Tradescantia zebrina (Bosse), indicating that monocotyledonous plants are unable to perceive the signal. The reactions observed after treatment with the purified PaNie(213) were identical to responses measured after treatment with a crude elicitor preparation from the culture medium of P. aphanidermatum, described previously. The availability of the pure protein offers the possibility to isolate the corresponding receptor and its connection to downstream signaling-inducing defense reactions. PMID:11706166

  17. Differential expression patterns of non-symbiotic hemoglobins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Leiva-Eriksson, Nlida; Pin, Pierre A; Kraft, Thomas; Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, Andr E; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Blow, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Biennial sugar beet (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is a Caryophyllidae that has adapted its growth cycle to the seasonal temperature and daylength variation of temperate regions. This is the first time a holistic study of the expression pattern of non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) is being carried out in a member of this group and under two essential environmental conditions for flowering, namely vernalization and length of photoperiod. BvHb genes were identified by sequence homology searches against the latest draft of the sugar beet genome. Three nsHb genes (BvHb1.1, BvHb1.2 and BvHb2) and one truncated Hb gene (BvHb3) were found in the genome of sugar beet. Gene expression profiling of the nsHb genes was carried out by quantitative PCR in different organs and developmental stages, as well as during vernalization and under different photoperiods. BvHb1.1 and BvHb2 showed differential expression during vernalization as well as during long and short days. The high expression of BvHb2 indicates that it has an active role in the cell, maybe even taking over some BvHb1.2 functions, except during germination where BvHb1.2 together with BvHb1.1-both Class 1 nsHbs-are highly expressed. The unprecedented finding of a leader peptide at the N-terminus of BvHb1.1, for the first time in an nsHb from higher plants, together with its observed expression indicate that it may have a very specific role due to its suggested location in chloroplasts. Our findings open up new possibilities for research, breeding and engineering since Hbs could be more involved in plant development than previously was anticipated. PMID:24486763

  18. Characterisation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) varieties using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sugar beet is an obligate outcrossing species. Varieties consist of mixtures of plants from various parental combinations. As the number of informative morphological characteristics is limited, this leads to some problems in variety registration research. Results We have developed 25 new microsatellite markers for sugar beet. A selection of 12 markers with high quality patterns was used to characterise 40 diploid and triploid varieties. For each variety 30 individual plants were genotyped. The markers amplified 3-21 different alleles. Varieties had up to 7 different alleles at one marker locus. All varieties could be distinguished. For the diploid varieties, the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.458 to 0.744. The average inbreeding coefficient Fis was 0.282 0.124, but it varied widely among marker loci, from Fis = +0.876 (heterozygote deficiency) to Fis = -0.350 (excess of heterozygotes). The genetic differentiation among diploid varieties was relatively constant among markers (Fst = 0.232 0.027). Among triploid varieties the genetic differentiation was much lower (Fst = 0.100 0.010). The overall genetic differentiation between diploid and triploid varieties was Fst = 0.133 across all loci. Part of this differentiation may coincide with the differentiation among breeders' gene pools, which was Fst = 0.063. Conclusions Based on a combination of scores for individual plants all varieties can be distinguished using the 12 markers developed here. The markers may also be used for mapping and in molecular breeding. In addition, they may be employed in studying gene flow from crop to wild populations. PMID:20482800

  19. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  20. A DRAFT SEQUENCE OF THE RICE GENOME (ORYZA SATIVA L. SSP. INDICA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the japonica subspecies of rice, an important cereal and model monocot, was sequenced and assembled by whole-genome shotgun sequencing. The assembled sequence covers 93% of the 420-megabase genome. Gene predictions on the assembled sequence suggest that the genome contains 32,000 to 50...